WorldWideScience

Sample records for supernova blast wave

  1. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  2. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON PROCESSING IN THE BLAST WAVE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT N132D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tappe, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-72, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rho, J. [SOFIA Science Mission Operations/USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Boersma, C. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Micelotta, E. R., E-mail: atappe@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western University, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 14-36 {mu}m mapping observations of the supernova remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study focuses on the processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that we previously identified in the southern blast wave. The mid-infrared spectra show strong continuum emission from shock-heated dust and a unique, nearly featureless plateau in the 15-20 {mu}m region, which we attribute to PAH molecules. The typical PAH emission bands observed in the surrounding interstellar medium ahead of the blast wave disappear, which indicates shock processing of PAH molecules. The PAH plateau appears most strongly at the outer edge of the blast wave and coincides with diffuse X-ray emission that precedes the brightest X-ray and optical filaments. This suggests that PAH molecules in the surrounding medium are swept up and processed in the hot gas of the blast wave shock, where they survive the harsh conditions long enough to be detected. We also observe a broad emission feature at 20 {mu}m appearing with the PAH plateau. We speculate that this feature is either due to FeO dust grains or connected to the processing of PAHs in the supernova blast wave shock.

  3. Supernovae and their expanding blast waves during the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Cassisi, Santi

    2015-01-01

    Our arguments deal with the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters and show why only a few of the supernovae products were retained within globular clusters and only in the most massive cases ($M \\ge 10^6$ Msol), while less massive clusters were not contaminated at all by supernovae. Here we show that supernova blast waves evolving in a steep density gradient undergo blowout and end up discharging their energy and metals into the medium surrounding the clusters. This inhibits the dispersal and the contamination of the gas left over from a first stellar generation. Only the ejecta from well centered supernovae, that evolve into a high density medium available for a second stellar generation in the most massive clusters would be retained. These are likely to mix their products with the remaining gas, leading in these cases eventually to an Fe contaminated second stellar generation.

  4. The nature of blast-wave-driven interfacial instabilities - important implications for modeling supernovae explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Aaron

    2004-11-01

    In this talk we discuss the nature of late-time, broad-banded instability development at an interface when a strong blast wave travels from a heavier to lighter fluid, as is the case in a supernova explosion. After a short period of Richtmyer-Meshkov growth, the interface is unstable via the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism, which rapidly becomes the dominant energy source for growth. This situation is distinct from the classical case in two important ways, both of which can be understood in terms of a bubble merger model we have developed for blast-wave-driven systems. Rather than the constant acceleration feeding the instability to spawn ever larger scales and accelerate the growth, the decaying acceleration in the blast-wave case leads to a decay in the RT growth rate, and a freezing in of a preferred largest scale, which is dependent on the precise details of the system. In the language of bubble-merger models, this can be understood in terms of the time for the generation of the next largest scale being longer than the lifetime of the blast wave. Secondly, the continual expansion behind the blast front precludes the emergence of a self-similar regime, independent of the initial conditions, in the planar case. Self-similarity may be recovered in diverging systems but may be difficult to observe in reality because of rather restrictive conditions that must be met. These observations are borne out by hi-resolution numerical simulations using the higher order Godunov AMR hydrocode Raptor in 2 and 3D, and explain other simulations of instability growth in supernovae explosions; the initial "interfacial" structure is likely very important in determining the late-time growth. The model predictions are also consistent with numerous images of natural and manmade explosions.

  5. Supernova-blast waves in wind-blown bubbles, turbulent, and power-law ambient media

    CERN Document Server

    Haid, Sebastian; Naab, Thorsten; Seifried, Daniel; Mackey, Jonathan; Gatto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) blast waves inject energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM), control its turbulent multiphase structure and the launching of galactic outflows. Accurate modelling of the blast wave evolution is therefore essential for ISM and galaxy formation simulations. We present an efficient method to compute the input of momentum, thermal energy, and the velocity distribution of the shock-accelerated gas for ambient media with uniform (and with stellar wind blown bubbles), power-law, and turbulent density distributions. Assuming solar metallicity cooling, the blast wave evolution is followed to the beginning of the momentum conserving snowplough phase. The model recovers previous results for uniform ambient media. The momentum injection in wind-blown bubbles depend on the swept-up mass and the efficiency of cooling, when the blast wave hits the wind shell. For power-law density distributions with $n(r) \\sim$ $r^{-2}$ (for $n(r) > n_{_{\\rm floor}}$) the amount of momentum injection is solely r...

  6. Supernova blast waves in wind-blown bubbles, turbulent, and power-law ambient media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haid, S.; Walch, S.; Naab, T.; Seifried, D.; Mackey, J.; Gatto, A.

    2016-08-01

    Supernova (SN) blast waves inject energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM), control its turbulent multiphase structure and the launching of galactic outflows. Accurate modelling of the blast wave evolution is therefore essential for ISM and galaxy formation simulations. We present an efficient method to compute the input of momentum, thermal energy, and the velocity distribution of the shock-accelerated gas for ambient media (densities of 0.1 ≥ n0 [cm- 3] ≥ 100) with uniform (and with stellar wind blown bubbles), power-law, and turbulent (Mach numbers M from 1to100) density distributions. Assuming solar metallicity cooling, the blast wave evolution is followed to the beginning of the momentum conserving snowplough phase. The model recovers previous results for uniform ambient media. The momentum injection in wind-blown bubbles depend on the swept-up mass and the efficiency of cooling, when the blast wave hits the wind shell. For power-law density distributions with n(r) ˜ r-2 (for n(r) > nfloor) the amount of momentum injection is solely regulated by the background density nfloor and compares to nuni = nfloor. However, in turbulent ambient media with lognormal density distributions the momentum input can increase by a factor of 2 (compared to the homogeneous case) for high Mach numbers. The average momentum boost can be approximated as p_{turb}/{p_{{0}}} =23.07 (n_{{0,turb}}/1 cm^{-3})^{-0.12} + 0.82 (ln (1+b2{M}2))^{1.49}(n_{{0,turb}}/1 cm^{-3})^{-1.6}. The velocity distributions are broad as gas can be accelerated to high velocities in low-density channels. The model values agree with results from recent, computationally expensive, three-dimensional simulations of SN explosions in turbulent media.

  7. SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR EXPANDING BLAST WAVES DURING THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla, México (Mexico); Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain); Cassisi, Santi, E-mail: gtt@inaoep.mx, E-mail: cmt@iac.es, E-mail: cassisi@oa-teramo.inaf.it [INAF—Astronomical Observatory of Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy)

    2015-11-20

    Our arguments deal with the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters and show why only a few of the supernovae (SNe) products were retained within globular clusters and only in the most massive cases (M ≥ 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}), while less massive clusters were not contaminated at all by SNe. Here, we show that SN blast waves evolving in a steep density gradient undergo blowout and end up discharging their energy and metals into the medium surrounding the clusters. This inhibits the dispersal and the contamination of the gas left over from a first stellar generation. Only the ejecta from well-centered SNe that evolve into a high-density medium available for a second stellar generation (2SG) in the most massive clusters would be retained. These are likely to mix their products with the remaining gas, eventually leading in these cases to an Fe-contaminated 2SG.

  8. The Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R

    2008-05-27

    Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role throughout the evolution of supernovae from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of the stellar systems. We consider the simpler and fundamental hydrodynamic instability problem of a material interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a divergent central Taylor-Sedov blast wave. The existence of unified solutions at high Mach number and small density ratio suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models modified to include the effects of divergence and radial velocity gradients. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Raleigh-Taylor, but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth picture. Loss of memory of initial conditions can occur in the quasi-self-similar model, but requires initial mode numbers higher than those predicted for pre-explosion interfaces in Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is likely strongly influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low-modes are dominant, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes are present in the initial conditions, the contribution to the perturbation growth from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is significant or dominant compared to Rayleigh-Taylor. Such Richtmyer-Meshkov growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in the Tycho. Laser-driven high-energy-density laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making

  9. Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this text is to document many of the lessons that have been learned during the author’s more than forty years in the field of blast and shock. The writing therefore takes on an historical perspective, in some sense, because it follows the author’s experience. The book deals with blast waves propagating in fluids or materials that can be treated as fluids. It begins by distinguishing between blast waves and the more general category of shock waves. It then examines several ways of generating blast waves, considering the propagation of blast waves in one, two and three dimensions as well as through the real atmosphere. One section treats the propagation of shocks in layered gases in a more detailed manner. The book also details the interaction of shock waves with structures in particular reflections, progressing from simple to complex geometries, including planar structures, two-dimensional structures such as ramps or wedges, reflections from heights of burst, and three-dimensional st...

  10. Diffusion of cosmic rays in a multiphase interstellar medium swept-up by a supernova remnant blast wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Soonyoung; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are one of the most energetic astrophysical events and are thought to be the dominant source of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs). A recent report on observations from the Fermi satellite has shown a signature of pion decay in the gamma-ray spectra of SNRs. This provides strong evidence that high-energy protons are accelerated in SNRs. The actual gamma-ray emission from pion decay should depend on the diffusion of CRs in the interstellar medium. In order to quantitatively analyse the diffusion of high-energy CRs from acceleration sites, we have performed test particle numerical simulations of CR protons using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of an interstellar medium swept-up by a blast wave. We analyse the diffusion of CRs at a length scale of order a few pc in our simulated SNR, and find the diffusion of CRs is precisely described by a Bohm diffusion, which is required for efficient acceleration at least for particles with energies above 30 TeV for a realistic interstellar medium. Although we find the possibility of a superdiffusive process (travel distance ∝ t0.75) in our simulations, its effect on CR diffusion at the length scale of the turbulence in the SNR is limited.

  11. Infrared and X-Ray Evidence for Circumstellar Grain Destruction by the Blast Wave of Supernova 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Dwek, E; Bouchet, P; Burrows, D N; Challis, P; Danziger, I J; De Buizer, J M; Gehrz, R D; Kirshner, R P; McCray, R; Park, S; Polomski, E F; Woodward, C E

    2007-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A show that its morphology and luminosity are rapidly changing at X-ray, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths as the blast wave from the explosion expands into the circumstellar equatorial ring, produced by mass loss from the progenitor star. The observed infrared (IR) radiation arises from the interaction of dust grains that formed in mass outflow with the soft X-ray emitting plasma component of the shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectra at 5 - 30 microns taken on day 6190 since the explosion show that the emission arises from ~ 1.1E-6 Msun of silicate grains radiating at a temperature of ~180+20-15 K. Subsequent observations on day 7137 show that the IR flux had increased by a factor of 2 while maintaining an almost identical spectral shape. The observed IR-to-X-ray flux ratio (IRX) is consistent with that of a dusty plasma with standard Large Magellanic Cloud dust abundances. IRX has decreased by a factor of ~ 2 between days 6190 and 7137, providing...

  12. Diffusion of Cosmic Rays in a Multiphase Interstellar Medium Swept-Up by a Supernova Remnant Blast Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Roh, Soonyoung; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are one of the most energetic astrophysical events and are thought to be the dominant source of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs). A recent report on observations from the Fermi satellite has shown a signature of pion decay in the gamma-ray spectra of SNRs. This provides strong evidence that high-energy protons are accelerated in SNRs. The actual gamma-ray emission from pion decay should depend on the diffusion of CRs in the interstellar medium. In order to quantitatively analyse the diffusion of high-energy CRs from acceleration sites, we have performed test particle numerical simulations of CR protons using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of an interstellar medium swept-up by a blast wave. We analyse the diffusion of CRs at a length scale of order a few pc in our simulated SNR, and find the diffusion of CRs is precisely described by a Bohm diffusion, which is required for efficient acceleration at least for particles with energies above 30 TeV for a realistic int...

  13. Laboratory blast wave driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn

    2008-11-01

    This presentation discusses experiments involving the evolution of hydrodynamic instabilities in the laboratory under high-energy-density (HED) conditions. These instabilities are driven by blast waves, which occur following a sudden, finite release of energy, and consist of a shock front followed by a rarefaction wave. When a blast wave crosses an interface with a decrease in density, hydrodynamic instabilities will develop. Instabilities evolving under HED conditions are relevant to astrophysics. These experiments include target materials scaled in density to the He/H layer in SN1987A. About 5 kJ of laser energy from the Omega Laser facility irradiates a 150 μm plastic layer that is followed by a low-density foam layer. A blast wave structure similar to those in supernovae is created in the plastic layer. The blast wave crosses an interface having a 2D or 3D sinusoidal structure that serves as a seed perturbation for hydrodynamic instabilities. This produces unstable growth dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the nonlinear regime. We have detected the interface structure under these conditions using x-ray backlighting. Recent advances in our diagnostic techniques have greatly improved the resolution of our x-ray radiographic images. Under certain conditions, the improved images show some mass extending beyond the RT spike and penetrating further than previously observed or predicted by current simulations. The observed effect is potentially of great importance as a source of mass transport to places not anticipated by current theory and simulation. I will discuss the amount of mass in these spike extensions, the associated uncertainties, and hypotheses regarding their origin We also plan to show comparisons of experiments using single mode and multimode as well as 2D and 3D initial conditions. This work is sponsored by DOE/NNSA Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058 (Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances) and DE-FG52-04NA00064 (National Laser User

  14. Blast Wave Characteristics and Equivalency

    OpenAIRE

    Sochet, Isabelle; Schneider, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    ISBN 978-5-94588-079-5; The characteristics of blast waves generated by detonation of gas clouds are studies theoretically and validated by both small-scale and large-scale experiments with ethylene-air mixtures of different equivalence ratio. The mixtures were confined in hemispherical or spherical balloons made from thin polyethylene foils of 0.75 m³ and 15 m³ in volume. The detonation of gas mixtures was initiated by a solid explosive. The characteristics of the blast wave in terms of over...

  15. Gravitational wave triggered searches for failed supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, James; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Stellar core collapses occur to all stars of sufficiently high mass and often result in supernovae. A small fraction of supergiant stars, however, are thought to collapse directly into black holes without producing supernovae. A survey of such ``failed'' supernovae would require monitoring millions of supergiants for several years. That is very challenging even for current surveys. With the start of the Advanced LIGO science run, we investigate the possibility of detecting failed supernovae by looking for missing supergiants associated with gravitational wave triggers. We use the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). Our project is a joint effort between the community and the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration. In this talk we report on our ongoing efforts and discuss prospects for future searches.

  16. Blast Wave Experiments at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    radiation flows upward, it passes though a 1.7-mm high, tapered, 25-μm thick gold wall cone that is filled 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel (SiO2). Above...this cone is a 20 ± 3 mg/cm3 silica aerogel filled, 1-mm high, 2.4-mm inner diameter, 25-μm thick gold wall cylinder. On the cylinder rests a 4-mm...diameter gold platform that supports a higher density (40-60 mg/cm3) silica aerogel . This aerogel is the region where the blast wave forms after

  17. Alfven Wave-Driven Supernova Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K; Yamada, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the role of Alfven waves in the core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion. We assume that Alfven waves are generated by convections inside a proto-neutron star (PNS) and emitted from its surface. Then these waves propagate outwards and dissipate via nonlinear processes and heat up matter around a stalled prompt shock. To quantitatively assess the importance of this process for revival of the stalled shock, we perform 1D time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations, taking into account the heating via the dissipation of Alfven waves. We show that the shock revival occurs if the surface field strength is larger than ~2x10^{15}G and if the amplitude of velocity fluctuation at the PNS surface is larger than ~ 20% of the local sound speed. Interestingly, the Alfven wave mechanism is self-regulating in the sense that the explosion energy is not very sensitive to the surface field strength and initial amplitude of Alfven waves as long as they are larger than the threshold values given above. It should be em...

  18. Probing the Core-Collapse Supernova Mechanism with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions must draw on the energy provided by gravitational collapse and transfer the necessary fraction to the kinetic and internal energy of the ejecta. Despite many decades of concerted theoretical effort, the detailed mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions is still unknown, but indications are strong that multi-D processes lie at its heart. This opens up the possibility of probing the supernova mechanism with gravitational waves, carrying direct dynamical information from the supernova engine deep inside a dying massive star. I present a concise overview of the physics and primary multi-D dynamics in neutrino-driven, magnetorotational, and acoustically-driven core-collapse supernova explosion scenarios. Discussing and contrasting estimates for the gravitational-wave emission characteristics of these mechanisms, I argue that their gravitational-wave signatures are clearly distinct and that the observation (or non-observation) of gravitational waves from a ...

  19. Spike Penetration in Blast-Wave-Driven Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2010-05-01

    Recent experiments by C. Kuranz and collaborators, motivated by structure in supernovae, have studied systems in which planar blast waves encounter interfaces where the density decreases. During the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase of such experiments, they observed greater penetration of the RT spikes than tends to be seen in simulations. Here we seek to employ semi-analytic theory to understand the general nature and regimes of spike penetration for blast-wave-driven instabilities. This problem is not trivial as one must account for the initial vorticity deposition at the interface, for its time-dependent deceleration, for the expansion of the shocked material in time and space, and for the drag on the broadened tips of the spikes. We offer here an improved evaluation of the material expansion in comparison to past work. The goal is to use such models to increase our ability to interpret the behavior of simulations of such systems, in both the laboratory and astrophysics. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  20. Inferring Core-Collapse Supernova Physics with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Logue, J; Heng, I S; Kalmus, P; Scargill, J

    2012-01-01

    Stellar collapse and the subsequent development of a core-collapse supernova explosion emit bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) that might be detected by the advanced generation of laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, and LCGT. GW bursts from core-collapse supernovae encode information on the intricate multi-dimensional dynamics at work at the core of a dying massive star and may provide direct evidence for the yet uncertain mechanism driving supernovae in massive stars. Recent multi-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae exploding via the neutrino, magnetorotational, and acoustic explosion mechanisms have predicted GW signals which have distinct structure in both the time and frequency domains. Motivated by this, we describe a promising method for determining the most likely explosion mechanism underlying a hypothetical GW signal, based on Principal Component Analysis and Bayesian model selection. Using simulated Advanced LIGO noise and ass...

  1. Core-Collapse Supernovae, Neutrinos, and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D; Gossan, S; Abdikamalov, E; Gamma, U C T; Drasco, S

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most energetic cosmic cataclysms. They are prodigious emitters of neutrinos and quite likely strong galactic sources of gravitational waves. Observation of both neutrinos and gravitational waves from the next galactic or near extragalactic core-collapse supernova will yield a wealth of information on the explosion mechanism, but also on the structure and angular momentum of the progenitor star, and on aspects of fundamental physics such as the equation of state of nuclear matter at high densities and low entropies. In this contribution to the proceedings of the Neutrino 2012 conference, we summarize recent progress made in the theoretical understanding and modeling of core-collapse supernovae. In this, our emphasis is on multi-dimensional processes involved in the explosion mechanism such as neutrino-driven convection and the standing accretion shock instability. As an example of how supernova neutrinos can be used to probe fundamental physics, we discuss how the rise ti...

  2. Analysis of Blast Wave Propagation Inside Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingbo; YAN Qiushi; WU Jun

    2008-01-01

    The explosion inside tunnel would generate blast wave which transmits through the longi tudinal tunnel.Because of the close-in effects of the tunnel and the reflection by the confining tunnel structure,blast wave propagation inside tunnel is distinguished from that in air.When the explosion happens inside tunnel,the overpressure peak is higher than that of explosion happening in air.The continuance time of the biast wave also becomes longer.With the help of the numerical simu lation finite element software LS-DYNA.a three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic simulation analysis for an explosion experiment inside tunnel was carried out.LS-DYNA is a fully integrated analysis program specifically designed for nonlinear dynamics and large strain problems.Compared with the experimental results.the simulation results have made the material parameters of numerical simulation model available.By using the model and the same material parameters,many results were adopted by calculating the model under different TNT explosion dynamites.Then the method of dimensional analysis was Used for the Simulation resufts.AS Overpressures of the explosion biast wave are the governing factor in fhe tunnel responses.a formula for the explosion biast wave overpressure at a certain distance from the detonation center point inside the tunnel was de rived by using the dimensional analysis theory.By cornparing the results computed by the fromula with experimental results which were obtained before.the formula was proved to be very applicable at some instance.The research may be helpful to estimate rapidly the effect of internal explosion of tunnel on the structure.

  3. Device for Underwater Laboratory Simulation of Unconfined Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elijah; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shock tubes simulate blast waves to study their effects in air under laboratory conditions; however, few experimental models exist for simulating underwater blast waves that are needed for facilitating experiments in underwater blast transmission, determining injury thresholds in marine animals, validating numerical models, and exploring mitigation strategies for explosive well removals. This method incorporates an oxy-acetylene driven underwater blast simulator which creates peak blast pressures of about 1860 kPa. Shot-to-shot consistency was fair, with an average standard deviation near 150 kPa. Results suggest peak blast pressures from 460 kPa to 1860 kPa are available by adjusting the distance from the source.

  4. Modeling of aqueous foam blast wave attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domergue L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of aqueous foams enables the mitigation of blast waves induced by the explosion of energetic materials. The two-phase confinement gives rise to interphase interactions between the gaseous and liquid phases, which role have been emphasized in shock-tube studies with solid foams [1, 2]. Multifluid formalism enables the thermo-mechanical disequilibria between phases to be taken into account. The flow model ensures the correct estimation of the acoustic impedance of the two-phase media. As for the numerical scheme, Riemann solvers are used to describe the microscopic fluid interactions, the summation of which provides the multiphase flux. The role of the different transfer mechanisms is evaluated in the case where the liquid ligaments of the foam matrix have been shattered into droplets by the shock impingement. Characteristics of blast waves in heterogeneous media leads to a decrease of overpressure. The numerical results have been compared favorably to experimental data [3, 4].

  5. Experimental Investigation of a Novel Blast Wave Mitigation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbi Su

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel blast wave mitigation device was investigated experimentally in this paper. The device consists of a piston-cylinder assembly. A shock wave is induced within the cylinder when a blast wave impacts on the piston. The shock wave propagates inside the device and is reflected repeatedly. The shock wave propagation process inside the device lengthens the duration of the force on the base of the device to several orders of magnitude of the duration of the blast wave, while it decreases the maximum pressure over an order of magnitude. Two types of experiments were carried out to study the blast wave mitigation device. The first type of experiments was done with honeycomb structures protected by the blast wave mitigation device. Experimental results show that the device can adequately protect the honeycomb structure. A second type of experiments was done using a Hopkinson bar to measure the pressure transmitted through the blast wave mitigation device. The experimental results agree well with results from a theoretical model.

  6. High-speed measurement of firearm primer blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; Eng, Jonathan; Courtney, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a method and results for direct high-speed measurements of firearm primer blast waves employing a high-speed pressure transducer located at the muzzle to record the blast pressure wave produced by primer ignition. Key findings are: 1) Most of the lead styphnate based primer models tested show 5.2-11.3% standard deviation in the magnitudes of their peak pressure. 2) In contrast, lead-free diazodinitrophenol (DDNP) based primers had standard deviations of the peak blast pressure of 8.2-25.0%. 3) Combined with smaller blast waves, these large variations in peak blast pressure of DDNP-based primers led to delayed ignition and failure to fire in brief field tests.

  7. Evolution of blast wave profiles in simulated air blasts: experiment and computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, N.; Ganpule, S.; Kleinschmit, N. N.; Feng, R.; Holmberg, A. D.; Sundaramurthy, A.; Selvan, V.; Alai, A.

    2012-09-01

    Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due to increased incidence of blast-induced neurotrauma in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. One of the important aspects in these studies is how to best replicate the field conditions in the laboratory which relies on reproducing blast wave profiles. Evolution of the blast wave profiles along the length of the compression-driven air shock tube is studied using experiments and numerical simulations with emphasis on the shape and magnitude of pressure time profiles. In order to measure dynamic pressures of the blast, a series of sensors are mounted on a cylindrical specimen normal to the flow direction. Our results indicate that the blast wave loading is significantly different for locations inside and outside of the shock tube. Pressure profiles inside the shock tube follow the Friedlander waveform fairly well. Upon approaching exit of the shock tube, an expansion wave released from the shock tube edges significantly degrades the pressure profiles. For tests outside the shock tube, peak pressure and total impulse reduce drastically as we move away from the exit and majority of loading is in the form of subsonic jet wind. In addition, the planarity of the blast wave degrades as blast wave evolves three dimensionally. Numerical results visually and quantitatively confirm the presence of vortices, jet wind and three-dimensional expansion of the planar blast wave near the exit. Pressure profiles at 90° orientation show flow separation. When cylinder is placed inside, this flow separation is not sustained, but when placed outside the shock tube this flow separation is sustained which causes tensile loading on the sides of the cylinder. Friedlander waves formed due to field explosives in the intermediate-to far-field ranges are replicated in a narrow test region located deep inside the shock tube.

  8. GRB-supernovae: a new spin on gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Van Putten, M H P M

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of the GRB-supernova association poses the question on the nature of the inner engine as the outcome of Type Ib/c supernovae. These events are believed to represent core-collapse of massive stars, probably in low-period stellar binaries and similar but not identical to the Type II event SN1987A. The branching ratio of Type Ib/c supernovae into GRB-supernovae has the remarkably small value of less than 0.5%. These observational constraints point towards a rapidly rotating black hole formed at low probability with low kick velocity. The putative black hole hereby remains centered, and matures into a high-mass object with large rotational energy in angular momentum. As the MeV-neutrino emissions from SN1987A demonstrate, the most powerful probe of the inner workings of core-collapse events are radiation channels to which the remnant envelope is optically thin. We here discuss the prospect of gravitational-wave emissions powered by a rapidly rotating central black hole which, in contrast to MeV-neut...

  9. Strongest gravitational waves from neutrino oscillations at supernova core bounce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera Cuesta, H.J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Laboratorio de Cosmologia e Fisica Experimental de Altas Energias, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Cep 22290-180, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Miramare 34014, Trieste (Italy); Centro Latino-Americano de Fisica, Avenida Wenceslau Braz 71, CEP 22290-140, Fundos, Botafogo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fiuza, K. [Instituto de Fisica - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Agronomia, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Resonant active-to-active ({nu}{sub a} {yields}{nu}{sub a}), as well as active-to-sterile ({nu}{sub a} {yields}{nu}{sub s}) neutrino ({nu}) oscillations can take place during the core bounce of a supernova collapse. Besides, over this phase, weak magnetism increases the antineutrino (anti {nu}) mean free path, and thus its luminosity. Because the oscillation feeds mass-energy into the target {nu} species, the large mass-squared difference between the species ({nu}{sub a} {yields}{nu}{sub s}) implies a huge amount of energy to be given off as gravitational waves (L{sub GW} {proportional_to}10{sup 49} erg s{sup -1}), due to anisotropic but coherent {nu} flow over the oscillation length. This asymmetric {nu}-flux is driven by both the spin-magnetic and the universal spin-rotation coupling. The novel contribution of this paper stems from (1) the new computation of the anisotropy parameter {alpha}{proportional_to}0.1-0.01, and (2) the use of the tight constraints from neutrino experiments as SNO and KamLAND, and the cosmic probe WMAP, to compute the gravitational-wave emission during neutrino oscillations in supernovae core collapse and bounce. We show that the mass of the sterile neutrino {nu}{sub s} that can be resonantly produced during the flavor conversions makes it a good candidate for dark matter as suggested by Fuller et al., Phys. Rev. D 68, 103002 (2003). The new spacetime strain thus estimated is still several orders of magnitude larger than those from {nu} diffusion (convection and cooling) or quadrupole moments of neutron star matter. This new feature turns these bursts into the more promising supernova gravitational-wave signals that may be detected by observatories as LIGO, VIRGO, etc., for distances far out to the VIRGO cluster of galaxies. (orig.)

  10. Supernova Seismology: Gravitational Wave Signatures of Rapidly Rotating Core Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early postbounce...

  11. The Effect of Initial Conditions on the Nonlinear Evolution of Perturbed Interfaces Driven by Strong Blast Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A

    2004-04-27

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this dissertation, we present a computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. Using multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics codes and theoretical models, we consider the late nonlinear instability evolution of single mode, few mode, and multimode interfaces. We rely primarily on 2D calculations but present recent 3D results as well. For planar multimode systems, we show that compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. Aspects of the IC's are shown to have a strong effect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. We point to recent stellar calculations that predict IC's we find incompatible with self-similarity, and

  12. The Effect of Initial Conditions on the Nonlinear Evolution of Perturbed Interfaces Driven by Strong Blast Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Aaron R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this dissertation, we present a computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. Using multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics codes and theoretical models, we consider the late nonlinear instability evolution of single mode, few mode, and multimode interfaces. We rely primarily on 2D calculations but present recent 3D results as well. For planar multimode systems, we show that compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. Aspects of the IC's are shown to have a strong effect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. We point to recent stellar calculations that predict IC's we find incompatible with self-similarity, and

  13. Circulation in blast driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Mixing in many natural phenomena (e.g. supernova collapse) and engineering applications (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) is often initiated through hydrodynamic instabilities. Explosions in these systems give rise to blast waves which can interact with perturbations at interfaces between different fluids. Blast waves are formed by a shock followed by a rarefaction. This wave profile leads to complex time histories of interface acceleration. In addition to the instabilities induced by the acceleration field, the rarefaction from the blast wave decompresses the material at the interface, further increasing the perturbation growth. After the passage of the wave, circulation circulation generated by the blast wave through baroclinic vorticity continues to act upon the interface. In this talk, we provide scaling laws for the circulation and amplitude growth induced by the blast wave. Numerical simulations of the multifluid Euler equations solved using a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method are used to validate the theoretical results.

  14. Triple-layer Absorptive Structures for Shock Wave Blast Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Triple-layer absorptive structure is designed to reinforce a missile silo against shock wave blasts. An energy-absorbing layer and a cushion layer overlay the circular silo cover made of reinforced concrete. The dynamic stress analysis is performed by ABAQUS/Explicit. The mesoscopic structure of the energy absorbing layer is designed as an assembly of ductile tubes containing crushable cellular ceramics. Combined mesoscopic and macroscopic simulations indicate that the structure can enhance the survivability of a missile silo against blast waves.

  15. Supernova Remnant Evolution: from explosion to dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Leahy, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Here is considered the full evolution of a spherical supernova remnant. We start by calculating the early time ejecta dominated stage and continue through the different phases of interaction with the circumstellar medium, and end with the dissipation and merger phase. The physical connection between the phases reveals new results. One is that the blast wave radius during the adiabatic phase is significantly smaller than it would be, if one does notaccount for the blast wave interaction with the ejecta.

  16. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  17. Distributional Tests for Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanczyk, Marek; LIGO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSN) are spectacular and violent deaths of massive stars. CCSN are some of the most interesting candidates for producing gravitational-waves (GW) transients. Current published results focus on methodologies to detect single GW unmodelled transients. The advantages of these tests are that they do not require a background for which we have an analytical model. Examples of non-parametric tests that will be compared are Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney, chi squared, and asymmetric chi squared. I will present methodological results using publicly released LIGO-S6 data recolored to the design sensitivity of Advanced LIGO and that will be time lagged between interferometers sites so that the resulting coincident events are not GW.

  18. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Raymond, John C; Williams, Brian J; Blair, William P; Borkowski, Kazimierz J; Gaetz, Terrance J; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV $\\lambda$1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10" behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25" behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  19. Simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-01

    U.S. soldiers are surviving blast and impacts due to effective body armor, trauma evacuation and care. Blast injuries are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military personnel returning from combat. Understanding of Primary Blast Injury may be needed to develop better means of blast mitigation strategies. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of blast direction and strength on the resulting mechanical stress and wave energy distributions generated in the brain.

  20. Blast wave injury prediction models for complex scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teland, J.A.; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Blast waves from explosions can cause lethal injuries to humans. Development of injury criteria has been ongoing for many years, but with the main focus on free field conditions. However, with terrorist actions as a new threat, explosions in urban areas have become of much more interest. Urban areas

  1. Close-in Blast Waves from Spherical Charges*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, William; Kuhl, Allen

    2011-06-01

    We study the close-in blast waves created by the detonation of spherical high explosives (HE) charges, via numerical simulations with our Arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (200 μm per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in air, and the reflection of the blast wave from an ideal surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and air were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. The results were analyzed to evaluate the: (i) free air pressure-range curves: Δps (R) , (ii) free air impulse curves, (iii) reflected pressure-range curves, and (iv) reflected impulse-range curves. A variety of explosives were studied. Conclusions are: (i) close-in (R Heat of Detonation'' of the explosive (because close-in, there is not enough time to fully couple the chemical energy to the air via piston work); (iii) instead they are related to the detonation conditions inside the charge. Scaling laws will be proposed for such close-in blast waves.

  2. Blast wave injury prediction models for complex scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teland, J.A.; Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Blast waves from explosions can cause lethal injuries to humans. Development of injury criteria has been ongoing for many years, but with the main focus on free field conditions. However, with terrorist actions as a new threat, explosions in urban areas have become of much more interest. Urban areas

  3. An Early & Comprehensive Millimeter and Centimeter Wave and X-ray Study of Supernova 2011dh: A Non-Equipartition Blastwave Expanding into A Massive Stellar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Horesh, Assaf; Fox, Derek B; Frail, Dale A; Carpenter, John; Kulkarni, S R; Ofek, Eran O; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Arcavi, Iair; Quimby, Robert; Cenko, S Bradley; Nugent, Peter E; Bloom, Joshua S; Law, Nicholas M; Poznanski, Dovi; Gorbikov, Evgeny; Polishook, David; Yaron, Ofer; Ryder, Stuart; Weiler, Kurt W; Bauer, Franz; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Immler, Stefan; Panagia, Nino; Pooley, Dave; Kassim, Namir

    2012-01-01

    Only a handful of supernovae (SNe) have been studied in multi-wavelength from radio to X-rays, starting a few days after explosion. The early detection and classification of the nearby type IIb SN2011dh/PTF11eon in M51 provides a unique opportunity to conduct such observations. We present detailed data obtained at the youngest phase ever of a core-collapse supernova (days 3 to 12 after explosion) in the radio, millimeter and X-rays; when combined with optical data, this allows us to explore the early evolution of the SN blast wave and its surroundings. Our analysis shows that the expanding supernova shockwave does not exhibit equipartition (e_e/e_B ~ 1000), and is expanding into circumstellar material that is consistent with a density profile falling like R^-2. Within modeling uncertainties we find an average velocity of the fast parts of the ejecta of 15,000 +/- 1800 km/s, contrary to previous analysis. This velocity places SN 2011dh in an intermediate blast-wave regime between the previously defined compact...

  4. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from nine young supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barclay, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dartez, L; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fuentes-Tapia, S; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hee, S; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Le, J; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; McWilliams, S; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moore, B; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Pai, S; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patrick, Z; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Post, A; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sawadsky, A; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szczepanczyk, M; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C van den; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Xie, S; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, Q; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth LIGO science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of ten. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering F-statistic. We found no credible gravitational-wave signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as $4\\times10^{-25}$ on intrinsic strain, $2\\times10^{-7}$ on fiducial ellipticity, and $4\\times10^{-5}$ on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  5. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  6. A $55 Shock Tube for Simulated Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elijah; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shock tubes are commonly employed to test candidate armor materials, validate numerical models, and conduct simulated blast experiments in animal models. As DoD interests desire to field wearable sensors as blast dosimeters, shock tubes may also serve for calibration and testing of these devices. The high blast pressures needed for experimental testing of candidate armors are unnecessary to test these sensors. An inexpensive, efficient, and easily available way of testing these pressure sensors is desirable. It is known that releasing compressed gas suddenly can create a repeatable shock front, and the pressures can be finely tuned by changing the pressure to which the gas is compressed. A Crosman 0.177 caliber air pistol was used (without loading any pellets) to compress and release air in one end of a 24 inch long 3/4 inch diameter standard pipe nipple to simulate a blast wave at the other end of the tube. A variable number of pumps were used to vary the peak blast pressure. As expected, the trials where 10...

  7. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ghavamian, Parviz [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Williams, Brian J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Borkowski, Kazimierz J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Sankrit, Ravi, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  8. Measurement of the decay rate of single-frequency perturbations on blast waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, A D; Ditmire, T; Hansen, J F; Edwards, M J; Adams, R G; Rambo, P K; Ruggles, L; Smith, I C; Porter, J L

    2005-12-09

    To explore the validity of theories forwarded to explain the dynamics of hydrodynamic perturbations on high Mach number blast waves, we have studied the decay rate of perturbations on blast waves traveling through nitrogen gas. In our experiments, 1 kJ pulses from the Z-Beamlet laser at Sandia National Laboratories illuminated solid targets immersed in gas and created blast waves. The polytropic index implied by comparing experiment to theoretical predictions is compared to simulation results.

  9. Methodological studies on the search for Gravitational Waves and Neutrinos from Type II Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casentini, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Type II SNe, also called Core-collapse SuperNovae have a neutrino (v) emission, as confirmed by SN 1987A, and are also potential sources of gravitational waves. Neutrinos and gravitational waves from these sources reach Earth almost contemporaneously and without relevant interaction with stellar matter and interstellar medium. The upcoming advanced gravitational interferometers would be sensitive enough to detect gravitational waves signals from close galactic Core-collapse SuperNovae events. Nevertheless, significant uncertainties on theoretical models of emission remain. A joint search of coincident low energy neutrinos and gravitational waves events from these sources would bring valuable information from the inner core of the collapsing star and would enhance the detection of the so-called Silent SuperNovae. Recently a project for a joint search involving gravitational wave interferometers and neutrino detectors has started. We discuss the benefits of a joint search and the status of the search project.

  10. Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

    2011-08-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  11. High-speed measurement of rifle primer blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a method and results for direct high-speed measurements of rifle primer blast waves employing a high-speed pressure transducer located at the muzzle to record the blast pressure wave produced by primer ignition. Our key findings are: 1) Most of the primer models tested show 5-12% standard deviation in the magnitudes of their peak pressure. 2) For most primer types tested, peak pressure magnitudes are well correlated with measured primer masses so that significant reductions in standard deviation are expected to result from sorting primers by mass. 3) A range of peak pressures from below 200 psi to above 500 psi is available in different primer types.

  12. Numerical simulations of blast wave characteristics with a two-dimensional axisymmetric room model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Y.; Homae, T.; Wakabayashi, K.; Matsumura, T.; Nakayama, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This paper numerically visualizes explosion phenomena in order to discuss blast wave characteristics with a two-dimensional axisymmetric room model. After the shock wave exits via an opening, the blast wave propagates into open space. In the present study, a parametric study was conducted to determine the blast wave characteristics from the room exit by changing the room shape and the mass of the high explosive. Our results show that the blast wave characteristics can be correctly estimated using a scaling factor proposed in the present paper that includes the above parameters. We conducted normalization of the peak overpressure curve using the shock overpressure at the exit and the length scale of the room volume. In the case where the scaling factor has the same value, the normalized peak overpressure curve does not depend on the calculation conditions, and the scaling factor describes the blast wave characteristics emerging from the current room model.

  13. Blast wave attenuation by lightly destructable granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, V. V.; Lu, F. K.; Medin, S. A.; Mirova, O. A.; Parshikov, A. N.; Petukhov, V. A.; Volodin, V. V.

    Terrorist bombings are a dismal reality nowadays. One of the most effective ways for protection against blast overpressure is the use of lightly compacted materials such as sand [1] and aqueous foam [2] as a protective envelope or barrier. According to [1], shock wave attenuation in a mine tunnel (one-dimensional case) behind a destroyed object is given by q_e ≈ q {1}/{1 + 4(S/q)^{1/6} bρ _{mat} /L^{1/3} }where qe — effective charge, S — exposed area of the obstacle, q — TNT equivalent (grams), L — distance between charge and obstacle, b — obstacle thickness and ρ mat — material density. This empirical equation is applicable only in a one-dimensional case but not for a less confined environment. Another way of protecting a structure against blast is to coat the surface with a sacrificial layer. In [3] full-scale experiments were carried out to investigate the behaviour of a covering of aluminum foam under the effect of a blast wave.

  14. Model for small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Juan R.; Desai, Sachi V.

    2011-11-01

    Accurate modeling of small firearms muzzle blast wave propagation in the far field is critical to predict sound pressure levels, impulse durations and rise times, as functions of propagation distance. Such a task being relevant to a number of military applications including the determination of human response to blast noise, gunfire detection and localization, and gun suppressor design. Herein, a time domain model to predict small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation is introduced. The model implements a Friedlander wave with finite rise time which diverges spherically from the gun muzzle. Additionally, the effects in blast wave form of thermoviscous and molecular relaxational processes, which are associated with atmospheric absorption of sound were also incorporated in the model. Atmospheric absorption of blast waves is implemented using a time domain recursive formula obtained from numerical integration of corresponding differential equations using a Crank-Nicholson finite difference scheme. Theoretical predictions from our model were compared to previously recorded real world data of muzzle blast wave signatures obtained by shooting a set different sniper weapons of varying calibers. Recordings containing gunfire acoustical signatures were taken at distances between 100 and 600 meters from the gun muzzle. Results shows that predicted blast wave slope and exponential decay agrees well with measured data. Analysis also reveals the persistency of an oscillatory phenomenon after blast overpressure in the recorded wave forms.

  15. Dynamics and stability of relativistic gamma-ray-bursts blast waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. In gamma-ray-bursts (GRBs), ultra-relativistic blast waves are ejected into the circumburst medium. We analyse in unprecedented detail the deceleration of a self-similar Blandford-McKee blast wave from a Lorentz factor 25 to the nonrelativistic Sedov phase. Our goal is to determine the stabili

  16. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenzhi Wang

    Full Text Available Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI. To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts.

  17. Heating of X-Ray Hot Gas in Groups by Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Y

    2001-01-01

    In order to find the conditions which determine whether X-Ray hot gas in galaxy groups (intragroup gas; IGG) is heated externally or internally, we investigate the evolution of blast waves in galaxy groups growing on a hierarchical clustering scenario. We find that the blast waves driven by quasars are confined in groups and heat the IGG internally at z~ 1, they expel the IGG from groups; the expelled gas may fall back into the groups later as externally heated gas. Moreover, this may explain the observed low metal abundance of IGG. For blast waves driven by strong starbursts, the shift of the fate of blast waves occurs at z~ 3. On the other hand, although blast waves driven by weak starbursts do not expel IGG from groups, the heating efficiency decreases at z>~ 3 because of radiative cooling. It will be useful to compare these results with XMM-Newton observations.

  18. Detection strategies for a supernova gravitational wave burst in a network of interferometric detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, N; Bizouard, M A; Brisson, V; Cavalier, F; Davier, M; Hello, P; Kreckelberg, S; Porter, E K; Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelberg, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-01-01

    Trying to detect the gravitational wave (GW) signal emitted by a type II supernova is a main challenge for the GW community. Indeed, the corresponding waveform is not accurately modeled as the supernova physics is very complex; in addition, all the existing numerical simulations agree on the weakness of the GW emission, thus restraining the number of sources potentially detectable. Consequently, triggering the GW signal with a confidence level high enough to conclude directly to a detection is very difficult, even with the use of a network of interferometric detectors. On the other hand, one can hope to take benefit from the neutrino and optical emissions associated to the supernova explosion, in order to discover and study GW radiation in an event already detected independently. This article aims at presenting some realistic scenarii for the search of the supernova GW bursts, based on the present knowledge of the emitted signals and on the results of network data analysis simulations. Both the direct search ...

  19. Probing neutrino oscillations from supernovae shock waves via the IceCube detector

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S; Ross, Graham G; Choubey, Sandhya

    2006-01-01

    The time dependent neutrino oscillation signals due to the passage of a shock wave through the supernovae are analyzed for the case of three active neutrinos and also for the case that there are two additional sterile neutrinos. It is shown that, even without flavour identification and energy measurement, detailed information about the masses and mixing angles of the neutrinos may be obtained with a detector with excellent time resolution such as IceCube. Such a signal would also give important information about the nature of the shock wave within the supernovae.

  20. Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    We live in a Universe that is getting bigger faster. This astonishing discovery of Universal acceleration was made in the late 1990s by two teams who made observations of a special type of exploded star known as a `Supernova Type Ia'. (SNeIa) Since the discovery of the accelerating Universe, one of the biggest questions in modern cosmology has been to determine the cause of that acceleration - the answer to this question will have far reaching implications for our theories of cosmology and fundamental physics more broadly. The two main competing explanations for this apparent late time acceleration of the Universe are modified gravity and dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) has been designed and commissioned to find to find answers to these questions about the nature of dark energy and modified gravity. The new 570 megapixel Dark Energy Camera is currently operating with the Cerro-Tololo Inter American Observatory's 4m Blanco teleccope, carrying out a systematic search for SNeIa, and mapping out the large scale structure of the Universe by making observations of galaxies. The DES science program program which saw first light in September 2013 will run for five years in total. DES SNeIa data in combination with the other DES observations of large scale structure will enable us to put increasingly accurate constraints on the expansion history of the Universe and will help us distinguish between competing theories of dark energy and modified gravity. As we draw to the close of the first observing season of DES in March 2014, we will report on the current status of the DES supernova survey, presenting first year supernovae data, preliminary results, survey strategy, discovery pipeline, spectroscopic target selection and data quality. This talk will give the first glimpse of the DES SN first year data and initial results as we begin our five year survey in search of dark energy. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  1. A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Amy; 10.1016/j.mehy.2008.08.015

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. ...

  2. Antiknock Performance of Interlayered High-Damping-Rubber Blast Door under Thermobaric Shock Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiudi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The long duration and high impulse shock wave of thermobaric bomb threatens the security of underground structures. To obtain high resistance blast door against thermobaric shock wave, firstly, the dynamic mechanic property of high damping rubber was studied by split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB equipment and the stress-strain relationship of high damping rubber under average strain rate of 5200/s was obtained. Secondly, the numerical model of interlayered high-damping-rubber blast door was established with ANSYS/LS-DYNA code based on test results, and the antiknock performance of interlayered high-damping-rubber blast door under thermobaric shock wave was analyzed by contrast with ordinary blast door. The results showed that the midspan displacement of the blast door decreased firstly and then increased with the increase of thickness of the high-damping-rubber interlayer, and the optimal thickness of the high-damping-rubber interlayer for energy consuming was 150 mm in the calculation condition of this paper. With the increase of the distance between the interlayer and the front surface of the door, the midspan displacement of the blast door decreased continually. The midspan maximum displacement of interlayered high-damping-rubber blast door decreased 74.5% in comparison to ordinary blast door. It showed that the high-damping-rubber structure can effectively improve the antiknock performance of blast door under thermobaric shock wave.

  3. Neutrino signal of supernova shock wave propagation:MSW distortion of the spectra and neucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Shiou; Suzuki, H.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Yamada, H.; Kajino, T.

    We try to limit the neutrino oscillation parameters from the supernova neutrinos by studying the MSW matter effect. The supernova neutrinos are generated in the core and propagate through the envelope. It is pointed out that shock wave propagation has strong influences on the supernova neutrino oscillation through the change of density profile. Using an implicit Lagrangian code for general relativistic spherical hydrodynamics (Ya- mada,1997), we succeeded in calculating propagation of shock waves which are generated by adiabatic collapse of iron cores and pass into the stellar envelopes for more than ˜5s. We examined how the influence of the shock wave appears in the neutrino spectrum, using density profile obtained in our calculation. We confirmed that the influence of the shock wave appears from low-energy side and moves toward high-energy side according to the shock propagation. In addition, we calculated the neutrino signal that will be observed on the earth, and found that this manner of the neutrino signal depends remarkably on the neutrino oscillation parameters. There- fore, there is a possibility of constraining the neutrino oscillation parameters from the supernova neutrino spectrum. Moreover, there is a possibility of finding the influence on the nucleosynthesis by changing the neutrino spectrum.

  4. Self-similar ultra-relativistic jetted blast wave

    CERN Document Server

    Keshet, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Following a suggestion that a directed relativistic explosion may have a universal intermediate asymptotic, we derive a self-similar solution for an ultra-relativistic jetted blast wave. The solution involves three distinct regions: an approximately paraboloid head where the Lorentz factor $\\gamma$ exceeds $\\sim1/2$ of its maximal, nose value; a geometrically self-similar, expanding envelope slightly narrower than a paraboloid; and an axial core in which the radial flow $U$ converges inward towards the axis. Most ($\\sim 80\\%$) of the energy lies well beyond the head. Here, a radial cross section shows a maximal $\\gamma$ (separating the core and the envelope), a sign reversal in $U$, and a minimal $\\gamma$, at respectively $\\sim 1/6$, $\\sim1/4$, and $\\sim3/4$ of the shock radius. The solution is apparently unique, and approximately agrees with previous simulations, of different initial conditions, that resolved the head. This suggests that unlike a spherical relativistic blast wave, our solution is an attracto...

  5. Turbulent Supernova Shock Waves and the Sterile Neutrino Signature in Megaton Water Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S; Ross, Graham G; Choubey, Sandhya

    2007-01-01

    The signatures of sterile neutrinos in the supernova neutrino signal in megaton water Cerenkov detectors are studied. Time dependent modulation of the neutrino signal emerging from the sharp changes in the oscillation probability due to shock waves is shown to be a smoking gun for the existence of sterile neutrinos. These modulations and indeed the entire neutrino oscillation signal is found to be different for the case with just three active neutrinos and the cases where there are additional sterile species mixed with the active neutrinos. The effect of turbulence is taken into account and it is found that the effect of the shock waves, while modifed, remain significant and measurable. Supernova neutrino signals in water detectors can therefore give unambiguous proof for the existence of sterile neutrinos, the sensitivity extending beyond that for terrestial neutrino experiments. In addition the time dependent modulations in the signal due to shock waves can be used to trace the evolution of the shock wave i...

  6. Generation of planar blast waves using carbon nanotubes-poly-dimethylsiloxane optoacoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, C.; Fan, X.; Ha, K.; Kim, D.

    2017-01-01

    We have generated planar blast waves over the large area using carbon nanotubes(CNT)-poly-dimethylsiloxane(PDMS) optoacoustic transducer. Pulse laser is absorbed by CNT and converted to heat, and the heat is transferred to PDMS inducing its thermal expansion and blast wave generation. To theoretically describe the planar blast wave generation, we build one-dimensional simulation model and find analytical solutions for temperature and pressure distributions. The analytical solution validated by the experimental data sheds light on how to improve the performance of the new transducer. Resonance of acoustic waves inside the transducer is also discussed. The new optoacoustic transducer optimized based on the fundamental understandings will be useful in generating high quality blast waves for research and industrial applications.

  7. Full-scale testing of leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room exposed to external air blast loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, R.; Ambrosini, D.

    2017-06-01

    For the last few decades, the effects of blast loading on structures have been studied by many researchers around the world. Explosions can be caused by events such as industrial accidents, military conflicts or terrorist attacks. Urban centers have been prone to various threats including car bombs, suicide attacks, and improvised explosive devices. Partially vented constructions subjected to external blast loading represent an important topic in protective engineering. The assessment of blast survivability inside structures and the development of design provisions with respect to internal elements require the study of the propagation and leakage of blast waves inside buildings. In this paper, full-scale tests are performed to study the effects of the leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room that is subjected to different external blast loadings. The results obtained may be useful for proving the validity of different methods of calculation, both empirical and numerical. Moreover, the experimental results are compared with those computed using the empirical curves of the US Defense report/manual UFC 3-340. Finally, results of the dynamic response of the front masonry wall are presented in terms of accelerations and an iso-damage diagram.

  8. Gravitational waves from braneworld neutrino oscillations at supernova core-collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Cosmologia e Fisica Experimental de Altas Energias]. E-mail: hermanjc@cbpfsul.cat.cbpf.br

    2003-07-01

    In braneworld-like solutions of the hierarchy problem gravitons and right-handed (sterile) neutrinos are in principle the unique non-standard model fields allowed to propagate into the bulk, thus their coupling is naturally expected. Since active-to-sterile neutrino oscillations can take place during the core bounce of a supernova collapse, then gravitational waves must be produced over the oscillation length through anisotropic neutrino flow. Because the oscillation feeds mass-energy up into (or takes it out of) the target species, the large mass-squared difference between species makes a huge amount of energy to be given off as gravity waves, which is larger than from neutrino convection and cooling, or quadrupole moments of neutron star matter. The space-time strain from these bursts would turn them the more sure supernova gravitational-wave signal detectable by inferometers, for distances out to the VIRGO cluster of galaxies. (author)

  9. On the magnetisation of gamma-ray burst blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, Martin; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The origin of magnetic fields that permeate the blast waves of gamma-ray bursts is a long-standing problem. The present paper argues that in four GRBs revealing extended emission at >100 MeV, with follow-up in the radio, optical and X-ray domains at later times, this magnetisation can be described as the partial decay of the microturbulence that is generated in the shock precursor. Assuming that the extended high energy emission can be interpreted as synchrotron emission of shock accelerated electrons, we model the multi-wavelength light curves of GRB 090902B, GRB 090323, GRB 090328 and GRB 110731A, using a simplified then a full synchrotron calculation with power law decaying microturbulence \\epsilon_B \\propto t^{\\alpha_t} (t denotes the time since injection through the shock, in the comoving blast frame). We find that these models point to a consistent value of the decay exponent -0.5 < \\alpha_t < -0.4.

  10. Current Status of Blast Wave Theory and Computations. Volume 2. The Quasi-Similar Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    0.02 0.04 y Fig. IV.4.17 - 260 - SIV.5. ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE BLAST WAVES PROPAGATING THROUGH GASEOUS MIXTURES WITH A SPATIALLY VARYING HEAT OF DETONATION * i...a Spatially Varying Heat of Detonation " Paper Presented at the 8th International Colloquium on Gasdynamics of Ex- plosions and Reactive Systems... of Detonation 260 6. Blast Waves in a Detonating Medium with Transport Properties Taken into Account 287 REFERENCES 326 iii CHAPTER I NON-SELF-SIMILAR

  11. Mesh Size Effect in Numerical Simulation of Blast Wave Propagation and Interaction with Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yanchao; LI Zhongxian; HAO Hong

    2008-01-01

    Numerical method is popular in analysing the blast wave propagation and interaction with structures.However, because of the extremely short duration of blast wave and energy transmission between different grids, the numerical results are sensitive to the finite element mesh size.Previous numerical simulations show that a mesh size acceptable to one blast scenario might not be proper for another case, even though the difference between the two scenarios is very small,indicating a simple numerical mesh size convergence test might not be enough to guarantee accurate numerical results.Therefore, both coarse mesh and fine mesh were used in different blast scenarios to investigate the mesh size effect on numerical results of blast wave propagation and interaction with structures.Based on the numerical results and their comparison with field test results and the design charts in TM5-1300, a numerical modification method was proposed to correct the influence of the mesh size on the simulated results.It can be easily used to improve the accuracy of the numerical results of blast wave propagation and blast loads on structures.

  12. Blast overpressure waves induce transient anxiety and regional changes in cerebral glucose metabolism and delayed hyperarousal in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibah Omar Awwad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiological alterations, anxiety and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p<0.05; n=8-11. Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed hyperactivity and increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p<0.05; n=4-6 and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p<0.05; n=5-6.

  13. Analytical Solution of the Blast Wave Problem in a Non-Ideal Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. P. Singh; S. D. Ram; D. B. Singh

    2011-01-01

    An analytical approach is used to construct the exact solution of the blast wave problem with generalized geometries in a non-ideal medium. It is assumed that the density ahead of the shock front varies according to a power of distance from the source of the blast wave. Also, an analytical expression for the total energy in a non-ideal medium is derived.%An analytical approach is used to construct the exact solution of the blast wave problem with generalized geometries in a non-ideal medium.It is assumed that the density ahead of the shock front varies according to a power of distance from the source of the blast wave.Also,an analytical expression for the total energy in a non-ideal medium is derived.Blast waves are common occurrences in the Earth's atmosphere.They result from a sudden release of a relatively large amount of energy.Typical examples are lightening and chemical or nuclear explosions.Assume that we have an explosion,following which there may exist a very small region filled with hot matter at high pressure in a duration,which starts to expand outwards with its front headed by a strong shock.The process generally takes place in a very short time after which a forward-moving shock wave develops,which continuously assimilates the ambient air into the blast wave.Although some of the explosive material may still remain near the center,the amount of the air absorbed increases with time,and the later behavior of the blast wave may well be represented by the model of the shock wave at the front and a purely gasdynamic treatment for the motion of the air inside,which may be assumed to have ideal and non-viscous adiabatic heat exponent.

  14. Deflagration to detonation transition by amplification of acoustic waves in type Ia supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Charignon, Camille; Chièze, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We study a new mechanism for deflagration to detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia), based on the formation of shocks by amplification of sound waves in the steep density gradients of white dwarfs envelopes. Given a large enough jump in density a small pressure and velocity perturbation, produced by the turbulent deflagration, turns into a shock down of the gradient, where it will dissipate and heat up the media. With the right frequency and amplitude the heating can be en...

  15. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  16. Blast shock wave mitigation using the hydraulic energy redirection and release technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

    2012-01-01

    A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel.

  17. The Application of Bayesian Inference to Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossan, Sarah; Ott, Christian; Kalmus, Peter; Logue, Joshua; Heng, Siong

    2013-04-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) signature of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) encodes important information on the supernova explosion mechanism, the workings of which cannot be explored via observations in the electromagnetic spectrum. Recent research has shown that the CCSNe explosion mechanism can be inferred through the application of Bayesian model selection to gravitational wave signals from supernova explosions powered by the neutrino, magnetorotational and acoustic mechanisms. Extending this work, we apply Principal Component Analysis to the GW spectrograms from CCSNe to take into account also the time-frequency evolution of the emitted signals. We do so in the context of Advanced LIGO, to establish if any improvement on distinguishing between various explosion mechanisms can be obtained. Further to this, we consider a five-detector network of interferometers (comprised of the two Advanced LIGO detectors, Advanced Virgo, LIGO India and KAGRA) and generalize the aforementioned analysis for a source of known position but unknown distance, using realistic, re-colored detector data (as opposed to Gaussian noise), in order to make more reliable statements regarding our ability to distinguish between various explosion mechanisms on the basis of their GW signatures.

  18. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvan, P. E.; Sochet, I.; Trélat, S.

    2012-05-01

    To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the similitude between real and small scales. To study the interactions and propagations of the reflected shock waves, the present study was conducted by progressively building a confined volume around the charge. In this way, the influence of each wall and the origins of the reflected shock waves can be determined. The purpose of this paper is to report the blast wave interactions that resulted from the detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture in a confined room.

  19. Prospects for studying how high-intensity compression waves cause damage in human blast injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine; Bo, Chiara; Ramaswamy, Arul; Masouros, Spiros; Newell, Nicolas; Hill, Adam; Clasper, Jon; Bull, Anthony; Proud, William

    2011-06-01

    Blast injuries arising from improvised explosive devices are often complex leading to long-term disability in survivors. There is an urgent need to mitigate against the effects of blast that lead to these injuries, and to also improve post-traumatic therapeutic treatments related to problems associated with damage and healing processes and infections. We have initiated multidisciplinary studies to develop experimental facilities and strategies for analyzing the effects blast waves upon the human body, from cellular through to skeletal functions. This work is supported by the Atomic Weapons Establishment and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, UK.

  20. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    OpenAIRE

    Sochet, Isabelle; Sauvan, Pierre-Emmanuel; Trelat, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    International audience; To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the...

  1. Proposed searches for candidate sources of gravitational waves in a nearby core-collapse supernova survey

    CERN Document Server

    Heo, Jeon-Eun; Lee, Dae-Sub; Kong, In-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hoon; van Putten, Maurice H P M; Della Valle, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational wave bursts in the formation of neutron stars and black holes in energetic core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are of potential interest to LIGO-Virgo and KAGRA. Events nearby are readily discovered using moderately sized telescopes. CC-SNe are competitive with mergers of neutron stars and black holes, if the fraction producing an energetic output in gravitational waves exceeds about 1\\%. This opportunity motivates the design of a novel Sejong University Core-CollapsE Supernova Survey (SUCCESS), to provide triggers for follow-up searches for gravitational waves. It is based on the 76 cm Sejong University Telescope (SUT) for weekly monitoring of nearby star-forming galaxies, i.e., M51, M81-M82 and Blue Dwarf Galaxies from the Unified Nearby Galaxy Catalog with an expected yield of a few hundred per year. Optical light curves will be resolved for the true time-of-onset for probes of gravitational waves by broadband time-sliced matched filtering.

  2. Energy spectrum analysis of blast waves based on an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Wang, F.; Shang, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, C.; Kong, D.

    2016-07-01

    Using the improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), this paper investigates the problems of analysis and interpretation of the energy spectrum of a blast wave. It has been previously established that the energy spectrum is an effective feature by which to characterize a blast wave. In fact, the higher the energy spectra in a frequency band of a blast wave, the greater the damage to a target in the same frequency band. However, most current research focuses on analyzing wave signals in the time domain or frequency domain rather than considering the energy spectrum. We propose here an improved HHT method combined with a wavelet packet to extract the energy spectrum feature of a blast wave. When applying the HHT, the signal is first roughly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition. The wavelet packet method is then performed on each IMF to eliminate noise on the energy spectrum. Second, a coefficient is introduced to remove unrelated IMFs. The energy of each instantaneous frequency can be derived through the Hilbert transform. The energy spectrum can then be obtained by adding up all the components after the wavelet packet filters and screens them through a coefficient to obtain the effective IMFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by 12 groups of experimental data, and an energy attenuation model is established based on the experimental data. The improved HHT is a precise method for blast wave signal analysis. For other shock wave signals from blasting experiments, an energy frequency time distribution and energy spectrum can also be obtained through this method, allowing for more practical applications.

  3. Circular polarizations of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae: a clear indication of rapid rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that non-axisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the post-bounce cores. It is not surprising then that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show in this letter that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of Galaxy as long as the rotation period is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse.

  4. Parametric Study of Flow Patterns behind the Standing Accretion Shock Wave for Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Iwakami, Wakana; Yamada, Shoichi

    2013-01-01

    The systematic research of flow patterns behind the accretion shock wave is conducted using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations for core-collapse supernovae in this study. Changing the accretion rate and neutrino luminosity, the steady solutions of the one-dimensional irrotational accretion flow passing through the spherical shock wave are evolved by imposing a random perturbation with 1% amplitude at the onset of the simulations. Depending on the accretion rate and neutrino luminosity, various flow patterns appear behind the shock wave. We classified them into the three fundamental flow patterns: (1) sloshing motion, (2) spiral motion, (3) multiple high-entropy bubbles, and the two anomalous flow patterns: (4) spiral motion with buoyant bubbles, and (5) spiral motion with pulsating rotational velocity. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant in the higher accretion rate and lower neutrino luminosity, and the generations of multiple buoyant bubbles tend to prevail in the lower accretion ra...

  5. Analysis and Numerical Simulation on the Reduction Effect of Stress Waves Caused by Water Jet Slotting Near Blasting Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most serious “side effects” of blast excavation, blast-induced vibration must be controlled for existing buildings and human beings. This paper proposes a method for blast-induced vibration reduction with water jet assistance according to the cutting characters of low-noised, environment-friendly water jet. The mechanism of vibration-isolation with water jet assistance was analyzed, and the stress wave energy attenuation models were established based on blasting theory and stress wave theory. Influence law on shock wave attenuation by vibration-isolation slot was studied by numerical simulation. Simulation results agree with the theoretical analysis roughly. The results of this study put forward a method for blast-induced vibration near blasting source and provide a certain theoretical basis.

  6. Performance testing of lead free primers: blast waves, velocity variations, and environmental testing

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya; Summer, Peter David; Courtney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for lead free primers based on diazodinitrophenol (DDNP)compared with tests on lead styphnate based primers. First, barrel friction measurements in 5.56 mm NATO are presented. Second, shot to shot variations in blast waves are presented as determined by detonating primers in a 7.62x51mm rifle chamber with a firing pin, but without any powder or bullet loaded and measuring the blast wave at the muzzle with a high speed pressure transducer. Third, variations in primer blast waves, muzzle velocities, and ignition delay are presented after environmental conditioning (150 days) for two lead based and two DDNP based primers under cold and dry (-25 deg C,0% relative humidity), ambient (20 deg C, 50% relative humidity), and hot & humid (50 deg C, 100% relative humidity) conditions in 5.56 mm NATO. Taken together, these results indicate that DDNP based primers are not sufficiently reliable for service use.

  7. Evidence for a thermally unstable shock wave in the VELA supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Wallerstein, George; Balick, Bruce

    1991-12-01

    The emission and absorption line signatures of supernova remnant shock waves provide complementary diagnostic capabilities. This paper presents IUE spectra of the nebulosity and new spectra of HD 72088. Models of the emission and absorption lines from shocked gas are used to derive a shock velocity and elemental depletions. There is evidence from the absorption-line strengths and widths for thermally unstable cooling behind a 150 km/s shock. The shock velocity and swept-up column density estimates of Wallerstein and Balick (1990) are confirmed, and evidence is found for a nonthermal contribution to the pressure.

  8. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  9. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Instrumentation is needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. This paper describes the development and characterization of oxy-acetylene driven, laboratory scale shock tubes for use in studying blast injury, candidate armor materials, and material properties at blast loading rates. The pressure-time profiles show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of blast waves and have relevant durations. The modular design includes shock tube diameters of 27 mm and 41 mm, and a selection of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 920 kPa can be produced by selection of the driver section diameter and placement of the test sample. Characterization studies of several driver/driven section combinations showed consistent results, with peak pressures having 0.8 - 6.9 percent uncertainty in the mean. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current air-driven shock tubes. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven...

  10. Pre-supernova outbursts via wave heating in massive stars - I. Red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim

    2017-09-01

    Early observations of supernovae (SNe) indicate that enhanced mass-loss and pre-SN outbursts may occur in progenitors of many types of SNe. We investigate the role of energy transport via waves driven by vigorous convection during late-stage nuclear burning of otherwise typical 15 M⊙ red supergiant SN progenitors. Using mesa stellar evolution models including 1D hydrodynamics, we find that waves carry ∼107 L⊙ of power from the core to the envelope during core neon/oxygen burning in the final years before core collapse. The waves damp via shocks and radiative diffusion at the base of the hydrogen envelope, which heats up fast enough to launch a pressure wave into the overlying envelope that steepens into a weak shock near the stellar surface, causing a mild stellar outburst and ejecting a small (≲1 M⊙) amount of mass at low speed (≲50 km s-1) roughly one year before the SN. The wave heating inflates the stellar envelope but does not completely unbind it, producing a non-hydrostatic pre-SN envelope density structure different from prior expectations. In our models, wave heating is unlikely to lead to luminous Type IIn SNe, but it may contribute to flash-ionized SNe and some of the diversity seen in II-P/II-L SNe.

  11. The Role of Waves in the Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossan, Sarah; Fuller, Jim; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    The core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion mechanism is not well understood. For garden variety CCSNe, the favored explosion scenario is delayed revival of the stalled shock powered by neutrino-driven convection. Despite huge computational advances, many simulations must use parameterized `light-bulb' models for neutrino heating or mask out inner regions of the proto-neutron star (PNS) for computational efficiency. These approximations can fail to capture hydrodynamical processes in the PNS core where nearly all the binding energy resides, and from which much of the explosion energy may originate. We show that gravity waves excited by core PNS convection may represent a significant heating source for the post-shock region. Using 1D simulations, we calculate the wave heating rate in the post-shock region out to one second after core bounce, showing that wave heating rates in excess of 1051 erg/s may persist for several hundreds of milliseconds, even after neutrino heating rates have decreased. Waves excited by PNS convection may therefore significantly contribute to shock revival and, subsequently, a successful and energetic explosion. We discuss how simulations can miss the effect of waves, and how future simulations can more accurately quantify wave heating rates.

  12. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, C1510, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  13. Experimental approach to shape field relevant blast wave profiles in compressed gas-driven shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind eSundaramurthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Detonation of a high explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects even at farther distances, which is termed as primary blast injury, which is the theme of this work. The shock-blast profile is characterized with blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs. These parameters in turn are a function of field factors, such as the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (Chandra et al., 2011;Sundaramurthy et al., 2012;Skotak et al., 2013, the profile not only determines the survival of the animal but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, exact replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. 40 experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68 to 1209.68 mm, measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium. The relationships between SAPs and the resulting shock-blast profiles are characterized. Finally, shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared with the profiles obtained

  14. Nonlinear propagation of high-frequency energy from blast waves as it pertains to bat hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubeau, Alexandra

    Close exposure to blast noise from military weapons training can adversely affect the hearing of both humans and wildlife. One concern is the effect of high-frequency noise from Army weapons training on the hearing of endangered bats. Blast wave propagation measurements were conducted to investigate nonlinear effects on the development of blast waveforms as they propagate from the source. Measurements were made at ranges of 25, 50, and 100 m from the blast. Particular emphasis was placed on observation of rise time variation with distance. Resolving the fine shock structure of blast waves requires robust transducers with high-frequency capability beyond 100 kHz, hence the limitations of traditional microphones and the effect of microphone orientation were investigated. Measurements were made with a wide-bandwidth capacitor microphone for comparison with conventional 3.175-mm (⅛-in.) microphones with and without baffles. The 3.175-mm microphone oriented at 90° to the propagation direction did not have sufficient high-frequency response to capture the actual rise times at a range of 50 m. Microphone baffles eliminate diffraction artifacts on the rise portion of the measured waveform and therefore allow for a more accurate measurement of the blast rise time. The wide-band microphone has an extended high-frequency response and can resolve shorter rise times than conventional microphones. For a source of 0.57 kg (1.25 lb) of C-4 plastic explosive, it was observed that nonlinear effects steepened the waveform, thereby decreasing the shock rise time, from 25 to 50 m. At 100m, the rise times had increased slightly. For comparison to the measured blast waveforms, several models of nonlinear propagation are applied to the problem of finite-amplitude blast wave propagation. Shock front models, such as the Johnson and Hammerton model, and full-waveform marching algorithms, such as the Anderson model, are investigated and compared to experimental results. The models

  15. Frequency-Dependent Attenuation of Blasting Vibration Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junru; Lu, Wenbo; Yan, Peng; Chen, Ming; Wang, Gaohui

    2016-10-01

    The dominant frequency, in addition to the peak particle velocity, is a critical factor for assessing adverse effects of the blasting vibration on surrounding structures; however, it has not been fully considered in blasting design. Therefore, the dominant frequency-dependent attenuation mechanism of blast-induced vibration is investigated in the present research. Starting with blasting vibration induced by a spherical charge propagating in an infinite viscoelastic medium, a modified expression of the vibration amplitude spectrum was derived to reveal the frequency dependency of attenuation. Then, ground vibration induced by more complex and more commonly used cylindrical charge that propagates in a semi-infinite viscoelastic medium was analyzed by numerical simulation. Results demonstrate that the absorptive property of the medium results in the frequency attenuation versus distance, whereas a rapid drop or fluctuation occurs during the attenuation of ground vibration. Fluctuation usually appears at moderate to far field, and the dominant frequency generally decreases to half the original value when rapid drop occurs. The decay rate discrepancy between different frequency components and the multimodal structure of vibration spectrum lead to the unsmooth frequency-dependent attenuation. The above research is verified by two field experiments. Furthermore, according to frequency-based vibration standards, frequency drop and fluctuation should be considered when evaluating blast safety. An optimized piecewise assessment is proposed for more accurate evaluation: With the frequency drop point as the breakpoint, the assessment is divided into two independent sections along the propagating path.

  16. The Role of Waves in the Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossan, Sarah; Fuller, Jim; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    The core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion mechanism is not well understood. For garden variety CCSNe, the favored scenario for explosion is delayed revival of the stalled shock powered by neutrino-driven convection. Despite tremendous computational advances, many simulations must use parameterized ‘light-bulb’ models for neutrino heating or mask out inner regions of the proto-neutron star (PNS) for computational efficiency. These approximations can fail to capture hydrodynamical processes in the core of the PNS where nearly all the binding energy resides, and from which much of the explosion energy may originate. We show that gravity (buoyancy) waves excited by core PNS convection (within the central 20 km of the PNS) may represent a significant heating source for the post-shock region. The gravity waves propagate out of the PNS and transform into acoustic waves before depositing their energy at the shock, converting a small fraction of the PNS binding energy into explosion energy. Using 1D simulations, we calculate the wave heating rate in the post-shock region out to one second after core bounce, showing that wave heating rates in excess of 1051 erg/s may persist for several hundreds of milliseconds, even after neutrino heating rates have declined to smaller values. Waves excited by PNS convection may therefore significantly contribute to shock revival and, subsequently, a successful and energetic explosion. We discuss how simulations can miss the effect of waves (or have not recognized them), and how future simulations can more accurately quantify wave heating rates.

  17. Computational modeling of blast wave interaction with a human body and assessment of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X. G.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gupta, R. K.

    2017-07-01

    The modeling of human body biomechanics resulting from blast exposure poses great challenges because of the complex geometry and the substantial material heterogeneity. We developed a detailed human body finite element model representing both the geometry and the materials realistically. The model includes the detailed head (face, skull, brain and spinal cord), the neck, the skeleton, air cavities (lungs) and the tissues. Hence, it can be used to properly model the stress wave propagation in the human body subjected to blast loading. The blast loading on the human was generated from a simulated C4 explosion. We used the highly scalable solvers in the multi-physics code CoBi for both the blast simulation and the human body biomechanics. The meshes generated for these simulations are of good quality so that relatively large time-step sizes can be used without resorting to artificial time scaling treatments. The coupled gas dynamics and biomechanics solutions were validated against the shock tube test data. The human body models were used to conduct parametric simulations to find the biomechanical response and the brain injury mechanism due to blasts impacting the human body. Under the same blast loading condition, we showed the importance of inclusion of the whole body.

  18. Numerical investigation of the effects of shock tube geometry on the propagation of an ideal blast wave profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. D.; Hu, Z. M.; Jiang, Z. L.

    2017-03-01

    Bio-shock tubes (BSTs) can approximately simulate the typical blast waves produced by nuclear or chemical charge explosions for use in biological damage studies. The profile of an ideal blast wave in air is characterized by the overpressure, the negative pressure, and the positive pressure duration, which are determined by the geometric configurations of BSTs. Numerical experiments are carried out using the Eulerian equations by the dispersion-controlled dissipative scheme to investigate the effect of different structural components on ideal blast waveforms. The results show that cylindrical and conical frustum driver sections with an appropriate length can produce typical blast wave profiles, but a flattened peak pressure may appear when using a tube of a longer length. Neither a double-expansion tube nor a shrinkage tube set in BSTs is practical for the production of an ideal blast waveform. In addition, negative pressure recovery will occur, exceeding the ambient pressure with an increase in pressure in the vacuum section.

  19. Numerical investigation of the effects of shock tube geometry on the propagation of an ideal blast wave profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. D.; Hu, Z. M.; Jiang, Z. L.

    2017-09-01

    Bio-shock tubes (BSTs) can approximately simulate the typical blast waves produced by nuclear or chemical charge explosions for use in biological damage studies. The profile of an ideal blast wave in air is characterized by the overpressure, the negative pressure, and the positive pressure duration, which are determined by the geometric configurations of BSTs. Numerical experiments are carried out using the Eulerian equations by the dispersion-controlled dissipative scheme to investigate the effect of different structural components on ideal blast waveforms. The results show that cylindrical and conical frustum driver sections with an appropriate length can produce typical blast wave profiles, but a flattened peak pressure may appear when using a tube of a longer length. Neither a double-expansion tube nor a shrinkage tube set in BSTs is practical for the production of an ideal blast waveform. In addition, negative pressure recovery will occur, exceeding the ambient pressure with an increase in pressure in the vacuum section.

  20. Effects of blast wave to main steam piping under high energy line break condition by TNT model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Eung Seok; Chang, Yoon Suk [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study is to examine effect of the blast wave according to pipe break position through FE (Finite Element) analyses. If HELB (High Energy Line Break) accident occurs in nuclear power plants, not only environmental effect such as release of radioactive material but also secondary structural defects should be considered. Sudden pipe rupture causes ejection of high temperature and pressure fluid, which acts as a blast wave around the break location. The blast wave caused by the HELB has a possibility to induce structural defects around the components such as safe-related injection pipes and other structures.

  1. On the application of locally adaptive unstructured grids to the problems of blast wave propagation and attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, E.V.; Saito, T.; Takayama, K. [Tohoku Univ., Inst. of Fluid Science, Shock Wave Research Center, Sendai (Japan)]. E-mail: timo@ceres.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp; Voinovich, P.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Supercomputer Center at the A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Galyukov. A.O. [Soft-Impact Ltd., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tahir, R.B.; Molder, S. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The problem of blast wave propagation and attenuation have always been of considerable basic and practical interest. Due to diffraction effects, reflections and possible focusing, blast wave intensity may vary considerably even at the same distance from the explosion center. From the computational point of view, these problems deal typically with computational domains of complex geometry, often requiring the resolution of gas dynamics phenomena having characteristic scales much smaller than the scale of a computational domain. This paper presents experiences and capabilities in applying the above techniques to various practical problems involving blast wave propagation and attenuation.

  2. An Analytic Solution to the Propagation of Cylindrical Blast Waves in a Radiative Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G Verma

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have obtained a set of non-similarity in closed forms for the propagation of a cylindrical blast wave in a radiative gas. An explosion in a gas of constant density and pressure has been considered by assuming the existence of an initial uniform magnetic field in the axial direction. The disturbance is supposed to be headed by a shock surface of variable strength and the total energy of the wave varies with time.

  3. Study of blast wave interactions with structures using a phase-stepped double reference beam holographic interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, S.M.; Absil, L.H.J.; Bruinsma, A.J.A.; Braat, J.J.M.; Brug, H. van

    1999-01-01

    An optical study of blast wave propagation and interaction with multiple structures is presented, as well as a method for obtaining quantitative information on the pressure distribution from a number of phase-stepped images. The blast load distribution on buildings is studied by scaling down the bui

  4. Morphological evidence for azimuthal variations of the cosmic ray ion acceleration at the blast wave of SN 1006

    CERN Document Server

    Cassam-Chenai, Gamil; Reynoso, Estela M; Badenes, Carles; Moffett, David

    2008-01-01

    Using radio, X-ray and optical observations, we present evidence for morphological changes due to efficient cosmic ray ion acceleration in the structure of the southeastern region of the supernova remnant SN 1006. SN 1006 has an apparent bipolar morphology in both the radio and high-energy X-ray synchrotron emission. In the optical, the shock front is clearly traced by a filament of Balmer emission in the southeast. This optical emission enables us to trace the location of the blast wave (BW) even in places where the synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons is either absent or too weak to detect. The contact discontinuity (CD) is traced using images in the low-energy X-rays (oxygen band) which we argue reveals the distribution of shocked ejecta. We interpret the azimuthal variations of the ratio of radii between the BW and CD plus the X-ray and radio synchrotron emission at the BW using CR-modified hydrodynamic models. We assumed different azimuthal profiles for the injection rate of particles into th...

  5. Inferring the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, Jade; Logue, Joshua; Heng, Ik Siong

    2016-01-01

    A detection of a core-collapse supernova (CCSN) gravitational-wave (GW) signal with an Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector network may allow us to measure astrophysical parameters of the dying massive star. GWs are emitted from deep inside the core and, as such, they are direct probes of the CCSN explosion mechanism. In this study we show how we can determine the CCSN explosion mechanism from a GW supernova detection using a combination of principal component analysis and Bayesian model selection. We use simulations of GW signals from CCSN exploding via neutrino-driven convection and rapidly-rotating core collapse. Previous studies have shown that the explosion mechanism can be determined using one LIGO detector and simulated Gaussian noise. As real GW detector noise is both non-stationary and non-Gaussian we use real detector noise from a network of detectors with a sensitivity altered to match the advanced detectors design sensitivity. For the first time we carry out a careful selection of the number of princi...

  6. Inferring the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jade; Gossan, Sarah E.; Logue, Joshua; Heng, Ik Siong

    2016-12-01

    A detection of a core-collapse supernova (CCSN) gravitational-wave (GW) signal with an Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector network may allow us to measure astrophysical parameters of the dying massive star. GWs are emitted from deep inside the core, and, as such, they are direct probes of the CCSN explosion mechanism. In this study, we show how we can determine the CCSN explosion mechanism from a GW supernova detection using a combination of principal component analysis and Bayesian model selection. We use simulations of GW signals from CCSN exploding via neutrino-driven convection and rapidly rotating core collapse. Previous studies have shown that the explosion mechanism can be determined using one LIGO detector and simulated Gaussian noise. As real GW detector noise is both nonstationary and non-Gaussian, we use real detector noise from a network of detectors with a sensitivity altered to match the advanced detectors design sensitivity. For the first time, we carry out a careful selection of the number of principal components to enhance our model selection capabilities. We show that with an advanced detector network we can determine if the CCSN explosion mechanism is driven by neutrino convection for sources in our Galaxy and rapidly-rotating core collapse for sources out to the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  7. Directed searches for broadband extended gravitational-wave emission in nearby energetic core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Van Putten, Maurice H P M

    2016-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are factories of neutron stars and stellar mass black holes. Type Ib/c supernovae stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and their branching ratio of about 1\\% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein accretion of fall-back matter down to the Inner Most Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) offers a window to {\\em broadband extended gravitational-wave emission} (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time-frequency space by Time Sliced Matched Filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse grained searches followed by high resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br $(z=0.002339)$ using a bank of up to 64 thousand templates of one second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events w...

  8. Blast Wave Dynamics at the Cornea as a Function of Eye Protection Form and Fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven T; Harding, Thomas H; Statz, J Keegan; Martin, John S

    2017-03-01

    A shock tube and anthropomorphic headforms were used to investigate eye protection form and fit using eyewear on the Authorized Protective Eyewear List in primary ocular blast trauma experiments. Time pressure recordings were obtained from highly linear pressure sensors mounted at the cornea of instrumented headforms of different sizes. A custom shock tube produced highly reliable shock waves and pressure recordings were collected as a function of shock wave orientation and protective eyewear. Eyewear protection coefficients were calculated as a function of a new metric of eyewear fit. In general, better protection was correlated with smaller gaps between the eyewear and face. For oblique angles, most spectacles actually potentiated the blast wave by creating higher peak pressures at the cornea. Installing foam around the perimeter of the spectacle lens to close the gap between the lens and face resulted in significantly lower pressure at the cornea. In conclusion, current eye protection, which was designed to reduce secondary and tertiary blast injuries, provides insufficient protection against primary blast injury. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Shock Tube Design for High Intensity Blast Waves for Laboratory Testing of Armor and Combat Materiel

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elijah; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shock tubes create simulated blast waves which can be directed and measured to study blast wave effects under laboratory conditions. It is desirable to increase available peak pressure from ~1 MPa to ~5 MPa to simulate closer blast sources and facilitate development and testing of personal and vehicle armors. Three methods were investigated to increase peak simulated blast pressure produced by an oxy-acetylene driven shock tube while maintaining suitability for laboratory studies. The first method is the addition of a Shchelkin spiral priming section which works by increasing the turbulent flow of the deflagration wave, thus increasing its speed and pressure. This approach increased the average peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 5.33 MPa while maintaining a relevant pressure-time curve (Friedlander waveform). The second method is a bottleneck between the driving and driven sections. Coupling a 79 mm diameter driving section to a 53 mm driven section increased the peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 2.25 MPa. Using a 1...

  10. Prospects for Gravitational Wave Searches for Core-Collapse Supernovae within the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kiranjyot; Branchesi, Marica; Zanolin, Michele; Szczepanczyk, Marek; LIGO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present an updated estimate of the intrinsic (vs observed) core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) rate within 20 Mpc from Earth, which is roughly the largest distance of interest for the searches for gravitational waves (GWs) from CCSNe with laser interferometers. Recognizing that CCSN galaxy host models are morphologically dependent, we separate the galaxies within 20 Mpc into the local field and Virgo cluster and account for biases, such as galactic plane absorption. The improved estimation of the CCSNe rate within 20 Mpc is 430 +/- 21 CCSNe Century -1 Mpc-1. We also discuss the Feldman-Cousins and GRB methodologies for detecting CCSNe when there are multiple CCSNe optical triggers, as predicted for advanced LIGO data science runs. Illustrative examples of the sensitivity improvement with respect to the single-event current approaches are provided for rapidly rotating semi-analytical models of GW emissions and real (publicly released) LIGO data.

  11. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falta, David; Fisher, Robert; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-05-01

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore—like SNe II—potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation.

  12. Coherent Network Analysis of Gravitational Waves from Three-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2015-01-01

    Using predictions from three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we present a coherent network analysis to detection, reconstruction, and the source localization of the gravitational-wave (GW) signals. By combining with the GW spectrogram analysis, we show that several important hydrodynamics features imprinted in the original waveforms persist in the waveforms of the reconstructed signals. The characteristic excess in the GW spectrograms originates not only from rotating core-collapse and bounce, the subsequent ring down of the proto-neutron star (PNS) as previously identified, but also from the formation of magnetohydrodynamics jets and non-axisymmetric instabilities in the vicinity of the PNS. Regarding the GW signals emitted near at the rotating core bounce, the horizon distance, which we set by a SNR exceeding 8, extends up to $\\sim$ 18 kpc for the most rapidly rotating 3D model among the employed waveform libraries. Following the rotating core bounce, the domi...

  13. Structure of a strong supernova shock wave and rapid electron acceleration confined in its transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Shimada, Nobue; Amano, Takanobu; 10.1063/1.3322828

    2010-01-01

    A new rapid energization process within a supernova shock transition region (STR) is reported by utilizing numerical simulation. Although the scale of a STR as a main dissipation region is only several hundreds of thousands km, several interesting structures are found relating to generation of a root of the energetic particles. The nonlinear evolution of plasma instabilities lead to a dynamical change in the ion phase space distribution which associates with change of the field properties. As a result, different types of large-amplitude field structures appear. One is the leading wave packet and another is a series of magnetic solitary humps. Each field structure has a microscopic scale (~ the ion inertia length). Through the multiple nonlinear scattering between these large-amplitude field structures, electrons are accelerated directly. Within a STR, quick thermalization realizes energy equipartition between the ion and electron, hot electrons play an important role in keeping these large-amplitude field str...

  14. Indoor propagation and assessment of blast waves from weapons using the alternative image theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Jung, S.; Song, K. H.

    2016-03-01

    Blast waves generated from the muzzles of various weapons might have significant effects on the human body, and these effects are recognized as being more severe when weapons are fired indoors. The risk can be assessed by various criteria, such as waveform, exposed energy, and model-based types. This study introduces a prediction model of blast wave propagation for estimating waveform parameters related to damage risk assessment. To simulate indoor multiple reflections in a simple way, the model is based on the alternative image theory and discrete wavefront method. The alternative theory is a kind of modified image theory, but it uses the image space concept from a receiver's perspective, so that it shows improved efficiency for indoor problems. Further, the discrete wavefront method interprets wave propagation as the forward movement of a finite number of wavefronts. Even though the predicted results show slight differences from the measured data, the locations of significant shock waves indicate a high degree of correlation between them. Since the disagreement results not from the proposed techniques but from the assumptions used, it is concluded that the model is appropriate for analysis of blast wave propagation in interior spaces.

  15. The Impact of Bars and Spiral Density Waves on the Relative Frequencies of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramyan, L. S.; Hakobyan, A. A.; Petrosian, A. R.; Barkhudaryan, L. V.; Karapetyan, A. G.; Adibekyan, V.; Turatto, M.

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of the analysis of the impact of bars and spiral density waves on the relative frequencies of supernovae (SNe). We find that for early -type Grand-Design (GD) and non-Grand-Design (NGD) galaxies, the NIa/NCC ratios, i.e., one of the tracers of specific star formation rate (sSFR), are not significantly different between barred and unbarred hosts. At the same time, for both barred and unbarred early-type galaxies, the NIa /NCC ratio in NGD hosts is significantly higher than that in GD, and for late-type galaxies no any significant difference exists between the N Ia/NCC ratios. Thus, in contrast to bars, the spiral density waves significantly enhance the relative frequencies of SNe in early-type GD galaxies, while not in late-type hosts. This result is actual also for galaxies when barred and unbarred categories are separated. Hence, the sSFR might be enhanced by density waves in early-type galaxies only.

  16. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Santamaria, L.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors.

  17. A First Targeted Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts from Core-Collapse Supernovae in Data of First-Generation Laser Interferometer Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; 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Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with a set of two core-collapse supernovae observed between 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and V...

  18. Five Years of Mid-Infrared Evolution of the Remnant of SN 1987A: The Encounter Between the Blast Wave and the Dusty Equatorial Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Bouchet, Patrice; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Danziger, I. John; De Buizer, James M.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Park, Sangwook; Polomski, Elisha F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have used the Spitzer satellite to monitor the laid-IR evolution of SN 1987A over a 5 year period spanning the epochs between days 6000 and 8000 since the explosion. The supernova (SN) has evolved into a supernova remnant (SNR) and its radiative output, is dominated by the interaction of the SN blast wave with the pre-existing equatorial ring (ER). The mid-IR spectrum is dominated by emission from approximately 180 K silicate dust, collisionally-heated by the hot X-ray emitting gas with a temperature and density of 5 x 10(exp 6) K and approximately 3 x 10(exp 4) per cubic centimeter, respectively. The mass of the radiating dust is approximately 1.2 x 10(exp -6) solar mass on day 7554, and scales linearly with IR flux. Comparison of the IR data with the soft X-ray flux derived from Chandra observations shows that the IR-to-X-ray flux ratio, IRX, is roughly constant with a value of 2.5. Gas-grain collisions therefore dominate the cooling of the shocked gas. The constancy of IRX is most consistent with the scenario that very little grain processing or gas cooling have occurred throughout this epoch. The shape of the dust spectrum remained unchanged during the observations while the total flux increased by a factor of approximately 5 with a time dependence of t(sup '0.87 plus or minus 0.20), t' being the time since the first encounter between the blast wave and the ER. These observations are consistent with the transitioning of the blast wave from free expansion to a Sedov phase as it propagates into the main body of the ER, as also suggested by X-ray observations. The constant spectral shape of they IR, emission provides strong constraints on the density and temperature of the shocked gas in which the interaction takes place. The IR spectra also suggest the presence of a secondary population of very small, hot (T greater than or equal to 350 K), featureless dust. If these grains spatially coexists with the silicates, then they must have shorter lifetimes. The data

  19. Shock tube design for high intensity blast waves for laboratory testing of armor and combat materiel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Courtney

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shock tubes create simulated blast waves which can be directed and measured to study blast wave effects under laboratory conditions. It is desirable to increase available peak pressure from ∼1 MPa to ∼5 MPa to simulate closer blast sources and facilitate development and testing of personal and vehicle armors. Three methods are experimentally investigated to increase peak simulated blast pressure produced by an oxy-acetylene driven shock tube while maintaining suitability for laboratory studies. The first method is the addition of a Shchelkin spiral priming section which supports a deflagration to detonation transition. This approach increases the average peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 5.33 MPa while maintaining a relevant pressure-time curve (near Friedlander waveform. The second method is a bottleneck between the driving and driven sections. Coupling a 79 mm diameter driving section to a 53 mm driven section increases the peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 2.25 MPa. A 103 mm driving section is used to increase peak pressure to 2.64 MPa. The third method, adding solid fuel to the driving section with the oxy-acetylene, results in a peak pressure increasing to 1.70 MPa.

  20. Shock tube design for high intensity blast waves for laboratory testing of armor and combat materiel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elijah COURTNEY; Amy COURTNEY; Michael COURTNEY

    2014-01-01

    Shock tubes create simulated blast waves which can be directed and measured to study blast wave effects under laboratory conditions. It is desirable to increase available peak pressure from w1 MPa to w5 MPa to simulate closer blast sources and facilitate development and testing of personal and vehicle armors. Three methods are experimentally investigated to increase peak simulated blast pressure produced by an oxy-acetylene driven shock tube while maintaining suitability for laboratory studies. The first method is the addition of a Shchelkin spiral prim-ing section which supports a deflagration to detonation transition. This approach increases the average peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 5.33 MPa while maintaining a relevant pressure-time curve (near Friedlander waveform). The second method is a bottleneck between the driving and driven sections. Coupling a 79 mm diameter driving section to a 53 mm driven section increases the peak pressure from 1.17 MPa to 2.25 MPa. A 103 mm driving section is used to increase peak pressure to 2.64 MPa. The third method, adding solid fuel to the driving section with the oxy-acetylene, results in a peak pressure increasing to 1.70 MPa.

  1. Impulsive dispersion of a granular layer by a weak blast wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, V.; Saurel, R.; Jourdan, G.; Houas, L.

    2017-03-01

    The dispersion of particles by blast or shock waves induces the formation of coherent structures taking the shape of particle jets. In the present study, a blast wave, issued from an open shock tube, is generated at the center of a granular ring initially confined in a Hele-Shaw cell. With the present experimental setup, solid particle jet formation is clearly observed in a quasi-two-dimensional configuration. In all instances, the jets are initially generated inside the particle ring and thereafter expelled outward. Furthermore, thanks to the two-dimensional experimental configuration, a general study of the main parameters involved in these types of flows can be performed. Among them, the particle diameter, the density of the particles, the initial size of the ring, the shape of the overpressure generated and the surface friction of the Hele-Shaw cell are investigated. Empirical relationships are deduced from experimental results.

  2. GRB Afterglow Blast Wave Encountering Sudden Circumburst Density Change Produces No Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Gat, Ilana; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called ram, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreadin...

  3. No flares from GRB afterglow blast waves encountering sudden circumburst density change

    CERN Document Server

    Gat, Ilana; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreadin...

  4. Simulation of the reflected blast wave from a C-4 charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W. Michael; Kuhl, Allen L.; Tringe, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 μm per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 7 ranges (GR = 0, 5.08, 10.16, 15.24, 20.32, 25.4, and 30.48 cm) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 5 cm), which were dominated by jetting effects.

  5. Kinematics of ICMEs/shocks: blast wave reconstruction using type II emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Corona-Romero, P; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E; de-la-Luz, V; Mejia-Ambriz, J C

    2015-01-01

    We present a physical methodology to reconstruct the trajectory of interplanetary shocks using type II radio emission data. This technique calculates the shock trajectory assuming that the disturbance propagates as a blast wave in the interplanetary medium. We applied this Blast Wave Reconstruction (BWR) technique to analyze eight fast Earth-directed ICMEs/shocks associated with type II emissions. The technique deduces a shock trajectory that reproduces the type II frequency drifts, and calculates shock onset speed, shock transit time and shock speed at 1~AU. There were good agreements comparing the BWR results with the type II spectra, with data from coronagraph images, {\\it in situ} measurements, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations. Perturbations on the type II data affect the accuracy of the BWR technique. This methodology could be applied to track interplanetary shocks causing TII emissions in real-time, to predict the shock arrival time and shock speed at 1~AU.

  6. A viscous blast-wave model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, Amaresh

    2015-01-01

    Using a viscosity-based survival scale for geometrical perturbations formed in the early stages of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, we model the radial flow velocity during freeze-out. Subsequently, we employ the Cooper-Frye freeze-out prescription, with first-order viscous corrections to the distribution function, to obtain the transverse momentum distribution of particle yields and flow harmonics. For initial eccentricities, we use the results of Monte Carlo Glauber model. We fix the blast-wave model parameters by fitting the transverse momentum spectra of identified particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and demonstrate that this leads to a fairly good agreement with transverse momentum distribution of elliptic and triangular flow for various centralities. Within this viscous blast-wave model, we estimate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s\\simeq 0.24$ at the LHC.

  7. Beam energy dependence of Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii from a blast-wave model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S; Chen, J H; Zhong, C

    2016-01-01

    Beam energy dependence of correlation lengths (Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii) is calculated by using a blast-wave model and the results are comparable with those from RHIC-STAR beam energy scan data as well as the LHC-ALICE measurements. The parameters for the blast-wave model as a function of beam energy are configured by fitting Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii at each energy point. Transverse momentum dependence of Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii are presented with the extracted parameters for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 200 GeV and 2.76 TeV. From the results it can be found that particle emission duration can not be ignored while calculating Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii with the same parameters. And tuning kinetic freeze-out temperature in a range will result in system lifetime changing in reverse direction as that in RHIC-STAR measurements.

  8. Observational upper limits on the gravitational wave production of core collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xing-Jiang; Howell, E.; Blair, D.

    2010-11-01

    The upper limit on the energy density of a stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background obtained from the 2-yr science run (S5) of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is used to constrain the average GW production of core collapse supernovae (ccSNe). We assume that the ccSNe rate tracks the star formation history of the Universe and show that the stochastic background energy density depends only weakly on the assumed average source spectrum. Using the ccSNe rate for z <= 10, we scale the generic source spectrum to obtain an observation-based upper limit on the average GW emission. We show that the mean energy emitted in GWs can be constrained within < (0.49-1.98)Msolarc2 depending on the average source spectrum. While these results are higher than the total available gravitational energy in a core collapse event, second- and third-generation GW detectors will enable tighter constraints to be set on the GW emission from such systems.

  9. Observational upper limits on the gravitational wave production of core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xing-Jiang; Blair, David

    2010-01-01

    The upper limit on the energy density of a stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background obtained from the two-year science run (S5) of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) is used to constrain the average GW production of core collapse supernovae (ccSNe). We assume that the ccSNe rate tracks the star formation history of the universe and show that the stochastic background energy density depends only weakly on the assumed average source spectrum. Using the ccSNe rate for $z\\leq10$, we scale the generic source spectrum to obtain an observation-based upper limit on the average GW emission. We show that the mean GW production can be constrained within $< (0.49-1.98)\\hspace{1mm} M_{\\odot} c^{2}$ depending on the average source spectrum. While these results are higher than the available energy for explosion in a core collapse event, second and third generation GW detectors will enable tighter constraints to be set on the GW emission from such systems. As experimental limits become str...

  10. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Falta, David; Khanna, Gaurav

    2010-01-01

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore -- like SNe II -- potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We establish an upper-bound GW amplitude and expected frequency range based upon the energetics and nucleosynthetic yields of SNe Ia. We perform the first detailed calculations of the gravitationally-confined detonation (GCD) mechanism within the single-degenerate channel of SNe Ia. The GCD mechanism predicts a strongly-polarized GW burst from the SD channel of SNe Ia in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning, including the Big Bang Observer (BBO), and the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (DECIGO), as well as earthbound instruments, including the Einstein Telescope (ET), may be abl...

  11. Quick Estimates of Peak Overpressure from Two Simultaneous Blast Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    C. S. Knauth, Nuclear Blast Standard (1 kT), Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Krtland A-r Force Base, New Mexico , AFWL-TR-73-55, (Revised) 1975. 6 C. E...Needham, Private Communication, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico , November 1977. 36i If 1I * I I| ~~’.0 DISTRIBUTION...for Ops. & Plans Defense Communications Agency ATTN: Dep. Dir. for Nuc. Chem. Matters ATTN: Code 930 ATTN: MOCA -ADL ATTN: CCTC/C672, F. Moore Deputy

  12. Water Temperature and Concentration Measurements Within the Expanding Blast Wave of a High Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    housing was made of 1018 steel , and the gauge roof was extended to shield the opto- mechanical components from the primary blast wave. The input fiber...regions of each image indicate the steel frame and support crossbars of the gauge. This set of images provides a sense of the speed with which the shock was...University Press) [3] Peuker J M, Lynch P, Krier H and Glumac N 2009 Optical depth measurements of fireballs from aluminized high explosives Opt

  13. Dynamics and Afterglow Light Curves of GRB Blast Waves with a Long-lived Reverse Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Uhm, Z Lucas; Hascoet, Romain; Daigne, Frederic; Mochkovitch, Robert; Park, Il H

    2012-01-01

    We perform a detailed study on the dynamics of a relativistic blast wave with the presence of a long-lived reverse shock (RS). Although a short-lived RS has been widely considered, the RS is believed to be long-lived as a consequence of a stratification expected on the ejecta Lorentz factors. The existence of a long-lived RS makes the forward shock (FS) dynamics to deviate from a self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. Employing the "mechanical model" that correctly incorporates the energy conservation for such blast waves with a long-lived RS, we present an accurate solution for both the FS and RS dynamics. We conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. Adopting a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we keep track of an adiabatic evolution of numerous shells between the FS and RS. An evolution of the electron spectrum is also followed individually for every shell. We then find the FS and RS light curves by integrating over the entire FS and RS shocked regions, respectively. In particul...

  14. A parametric approach to shape field-relevant blast wave profiles in compressed-gas-driven shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1-3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68-1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared

  15. Effects of Initial Conditions on Compressible Mixing in Supernova-Relevant Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Greenough, J

    2004-04-30

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this paper, we summarize recent results from our computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. For planar multimode systems, compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. Initial conditions predicted by some recent stellar calculations are incompatible with self-similarity.

  16. Velocities and Displacements of Shrapnel and a Shock Wave during Blast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO De-hui; TIAN Da-zhan; XU Jin-yu; ZHANG Hai-rong

    2007-01-01

    It is important to minimize the destruction of defense works when blasted. In our opinion,information in the available literature is very deficient. We now present our research results on better and simpler formulas for calculating the velocities and displacements of shrapnel and a shock wave;these formulas are indispensable for understanding the destruction of blast. Formulas now available in China are too complicated. In this paper, we derive Equation (13) as the formula for calculating the velocity of shrapnel and Equation (18) as that for calculating the velocity of a shock wave. We used the test data of Denver Research Institute, as reported in Reference 4, as numerical example and found that our Equations (13) and (18) give calculated results that agree well with their test data in two respects: (1) both test data and our calculations show that at first a shock wave is ahead of shrapnel,then their displacements are equal, and finally shrapnel is ahead of the shock wave; (2) when the displacements of shrapnel and shock wave are equal, the time is 0.34 s according to test data and 0.31 s according to our calculations.

  17. Time-of-flight delay between oscillating neutrinos and gravitational waves from supernovae and the neutrino mass problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]|[Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Cosmologia e Fisica Experimental de Altas Energias]. E-mail: hermanjc@cbpf.br

    2001-04-01

    Neutrino oscillations during core bounce of a supernova collapse may induce detectable gravitational-wave bursts by the time they are trapped in the core. For large-scale distances the flavor changing neutrinos get delayed on its trip to earth while the gravitational waves they emit do not. Since the oscillation mechanism sets up the offset for both emissions, this fact yields in a time-of-flight delay between both the radiations that, whenever measured, could provide an inedit estimative of the absolute scale of neutrino masses. (author)

  18. Time-of-flight delay between oscillating neutrinos and gravitational waves from supernovae and the neutrino mass problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]|[Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Cosmologia e Fisica Experimental de Altas Energias]. E-mail: hermanjc@cbpf.br

    2001-04-01

    Neutrino oscillations during core bounce of a supernova collapse may induce detectable gravitational-wave bursts by the time they are trapped in the core. For large-scale distances the flavor changing neutrinos get delayed on its trip to earth while the gravitational waves they emit do not. Since the oscillation mechanism sets up the offset for both emissions, this fact yields in a time-of-flight delay between both the radiations that, whenever measured, could provide an inedit estimative of the absolute scale of neutrino masses. (author)

  19. Directed Searches for Broadband Extended Gravitational Wave Emission in Nearby Energetic Core-collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are factories of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. SNe Ib/c stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and they have a branching ratio of about 1% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein the accretion of fall-back matter down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) offers a window into broadband extended gravitational wave emission (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time-frequency space by time-sliced matched filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse-grained searches followed by high-resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse-grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br (z = 0.002339) using a bank of up to 64,000 templates of one-second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events with signal-to-noise ratios > 6 from the LIGO L1 and H1 detectors reduces the total to a few events of interest. Lacking any further properties reflecting a common excitation by broadband gravitational radiation, we disregarded these as spurious. This new pipeline may be used to systematically search for long-duration chirps in nearby CC-SNe from robotic optical transient surveys using embarrassingly parallel computing.

  20. Gravitational waves within the magnetar model of superluminous supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Wynn C G

    2016-01-01

    The light curve of many supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be explained by a sustained injection of extra energy from its possible central engine, a rapidly rotating strongly magnetic neutron star (i.e., magnetar). The magnetic dipole radiation power that the magnetar supplies comes at the expense of the star's rotational energy. However radiation by gravitational waves (GWs) can be more efficient than magnetic dipole radiation because of its stronger dependence on neutron star spin rate Omega, i.e., Omega^6 (for a static "mountain") or Omega^8 (for a r-mode fluid oscillation) versus Omega^4 for magnetic dipole radiation. Here we use the magnetic field B and initial spin period P_0 inferred from SN and GRB observations to obtain simple constraints on the dimensionless amplitude of the mountain of epsilon 10^-4 (B/10^14 G) (P_0/1 ms) or alpha > 0.01 (B/10^14 G) (P_0/1 ms)^2, light curves are strongly affected, with significant decrease in peak luminosity and increase in time to peak luminosity. ...

  1. Deflagration to detonation transition by amplification of acoustic waves in type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Charignon, Camille

    2013-01-01

    We study a new mechanism for deflagration to detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia), based on the formation of shocks by amplification of sound waves in the steep density gradients of white dwarfs envelopes. Given a large enough jump in density a small pressure and velocity perturbation, produced by the turbulent deflagration, turns into a shock down of the gradient, where it will dissipate and heat up the media. With the right frequency and amplitude the heating can be enough to initiate a detonation, which can propagate backward and up the density gradient. We studied planar and spherical geometry. In the planar case we made a parametric study of the frequency and amplitude. We found it possible to obtain a detonation for perturbations down to Mach number M=0.003. In the spherical case, geometrical damping makes it harder to initiate a detonation, but considering a small He atmosphere (<0.01 Msol) makes it possible again to obtain a detonation down to small perturbation (M=0.002). In ...

  2. A new gravitational-wave signature of SASI activities in non-rotating supernova cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    We present results from fully relativistic three-dimensional core-collapse supernova (CCSN) simulations of a non-rotating 15 M_sun star using three different nuclear equations of state (EoSs). From our simulations covering up to ~350 ms after bounce, we show that the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) differs significantly depending on the stiffness of nuclear EoS. Generally, the SASI activity occurs more vigorously in models with softer EoS. By evaluating the gravitational-wave (GW) emission, we find a new GW signature on top of the previously identified one, in which the typical GW frequency increases with time due to an accumulating accretion to the proto-neutron star (PNS). The newly observed quasi-periodic signal appears in the frequency range from ~100 to 200 Hz and persists for ~150 ms before neutrino-driven convection dominates over the SASI. By analyzing the cycle frequency of the SASI sloshing and spiral modes as well as the mass accretion rate to the emission region, we ...

  3. Pair-Instability Supernovae, Gravity Waves, and Gamma-Ray Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Fryer, C L; Heger, A

    2001-01-01

    Growing theoretical evidence suggests that the first generation of stars may have been quite massive (~100-300 solar masses). If they retain their high mass until death, such stars will, after about 3Myr, make pair-instability supernovae. We consider the complete evolution of two zero-metallicity stars of 250 and 300 solar masses. Explosive oxygen and silicon burning cause the 130 solar mass helium core to explode, but explosive burning is unable to drive an explosion in the 300 solar mass star and it collapses to a black hole. For this star, the calculated angular momentum in the presupernova model is sufficient to delay black hole formation and the star initially forms a 50 solar mass, 1000km core within which neutrinos are trapped. Although the star does not become dynamically unstable, the calculated growth time of secular rotational instabilities is shorter than the black hole formation time, and such instabilities may develop. We estimate the energy and amplitude of the gravitational waves emitted durin...

  4. Gravitational waves within the magnetar model of superluminous supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2016-11-01

    The light curve of many supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be explained by a sustained injection of extra energy from its possible central engine, a rapidly rotating strongly magnetic neutron star (i.e. magnetar). The magnetic dipole radiation power that the magnetar supplies comes at the expense of the star's rotational energy. However, radiation by gravitational waves (GWs) can be more efficient than magnetic dipole radiation because of its stronger dependence on neutron star spin rate Ω, i.e. Ω6 (for a static `mountain') or Ω8 (for an r-mode fluid oscillation) versus Ω4 for magnetic dipole radiation. Here, we use the magnetic field B and initial spin period P0 inferred from SN and GRB observations to obtain simple constraints on the dimensionless amplitude of the mountain of ε magnetar model. We show that when ε > 10-4(B/1014 G)(P0/1 ms) or α > 0.01(B/1014 G)(P0/1 ms)2, light curves are strongly affected, with significant decrease in peak luminosity and increase in time to peak luminosity. Thus, the GW effects studied here are more pronounced for low B and short P0 but are unlikely to be important in modelling SN and GRB light curves since the amplitudes needed for noticeable changes are quite large.

  5. A New Gravitational-wave Signature from Standing Accretion Shock Instability in Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2016-09-01

    We present results from fully relativistic three-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations of a non-rotating 15{M}⊙ star using three different nuclear equations of state (EoSs). From our simulations covering up to ˜350 ms after bounce, we show that the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) differs significantly depending on the stiffness of nuclear EoS. Generally, the SASI activity occurs more vigorously in models with softer EoS. By evaluating the gravitational-wave (GW) emission, we find a new GW signature on top of the previously identified one, in which the typical GW frequency increases with time due to an accumulating accretion to the proto-neutron star (PNS). The newly observed quasi-periodic signal appears in the frequency range from ˜100 to 200 Hz and persists for ˜150 ms before neutrino-driven convection dominates over the SASI. By analyzing the cycle frequency of the SASI sloshing and spiral modes as well as the mass accretion rate to the emission region, we show that the SASI frequency is correlated with the GW frequency. This is because the SASI-induced temporary perturbed mass accretion strikes the PNS surface, leading to the quasi-periodic GW emission. Our results show that the GW signal, which could be a smoking-gun signature of the SASI, is within the detection limits of LIGO, advanced Virgo, and KAGRA for Galactic events.

  6. DIRECTED SEARCHES FOR BROADBAND EXTENDED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE EMISSION IN NEARBY ENERGETIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M., E-mail: mvp@sejong.ac.kr [Room 614, Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong Gwangin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-10

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are factories of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. SNe Ib/c stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and they have a branching ratio of about 1% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein the accretion of fall-back matter down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) offers a window into broadband extended gravitational wave emission (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time–frequency space by time-sliced matched filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse-grained searches followed by high-resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse-grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br (z = 0.002339) using a bank of up to 64,000 templates of one-second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events with signal-to-noise ratios > 6 from the LIGO L1 and H1 detectors reduces the total to a few events of interest. Lacking any further properties reflecting a common excitation by broadband gravitational radiation, we disregarded these as spurious. This new pipeline may be used to systematically search for long-duration chirps in nearby CC-SNe from robotic optical transient surveys using embarrassingly parallel computing.

  7. A New Multi-Dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code of Core-Collapse Supernovae III. Gravitational Wave Signals from Supernova Explosion Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Bernhard; Marek, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational-wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: A quasi-periodic modulation by prompt postshock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic e...

  8. Blast-Associated Shock Waves Result in Increased Brain Vascular Leakage and Elevated ROS Levels in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shushi Kabu

    Full Text Available Blast-associated shock wave-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI remains a persistent risk for armed forces worldwide, yet its detailed pathophysiology remains to be fully investigated. In this study, we have designed and characterized a laboratory-scale shock tube to develop a rodent model of bTBI. Our blast tube, driven by a mixture of oxygen and acetylene, effectively generates blast overpressures of 20-130 psi, with pressure-time profiles similar to those of free-field blast waves. We tested our shock tube for brain injury response to various blast wave conditions in rats. The results show that blast waves cause diffuse vascular brain damage, as determined using a sensitive optical imaging method based on the fluorescence signal of Evans Blue dye extravasation developed in our laboratory. Vascular leakage increased with increasing blast overpressures and mapping of the brain slices for optical signal intensity indicated nonhomogeneous damage to the cerebral vasculature. We confirmed vascular leakage due to disruption in the blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity following blast exposure. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in the brain also increased with increasing blast pressures and with time post-blast wave exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis of the brain sections analyzed at different time points post blast exposure demonstrated astrocytosis and cell apoptosis, confirming sustained neuronal injury response. The main advantages of our shock-tube design are minimal jet effect and no requirement for specialized equipment or facilities, and effectively generate blast-associated shock waves that are relevant to battle-field conditions. Overall data suggest that increased oxidative stress and BBB disruption could be the crucial factors in the propagation and spread of neuronal degeneration following blast injury. Further studies are required to determine the interplay between increased ROS activity and BBB disruption to develop effective

  9. A Numerical Study on the Screening of Blast-Induced Waves for Reducing Ground Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dohyun; Jeon, Byungkyu; Jeon, Seokwon

    2009-06-01

    Blasting is often a necessary part of mining and construction operations, and is the most cost-effective way to break rock, but blasting generates both noise and ground vibration. In urban areas, noise and vibration have an environmental impact, and cause structural damage to nearby structures. Various wave-screening methods have been used for many years to reduce blast-induced ground vibration. However, these methods have not been quantitatively studied for their reduction effect of ground vibration. The present study focused on the quantitative assessment of the effectiveness in vibration reduction of line-drilling as a screening method using a numerical method. Two numerical methods were used to analyze the reduction effect toward ground vibration, namely, the “distinct element method” and the “non-linear hydrocode.” The distinct element method, by particle flow code in two dimensions (PFC 2D), was used for two-dimensional parametric analyses, and some cases of two-dimensional analyses were analyzed three-dimensionally using AUTODYN 3D, the program of the non-linear hydrocode. To analyze the screening effectiveness of line-drilling, parametric analyses were carried out under various conditions, with the spacing, diameter of drill holes, distance between the blasthole and line-drilling, and the number of rows of drill holes, including their arrangement, used as parameters. The screening effectiveness was assessed via a comparison of the vibration amplitude between cases both with and without screening. Also, the frequency distribution of ground motion of the two cases was investigated through fast Fourier transform (FFT), with the differences also examined. From our study, it was concluded that line-drilling as a screening method of blast-induced waves was considerably effective under certain design conditions. The design details for field application have also been proposed.

  10. Methodology of the joint search for Gravitational Wave and Low Energy Neutrino signals from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casentini, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have a neutrino (v) signature confirmed by SN 1987A and are potential sources of Gravitational Waves (GWs). vs and GWs coming from these sources will reach the observer almost simultaneously and without significant interaction with interstellar matter. The expected GW signals are in the range of the upcoming advanced detectors for galactic neighborhood events. However, there are still significant uncertainties on the theoretical model of the emission. A joint search of coincident vs and GWs from these sources would bring valuable information from the inner core of the collapsing star and would enhance the detection of the so-called Silent Supernovae. Recently, a project for a joint search involving GW interferometers and v detectors has started. In this paper we discuss about the principal GW theoretical models of emission, and we present a methodological study of the joint search project between GW and v.

  11. Modeling and simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Taylor, Paul Allen

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm{sup 3} voxels), 5 material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female dataset. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior and lateral directions. Three dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric (shear) stress within the first 2 milliseconds of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 msec time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.

  12. Application of Wavelet Analysis in Signal De-noising of Blast Shock Wave Overpressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-wei JIANG; Yu-jun FANG; Li-zhen WAN; Jian-bing MEN

    2010-01-01

    It's a problem to be solved how to de-noise the signal of blast shock wave overpressure.In the conventional methods,the high frequency of the signal is cut directly by some mathematics algorithms,such as Fourier Transform,but some of the useful signal will be cut together.We adopt a new method for the signal de-noising of shock wave overpressure by wavelet analysis.There are four steps in this method.Firstly,the original signal is de-cpmposed.Then the time-frequency features of the signal and noise are analyzed.Thirdly,the noise is separated from the signal by only cutting its frequency while the useful signal frequency is reserved as much as possible.Lastly,the useful signal with least loss of information is recovered by reconstruction process.To verify this method,a blast shock wave signal is de-noised with FFT to make a comparison.The results show that the signal de-noised by wavelet analysis approximates the ideal signal well.

  13. Vivid View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This composite image of the Tycho supernova remnant combines infrared and X-ray observations obtained with NASA's Spitzer and Chandra space observatories, respectively, and the Calar Alto observatory, Spain. It shows the scene more than four centuries after the brilliant star explosion witnessed by Tycho Brahe and other astronomers of that era. The explosion has left a blazing hot cloud of expanding debris (green and yellow). The location of the blast's outer shock wave can be seen as a blue sphere of ultra-energetic electrons. Newly synthesized dust in the ejected material and heated pre-existing dust from the area around the supernova radiate at infrared wavelengths of 24 microns (red). Foreground and background stars in the image are white.

  14. Blast Overpressure Studies with Animals and Man: Biological Response to Complex Blast Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-31

    armored vehicle. 4. To investigate the relative importance of the quasi- static pressure rise component of complex waves in I producing trauma by...were to be protected were blocked with a selected I earplug. Each sheep received a preanesthetic intramuscular (IM) injection of atropine sulfate (0.44...ketamine hydrochloride (22 mg/kg), exsanguinated by severing the jugular veins and carotid I arteries, and necropsied. Each animal was assessed for

  15. Synchrotron signature of a relativistic blast wave with decaying microturbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, M

    2012-01-01

    Microphysics of weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shock waves, corroborated by recent high performance numerical simulations, indicate the presence of a microturbulent layer of large magnetic field strength behind the shock front, which must decay beyond some hundreds of skin depths. The present paper discusses the dynamics of such microturbulence, borrowing from these same numerical simulations, and calculates the synchrotron signature of a powerlaw of shock accelerated particles. The decaying microturbulent layer is found to leave distinct signatures in the spectro-temporal evolution of the spectrum $F_\

  16. Geotechnical centrifuge model tests for explosion cratering and propagation laws of blast wave in sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-kai FAN; Zu-yu CHEN; Xiang-qian LIANG; Xue-dong ZHANG; Xin HUANG

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the explosion cratering effects and their propagation laws of blast waves in dry standard sands using a 450 g-t geotechnical centrifuge apparatus.Ten centrifuge model tests were completed with various ranges of explosive mass,burial depth and centrifuge accelerations.Eleven accelerometers were installed to record the acceleration response in sand.The dimensions of the explosion craters were measured after the tests.The results demonstrated that the relationship between the dimensionless parameters of cratering efficiency and gravity scaled yield is a power regression function.Three specific function equations were obtained.The results are in general agreement with those obtained by other studies.A scaling law based on the combination of the r terms was used to fit the results of the ten model tests with a correlation coefficient of 0.931.The relationship can be conveniently used to predict the cratering effects in sand.The results also showed that the peak acceleration is a power increasing function of the acceleration level.An empirical exponent relation between the proportional peak acceleration and distance is proposed.The propagation velocity of blast waves is found to be ranged between 200 and 714 m/s.

  17. Absorption Phenomena and a Probable Blast Wave in the 13 July 2004 Eruptive Event

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V; Slemzin, V A; Chertok, I M; Kuzmenko, I V; Shibasaki, K; 10.1007/s11207-008-9178-8

    2008-01-01

    We present a case study of the 13 July 2004 solar event, in which disturbances caused by eruption of a filament from an active region embraced a quarter of the visible solar surface. Remarkable are absorption phenomena observed in the SOHO/EIT 304 A channel; they were also visible in the EIT 195 A channel, in the H-alpha line, and even in total radio flux records. Coronal and Moreton waves were also observed. Multi-spectral data allowed reconstructing an overall picture of the event. An explosive filament eruption and related impulsive flare produced a CME and blast shock, both of which decelerated and propagated independently. Coronal and Moreton waves were kinematically close and both decelerated in accordance with an expected motion of the coronal blast shock. The CME did not resemble a classical three-component structure, probably, because some part of the ejected mass fell back onto the Sun. Quantitative evaluations from different observations provide close estimates of the falling mass, ~3 10^15 g, whic...

  18. Collimation and asymmetry of the hot blast wave from the recurrent nova V745 Scorpii

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Jeremy J; Laming, J Martin; Starrfield, Sumner; Kashyap, Vinay; Orlando, Salvatore; Page, Kim L; Hernanz, M; Ness, J-U; Gehrz, R D; van Rossum, Daan; Woodward, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent symbiotic nova V745 Sco exploded on 2014 February 6 and was observed on February 22 and 23 by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Transmission Grating Spectrometers. By that time the supersoft source phase had already ended and Chandra spectra are consistent with emission from a hot, shock-heated circumstellar medium with temperatures exceeding 10^7K. X-ray line profiles are more sharply peaked than expected for a spherically-symmetric blast wave, with a full width at zero intensity of approximately 2400 km/s, a full width at half maximum of 1200 +/- 30 km/s and an average net blueshift of 165 +/- 10 km/s. The red wings of lines are increasingly absorbed toward longer wavelengths by material within the remnant. We conclude that the blast wave was sculpted by an aspherical circumstellar medium in which an equatorial density enhancement plays a role, as in earlier symbiotic nova explosions. Expansion of the dominant X-ray emitting material is aligned close to the plane of the sky and most consistent wit...

  19. VISAR Unfold Analysis of MagLIF Laser Blast Wave Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mark; Peterson, Kyle; Harvey-Thompson, Adam

    2015-06-01

    MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) is a fusion energy scheme, which utilizes a short laser pulse to preheat a fuel, and a magnetically driven cylindrical liner to compress the fuel to high energy density plasma conditions. Recently, a set of successful experiments have been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of our preheat process in MagLIF using the Z-Beamlet laser at Sandia. The fuel is preheated in the liner, with no compression from the Z-machine, and a VISAR diagnostic was fielded on the outer surface of the liner to measure velocity of the liner due to the pressure of the laser blast wave on the inner surface of the liner. In support of this program, we developed a fast unfold method of the VISAR data using semi-analytical techniques/numerical methods. The method incorporates appropriate boundary conditions at both edges of the VISAR foil, realistic EOS tables, and an additional pressure pulse time-delay feature for accurately unfolding the time-dependent pressure from the VISAR data. Our fully automated method can produce high-quality unfolds of the laser blast wave in under a minute. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I., E-mail: snezhana.abarzhi@gmail.com [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Kuranz, C. C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Arnett, D. [University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  1. Numerical simulation of the fluid-structure interaction between air blast waves and soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, S.; Risby, M. S.; Albert, A. Luthfi; Norazman, M.; Ariffin, I.; Alias, Y. Muhamad

    2014-03-01

    Normally, an explosion threat on free field especially from high explosives is very dangerous due to the ground shocks generated that have high impulsive load. Nowadays, explosion threats do not only occur in the battlefield, but also in industries and urban areas. In industries such as oil and gas, explosion threats may occur on logistic transportation, maintenance, production, and distribution pipeline that are located underground to supply crude oil. Therefore, the appropriate blast resistances are a priority requirement that can be obtained through an assessment on the structural response, material strength and impact pattern of material due to ground shock. A highly impulsive load from ground shocks is a dynamic load due to its loading time which is faster than ground response time. Of late, almost all blast studies consider and analyze the ground shock in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) because of its influence on the propagation and interaction of ground shock. Furthermore, analysis in the FSI integrates action of ground shock and reaction of ground on calculations of velocity, pressure and force. Therefore, this integration of the FSI has the capability to deliver the ground shock analysis on simulation to be closer to experimental investigation results. In this study, the FSI was implemented on AUTODYN computer code by using Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE). Euler-Godunov has the capability to deliver a structural computation on a 3D analysis, while ALE delivers an arbitrary calculation that is appropriate for a FSI analysis. In addition, ALE scheme delivers fine approach on little deformation analysis with an arbitrary motion, while the Euler-Godunov scheme delivers fine approach on a large deformation analysis. An integrated scheme based on Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian allows us to analyze the blast propagation waves and structural interaction simultaneously.

  2. Simulations of Magnetic Field Generation in Laser-Produced Blast Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D.; Fatenejad, M.; Gregori, G.; Miniati, F.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ravasio, A.; Koenig, M.; Murphy, C. D.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Universe. The origin of these fields and process by which they are amplified are not fully understood, although amplification is thought to involve turbulence. Experiments being conducted at medium-scale laser facilities (such as the LULI laser the Janus laser) can investigate the self-generation of magnetic fields under conditions that resemble astrophysical shocks. In these experiments, two 527 nm, 1.5 ns long laser beams are focused onto a 500 μm diameter graphite rod producing an explosion and asymmetric blast wave into a Helium filled chamber. A variety of diagnostics measure the velocity, electron density, and show that a large scale magnetic field is produced. We report preliminary hydrodynamic and MHD simulations using FLASH of a simplified version of the experiment. The results provide insights into the origin and generation of the magnetic field. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, the European Research Council, and Laserlab Europe.

  3. Study of radiative blast waves generated on the Z-beamlet laser.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edens, Aaron D.; Schwarz, Jens

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the original goals of the project to study the Vishniac Overstability on blast waves produced using the Z-Beamlet laser facility as well as the actual results. The proposed work was to build on earlier work on the facility and result in the best characterized set of data for such phenomena in the laboratory. To accomplish the goals it was necessary to modify the existing probe laser at the facility so that it could take multiple images over the course of 1-2 microseconds. Troubles with modifying the probe laser are detailed as well as the work that went into said modifications. The probe laser modification ended up taking the entire length of the project and were the major accomplishment of the research.

  4. Blast wave mitigation by dry aqueous foam: numerical modelling and experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counilh, Denis; Ballanger, Felix; Rambert, Nicolas; Haas, Jean-Francois; Chinnayya, Aschwin; Lefrancois, Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    Dry aqueous foams (two-phase media with water liquid fraction lower than 5%) are known to mitigate blast wave effects induced by an explosion. The CEA has calibrated his numerical multiphase code MOUSSACA from shock tube and high-explosive experiments. The shock tube experiments have highlighted the foam fragmentation into droplets and the momentum transfer between the liquid and gas phases of the foam. More recently, experiments with hemispheric explosive charges from 3 g to 120 g have provided more findings about the pressure and impulse mitigation properties of foams. We have also taken into account the heat and mass transfer, as well as the droplets secondary breakup, characterized by the Weber number, ratio of inertia over surface tension. Good agreement is found between the calculation and the experiments. co-supervisor of the Felix Ballanger 's doctoral thesis.

  5. A viscous blast-wave model for high energy heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Koch, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Employing a viscosity-based survival scale for initial geometrical perturbations formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, we model the radial flow velocity at freeze-out. Subsequently, we use the Cooper-Frye freeze-out prescription, with viscous corrections to the distribution function, to extract the transverse momentum dependence of particle yields and flow harmonics. We fit the model parameters for central collisions, by fitting the spectra of identified particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and estimate them for other centralities using simple hydrodynamic relations. We use the results of Monte Carlo Glauber model for initial eccentricities. We demonstrate that this improved viscous blast-wave model leads to good agreement with transverse momentum distribution of elliptic and triangular flow for all centralities and estimate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s ≃ 0.24 at the LHC.

  6. Gravitational-Wave Bursts Induced by Neutrino Oscillations: The Origin of Asymmetry in Supernovae Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta, Herman J. Mosquera

    1999-01-01

    If neutrino flavor changes really exist, to say: $\\mu$-neutrino oscillating into a sterile neutrino, then, it can be expected that due to neutrino oscillations and non-spherical distortion of the resonance surface induced by the magnetic field, some asymmetric emission of sterile neutrinos can occur during the protoneutron star formation at the onset of a supernova core-collapse. Assuming no strong suppression of the oscillations, the non-spherical huge neutrino energies released, ($\\sim 10^{...

  7. Equation-of-State Dependent Features in Shock-Oscillation Modulated Neutrino and Gravitational-Wave Signals from Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, A; Müller, E

    2008-01-01

    We present 2D hydrodynamic simulations of the long-time accretion phase of a 15 solar mass star after core bounce and before the launch of a supernova explosion. Our simulations are performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code, employing multi-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport and an effective relativistic gravitational potential. Testing the influence of a stiff and a soft equation of state for hot neutron star matter, we find that the non-radial mass motions in the supernova core due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection impose a time variability on the neutrino and gravitational-wave signals. These variations have larger amplitudes as well as higher frequencies in the case of a more compact nascent neutron star. After the prompt shock-breakout burst of electron neutrinos, a more compact accreting remnant radiates neutrinos with higher luminosities and larger mean energies. The observable neutrino emission in the direction of SASI shock oscillations exhibits a modulation o...

  8. An experimental investigation of blast driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musci, Benjamin; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    In the Georgia Tech Shock and Advanced Mixing Lab, a facility is being built to study blast driven turbulence. Motivated by the discrepancies observed between actual and modeled supernovae, this facility aims to resolve the important spatial scales in the extensive mixing of the outer layers. These outer layers will be modeled by subjecting two-three gases of varying density to a blast wave generated by Exploding Bridge Wires. The blast wave's interaction with perturbations at the gaseous, membrane-less, interfaces will induce the Richtmeyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh Taylor Instability, depending on the acceleration history and perturbation amplitude. Through the use of simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence, this project aims to determine the effect of interface initial conditions on turbulence. A 2D Diverging Wedge and 3D Diverging Conical Tube are being built to enable repeatable blast-wave production, continuous optical viewing of the flow, reproducible multi-layer interface creation, and the collection of simultaneous density-velocity measurements to directly measure turbulent quantities. The preliminary analysis informing the design of this facility, the construction progress, and updates on newly realized design constraints are presented.

  9. Exposure of the thorax to a sublethal blast wave causes a hydrodynamic pulse that leads to perivenular inflammation in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, J Marc; Pampori, Adam; Keledjian, Kaspar; Tosun, Cigdem; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2014-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by an explosive blast (blast-TBI) is postulated to result, in part, from transvascular transmission to the brain of a hydrodynamic pulse (a.k.a., volumetric blood surge, ballistic pressure wave, hydrostatic shock, or hydraulic shock) induced in major intrathoracic blood vessels. This mechanism of blast-TBI has not been demonstrated directly. We tested the hypothesis that a blast wave impacting the thorax would induce a hydrodynamic pulse that would cause pathological changes in the brain. We constructed a Thorax-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (TOBIA) and a Jugular-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (JOBIA). TOBIA delivered a collimated blast wave to the right lateral thorax of a rat, precluding direct impact on the cranium. JOBIA delivered a blast wave to the fluid-filled port of an extracorporeal intravenous infusion device whose catheter was inserted retrograde into the jugular vein, precluding lung injury. Long Evans rats were subjected to sublethal injury by TOBIA or JOBIA. Blast injury induced by TOBIA was characterized by apnea and diffuse bilateral hemorrhagic injury to the lungs associated with a transient reduction in pulse oximetry signals. Immunolabeling 24 h after injury by TOBIA showed up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha, ED-1, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein in veins or perivenular tissues and microvessels throughout the brain. The perivenular inflammatory effects induced by TOBIA were prevented by ligating the jugular vein and were reproduced using JOBIA. We conclude that blast injury to the thorax leads to perivenular inflammation, Sur1 up-regulation, and reactive astrocytosis resulting from the induction of a hydrodynamic pulse in the vasculature.

  10. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them. This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains. In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight. N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud. In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  11. Effect of Shock Wave on Fabricated Anti-Blast Wall and Distribution Law Around the Wall Under Near Surface Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; LIU Jingbo; YAN Qiushi

    2008-01-01

    The loads of shock wave effect on fabricated anti-blast wall and distribution law around the wall were investigated by using near surface explosion test method and FEM.The pressure-time histories and variety law on the foreside and backside of the anti-blast wall were adopted in the tests of variety of different explosion distances and dynamites,as well as in the comparison between the test and numerical calculation.The test results show that the loads of shock wave effect on the anti-blast wall were essen-tially consistent with calculation results using criterion under surface explosion when explosion distances exceed 2 m,the distribution of overpressure behind wall was gained according to variety law based on small-large-small.It is also demonstrated that the peak overpressure behind wall had commonly appeared in wall height by 1.5--2.5 multiples,and the peak overpressures of protective building behind wall could be reduced effectively by using the fabricated anti-blast wall.

  12. Spectra of magnetic fluctuations and relativistic particles produced by a nonresonant wave instability in supernova remnant shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, Andrey E; Ellison, Donald C

    2009-01-01

    We model strong forward shocks in young supernova remnants with efficient particle acceleration where a nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current amplifies magnetic turbulence in the shock precursor. Particle injection, magnetic field amplification (MFA) and the nonlinear feedback of particles and fields on the bulk flow are derived consistently. The shock structure depends critically on the efficiency of turbulence cascading. If cascading is suppressed, MFA is strong, the shock precursor is stratified, and the turbulence spectrum contains several discrete peaks. These peaks, as well as the amount of MFA, should influence synchrotron X-rays, allowing observational tests of cascading and other assumptions intrinsic to the nonlinear model of nonresonant wave growth.

  13. Modeling blast waves, gas and particles dispersion in urban and hilly ground areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hank, S; Saurel, R; Le Métayer, O; Lapébie, E

    2014-09-15

    The numerical simulation of shock and blast waves as well as particles dispersion in highly heterogeneous media such as cities, urban places, industrial plants and part of countries is addressed. Examples of phenomena under study are chemical gas products dispersion from damaged vessels, gas dispersion in urban places under explosion conditions, shock wave propagation in urban environment. A three-dimensional simulation multiphase flow code (HI2LO) is developed in this aim. To simplify the consideration of complex geometries, a heterogeneous discrete formulation is developed. When dealing with large scale domains, such as countries, the topography is considered with the help of elevation data. Meteorological conditions are also considered, in particular regarding complex temperature and wind profiles. Heat and mass transfers on sub-scale objects, such as buildings, trees and other obstacles are considered as well. Particles motion is addressed through a new turbulence model involving a single parameter to describe accurately plumes. Validations against experiments in basic situations are presented as well as examples of industrial and environmental computations.

  14. How supernova explosions power galactic winds

    CERN Document Server

    Creasey, Peter; Bower, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Feedback from supernovae is an essential aspect of galaxy formation. In order to improve subgrid models of feedback we perform a series of numerical experiments to investigate how supernova explosions power galactic winds. We use the Flash hydrodynamic code to model a simplified ISM, including gravity, hydrodynamics, radiative cooling above 10,000 K, and star formation that reproduces the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. By simulating a small patch of the ISM in a tall box perpendicular to the disk, we obtain sub-parsec resolution allowing us to resolve individual supernova events and we investigate how the wind properties depend on those of the ISM and the galaxy. We find that outflows are more efficient in disks with lower surface densities or gas fractions. A simple model in which the warm cloudy medium is the barrier that limits the expansion of blast waves reproduces the scaling of outflow properties with disk parameters at high star formation rates. The scaling we find sets the investigation of galaxy winds ...

  15. Wave-driven stellar expansion and binary interaction in pre-supernova outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mcley, Liron

    2014-01-01

    We suggest that the main outcome of energy leakage carried by waves from the core to the envelope of pre-collapse massive stars is envelope expansion rather than major mass ejection. We show that the propagating waves add to the pressure in the envelope at radii smaller than the radius where the convection driven by the waves becomes supersonic, the driven radius. The extra wave pressure and wave energy dissipation lead to envelope expansion. Using the numerical code MESA we show that the envelope expansion absorbs most of the energy carried by the waves. A possible conclusion from our results is that pre-explosion outbursts (PEOs) result from a binary companion accreting mass from the extended envelope and releasing a huge amount of energy. The accreting companion is likely to expel mass in a bipolar morphology, e.g., jets and an equatorial ring.

  16. Probing supernova shock waves and neutrino flavor transitions in next-generation water-Cherenkov detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fogli, G L; Mirizzi, A; Montanino, D

    2004-01-01

    Several current projects aim at building a large water-Cherenkov detector, with a fiducial volume about 20 times larger than in the current Super-Kamiokande experiment. These projects include the Underground nucleon decay and Neutrino Observatory (UNO) in the Henderson Mine (Colorado), the Hyper-Kamiokande (HK) detector in the Tochibora Mine (Japan), and the MEgaton class PHYSics (MEMPHYS) detector in the Frejus site (Europe). We study the physics potential of a reference next-generation detector (0.4 Mton of fiducial mass) in providing information on supernova neutrino flavor transitions with unprecedented statistics. After discussing the ingredients of our calculations, we compute neutrino event rates from inverse beta decay ($\\bar\

  17. A compressed cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Silk, J.; Leep, E. M.; Wallerstein, G.

    1981-01-01

    Strong interstellar absorption lines of C I, arising from the two excited fine-structure levels, are found in IUE observations of HD 72350 (type B4 III). An analysis of the excited-level populations of C I gives local temperature and pressure limits, and auxiliary data on the limit of column density for excited O I and the carbon ionization help to establish that (1) the local temperature is within the limits of 25-100 K, and (2) the pressure/Boltzmann's constant ratio is at least 10 to the 4.3/cu cm K, despite its small size. This high-pressure cloud is discussed in terms of shock compression by the Vela supernova blast wave, along with the relationship of this kind of cloud compression to star formation and to the origin of the characteristic filamentary emission arcs seen in Vela and other supernova remnants

  18. Numerical simulation of long-duration blast wave evolution in confined facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, F.; Baum, J. D.; Mestreau, E.; Löhner, R.; Sunshine, D.

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research effort was to investigate the quasi-steady flow field produced by explosives in confined facilities. In this effort we modeled tests in which a high explosive (HE) cylindrical charge was hung in the center of a room and detonated. The HEs used for the tests were C-4 and AFX 757. While C-4 is just slightly under-oxidized and is typically modeled as an ideal explosive, AFX 757 includes a significant percentage of aluminum particles, so long-time afterburning and energy release must be considered. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)-produced thermo-chemical equilibrium algorithm, “Cheetah”, was used to estimate the remaining burnable detonation products. From these remaining species, the afterburning energy was computed and added to the flow field. Computations of the detonation and afterburn of two HEs in the confined multi-room facility were performed. The results demonstrate excellent agreement with available experimental data in terms of blast wave time of arrival, peak shock amplitude, reverberation, and total impulse (and hence, total energy release, via either the detonation or afterburn processes.

  19. Computer Simulation of Blast Waves in a Tunnel with Sudden Decrease in Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, L. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Neuscamman, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-22

    The case of an explosion in a tunnel where the blast wave encounters a sudden decrease in cross section is studied with quasi-one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional axisymmetric codes (2D) and the results are compared to experimental data. It is found that the numerical results from both codes are in good agreement until the interface at the change in cross section is encountered. Thereafter, however, the peak pressure derived with the codes is found to be significantly higher than the experimental results although the agreement between the 2D result and the experiment improves with increasing distance down the tunnel. Peak pressure and impulse per unit area obtained downstream of the interface with the 1D analysis are found to be substantially higher than with either the experiment or the 2D results. The reason for this is the time delay for the shock reflecting off the (vertical) rigid wall between the inner and outer tunnel radii to interact with the (supersonic) core flow into the decreased cross section. In the 1D case the reflected and transmitted shocks are formed instantaneously across the entire cross section resulting in higher pressure and increased shock speed downstream of the interface.

  20. Dissipation of Impact Stress Waves within the Artificial Blasting Damage Zone in the Surrounding Rocks of Deep Roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Ning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial explosions are commonly used to prevent rockburst in deep roadways. However, the dissipation of the impact stress wave within the artificial blasting damage zone (ABDZ of the rocks surrounding a deep roadway has not yet been clarified. The surrounding rocks were divided into the elastic zone, blasting damage zone, plastic zone, and anchorage zone in this research. Meanwhile, the ABDZ was divided into the pulverizing area, fractured area, and cracked area from the inside out. Besides, the model of the normal incidence of the impact stress waves in the ABDZ was established; the attenuation coefficient of the amplitude of the impact stress waves was obtained after it passed through the intact rock mass, and ABDZ, to the anchorage zone. In addition, a numerical simulation was used to study the dynamic response of the vertical stress and impact-induced vibration energy in the surrounding rocks. By doing so, the dissipation of the impact stress waves within the ABDZ of the surrounding rocks was revealed. As demonstrated in the field application, the establishment of the ABDZ in the surrounding rocks reduced the effect of the impact-induced vibration energy on the anchorage support system of the roadway.

  1. a Finite Difference Numerical Model for the Propagation of Finite Amplitude Acoustical Blast Waves Outdoors Over Hard and Porous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Victor Ward

    1990-01-01

    This study has concerned the propagation of finite amplitude, i.e. weakly non-linear, acoustical blast waves from explosions over hard and porous media models of outdoor ground surfaces. The nonlinear acoustic propagation effects require a numerical solution in the time domain. To model a porous ground surface, which in the frequency domain exhibits a finite impedance, the linear phenomenological porous model of Morse and Ingard was used. The phenomenological equations are solved in the time domain for coupling with the time domain propagation solution in the air. The numerical solution is found through the method of finite differences. The second-order in time and fourth -order in space MacCormack method was used in the air, and the second-order in time and space MacCormack method was used in the porous medium modeling the ground. Two kinds of numerical absorbing boundary conditions were developed for the air propagation equations to truncate the physical domain for solution on a computer. Radiation conditions first were used on those sides of the domain where there were outgoing waves. Characteristic boundary conditions secondly are employed near the acoustic source. The numerical model agreed well with the Pestorius algorithm for the propagation of electric spark pulses in the free field, and with a result of Pfriem for normal plane reflection off a hard surface. In addition, curves of pressure amplification versus incident angle for waves obliquely incident on the hard and porous surfaces were produced which are similar to those in the literature. The model predicted that near grazing finite amplitude acoustic blast waves decay with distance over hard surfaces as r to the power -1.2. This result is consistent with the work of Reed. For propagation over the porous ground surface, the model predicted that this surface decreased the decay rate with distance for the larger blasts compared to the rate expected in the linear acoustics limit.

  2. Supernova detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahata, Masayuki [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray research, University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida-shi, Gifu, Japan, 506-1205 (Japan)], E-mail: nakahata@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-11-01

    The detection of supernova neutrinos is reviewed, focusing on the current status of experiments to detect supernova burst neutrinos and supernova relic neutrinos. The capabilities of each detector currently operating and in development are assessed and the likely neutrino yield for a future supernova is estimated. It is expected that much more information will be obtained if a supernova burst were to occur in our Galaxy than was obtained for supernova SN1987A. The detection of supernova relic neutrinos is considered and it is concluded that a large volume detector with a neutron tagging technique is necessary.

  3. Parametrized 3D models of neutrino-driven supernova explosions: Neutrino emission asymmetries and gravitational-wave signals

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, E; Wongwathanarat, A

    2011-01-01

    Time-dependent and direction-dependent neutrino and gravitational-wave (GW) signatures are presented for a set of 3D hydrodynamic models of parametrized, neutrino-driven supernova explosions of non-rotating 15 and 20 solar mass stars. We employ an approximate treatment of neutrino transport. Due to the excision of the high-density core of the proto-neutron star and the use of an axis-free overset grid, the models can be followed from the post-bounce accretion phase for more than one second without imposing any symmetry restrictions. GW and neutrino emission exhibit the generic time-dependent features known from 2D models. Non-radial hydrodynamic mass motions in the accretion layer and their interaction with the outer layers of the proto-neutron star together with anisotropic neutrino emission give rise to a GW signal with an amplitude of ~5-20 cm and frequencies 100--500 Hz. The GW emission from mass motions reaches a maximum before the explosion sets in. Afterwards the GW signal exhibits a low-frequency modu...

  4. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays. Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images. To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer wavelengths. Since the amount

  5. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Green, D A; Hwang, U; Petre, R; Krishnamurthy, K; Willett, R

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0."84% +/- 0."06% per yr to 0."52% +/- 0."03% per yr. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3, and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The spatially-integrated dominantly synchrotron X-ray flux increases at 1.9% +/- 0.4% per yr. We identify the outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sudden large density gradients in either ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as found at a win...

  6. Bayesian parameter estimation of core collapse supernovae using gravitational wave simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Matthew C; Christensen, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Using the latest numerical simulations of rotating stellar core collapse, we present a Bayesian framework to extract the physical information encoded in noisy gravitational wave signals. We fit Bayesian principal component regression models with known and unknown signal arrival times to reconstruct gravitational wave signals, and subsequently fit known astrophysical parameters on the posterior means of the principal component coefficients using a linear model. We predict the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to gravitational energy of the inner core at bounce by sampling from the posterior predictive distribution, and find that these predictions are generally very close to the true parameter values, with $90\\%$ credible intervals $\\sim 0.04$ and $\\sim 0.06$ wide for the known and unknown arrival time models respectively. Two supervised machine learning methods are implemented to classify precollapse differential rotation, and we find that these methods discriminate rapidly rotating progenitors particularly w...

  7. Broadband extended emission in gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Levinson, Amir; Pick, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Black holes in core-collapse of massive stars are expected to surge in mass and angular momentum by hyper-accretion immediately following their formation. We here describe a general framework of extended emission in gravitational waves from non-axisymmetric accretion flows from fallback matter of the progenitor envelope. It shows (a) a maximum efficiency in conversion of accretion energy into gravitational waves at hyper-accretion rates exceeding a critical value set by the ratio of the quadrupole mass inhomogeneity and viscosity with (b) a peak characteristic strain amplitude at the frequency $f_b=\\Omega_b/\\pi$, where $\\Omega_b$ is the Keplerian angular velocity at which viscous torques equal angular momentum loss in gravitational radiation, with $h_{char}\\propto f^{1/6}$ at $ff_b$. Upcoming gravitational wave observations may probe this scaling by extracting broadband spectra using time-sliced matched filtering with chirp templates, recently developed for identifying turbulence in noisy time series.

  8. Matching Supernovae to Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    developed a new automated algorithm for matching supernovae to their host galaxies. Their work builds on currently existing algorithms and makes use of information about the nearby galaxies, accounts for the uncertainty of the match, and even includes a machine learning component to improve the matching accuracy.Gupta and collaborators test their matching algorithm on catalogs of galaxies and simulated supernova events to quantify how well the algorithm is able to accurately recover the true hosts.Successful MatchingThe matching algorithms accuracy (purity) as a function of the true supernova-host separation, the supernova redshift, the true hosts brightness, and the true hosts size. [Gupta et al. 2016]The authors find that when the basic algorithm is run on catalog data, it matches supernovae to their hosts with 91% accuracy. Including the machine learning component, which is run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy of the matching to 97%.The encouraging results of this work which was intended as a proof of concept suggest that methods similar to this could prove very practical for tackling future survey data. And the method explored here has use beyond matching just supernovae to their host galaxies: it could also be applied to other extragalactic transients, such as gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events, or electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave detections.CitationRavi R. Gupta et al 2016 AJ 152 154. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/6/154

  9. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A New Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, William C; Blackman, Eric G

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become the signature injury of current military conflicts. The debilitating effects of TBI on society are long-lasting and costly. Although the mechanisms by which impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. Various mechanisms, including impacts caused by the blast, have been investigated, but blast-induced deformation of the skull has been neglected. Through the use of hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient flexure of the skull to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even if no impact occurs. This mechanism has implications for the diagnosis of TBI in soldiers and the design of protective equipment such as helmets.

  10. Near-field investigation of the explosive dispersal of radioactive material based on a reconstructed spherical blast-wave flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, David; Ivan, Lucian

    2017-03-15

    A "dirty bomb" is a type of radiological dispersal device (RDD) that has been the subject of significant safety and security concerns given the disruption that would result from a postulated terrorist attack. Assessing the risks of radioactive dose in a hypothetical scenario requires models that can accurately predict dispersion in a realistic environment. Modelling a RDD is complicated by the fact that the most important phenomena occur over vastly disparate spatial and temporal length scales. Particulate dispersion in the air is generally considered on scales of hundreds to thousands of meters, and over periods of minutes and hours. Dispersion models are extremely sensitive, however, to the particle size and source characterization, which are determined in distances measured in micrometers to meters, over milliseconds or less. This study examines the extent to which the explosive blast determines the transport of contaminant particles relative to the atmospheric wind over distances relevant to "near-field" dispersion problems (i.e., hundreds of meters), which are relevant to urban environments. Our results indicate that whether or not the effect of the blast should be included in a near-field dispersion model is largely dependent on the size of the contaminant particle. Relatively large particles (i.e., >40 μm in diameter), which are most likely to be produced by a RDD, penetrate the leading shock front, thereby avoiding the reverse blast wind. Consequently, they travel much farther than suspended aerosols (<10 μm) before approaching the ambient wind velocity. This suggests that, for these "near-field" dispersion problems in urban environments, the transport of contaminants from the blast wave may be integral to accurately predicting their dispersion.

  11. A Possible Site of Cosmic Ray Acceleration in the Supernova Remnant IC 443

    CERN Document Server

    Keohane, J W; Gotthelf, E V; Ozaki, M; Koyama, K; Keohane, Jonathan W.

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence for shock acceleration of cosmic rays to high energies (about 10 TeV) in the supernova remnant IC 443. X-ray imaging spectroscopy with ASCA reveals two regions of particularly hard emission: an unresolved source embedded in an extended emission region, and a ridge of emission coincident with the southeastern rim. Both features are located on part of the radio shell where the shock wave is interacting with molecular gas, and together they account for a majority of the emission at 7 keV. Though we would not have noticed it a priori, the unresolved feature is coincident with one resolved by the ROSAT HRI. Because this feature overlaps a unique region of flat radio spectral index (alpha 5,000 km/s). We conclude that the anomalous feature is most likely tracing enhanced particle acceleration by shocks that are formed as the supernova blast wave impacts the ring of molecular clouds.

  12. Dust Destruction by the Reverse Shock in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R; Slavin, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, potentially capable of producing one solar mass of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift universe. Our aim is to identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta, and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. We use analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock, with special application to the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A. We assume that the dust resides in cool oxygen-rich clumps that are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma, and that the dust consists of silic...

  13. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  14. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  15. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Kndlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin*, N; Kühn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepé, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sánchez, D; Sander, A; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgr, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-01-01

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10-13 s s-1 . Its characteristic age of 104 years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  16. Gravitational Wave Signatures from Low-mode Spiral Instabilities in Rapidly Rotating Supernova Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of gravitational waves (GWs) from rotating core-collapse of a 15 solar mass star by performing three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations with an approximate neutrino transport. By parametrically changing the precollapse angular momentum, we focus on the effects of rotation on the GW signatures in the early postbounce evolution. Regarding three-flavor neutrino transport, we solve the energy-averaged set of radiation energy and momentum. In addition to the gravitational quadrupole radiation from matter motions, we take into account GWs from anisotropic neutrino emission. With these computations, our results present evidence that non-axisymmetric instabilities play an essential role in determining the GW signatures in the rotating postbounce evolution. For our rapidly rotating models, we show that precollapse density inhomogeneities give rise to millisecond variations in the waveforms. During prompt convection, we find that the waveforms show narrow-band and highly quasi...

  17. Measuring the Angular Momentum Distribution in Core-Collapse Supernova Progenitors with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; DeMaio, Alexandra M; Ott, Christian D

    2013-01-01

    The late collapse, core bounce, and the early postbounce phase of rotating core collapse leads to a characteristic gravitational wave (GW) signal. The precise shape of the signal is governed by the interplay of gravity, rotation, nuclear equation of state (EOS), and electron capture during collapse. We explore the dependence of the signal on total angular momentum and its distribution in the progenitor core by means of a large set of axisymmetric general-relativistic core collapse simulations in which we vary the initial angular momentum distribution in the core. Our simulations include a microphysical finite-temperature EOS, an approximate electron capture treatment during collapse, and a neutrino leakage scheme for the postbounce evolution. We find that the precise distribution of angular momentum is relevant only for very rapidly rotating cores with T/|W|>~8% at bounce. We construct a numerical template bank from our baseline set of simulations, and carry out additional simulations to generate trial wavefo...

  18. Biomechanical modeling for the response of human thorax to blast waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Tao, Gang

    2015-08-01

    A simplified finite element model of a human thorax had been developed for probing into the mechanical response in simple and complex blast environments. The human thorax model was first created by CT images with blast loading applied via a coupled arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method, allowing for a variety of loads to be considered. The goal is to analyze the maximum stress distributions of lung tissue and peak inward thorax wall velocity and to know the possible regions and levels of lung injury. In parallel, a mathematical model has been modified from the Lobdell model to investigate the detailed percentage of lung injury at each level. The blast loadings around the human thorax were obtained from the finite element model, and were then applied in the mathematical model as the boundary conditions to predict the normalized work of the human thorax lung. The present results are found in agreement with the modified Bowen curves and the results predicted by Axelsson's model.

  19. Skull flexure from blast waves: a mechanism for brain injury with implications for helmet design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-14

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts. The debilitating effects of TBI are long-lasting and costly. Although the mechanisms by which impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. Various possibilities have been investigated, but blast-induced deformation of the skull has been neglected. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that nonlethal blasts can induce sufficient flexure of the skull to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even if no impact occurs. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for the diagnosis of soldiers and the design of protective equipment such as helmets.

  20. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Green, David; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert

    2014-08-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), about 100 yr old from global expansion measurements, and most likely the result of an asymmetric Type Ia supernova explosion. We smoothed a Chandra image from a 1 Ms observation in 2011 and fit the resulting model to unsmoothed images from 2007 and 2009, allowing for expansion and image shifts. The measured expansion rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, increasing inward by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis, from 0.52% +- 0.03% per yr to 0.84% +- 0.06% per yr. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9 +0.3, and implying a significant (deceleration parameter m < 0.6) deceleration of the blast wave. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux, strongly dominated by synchrotron emission, increases at a rate of 1.9% +- 0.7% per year, in agreement with previous measurements. G1.9+0.3 is the only Galactic SNR brightening at X-ray and radio wavelengths. We identify the inner rims with the reverse shock and more slowly-expanding rims farther out with the blast wave. The large spread in expansion ages between the reverse shock and the blast wave requires abrupt density gradients in either the ejecta or the ambient medium, to suddenly decelerate the reverse shock or the blast wave. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest (factor of several) density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as found at a wind termination shock, implying a strong presupernova wind from the progenitor system. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered a larger (factor of 10 or more) density discontinuity within the SN ejecta, such as found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia SN models. Through 1D hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. The presence of strong density gradients in the outer

  1. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-30

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts, with debilitating, costly, and long-lasting effects. Although mechanisms by which head impacts cause TBI have been well-researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient skull flexure to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even without a head impact. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for injury diagnosis and armor design.

  2. NONUNIFORM EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Green, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, 19 J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Hwang, Una [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Petre, Robert [NASA/GSFC, Code 660, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Krishnamurthy, Kalyani [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Willett, Rebecca, E-mail: kborkow@unity.ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr{sup –1} to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr{sup –1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr{sup –1}. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  3. Dance into the fire: dust survival inside supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, potentially capable of producing 1 M_{⊙}) of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift universe. Our goal is to identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta, and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. To do so, we have developed analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock, and the simultaneous processing of the dust inside the cavity of the supernova remnant. We have applied our models to the special case of the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), assuming that the dust (silicates and carbon grains) resides in cool oxygen-rich ejecta clumps which are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma (smooth ejecta). The passage of the reverse shock through the clumps gives rise to a relative gas-grain motion and also destroys the clumps. While residing in the ejecta clouds, dust is processed via kinetic sputtering, which is terminated either when the grains escape the clumps, or when the clumps are destroyed by the reverse shock. In either case, grain destruction proceeds thereafter by thermal sputtering in the hot shocked smooth ejecta. We find that 12 and 16 percent of silicate and carbon dust, respectively, survive the passage of the reverse shock by the time the shock has reached the center of the remnant. These fractions depend on the morphology of the ejecta and the medium into which the remnant is expanding, as well as the composition and size distribution of the grains that formed in the ejecta. Results will

  4. Supernova VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, N.

    2009-08-01

    We review VLBI observations of supernovae over the last quarter century and discuss the prospect of imaging future supernovae with space VLBI in the context of VSOP-2. From thousands of discovered supernovae, most of them at cosmological distances, ˜50 have been detected at radio wavelengths, most of them in relatively nearby galaxies. All of the radio supernovae are Type II or Ib/c, which originate from the explosion of massive progenitor stars. Of these, 12 were observed with VLBI and four of them, SN 1979C, SN 1986J, SN 1993J, and SN 1987A, could be imaged in detail, the former three with VLBI. In addition, supernovae or young supernova remnants were discovered at radio wavelengths in highly dust-obscured galaxies, such as M82, Arp 299, and Arp 220, and some of them could also be imaged in detail. Four of the supernovae so far observed were sufficiently bright to be detectable with VSOP-2. With VSOP-2 the expansion of supernovae can be monitored and investigated with unsurpassed angular resolution, starting as early as the time of the supernova's transition from its opaque to transparent stage. Such studies can reveal, in a movie, the aftermath of a supernova explosion shortly after shock break out.

  5. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  6. Supernova explosions and the birth of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H -Th; Müller, B; Scheck, L

    2007-01-01

    We report here on recent progress in understanding the birth conditions of neutron stars and the way how supernovae explode. More sophisticated numerical models have led to the discovery of new phenomena in the supernova core, for example a generic hydrodynamic instability of the stagnant supernova shock against low-mode nonradial deformation and the excitation of gravity-wave activity in the surface and core of the nascent neutron star. Both can have supportive or decisive influence on the inauguration of the explosion, the former by improving the conditions for energy deposition by neutrino heating in the postshock gas, the latter by supplying the developing blast with a flux of acoustic power that adds to the energy transfer by neutrinos. While recent two-dimensional models suggest that the neutrino-driven mechanism may be viable for stars from about 8 solar masses to at least 15 solar masses, acoustic energy input has been advocated as an alternative if neutrino heating fails. Magnetohydrodynamic effects ...

  7. Controlled Low-Pressure Blast-Wave Exposure Causes Distinct Behavioral and Morphological Responses Modelling Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Comorbid Mild Traumatic Brain Injury-Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Amitai; Ram, Omri; Ifergane, Gal; Matar, Michael A; Sagi, Ram; Ostfeld, Ishay; Hoffman, Jay R; Kaplan, Zeev; Sadot, Oren; Cohen, Hagit

    2017-01-01

    The intense focus in the clinical literature on the mental and neurocognitive sequelae of explosive blast-wave exposure, especially when comorbid with post-traumatic stress-related disorders (PTSD) is justified, and warrants the design of translationally valid animal studies to provide valid complementary basic data. We employed a controlled experimental blast-wave paradigm in which unanesthetized animals were exposed to visual, auditory, olfactory, and tactile effects of an explosive blast-wave produced by exploding a thin copper wire. By combining cognitive-behavioral paradigms and ex vivo brain MRI to assess mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) phenotype with a validated behavioral model for PTSD, complemented by morphological assessments, this study sought to examine our ability to evaluate the biobehavioral effects of low-intensity blast overpressure on rats, in a translationally valid manner. There were no significant differences between blast- and sham-exposed rats on motor coordination and strength, or sensory function. Whereas most male rats exposed to the blast-wave displayed normal behavioral and cognitive responses, 23.6% of the rats displayed a significant retardation of spatial learning acquisition, fulfilling criteria for mTBI-like responses. In addition, 5.4% of the blast-exposed animals displayed an extreme response in the behavioral tasks used to define PTSD-like criteria, whereas 10.9% of the rats developed both long-lasting and progressively worsening behavioral and cognitive "symptoms," suggesting comorbid PTSD-mTBI-like behavioral and cognitive response patterns. Neither group displayed changes on MRI. Exposure to experimental blast-wave elicited distinct behavioral and morphological responses modelling mTBI-like, PTSD-like, and comorbid mTBI-PTSD-like responses. This experimental animal model can be a useful tool for elucidating neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of blast-wave-induced mTBI and PTSD and comorbid mTBI-PTSD.

  8. Aspherical supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3

  9. Aspherical supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-05-21

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3

  10. 2D radiaition-hydrodynamic simulations of supernova shock breakout in bipolar explosions of a blue supergiant progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional special relativistic radiation-hydrodynamics code is developed and applied to numerical simulations of supernova shock breakout in bipolar explosions of a blue supergiant. Our calculations successfully simulate the dynamical evolution of a blast wave in the star and its emergence from the surface. Results of the model with spherical energy deposition show a good agreement with previous simulations. Furthermore, we calculate several models with bipolar energy deposition and compare their results with the spherically symmetric model. The bolometric light curves of the shock breakout emission are calculated by a ray-tracing method. Our radiation-hydrodynamic models indicate that the early part of the shock breakout emission can be used to probe the geometry of the blast wave produced as a result of the gravitational collapse of the iron core.

  11. Blast effects of external explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Sochet, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Security considerations for industrial production and storage require characterization of the mechanical effects caused by blast waves resulting from a detonation or deflagration. This paper evaluates current analytical methods to determine the characteristic parameters of a blast wave with respect to the pressure, impulse and duration of the positive phase of the blast. In the case of a detonation, the trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent-based method determines the mass ...

  12. On the propagation and multiple reflections of a blast wave travelling through a dusty gas in a closed box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Marcello; Drikakis, Dimitris; Kokkinakis, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    This paper concerns the propagation of shock waves in an enclosure filled with dusty gas. The main motivation for this problem is to probe the effect on such dynamics of solid particles dispersed in the fluid medium. This subject, which has attracted so much attention over recent years given its important implications in the study of the structural stability of systems exposed to high-energy internal detonations, is approached here in the framework of a hybrid numerical two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian methodology. In particular, insights are sought by considering a relatively simple archetypal setting corresponding to a shock wave originating from a small spherical region initialized on the basis of available analytic solutions. The response of the system is explored numerically with respect to several parameters, including the blast intensity (via the related value of the initial shock Mach number), the solid mass fraction (mass load), and the particle size (Stokes number). Results are presented in terms of pressure-load diagrams. Beyond practical applications, it is shown that a kaleidoscope of fascinating patterns is produced by the "triadic" relationships among multiple shock reflection events and particle-fluid and particle-wall interaction dynamics. These would be of great interest to researchers and scientists interested in fundamental problems relating to the general theory of pattern formation in complex nonlinear multiphase systems.

  13. Research Performance Progress Report: Diverging Supernova Explosion Experiments on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewa, Tomasz [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2016-10-25

    The aim of this project was to design a series of blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments of this kind are relevant to mixing in core-collapse supernovae (ccSNe) and have the potential to address previously unanswered questions in high-energy density physics (HEDP) and astrophysics. The unmatched laser power of the NIF laser offers a unique chance to observe and study “new physics” like the mass extensions observed in HEDP RT experiments performed on the Omega laser [1], which might be linked to self-generated magnetic fields [2] and so far could not be reproduced by numerical simulations. Moreover, NIF is currently the only facility that offers the possibility to execute a diverging RT experiment, which would allow to observe processes such as inter-shell penetration via turbulent mixing and shock-proximity effects (distortion of the shock by RT spikes).

  14. Chandra Observations of Shock Kinematics in Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhekov, S A; Borkowski, K J; Burrows, D N; Park, S

    2005-01-01

    We report the first results from deep X-ray observations of the SNR 1987A with the Chandra LETG. Temperatures inferred from line ratios range from 0.1 - 2 keV and increase with ionization potential. Expansion velocities inferred from X-ray line profiles range from 300 - 1700 km/s, much less than the velocities inferred from the radial expansion of the radio and X-ray images. We can account for these observations with a scenario in which the X-rays are emitted by shocks produced where the supernova blast wave strikes dense protrusions of the inner circumstellar ring, which are also responsible for the optical hot spots.

  15. Chandra LETG Observations of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhekov, S A; Burrows, D N; McCray, R; Park, S; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Burrows, David N.; Cray, Richard Mc; Park, Sangwook; Zhekov, Svetozar A.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the results from deep Chandra LETG observations of the supernova remnant 1987A (SNR 1987A). We find that a distribution of shocks, spanning the same range of velocities (from 300 to 1700 km/s) as deduced in the first part of our analysis (Zhekov et al. 2005, ApJL, 628, L127), can account for the entire X-ray spectrum of this object. The post-shock temperature distribution is bimodal, peaking at kT 0.5 and 3 keV. Abundances inferred from the X-ray spectrum have values similar to those for the inner circumstellar ring, except that the abundances of nitrogen and oxygen are approximately a factor of two lower than those inferred from the optical/UV spectrum. The velocity of the X-ray emitting plasma has decreased since 1999, apparently because the blast wave has entered the main body of the inner circumstellar ring.

  16. Transport and mixing of r-process elements in neutron star binary merger blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, Gabriela; Naiman, Jill; Shen, Sijing; Lee, William H

    2016-01-01

    The r-process nuclei are robustly synthesized in the material ejected during a neutron star binary merger (NSBM), as tidal torques transport angular momentum and energy through the outer Lagrange point in the form of a vast tidal tail. If NSBM are indeed solely responsible for the solar system r- process abundances, a galaxy like our own would require to host a few NSBM per million years, with each event ejecting, on average, about 5x10^{-2} M_sun of r-process material. Because the ejecta velocities in the tidal tail are significantly larger than in ordinary supernovae, NSBM deposit a comparable amount of energy into the interstellar medium (ISM). In contrast to extensive efforts studying spherical models for supernova remnant evolution, calculations quantifying the impact of NSBM ejecta in the ISM have been lacking. To better understand their evolution in a cosmological context, we perform a suite of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with optically-thin radiative cooling of isolated NSBM ejecta expa...

  17. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blast Wave Physics. II. The Distribution of rho and Structure of the Circumburst Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, R. L. C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Weltervrede, P.

    2008-01-01

    We constrain blast wave parameters and the circumburst media ofa subsample of 10 BeppoSAX gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical, and NIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects ofmetallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behavior. Using the blast wave model and some assumptions which include on-axis viewing and standard jet structure, constant blast wave energy, and no evolution of the microphysical parameters, we find a mean value ofp for the sample as a whole of 9.... oa -0.003.0" 2 a_ statistical analysis of the distribution demonstrates that the p-values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value forp at the 3 _ level or greater, which has significant implications for particle acceleration models. This approach provides us with a measured distribution ofcircumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k ----0 (homogeneous) and k - 2 (windlike). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly windlike. The fifth source has a value of 0 medium.

  18. SN 1978K: The first millimetre detection of an evolved supernova outside of our Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Ryder, S D; Smith, I A; Tingay, S J; Kool, E C; Polshaw, J

    2016-01-01

    Supernova 1978K is one of the oldest-known examples of the class of Type IIn supernovae that show evidence for strong interaction between the blast wave and a dense, pre-existing circumstellar medium. Here we report detections of SN 1978K at both 34 GHz and 94 GHz, making it only the second extragalactic supernova after SN 1987A to be detected at late-times at these frequencies. We find SN 1978K to be >400 times more luminous than SN 1987A at millimetre wavelengths in spite of the roughly nine year difference in ages, highlighting the risk in adopting SN 1987A as a template for the evolution of core-collapse supernovae in general. Additionally, from new VLBI observations at 8.4 GHz, we measure a deconvolved diameter for SN 1978K of ~5 milli-arcsec, and a corresponding average expansion velocity of <1500 km/s. These observations provide independent evidence of an extremely dense circumstellar medium surrounding the progenitor star.

  19. Radio rebrightening of the GRB afterglow by the accompanying supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Duran, Rodolfo Barniol

    2015-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet powers the afterglow emission by shocking the surrounding medium, and radio afterglow can now be routinely observed to almost a year after the explosion. Long-duration GRBs are accompanied by supernovae (SNe) that typically contain much more energy than the GRB jet. Here we consider the fact that the SN blast wave will also produce its own afterglow, which will peak at much later time (since it is non-relativistic), when the SN blast wave transitions from a coasting phase to a decelerating Sedov-Taylor phase. We predict that this component will peak generally a few tens of years after the explosion and it will outshine the GRB powered afterglow well-before its peak emission. In the case of GRB 030329, where the external density is constrained by the $\\sim 10$-year coverage of the radio GRB afterglow, the radio emission is predicted to start rising over the next decade and to continue to increase for the following decades up to a level of $\\sim 0.5$ mJy. Detection of the SN-powere...

  20. A Deep Chandra Observation of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: A Type Ia Event with Circumstellar Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, S P; Hwang, U; Hughes, J P; Badenes, C; Laming, J M; Blondin, J M

    2007-01-01

    We present initial results of a 750 ks Chandra observation of the remnant of Kepler's supernova of AD 1604. The strength and prominence of iron emission, together with the absence of O-rich ejecta, demonstrate that Kepler resulted from a thermonuclear supernova, even though evidence for circumstellar interaction is also strong. We have analyzed spectra of over 100 small regions, and find that they fall into three classes. (1) The vast majority show Fe L emission between 0.7 and 1 keV and Si and S K alpha emission; we associate these with shocked ejecta. A few of these are found at or beyond the mean blast wave radius. (2) A very few regions show solar O/Fe abundance rations; these we associate with shocked circumstellar medium (CSM). Otherwise O is scarce. (3) A few regions are dominated by continuum, probably synchrotron radiation. Finally, we find no central point source, with a limit about 100 times fainter than the central object in Cas A. The evidence that the blast wave is interacting with CSM may indic...

  1. Chandra X-ray Observatory Arcsecond Imaging of the Young, Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant 1E0102.2-7219

    CERN Document Server

    Gaetz, T J; Edgar, R J; Eriksen, K A; Plucinsky, P P; Schlegel, E M; Smith, R K; Butt, Yousaf M.; Edgar, Richard J.; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Schlegel, Eric M.; Smith, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    We present observations of the young, Oxygen-rich supernova remnant 1E0102.2-7219 taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory during Chandra's Orbital Activation and Checkout phase. The boundary of the blast wave shock is clearly seen for the first time, allowing the diameter of the remnant and the mean blast wave velocity to be accurately determined. The prominent X-ray bright ring of material may be the result of the reverse shock encountering ejecta; the radial variation of O VII vs. O VIII emission indicates an ionizing shock propagating inwards, possibly through a strong density gradient in the ejecta. We compare the X-ray emission to Australia Telescope Compact Array 6 cm radio observations (Amy and Ball 1993) and to archival Hubble Space Telescope [O III] observations. The ring of radio emission is predominantly inwards of the outer blast wave, consistent with an interpretation as synchrotron radiation originating behind the blast wave, but outwards of the bright X-ray ring of emission. Many (but not all) o...

  2. The synchrotron-self-Compton spectrum of relativistic blast waves at large Y

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, M

    2015-01-01

    Recent analyses of multiwavelength light curves of gamma-ray bursts afterglows point to values of the magnetic turbulence well below the canonical $\\sim1\\,$\\% of equipartition, in agreement with theoretical expectations of a micro-turbulence generated in the shock precursor, which then decays downstream of the shock front through collisionless damping. As a direct consequence, the Compton parameter $Y$ can take large values in the blast. In the presence of decaying micro-turbulence and/or as a result of the Klein-Nishina suppression of inverse Compton cooling, the $Y$ parameter carries a non-trivial dependence on the electron Lorentz factor, which modifies the spectral shape of the synchrotron and inverse Compton components. This paper provides detailed calculations of this synchrotron-self-Compton spectrum in this large $Y$ regime, accounting for the possibility of decaying micro-turbulence. It calculates the expected temporal and spectral indices $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ customarily defined by $F_\

  3. Origin of asymmetries in X-ray emission lines from the blast wave of the 2014 outburst of nova V745 Sco

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Miceli, M

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic nova V745 Sco was observed in outburst on 2014 February 6. Its observations by the Chandra X-ray Observatory at days 16 and 17 have revealed a spectrum characterized by asymmetric and blue-shifted emission lines. Here we investigate the origin of these asymmetries through three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations describing the outburst during the first 20 days of evolution. The model takes into account thermal conduction and radiative cooling and assumes a blast wave propagates through an equatorial density enhancement. From the simulations, we synthesize the X-ray emission and derive the spectra as they would be observed with Chandra. We find that both the blast wave and the ejecta distribution are efficiently collimated in polar directions due to the presence of the equatorial density enhancement. The majority of the X-ray emission originates from the interaction of the blast with the equatorial density enhancement and is concentrated on the equatorial plane as a ring-like structure. Our "be...

  4. Blasting Vibration Generated by Breaking-Blasting Large Barriers with EBBLB

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Zhen-xiong; Gu Wen-bin; Liang Ting; Liu Jian-qing; Xu Jing-lin; Liu Xin

    2016-01-01

    Equipment for breaking and blasting large barriers (EBBLB) is new break-blast equipment, which inevitably induces ground vibration and may cause substantial damage to rock mass and nearby structures as well as human beings. The ground vibration induced by break-blast is one of the inevitable outcomes. By monitoring vibration at measuring points at different distances from blasting center, time history curve of vibrating velocity can be obtained; it can be drawn that blasting seismic waves are...

  5. Theoretical models for supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-09-21

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the ..gamma..-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars (M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of /sup 4/He and /sup 14/N prior to their collapse on the pair instability.

  6. Blood Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Delayed Neurological Deficits in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Induced by Blast Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Shetty

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred.

  7. NASA'S Chandra Finds New Evidence on Origin of Supernovas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    CAMBRIDGE, Ma. -- Astronomers may now know the cause of an historic supernova explosion that is an important type of object for investigating dark energy in the universe. The discovery, made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, also provides strong evidence that a star can survive the explosive impact generated when a companion star goes supernova. The new study examined the remnant of a supernova observed by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe in 1572. The object, dubbed Tycho for short, was formed by a Type Ia supernova, a category of stellar explosion useful in measuring astronomical distances because of their reliable brightness. Type Ia supernovas have been used to determine that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate, an effect attributed to the prevalence of an invisible, repulsive force throughout space called dark energy. A team of researchers analyzed a deep Chandra observation of Tycho and found an arc of X-ray emission in the supernova remnant. Evidence supports the conclusion that a shock wave created the arc when a white dwarf exploded and blew material off the surface of a nearby companion star. "There has been a long-standing question about what causes Type Ia supernovas," said Fangjun Lu of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. "Because they are used as steady beacons of light across vast distances, it is critical to understand what triggers them." One popular scenario for Type Ia supernovas involves the merger of two white dwarfs. In this case, no companion star or evidence for material blasted off a companion should exist. In the other main competing theory, a white dwarf pulls material from a "normal," or sun-like, companion star until a thermonuclear explosion occurs. Both scenarios may actually occur under different conditions, but the latest Chandra result from Tycho supports the latter one. n addition, the Tycho study seems to show the remarkable resiliency of stars, as the supernova

  8. Smoking Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, H L; Dunne, L

    2007-01-01

    The question "Are supernovae important sources of dust?" is a contentious one. Observations with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) only detected very small amounts of hot dust in supernova remnants. Here, we review observations of two young Galactic remnants with the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA), which imply that large quantities of dust are produced by supernovae. The association of dust with the Cassiopeia A remnant is in question due to the contamination of foreground material. In this article, we compare the emission from cold dust with CO emission towards Kepler's supernova remnant. We detect very little CO at the location of the submillimetre peaks. A comparison of masses from the CO and the dust clouds are made, and we estimate the 3 sigma upper limit on the gas-to-dust ratios to range from 25 - 65 suggesting that we cannot yet rule out freshly-formed or swept up circumstellar dust in Kepler's supernova remnant.

  9. GALACTIC AND EXTRAGALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AS SITES OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Sasaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernova remnants, owing to their strong shock waves, are likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Studies of supernova remnants in X-rays and gamma rays provide us with new insights into the acceleration of particles to high energies. This paper reviews the basic physics of supernova remnant shocks and associated particle acceleration and radiation processes. In addition, the study of supernova remnant populations in nearby galaxies and the implications for Galactic cosmic ray distribution are discussed.

  10. Radio Supernovae in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kamble, Atish; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, Ashley; Chakraborti, Sayan; Williams, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In the last three decades, about 50 radio supernovae have been detected as a result of targeted searches of optically discovered supernovae in the local universe. Despite this relatively small number some diversity among them has already been identified which is an indication of the underlying richness of radio supernovae waiting to be discovered. For example, comparison of star formation and supernova discovery rate imply that as many as half of the supernovae remain undetected in the traditional optical searches, either because of intrinsic dimness or due to dust obscuration. This has far reaching consequences to the models of stellar and galaxy evolution. A radio sky survey would be ideal to uncover larger supernova population. Transient radio sky would benefit significantly from such a survey. With the advent of advanced gravitational wave detectors a new window is set to open on the local Universe. Localization of these gravitational detectors is poor to identify electromagnetic counterparts of the gravi...

  11. Mechanism of blood-brain barrier impairment after mild traumatic brain injury caused by blast shock waves and its relationship with delayed nerve dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-xi XU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI caused by blast shock waves (BSWs is one of the most common injuries among soldiers in the war. Such mTBI can also happen in civilians if exposed to shock waves of accidental explosion disasters, bomb attacks by terrorists and so on. This injury often results in cognitive problems, memory dysfunction and emotional disorder, and these neurological deficits are closely related to the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The present paper discusses mainly the relationship between dysfunction or disruption of BBB and inflammatory reaction in mild brain injury associated with explosive shock wave and effects of early intervention of oxidative stress injury, repairing the BBB and blocking inflammation on relieving delayed neurological deficits. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.05.15

  12. Implications of supernova remnant origin model of galactic cosmic rays on gamma rays from young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2017-06-01

    It is widely believed that Galactic cosmic rays are originated in supernova remnants (SNRs), where they are accelerated by a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in supernova blast waves driven by expanding SNRs. In recent theoretical developments of the DSA theory in SNRs, protons are expected to accelerate in SNRs at least up to the knee energy. If SNRs are the true generators of cosmic rays, they should accelerate not only protons but also heavier nuclei with the right proportions, and the maximum energy of the heavier nuclei should be the atomic number (Z ) times the mass of the proton. In this work, we investigate the implications of the acceleration of heavier nuclei in SNRs on energetic gamma rays produced in the hadronic interaction of cosmic rays with ambient matter. Our findings suggest that the energy conversion efficiency has to be nearly double for the mixed cosmic ray composition compared to that of pure protons to explain observations. In addition, the gamma-ray flux above a few tens of TeV would be significantly higher if cosmic ray particles could attain energies Z times the knee energy in lieu of 200 TeV, as suggested earlier for nonamplified magnetic fields. The two stated maximum energy paradigms will be discriminated in the future by upcoming gamma-ray experiments like the Cherenkov telescope array (CTA).

  13. Non-linear collisionless damping of Weibel turbulence in relativistic blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Weibel/filamentation instability is known to play a key role in the physics of weakly magnetized collisionless shock waves. From the point of view of high energy astrophysics, this instability also plays a crucial role because its development in the shock precursor populates the downstream with a small-scale magneto-static turbulence which shapes the acceleration and radiative processes of suprathermal particles. The present work discusses the physics of the dissipation of this Weibel-generated turbulence downstream of relativistic collisionless shock waves. It calculates explicitly the first-order non-linear terms associated to the diffusive nature of the particle trajectories. These corrections are found to systematically increase the damping rate, assuming that the scattering length remains larger than the coherence length of the magnetic fluctuations. The relevance of such corrections is discussed in a broader astrophysical perspective, in particular regarding the physics of the external relativistic ...

  14. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Matthew; Skotak, Maciej; Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent.

  15. NONTHERMAL RADIATION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION AND PARTICLE ESCAPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jones, T. W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Edmon, Paul P., E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: twj@msi.umn.edu, E-mail: pedmon@cfa.harvard.edu [Research Computing, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We explore nonlinear effects of wave-particle interactions on the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in Type Ia-like supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves by implementing phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvénic drift, and particle escape in time-dependent numerical simulations of nonlinear DSA. For typical SNR parameters, the cosmic-ray (CR) protons can be accelerated to PeV energies only if the region of amplified field ahead of the shock is extensive enough to contain the diffusion lengths of the particles of interest. Even with the help of Alfvénic drift, it remains somewhat challenging to construct a nonlinear DSA model for SNRs in which of the order of 10% of the supernova explosion energy is converted into CR energy and the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of 10 or so in the shock precursor, while, at the same time, the energy spectrum of PeV protons is steeper than E {sup –2}. To explore the influence of these physical effects on observed SNR emission, we also compute the resulting radio-to-gamma-ray spectra. Nonthermal emission spectra, especially in X-ray and gamma-ray bands, depend on the time-dependent evolution of the CR injection process, MFA, and particle escape, as well as the shock dynamic evolution. This result comes from the fact that the high-energy end of the CR spectrum is composed of particles that are injected in the very early stages of the blast wave evolution. Thus, it is crucial to better understand the plasma wave-particle interactions associated with collisionless shocks in detailed modeling of nonthermal radiation from SNRs.

  16. Cosmic Ray Acceleration at the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence from Chandra X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, J S; Badenes, C; Ghavamian, P; McKee, C F; Moffett, D; Plucinsky, P P; Rakowski, C; Reynoso, E; Slane, P O

    2005-01-01

    We present evidence for cosmic ray acceleration at the forward shock in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) from three X-ray observables: (1) the proximity of the contact discontinuity to the forward shock, or blast wave, (2) the morphology of the emission from the rim of Tycho, and (3) the spectral nature of the rim emission. We determine the locations of the blast wave (BW), contact discontinuity (CD), and reverse shock (RS) around the rim of Tycho's supernova remnant using a principal component analysis and other methods applied to new Chandra data. The azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of the BW is 251". For the CD and RS we find average radii of 241" and 183", respectively. Taking account of projection effects, we find ratios of 1:0.93:0.70 (BW:CD:RS). We show these values to be inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamical models of SNR evolution. The CD:BW ratio can be explained if cosmic ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. The RS:BW ratio, as well as the strong Fe Ka emission from the T...

  17. SOUSA's Swift Supernova Siblings

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae in its first ten years. Photometry from the Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope (UVOT) is being compiled in the Swift Optical/Ultraviolet Supernovae Archive (SOUSA). The diversity of supernovae leads to a wide dynamic range of intrinsic properties. The intrinsic UV brightness of supernovae as a function of type and epoch allows one to understand the distance ranges at which Swift can reliably detect supernovae. The large Swift sample also includes supernovae from the same galaxy as other Swift supernovae. Through the first ten years, these families include 34 supernovae from 16 host galaxies (two galaxies have each hosted three Swift supernovae).

  18. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  19. Experimental Investigation on Propagation Rule of Shock Wave by Emulsion Explosives Underwater Blasting%乳化炸药水中爆炸冲击波传播规律试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵根; 季荣; 郑晓宁; 王文辉; 吴从清

    2011-01-01

    In the process of underwater blasting, the adobe blasting method was usually used to cut and demolish underwater metallic structure, sympathatic detonation of suspicious explosive object, etc. When blast area near by the culture area and protection of aquatic wildlife, it needs to consider the factor of water wave. In this paper, the propagation empirical formula of water wave is discussed. Through the blast test and arialysis on the monitored data, the propagation rules of water wave by high-energy and common emulsion explosives underwater blasting are obtained.%在水下工程爆破中,通常采用裸露药包爆破法,进行水下金属构件的切割与拆除、水下可疑爆炸物的诱爆等,当爆破区域附近有养殖区、野生保护水生物时,就需考虑炸药爆炸产生的水中冲击波影响问题.对水中冲击波传播规律的公式形式进行了探讨,通过爆破试验以及对监测资料的分析,得到了高能、普通乳化炸药的水中爆炸冲击波传播规律.

  20. Origin of asymmetries in X-ray emission lines from the blast wave of the 2014 outburst of nova V745 Sco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Salvatore; Drake, Jeremy J.; Miceli, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The symbiotic nova V745 Sco was observed in outburst on 2014 February 6. Its observations by the Chandra X-ray Observatory at days 16 and 17 have revealed a spectrum characterized by asymmetric and blueshifted emission lines. Here we investigate the origin of these asymmetries through 3D hydrodynamic simulations describing the outburst during the first 20 d of evolution. The model takes into account thermal conduction and radiative cooling, and assumes that a blast wave propagates through an equatorial density enhancement (EDE). From these simulations, we synthesize the X-ray emission and derive the spectra as they would be observed with Chandra. We find that both the blast wave and the ejecta distribution are efficiently collimated in polar directions due to the presence of the EDE. The majority of the X-ray emission originates from the interaction of the blast with the EDE and is concentrated on the equatorial plane as a ring-like structure. Our `best-fitting' model requires a mass of ejecta in the outburst Mej ≈ 3 × 10-7 M⊙ and an explosion energy Eb ≈ 3 × 1043 erg, and reproduces the distribution of emission measure versus temperature and the evolution of shock velocity and temperature inferred from the observations. The model predicts asymmetric and blueshifted line profiles similar to those observed and explains their origin as due to substantial X-ray absorption of redshifted emission by ejecta material. The comparison of predicted and observed Ne and O spectral line ratios reveals no signs of strong Ne enhancement and suggests that the progenitor is a CO white dwarf.

  1. Rock blasting and explosives engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, P.-A.; Holmberg, R.; Lee, J. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Research Center for Energetic Materials)

    1994-01-01

    The book covers the practical engineering aspects of different kinds of rock blasting. It includes a thorough analysis of the cost of the entire process of tunneling by drilling and blasting compared with full-face boring. It covers the economics of the entire rock blasting operation and its dependence on the size of excavation. The book highlights the fundamentals of rock mechanics, shock waves and detonation, initiation and mechanics of rock motion. It describes the engineering design principles and computational techniques for many separate mining methods and rock blasting operations. 274 refs.

  2. Expansion measurement of Supernova Remnant RX J1713.7-3946

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuji, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 is well known for its bright TeV gamma-ray emission with shell-like morphology. To constrain the hydrodynamical evolution, we have performed six times observations of the northwestern (NW) shell with the Chandra X-ray Observatory from 2005 to 2011, and measured the proper motion by using these data and the first epoch observation taken in 2000. The blast-wave shock speed at the NW shell is measured to be $(3900\\pm 300) (d/{\\rm kpc})\\ {\\rm km}\\ {\\rm s}^{-1}$ with an estimated distance of $d = 1$ kpc, and the proper motions of other structures within the NW shell are significantly less than that. Assuming that the measured blast-wave shock speed is the representative of the remnant's outer shock wave as a whole, we have confronted our measurements as well as a recent detection of thermal X-ray lines, with the analytic solution of the hydrodynamical properties of SNRs. Our hydrodynamical analysis indicates that the age of the remnant is 1580-2100 years, supporting the asso...

  3. Supernova Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, the study of stellar explosions -- supernovae -- have focused almost exclusively on the strong optical emission that dominates the bolometric luminosity in the days following the ultimate demise of the star. Yet many of the leading breakthroughs in our understanding of stellar death have been enabled by obtaining data at other wavelengths. For example, I have shown that 1% of all supernovae give rise to powerful relativistic jets, representing the biggest bangs in the Universe since the Big Bang. My recent serendipitous X-ray discovery of a supernova in the act of exploding (“in flagrante delicto”) revealed a novel technique to discover new events and provide clues on the shock physics at the heart of the explosion. With the advent of sensitive new radio telescopes, my research group combines clues from across the electromagnetic spectrum (radio to gamma-ray), leading us to a holistic study of stellar death, the physics of the explosions, and their role in fertilizing the Universe with new elements, by providing the community with cosmic autopsy reports.

  4. Exit from inflation with a first-order phase transition and a gravitational wave blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Ashoorioon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In double-field inflation, which exploits two scalar fields, one of the fields rolls slowly during inflation whereas the other field is trapped in a meta-stable vacuum. The nucleation rate from the false vacuum to the true one becomes substantial enough that triggers a first order phase transition and ends inflation. We revisit the question of first order phase transition in an “extended” model of hybrid inflation, realizing the double-field inflationary scenario, and correctly identify the parameter space that leads to a first order phase transition at the end of inflation. We compute the gravitational wave profile which is generated during this first order phase transition. Assuming instant reheating, the peak frequency falls in the 1 GHz to 10 GHz frequency band and the amplitude varies in the range 10−11≲ΩGWh2≲10−8, depending on the value of the cosmological constant in the false vacuum. For a narrow band of vacuum energies, the first order phase transition can happen after the end of inflation via the violation of slow-roll, with a peak frequency that varies from 1 THz to 100 THz. For smaller values of cosmological constant, even though inflation can end via slow-roll violation, the universe gets trapped in a false vacuum whose energy drives a second phase of eternal inflation. This range of vacuum energies do not lead to viable inflationary models, unless the value of the cosmological constant is compatible with the observed value, M∼10−3 eV.

  5. Matter Effects on Neutrino Oscillations in Different Supernova Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Li-Jun; Li, Rui-Cheng; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of simulations about supernova explosion, we have a better understanding about the density profiles and the shock waves in supernovae than before. There might be a reverse shock wave, another sudden change of density except the forward shock wave, or even no shock wave, emerging in the supernova. Instead of using the expression of the crossing probability at the high resonance, PH, we have studied the matter effects on neutrino oscillations in different supernova models. In detail, we have calculated the survival probability of ve (Ps) and the conversion probability of vx (Pc) in the Schrödinger equation within a simplified two-flavor framework for a certain case, in which the neutrino transfers through the supernova matter from an initial flavor eigenstate located at the core of the supernova. Our calculations was based on the data of density in three different supernova models obtained from simulations. In our work, we do not steepen the density gradient around the border of the shock wave, which differs to what was done in most of the other simulations. It is found that the mass and the density distribution of the supernova do make a difference on the behavior of Ps and Pc. With the results of Ps and Pc, we can estimate the number of ve (and vx) remained in the beam after they go through the matter in the supernova. Supported by National Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11175020 and 11275025

  6. LAD Early Career Prize Talk:Laboratory astrophysics experiments investigating the effects of high energy fluxes on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth relevant to young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Park, Hye Sook; Huntington, Channing; Miles, Aaron R.; Remington, Bruce A.; Plewa, Tomek; Trantham, Matt; Shvarts, Dov; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Steven; Wan, Wesley; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Flippos, Kirk; Malamud, Guy; Handy, Timothy; Prisbey, Shon; Grosskopf, Michael; Krauland, Christine; Klein, Sallee; Harding, Eric; Wallace, Russell; Marion, Donna; Kalantar, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Energy-transport effects can alter the structure that develops as a supernova evolves into a supernova remnant. The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability is thought to produce structure at the interface between the stellar ejecta and the circumstellar matter (CSM), based on simple models and hydrodynamic simulations. When a blast wave emerges from an exploding star, it drives a forward shock into the CSM and a reverse shock forms in the expanding stellar ejecta, creating a young supernova remnant (SNR). As mass accumulates in the shocked layers, the interface between these two shocks decelerates, becoming unstable to the RT instability. Simulations predict that RT produces structures at this interface, having a range of spatial scales. When the CSM is dense enough, as in the case of SN 1993J, the hot shocked matter can produce significant radiative fluxes that affect the emission from the SNR. Here we report experimental results from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to explore how large energy fluxes, which are present in supernovae such as SN 1993J, might affect this structure. The experiment used NIF to create a RT unstable interface subject to a high energy flux by the emergence of a blast wave into lower-density matter, in analogy to the SNR. We also preformed and with a low energy flux to compare the affect of the energy flux on the instability growth. We found that the RT growth was reduced in the experiments with a high energy flux. In analyzing the comparison with SN 1993J, we discovered that the energy fluxes produced by heat conduction appear to be larger than the radiative energy fluxes, and large enough to have dramatic consequences. No reported astrophysical simulations have included radiation and heat conduction self-consistently in modeling SNRs.

  7. A Table-top Blast Driven Shock Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The d...

  8. Blast-Induced Damage on Millisecond Blasting Model Test with Multicircle Vertical Blastholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin-yong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the blast-induced damage effect on surrounding rock in vertical shaft excavation, 4 kinds of millisecond blasting model tests with three-circle blastholes were designed and carried out with excavation blasting in vertical shaft as the background. The longitudinal wave velocity on the side of concrete model was also measured before and after blasting. Then blast damage factor was then calculated by measuring longitudinal wave velocity before and after blasting. The test results show that the blast-induced damage factor attenuated gradually with the centre of three-circle blastholes as centre. With the threshold value of 0.19 for blast-induced damage factor, blast-induced damage zones for 4 kinds of model tests are described and there is an inverted cone blast-induced damage zone in concrete model. And analyses of cutting effect and blast-induced damage zone indicate that in order to minimize the blast-induced damage effect and ensure the cutting effect the reasonable blasting scheme for three-circle blastholes is the inner two-circle blastholes initiated simultaneously and the outer third circle blastholes initiated in a 25 ms delay.

  9. Postexplosion hydrodynamics of supernovae in red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herant, Marc; Woosley, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    Shock propagation, mixing, and clumping are studied in the explosion of red supergiants as Type II supernovae using a two-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. We show that extensive Rayleigh-Talor instabilities develop in the ejecta in the wake of the reverse shock wave. In all cases, the shell structure of the progenitor is obliterated to leave a clumpy, well-mixed supernova remnant. However, the occurrence of mass loss during the lifetime of the progenitor can significantly reduce the amount of mixing. These results are independent of the Type II supernova explosion mechanism.

  10. Early-time signatures of {\\gamma}-ray emission from supernovae in dense circumstellar media

    CERN Document Server

    Kantzas, Dimitrios; Mastichiadis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    We present our results on the {\\gamma}-ray emission from interaction-powered supernovae (SNe), a recently discovered SN type that is suggested to be surrounded by a circumstellar medium (CSM) with densities 10^7-10^12~ cm^-3. Such high densities favor inelastic collisions between relativistic protons accelerated in the SN blast wave and CSM protons and the production of {\\gamma}-ray photons through neutral pion decays. Using a numerical code that includes synchrotron radiation, adiabatic losses due to the expansion of the source, photon-photon interactions, proton-proton collisions and proton-photon interactions, we calculate the multi-wavelength non-thermal photon emission soon after the shock breakout and follow its temporal evolution until 100-1000 days. Focusing on the {\\gamma}-ray emission at >100 MeV, we show that this could be detectable by the Fermi-LAT telescope for nearby (10^11 cm^-3).

  11. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Ellison, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occuring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to devel...

  12. HI 21 cm Emission Line Study of Southern Galactic Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, B C; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun

    2004-01-01

    We have searched for HI 21 cm line emission from shocked atomic gas associated with southern supernova remnants (SNRs) using data from the Southern Galactic Plane Survey. Among the 97 sources studied, we have detected 10 SNRs with high-velocity HI emission confined to the SNR. The large velocity and the spatial confinement suggest that the emission is likely from the gas accelerated by the SN blast wave. We also detected 22 SNRs which show HI emission significantly brighter than the surrounding regions over a wide ($>10$\\kms) velocity interval. The association with these SNRs is less certain. We present the parameters and maps of the excess emission in these SNRs. We discuss in some detail the ten individual SNRs with associated high-velocity HI emission.

  13. First supernova companion star found

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    discovery possible.” Supernovae occur when a star of more than about eight times the mass of the Sun reaches the end of its nuclear fuel reserves and can no longer produce enough energy to keep the star from collapsing under its own immense weight. The core of the star collapses, and the outer layers are ejected in a fast-moving shock wave. This huge energy release causes the visible supernova we see. While astronomers are convinced that observations will match this theoretical model, they are in the embarrassing position that they have confidently identified only two stars that later exploded as supernovae - the precursors of supernovae 1987A and 1993J. There have been more than 2000 supernovae discovered in galaxies beyond the Milky Way and there appear to be about eight distinct sub-classes. However identifying which stars produce which flavours has proved incredibly difficult. This team has now embarked on a parallel project with the Hubble Space Telescope to image a large number of galaxies and then wait patiently for a supernova to explode. Supernovae appear in spiral galaxies like M81 on average once every 100 years or so. The team, led by Stephen Smartt, hope to increase the numbers of supernova progenitors known from 2 to 20 over the next five years. Notes for editors The team is composed of Stephen J. Smartt and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge, UK), Rolf. P. Kudritzki (University of Hawaii, USA), Philipp Podsiadlowski (University of Oxford, UK) and Gerry F. Gilmore (University of Cambridge, UK). Animations of the discovery and general Hubble Space Telescope background footage are available from http://www.spacetelescope.org/video/heic0401_vnr.html

  14. Detection of Supernova Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Bekman, B.; Holeczek, J.; Kisiel, J4

    2004-01-01

    Matter effects on neutrino oscillations in both, a supernova and the Earth, change the observed supernova neutrino spectra. We calculate the expected number of supernova neutrino interactions for ICARUS, SK and SNO detectors as a function of the distance which they traveled in the Earth. Calculations are performed for supernova type II at 10kpc from the Earth, using standard supernova neutrino fluxes described by thermal Fermi--Dirac distributions and the PREM I Earth matter density profile.

  15. Dust Destruction in Fast Shocks of Core-Collapse Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, B J; Reynolds, S P; Blair, W P; Ghavamian, P; Hendrick, S P; Long, K S; Points, S; Raymond, J C; Sankrit, R; Smith, R C; Winkler, P F; Williams, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    We report observations with the MIPS instrument aboard the {\\it Spitzer Space Telescope} (SST) of four supernova remnants (SNRs) believed to be the result of core-collapse SNe: N132D (0525-69.6), N49B (0525-66.0), N23 (0506-68.0), and 0453-68.5. All four of these SNRs were detected in whole at 24 $\\mu$m and in part at 70 $\\mu$m. Comparisons with {\\it Chandra} broadband X-ray images show an association of infrared (IR) emission with the blast wave. We attribute the observed IR emission to dust that has been collisionally heated by electrons and ions in the hot, X-ray emitting plasma, with grain size distributions appropriate for the LMC and the destruction of small grains via sputtering by ions. As with our earlier analysis of Type Ia SNRs, models can reproduce observed 70/24 $\\mu$m ratios only if effects from sputtering are included, destroying small grains. We calculate the mass of dust swept up by the blast wave in these remnants, and we derive a dust-to-gas mass ratio of several times less than the often a...

  16. An X-ray study of the supernova remnant W44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrus, Ilana; Hughes, John P.

    1994-12-01

    We report results from the analysis and modeling of data for the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. Spectral analysis of archival data from the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer, the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter, and the Large Area Counters on Ginga, covering an energy range from 0.3 to 8 keV, indicates that the SNR can be described well using a nonequilibrium ionization model with temperature ~ 0.8 keV, ionization timescale ~ 9000 cm(-3) years, and elemental abundances close to the solar ratios. The column density toward the SNR is high: greater than 10(22) atoms cm(-2) . As has been known for some time, W44 presents a centrally peaked surface brightness distribution in the soft X-ray band while at radio wavelengths it shows a limb-brightened shell morphology, in contradiction to predictions of standard models (e.g., Sedov) for SNR evolution. We have investigated two different evolutionary scenarios which can explain the centered X-ray morphology of the remnant: (1) the White and Long (1991) model involving the slow thermal evaporation of clouds engulfed by the supernova blast wave as it propagates though a clumpy interstellar medium (ISM), and (2) a hydrodynamical simulation of a blast wave propagating through a homogeneous ISM, including the effects of radiative cooling. Both models can have their respective parameters tuned to reproduce approximately the morphology of the SNR. We find that, for the case of the radiative-phase shock model, the best agreement is obtained for an initial explosion energy in the range (0.5 - 0.6) times 10(51) ergs and an ambient ISM density of between 1.5 and 2 cm(-3) .

  17. Expansion measurements of supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Naomi; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2016-12-01

    Supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 is well known for its bright TeV gamma-ray emission with a shell-like morphology. Strong synchrotron X-ray emission dominates the total X-ray flux in SNR RX J1713.7-3946 and the X-ray morphology is broadly similar to the TeV gamma-ray appearance. The synchrotron X-ray and TeV gamma-ray brightness allows us to perform detailed analysis of the acceleration of TeV-scale particles in this SNR. To constrain the hydrodynamical evolution of RX J1713.7-3946, we have performed six observations of the northwestern (NW) shell with the Chandra X-ray Observatory from 2005 to 2011, and measured the proper motion by using these data and the first epoch observation taken in 2000. The blast-wave shock speed at the NW shell is measured to be (3900 ± 300)(d/ kpc) km s-1 with an estimated distance of d = 1 kpc, and the proper motions of other structures within the NW shell are significantly less than that. Assuming that the measured blast-wave shock speed is representative of the remnant's outer shock wave as a whole, we have confronted our measurements, as well as a recent detection of thermal X-ray lines, with the analytic solution of the hydrodynamical properties of SNRs. Our hydrodynamical analysis indicates that the age of the remnant is 1580-2100 yr, supporting the association with SN393. A model with supernova kinetic energy of E = 1051 erg, ejecta mass of Mej = 3 M⊙, and ambient density at the current blast wave location of n2 = 0.015 cm-3, provides a reasonable explanation for our measurements and previous findings at the X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. We find that the transition to the Sedov-Taylor phase is incomplete for any reasonable set of parameters, implying that the current maximum energy of accelerated protons in RX J1713.7-3946 would not correspond to the maximum attainable energy for this remnant.

  18. 温压弹爆炸冲击波作用下防护门破坏模式研究%Failure mode of a blast door subjected to the explosion wave of a thermobaric bomb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀地; 耿振刚; 苗朝阳; 杨森

    2016-01-01

    为研究温压弹爆炸冲击波作用下防护门的破坏模式,利用 ANSYS /LS-DYNA 软件建立了考虑材料应变率效应的分离式钢筋混凝土防护门数值计算模型。对防护门加载温压弹爆炸冲击波波形,分析了防护门的挠度、转角和剪应力,并与 TNT 的作用结果进行了对比。结果表明:温压弹爆炸冲击波作用下,随着距爆炸源距离的增加,防护门的破坏模式由直剪破坏、弯剪耦合破坏逐渐变为弯曲破坏;防护门的响应与温压弹爆炸冲击波的高冲量有关,温压弹爆炸冲击波作用下防护门的破坏程度大于 TNT 的作用结果;防护门跨中速度值可以用来快速评估防护门的破坏模式。%To reveal the failure mode of a blast door subjected to the explosion wave of a thermobaric bomb,a separate reinforced concrete numerical model considering strain rate effects of a blast door was established with the dynamic finite element software ANSYS /LS-DYNA.The explosion wave of a thermobaric bomb was loaded on the blast door and the deflection and shear stress of the blast door were analyzed and compared with the shock wave of TNT.The results show that with the distance from explosion increasing,the failure mode of blast door under the thermobaric bomb gradually changes from punching shear failure and mixed flexural-shear failure to flexural failure.The dynamic response of the blast door is related to the high impulse of the thermobaric bomb,and the damage of the blast door under the thermobaric bomb is more serious than that under TNT.The velocity of the mid span can be used to estimate the failure mode of the blast door.

  19. Environmental impact of Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Dubner, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of a supernovae (SN) represents the sudden injection of about 10^51 ergs of thermal and mechanical energy in a small region of space, causing the formation of powerful shock waves that propagate through the interstellar medium at speeds of several thousands of km/s. These waves sweep, compress and heat the interstellar material that they encounter, forming the supernova remnants. Their evolution over thousands of years change forever, irreversibly, not only the physical but also the chemical properties of a vast region of space that can span hundreds of parsecs. This contribution briefly analyzes the impact of these explosions, discussing the relevance of some phenomena usually associated with SNe and their remnants in the light of recent theoretical and observational results.

  20. Dense Fe-Rich Ejecta in Supernova Remnants DEM L238 and DEM L249: A New Class of Type Ia Supernova?

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P

    2006-01-01

    We present observations of two LMC supernova remnants (SNRs), DEM L238 and DEM L249, with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray satellites. Bright central emission, surrounded by a faint shell, is present in both remnants. The central emission has an entirely thermal spectrum dominated by strong Fe L-shell lines, with the deduced Fe abundance in excess of solar and not consistent with the LMC abundance. This Fe overabundance leads to the conclusion that DEM L238 and DEM L249 are remnants of thermonuclear (Type Ia) explosions. The shell emission originates in gas swept up and heated by the blast wave. A standard Sedov analysis implies about 50 solar masses in both swept-up shells, SNR ages between 10,000 and 15,000 yr, low (< 0.05 cm^-3) preshock densities, and subluminous explosions with energies of 3x10^50 ergs. The central Fe-rich supernova ejecta are close to collisional ionization equilibrium. Their presence is unexpected, because standard Type Ia SNR models predict faint ejecta emission with short ionizati...

  1. Blast Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    Team Leader Risa Scherer Blast Mitigation Interior and Laboratory Team Leader Blast Technologies POC’s Government Point Of Contacts (POCs): To...to yield injury assessments at higher fidelities and with higher confidence UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Risa Scherer Blast Mitigation Interior and

  2. "Special Case" Stellar Blast Teaching Astronomers New Lessons About Cosmic Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    - Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "If astronomers use such supernovae to measure the Universe, it's important to fully understand how these systems evolve prior to the explosion," she added. RS Ophiuchi is a "recurrent" nova that experienced such blasts in 1898, 1933, 1958, 1967, and 1985 prior to this year's event. Sokoloski also pointed out that RS Ophiuchi is "a very special type of system," in which the nova explosions occur inside a gaseous nebula created by the stellar wind coming from the red giant companion to the white dwarf. "This means that we can track the outward-moving blast wave from the explosion by observing X-rays produced as the blast plows through this nebula," said Sokoloski, who led a team using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite to do so. "One natural way to produce what we observe is with an explosion that was not spherical," she added. Another surprise came when the radio waves coming from RS Ophiuchi indicated that a strong magnetic field is present in the material ejected by the explosion. "This is the first case we've seen that showed signs of such a magnetic field in a recurrent nova," said Michael Rupen who, with Amy Mioduszewski, both of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, and Sokoloski, did another study of the system using the VLBA. Rupen pointed out the importance of observing the object with both X-ray and radio telescopes. "What we could infer from the X-ray data, we could image with the radio telescopes," he said. All the researchers agree that their studies show that the explosion is more complex than scientists previously thought such blasts to be. "It's a jet-like explosion, probably shaped by the geometry of the binary-star system at the center," said O'Brien. Rupen added that RS Ophiuchi showed the "earliest detection ever of such a jet. In fact, we could actually tell -- within a couple of days -- when the jet turned on." The new information is valuable for understanding not just nova explosions but other

  3. Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2012-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe), the luminous explosions of stars, were observed since antiquity, with typical peak luminosity not exceeding 1.2x10^{43} erg/s (absolute magnitude >-19.5 mag). It is only in the last dozen years that numerous examples of SNe that are substantially super-luminous (>7x10^{43} erg/s; <-21 mag absolute) were well-documented. Reviewing the accumulated evidence, we define three broad classes of super-luminous SN events (SLSNe). Hydrogen-rich events (SLSN-II) radiate photons diffusing out from thick hydrogen layers where they have been deposited by strong shocks, and often show signs of interaction with circumstellar material. SLSN-R, a rare class of hydrogen-poor events, are powered by very large amounts of radioactive 56Ni and arguably result from explosions of very massive stars due to the pair instability. A third, distinct group of hydrogen-poor events emits photons from rapidly-expanding hydrogen-poor material distributed over large radii, and are not powered by radioactivity (SLSN-I). Thes...

  4. More Supernova Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    SEP 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE More Supernova Surprises 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...PERSPECTIVES More Supernova Surprises ASTRONOMY J. Martin Laming Spectroscopic observations of the supernova SN1987A are providing a new window into high...a core-collapse supernova ) have stretched and motivated research that has expanded our knowledge of astrophysics. The brightest such event in

  5. SNO and Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Virtue, C J

    2001-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has unique capabilities as a supernova detector. In the event of a galactic supernova there are opportunities, with the data that SNO would collect, to constrain certain intrinsic neutrino properties significantly, to test details of the various models of supernova dynamics, and to provide prompt notification to the astronomical community through the Supernova Early Warning System (SNEWS). This paper consists of a discussion of these opportunities illustrated by some preliminary Monte Carlo results.

  6. Blast Valve Design and Related Studies : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Sharma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The protective structures required for performing critical operations are vulnerable to the blast and shock loads of advanced weapons. A blast valve is an important component of such structures for ventilation during normal conditions and for protection from blast/ shock during explosion. In this paper, various aspects of blast valve design and related studies are briefly reviewed. The concept and effects of blast wave, blast impact, numerical modelling and deformation of circular plate (one of the critical components of blast valve have been discussed. The merits and demerits of sensing mechanisms viz. remote and direct sensing are discussed. The leakage of blast pressure during finite closing period of the valve (one of the critical problems and the shock tube as a major experimental facility for testing of blast valves are briefly discussed.

  7. Chandra observation of the supernova remnant N11L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Yang; Chu, You-Hua; Williams, Rosa M.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) N11L in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The X-ray emission is predominantly distributed within the main shell and the northern loop-like filaments traced by the optical narrow band images, with an indistinct extension along the north area. The brightest emission comes from a northeast-southwest ridge, and peaks at two patches at center and southwest. Spectral analysis indicates that the blast wave is propagating in a inhomogenous environment, and the X-ray emission overall is dominated by thermal gas whose composition is consistent with the LMC average abundance. The ionization time of the hot plasma implied by the X-ray spectral analysis is consistent with the Sedov age of the SNR derived from the best-fit parameters and the apparent radius of the SNR based on the optical images, however, the consequent explosion energy is no only at least one order of magnitude less than the canonical value of 10^{51} ergs, but also takes a small portion of the thermal energy of the hot gas. That discrepancy supports the blown-out scenario.

  8. HST/ACS Narrowband Imaging of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Frattare, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Lawrence; DeLaney, Tracey; Harrus, Ilana M.; Ennis, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    We present narrowband images of the Kepler supernova remnant obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The images, with an angular resolution of 0.05" reveal the structure of the emitting gas in unprecedented detail. Radiative and nonradiative shocks are found in close proximity, unresolvable in gromd-based spectra, indicating that the pre-shock medium is highly clumped. The ionization structure, traced by differences in the [0 111] to [N 11] flux ratio, varies on subarcsecond scales. The variation is due to 110th differences in shock velocity as well as gradients in the evolutionary stage of the shocks. A prollinent complex of knots protruding beyond the boundary of the rennallt in the northwest is found to consist of bright radiative knots, collected by arcuate nonradiative filaments. Based on the coincidence of the optical emission with a bright isolated knot of X-ray emission, we infer that this feature is due to a Rayleigh-Taylor finger that formed at the contact discontinuity and overtook the primary blast wave.

  9. The X-ray Spectrum of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Michael, E; McCray, R; Hwang, U; Burrows, D N; Park, S; Garmire, G P; Holt, S S; Hasinger, G; Michael, Eli; Zhekov, Svetozar; Cray, Richard Mc; Hwang, Una; Burrows, David N.; Park, Sangwook; Garmire, Gordon P.; Holt, Stephen S.; Hasinger, Guenther

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the X-ray emission observed from Supernova Remnant 1987A with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We analyze a high resolution spectrum obtained in 1999 October with the high energy transmission grating (HETG). From this spectrum we measure the strengths and an average profile of the observed X-ray lines. We also analyze a high signal-to-noise ratio CCD spectrum obtained in 2000 December. The good statistics (~ 9250 counts) of this spectrum and the high spatial resolution provided by the telescope allow us to perform spectroscopic analyses of different regions of the remnant. We discuss the relevant shock physics that can explain the observed X-ray emission. The X-ray spectra are well fit by plane parallel shock models with post-shock electron temperatures of ~ 2.6 keV and ionization ages of ~ 6 x 10^10 cm^3/s. The combined X-ray line profile has a FWHM of ~ 5000 km/s, indicating a blast wave speed of ~ 3500 km/s. At this speed, plasma with a mean post-shock temperature of ~ 17 keV is produced. This is ...

  10. Mapping of 20 μm emission from the supernova remnant Cas A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, R. G.; Greidanus, H.

    A small region in the bright northern rim of the young supernova remnant Cas A has been mapped at 20 μm with UKIRT. The total flux density detected is 18 Jy, equivalent to 2x10-4Msun of dust radiating at 90K. Structure is detected down to the 5″resolution limit. Although this is a region rich in fast moving optical knots, X-ray structure and small scale radio emission, there is no correlation between any of these and the infrared features. In particular, the detailed correlation between hot (X-ray emitting) gas and shock-heated dust predicted by model calculations is totally absent. A possible anticorrelation between the two may be explained by small-scale pressure differences in the post-shock gas, or by variations in the gas-to-dust ratio. While the origin of the dust remains unclear in that it could be associated with either reverse-shocked ejecta or interstellar clouds, the authors argue that it is unlikely to coincide with the main supernova blast wave.

  11. Spitzer Space Telescope Observations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: A Detailed Look at the Circumstellar Dust Component

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, W P; Long, K S; Williams, B J; Borkowski, K J; Sankrit, S P R R; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Stephen P. Reynolds & Ravi

    2007-01-01

    We present 3.6 - 160 micron infrared images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN1604) obtained with the IRAC and MIPS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We also present MIPS SED low resolution spectra in the 55 - 95 micron region. The observed emission in the MIPS 24 micron band shows the entire shell. Emission in the MIPS 70 micron and IRAC 8 micron bands is seen only from the brightest regions of 24 micron emission, which also correspond to the regions seen in optical Halpha images. Shorter wavelength IRAC images are increasingly dominated by stars, although faint filaments are discernible. The SED spectrum of shows a faint continuum dropping off to longer wavelengths and confirms that strong line emission does not dominate the mid-IR spectral region. The emission we see is due primarily to warm dust emission from dust heated by the primary blast wave; no excess infrared emission is observed in regions where supernova ejecta are seen in X-rays. We use models of the dust to interpret the observed 70/24...

  12. High-resolution IUE observations of interstellar absorption lines in the Vela supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Wallerstein, G.; Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of 45 stars in the vicinity of the Vela supernova remnant were recorded by the short-wavelength echelle spectrograph aboard the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Over one-third of the stars show interstellar absorption lines at large radial velocities (greater than 60 km/s). The mapping of these high-velocity components in the sky suggests the motions are chaotic, rather than from a coherent expansion of the remnant material. In accord with earlier conclusions from Copernicus data, the gas at high velocity exhibits higher than normal ionization and shows substantially less depletion of nonvolatile elements than normal interstellar material at low velocities. Relatively strong lines from neutral carbon in the two excited fine-structure states indicate that the neutral clouds within the remnant have had their pressures enhanced by the passage of the blast wave from the supernova. Also, the remnant seems to show a significant enhancement in the abundances of low-velocity Si IV, C IV, and N V over those found in the general interstellar medium.

  13. 炮口冲击波超压无线存储测试系统设计%Design of Muzzle Blast Wave Overpressure Measuring System Based on Wireless and Memory Test Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘帆; 杜红棉; 范锦彪; 赖富文; 焦耀晗; 苗松珍; 岳掌宽; 闫鹏飞

    2014-01-01

    为了评估炮口冲击波对相关操作人员及设备造成的损伤和破坏程度,将存储测试技术应用到炮口冲击波测试中,并结合无线传输技术,使得测试主控制台可以在一定距离外进行有效监控。通过对测试系统进行的激波管动态校准,符合国军标对炮口冲击波超压测试的基本要求。测试装置在无线触发状态和多次重触发状态进行了测试试验,均成功获取到炮口冲击波超压曲线。试验结果表明所设计的炮口冲击波无线存储测试系统能有效工作,同时具有操作简单等优点,具有良好的应用前景。%In order to evaluate the damage of relevant operators and equipments caused by muzzle blast wave,The muzzle blast wave test system applied Storage testing technology combined with Wireless transmission technology,to make the main test console monitoring effectively in a certain distance. The results of dynamic calibration based on shock tube showed the test system meets the basic requirements of military specifications on the muzzle blast wave overpressure test. The test devices in both wireless trigger state and multiple re-trigger state obtained the curves of the muzzle blast wave overpressure successfully. The results show that the designed muzzle blast wave wireless storage test system can work effectively,has the advantage of easy operation and has a good application prospect.

  14. SNR 1987A: the birth of a Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Patrice; Danziger, John

    Observations show that the infrared emission from dust observed in Supernovae and Supernova Remants originates both from the freshly synthesized dust in the expanding envelope and from pre-existing dust in the CSM. There are some few cases where it is suggested that dust formed recently in the CSM as a result of interaction with the expanding emvelope. The mass of dust in these various environments is, with a few exceptions, poorly determined. However the few estimates of the dust mass condensed in the ejecta make questionable so far any claims for supernovae being significant dust factories. This is the case in particular for SNR 1987A. We present up to date multiwavelength observations of this incipient remnant obtained with the VLT, Gemini, Chandra, Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope. The various light curves show that the morphology and luminosity of the remnant are rapidly changing at X-ray, optical, and infrared wavelengths as the blast wave from the explosion expands into the circumstellar equatorial ring produced by mass loss from the progenitor 20000 years before the explosion. The observed IR/soft-X-ray flux ratio (IRX) is consistent with that of a dusty plasma with standard LMC dust abundances. This ratio decreased between days 6190 and 7137, providing the first direct observation of dust destruction, and has been remarkably stable since that date (up to day 8000), which might indicate that the episode of destruction has terminated. We show that the main components of the dust grains present in the ring are silicates and a model consistent with the observations has been elaborated. There remain some spectral features which are not explained. In addition, the lack of a strong correlation between images obtained in the visible (hot spots) and in the mid-infrared (dust clumps) also makes the precise location of the soft X-ray emitting region uncertain. The composition of the grains that have condensed in the ejecta of SN 1987A is still not known with

  15. Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence from Chandra X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jessica S.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Ghavamian, Parviz; McKee, Christopher F.; Moffett, David; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Rakowski, Cara; Reynoso, Estela; Slane, Patrick

    2005-11-01

    We present evidence for cosmic-ray acceleration at the forward shock in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) from three X-ray observables: (1) the proximity of the contact discontinuity to the forward shock, or blast wave, (2) the morphology of the emission from the rim of Tycho, and (3) the spectral nature of the rim emission. We determine the locations of the blast wave (BW), contact discontinuity (CD), and reverse shock (RS) around the rim of Tycho's supernova remnant using a principal component analysis and other methods applied to new Chandra data. The azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of the BW is 251". For the CD and RS we find average radii of 241" and 183", respectively. Taking account of projection effects, we find ratios of 1:0.93:0.70 (BW:CD:RS). We show these values to be inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamic models of SNR evolution. The CD:BW ratio can be explained if cosmic-ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. The RS:BW ratio, as well as the strong Fe Kα emission from the Tycho ejecta, imply that the RS is not accelerating cosmic rays. We also extract radial profiles from ~34% of the rim of Tycho and compare them to models of surface brightness profiles behind the BW for a purely thermal plasma with an adiabatic shock. The observed morphology of the rim is much more strongly peaked than predicted by the model, indicating that such thermal emission is implausible here. Spectral analysis also implies that the rim emission is nonthermal in nature, lending further support to the idea that Tycho's forward shock is accelerating cosmic rays.

  16. Quantification of Aleatory Uncertainty in Blast Wave Problem%爆炸波问题中偶然不确定度的量化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁霄; 王瑞利

    2016-01-01

    As uncertainty always exists in the modeling and simulation of complex engineering problems, the identification and analysis of its source and the quantification of its degrees play an important role in assessing the credibility of the modeling and simulation results.In this paper,the concept of uncertainty as well as uncertainty quantification process was presented in the modeling and simulation,with the blast wave problem used as a typical example to illustrate the detailed process for the quantification of the aleatory uncertainty.The expectations and variances of density,pressure,velocity and internal energy were calculated and,moreover,the probability density function of the shock wave position was obtained using the Monte-Carlo and the non-intrusive polynomial chaos (NIPC).The results were consistent with each other,which verified that the NIPC method is an efficient approach in the uncertainty quantification of a complex nonlinear system.%复杂工程建模与模拟中始终存在不确定度,分析与辨识不确定度的来源及量化不确定度对建模与模拟可信度评估具有重要意义。为此,给出了建模与模拟中误差与不确定度的概念以及不确定度量化的过程,并以爆炸波问题为例说明量化偶然不确定度的过程,得到了爆炸波问题的期望和标准差以及激波位置的概率密度函数,验证了非嵌入多项式混沌方法在复杂非线性系统不确定度量化中的有效性。

  17. Experimental Study on Effect of Prefabricated Damping Ditch/Slot on Reduction of Blasting Wave%预制沟槽对爆破震动阻隔效应的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文潮; 王占江; 李运良; 门朝举; 陈立强

    2012-01-01

    由于裂隙或者沟槽对炸药爆炸引起的震动具有良好的隔震作用,所以用现场试验的方法对比研究了用导爆索爆炸形成减震沟槽和人工开挖沟槽的减震效果.用3发50 g TNT当量、lm埋深的爆炸实验,研究了爆破成形和人工开挖预制的两种沟槽的隔震效果.实验结果表明,在爆破成形沟槽的两边存在一定宽度的裂隙区.两种沟槽均有效地降低了爆破震动的幅度并改变了地震波的频谱,而爆破成形沟槽的减震效果优于人工开挖的.离减震沟槽越近,隔震效果越明显.减震沟槽对中远区地震波低频部分隔震效果明显.%Cap or slot has an important effect on reduction of blasting vibration. The effect of vibration isolation and damping of gap or slot, which formed by detonation of the blasting fuse and excavation through manual work, is studied in this paper. In order to investigate the action of gap or slot, three underground explosion experiments were carried out an the north side of gap or slot, whose equivalent is 50g TNT and embedded depth is 1 m. The Pre-split crack zone exists in both sides of gap or slot formed by detonation of the blasting fuse. The experimental results show that the effects of gap or slot on reduction of blasting vibration are distinct and the explosion earthquake wave frequency spectrum characteristics are changed. The effect of gap or slot formed by detonation of the blasting fuse is superior to that of men-made gap or slot. The closer to gap or slot excavation face, the better the effect on reduction of blasting vibration is; The effects on vibration reduction are distinct to low frequency seismic wave at far distance from the gap or slot excavation face.

  18. The Early Evolution of Primordial Pair-Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Joggerst, C C

    2010-01-01

    The observational signatures of the first cosmic explosions and their chemical imprint on second-generation stars both crucially depend on how heavy elements mix within the star at the earliest stages of the blast. We present numerical simulations of the early evolution of Population III pair-instability supernovae with the new adaptive mesh refinement code CASTRO. In stark contrast to 15 - 40 Msun core-collapse primordial supernovae, we find no mixing in most 150 - 250 Msun pair-instability supernovae out to times well after breakout from the surface of the star. This may be the key to determining the mass of the progenitor of a primeval supernova, because vigorous mixing will cause emission lines from heavy metals such as Fe and Ni to appear much sooner in the light curves of core-collapse supernovae than in those of pair-instability explosions. Our results also imply that unlike low-mass Pop III supernovae, whose collective metal yields can be directly compared to the chemical abundances of extremely metal...

  19. Supernovae neutrino pasta interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zidu; Horowitz, Charles; Caplan, Matthew; Berry, Donald; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, the neutron rich matter is believed to have complex structures, such as spherical, slablike, and rodlike shapes. They are collectively called ``nuclear pasta''. Supernovae neutrinos may scatter coherently on the ``nuclear pasta'' since the wavelength of the supernovae neutrinos are comparable to the nuclear pasta scale. Consequently, the neutrino pasta scattering is important to understand the neutrino opacity in the supernovae. In this work we simulated the ``nuclear pasta'' at different temperatures and densities using our semi-classical molecular dynamics and calculated the corresponding static structure factor that describes ν-pasta scattering. We found the neutrino opacities are greatly modified when the ``pasta'' exist and may have influence on the supernovae neutrino flux and average energy. Our neutrino-pasta scattering effect can finally be involved in the current supernovae simulations and we present preliminary proto neutron star cooling simulations including our pasta opacities.

  20. Supernova Neutrino Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Botella, Ines, E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-25

    The neutrino burst from a core collapse supernova can provide information about the explosion mechanism and the mechanisms of proto neutron star cooling but also about the intrinsic properties of the neutrino such as flavor oscillations. One important question is to understand to which extend can the supernova and the neutrino physics be decoupled in the observation of a single supernova. The possibility to probe the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the type of mass hierarchy from the detection of supernova neutrinos with liquid argon detectors is discussed in this paper. Moreover, a quantitatively study about the possibility to constrain the supernova parameters is presented. A very massive liquid argon detector ({approx} 100 kton) is needed to perform accurate measurements of these parameters. Finally the possible detection of the diffuse supernova neutrino background in liquid argon detectors is also described.

  1. The historical supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, David H

    1977-01-01

    The Historical Supernovae is an interdisciplinary study of the historical records of supernova. This book is composed of 12 chapters that particularly highlight the history of the Far East. The opening chapter briefly describes the features of nova and supernova, stars which spontaneously explode with a spectacular and rapid increase in brightness. The succeeding chapter deals with the search for the historical records of supernova from Medieval European monastic chronicles, Arabic chronicles, astrological works etc., post renaissance European scientific writings, and Far Eastern histories and

  2. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  3. Research on Effects of Blast Casting Vibration and Vibration Absorption of Presplitting Blasting in Open Cast Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact energy produced by blast casting is able to break and cast rocks, yet the strong vibration effects caused at the same time would threaten the safety of mines. Based on the theory of Janbu’s Limit Equilibrium Method (LEM, pseudo-static method has been incorporated to analyze the influence of dynamic loads of blasting on slope stability. The horizontal loads produced by blast vibrations cause an increase in sliding forces, and this leads to a lower slope stability coefficient. When the tensile stresses of the two adjacent blast holes are greater than the tensile strength of rock mass, the radical oriented cracks are formed, which is the precondition for the formation of presplit face. Thus, the formula for calculating the blast hole spacing of presplit blasting can be obtained. Based on the analysis of the principles of vibration tester and vibration pick-up in detecting blast vibrations, a detection scheme of blast vibration is worked out by taking the blast area with precrack rear and non-precrack side of the detection object. The detection and research results of blast vibration show that presplit blasting can reduce the attenuation coefficient of stress wave by half, and the vibration absorption ratio could reach 50.2%; the impact of dynamic loads on the end-wall slope stability coefficient is 1.98%, which proves that presplit blasting plays an important role in shock absorption of blast casting.

  4. Inferences about Supernova Physics from Gravitational-Wave Measurements: GW151226 Spin Misalignment as an Indicator of Strong Black-Hole Natal Kicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Gerosa, Davide; Wysocki, Daniel

    2017-07-07

    The inferred parameters of the binary black hole GW151226 are consistent with nonzero spin for the most massive black hole, misaligned from the binary's orbital angular momentum. If the black holes formed through isolated binary evolution from an initially aligned binary star, this misalignment would then arise from a natal kick imparted to the first-born black hole at its birth during stellar collapse. We use simple kinematic arguments to constrain the characteristic magnitude of this kick, and find that a natal kick v_{k}≳50  km/s must be imparted to the black hole at birth to produce misalignments consistent with GW151226. Such large natal kicks exceed those adopted by default in most of the current supernova and binary evolution models.

  5. Neutrinos from Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S; Choubey, Sandhya; Kar, Kamales

    2002-01-01

    In this review, the effect of flavor oscillations on the neutrinos released during supernova explosion after core collapse is described. In some scenarios there are large enhancement of the number of events compared to the no oscillation case. Various other features associated with supernova neutrinos are also discussed.

  6. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A M; Sullivan, M; Lintott, C J; Nugent, P E; Botyanszki, J; Kasliwal, M; Quimby, R; Bamford, S P; Fortson, L F; Schawinski, K; Hook, I; Blake, S; Podsiadlowski, P; Joensson, J; Gal-Yam, A; Arcavi, I; Howell, D A; Bloom, J S; Jacobsen, J; Kulkarni, S R; Law, N M; Ofek, E O; Walters, R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof of concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period April-July 2010, during which nearly 14,000 supernova candidates from PTF were classified by more than 2,500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners, and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners, and identified as transients 93% of the ~130 spectroscopically confirmed SNe that PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive iden...

  7. Molecules in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The first molecules detected at infrared wavelengths in the ejecta of a Type II supernova, namely SN1987A, consisted of CO and SiO. Since then, confirmation of the formation of these two species in several other supernovae a few hundred days after explosion has been obtained. However, supernova environments appear to hamper the synthesis of large, complex species due to the lack of microscopically-mixed hydrogen deep in supernova cores. Because these environments also form carbon and silicate dust, it is of importance to understand the role played by molecules in the depletion of elements and how chemical species get incorporated into dust grains. In the present paper, we review our current knowledge of the molecular component of supernova ejecta, and present new trends and results on the synthesis of molecules in these harsh, explosive events.

  8. Progenitor-Explosion Connection and Remnant Birth Masses for Neutrino-Driven Supernovae of Iron-Core Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Ugliano, Marcella; Marek, Andreas; Arcones, Almudena

    2012-01-01

    We perform hydrodynamic supernova simulations in spherical symmetry for over 100 single stars of solar metallicity to explore the progenitor-explosion and progenitor-remnant connections established by the neutrino-driven mechanism. We use an approximative treatment of neutrino transport and replace the high-density interior of the neutron star (NS) by an inner boundary condition based on an analytic proto-NS core-cooling model, whose free parameters are chosen such that explosion energy, nickel production, and energy release by the compact remnant of progenitors around 20 solar masses are compatible with Supernova 1987A. Thus we are able to simulate the accretion phase, initiation of the explosion, subsequent neutrino-driven wind phase for 15-20 s, and the further evolution of the blast wave for hours to days until fallback is completed. Our results challenge long-standing paradigms. We find that remnant mass, launch time, and properties of the explosion depend strongly on the stellar structure and exhibit la...

  9. Simulating geometrically complex blast scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G. Cullis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of blast waves generated by energetic and non-energetic sources are of continuing interest to the ballistics research community. Modern conflicts are increasingly characterised by asymmetric urban warfare, with improvised explosive devices (IEDs often playing a dominant role on the one hand and an armed forces requirement for minimal collateral effects from their weapons on the other. These problems are characterised by disparate length- and time-scales and may also be governed by complex physics. There is thus an increasing need to be able to rapidly assess and accurately predict the effects of energetic blast in topologically complex scenarios. To this end, this paper presents a new QinetiQ-developed advanced computational package called EAGLE-Blast, which is capable of accurately resolving the generation, propagation and interaction of blast waves around geometrically complex shapes such as vehicles and buildings. After a brief description of the numerical methodology, various blast scenario simulations are described and the results compared with experimental data to demonstrate the validation of the scheme and its ability to describe these complex scenarios accurately and efficiently. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the use of the code in supporting the development of algorithms for fast running engineering models.

  10. Simulating geometrically complex blast scenarios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian G. CULLIS; Nikos NIKIFORAKIS; Peter FRANKL; Philip BLAKELY; Paul BENNETT; Paul GREENWOOD

    2016-01-01

    The effects of blast waves generated by energetic and non-energetic sources are of continuing interest to the ballistics research community. Modern conflicts are increasingly characterised by asymmetric urban warfare, with improvised explosive devices (IEDs) often playing a dominant role on the one hand and an armed forces requirement for minimal collateral effects from their weapons on the other. These problems are characterised by disparate length-and time-scales and may also be governed by complex physics. There is thus an increasing need to be able to rapidly assess and accurately predict the effects of energetic blast in topologically complex scenarios. To this end, this paper presents a new QinetiQ-developed advanced computational package called EAGLE-Blast, which is capable of accurately resolving the generation, propagation and interaction of blast waves around geometrically complex shapes such as vehicles and buildings. After a brief description of the numerical methodology, various blast scenario simulations are described and the results compared with experimental data to demonstrate the validation of the scheme and its ability to describe these complex scenarios accurately and efficiently. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the use of the code in supporting the development of algorithms for fast running engineering models.

  11. Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Michael W; Courtney, Amy C

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  12. A Table-top Blast Driven Shock Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1063/1.3518970

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer which explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  13. An extremely luminous X-ray outburst at the birth of a supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, A M; Berger, E; Page, K L; Schady, P; Parrent, J; Pooley, D; Wang, X-Y; Ofek, E O; Cucchiara, A; Rau, A; Waxman, E; Simon, J D; Bock, D C-J; Milne, P A; Page, M J; Barentine, J C; Barthelmy, S D; Beardmore, A P; Bietenholz, M F; Brown, P; Burrows, A; Burrows, D N; Bryngelson, G; Byrngelson, G; Cenko, S B; Chandra, P; Cummings, J R; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Gehrels, N; Immler, S; Kasliwal, M; Kong, A K H; Krimm, H A; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T J; Mészáros, P; Nakar, E; O'Brien, P T; Overzier, R A; de Pasquale, M; Racusin, J; Rea, N; York, D G

    2008-05-22

    Massive stars end their short lives in spectacular explosions--supernovae--that synthesize new elements and drive galaxy evolution. Historically, supernovae were discovered mainly through their 'delayed' optical light (some days after the burst of neutrinos that marks the actual event), preventing observations in the first moments following the explosion. As a result, the progenitors of some supernovae and the events leading up to their violent demise remain intensely debated. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of a supernova at the time of the explosion, marked by an extremely luminous X-ray outburst. We attribute the outburst to the 'break-out' of the supernova shock wave from the progenitor star, and show that the inferred rate of such events agrees with that of all core-collapse supernovae. We predict that future wide-field X-ray surveys will catch each year hundreds of supernovae in the act of exploding.

  14. 温压弹爆炸冲击波作用下防护门的动力响应%Dynamic Response of Blast Door Subjected to Explosion Wave of Thermobaric Bomb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗朝阳; 李秀地; 孙伟; 杨森; 王起帆

    2015-01-01

    The explosion wave of thermobaric bomb has the characteristics of long duration and high im-pulse. To reveal the destruction mechanism of blast door subjected to explosion wave of thermobaric bomb, separate reinforced concrete numerical model of the dynamic response of blast door was established with the dynamic finite element software ANSYS / LS-DYNA,and the dependability of the numerical model was ver-ified by the experimental data. On this base,results of the deflection and shear stress and the failure mode of the blast door were analyzed and compared with the shock wave of TNT according to the characteristics of the thermobaric bomb. The results show that the deflection,rotation angle and deformation of blast door subjected to thermpbaric bomb are bigger than that to TNT,and the dynamic response of blast door is not only related to the impulse of thermobaric bomb but also to the decay rate of shock wave,and the failure mode under thermobaric bomb is mainly shear bending coupling failure,while the failure mode of blast door under TNT is mainly shear failure.%温压弹爆炸冲击波具有持续时间长、冲量高的特点。为揭示温压弹爆炸冲击波作用下防护门的破坏机理,利用大型有限元软件 ANSYS/ LS-DYNA 建立了分离式钢筋混凝土防护门动力响应的数值计算模型,并用试验实测数据验证了计算模型的可靠性。在此基础上,针对温压弹冲击波的特点,分析了防护门的挠度、剪应力及其破坏模式,并与 TNT 冲击波的作用结果进行了对比。数值计算结果表明:温压弹冲击波作用下防护门的挠度、转角及变形均大于TNT 冲击波作用的结果;防护门的动力响应不仅与温压弹冲击波的冲量大小有关,还与温压弹冲击波的衰减速率有关;温压弹冲击波作用下防护门的破坏模式主要为弯剪耦合破坏,而 TNT 冲击波作用下防护门的破坏模式主要为剪切破坏。

  15. On the Likelihood of Supernova Enrichment of Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Gaidos, Eric

    2007-07-01

    We estimate the likelihood of direct injection of supernova ejecta into protoplanetary disks using a model in which the number of stars with disks decreases linearly with time, and clusters expand linearly with time such that their surface density is independent of stellar number. The similarity of disk dissipation and main-sequence lifetimes implies that the typical supernova progenitor is very massive, ~75-100 Msolar. Such massive stars are found only in clusters with >~104 members. Moreover, there is only a small region around a supernova within which disks can survive the blast yet be enriched to the level observed in the solar system. These two factors limit the overall likelihood of supernova enrichment of a protoplanetary disk to radionucleides in meteorites is to be explained in this way, however, the solar system most likely formed in one of the largest clusters in the Galaxy, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than Orion, where multiple supernovae impacted many disks in a short period of time.

  16. On the likelihood of supernova enrichment of protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jonathan P

    2007-01-01

    We estimate the likelihood of direct injection of supernova ejecta into protoplanetary disks using a model in which the number of stars with disks decreases linearly with time, and clusters expand linearly with time such that their surface density is independent of stellar number. The similarity of disk dissipation and main sequence lifetimes implies that the typical supernova progenitor is very massive, ~ 75-100 Msun. Such massive stars are found only in clusters with > 10^4 members. Moreover, there is only a small region around a supernova within which disks can survive the blast yet be enriched to the level observed in the Solar System. These two factors limit the overall likelihood of supernova enrichment of a protoplanetary disk to < 1%. If the presence of short lived radionucleides in meteorites is to be explained in this way, however, the Solar System most likely formed in one of the largest clusters in the Galaxy, more than two orders of magnitude greater than Orion, where multiple supernovae impac...

  17. Numerical studies on the link between radioisotopic signatures on Earth and the formation of the Local Bubble. I. 60Fe transport to the solar system by turbulent mixing of ejecta from nearby supernovae into a locally homogeneous interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulreich, M. M.; Breitschwerdt, D.; Feige, J.; Dettbarn, C.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The discovery of radionuclides like 60Fe with half-lives of million years in deep-sea crusts and sediments offers the unique possibility to date and locate nearby supernovae. Aims: We want to quantitatively establish that the 60Fe enhancement is the result of several supernovae which are also responsible for the formation of the Local Bubble, our Galactic habitat. Methods: We performed three-dimensional hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations (with resolutions down to subparsec scale) of the Local Bubble and the neighbouring Loop I superbubble in different homogeneous, self-gravitating environments. For setting up the Local and Loop I superbubble, we took into account the time sequence and locations of the generating core-collapse supernova explosions, which were derived from the mass spectrum of the perished members of certain stellar moving groups. The release of 60Fe and its subsequent turbulent mixing process inside the superbubble cavities was followed via passive scalars, where the yields of the decaying radioisotope were adjusted according to recent stellar evolution calculations. Results: The models are able to reproduce both the timing and the intensity of the 60Fe excess observed with rather high precision, provided that the external density does not exceed 0.3 cm-3 on average. Thus the two best-fit models presented here were obtained with background media mimicking the classical warm ionised and warm neutral medium. We also found that 60Fe (which is condensed onto dust grains) can be delivered to Earth via two physical mechanisms: either through individual fast-paced supernova blast waves, which cross the Earth's orbit sometimes even twice as a result of reflection from the Local Bubble's outer shell, or, alternatively, through the supershell of the Local Bubble itself, injecting the 60Fe content of all previous supernovae at once, but over a longer time range.

  18. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Lynn, S.; Sullivan, M.; Lintott, C. J.; Nugent, P. E.; Botyanszki, J.; Kasliwal, M.; Quimby, R.; Bamford, S. P.; Fortson, L. F.; Schawinski, K.; Hook, I.; Blake, S.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Jönsson, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Law, N. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Walters, R.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof-of-concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period 2010 April-July, during which nearly 14 000 supernova candidates from the PTF were classified by more than 2500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners and identified as transients 93 per cent of the ˜130 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae (SNe) that the PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive identifications). Further analysis shows that only a small fraction of the lowest signal-to-noise ratio detections (r > 19.5) are given low scores: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae correctly identifies all SNe with ≥8σ detections in the PTF imaging data. The Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project has direct applicability to future transient searches, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, by both rapidly identifying candidate transient events and via the training and improvement of existing machine classifier algorithms. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 10 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project ().

  19. Silencing by blasting: combination of laser pulse induced stress waves and magnetophoresis for siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babincová, M.; Babincová, N.; Durdík, S.; Bergemann, C.; Sourivong, P.

    2016-06-01

    A new method is developed for efficient delivery of short interference RNA into cells using combination of magnetophoresis for pre-concentration of siRNA-magnetic nanoparticle complex on the surface of cells with subsequent nanosecond laser pulse generating stress waves in transfection chamber, which is able to permeabilize cell membrane for the facilitated delivery of siRNA into the cell interior. As has been shown using siRNA inducing cell apoptosis, combination of these two physical factors increased the efficiency of three different human carcinoma cells transfection to 93%, 89%, and 84%, for HeLa (cervical carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast carcinoma), and UCI-107 (ovarian carcinoma) cells, respectively. This new physical method of siRNA delivery may have therefore far reaching applications in biotechnology and functional genomics.

  20. THE VERY UNUSUAL INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTION OF 2012 JULY 23: A BLAST WAVE MEDIATED BY SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C. T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mason, G. M. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gomez-Herrero, R. [University of Alcala, E-28871 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Klassen, A. [Kiel University, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C., E-mail: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The giant, superfast, interplanetary coronal mass ejection, detected by STEREO A on 2012 July 23, well away from Earth, appears to have reached 1 AU with an unusual set of leading bow waves resembling in some ways a subsonic interaction, possibly due to the high pressures present in the very energetic particles produced in this event. Eventually, a front of record high-speed flow reached STEREO. The unusual behavior of this event is illustrated using the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic ion observations obtained by STEREO. Had the Earth been at the location of STEREO, the large southward-oriented magnetic field component in the event, combined with its high speed, would have produced a record storm.

  1. Experimental study of blast mitigating devices based on combined construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, K.; Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    A robust blast inhibiting bin is the most often used device for damage blast effects suppression. In particular, a top open cylindrical bin significantly reduces a fragmentation effect resulted from a detonation of an explosive device placed inside the bin. However, reduction of blast wave overpressure and impulse by such cylindrical bins is not sufficient [1]. A reasonable alternative to endless increase of height and thickness of robust blast inhibiting bins is a development of destructible inhibitors having no solid elements in their structure and, therefore, excluding secondary fragmentation. So, the family of "Fountain" inhibitors [2,3] localizes and suppresses damaging blast effects due to multiphase working system. The present study is analyzing data obtained in testing of prototypes of new combined inhibitors. Their structure combines robust elements (bottoms, side surfaces) with elements responsible for blast loads reduction due to multi-phase working system (top and low transverse embeddings) and fairings impeding wave propagation in undesirable directions.

  2. Impacto ambiental de los remanentes de supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    The explosion of a supernovae (SN) represents the sudden injection of about ergs of thermal and mechanical energy in a small region of space, causing the formation of powerful shock waves that propagate through the interstellar medium at speeds of several thousands of km/s. These waves sweep, compress and heat the interstellar material that they encounter, forming the supernova remnants. Their evolution over thousands of years change forever, irreversibly, not only the physical but also the chemical properties of a vast region of space that can span hundreds of parsecs. This contribution briefly analyzes the impact of these explosions, discussing the relevance of some phenomena usually associated with SNe and their remnants in the light of recent theoretical and observational results.

  3. Some Aspects of Supernova Neutrino Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Keister, B D

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines specific aspects of neutrino-neutrino scattering and propagation outside a supernova within the framework of refractive optics, including an analysis of possible corrections to lowest-order coherent wave propagation.. These basic ingredients are then examined in a single-variable model that retains the non-linear nature of the the neutrino refractive medium, provides some specific analytic results, and allows one to separate issues of numerical instability from physical sensitivity.

  4. Automated search for supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  5. Supernova electron capture rates

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Pinedo, G

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the Gamow-Teller strength distributions for the ground states and low lying states of several nuclei that play an important role in the precollapse evolution of supernova. The calculations reproduce the experimental GT distributions nicely. The GT distribution are used to calculate electron capture rates for typical presupernova conditions. The computed rates are noticeably smaller than the presently adopted rates. The possible implications for the supernova evolution are discussed.

  6. The Death of a Star: Supernova 1987a. NASA Educational Briefs for the Upper Elementary-Level Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This material discusses supernova, the violent death of a massive star, at a level appropriate for upper elementary students. Background information on Supernova 1987a is presented. Observation techniques using visible light, ultraviolet waves, radio waves, neutrinos, X-rays, and gamma-rays are described. A vocabulary list, 11 questions, and 6…

  7. On the Propagation of Blast Wave in Earth′s Atmosphere: Adiabatic and Isothermal Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Sharma

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Adiabatic and isothermal propagations of spherical blast wave produced due to a nuclear explosion have been studied using the Energy hypothesis of Thomas, in the nonuniform atmosphere of the earth. The explosion is considered at different heights. Entropy production is also calculated along with the strength and velocity of the shock. In both the cases; for adiabatic and isothermal flows, it has been found that shock strength and shock velocity are larger at larger heights of explosion, in comparison to smaller heights of explosion. Isothermal propagation leads to a smaller value of shock strength and shock velocity in comparison to the adiabatic propagation. For the adiabatic case, the production of entropy is higher at higher heights of explosion, which goes on decreasing as the shock moves away from the point of explosion. However for the isothermal shock, the calculation of entropy production shows negative values. With negative values for the isothermal case, the production of entropy is smaller at higher heights of explosion, which goes on increasing as the shock moves away from the point of explosion. Directional study of the shock motion and entropy production show that in both the cases of adiabatic and isothermal flow, shock strength and shock velocity are larger in upward motion of the shock, in comparison to the downward motion of the shock. For adiabatic flow, entropy production is larger in upward motion of the shock; whereas, with negative values, entropy production is smaller in upward motion of the isothermal shock. For the adiabatic case, the profiles of shock strength, shock velocity and entropy production are smooth and have the largest value in vertically upward direction and have the lowest value in vertically downward direction, forming the oval shape. For the isothermal case, the profiles of shock strength and shock velocity show similar trend as that for adiabatic case but the profile of entropy production shows opposite

  8. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W; Varela, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism p...

  9. Numerical Calculation of Concrete Slab Response to Blast Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiaoqing; HAO Hong; KUZNETSOV Valerian A; WASCHL John

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper,a dynamic plastic damage model for concrete has been employed to estimate responses of a reinforced concrete slab subjected to blast loading.The interaction between the blast wave and the concrete slab is considered in 3D simulation.In the first stage,the initial detonation and blast wave propagation is modelled in 2D simulation before the blast wave reaches the concrete slab,then the results obtained from 2D calculation are remapped to a 3D model.The calculated blast load is compared with that obtained from TM5-1300.Numerical results of the concrete slab response are compared with the explosive test carried out in the Weapons System Division,Defence Science and Technology Organisation,Department of Defence,Australia.

  10. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  11. Expansion of Kes 73, A Shell Supernova Remnant Containing a Magnetar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2017-09-01

    Of the 30 or so Galactic magnetars, about 8 are in supernova remnants (SNRs). One of the most extreme magnetars, 1E 1841‑045, is at the center of the SNR Kes 73 (G27.4+0.0), whose age is uncertain. We measure its expansion using three Chandra observations over 15 years, obtaining a mean rate of 0.023 % +/- 0.002 % yr‑1. For a distance of 8.5 kpc, we obtain a shell velocity of 1100 km s‑1 and infer a blast wave speed of 1400 km s‑1. For Sedov expansion into a uniform medium, this gives an age of 1800 years. Derived emission measures imply an ambient density of about 2 cm‑3 and an upper limit on the swept-up mass of about 70 {M}ȯ , with lower limits of tens of {M}ȯ , confirming that Kes 73 is in an advanced evolutionary stage. Our spectral analysis shows no evidence for enhanced abundances as would be expected from a massive progenitor. Our derived total energy is 1.9× {10}51 erg, giving a very conservative lower limit to the magnetar’s initial period of about 3 ms, unless its energy was lost by non-electromagnetic means. We see no evidence of a wind-blown bubble as would be produced by a massive progenitor, or any evidence that the progenitor of Kes 73/1E 1841‑045 was anything but a normal red supergiant producing a Type IIP supernova, though a short-lived stripped-envelope progenitor cannot be absolutely excluded. Kes 73's magnetar thus joins SGR 1900+14 as magnetars resulting from relatively low-mass progenitors.

  12. Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

  13. Cosmic Supernova Rate History and Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2001-01-01

    Adopting a single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernova progenitors with the metallicity effect, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies, and compare with the recent observational data up to z ~ 0.55.

  14. Decoherence and oscillations of supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, Joern [University of Bergen, Institute for Physics and Technology (Norway); Smirnov, Alexei Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); The Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Supernova neutrinos have several exceptional features which can lead to interesting physical consequences. At the production point their wave packets have an extremely small size σ{sub x} ∝ 10{sup -11} cm; hence the energy uncertainty can be as large as the energy itself, σ{sub E} ∝ E, and the coherence length is short. On the way to the Earth the wave packets of mass eigenstates spread to macroscopic sizes and separate. Inside the Earth the mass eigenstates split into eigenstates in matter and oscillate again. The coherence length in the Earth is comparable with the radius of the Earth. We explore these features and their consequences. (1) We present new estimates of the wave packet size. (2) We consider the decoherence condition for the case of wave packets with spatial spread and show that it is not modified by the spread. (3) We study the coherence of neutrinos propagating in a multi-layer medium with density jumps at the borders of layers. In this case coherence can be partially restored due to a ''catch-up effect'', increasing the coherence length beyond the usual estimate. This catch-up effect can occur for supernova neutrinos as they cross the shock wave fronts in the exploding star or the core of the Earth. (orig.)

  15. A kinematic study of 0509-67.5, the second youngest supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and its astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Luke

    2016-05-01

    Supernova remnants are the lasting interactions of shock waves that develop in the wake of supernovae. These remnants, especially those in our galaxy and our companion galaxies, allow us to study supernovae for thousands of years after the initial stellar explosions. Remnants that are formed from Ia supernovae, which are the explosions and complete annihilation of white dwarf stars, are of particular interest due to the explosions' value as standard candles in cosmological studies. The shock waves in these young supernova remnants offer an unparalleled look into the physical processes that take place there, especially since these shocks are often simpler to study than shocks with strong radiative components that are present in remnants that are formed from the core-collapse supernovae of massive stars. I will detail the work of my kinematic study of the second youngest remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, 0509--67.5, which has been confirmed to be the result of a Ia supernova. Chapter 2 details the proper motion measurements made on the forward shock of this remnant, which has led to many key results. I was able to use the results of ii the global shock speed in the remnant to measure the density of neutral hydrogen in the ambient medium into which these shocks expand. In addition, I use the measurements of the shock speed for select portions of the forward shock to search for signatures of efficient cosmic-ray acceleration. Hydrodynamic simulations are then employed to constrain the age and ambient medium density of 0509--67.5, as well as to place limits on the compression factor at the immediate location of the blast wave. Chapter 3 uses the proper motion results from chapter 2 to determine possible asymmetries in the expansion of the remnant for the eastern and western limbs. These measurements are then used as constraints in hydrodynamic simulations to assess the possible dynamical offset of the explosion site compared to the geometric center of 0509

  16. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  17. The Most Luminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent observations have revealed a stunning diversity of extremely luminous supernovae, seemingly increasing in radiant energy without bound. We consider simple approximate limits for what existing models can provide for the peak luminosity and total radiated energy for non-relativistic, isotropic stellar explosions. The brightest possible supernova is a Type I explosion powered by a sub-millisecond magnetar with field strength B ∼ few × {10}13 G. In extreme cases, such models might reach a peak luminosity of 2× {10}46 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and radiate a total energy of up to 4× {10}52 {erg}. Other less luminous models are also explored, including prompt hyper-energetic explosions in red supergiants, pulsational-pair instability supernovae, pair-instability supernovae, and colliding shells. Approximate analytic expressions and limits are given for each case. Excluding magnetars, the peak luminosity is near 3× {10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 for the brightest models and the corresponding limit on total radiated energy is 3× {10}51 {erg}. Barring new physics, supernovae with a light output over 3× {10}51 erg must be rotationally powered, either during the explosion itself or after, the most obvious candidate being a rapidly rotating magnetar. A magnetar-based model for the recent transient event, ASASSN-15lh is presented that strains, but does not exceed the limits of what the model can provide.

  18. Blast from the Past Gives Clues About Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    massive -- from those that formed later. They hope to find evidence for these giants by observing objects as distant as GRB 090423 or more distant. "The best way to distinguish these distant, early-generation stars is by studying their explosive deaths, as supernovae or Gamma Ray Bursts," said Poonam Chandra, of the Royal Military College of Canada, and leader of the research team. While the data on GRB 090423 don't indicate that it resulted from the death of such a monster star, new astronomical tools are coming that may reveal them. "The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), will allow us to pick out these very-distant GRBs more easily so we can target them for intense followup observations. The Expanded Very Large Array, with much greater sensitivity than the current VLA, will let us follow these blasts much longer and learn much more about their energies and environments. We'll be able to look back even further in time," Frail said. Both ALMA and the EVLA are scheduled for completion in 2012. Chandra, Frail and Fox worked with Shrinivas Kulkarni of Caltech, Edo Berger of Harvard University, S. Bradley Cenko of the University of California at Berkeley, Douglas C.-J. Bock of the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy in California, and Fiona Harrison and Mansi Kasliwal of Caltech. The scientists described their research in a paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

  19. Reconstructing core-collapse supernovae waveforms with advanced era interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Jessica; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Among of the wide range of potentially interesting astrophysical sources for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo are galactic core-collapse supernovae. Although detectable core-collapse supernovae have a low expected rate (a few per century, or less) these signals would yield a wealth of new physics in the form of many messengers. Of particular interest is the insight into the explosion mechanism driving core-collapse supernovae that can be gleaned from the reconstructed gravitational wave signal. A well-reconstructed waveform will allow us to assess the likelihood of different explosion models, perform model selection, and potentially map unexpected features to new physics. This talk will present a study evaluating the current performance of the reconstruction of core-collapse supernovae gravitational wave signals. We used simulated waveforms modeled after different explosion mechanisms that we first injected into fake strain data re-colored to the expected Advanced LIGO/Virgo noise curves and then reconstructed using the pipelines Coherent Waveburst 2G and BayesWave. We will discuss the impact of these results on our ability to accurately reconstruct core-collapse supernovae signals, and by extension, other potential astrophysical generators of rich, complex waveforms.

  20. Nearby supernova factory announces 34 supernovae in one year'; best Rookie year ever for supernova search

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory), an international collaboration based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, announced that it had discovered 34 supernovae during the first year of the prototype system's operation (2 pages).

  1. A multi-mode shock tube for investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneer, Dexter V; Hisel, Richard D; Hoffman, Joshua M; Kryscio, Richard J; Lusk, Braden T; Geddes, James W

    2011-01-01

    Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave components

  2. Dark Matter Balls Help Supernovae to Explode

    CERN Document Server

    Froggatt, Colin D

    2015-01-01

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat - of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating d...

  3. When Microquasar Jets and Supernova Collide: Hydrodynamically Simulating the SS433-W50 Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Goodall, Paul T; Blundell, Katherine M

    2011-01-01

    We present investigations of the interaction between the relativistic, precessing jets of the microquasar SS433 with the surrounding, expanding Supernova Remnant (SNR) shell W50, and the consequent evolution in the inhomogeneous Interstellar Medium (ISM). We model their evolution using the hydrodynamic FLASH code, which uses adaptive mesh refinement. We show that the peculiar morphology of the entire nebula can be reproduced to a good approximation, due to the combined effects of: (i) the evolution of the SNR shell from the free-expansion phase through the Sedov blast wave in an exponential density profile from the Milky Way disc, and (ii) the subsequent interaction of the relativistic, precessing jets of SS 433. Our simulations reveal: (1) Independent measurement of the Galaxy scale-height and density local to SS433 (as n_0 = 0.2 cm^{-3}, Z_d = 40 pc), with this scale-height being in excellent agreement with the work of Dehnen & Binney. (2) A new mechanism for hydrodynamic refocusing of conical jets. (3)...

  4. Supernova Remnants and the Interstellar Medium of M83: Imaging & Photometry with WFC3 on HST

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Long, Knox S; Mutchler, Max; Whitmore, Bradley C; Kuntz, Kip D; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael; Frogel, Jay A; O'Connell, Robert; Hall, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Kimble, Randy A; MacKenty, John; McCarthy, Patrick; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joe; Sirianni, Marco; Trauger, John; Walker, Alistair R; Windhorst, Rogier; Young, Erick

    2010-01-01

    We present Wide Field Camera 3 images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope within a single field in the southern grand design star-forming galaxy M83. Based on their size, morphology and photometry in continuum-subtracted H$\\alpha$, [\\SII], H$\\beta$, [\\OIII] and [\\OII] filters, we have identified 60 supernova remnant candidates, as well as a handful of young ejecta-dominated candidates. A catalog of these remnants, their sizes and, where possible their H$\\alpha$ fluxes are given. Radiative ages and pre-shock densities are derived from those SNR which have good photometry. The ages lie in the range $2.62 < log(\\tau_{\\rm rad}/{\\rm yr}) < 5.0$, and the pre-shock densities at the blast wave range over $0.56 < n_0/{\\rm cm^{-3}} < 1680$. Two populations of SNR have been discovered. These divide into a nuclear and spiral arm group and an inter-arm population. We infer an arm to inter-arm density contrast of 4. The surface flux in diffuse X-rays is correlated with the inferred pre-shock density, indicati...

  5. An X-ray and Radio Study of the Varying Expansion Velocities in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Brian J; Hewitt, John W; Blondin, John M; Borkowski, Kazimierz J; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    We present newly obtained X-ray and radio observations of Tycho's supernova remnant using {\\it Chandra} and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in 2015 and 2013/14, respectively. When combined with earlier epoch observations by these instruments, we now have time baselines for expansion measurements of the remnant of 12-15 year in the X-rays and 30 year in the radio. The remnant's large angular size allows for proper motion measurements at many locations around the periphery of the blast wave. We find, consistent with earlier measurements, a clear gradient in the expansion velocity of the remnant, despite its round shape. The proper motions on the western and southwestern sides of the remnant are about a factor of two higher than those in the east and northeast. We showed in an earlier work that this is related to an offset of the explosion site from the geometric center of the remnant due to a density gradient in the ISM, and using our refined measurements reported here, we find that this offset is $\\sim 23"...

  6. Supernova Remnants in the Sedov Expansion Phase Thermal X-Ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P

    2001-01-01

    Improved calculations of X-ray spectra for supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Sedov-Taylor phase are reported, which for the first time include reliable atomic data for Fe L-shell lines. This new set of Sedov models also allows for a partial collisionless heating of electrons at the blast wave and for energy transfer from ions to electrons through Coulomb collisions. X-ray emission calculations are based on the updated Hamilton-Sarazin spectral model. The calculated X-ray spectra are succesfully interpreted in terms of three distribution functions: the electron temperature and ionization timescale distributions, and the ionization timescale averaged electron temperature distribution. The comparison of Sedov models with a frequently used single nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) timescale model reveals that this simple model is generally not an appropriate approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs. We find instead that plane-parallel shocks provide a useful approximation to X-ray spectra of SNRs, particularly for youn...

  7. Dust Destruction in Type Ia Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P; Blair, W P; Ghavamian, P; Sankrit, R; Hendrick, S P; Long, K S; Raymond, J C; Smith, R C; Points, S; Winkler, P F; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Williams, Brian J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Sankrit, Ravi; Hendrick, Sean P.; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C.; Points, Sean

    2006-01-01

    We present first results from an extensive survey of Magellanic Clouds supernova remnants (SNRs) with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We describe IRAC and MIPS imaging observations at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8, 24, and 70 microns of four Balmer-dominated Type Ia SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC): DEM L71 (0505-67.9), 0509--67.5, 0519--69.0, and 0548-70.4. None was detected in the four short-wavelength IRAC bands, but all four were clearly imaged at 24 microns, and two at 70 microns. A comparison of these images to Chandra broadband X-ray images shows a clear association with the blast wave, and not with internal X-ray emission associated with ejecta. Our observations are well described by 1-D shock models of collisionally heated dust emission, including grain size distributions appropriate for the LMC, grain heating by collisions with both ions and electrons, and sputtering of small grains. Model parameters are constrained by X-ray, optical, and far-ultraviolet observations. Our models can reproduce observed 70/24...

  8. Evolution of Magnetic Fields and Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Schure, K M; Achterberg, A; Keppens, R

    2009-01-01

    Observations show that the magnetic field in young supernova remnants (SNRs) is significantly stronger than can be expected from the compression of the circumstellar medium (CSM) by a factor of four expected for strong blast waves. Additionally, the polarization is mainly radial, which is also contrary to expectation from compression of the CSM magnetic field. Cosmic rays (CRs) may help to explain these two observed features. They can increase the compression ratio to factors well over those of regular strong shocks by adding a relativistic plasma component to the pressure, and by draining the shock of energy when CRs escape from the region. The higher compression ratio will also allow for the contact discontinuity, which is subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability, to reach much further out to the forward shock. This could create a preferred radial polarization of the magnetic field. With an adaptive mesh refinement MHD code (AMRVAC), we simulate the evolution of SNRs with three different configurati...

  9. Towards simulating star formation in turbulent high-z galaxies with mechanical supernova feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Dubois, Yohan; Slyz, Adrianne

    2015-01-01

    Feedback from supernovae is essential to understanding the self-regulation of star formation in galaxies. However, the efficacy of the process in a cosmological context remains unclear due to excessive radiative losses during the shock propagation. To better understand the impact of SN explosions on the evolution of galaxies, we perform a suite of high-resolution (12 pc), zoom-in cosmological simulations of a Milky Way-like galaxy at z=3 with adaptive mesh refinement. We find that SN explosions can efficiently regulate star formation, leading to the stellar mass and metallicity consistent with the observed mass-metallicity relation and stellar mass-halo mass relation at z~3. This is achieved by making three important changes to the classical feedback scheme: i) the different phases of SN blast waves are modelled directly by injecting radial momentum expected at each stage, ii) the realistic time delay of SNe, commencing at as early as 3 Myr, is required to disperse very dense gas before a runaway collapse set...

  10. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae: From Shock Revival to Shock Breakout

    CERN Document Server

    Wongwathanarat, Annop; Janka, H -Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present 3D simulations of core-collapse supernovae from blast-wave initiation by the neutrino-driven mechanism to shock breakout from the stellar surface, considering two 15 Msun red supergiants (RSG) and two blue supergiants (BSG) of 15 Msun and 20 Msun. We demonstrate that the metal-rich ejecta in homologous expansion still carry fingerprints of asymmetries at the beginning of the explosion, but the final metal distribution is massively affected by the detailed progenitor structure. The most extended and fastest metal fingers and clumps are correlated with the biggest and fastest-rising plumes of neutrino-heated matter, because these plumes most effectively seed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the C+O/He and He/H composition-shell interfaces after the passage of the SN shock. The extent of radial mixing, global asymmetry of the metal-rich ejecta, RT-induced fragmentation of initial plumes to smaller-scale fingers, and maximal Ni and minimal H velocities do not only depend on the initi...

  11. X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Emission from Middle-aged Supernova Remnants in Cavities. I. Spherical Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang竹唐, Zhu; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ressler, Sean M.

    2016-12-01

    We present analytical and numerical studies of models of supernova-remnant (SNR) blast waves in one spatial dimension expanding into uniform media and interacting with a denser cavity wall. We predict the nonthermal emission from such blast waves: synchrotron emission at radio and X-ray energies, and bremsstrahlung, inverse-Compton emission (from cosmic-microwave-background seed photons; ICCMB), and emission from the decay of {π }0 mesons produced in inelastic collisions between accelerated ions and thermal gas, at GeV and TeV energies. Accelerated-particle spectra are assumed to be power laws with exponential cutoffs at energies limited by the remnant age or (for electrons, if lower) by radiative losses. We compare the results with those from homogeneous (“one-zone”) models. Such models give fair representations of the 1D results for uniform media, but cavity-wall interactions produce effects for which one-zone models are inadequate. We study the time evolution of SNR morphology and emission with time. Strong morphological differences exist between ICCMB and {π }0-decay emission; at some stages, the TeV emission can be dominated by the former and the GeV by the latter, resulting in strong energy dependence of morphology. Integrated gamma-ray spectra show apparent power laws of slopes that vary with time, but do not indicate the energy distribution of a single population of particles. As observational capabilities at GeV and TeV energies improve, spatial inhomogeneity in SNRs will need to be accounted for.

  12. Cosmology with Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Scovacricchi, Dario; Bacon, David; Sullivan, Mark; Prajs, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) as standardisable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z~3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the "Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae" (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardisation values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalise over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ~100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Omega_m by at least 20% (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia a...

  13. Improved blasting results with precise initiation:Numerical simulation of sublevel caving blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Changping

    2013-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of rock blasting using LS-DYNA software havebeen conducted to investigate the effect of short delay time on the fragmentation inunderground mines. The purpose was to test the hypothesis proposed by Rossmaniththat stress wave interaction could result in finer fragmentation by controlling theinitiation times. The blasted rock was simulated with RHT material model. After thecalculation, the elements with damage level above 0.6 were removed to simulate thefractur...

  14. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita eDe Gasperi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI. The β-amyloid (Aβ peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain Aβ following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Aβ 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain Aβ levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the β-secretase, BACE-1, and the γ-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering Aβ production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain.

  15. Chandra Observations of Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Hwang; R. Petre; A. E. Szymkowiak; S. S. Holt

    2002-03-01

    We present a new Chandra observation of Tycho’s supernova remnant with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Multicolor X-ray imaging reveals new details of the outer shock and ejecta. At energies between 4 and 6 keV, the outline of the outer shock is clearly revealed in X-rays for the first time. The distribution of the emission from lines of Si and Fe are confirmed to have a different morphology from each other, and the Si ejecta are shown to extend to the blast shock at several locations. Characteristic spectra of the outer shock and ejecta are also presented.

  16. Physics of supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-12-13

    Presupernova models of massive stars are presented and their explosion by ''delayed neutrino transport'' examined. A new form of long duration Type II supernova model is also explored based upon repeated encounter with the electron-positron pair instability in stars heavier than about 60 Msub solar. Carbon deflagration in white dwarfs is discussed as the probable explanation of Type I supernovae and special attention is paid to the physical processes whereby a nuclear flame propagates through degenerate carbon. 89 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  18. BVRI Photometry of Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Wynn C. G.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Peng, Chien Y.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas; Treffers, Richard R.; Richmond, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    We present optical photometry of one Type IIn supernova (1994Y) and nine Type Ia supernovae (1993Y, 1993Z, 1993ae, 1994B, 1994C, 1994M, 1994Q, 1994ae, and 1995D). SN 1993Y and SN 1993Z appear to be normal SN Ia events with similar rates of decline, but we do not have data near maximum brightness. The colors of SN 1994C suggest that it suffers from significant reddening or is intrinsically red. The light curves of SN 1994Y are complicated; they show a slow rise and gradual decline near maximum...

  19. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  20. 爆炸冲击波所致轻度颅脑损伤的诊断与处理%Diagnosis and treatment of mild brain injury induced by explosive blast wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段朝霞; 张洁元; 陈魁君; 李冠桦; 李兵仓

    2016-01-01

    Blast⁃related traumatic brain injury ( bTBI) induced by explosive blast wave is the most common event on the battlefield.Most of the patients are characterized as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The traditional clinical imaging couldn′t detect the pathological changes in the brain. Also, the functional significance of this type of injury remains controversial.In recent years,some new technology can sensitively detect the minimal abnormality in the injured brain tissues.Thus,it is valuable in the diagnosis of mTBI.In this paper,we summarized the new advancement of diagnosis for mTBI induced by explosive blast wave.%爆炸冲击波引起的创伤性颅脑损伤( bTBI)是战场上最常见的损伤,大多数患者是轻度的颅脑创伤( mTBI)。常规的临床影像技术如CT不能检测出mTBI的脑部变化,并且这类损伤的功能意义目前还有争议,最近几年出现的新技术能敏感地检测出脑组织的细微异常,因此在mTBI的诊断中起非常中的作用。笔者主要综述爆炸冲击波所致mTBI诊断的相关进展。

  1. Research about wireless memory test system for the super pressure of blast wave%冲击波超压无线式存储测试系统的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建伟; 马铁华; 杜红棉; 杨卓静

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a Kind of wireless memory test system for the super pressure of blast wave.This system sets the parameters such as trigger level and sampling frequency to storage test device by the way of wireless communication.It can control device turning on or off the power,triggering and choosing the gain of sensors.It is Communication distance can be up to 200 meters above.The system arranges the blast pressure sensor,adapter circuit,A /D transform,control circuit,Wireless communication module of ZigBee and battery interface together densely,which makes up of the blast wave measurement system work independently.Experiment proves that this system has advantages of anti-interference and no-need 0f cable,so it especially suitable for the test occasion which has the big range and many points.%本文提出一种冲击波超压无线式存储测试系统,该系统以无线通讯的方式对存储测试装置设置触发电平、采样频率等参数,还可以控制装置上电、下电、触发和传感器的增益选择,通讯距离可达到200m以上。该系将压力传感器、适配电路、A/D转换器、控制电路、ZigBee无线通讯模块和电源紧凑的封装在坚固的壳体中,构成一种可相对独立工作的便携式冲击波场超压测试仪。实验证明,该系统具有抗干扰性强和无需电缆引线的优点,特别适宜于大范围多测点的试验场合。

  2. Influence of millisecond time, charge length and detonation velocity on blasting vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈士海; 吴建; 张子华

    2015-01-01

    The law of blasting vibration caused by blasting in rock is very complex. Traditional numerical methods cannot well characterize all the influencing factors in the blasting process. The effects of millisecond time, charge length and detonation velocity on the blasting vibration are discussed by analyzing the characteristics of vibration wave generated by finite length cylindrical charge. It is found that in multi-hole millisecond blasting, blasting vibration superimpositions will occur several times within a certain distance from the explosion source due to the propagation velocity difference of P-wave and S-wave generated by a short column charge. These superimpositions will locally enlarge the peak velocity of blasting vibration particle. The magnitude and scope of the enlargement are closely related to the millisecond time. Meanwhile, the particle vibration displacement characteristics of rock under long cylindrical charge is analyzed. The results show that blasting vibration effect would no longer increase when the charge length increases to a certain extent. This indicates that the traditional simple calculation method using the maximum charge weight per delay interval to predict the effect of blasting vibration is unreasonable. Besides, the effect of detonation velocity on blasting vibration is only limited in a certain velocity range. When detonation velocity is greater than a certain value, the detonation velocity almost makes no impact on blasting vibration.

  3. Supernova 2013by

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valenti, S.; Sand, D.; Stritzinger, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet and optical light curves, as well as visual-wavelength and near-infrared spectroscopy of the Type II linear (IIL) supernova (SN) 2013by. We show that SN 2013by and other SNe IIL in the literature, after their linear decline phase that start after maximum, have...

  4. QCD and Supernovas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, T.

    2005-12-01

    In this contribution we briefly summarize aspects of the physics of QCD which are relevant to the supernova problem. The topic of greatest importance is the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear and strongly-interacting matter, which is required to describe the physics of the proto-neutron star (PNS) and the neutron star remnant (NSR) formed during a supernova event. Evaluation of the EOS in the regime of relevance for these systems, especially the NSR, requires detailed knowledge of the spectrum and strong interactions of hadrons of the accessible hadronic species, as well as other possible phases of strongly interacting matter, such as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The forces between pairs of baryons (both nonstrange and strange) are especially important in determining the EOS at NSR densities. Predictions for these forces are unfortunately rather model dependent where not constrained by data, and there are several suggestions for the QCD mechanism underlying these short-range hadronic interactions. The models most often employed for determining these strong interactions are broadly of two types, 1) meson exchange models (usually assumed in the existing neutron star and supernova literature), and 2) quark-gluon models (mainly encountered in the hadron, nuclear and heavy-ion literature). Here we will discuss the assumptions made in these models, and discuss how they are applied to the determination of hadronic forces that are relevant to the supernova problem.

  5. The Most Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed an amazing diversity of extremely luminous supernovae, seemingly increasing in radiant energy without bound. We consider here the physical limits of what existing models can provide for the peak luminosity and total radiated energy for non-relativistic, isotropic stellar explosions. The brightest possible supernova is a Type I explosion powered by a sub-millisecond magnetar. Such models can reach a peak luminosity of $\\rm 2\\times10^{46}\\ erg\\ s^{-1}$ and radiate a total energy of $\\rm 4 \\times10^{52}\\ erg$. Other less luminous models are also explored, including prompt hyper-energetic explosions in red supergiants, pulsational-pair instability supernovae, and pair-instability supernovae. Approximate analytic expressions and limits are given for each case. Excluding magnetars, the peak luminosity is near $\\rm 1\\times10^{44}\\ erg\\ s^{-1}$ for the brightest models. The corresponding limits on total radiated power are $\\rm3 \\times 10^{51}\\ erg$ (Type I) and $\\rm1 \\times 10^{51}\\ ...

  6. Supernovae and Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Tornambé, A.

    2009-08-01

    A decade ago the observations of thermonuclear supernovae at high-redhifts showed that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating and since then, the evidence for cosmic acceleration has gotten stronger. This acceleration requires that the Universe is dominated by dark energy, an exotic component characterized by its negative pressure. Nowadays all the available astronomical data (i.e. thermonuclear supernovae, cosmic microwave background, barionic acoustic oscillations, large scale structure, etc.) agree that our Universe is made of about 70% of dark energy, 25% of cold dark matter and only 5% of known, familiar matter. This Universe is geometrically flat, older than previously thought, its destiny is no longer linked to its geometry but to dark energy, and we ignore about 95% of its components. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today. Current astronomical observations are compatible with dark energy being the vacuum energy. Supernovae have played a fundamental role in modern Cosmology and it is expected that they will contribute to unveil the dark energy. In order to do that it is mandatory to understand the limits of supernovae as cosmological distance indicators, improving their precision by a factor 10.

  7. Air-Decking Technique in Bench Blasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hong-bing; LU Wen-bo; WU Liang

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism and the design parameters of blasting with air-decking are studied. The theory of detonation waves is used to investigate the processes of the one-dimensional plane detonation wave within a borehole. The interaction of the rarefaction wave with an interface and reflection on a rigid wall is also analyzed. The same courses of the shock wave are also investigated. This decides the distribution of the pressure of the explosion products changing with time along the borehole. Based on the above theoretical analysis, two conditions should be met for a reasonable range of values of the air-decking ratio in blasting rock. First, the rarefaction wave from the contact interface between detonation products and air reaches the bottom earlier than that of the reflected shock wave from the end of the stemming. Second,the reflected shock wave reaches the contact interface between the detonation products and air earlier than that of the reflected rarefaction wave from the bottom of the borehole. Finally, the reasonable value of the air-decking ratio must be decided theoretically in air-decking blasting. For different explosives, the reasonable range of air-decking ratio varies from 0.15 to 0.4. This result is well consistent with what was obtained by previous researchers.

  8. Computational Astrophysics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, dominating the production of elements between oxygen and iron and likely responsible for half the elements heavier than iron. They result from the death throes of massive stars, beginning with stellar core collapse and the formation of a supernova shock wave that must ultimately disrupt such stars. Past, first-principles models most often led to the frustrating conclusion the shock wave stalls and is not revived, at least given the physics included in the models. However, recent progress in the context of two-dimensional, first-principles supernova models is reversing this trend, giving us hope we are on the right track toward a solution of one of the most important problems in astrophysics. Core collapse supernovae are multi-physics events, involving general relativity, hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, nuclear burning, and radiation transport in the form of neutrinos, along with a detailed nuclear physics equation of state and neutrino weak interactions. Computationally, simulating these catastrophic stellar events presents an exascale computing challenge. I will discuss past models and milestones in core collapse supernova theory, the state of the art, and future requirements. In this context, I will present the results and plans of the collaboration led by ORNL and the University of Tennessee.

  9. Comparison of Some Blast Vibration Predictors for Blasting in Underground Drifts and Some Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Vaibhab Pramod; Dey, Kaushik

    2016-04-01

    Drilling and blasting are the most economical excavation techniques in underground drifts driven through hard rock formation. Burn cut is the most popular drill pattern, used in this case, to achieve longer advance per blast round. The ground vibration generated due to the propagation of blast waves on the detonation of explosive during blasting is the principal cause for structural and rock damage. Thus, ground vibration is a point of concern for the blasting engineers. The ground vibration from a blast is measured using a seismograph placed at the blast monitoring station. The measured vibrations, in terms of peak particle velocity, are related to the maximum charge detonated at one instant and the distance of seismograph from the blast point. The ground vibrations from a number of blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances are monitored. A number of scaling factors of these dependencies (viz. Distance and maximum charge/delay) have been proposed by different researchers, namely, square root, cube root, CMRI, Langefors and Kihlstrom, Ghosh-Daemon, Indian standard etc. Scaling factors of desired type are computed for all the measured blast rounds. Regression analysis is carried out between the scaling factors and peak particle velocities to establish the coefficients of the vibration predictor equation. Then, the developed predictor equation is used for designing the blast henceforth. Director General of Mine Safety, India, specified that ground vibrations from eight to ten blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances should be monitored to develop a predictor equation; however, there is no guideline about the type of scaling factor to be used. Further to this, from the statistical point of view, a regression analysis on a small sample population cannot be accepted without the testing of hypothesis. To show the importance of the above, in this paper, seven scaling factors are considered for blast data set of a hard-rock underground drift using burn

  10. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  11. Gravitational radiation from magnetically funneled supernova fallback onto a magnetar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melatos, A.; Priymak, M., E-mail: amelatos@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: m.priymak@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-10-20

    Protomagnetars spun up to millisecond rotation periods by supernova fallback are predicted to radiate gravitational waves via hydrodynamic instabilities for ∼10{sup 2} s before possibly collapsing to form a black hole. It is shown that magnetic funneling of the accretion flow (1) creates a magnetically confined polar mountain, which boosts the gravitational wave signal, and (2) 'buries' the magnetic dipole moment, delaying the propeller phase and assisting black hole formation.

  12. Effectiveness of eye armor during blast loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailoor, Shantanu; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-11-01

    Ocular trauma is one of the most common types of combat injuries resulting from the interaction of military personnel with improvised explosive devices. Ocular blast injury mechanisms are complex, and trauma may occur through various injury mechanisms. However, primary blast injuries (PBI) are an important cause of ocular trauma that may go unnoticed and result in significant damage to internal ocular tissues and visual impairment. Further, the effectiveness of commonly employed eye armor, designed for ballistic and laser protection, in lessening the severity of adverse blast overpressures (BOP) is unknown. In this paper, we employed a three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction computational model for assessing effectiveness of the eye armor during blast loading on human eyes and validated results against free field blast measurements by Bentz and Grimm (2013). Numerical simulations show that the blast waves focused on the ocular region because of reflections from surrounding facial features and resulted in considerable increase in BOP. We evaluated the effectiveness of spectacles and goggles in mitigating the pressure loading using the computational model. Our results corroborate experimental measurements showing that the goggles were more effective than spectacles in mitigating BOP loading on the eye. Numerical results confirmed that the goggles significantly reduced blast wave penetration in the space between the armor and the eyes and provided larger clearance space for blast wave expansion after penetration than the spectacles. The spectacles as well as the goggles were more effective in reducing reflected BOP at higher charge mass because of the larger decrease in dynamic pressures after the impact. The goggles provided greater benefit of reducing the peak pressure than the spectacles for lower charge mass. However, the goggles resulted in moderate, sustained elevated pressure loading on the eye, that became 50-100% larger than the pressure loading

  13. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Gusdorf, A.

    2015-07-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 M⊙ generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the centre of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 M⊙ progenitor moving with velocity 20 km s-1 and to our initially 40 M⊙ progenitor. These remnants generate mixing of ISM gas, stellar wind and supernova ejecta that is particularly important upstream from the centre of the explosion. Their light curves are dominated by emission from optically thin cooling and by X-ray emission of the shocked ISM gas. We find that these remnants are likely to be observed in the [O III] λ 5007 spectral line emission or in the soft energy-band of X-rays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of observed Galactic supernova remnants such as 3C 391 and the Cygnus Loop.

  14. Supernova-Remnant Origin of Cosmic Rays?

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y M; Romero, G E; Dame, T M; Combi, J A; Butt, Yousaf M.; Torres, Diego F.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Dame, Thomas M.; Combi, Jorge A.

    2002-01-01

    It is thought that Galactic cosmic ray (CR) nuclei are gradually accelerated to high energies (up to ~300 TeV/nucleon, where 1TeV=10^12eV) in the expanding shock-waves connected with the remnants of powerful supernova explosions. However, this conjecture has eluded direct observational confirmation^1,2 since it was first proposed in 1953 (ref. 3). Enomoto et al.^4 claim to have finally found definitive evidence that corroborates this model, proposing that the very-high-energy, TeV-range, gamma-rays from the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 are due to the interactions of energetic nuclei in this region. Here we argue that their claim is not supported by the existing multiwavelength spectrum of this source. The search for the origin(s) of Galactic cosmic ray nuclei may be closing in on the long-suspected supernova-remnant sources, but it is not yet over.

  15. Neutrino oscillations in MHD supernova explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, S; Kotake, K [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, T, E-mail: shio.k@nao.ac.j [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the neutrino oscillations numerically in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) explosion models to see how asphericity has impacts on neutrino spectra. Magneto-driven explosions are one of the most attracting scenarios for producing large scale departures from spherical symmetric geometry, that are reported by many observational data. We find that the event rates at Super-Kamiokande (SK) seen from the polar direction (e.g., the rotational axis of the supernovae) decrease when the shock wave is propagating through H-resonance. In addition, we find that L-resonance in this situation becomes non-adiabatic, and the effect of L-resonance appears in the neutrino signal, because the MHD shock can propagate to the stellar surface without shock-stall after core bounce, and the shock reaches the L-resonance at earlier stage than the conventional spherical supernova explosion models. Our results suggest that we may obtain the observational signatures of the two resonances in SK for Galactic supernova.

  16. Detonation safety of blasting caps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢兴华; 彭小圣

    2002-01-01

    By means of researching into sympathetic detonation of blasting detonators in air, the regular patterns are concluded from blasting detonators interaction with the shock loading. The aerial distribution of initiating ability of detonators looks like a butterfly. The initiating ability mainly consists of shock wave, explosive gases and fliers. But fundamental questions remain. When does shock wave take the leading role? When and how does the explosive gases or the fliers take function? For those questions, there is less quantitative research. Through the theoretic deduction of the overpressure, the energy calculation of fliers and the experiment of sympathetic detonation of detonators, we can learn the sympathetic detonation distances of several kinds of detonators and make an inquiry into the lateral initiating regulations of detonators. So, we can provide the base data for the research into no sympathetic detonation of herd blasting detonators and then control the detonation between them. Then we can make full use of detonators and reduce the frequency of accidents caused by detonators.

  17. Calculation of driling and blasting parameters in blasting performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Karanakova Stefanovska, Radmila; Dambov, Ilija

    2015-01-01

    In all mining technology drilling and blasting parameters and works are one of the main production processes at each mine. The parameters of drilling and blasting and explosives consumption per ton of blasting mass are define economic indicators of any blasting no matter for what purpose and where mining is performed. The calculation of rock blasting should always have in mind that the methodology of calculation of all drilling and blasting parameters in blasting performance are performed for...

  18. 黄河爆破破冰的水中冲击波特性试验研究%Experimental Research on Underwater Shock Wave Characteristic of Ice Blasting at Yellow River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁向前; 熊峰; 陆遐龄

    2014-01-01

    以黄河包头磴口段开河期冰盖为试验对象,开展了多种新型破冰弹的爆破破冰综合试验。重点介绍了2#岩石乳化炸药单药包在不同入水深度处爆破和多药包群爆破冰试验,实测了水中爆破冲击波压力,分析计算了单药包爆破水击波压力幅值与入水深度的相关性、多药包群爆水击波压力变化特征及冲击波冲量等,归纳总结了冰盖覆盖下单药包和多药包爆破水中冲击波压力经验计算公式以及水中冲击波波速值。研究成果为冰盖覆盖下爆破水击波特性增添了新的内容,同时为新型防凌破冰装备的研制应用及安全控制提供了理论依据。%The comprehensive experiments of new ice blasting missile were conducted during the period of break-ing at Dengkou in the Yellow River. The experiments with 2# rock emulsion explosive and multiple explosive at dif-ferent water depth were introduced,and the underwater shock waves were also detected in the test field. By the rela-tionship between the underwater shock wave stress amplitude and the depth of single explosive under water,the char-acteristics of shock wave pressure and impulse of shock wave were obtained. Further more,the formula of underwater shock wave stress with single explosive and multiple explosive and the velocity of underwater shock wave were calcu-lated. The results from the underwater shock wave under the cover of ice provided theoretical support for ice breaking equipment.

  19. Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Jha, Saurabh; Kuhlmann, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    We have publicly released a blinded mix of simulated SNe, with types (Ia, Ib, Ic, II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation is realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). We challenge scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type for each SN. A spectroscopically confirmed subset is provided for training. The goals of this challenge are to (1) learn the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different classification algorithms, (2) use the results to improve classification algorithms, and (3) understand what spectroscopically confirmed sub-...

  20. Collective supernova neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Neutrinos emitted by core-collapse supernovae (SNe) represent an important laboratory for both particle physics and astrophysics. While propagating in the dense SN environment, they can feel not only the presence of background matter (via ordinary Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects) but also of the gas of neutrinos and antineutrinos (via neutrino-neutrino interaction effects). The neutrino-neutrino interactions appear to modify the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos in a collective way, completely different from the ordinary matter effects. In these conditions, the flavor evolution equations become highly nonlinear, sometimes resulting in surprising phenomena when the entire neutrino system oscillates coherently as a single collective mode. In this talk, I present the recent results on collective supernova neutrino flavor conversions and I discuss about the sensitivity of these effects to the ordering of the neutrino mass spectrum.

  1. ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CTR10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘楠

    2008-01-01

    ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CTR10作为ADIDAS控制型跑鞋中的佼佼者,鞋款结合了如立体FORMOTION,大面积的PRO-MODERATOR特殊材质,以及强化型的07款鞋模(EL-07),前脚掌大块ADIPRENE+等诸多ADIDAS的当家技术,但在实际的跑步过程中,这些技术点能否真正为跑步者带来明显的感受?请随我们进入到ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CONTROL10评测环节。

  2. Galaxy Outflows Without Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, Sharanya; Ostriker, Eve C

    2016-01-01

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have $\\approx 50-100\\,{\\rm km\\,s^{-1}}$ line-of-sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly-compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds $\\approx 35\\,{\\rm km\\...

  3. Supernova Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  4. Nurseries of Supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Teddy

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) have long been the gold standard for precision cosmology and after several decades of intense research the supernova (SN) community was in 2011 honored by giving the Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of Dark Energy to the leaders of the two big SN collaborations...... the gasphase metallicity, stellar mass and stellar age for this z = 1.55 host galaxy. I am also able to rule out the presence of any AGN though emission-line ratios. The host is classified as a highly star forming, low mass, low metallicity galaxy. It is a clear outlier in star formation and stellar mass...... compared to most low redshift (z 1) redshift SNe. This is mainly due to the change in specific star-formation rate as a function of redshift. This can potentially impact the use of high redshift SN Ia as standard candels...

  5. Modelling and Testing of Blast Effect On the Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuli, Lucia; Jangl, Štefan; Papán, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    As a blasting agent in the blasting and mining engineering, has been using one of so called new generation of explosives which offer greater flexibility in their range and application, and such explosive is ANFO. It is type of explosive consists of an oxidiser and a fuel (ammonium nitrate and fuel oil). One of such ANFO explosives which are industrially made in Slovakia is POLONIT. The explosive is a mixture of ammonium nitrate, methyl esters of higher fatty acids, vegetable oil and red dye. The paper deals with the analysis of structure subjected to the blast load created by the explosion of POLONIT charge. First part of paper is describing behaviour and characteristic of blast wave generated from the blast (detonation characteristics, physical characteristics, time-history diagram etc.) and the second part presents the behaviour of such loaded structures, because of the analysis of such dynamical loaded structure is required knowing the parameters of blast wave, its effect on structure and the tools for the solution of dynamic analysis. The real field tests of three different weight of charges and two different structures were done. The explosive POLONIT was used together with 25 g of ignition explosive PLNp10. Analytical and numerical model of blast loaded structure is compared with the results obtained from the field tests (is compared with the corresponding experimental accelerations). For the modelling structures were approximated as a one-degree system of freedom (SDOF), where the blast wave was estimated with linear decay and exponential decay using positive and negative phase of blast wave. Numerical solution of the steel beam dynamic response was performed via FEM (Finite Element Method) using standard software Visual FEA.

  6. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, D M -A; Mackey, J; Velazquez, P F; Gusdorf, A

    2015-01-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum, and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 Mo generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the center of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 Mo progenitor moving with velocity 20 km/s and to our i...

  7. Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2011-01-21

    In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cm from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff implies

  8. SPHERICAL SHOCK WAVES IN SOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differential Equation of Self-Similar Motion; Application of the Theory of Self-Similar Motion to the Problem of Expansion of a Spherical...Self-Similar Solutions of the Problem of Cratering Due to Hypervelocity Impact, and Numerical Integration of the Differential Equation of Spherical...Aluminum, Blast Waves in Other Metals; and Consideration of the Non-Similar Aspects of the Blast Wave Problem ; Experimental Procedure and Results; Singular Point of Ordinary Differential Equations; Numerical Program-Fortran

  9. Asymmetric expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant G1.9+0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-06-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) Type Ia SN that exploded around CE 1900, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, with a single bright maximum in its shell, but exhibits a bilaterally symmetric morphology in X-rays. It has been difficult to understand the origin of these contrasting morphologies. We present the results of expansion measurements of G1.9+0.3 that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. These measurements are based on a comparison of our 2015 400-ks Chandra observation with earlier Chandra observations, including a 1-Ms observation in 2011. The mean expansion rate from 2011 to 2015 is 0.58% per yr, in agreement with previous measurements. We also confirm that the expansion decreases radially away from the remnant's center along the major E-W axis, from 0.77% per yr to 0.53% per yr. Large variations in expansion are also present along the minor N-S axis, but expansion there is strongly asymmetric and varies on small spatial scales. We use the “Demons” method to study the complex motions within G1.9+0.3. This method provides a nonparametric way for measuring these motions globally. We find motions varying by a factor of 5, from 0.09" to 0.44" per year. The slowest shocks are in the north, at the outer boundary of the bright radio emission, with speeds there as low as 3,600 km/s (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than the average shock speed of 12,000 km/s. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. The presence of this asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. The SN ejecta have also been strongly decelerated in the N, but they expand faster than the blast wave. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. As with Kepler

  10. SN 1957D in M83: A Young Supernova Remnant Emerges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, K. S.; Blair, W. P.; Soria, R.; Godfrey, L. E. H.; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Whitmore, B. C.

    2012-05-01

    We report recent multi-wavelength observations of the remnant from SN 1957D, a core-collapse supernova in M83 and one of six SNe M83 has produced in the past century. SN 1957D was recovered as a radio SNR by Cowan & Branch (1983), and optically by Long et al. (1988). We have recently detected it for the first time in X-rays, in a long observation from Chandra. New HST WFC3 images resolve the SNR from the complex surrounding emission and reveal the local star field. The optical flux from SN 1957D is dominated by broad [O III] emission lines, the signature of fast-moving SN ejecta. The [O III] flux dropped precipitously between 1989 and 1991; a series of subsequent observations indicates continuing but more gradual decline. The width of the broad lines has remained roughly constant at about 3000 km/s (FWHM). At radio wavelengths, observations over the period 1990-2011 show a decline rate Sν t-3.9, far steeper than the rate observed between 1984 and 1990. Such evolution suggests early expansion into a circumstellar medium dominated by wind material from the progenitor, followed by a steeper decline as the blast wave overruns the edge of the wind material. The X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 10 keV) is 2.0 E37 erg/s, with a relatively hard spectrum. We cannot distinguish between a power law (indicating a probable pulsar and surrounding nebula) vs a hot thermal spectrum from the blast wave. However, the absorption is relatively high, NH 2 E22 cm-2, suggesting a dense local environment. Photometry of the local stellar population around SN 1957D, using HST WFC3 images, indicates a log(age) 7.3 and (remaining) stars up to about 11 M. This research is supported primarily by NASA through Chandra Grant G01-12115; PFW acknowledges additional support from NSF Grant AST-0908566.

  11. Observations and Theory of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J C

    2003-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the observations of supernovae and the theory of their explosion mechanisms. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: observations of the spectra, spectropolarimetry, and light curves of supernovae of various types, theory of thermonuclear explosions, core collapse, and radioactive decay, applications to cosmology, and possible connections to gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  13. Mass Varying Neutrinos in Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi-Torres, F; de Holanda, P C; Peres, O L G

    2010-01-01

    We study limits for the mass varying neutrino model, using constrains from supernova neutrinos placed by the r-process condition, $Y_e<0.5$. Also, we use this model in a supernova environment to study the regions of survival probability in the oscillation space parameter ($\\tan^2\\theta$ and $\\Delta m^2_0$), considering the channel $\

  14. Vibration Superposition in Tunnel Blasting with Millisecond Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jun-jie; LOU Xiao-ming; LUO De-pi

    2009-01-01

    According to explosion dynamics and elastic wave theory,the models of particle vibration velocity for simultaneous blasting and millisecond blasting are built.In the models,influential factors such as delay interval and charge quantity,are considered.The calculated vibration velocity is compared with the field test results,which shows that the theoretical values are close to the experimental ones.Meanwhile,the particle vibration velocity decreases quickly with time due to the damping of rock mass and has a harmonic motion,and the particle vibration velocity of millisecond blasting has short interval.The superposition of particle vibration velocities may reduce vibration because of wave interference,or magnify the surrounding rock response to the blasting-induced vibration.

  15. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, Şişli, İstanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  16. Cosmology with superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scovacricchi, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Bacon, D.; Sullivan, M.; Prajs, S.

    2016-02-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) as standardizable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z ˜ 3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the `Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae' (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardization values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalize over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ≃100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Ωm by at least 20 per cent (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia and 10 000 LSST-like SLSNe can measure Ωm and w to 2 and 4 per cent, respectively. The real power of SLSNe becomes evident when we consider possible temporal variations in w(a), giving possible uncertainties of only 2, 5 and 14 per cent on Ωm, w0 and wa, respectively, from the combination of DES SNe Ia, LSST-like SLSNe and Planck. These errors are competitive with predicted Euclid constraints, indicating a future role for SLSNe for probing the high-redshift Universe.

  17. GALAXY OUTFLOWS WITHOUT SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, Sharanya [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, 2nd Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 876004, Tempe-85287 (United States); Ostriker, Eve C., E-mail: sharanya.sur@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sharanya.sur@asu.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have ≈50–100 km s{sup −1} line of sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds ≈35 km s{sup −1}, as occurs in the dense disks that have star-formation rate (SFR) densities above ≈0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the SFR density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.

  18. Resonant Amplification of Turbulence by the Blast Wawes

    CERN Document Server

    Zankovich, A M

    2016-01-01

    We discuss an idea whether spherical blast waves can amplify by a non-local resonant hydrodynamic mechanism inhomogeneities formed by turbulence or phase segregation in the interstellar medium. We consider the problem of a blast-wave-turbulence interaction in the Linear Interaction Approximation. Mathematically, this is an eigenvalue problem for finding the structure and amplitude of eigenfunctions describing the response of the shock-wave flow to forced oscillations by external perturbations in the ambient interstellar medium. Linear analysis shows that the blast wave can amplify density and vorticity perturbations for a wide range of length scales with amplification coefficients of up to 20, with amplification the greater, the larger the length. There also exist resonant harmonics for which the gain becomes formally infinite in the linear approximation. Their orbital wavenumbers are within the range of macro- ($l \\sim 1$), meso- ($l \\sim 20$) and microscopic ($l > 200$) scales. Since the resonance width is ...

  19. Multimessengers from Core-Collapse Supernovae: Multidimensionality as a Key to Bridge Theory and Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kotake

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Core-collapse supernovae are dramatic explosions marking the catastrophic end of massive stars. The only means to get direct information about the supernova engine is from observations of neutrinos emitted by the forming neutron star, and through gravitational waves which are produced when the hydrodynamic flow or the neutrino flux is not perfectly spherically symmetric. The multidimensionality of the supernova engine, which breaks the sphericity of the central core such as convection, rotation, magnetic fields, and hydrodynamic instabilities of the supernova shock, is attracting great attention as the most important ingredient to understand the long-veiled explosion mechanism. Based on our recent work, we summarize properties of gravitational waves, neutrinos, and explosive nucleosynthesis obtained in a series of our multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations and discuss how the mystery of the central engines can be unraveled by deciphering these multimessengers produced under the thick veils of massive stars.

  20. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  1. X-Ray Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1--100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.

  2. Constraining supernova models using the hot gas in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    De Plaa, J; Bleeker, J A M; Vink, J; Kaastra, J S; Méndez, M; Vink, Jacco

    2007-01-01

    The hot Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) in clusters of galaxies is a very large repository of metals produced by supernovae. We aim to accurately measure the abundances in the ICM of many clusters and compare these data with metal yields produced by supernovae. Using the data archive of the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory, we compile a sample of 22 clusters. We fit spectra extracted from the core regions and determine the abundances of silicon, sulfur, argon, alcium, iron, and nickel. The abundances from the spectral fits are subsequently fitted to supernova yields determined from several supernova type Ia and core-collapse supernova models. We find that the argon and calcium abundances cannot be fitted with currently favoured supernova type Ia models. We obtain a major improvement of the fit, when we use an empirically modified delayed-detonation model that is calibrated on the Tycho supernova remnant. The two modified parameters are the density where the sound wave in the supernova turns into a shock and the ratio ...

  3. An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Aurélie; Nyein, Michelle K; Zheng, James Q; Moore, David F; Joannopoulos, John D; Radovitzky, Raúl

    2014-10-28

    Despite recent efforts to understand blast effects on the human brain, there are still no widely accepted injury criteria for humans. Recent animal studies have resulted in important advances in the understanding of brain injury due to intense dynamic loads. However, the applicability of animal brain injury results to humans remains uncertain. Here, we use advanced computational models to derive a scaling law relating blast wave intensity to the mechanical response of brain tissue across species. Detailed simulations of blast effects on the brain are conducted for different mammals using image-based biofidelic models. The intensity of the stress waves computed for different external blast conditions is compared across species. It is found that mass scaling, which successfully estimates blast tolerance of the thorax, fails to capture the brain mechanical response to blast across mammals. Instead, we show that an appropriate scaling variable must account for the mass of protective tissues relative to the brain, as well as their acoustic impedance. Peak stresses transmitted to the brain tissue by the blast are then shown to be a power function of the scaling parameter for a range of blast conditions relevant to TBI. In particular, it is found that human brain vulnerability to blast is higher than for any other mammalian species, which is in distinct contrast to previously proposed scaling laws based on body or brain mass. An application of the scaling law to recent experiments on rabbits furnishes the first physics-based injury estimate for blast-induced TBI in humans.

  4. Re-research on the size of proto-neutron star in core-collapse supernova

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhi-Quan; Liu Men-Quan

    2008-01-01

    The electron capture timeseale may be shorter than hydrodynamic timescale in inner iron core of core-collapse supernova according to a recent new idea. Based on the new idea, this paper carries out a numerical simulation on supernova explosion for the progenitor model Wsl5M⊙. The numerical result shows that the size of proto-neutron star has a significant change (decrease about 20%), which may affects the propagation of the shock wave and the final explosion energy.

  5. Extreme explosions supernovae, hypernovae, magnetars, and other unusual cosmic blasts

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, David S

    2013-01-01

    What happens at the end of the life of massive stars? At one time we thought all these stars followed similar evolutionary paths. However, new discoveries have shown that things are not quite that simple. This book focuses on the extreme -the most intense, brilliant and peculiar- of astronomical explosions. It features highly significant observational finds that push the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics, particularly as before these objects were only predicted in theory.  This book is for those who want the latest information and ideas about the most dramatic and unusual explosions dete

  6. Toxicology of blast overpressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, N M

    1997-07-25

    Blast overpressure (BOP) or high energy impulse noise, is the sharp instantaneous rise in ambient atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation or firing of weapons. Blasts that were once confined to military and to a lesser extent, occupational settings, are becoming more universal as the civilian population is now increasingly at risk of exposure to BOP from terrorist bombings that are occurring worldwide with greater frequency. Exposure to incident BOP waves can cause auditory and non-auditory damage. The primary targets for BOP damage are the hollow organs, ear, lung and gastrointestinal tract. In addition, solid organs such as heart, spleen and brain can also be injured upon exposure. However, the lung is more sensitive to damage and its injury can lead to death. The pathophysiological responses, and mortality have been extensively studied, but little attention, was given to the biochemical manifestations, and molecular mechanism(s) of injury. The injury from BOP has been, generally, attributed to its external physical impact on the body causing internal mechanical damage. However, a new hypothesis has been proposed based on experiments conducted in the Department of Respiratory Research, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and later in the Department of Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh. This hypothesis suggests that subtle biochemical changes namely, free radical-mediated oxidative stress occur and contribute to BOP-induced injury. Understanding the etiology of these changes may shed new light on the molecular mechanism(s) of injury, and can potentially offer new strategies for treatment. In this symposium. BOP research involving auditory, non-auditory, physiological, pathological, behavioral, and biochemical manifestations as well as predictive modeling and current treatment modalities of BOP-induced injury are discussed.

  7. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  8. The Nearby Supernova Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Wood-Vasey, W M; Lee Byung Cheol; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Perlmutter, S; Siegrist, J L; Wang, L; Antilogus, P; Astier, Pierre; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Copin, Y; Smadja, G; Gangler, E; Castera, A; Adam, G; Bacon, R; Lemonnier, J P; Pecontal, A; Pécontal, E; Kessler, R

    2004-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) at redshifts 0.03

  9. Asymmetric supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Akiyama, Shizuka

    2010-03-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and Cas A. Asymmetry in the strength of polar jets is a plausible mechanism to produce substantial pulsar "kick" velocities. Jets may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) for the core collapse problem in the context of the non-monotonic behavior expected: increasing centrifugal support will lead to a maximum rotation and magnetic field production as a function of the initial rotation of the iron core. Non-axisymmetric instabilities are predicted for differentially rotating proto-neutron stars with values of the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to binding energy, T/∣ W∣≳0.01. The non-axisymmetric instabilities are likely to drive magnetosonic waves into the surrounding time-dependent density structure. These waves represent a mechanism of the dissipation of the rotational energy of the proto-neutron star, and the outward deposition of this energy may play a role in the supernova explosion process. The phase of deleptonization and contraction of the proto-neutron star lasting several seconds is likely to be an important phase of magnetic non-axisymmetric evolution. In the special circumstance that the proto-neutron star is born sufficiently rapidly rotating that it is subject to bar-mode instabilities on secular timescales, a possible outcome is that the deleptonizing neutron star will evolve along the locus T/∣ W∣˜0.14 releasing a significant fraction of its binding energy as MHD power sufficient to account for a GRB. This power will be provided over an extended time, 10 s, that is strongly reminiscent of the timescale of long GRBs and is also comparable to the

  10. Study of TATP: blast characteristics and TNT equivalency of small charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachman, J.; Matyáš, R.; Künzel, M.

    2014-07-01

    Blast wave parameters including incident overpressure, impulse and duration of the positive phase of the incident blast wave and its time of arrival were experimentally determined for 50 g charges of low bulk density () dry TATP (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane). The results were compared with published TNT data, and TNT equivalencies were determined, resulting in the values of 70 % based on overpressure and 55 % based on impulse of the positive phase of the blast wave. Brisance by the Hess method (lead cylinder compression) was found to be about one-third of that for TNT (at density . Detonation velocities averaged around

  11. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (olivine (forsterite 83) grains olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  12. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Allam, S; Althouse, W E; Amanullah, R; Annis, J; Astier, Pierre; Aumeunier, M; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Barrelet, E; Basa, S; Bebek, C; Bergström, L; Bernstein, G; Bester, M; Besuner, B; Bigelow, B; Blandford, R; Bohlin, R; Bonissent, A; Bower, C; Brown, M; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Cole, D; Commins, Eugene D; Craig, W; Davis, T; Dawson, K; Day, C; De Harveng, M; De Jongh, F; Deustua, S; Diehl, H; Dobson, T; Dodelson, S; Ealet, A; Ellis, R; Emmet, W; Figer, D; Fouchez, D; Frerking, M; Frieman, J A; Fruchter, A; Gerdes, D; Gladney, L; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D; Heetderks, H; Hoff, M; Holland, S; Huffer, M; Hui, L; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Jelinsky, P; Juramy, C; Karcher, A; Kent, S; Kahn, S; Kim, A; Kolbe, W; Krieger, B; Kushner, G; Kuznetsova, N; Lafever, R; Lamoureux, J; Lampton, M; Lefèvre, O; Lebrun, V; Levi, M; Limon, P; Lin, H; Linder, E; Loken, S; Lorenzon, W; Malina, R; Marian, L; Marriner, J P; Marshall, P; Massey, R; Mazure, A; McGinnis, B; McKay, T; McKee, S; Miquel, R; Mobasher, B; Morgan, N; Mortsell, E; Mostek, N; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nakajima, R; Nugent, P; Olus, H; Pain, R; Palaio, N; Pankow, D; Peoples, John; Perlmutter, S; Peterson, D; Prieto, E; Rabinowitz, D; Réfrégier, A; Rhodes, J; Roe, N; Rusin, D; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Seiffert, M; Sholl, M; Shukla, H; Smadja, G; Smith, R M; Smoot, George F; Snyder, J; Spadafora, A; Stabenau, F; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Szymkowiak, A; Tarle, G; Taylor, K; Tilquin, A; Tomasch, A; Tucker, D; Vincent, D; Von der Lippe, H; Walder, J P; Wang, G; Weinstein, A; Wester, W; White, M

    2005-01-01

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a companion White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties lead to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. SNAP has achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction.

  13. Photometric redshifts for supernovae Ia in the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pascal, S; Rich, J; Guy, J; Bazin, G; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Sullivan, M

    2009-01-01

    We present a method using the SALT2 light curve fitter to determine the redshift of Type Ia supernovae in the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) based on their photometry in g', r', i' and z'. On 289 supernovae of the first three years of SNLS data, we obtain a precision $\\sigma_{\\Delta z/(1+z)} = 0.022$ on average up to a redshift of 1.0, with a higher precision of 0.016 for z0.45. The rate of events with $|\\Delta z|/(1+z)>0.15$ (catastrophic errors) is 1.4%. Both the precision and the rate of catastrophic errors are better than what can be currently obtained using host galaxy photometric redshifts. Photometric redshifts of this precision may be useful for future experiments which aim to discover up to millions of supernovae Ia but without spectroscopy for most of them.

  14. NASA Scientists Witness a Supernova Cosmic Rite of Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have witnessed a cosmic rite of passage, the transition from a supernova to a supernova remnant, a process that has never been seen in much detail until now, leaving it poorly defined. A supernova is a massive star explosion; the remnant is the beautiful glowing shell that evolves afterwards. When does a supernova become supernova remnant? When does the shell appear and what powers its radiant glow? A science team led by Dr. Stefan Immler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., has taken a fresh look at a supernova that exploded in 1970, called SN 1970G, just off the handle of the Big Dipper. This is the oldest supernova ever seen by X-ray telescopes. Chandra X-ray Image of SN 1970G Chandra X-ray Image of SN 1970G "Some astronomers have thought there's a moment when the supernova remnant magically turns on years after the supernova itself has faded away, when the shock wave of the explosion finally hits and lights up the interstellar medium," said Immler. "By contrast, our results show that a new supernova quickly and seamlessly evolves into a supernova remnant. The star's own debris, and not the interstellar medium gas, fuels the remnant." These results appear in The Astrophysical Journal, co-authored by Dr. Kip Kuntz, also of Goddard. They support previous Chandra observations of SN 1987A by Dr. Sangwook Park of Penn State. Using new data from Chandra and archived data from the European-led ROSAT and XMM-Newton observatories, Immler and Kuntz pieced together how SN 1970G evolved over the years. They found telltale signs of a supernova remnant - bright X-ray light - yet no evidence of interstellar gas, even across a distance around the site of the explosion 35 times larger than our solar system. Instead, the material that is heated by the supernova shock to glow in X-ray light, what we call the remnant, is from the stellar wind of the star itself and not distant gas in the interstellar medium. This

  15. Supernova 1987A: The Supernova of a Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Supernova 1987A, the brightest supernova since Kepler's in 1604, was detected 30 years ago at a distance of 160 000 light years in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. Visible with the naked eye and detected with the full range of technology constructed since Kepler's time, SN 1987A has continued to be a rich source of empirical information to help understand supernova explosions and their evolution into supernova remnants. While the light output has faded by a factor of 10 000 000 over those 30 years, instrumentation, like the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array has continued to improve so that this supernova continues to be visible in X-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared light and in radio emission. In this review, I will sketch what has been learned from these observations about the pre-supernova star and its final stages of evolution, the explosion physics, the energy sources for emission, and the shock physics as the expanding debris encounters the circumstellar ring that was created about 20 000 years before the explosion. Today, SN 1987A is making the transition to a supernova remnant- the energetics are no longer dominated by the radioactive elements produced in the explosion, but by the interaction of the expanding debris with the surrounding gas. While we are confident that the supernova explosion had its origin in gravitational collapse, careful searches for a compact object at the center of the remnant place upper limits of a few solar luminosities on that relic. Support for HST GO programs 13401 and 13405 was provided by NASA through grants from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Magnetar-Powered Supernovae in Two Dimensions. I. Superluminous Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, S. E.; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the radiation emitted by a rapidly rotating magnetar embedded in a young supernova can greatly amplify its luminosity. These one-dimensional studies have also revealed the existence of an instability arising from the piling up of radiatively accelerated matter in a thin dense shell deep inside the supernova. Here we examine the problem in two dimensions and find that, while instabilities cause mixing and fracture this shell into filamentary structures that red...

  17. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimerz J.; Gwynne, Peter; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) SN Ia that exploded approximately 1900 CE, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, much brighter in the north, but bilaterally symmetric in X-rays. We present the results of X-ray expansion measurements that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. We confirm the mean expansion rate (2011-2015) of 0.58% per yr, but large spatial variations are present. Using the nonparametric 'Demons' method, we measure the velocity field throughout the entire SNR, finding that motions vary by a factor of 5, from 0.''09 to 0.''44 per yr. The slowest shocks are at the outer boundary of the bright northern radio rim, with velocities v(sub s) as low as 3600 km per sec (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than v(sub s) = 12,000-13,000 km per sec along the X-ray-bright major axis. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. This asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. Based on Chandra observations spanning 8.3 yr, we measure its increase at 1.3% +/- 0.8% per yr. The SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium ejected by the SN progenitor prior to its explosion.

  18. The Vela Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.

    We wish to obtain both emission and absorption line observations of the Vela Supernova remnant. The filament we wish to study in emission is the brightest filament in the SNR, so it will provide a spectrum twice the quality of any in existence. It is also located at the edge of an unusual bulge in the SNR, and it can be used to test the level of departure from pressure equilibrium in the remnant, which is useful as a test of evaporative models of SNR evolution. The absorption line studies will look for evidence of the drastically unstable behavior of shocks above 150 km/s predicted by Innes and Giddings. Four of the stars studied by Jenkins, Silk and Wallerstein showed marginal evidence for two positive or two negative high velocity components. If these multiple velocity components are confirmed, they support the secondary shock predictions of Innes and Giddings.

  19. Neutrinos and nucleosynthesis in supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, U [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Fisica de Altas EnergIas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM). Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); D' Olivo, J C [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Fisica de Altas EnergIas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM). Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Cabral-Rosetti, L G [Departamento de Posgrado, Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigacion y Docencia en Educacion Tecnica (CIIDET), Av. Universidad 282 Pte., Col. Centro, A. Postal 752, C.P. 76000, Santiago de Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2006-05-15

    The type II supernova is considered as a candidate site for the production of heavy elements. The nucleosynthesis occurs in an intense neutrino flux, we calculate the electron fraction in this environment.

  20. The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background

    CERN Document Server

    Beacom, John F

    2010-01-01

    The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) is the weak glow of MeV neutrinos and antineutrinos from distant core-collapse supernovae. The DSNB has not been detected yet, but the Super-Kamiokande (SK) 2003 upper limit on the electron antineutrino flux is close to predictions, now quite precise, based on astrophysical data. If SK is modified with dissolved gadolinium to reduce detector backgrounds and increase the energy range for analysis, then it should detect the DSNB at a rate of a few events per year, providing a new probe of supernova neutrino emission and the cosmic core-collapse rate. If the DSNB is not detected, then new physics will be required. Neutrino astronomy, while uniquely powerful, has proven extremely difficult -- only the Sun and the nearby Supernova 1987A have been detected to date -- so the promise of detecting new sources soon is exciting indeed.

  1. Dry ice blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  2. Toward a Standard Model of Core Collapse Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzacappa, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the current status of core collapse supernova models and the future developments needed to achieve significant advances in understanding the supernova mechanism and supernova phenomenology, i.e., in developing a supernova standard model.

  3. Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Della Valle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa el estatus observacional de la conexi on Supernova (SN/Estallido de Rayos-Gamma (GRB. Recientes (y no tan recientes observaciones de GRBs largos sugieren que una fracci on signi cativa de ellos (pero no todos est an asociados con supernovas brillantes del tipo Ib/c. Estimaciones actuales de las tasas de producci on de GRBs y SNs dan una raz on para GRB/SNe-Ibc en el rango 0:4%

  4. Blast Loading Experiments of Developed Surrogate Models for TBI Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

    2009-06-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells followed by SLA prototyped skulls housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted with the simple geometries to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head due to impedance mismatches. Results from the strain correlations added to the theory of internal shearing between tissues.

  5. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Jackman, C H; Cannizzo, J K; Mattson, B J; Chen, W; Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan

    2003-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time, improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma-ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma-rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion roughly to double the ``biologically active'' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova mu...

  6. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  7. Supernova interaction with dense mass loss

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalier, Roger A

    2013-01-01

    Supernovae of Type IIn (narrow line) appear to be explosions that had strong mass loss before the event, so that the optical luminosity is powered by the circumstellar interaction. If the mass loss region has an optical depth $>c/v_s$, where $v_s$ is the shock velocity, the shock breakout occurs in the mass loss region and a significant fraction of the explosion energy can be radiated. The emission from the superluminous SN 2006gy and the normal luminosity SN 2011ht can plausibly be attributed to shock breakout in a wind, with SN 2011ht being a low energy event. Superluminous supernovae of Type I may derive their luminosity from interaction with a mass loss region of limited extent. However, the distinctive temperature increase to maximum luminosity has not been clearly observed in Type I events. Suggested mechanisms for the strong mass loss include pulsational pair instability, gravity-waves generated by instabilities in late burning phases, and binary effects.

  8. Reflection Shocked Gas in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Miyata, E; Miyata, Emi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    We performed spectroscopic X-ray observations of the eastern and northern regions of the Cygnus Loop with the ASCA observatory. The X-ray surface brightness of these regions shows a complex structure in the ROSAT all-sky survey image. We carried out a spatially-resolved analysis for both regions and found that $kT_{\\rm e}$ did not increase toward the center region, but showed inhomogeneous structures. Such variation cannot be explained by a blast wave model propagating into a homogeneous interstellar medium. We thus investigated the interaction between a blast wave and an interstellar cloud. Two major emission mechanisms are plausible: a cloud evaporation model and a reflection shock model. In both regions, only a reflection shock model qualitatively explains our results. Our results suggest the existence of a large-scale interstellar cloud. We suppose that such a large-scale structure would be produced by a precursor.

  9. An Energy-Based Safety Evaluation Index of Blast Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsheng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined peak particle velocity (PPV and frequency safety criterion for blast vibration is widely used in blasting engineering. However, some field investigations are inconsistent with this criterion. On the basis of field investigations, it is found that there are two failure modes of structures subjected to blasting seismic waves, that is, first-excursion failure and cumulative plastic damage failure. Moreover, the nature of structural responses under blast vibrations is a process of energy input, transformation, and dissipation. Therefore, an energy-based dual safety standard is proposed in this work to more comprehensively explain all failure modes of structures under blast vibrations. To this end, structures are simplified into elastic-plastic single degree of freedom (SDOF systems with bilinear restoring force models, and energy responses of SDOF systems are then determined using the Newmark-β method. From the energy responses, the maximum instantaneous input energy and hysteretic energy are selected as the basis of the dual safety criterion, because they can reflect first-excursion failure and cumulative plastic damage failure, respectively. Finally, field investigations in a blasting site in Zunyi, Guizhou province, China, are used to prove that compared to the PPV-frequency criterion the proposed energy-based dual safety criterion is more capable of assessing the damage potential of blast vibrations.

  10. Modelling and Dynamic Response of Steel Reticulated Shell under Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximei Zhai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Explicit finite element programme LS-DYNA was used to simulate a long-span steel reticulated shell under blast loading to investigate the structural dynamic responses in this paper. The elaborate finite element model of the Kiewitt-8 single-layer reticulated shell with span of 40 m subjected to central blast loading was established and all the process from the detonation of the explosive charge to the demolition, including the propagation of the blast wave and its interaction with structure was reproduced. The peak overpressure from the numerical analysis was compared with empirical formulas to verify the credibility and applicability of numerical simulation for blast loading. The dynamic responses of the structure under blast loading with different TNT equivalent weights of explosive and rise-span ratios were obtained. In addition, the response types of Kiewitt-8 single-layer reticulated shell subjected to central explosive blast loading were defined.

  11. A Review of Current Researches on Blast Load Effects on Building Structures in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhongxian; DU Hao; BAO Chunxiao

    2006-01-01

    The damages of building structures subjected to multifarious explosions cause huge losses of lives and property.It is the reason why the blast resistance and explosion protection of building structures become an important research topic in the civil engineering field all over the world.This paper provides an overview of the research work in China on blast loads effect on building structures.It includes modeling blast shock wave propagation and their effects,the dynamic responses of various building structures under blast loads and the measures to strengthen the building structures against blast loads.The paper also discusses the achievements and further work that needs be done for a better understanding of the blast loads' effects on building structures,and for deriving effective and economic techniques to design new or to strengthen existing structures.

  12. Understanding the Effects of Blast Wave on the Intracranial Pressure and Traumatic Brain Injury in Rodents and Humans Using Experimental Shock Tube and Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    prostate cancer , diabetes 2 M 75 173 79 cardiovascular disease 3 M 65 175 73 Prostate cancer 7.2.2.3. Instrumentation Although in the original...the brain stiffness (it was found out from literature that stiffness of brain tissue is high in the case of younger rats). They determined that for...indirect component of the loading. The amplitude and frequency of the wave depends on the cross sectional geometry (second moment of area) and stiffness

  13. Analysis of natural mineral earthquake and blast based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelong; Li, Zhonghui; Wang, Enyuan; Feng, Junjun; Kong, Xiangguo; Chen, Liang; Li, Baolin; Li, Nan

    2016-05-01

    There are important theoretical and scientific benefits to identify natural mineral earthquake and blast accurately to ensure the safety of mining. In the paper, we studied the wave characteristics of natural mineral earthquake and blast in a coal mine based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) method. Results show that the dominant frequency of natural mineral earthquake wave is 20 Hz, which is lower than the other frequency bands. The blast wave frequency is relatively complex and its dominant frequency is 140 Hz, which is higher than the other frequency bands. The natural mineral earthquake wave amplitude is 50 mV and the blast signal amplitude reaches up to 250 mV. However, the decay rate of natural mineral earthquake wave is slower than the blast wave. Both of them could be decomposed into 9 intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition (EMD). c2, c3, c4 and c5 are the main part of the natural mineral earthquake wave; while c2, c3, and c4 are the main part of the blast wave. These IMFs contain most of the signal energy and belong to the advantage part of the original signal. Besides, the instantaneous energy duration of natural mineral earthquake wave is longer, its peak energy arrival time is earlier and decay rate is slower, while the value is lower. The natural mineral earthquake wave Hilbert energy distributes in the sampling points 600-1200, frequency less than 50 Hz, and the energy peak 100 is at 25 Hz. By contrast, the blast wave Hilbert energy is concentrated on the sampling points 600-800, frequency around 50 Hz and 140 Hz, and the energy peak 170 is at 140 Hz.

  14. Hybrid S2/Carbon Epoxy Composite Armours Under Blast Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, F.; Meo, Michele; Wright, A.; French, M.; Bernabei, M.

    2012-06-01

    Civil and military structures, such as helicopters, aircrafts, naval ships, tanks or buildings are susceptible to blast loads as terroristic attacks increases, therefore there is the need to design blast resistant structures. During an explosion the peak pressure produced by shock wave is much greater than the static collapse pressure. Metallic structures usually undergo large plastic deformations absorbing blast energy before reaching equilibrium. Due to their high specific properties, fibre-reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in blast resistant armours. A deep insight into the relationship between explosion loads, composite architecture and deformation/fracture behaviour will offer the possibility to design structures with significantly enhanced energy absorption and blast resistance performance. This study presents the results of a numerical investigation aimed at understanding the performance of a hybrid composite (glass/carbon fibre) plate subjected to blast loads using commercial LS-DYNA software. In particular, the paper deals with numerical 3D simulations of damages caused by air blast waves generated by C4 charges on two fully clamped rectangular plates made of steel and hybrid (S2/Carbon) composite, respectively. A Multi Materials Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (MMALE) formulation was used to simulate the shock phenomenon. For the steel plates, the Johnson-Cook material model was employed. For the composite plates both in-plane and out-of-plane failure criteria were employed. In particular, a contact tiebreak formulation with a mixed mode failure criteria was employed to simulate delamination failure. As for the steel plates the results showed that excellent correlation with the experimental data for the two blast load conditions in terms of dynamic and residual deflection for two different C4 charges. For the composite plates the numerical results showed that, as expected, a wider delamination damage was observed

  15. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    curvature changes. Figure 38. Locations with element disconnect issues 2. Modeling air blast wave propagation using a 2-D to 3-D mapping...sagittal sinus, transverse sinus, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), hemispheres of the cerebrum with distinct white and gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem...brain and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) were meshed and defined with Lagrangian formulation-based elements. The CSF fills the subarachnoid space

  16. Numerical simulation of parallel hole cut blasting with uncharged holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shijie Qu; Xiangbin Zheng; Lihua Fan; Ying Wang

    2008-01-01

    The cavity formation and propagation process of stress wave from parallel hole cut blasting was simulated with AN-SYS/LS-DYNA 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element software. The distribution of element plastic strain, node velocity, node time-acceleration history and the blasting cartridge volume ratio during the process were analyzed. It was found that the detonation of charged holes would cause the interaction of stress wave with the wall of uncharged holes. Initial rock cracking and displacement to neighboring uncharged holes become the main mechanism of cavity formation in early stage.

  17. The Search for Lensed Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae that have multiple images due to gravitational lensing can provide us with a wealth of information both about the supernovae themselves and about our surrounding universe. But how can we find these rare explosions?Clues from Multiple ImagesWhen light from a distant object passes by a massive foreground galaxy, the galaxys strong gravitational pull can bend the light, distorting our view of the backgroundobject. In severe cases, this process can cause multiple images of the distant object to appear in the foreground lensing galaxy.An illustration of gravitational lensing. Light from the distant supernova is bent as it passes through a giant elliptical galaxy in the foreground, causing multiple images of the supernova to appear to be hosted by the elliptical galaxy. [Adapted from image by NASA/ESA/A. Feild (STScI)]Observations of multiply-imaged Type Ia supernovae (explosions that occur when white dwarfs in binary systems exceed their maximum allowed mass) could answer a number of astronomical questions. Because Type Ia supernovae are standard candles, distant, lensed Type Ia supernovae can be used to extend the Hubble diagram to high redshifts. Furthermore, the lensing time delays from the multiply-imaged explosion can provide high-precision constraints on cosmological parameters.The catch? So far, weve only found one multiply-imaged Type Ia supernova: iPTF16geu, discovered late last year. Were going to need a lot more of them to develop a useful sample! So how do we identify themutiply-imaged Type Ias among the many billions of fleeting events discovered in current and future surveys of transients?Searching for AnomaliesAbsolute magnitudes for Type Ia supernovae in elliptical galaxies. None are expected to be above -20 in the B band, so if we calculate a magnitude for a Type Ia supernova thats larger than this, its probably not hosted by the galaxy we think it is! [Goldstein Nugent 2017]Two scientists from University of California, Berkeley and

  18. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  19. Blast overpressure after tire explosion: a fatal case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomara, Cristoforo; D'Errico, Stefano; Riezzo, Irene; Perilli, Gabriela; Volpe, Umberto; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-12-01

    Fatal blast injuries are generally reported in literature as a consequence of the detonation of explosives in war settings. The pattern of lesion depends on the position of the victim in relation to the explosion, on whether the blast tracks through air or water, and whether it happens in the open air or within an enclosed space and the distance from the explosion. Tire explosion-related injuries are rarely reported in literature. This study presents a fatal case of blast overpressure due to the accidental explosion of a truck tire occurring in a tire repair shop. A multidisciplinary approach to the fatality involving forensic pathologists and engineers revealed that the accidental explosion, which caused a series of primary and tertiary blast wave injuries, was due to tire deterioration.

  20. Chandra's View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image reveals, in detail, the turbulent debris created by a supernova explosion that was observed by the Danish Astronomer Tycho Brahe in the year 1572. The colors show different x-ray energies, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and high energies, respectively. Most likely caused by the destruction of a white dwarf star, a shock wave produced by the expanding debris is outlined by the sharp blue circular arcs of 20 million degree Celsius gas seen on the outer rim. The stellar debris, visible only by x-ray, has a temperature of about 10 million degrees, and shows up as mottled yellow, green, and red fingers of gas.

  1. Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation

    CERN Document Server

    Plewa, T; Lamb, D

    2004-01-01

    We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The proposed scenario follows from relaxing the assumption of symmetry in the model and involves a detonation created in an unconfined environment. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of stellar material initiating a deflagration. This deflagration results in the formation of a buoyantly-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout forms a strong pressure wave that laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface. The flow conditions at that moment support a detonation that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion fol...

  2. Type Ia supernovae and the DD scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Isern, J; Lorén-Aguilar, P

    2011-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to be the outcome of the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf in a close binary system. Two possible scenarios, not necessarily incompatible, have been advanced. One assumes a white dwarf that accretes matter from a nondegenerate companion (the single degenerate scenario), the other assumes two white dwarfs that merge as a consequence of the emission of gravitational waves (the double degenerate scenario). The delay time distribution of star formation bursts strongly suggests that the DD scenario should be responsible of the late time explosions, but this contradicts the common wisdom that the outcome of the merging of two white dwarfs is an accretion induced collapse to a neutron star. In this contribution we review some of the most controversial issues of this problem.

  3. Recombination Effects on Supernovae Light-Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Sari, Re'em

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae of type IIP are marked by the long plateau seen in their optical light curves. The plateau is believed to be the result of a recombination wave that propagates through the outflowing massive hydrogen envelope. Here, we analytically investigate the transition from a fully ionized envelope to a partially recombined one and its effects on the SN light curve. The motivation is to establish the underlying processes which dominate the evolution at late times when recombination takes place in the envelope, yet early enough so that $^{56}$Ni decay is a negligible source of energy. We assume a simple, yet adequate, hydrodynamic profile of the envelope and study the mechanisms which dominate the energy emission and the observed temperature. We consider the diffusion of photons through the envelope while analyzing the ionization fraction and the coupling between radiation and gas. We find that once recombination starts, the observed temperature decreases slowly in time. However, in a typical red supergiant (R...

  4. Electron Acceleration in Supernovae and Millimeter Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Maeda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernovae launch a strong shock wave by the interaction of the expanding ejecta and surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM. At the shock, electrons are accelerated to relativistic speed, creating observed synchrotron emissions in radio wavelengths. In this paper, I suggest that SNe (i.e., < 1 year since the explosion provide a unique site to study the electron acceleration mechanism. I argue that the eciency of the acceleration at the young SN shock is much lower than conventionally assumed, and that the electrons emitting in the cm wavelengths are not fully in the Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA regime. Thus radio emissions from young SNe record information on the yet-unresolved 'injection' mechanism. I also present perspectives of millimeter (mm observations of SNe - this will provide opportunities to uniquely determine the shock physics and the acceleration efficiency, to test the non-linear DSA mechanism and provide a characteristic electron energy scale with which the DSA start dominating the electron acceleration.

  5. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  6. 网格划分影响二维爆炸冲击波数值模拟精度的研究%The Influence Research of the Mesh Size on the Numerical Simulation Accuracy of 2-D Blast Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜欣新; 毛毳

    2013-01-01

    使用 ANSYS/LS-DYNA 建立了 TNT 炸药在空气中爆炸传播的二维计算模型,比较了相同网格划分比例时,三种不同当量 TNT 爆炸后在各自比例距离上测得的超压峰值.结果表明:各峰值基本相同,差别小于104,Pa.在此基础上,改变网格划分比例,模拟计算5,kg 当量 TNT的超压峰值,并与美国常规武器防护设计规范(TM5-855-1)进行对比,提出了与不同比例距离区间相适应的网格划分比例.%A 2-D calculating model of blast wave spreading in the air is established by ANSYS/LS-DYNA, and the peak overpressure measured on several scale distances of three different kinds of equivalent weight are compared under the same mesh size. The result indicates that the differences of the peak overpressures are less than 104 Pa, which means they are basi-cally the same. Based on the above analysis, the authors changes the mesh size to simulate the peak overpressure of 5.00 kg equivalent weight of TNT, and compares it with the result of the code for design of the U.S.A. conventional weapons protec-tion (TM5-855-1), the fundamentals of protective design for conventional weapons, and proposes different mesh generation methods to suit different scale distance zones.

  7. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.05.025

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting warfighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wave may result in brain injury have been proposed - a thoracic mechanism, head acceleration and direct cranial transmission. These mechanisms need not be mutually exclusive. In this study, likely regions of interest for the first two mechanisms based on blast characteristics (positive pulse duration and peak effective overpressure) are developed using available data from blast experiments and related studies, including behind-armor blunt trauma and ballistic pressure wave studies. These related studies are appropriate to in...

  8. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  9. Evidence from stable isotopes and (10)Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-11-22

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived (10)Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  10. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  11. Evidence from stable isotopes and Be-10 for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-01-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived Be-10 can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  12. Supernova Physics at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Ankowski, Artur; Benhar, Omar; Chen, Sun; Cherry, John; Cui, Yanou; Friedland, Alexander; Gil-Botella, Ines; Haghighat, Alireza; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Huber, Patrick; Kneller, James; Laha, Ranjan; Li, Shirley; Link, Jonathan; Lovato, Alessandro; Macias, Oscar; Mariani, Camillo; Mezzacappa, Anthony; O'Connor, Evan; O'Sullivan, Erin; Rubbia, Andre; Scholberg, Kate; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    The DUNE/LBNF program aims to address key questions in neutrino physics and astroparticle physics. Realizing DUNE's potential to reconstruct low-energy particles in the 10-100 MeV energy range will bring significant benefits for all DUNE's science goals. In neutrino physics, low-energy sensitivity will improve neutrino energy reconstruction in the GeV range relevant for the kinematics of DUNE's long-baseline oscillation program. In astroparticle physics, low-energy capabilities will make DUNE's far detectors the world's best apparatus for studying the electron-neutrino flux from a supernova. This will open a new window to unrivaled studies of the dynamics and neutronization of a star's central core in real time, the potential discovery of the neutrino mass hierarchy, provide new sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model, and evidence of neutrino quantum-coherence effects. The same capabilities will also provide new sensitivity to `boosted dark matter' models that are not observable in traditional direc...

  13. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What causes the tremendous explosions of superluminous supernovae? New observations reveal the geometry of one such explosion, SN 2015bn, providing clues as to its source.A New Class of ExplosionsImage of a type Ia supernova in the galaxy NGC 4526. [NASA/ESA]Supernovae are powerful explosions that can briefly outshine the galaxies that host them. There are several different classifications of supernovae, each with a different physical source such as thermonuclear instability in a white dwarf, caused by accretion of too much mass, or the exhaustion of fuel in the core of a massive star, leading to the cores collapse and expulsion of its outer layers.In recent years, however, weve detected another type of supernovae, referred to as superluminous supernovae. These particularly energetic explosions last longer months instead of weeks and are brighter at their peaks than normal supernovae by factors of tens to hundreds.The physical cause of these unusual explosions is still a topic of debate. Recently, however, a team of scientists led by Cosimo Inserra (Queens University Belfast) has obtained new observations of a superluminous supernova that might help address this question.The flux and the polarization level (black lines) along the dominant axis of SN 2015bn, 24 days before peak flux (left) and 28 days after peak flux (right). Blue lines show the authors best-fitting model. [Inserra et al. 2016]Probing GeometryInserra and collaborators obtained two sets of observations of SN 2015bn one roughly a month before and one a month after the superluminous supernovas peak brightness using a spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope in Chile. These observations mark the first spectropolarimetric data for a superluminous supernova.Spectropolarimetry is the practice of obtaining information about the polarization of radiation from an objects spectrum. Polarization carries information about broken spatial symmetries in the object: only if the object is perfectly symmetric can it

  14. Extremely fast acceleration of cosmic rays in a supernova remnant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Aharonian, Felix A; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo

    2007-10-04

    Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) are widely believed to be accelerated by shock waves associated with the expansion of supernova ejecta into the interstellar medium. A key issue in this long-standing conjecture is a theoretical prediction that the interstellar magnetic field can be substantially amplified at the shock of a young supernova remnant (SNR) through magnetohydrodynamic waves generated by cosmic rays. Here we report a discovery of the brightening and decay of X-ray hot spots in the shell of the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 on a one-year timescale. This rapid variability shows that the X-rays are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons through a synchrotron process and that electron acceleration does indeed take place in a strongly magnetized environment, indicating amplification of the magnetic field by a factor of more than 100. The X-ray variability also implies that we have witnessed the ongoing shock-acceleration of electrons in real time. Independently, broadband X-ray spectrometric measurements of RX J1713.7-3946 indicate that electron acceleration proceeds in the most effective ('Bohm-diffusion') regime. Taken together, these two results provide a strong argument for acceleration of protons and nuclei to energies of 1 PeV (10(15) eV) and beyond in young supernova remnants.

  15. Extremely Fast Acceleration of Cosmic Rays in a Supernova Remnant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Aharonian, F.A.; Tanaka, T.; Takahashi, T.; Maeda, Y.; /JAERI, Tokai /Dublin Inst. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC

    2007-10-23

    Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) are widely believed to be accelerated by shock waves associated with the expansion of supernova ejecta into the interstellar medium. A key issue in this long-standing conjecture is a theoretical prediction that the interstellar magnetic field can be substantially amplified at the shock of a young supernova remnant (SNR) through magnetohydrodynamic waves generated by cosmic rays. Here we report a discovery of the brightening and decay of X-ray hot spots in the shell of theSNRRXJ1713.723946 on a one-year timescale. This rapid variability shows that the X-rays are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons through a synchrotron process and that electron acceleration does indeed take place in a strongly magnetized environment, indicating amplification of the magnetic field by a factor of more than 100. The X-ray variability also implies that we have witnessed the ongoing shock-acceleration of electrons in real time. Independently, broadband X-ray spectrometric measurements of RXJ1713.723946 indicate that electron acceleration proceeds in the most effective ('Bohm-diffusion') regime. Taken together, these two results provide a strong argument for acceleration of protons and nuclei to energies of 1 PeV (10{sup 15} eV) and beyond in young supernova remnants.

  16. Characterising Dark Energy through supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Tamara M

    2016-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are a powerful cosmological probe, that gave the first strong evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. Here we provide an overview of how supernovae can go further to reveal information about what is causing the acceleration, be it dark energy or some modification to our laws of gravity. We first summarise the many different approaches used to explain or test the acceleration, including parametric models (like the standard model, LambdaCDM), non-parametric models, dark fluid models such as quintessence, and extensions to standard gravity. We also show how supernova data can be used beyond the Hubble diagram, to give information on gravitational lensing and peculiar velocities that can be used to distinguish between models that predict the same expansion history. Finally, we review the methods of statistical inference that are commonly used, making a point of separating parameter estimation from model selection.

  17. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  18. Standardization of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Coelho, Rodrigo C V; Reis, Ribamar R R; Siffert, Beatriz B

    2014-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been intensively investigated due to its great homogeneity and high luminosity, which make it possible to use them as standardizable candles for the determination of cosmological parameters. In 2011, the physics Nobel prize was awarded for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae. This is a pedagogical article, aimed at those starting their study of that subject, in which we dwell on some topics related to the analysis of SNe Ia and their use in luminosity distance estimators. Here we investigate their spectral properties and light curve standardization, paying careful attention to the fundamental quantities directly related to the SNe Ia observables. Finally, we describe our own step-by-step implementation of a classical light curve fi?tter, the stretch, applying it to real data from the Carnegie Supernova Project.

  19. Deep blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  20. Responsibility of a Filament Eruption for the Initiation of a Flare, CME, and Blast Wave, and its Possible Transformation into a Bow Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V; Kuzmenko, I V; Kochanov, A A; Chertok, I M; Kalashnikov, S S

    2014-01-01

    Multi-instrument observations of two filament eruptions on 24 February and 11 May 2011 suggest the following updated scenario for eruptive flare, CME and shock wave evolution. An initial destabilization of a filament results in stretching out of magnetic threads belonging to its body and rooted in the photosphere along the inversion line. Their reconnection leads to i) heating of parts of the filament or its environment, ii) initial development of the flare arcade cusp and ribbons, and iii) increasing similarity of the filament to a curved flux rope and its acceleration. Then the pre-eruption arcade enveloping the filament gets involved in reconnection according to the standard model and continues to form the flare arcade and ribbons. The poloidal magnetic flux in the curved rope developing from the filament progressively increases and forces its toroidal expansion. This flux rope impulsively expands and produces an MHD disturbance, which rapidly steepens into a shock. The shock passes through the arcade expa...

  1. Effects Of Primary Blast Overpressure On Retina And Optic Tract In Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eDemar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model.The amplitude of a- and b- waves on the electroretinogram (ERG for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield-simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm post-optic chiasm were evaluated 14 days after the blast.For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post-blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P=0.005-0.01 Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post-blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P=0.01, and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001. Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both post-chiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves.

  2. Software Based Supernova Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Stephen M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes software for detecting Supernova (SN) in images. The software can operate in real-time to discover SN while data is being collected so the instrumentation can immediately be re-tasked to perform spectroscopy or photometry of a discovery. Because the instrumentation captures two images per minute, the realtime budget is constrained to 30 seconds per target, a challenging goal. Using a set of two to four images, the program creates a "Reference" (REF) image and a "New" (NEW) image where all images are used in both NEW and REF but any SN survives the combination process only in the NEW image. This process produces good quality images having similar noise characteristics but without artifacts that might be interpreted as SN. The images are then adjusted for seeing and brightness differences using a variant of Tomaney and Crotts method of Point Spread Function (PSF) matching after which REF is subtracted from NEW to produce a Difference (DIF) image. A Classifier is then trained on a grid of artificial SN to estimate the statistical properties of four attributes and used in a process to mask false positives that can be clearly identified as such. Further training to avoid any remaining false positives sets the range, in standard deviations for each attribute, that the Classifier will accept as a valid SN. This training enables the Classifier to discriminate between SN and most subtraction residue. Lastly, the DIF image is scanned and measured by the Classifier to find locations where all four properties fall within their acceptance ranges. If multiple locations are found, the one best conforming to the training estimates is chosen. This location is then declared as a Candidate SN, the instrumentation re-tasked and the operator notified.

  3. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  4. Study on time-history characteristics of air blast wave due to great extent of roof instability%大面积顶板失稳诱发空气冲击波灾害时程特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘畅; 覃敏; 彭云

    2014-01-01

    采空区大面积顶板冒落可在瞬间产生破坏力极强的空气冲击波。介绍了空气冲击波的形成及危害形式,指出了传统冲击模型的缺陷,通过建立新的冲击模型,深入分析了空气冲击波从形成到消亡过程中的速度和能量变化特征,结合香炉山钨矿大面积采空区的实际情况,选取典型参数进行分析计算,结果表明:空气冲击波速度与冒落块体尺寸,顶板冒落的高度,可供逸出气体巷道的总断面积,巷道的通风阻力等因素有关;下落块体受压缩空气阻力作用,下降时间略微增加,整个冒落过程持续时间为2.89s,当下落时间为2.1s时,风速达到极值,为508.1m/s,冲击影响范围在距离事发空区的370m以内;块体下落的起始阶段受空气阻力较小,飓风速度急剧升高,下降中间阶段,飓风速度先是缓慢爬升,然后达到峰值,块体下降的后期受空气阻力作用最为明显,风速急剧下降,巷道内飓风流迅速趋于平缓;建议对香炉山钨矿采空区尽快实施充填,并采取疏堵结合、设置缓冲垫层、加强地压活动监测等措施降低冲击危险,减小冲击危害。%Air blast wave caused by great extent of roof in worked-out area can bring about a great destruction .The formation and damaging forms of impact waves were introduced .And the defects of traditional model were pointed out.In order to make a further research on the time-history characteristics of waves speed and energy during the process from generation to disappearance , a new model was established .Then the typical parameters coming from the worked-out area of Xianglushan tungsten ore were used for calculation and analysis .And the results showed that:(1) shock velocity is closely related to falling height , size of rock block, sectional area of roadways and ven-tilation resistance, et, al;(2) under the action of aerodynamic drag , the falling time of the

  5. Molecular and Ionic Shocks in the Supernova Remnant 3C 391

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Rho, Jeonghee; Jarrett, T. H.; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier

    2002-01-01

    resolves into 16 clumps of H2 emission, with some fainter diffuse emission, but with no associated near-infrared continuum sources. One of the clumps is coincident with a previously detected OH 1720 MHz maser to within our 0.3" astrometry. These clumps are interpreted as a cluster of prestellar dense molecular cores that are currently being shocked by the supernova blast wave.

  6. Non-linear diffusion of cosmic rays escaping from supernova remnants I: the effect of neutrals

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, Lara; Marcowith, Alexandre; Morlino, Giovanni; Ptuskin, Vladimir S

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants are believed to be the main sources of galactic Cosmic Rays (CR). Within this framework, particles are accelerated at supernova remnant shocks and then released in the interstellar medium. The mechanism through which CRs are released and the way in which they propagate still remain open issues. The main difficulty is the high non-linearity of the problem: CRs themselves excite the magnetic turbulence that confines them close to their sources. We solve numerically the coupled differential equations describing the evolution in space and time of the escaping particles and of the waves generated through the CR streaming instability. The warm ionized and warm neutral phases of the interstellar medium are considered. These phases occupy the largest fraction of the disk volume, where most supernovae explode, and are characterised by the significant presence of neutral particles. The friction between those neutrals and ions results in a very effective wave damping mechanism. It is found that stream...

  7. Magnetar-Powered Supernovae in Two Dimensions. I. Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the radiation emitted by a rapidly rotating magnetar embedded in a young supernova can greatly amplify its luminosity. These one-dimensional studies have also revealed the existence of an instability arising from the piling up of radiatively accelerated matter in a thin dense shell deep inside the supernova. Here we examine the problem in two dimensions and find that, while instabilities cause mixing and fracture this shell into filamentary structures that reduce the density contrast, the concentration of matter in a hollow shell persists. The extent of the mixing depends upon the relative energy input by the magnetar and the kinetic energy of the inner ejecta. The light curve and spectrum of the resulting supernova will be appreciably altered, as will the appearance of the supernova remnant, which will be shellular and filamentary. A similar pile up and mixing might characterize other events where energy is input over an extended period by a centrally concentrated source, e.g...

  8. An investigation of a reticulated foam - perforated steel sheet combination as a blast mitigation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy-Tien N.; Proud, William G.

    2017-01-01

    Explosions are one of the main causes of injuries during battles and conflicts, with improvised explosive devices (IEDs) becoming increasingly common. Blast waves produced from such explosions can inflict very complex injuries on human and serious damage to structures. Here, the interaction between blast waves and sandwich structures of reticulated foam and perforated sheets is studied using a shock tube. The level of mitigation for primary blast injuries of these structures are discussed in terms of pulse shape, pressure magnitude and impulse. Schlieren photography and other high-speed imaging were used to capture the form of the blast wave. The results show up to 95% mitigation in both pressure and impulse with the structures studied. The behaviors of these mitigating sandwich panels under two loadings, Mach 2.0 and Mach 2.6, are also discussed.

  9. Face shield design against blast-induced head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Long Bin; Tse, Kwong Ming; Tan, Yuan Hong; Sapingi, Mohamad Ali Bin; Tan, Vincent Beng Chye; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2017-03-22

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has been on the rise in recent years because of the increasing use of improvised explosive devices in conflict zones. Our study investigates the response of a helmeted human head subjected to a blast of 1 atm peak overpressure, for cases with and without a standard polycarbonate (PC) face shield and for face shields comprising of composite PC and aerogel materials and with lateral edge extension. The novel introduction of aerogel into the laminate face shield is explored and its wave-structure interaction mechanics and performance in blast mitigation is analysed. Our numerical results show that the face shield prevented direct exposure of the blast wave to the face and help delays the transmission of the blast to reduce the intracranial pressures (ICPs) at the parietal lobe. However, the blast wave can diffract and enter the midface region at the bottom and side edges of the face shield, resulting in traumatic brain injury. This suggests that the bottom and sides of the face shield are important regions to focus on to reduce wave ingress. The laminated PC/aerogel/PC face shield yielded higher peak positive and negative ICPs at the frontal lobe, than the original PC one. For the occipital and temporal brain regions, the laminated face shield performed better than the original. The composite face shield with extended edges reduced ICP at the temporal lobe but increases ICP significantly at the parietal lobe, which suggests that a greater coverage may not lead to better mitigating effects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Are Supernovae Recorded in Indigenous Astronomical Traditions?

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    Novae and supernovae are rare astronomical events that would have had an influence on the sky-watching peoples who witnessed them. Although several bright novae/supernovae have been visible during recorded human history, there are many proposed but no confirmed accounts of supernovae in oral traditions or material culture. Criteria are established for confirming novae/supernovae in oral and material culture, and claims from around the world are discussed to determine if they meet these criteria. Australian Aboriginal traditions are explored for possible descriptions of novae/supernovae. Although representations of supernovae may exist in Indigenous traditions, and an account of a nova in Aboriginal traditions has been confirmed, there are currently no confirmed accounts of supernovae in Indigenous oral or material traditions.

  11. Numerical Simulation of the Response of Vehicle Cab Bottom Shell Structure under Explosive Blast Wave Based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics%基于SPH算法的驾驶室底部结构对爆炸冲击波响应数值仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石秉良; 周孔亢; 张云; 祁涛

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the response of vehicle cab bottom under the non-contact blast wave of improvised explosive device, mine, etc. smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) algorithm is employed. The energy, stress contours and destruction form of a square plate restricted by four sides under blast wave with SPH algorithm are analyzed, and the results is highly comparable with empirical formula and the classical method arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), the SPH algorithm is available for the transient dynamic response analysis of structure under blast wave. The SPH algorithm is employed to analyze the response of vehicle bottom under explosive blast wave, and the response of fuel tank, battery support, cabin floor and chassis, etc. are validated with physical test. A conclusion can be made that SPH needs simpler model and lower cost, and the result is more accurate. So SPH can be used to predict the vehicle cab bottom shell structure’s response under the blast wave, and provide a reference to the anti-explosion design of vehicle bottom structure.%针对地雷等简易爆炸装置在车辆驾驶室底部非接触爆炸问题,引入无网格光滑粒子流体动力学(Smoothed particle hydrodynamics, SPH)算法模拟爆炸冲击波作用下车辆底部结构的响应。以四边约束靶板为研究对象,分析靶板在爆炸冲击下的能量、应力变化和破坏形态,通过与传统的任意拉格朗日欧拉(Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, ALE)固流耦合分析法和经验公式计算结果对比,验证SPH算法应用于处理此类问题的可行性;利用SPH算法对爆炸冲击波作用下驾驶室底部结构进行数值仿真,分析车辆底部的油箱、电瓶支架、驾驶室地板、车架等关键结构的冲击响应,并与试验做出对比验证。仿真结果表明,基于 SPH 算法的爆炸仿真分析具有精度较高、建模简单、耗费计算资源少等优势,能够应用于爆炸冲击波作用下驾驶室底部板

  12. Field experiment for blasting crater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Tu-qiang

    2008-01-01

    A series of single hole blasting crater experiments and a variable distance multi-hole simultaneous blasting experiment was carded in the Yunfu Troilite Mine, according to the Livingston blasting crater theory. We introduce in detail, our methodology of data collection and processing from our experiments. Based on the burying depth of the explosives, the blasting crater volume was fitted by the method of least squares and the characteristic curve of the blasting crater was obtained using the MATLAB software. From this third degree polynomial, we have derived the optimal burying depth, the critical burying depth and the optimal explosive specific charge of the blasting crater.

  13. Study on Blast Pressure Resistance of Foamed Concrete Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Ahmad Zaidi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Great demand exist for more efficient design to protect personals and critical components against explosion or blast wave, generated both accidentally and deliberately, in various blast scenarios in both civilian and military activities. Concrete is a common material used in protective design of structures. Recently, the demands on producing the lighter concrete material have become interest in concrete research. Foamed concrete is a possible alternative of lightweight concrete for producing intermediate strength capabilities with excellent thermal insulation, freeze-thaw resistance, high-impact resistance and good shock absorption. This paper explores the role and development of Blast Pressure Resistant Materials (BPRM’s on foamed concrete. The explosive tests were conducted to determine the blast mitigating properties. The results show that when the foamed concrete density is increases the blast energy absorption capability will be decreases due to reduce of cavity volume. This is suggested that cavity plays an important role to dissipate and absorb the shock energy of the blast.

  14. A numerical technique to design blast noise mitigation measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    Large weapons, such as armor, artillery or demolitions, create a high-energy blast wave. It has a low frequency content, typically between 15 and 125 Hz, and can propagate over large distances. As a result it is a relative important cause for annoyance. Mitigation measures need to be close to the so

  15. A numerical technique to design blast noise mitigation measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    Large weapons, such as armor, artillery or demolitions, create a high-energy blast wave. It has a low frequency content, typically between 15 and 125 Hz, and can propagate over large distances. As a result it is a relative important cause for annoyance. Mitigation measures need to be close to the

  16. The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae: progress in supernova theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydr...

  17. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  18. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  19. Strange matter, detonations and supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Horvath, J.E.; Vucetich, H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a possible scenario driven by QCD deconfinement in a high density nuclear matter medium. Some expected consequences for type II supernovae explosions are also given, particularly, the output energy that might be enough to account for the observed events.

  20. ESF BLAST DESIGN ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.F. fitch

    1995-03-13

    The purpose and objective of this design analysis are to develop controls considered necessary and sufficient to implement the requirements for the controlled drilling and blasting excavation of operations support alcoves and test support alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The conclusions reached in this analysis will flow down into a construction specification ensuring controlled drilling and blasting excavation will be performed within the bounds established here.

  1. Blast Overpressure Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    USAARL Contract Report No. CR-98-Ö3 Blast Overpressure Studies By Daniel L. Johnson EG&G Management Systems, Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico May...Both studies were done at the Blast Overpressure-Kirtland Test Site (BOP-KTS) in New Mexico . Under a contract conducted for the USAMRMC, EG&G was... TDH -4 9 elements mounted in a David Clark 9AN/2 ear muff for added noise isolation. The calibration of the earphones was accomplished using a Bruel

  2. Effects of low-level blast exposure on the nervous system: Is there really a controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Elder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure blast waves can cause extensive CNS injury in humans. However, in combat settings such as Iraq and Afghanistan, lower level exposures associated with mild TBI (mTBI or subclinical exposure have been much more common. Yet controversy exists concerning what traits can be attributed to low-level blast, in large part due to the difficulty of distinguishing blast-related mTBI from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We describe how TBI is defined in humans and the problems posed in using current definitions to recognize blast-related mTBI. We next consider the problem of applying definitions of human mTBI to animal models, in particular that TBI severity in humans is defined in relation to alteration of consciousness at the time of injury, which typically cannot be assessed in animals. However, based on outcome assessments a condition of low-level blast exposure can be defined in animals that likely approximates human mTBI or subclinical exposure. We review blast injury modeling in animals noting that inconsistencies in experimental approach have contributed to uncertainty over the effects of low-level blast. Yet animal studies show that low-level blast pressure waves are transmitted to the brain. In brain low-level blast exposures cause behavioral, biochemical, pathological and physiological effects on the nervous system including the induction of PTSD-related behavioral traits in the absence of a psychological stressor. We review the relationship of blast exposure to chronic neurodegenerative diseases noting the paradoxical lowering of Abeta by blast, which along with other observations suggest that blast-related TBI is pathophysiologically distinct from non-blast TBI. Human neuroimaging studies show that blast-related mTBI is associated with a variety of chronic effects that are unlikely to be explained by co-morbid PTSD. We conclude that abundant evidence supports low-level blast as having long-term effects on the nervous system.

  3. Light-curve Analysis of Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae Based on Neutrino-driven Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2017-09-01

    Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are the most numerous subclass of core-collapse SNe originating from massive stars. In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the properties of the SN outburst for a red supergiant progenitor model and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of the ordinary Type IIP SN 1999em. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of (parametrically triggered) neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the (explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics) code Prometheus, using a presupernova model of a 15 M ⊙ star as initial data. On approaching homologous expansion, the hydrodynamic and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the (implicit, Lagrangian, radiation hydrodynamics) code Crab to follow the evolution of the blast wave during the SN outburst. Our 3D neutrino-driven explosion model with an explosion energy of about 0.5× {10}51 erg produces 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail of SN 1999em. The considered presupernova model, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1999em, except for those connected to the presupernova structure of the outer stellar layers. Our 3D simulations show that the distribution of 56Ni-rich matter in velocity space is asymmetric with a strong dipole component that is consistent with the observations of SN 1999em. The monotonic decline in luminosity from the plateau to the radioactive tail in ordinary SNe IIP is a manifestation of the intense turbulent mixing at the He/H composition interface.

  4. Workbook for Predicting Pressure Wave and Fragment Effect of Exploding Propellent Tanks and Gas Storage Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    infermtrilon Is presented in the form of grasphs, tablas , and nouwraphs to allow easy esileuilaisu without reoourse to diffiult matthemnatical onsiililatlom...34Blast Wave Interactions from Multiple Fxplosions." Paper No. XII , Proceedinas of the Conference on Mechanisms of Explosion and Blast Waves, J

  5. Prediction of vibration level in tunnel blasting; Tonneru kusshin happa ni yotte reiki sareru shindo no reberu yosoku ho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, A. [Kumamoto Industries Univ, Kumamoto (Japan); Yamamoto, M. [Asahi Chemical Industry Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Inaba, C. [Nishimatsu Construction Co. Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Kaneko, K. [Hokkaido Univ (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    For avoiding the generation of public hazard due to ground vibration causes by blasting in tunneling, it is important to devise a blasting method for ensuring the level of the ground vibration caused thereby under a limit, and an exact predication of ground vibration before blasting is desirable. In this study, the characteristics of the ground vibration caused by tunnel blasting are analyzed, and a summary of amplitude spectra calculating method is described. A theoretical analysis method for predicting the vibration level is proposed based on spectrum-multiplicative method. Vibration caused by multistage blasting in tunneling is most strong and deemed as important. When observing the process of elastic wave motion caused by multistage blasting being measured, the process can be divided into three element processes in frequency area as vibration source spectrum, transmission attenuation spectrum and frequency response function vibrating test, and, with the multiplication of them, the amplitude spectra at an observation portion can be estimated. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  6. X-Ray Studies of Supernova Remnants: A Different View of Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent data sets accumulated on young, ejecta dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I will review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first...

  7. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  8. Future GLAST observations of Supernova remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Funk, S

    2007-01-01

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of ~100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range betwee...

  9. Supernova neutrino detection in LAr TPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Botella, Ines, E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-10

    The neutrino burst from a core collapse supernova can provide information about the explosion mechanism and the mechanisms of proto neutron star cooling but also about the intrinsic properties of the neutrino such as flavor oscillations. One important question is to understand to which extent can the supernova and the neutrino physics be decoupled in the observation of a single supernova. The possibility to probe the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the type of mass hierarchy from the detection of supernova neutrinos with liquid argon detectors is summarized in this paper. Moreover, a quantitative study about the possibility to constrain the supernova parameters is presented. A very massive liquid argon detector ({approx} 100 kton) is needed to perform accurate measurements of these parameters. In addition, these detectors could also provide information on the {nu}{sub e} component of the diffuse supernova neutrino background.

  10. Finding Distances to Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are known as standard candles due to their consistency, allowing us to measure distances based on their brightness. But what if these explosions arent quite as consistent as we thought? Due scientific diligence requires careful checks, so a recent study investigates whether the metallicity of a supernovas environment affects the peak luminosity of the explosion.Metallicity Dependence?Type Ia supernovae are incredibly powerful tools for determining distances in our universe. Because these supernovae are formed by white dwarfs that explode when they reach a uniform accreted mass, the supernova peak luminosity is thought to be very consistent. This consistency allows these supernovae to be used as standard candles to measure distances to their host galaxies.But what if that peak luminosity is affected by a factor that we havent taken into account? Theorists have proposed that the luminosities of Type Ia supernovae might depend on the metallicity of their environments with high-metallicity environments suppressing supernova luminosities. If this is true, then we could be systematically mis-measuring cosmological distances using these supernovae.Testing AbundancesSupernova brightnesses vs. the metallicity of their environments. Low-metallicity supernovae (blue shading) and high-metallicity supernovae (red shading) have an average magnitude difference of ~0.14. [Adapted from Moreno-Raya et al. 2016]A team led by Manuel Moreno-Raya, of the Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain, has observed 28 Type Ia supernovae in an effort to test for such a metallicity dependence. These supernovae each have independent distance measurements (e.g., from Cepheids or the Tully-Fisher relation).Moreno-Raya and collaborators used spectra from the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope to estimate oxygen abundances in the region where each of these supernovae exploded. They then used these measurements to determine if metallicity of the local region

  11. VLBI observations of young Type II supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Marcaide, J M

    2005-01-01

    We give an overview of circumstellar interaction in young Type II supernovae, as seen through the eyes of very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. The resolution attained by such observations (best than 1 mas) is a powerful tool to probe the interaction that takes place after a supernova goes off. The direct imaging of a supernova permits, in principle, to estimate the deceleration of its expansion, and to obtain information on the eject and circumstellar density profiles, as well as estimates of the magnetic field intensity and relativistic particle energy density in the supernova. Unfortunately, only a handful of radio supernovae are close and bright enough as to permit their study with VLBI. We present results from our high-resolution observations of the nearby Type II radio supernovae SN1986J and SN2001gd.

  12. Improvements to type Ia supernova models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Clare M.

    Type Ia Supernovae provided the first strong evidence of dark energy and are still an important tool for measuring the accelerated expansion of the universe. However, future improvements will be limited by systematic uncertainties in our use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles. Using Type Ia supernovae for cosmology relies on our ability to standardize their absolute magnitudes, but this relies on imperfect models of supernova spectra time series. This thesis is focused on using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory both to understand current sources of uncertainty in standardizing Type Ia supernovae and to develop techniques that can be used to limit uncertainty in future analyses. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. The importance of systemic response in the pathobiology of blast-induced neurotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibolja eCernak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body, parallel blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure-increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as 1 direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and 2 via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body’s fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.

  14. Search for Kilonovae in Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Zoheyr; DES-GW Team; DES-SN Team

    2016-03-01

    The Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4-m Telescope is an ideal instrument for identifying rapid optical transients with its large field of view and four optical filters. We utilize two seasons of data from the Dark Energy Survey to search for kilonovae, an optical counterpart to gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers. Kilonova lightcurves from Barnes and Kasen inform our analysis for removing background signals such as supernovae. We simulate DES observations of kilonovae with the SNANA software package to estimate our search efficiency and optimize cuts. Finally, we report rate limits for binary neutron star mergers and compare to existing rate estimates.

  15. Experimental Investigation on the Basic Law of the Fracture Spatial Morphology for Water Pressure Blasting in a Drillhole Under True Triaxial Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingxiang; Li, Pengfeng

    2015-07-01

    The present literature on the morphology of water pressure blasting fractures in drillholes is not sufficient and does not take triaxial confining stress into account. Because the spatial morphology of water pressure blasting fractures in drillholes is not clear, the operations lack an exact basis. Using a large true triaxial water pressure blasting experimental system and an acoustic emission 3-D positioning system, water pressure blasting experiments on cement mortar test blocks (300 mm × 300 mm × 300 mm) were conducted to study the associated basic law of the fracture spatial morphology. The experimental results show that water pressure blasting does not always generate bubble pulsation. After water pressure blasting under true triaxial stress, a crushed compressive zone and a blasting fracture zone are formed from the inside, with the blasting section of the naked drillhole as the center, to the outside. The shape of the outer edges of the two zones is ellipsoidal. The range of the blasting fracture is large in the radial direction of the drillhole, where the surrounding pressure is large, i.e., the range of the blasting fracture in the drillhole radial cross-section is approximately ellipsoidal. The rock near the drillhole wall is affected by a tensile stress wave caused by the test block boundary reflection, resulting in more flake fractures appearing in the fracturing crack surface in the drillhole axial direction and parallel to the boundary surface. The flake fracture is thin, presenting a small-range flake fracture. The spatial morphology of the water pressure blasting fracture in the drillhole along the axial direction is similar to a wide-mouth Chinese bottle: the crack extent is large near the drillhole orifice, gradually narrows inward along the drillhole axial direction, and then increases into an approximate ellipsoid in the internal naked blasting section. Based on the causes of the crack generation, the blasting cracks are divided into three

  16. The Scientific Potential of Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliaroli, G.; Vissani, F.

    2013-04-15

    Thanks to recent theoretical progresses and to the test bench of SN1987A, it has been possible to improve our ability to extract information from the future observations. In this paper we discuss a parameterized model of the neutrino emission. Two applications of this model are considered: 1) the investigation of the scientific potential of a future supernova for the study of the astrophysical parameters; 2) the expectations regarding the diffuse supernova neutrino background, namely, the relic supernova neutrinos.

  17. Magnetares como fuentes para potenciar supernovas superluminosas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersten, M. C.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetars have been proposed as one of the possible sources to power the light curve of super-luminous supernovae. We have included the energy deposited by a hypothetical magnetar in our one-dimensional hydrodynamical code, and analyzed the dynamical effect on the supernova ejecta. In particular, we present a model for SN 2011kl, the first object associated with a ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst. Finally, we show its effect on the light curves of hydrogen rich supernovae.

  18. Magnetar Powered Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Thompson, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the properties of Type IIP supernovae that are dominantly powered by the rotational kinetic energy of the newly born neutron star. While the spin-down of a magnetar has previously been proposed as a viable energy source in the context of super-luminous supernovae, we show that a similar mechanism could produce both normal and peculiar Type IIP supernova light curves from red supergiant progenitors for a range of initial spin periods and equivalent dipole magnetic field strength...

  19. Interface dynamos in supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G; Thomas, J H; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason T.; Thomas, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Observational evidence for anisotropy in supernovae (SN) and their phenomenological connection to jetted sources such as gamma-ray bursts^Mhave revived considerations of the role magnetohydrodynamic outflows might play therein. Understanding the types of dynamos that might operate in supernova progenitors is therefore relevant. In contrast to previous work, here we study an ``interface dynamo'' for the conditions of a rapidly rotating neutron star surrounded by a convective envelope. Such dynamos have been studied for the Sun, naked white dwarfs,and post-AGB stars, where analogous configurations of strong shear layers surrounded by convective envelopes are present. The interface dynamo provides estimates of large-scale poloidal and toroidal fields, whose product enters the Poynting flux. Because the poloidal field is much weaker than the toroidal magnetic field, the actual average Poynting flux is lower than rough estimates which invoke the only the magnitude of the total magnetic energy. The lower value is s...

  20. Cosmology from Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Perlmutter, S; Deustua, S; Fabbro, S; Goldhaber, Gerson; Groom, D E; Kim, A G; Kim, M Y; Knop, R A; Nugent, P; Pennypacker, C R; Goobar, A; Pain, R; Hook, I M; Lidman, C E; Ellis, Richard S; Irwin, M J; McMahon, R G; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Walton, N A; Schaefer, B; Boyle, B J; Filippenko, A V; Matheson, T; Fruchter, A S; Panagia, N; Newberg, H J M; Couch, W J

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reports on first evidence for a low-mass-density/positive-cosmological-constant universe that will expand forever, based on observations of a set of 40 high-redshift supernovae. The experimental strategy, data sets, and analysis techniques are described. More extensive analyses of these results with some additional methods and data are presented in the more recent LBNL report #41801 (Perlmutter et al., 1998; accepted for publication in Ap.J.), astro-ph/9812133 . This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory reprint is a reduction of a poster presentation from the Cosmology Display Session #85 on 9 January 1998 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington D.C. It is also available on the World Wide Web at http://supernova.LBL.gov/ This work has also been referenced in the literature by the pre-meeting abstract citation: Perlmutter et al., B.A.A.S., volume 29, page 1351 (1997).

  1. Connecting supernovae with their environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, L.

    2017-03-01

    We present MUSE observations of galaxy NGC 7469 from its Science Verification to show how powerful is the combination of high-resolution wide-field integral field spectroscopy with both photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova (SN) explosions. Using STARLIGHT and H II explorer, we selected all H II regions of the galaxy and produced 2-dimensional maps of the Hα equivalent width, average luminosity-weighted stellar age, and oxygen abundance. We measured deprojected galactocentric distances for all H II regions, and radial gradients for all above-mentioned parameters. We positioned the type Ia SN2008ec in the Branch et al. diagram, and finally discussed the characteristics of the SN parent H II region compared to all other H II regions in the galaxy. In a near future, the AMUSING survey will be able to reproduce this analysis and construct statistical samples to enable the characterization of the progenitors of different supernova types.

  2. An Update on Radio Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Montes, Marcos J.; Panagia, Nino

    The radio emission from supernovae (SNe) is nonthermal synchrotron radiation of high brightness temperature, with a ``turn-on'' delay at longer wavelengths, power-law decline after maximum with index beta, and spectral index alpha asymptotically decreasing with time to a final, optically thin value. Radio supernovae (RSNe) are best described by the Chevalier (1982) ``mini-shell'' model, with modifications by Weiler \\etal\\ (1990). RSNe observations provide a valuable probe of the SN circumstellar environment and constraints on progenitor masses. We present a progress report on a number of recent RSNe, as well as on new behavior from RSNe 1979C and 1980K, and on RSNe as potential distance indicators. In particular, we present updated radio light curves for SN 1993J in M81.

  3. Evidence for Nearby Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez, N; Canelles, M; Benitez, Narciso; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-01-01

    Supernova explosions are one of the most energetic--and potentially lethal--phenomena in the Universe. Scientists have speculated for decades about the possible consequences for life on Earth of a nearby supernova, but plausible candidates for such an event were lacking. Here we show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at~130 parsecs from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. We find that the deposition on Earth of 60Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that ~2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction.

  4. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  5. Understanding Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A

    2004-01-01

    I summarize, in the form of an extended abstract, the ongoing efforts at the University of Arizona (and in collaboration) to understand core-collapse supernovae theoretically. Included are short discussions of 1D (SESAME) and 2D (VULCAN/2D) codes and results, as well as discussions of the possible role of rotation. Highlighted are recent developments in multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics and the essential physics of the neutrino-driven mechanism.

  6. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Douglas Scott [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of ~ 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for γ-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of ~ 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches ~60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  7. Hydrodynamics `experiments' on supernovae and on Nova - the laser*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Bruce A.

    1996-11-01

    To make progress in understanding the complex phenomena of supernovae (SN), one does not have the luxury of setting up clean, well controlled experiments in the universe to test the physics of our models and theories. Consequently, creating a surrogate environment to serve as an experimental astrophysics testbed would be highly beneficial. The existence of highly sophisticated, modern research lasers in the 1-50 kJ class, developed largely as a result of the world-wide effort in inertial confinement fusion, opens a new potential for creating just such an experimental testbed utilizing well-controlled, well-diagnosed laser plasmas. The next generation MJ-class ``superlasers" planned for the U.S. and France offer incentive to invest effort now on gaining experience using current laser facilities to develop genuinely useful laser-plasma astrophysics experiments. I will discuss two areas of physics critical to an understanding of supernovae that are amenable to supporting research on large lasers: nonlinear hydrodynamic instability evolution in 2D and 3D and (2) the radiative shock hydrodynamics of colliding plasmas such as SN ejecta-circumstellar matter interactions. The astrophysical relevance of these areas to supernovae will be developed in a companion talk.^2 *Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48. ^1In collaboration with S. G. Glendinning, J. Kane, J. Castor, A. Rubenchik, J. Colvin, R. P. Drake, R. London, E. Liang, and R. McCray. ^2Roger Chevalier, "The radiative hydrodynamics of supernova shock waves", these proceedings.

  8. Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    We review the main observational and theoretical facts about acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays in supernova remnants, discussing the arguments in favor and against a connection between cosmic rays and supernova remnants, the so-called supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of 1) magnetic field amplification, 2) acceleration of nuclei heavier than hydrogen, 3) presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. The status of the supernova-cosmic ray connection in the time of Fermi-LAT and Cherenkov telescopes is also discussed.

  9. High-low-blasting technology and its application in methane dynamic disaster prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xian-zhong; LIN Bai-quan; YANG Wei; NI Guan-hua; LI Quan-gui

    2011-01-01

    The gas cooperative control model combined local pressure-relief with regional pressure-relief was established,based on the theory of multi-parameters cooperative.For the status of high gas contents,high in-situ stress and low-permeability of Ji-15 seam of No.12 coal mine in Pingmei Group.The law of detonation wave propagation and ground-stress change distribution were simulated by means of the finite element analysis software.The technology of high-low-blasting,composed of high blasting(deep crossing hole controlled hydraulic blasting) and low blasting (special roadway deep hole controlled blasting) were developed.The research shows that around control hole produce maximum tension fracture failure,and result in directional and controlled blasting,when the distance between control hole and blasting hole is 1.2 m.The theory makes blasting force and hydraulic force advantage superimpose,which raises the effect of pressure relief and permeability enhancements compared with general blasting.High blasting influence radius and low blasting influence radius superimposed with each other,that prevents methane dynamic disaster.The result of type approval test shows that the technology can increase gas permeability as high as 22.7~36.2 ratio,decrease gas pressure from 2.85 MPa to 0.30 MPa,increase drilling influence radius to about 9 m.The technology realizes regional overall permeability improvement,that provides a new technical measure for methane dynamic disaster prevention.

  10. Blasting Damage Predictions by Numerical Modeling in Siahbishe Pumped Storage Powerhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Majid; Goshtasbi, Kamran

    2017-04-01

    One of the popular methods of underground and surface excavations is the use of blasting. Throughout this method of excavation, the loading resulted from blasting can be affected by different geo-mechanical and structural parameters of rock mass. Several factors affect turbulence in underground structures some of which are explosion, vibration, and stress impulses caused by the neighbouring blasting products. In investigating the blasting mechanism one should address the processes which expand with time and cause seismic events. To protect the adjoining structures against any probable deconstruction or damage, it is very important to model the blasting process prior to any actual operation. Efforts have been taken in the present study to demonstrate the potentiality of numerical methods in predicting the specified parameters in order to prevent any probable destruction. For this purpose the blasting process was modeled, according to its natural implementation, in one of the tunnels of Siahbishe dam by the 3DEC and AUTODYN 3D codes. 3DEC was used for modeling the blasting environment as well as the blast holes and AUTODYN 3D for modeling the explosion process in the blast hole. In this process the output of AUTODYN 3D, which is a result of modeling the blast hole and is in the form of stress waves, is entered into 3DEC. For analyzing the amount of destruction made by the blasting operation, the key parameter of Peak Particle Velocity was used. In the end, the numerical modeling results have been compared with the data recorded by the seismographs planted through the tunnel. As the results indicated 3DEC and AUTODYN 3D proved appropriate for analyzing such an issue. Therefore, by means of these two softwares one can analyze explosion processes prior to their implementation and make close estimation of the damage resulting from these processes.

  11. Pulsational-Pair Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2016-01-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 60 - 150 solar masses is explored. Depending upon their mass loss and rotation rates, many of these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae. Even a non-rotating 70 solar mass star is pulsationally unstable during oxygen shell burning and can power a sub-luminous supernova. Rotation decreases the limit further. For more massive stars, the pulsations are less frequent, span a longer time, and are more powerful. Violent pulsations eject not only any residual low density envelope, but also that fraction of the helium core mass outside about 35 - 50 solar masses. The remaining core of helium and heavy elements continues to evolve, ultimately forming an iron core of about 2.5 solar masses that probably collapses to a black hole. A variety of observational transients result with total durations ranging from days to 10,000 years, and luminosities from 10$^{41}$ to 10$^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Many transients resemble ordinary Type IIp supernovae,...

  12. Dark Energy and Termonuclear Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domíngez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Straniero, O.; Höflich, P.

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the current Universe is dominated by dark energy and exotic matter, the so called StandardModel of Cosmoloy or CDM model. All the available data (Thermonuclear Supernovae, Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Large Scale Structure, etc.) are compatible with a flat Universe made by ~70% of dark energy. Up to now observations agree that dark energy may be the vacuum energy (or cosmological constant) although improvements are needed to constrain further its equation of state. In this context, the cosmic destiny of the Universe is no longer linked to its geometry but to the nature of dark energy; it may be flat and expand forever or collapse. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today; it may open new roads of knowledge and led to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions in nature. It is expected that astronomical data will continue to provide directions to theorists and experimental physicists. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have played a fundamental role, showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago, and up to now they are the only astronomical observations that provide a direct evidence of the acceleration. However, in order to determine the source of the dark energy term it is mandatory to improve the precision of supernovae as distance indicators on cosmological scale.

  13. OH Masers and Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Wardle, Mark

    2012-01-01

    OH(1720 MHz) masers are created by the interaction of supernova remnants with molecular clouds. These masers are pumped by collisions in warm, shocked molecular gas with OH column densities in the range 10^{16}--10^{17} cm^{-2}. Excitation calculations suggest that inversion of the 6049 MHz OH line may occur at the higher column densities that have been inferred from main-line absorption studies of supernova remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. OH(6049 MHz) masers have therefore been proposed as a complementary indicator of remnant-cloud interaction. This motivated searches for 6049 MHz maser emission from supernova remnants using the Parkes 63 m and Effelsberg 100 m telescopes, and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. A total of forty-one remnants have been examined by one or more of these surveys, but without success. To check the accuracy of the OH column densities inferred from the single-dish observations we modelled OH absorption at 1667 MHz observed with the Very Large Array towards three supernov...

  14. A spitzer space telescope study of SN 2002hh: An infrared echo from a type llP supernova

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meikle, W. P. S.; Mattila, S.; Gerardy, C. L.;

    2006-01-01

    Stars: Supernovae: General, supernovae: individual (NGC 6946), Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 2002hh Udgivelsesdato: May 22......Stars: Supernovae: General, supernovae: individual (NGC 6946), Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 2002hh Udgivelsesdato: May 22...

  15. Study on Smooth-Blasting Results in Jointed and Fractured Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Factors that affect blasting results may be grouped into those factors that can be controlled and those that cannot be controlled. The controllable factors include explosive properties, initiation timing, and blast geometry. The uncontrollable factors comprise the rock’s natural structures, such as joints and fractures, and the properties, such as elastic constants, density and strength. Among these, the influence of rock structural planes often contributes a high degree of variability to blasting results. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of rock structural plane influences on smooth-blasting results based on elasticity and stress wave propagation theory with an emphasis on smooth blasting techniques. Two types of simulated experiments in lab (using strain and acoustic emission measurements) are used to verify the theoretical analysis. The results show that it is difficult to achieve smooth-blasting results when the angle between the natural rock structural planes and the blast-induced fracture planes ranges from 10° to 60°. Among these angles, 30° is the least desirable angle to produce a smooth wall. For angles less than 10° and greater than 60°, the influence of rock structural planes on blasting results can be ignored.

  16. Gravitational Waves III: Detecting Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cattani, M.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper we have deduced the basic equations that predict the emission of gravitational waves (GW) according to the Einstein gravitation theory. In a subsequent paper these equations have been used to calculate the luminosities and the amplitudes of the waves generated by binary stars, pulsations of neutron stars, wobbling of deformed neutron stars, oscillating quadrupoles, rotating bars and collapsing and bouncing cores of supernovas. We show here how the GW could be detected in our...

  17. Analysis of structural response under blast loads using the coupled SPH-FEM approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-xiang XU; Xi-la LIU

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model using the coupled smoothed particle hydrodynamics-finite element method(SPH-FEM)approach is presented for analysis of structures under blast loads.The analyses on two numerical cases,one for free field explosive and the other for structural response under blast loads,are performed to model the whole processes from the propagation of the pressure wave to the response of structures.Based on the simulation,it is concluded that this model can be used for reasonably accurte explosive analysis of structures.The resulting information would be valuable for protecting structures under blast loads.

  18. Bond interface crack propagation of fresh foundation concrete and rock under blasting load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Liang; LU Wen-bo; ZHONG Dong-wang

    2009-01-01

    According to concrete age,the dynamic stress intensity factors of bond inter-face crack of concrete-rock was calculated.Result shows that the propagation of concrete interface crack is mainly caused by tensile stress and shear stress for stress wave reflec-tion.With the growth of concrete age,interface crack fracture toughness increases,and its capacity of resisting blasting load strengthens.Therefore,blasting vibration should be strictly controlled for fresh concrete.

  19. Dietary Approaches to Protect Against Eye Blast Induced Oxidative Stress and Vision Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    optic nerve degeneration in the C57Bl/6 mouse. This suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in these processes in the retina and optic nerve...and b wave amplitudes in the SOD+/- mice (Fig. 2C), suggesting that SOD2 may serve an endogenous protective mechanism after blast. We are currently...bmax are decreased in SOD+/- mice despite being unaffected by blast in wild-type mice (ref), suggesting removal of an endogenous protective mechanism

  20. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.