WorldWideScience

Sample records for superluminal localized waves

  1. Wave Scattering by Superluminal Spacetime Slab

    CERN Document Server

    Deck-Léger, Zoé-Lise

    2016-01-01

    Spacetime media offers new opportunities for wave manipulation. Here we study superluminal slabs, and show that the amplitudes of the reflected waves are controlled by the velocity of the medium. In addition, the backward wave continuously scans from the specular to the collinear angle. A diagrammatic method is provided for insight into the deflection angles. A fundamental symmetry between sub- and superluminal scattering is derived from this diagrammatic description.

  2. Unified interpretation of superluminal behaviors in wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Viliani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Ranfagni, C. [Facolta di Scienze Matematiche Fisiche e Naturali, Corso di Laurea in Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Mignani, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Edoardo Amaldi' , Universita degli Studi di Roma ' Roma Tre' , Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: rocco.ruggeri@isc.cnr.it; Ricci, A.M. [Istituto per le Telecomunicazioni e l' Elettronica della Marina Militare ' Giancarlo Vallauri' (Mariteleradar), Viale Italia 72, 57100 Livorno (Italy)

    2007-10-29

    By using two approaches, we demonstrate that superluminal behaviors in wave propagation can be attributed to mechanisms acting in the near-field limit. One approach is based on complex waves, while the other relies on a path-integral treatment of stochastic motion. The results of the two approaches are comparable, and suitable for interpreting the data obtained in microwave experiments; these experiments, over a wide range of distances, show a time advance which, in any case, is limited to nanoseconds.

  3. Bessel-X waves: superluminal propagation and the Minkowski space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Mugnai, D.

    2006-01-01

    Superluminal behavior has been extensively studied in recent years, especially with regard to the topic of superluminality in the propagation of a signal. Particular interest has been devoted to Bessel-X waves propagation, since some experimental results showed that these waves have both phase and group velocities greater that light velocity c. However, because of the lack of an exact definition of signal velocity, no definite answer about the signal propagation (or velocity of information) h...

  4. Superluminal reflection and transmission of light pulses via resonant four-wave mixing in cesium vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qichang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Dan; Ahrens, Sven; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhu, Shiyao

    2016-10-17

    We report the experimental manipulation of the group velocities of reflected and transmitted light pulses in a degenerate two-level atomic system driven by a standing wave, which is created by two counter-propagating light beams of equal frequencies but variable amplitudes. It is shown that the light pulse is reflected with superluminal group velocity while the transmitted pulse propagates from subluminal to superluminal velocities via changing the power of the backward coupling field. We find that the simultaneous superluminal light reflection and transmission can be reached when the power of the backward field becomes closer or equal to the forward power, in this case the periodical absorption modulation for photonic structure is established in atoms. The theoretical discussion shows that the anomalous dispersion associated with a resonant absorption dip within the gain peak due to four-wave mixing leads to the superluminal reflection, while the varying dispersion from normal to anomalous at transparency, transparency within absorption, and electromagnetically induced absorption windows leads to the subluminal to superluminal transmission.

  5. Diffusion Simulation of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Induced by Superluminous L-O Mode Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; HE Zhao-Guo; ZHANG Sai; SU Zhen-Peng; CHEN Liang-Xu

    2011-01-01

    Temporal evolution of outer radiation belt electron dynamics resulting from superluminous L-O mode waves is simulated at L=6.5. Diffusion rates are evaluated and then used as inputs to solve a 2D momentum-pitch-angle diffusion equation, particularly with and without cross diffusion terms. Simulated results demonstrate that phase space density(PSD) of energetic electrons due to L-O mode waves can enhance significantly within 24 h, covering a broader pitch-angle range in the absence of cross terms than that in the presence of cross terms. PSD evolution is also determined by the peak wave frequency, particularly at high kinetic energies. This result indicates that superluminous waves can be a potential candidate responsible for outer radiation belt electron dynamics.

  6. Dynamic evolution of outer radiation belt electrons driven by superluminous R-X mode waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present initial results on the temporal evolution of the phase space density (PSD) of the outer radiation belt energetic electrons driven by the superluminous R-X mode waves. We calculate diffusion rates in pitch angle and momentum assuming the standard Gaussian distributions in both wave frequency and wave normal angle at the location L=6.5. We solve a 2D momentum-pitch-angle Fokker-Planck equation using those diffusion rates as inputs. Numerical results show that R-X mode can produce significant acceleration of relativistic electrons around geostationary orbit,supporting previous findings that superluminous waves potentially contribute to dramatic variation in the outer radiation belt electron dynamics.

  7. Visualization of superluminal pulses inside a white light cavity using plane wave spatio temporal transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, H N; Jang, Y J; Liu, X; Shahriar, M S

    2012-08-13

    In a white light cavity (WLC), the group velocity is superluminal over a finite bandwidth. For a WLC-based data buffering system we recently proposed, it is important to visualize the behavior of pulses inside such a cavity. The conventional plane wave transfer functions, valid only over space that is translationally invariant, cannot be used for the space inside WLC or any cavity, which is translationally variant. Here, we develop the plane wave spatio temporal transfer function (PWSTTF) method to solve this problem, and produce visual representations of a Gaussian input pulse incident on a WLC, for all times and positions.

  8. Propagation of Superluminous L-O Mode Waves During Geomagnetic Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fuliang; CHEN Lunjin; ZHENG Huinan; ZHOU Qinghua; WANG Shui

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the azimuthal angle ψ of the wave vector k on the propagation characteristics of the superluminous L-O mode waves (together with a case of the R-X mode) during different geomagnetic activities using a three-dimensional (3D) ray-tracing method is investigated.This work is primarily an extension of our previous two-dimensional study in which the wave azimuthal angle was not considered.We present numerical simulations for this mode which is generated in the source cavity along a 70° night geomagnetic field line at the specific altitude of 1.5RE (where RE is the Earth's radius).It is found that,as in the two-dimensional case,the trajectory of L-O mode starting in the source meridian plane (or the wave azimuthal angle ψ=180°) can reach the lowest latitude;whereas it basically stays at relatively higher latitudes starting off the source meridian plane (or ψ≠180°).The results reveal that under appropriate conditions,the superluminous L-O mode waves may exist in the radiation belts of the Earth,but this remains to be supplemented by observational data.

  9. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics. A superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-07-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly [non-causal] processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the [non-causal]. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That is, the QM world is sub-luminally, luminally and superluminally local-causal throughout, and the Law of Causality is ubiquitous in the micro-world. Thus, ''probabilistic causality'' is a merely epistemic term.

  10. Aspects of Quantum Non-Locality I: Superluminal Signalling, Action-at-a-Distance, Non-Separability and Holism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, Joseph

    In this paper and its sequel, I consider the significance of Jarrett's and Shimony's analyses of the so-called factorisability (Bell-locality) condition for clarifying the nature of quantum non-locality. In this paper, I focus on four types of non-locality: superluminal signalling, action-at-a-distance, non-separability and holism. In the second paper, I consider a fifth type of non-locality: superluminal causation according to 'logically weak' concepts of causation, where causal dependence requires neither action nor signalling. In this connection, I pay special attention to the difficulties that superluminal causation raises in relativistic space-time. I conclude by evaluating the relevance of Jarrett's and Shimony's analyses for clarifying the question of the compatibility of quantum non-locality with relativity theory. My main conclusions are, first: these analyses are significant for clarifying the questions of superluminal signalling in quantum phenomena and for the compatibility of these phenomena with relativity. But, second, by contrast: these analyses are not very significant for the study of action-at-a distance, superluminal causation, non-separability and holism in quantum phenomena.

  11. Studies of the Jet in BL Lacertae. II. Superluminal Alfv\\'en Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, M H; Arshakian, T G; Clausen-Brown, E; Homan, D C; Hovatta, T; Kovalev, Y Y; Lister, M L; Pushkarev, A B; Richards, J L; Savolainen, T

    2014-01-01

    Ridge lines on the pc-scale jet of the active galactic nucleus BL Lac display transverse patterns that move superluminally downstream. The patterns are not ballistic, but are analogous to waves on a whip. Their apparent speeds $\\beta_\\mathrm{app}$ (units of $c$) range from 4.2 to 13.5, corresponding to $\\beta_\\mathrm{wave}^\\mathrm{gal}= 0.981 - 0.998$ in the galaxy frame. We show that the magnetic field in the jet is well-ordered with a strong transverse component, and assume that it is helical and that the transverse patterns are longitudinal Alfv\\'en waves. The wave-induced transverse speed of the jet is non-relativistic ($\\beta_\\mathrm{tr}^\\mathrm{gal}\\sim 0.09$) and in agreement with our assumption of low-amplitude waves. In 2010 the wave activity subsided and the jet displayed a mild wiggle that had a complex oscillatory behavior. The waves are excited by changes in the position angle of the recollimation shock, in analogy to exciting a wave on a whip by shaking it. Simple models of the system are presen...

  12. Stimulated generation of superluminal light pulses via four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Ryan T; Vogl, Ulrich; Lett, Paul D

    2012-04-27

    We report on the four-wave mixing of superluminal pulses, in which both the injected and generated pulses involved in the process propagate with negative group velocities. Generated pulses with negative group velocities of up to v(g)=-1/880c are demonstrated, corresponding to the generated pulse's peak exiting the 1.7 cm long medium ≈50 ns earlier than if it had propagated at the speed of light in vacuum, c. We also show that in some cases the seeded pulse may propagate with a group velocity larger than c, and that the generated conjugate pulse peak may exit the medium even earlier than the amplified seed pulse peak. We can control the group velocities of the two pulses by changing the seed detuning and the input seed power.

  13. An Extended Model for Interaction Between Left-hand Superluminous Waves and Magnetospheric Electrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Fuliang; Zheng Huinan; Wang Shui

    2005-01-01

    The left-hand superluminous electromagnetic waves, L-O mode and L-X mode, can be excited and observed in the auroral cavity of the Earth during the magnetic storms. The two modes can propagate into outer radiation zone and encounter enhanced resonant interactions with the trapped energetic electrons over a wide range of magnetosphere. A current first-order resonant model is extended to evaluate the stochastic acceleration of electrons by the L-O mode and L-X mode at the higher-order resonance. Similar to the first-order resonance, L-O mode can produce significant acceleration of electrons at the higher harmonic resonances over a wide range of wave normal angles and spatial regions. However, the higher harmonic resonance's contribution for significant electron acceleration by L-X mode is less than that of the first order resonance,with the requirement of higher minimum energies, e.g., ~1 MeV in the outer radiation belt. This indicates that L-O mode may be one of the efficient mechanisms for the stochastic acceleration of electrons within the outer radiation zone.

  14. Gain-assisted superluminal microwave pulse propagation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sabegh, Z Amini; Maleki, M A; Mahmoudi, M

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system which is realized in a superconducting phase quantum circuit. It is shown that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in this system. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system.

  15. Sources of localized waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzipetros, Argyrios Alexandros

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of two types of Localized Wave (L W) pulses is considered; these are the 'Focus Wave Model (FWM) pulse and the X Wave pulse. First, we introduce the modified bidirectional representation where one can select new basis functions resulting in different representations for a solution to the scalar wave equation. Through this new representation, we find a new class of focused X Waves which can be extremely localized. The modified bidirectional decomposition is applied...

  16. Nonlinearity without Superluminality

    CERN Document Server

    Kent, A

    2002-01-01

    Quantum theory is compatible with special relativity. In particular, though measurements on entangled systems are correlated in a way that cannot be reproduced by local hidden variables, they cannot be used for superluminal signalling. As Gisin and Polchinski first pointed out, this is not true for general nonlinear modifications of the Schroedinger equation. Excluding superluminal signalling has thus been taken to rule out most nonlinear versions of quantum theory. The no superluminal signalling constraint has also been used for alternative derivations of the optimal fidelities attainable for imperfect quantum cloning and other operations. These results apply to theories satisfying the rule that their predictions for widely separated and slowly moving entangled systems can be approximated by non-relativistic equations of motion with respect to a preferred time coordinate. This paper describes a natural way in which this rule might fail to hold. In particular, it is shown that quantum readout devices which di...

  17. Slow to superluminal light waves in thin 3D photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo-López, J F; Galli, M; Balestreri, A; Patrini, M; Andreani, L C; López, C

    2007-11-12

    Phase measurements on self-assembled three-dimensional photonic crystals show that the group velocity of light can flip from small positive (slow) to negative (superluminal) values in samples of a few mum size. This phenomenon takes place in a narrow spectral range around the second-order stop band and follows from coupling to weakly dispersive photonic bands associated with multiple Bragg diffraction. The observations are well accounted for by theoretical calculations of the phase delay and of photonic states in the finite-sized systems.

  18. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics a superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    CERN Document Server

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly non-causal processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the non-causal. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That

  19. Superluminal radiation by uniformly moving charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2003-03-01

    The emission of superluminal quanta (tachyons) by freely propagating particles is scrutinized. Estimates are derived for spontaneous superluminal radiation from electrons moving close to the speed of the Galaxy in the microwave background. This is the threshold velocity for tachyon radiation to occur, a lower bound. Quantitative estimates are also given for the opposite limit, tachyon radiation emitted by ultra-relativistic electrons in linear colliders and supernova shock waves. The superluminal energy flux is studied and the spectral energy density of the radiation is derived, classically as well as in second quantization. There is a transversal bosonic and a longitudinal fermionic component of the radiation. We calculate the power radiated, its angular dependence, the mean energy of the radiated quanta, absorption and emission rates, as well as tachyonic number counts. We explain how the symmetry of the Einstein /A-coefficients connects to time-symmetric wave propagation and to the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory. A relation between the tachyon mass and the velocity of the Local Group of galaxies is suggested.

  20. Superluminal antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, John; Earley, Lawrence M.; Krawczyk, Frank L.; Potter, James M.; Romero, William P.; Wang, Zhi-Fu

    2017-03-28

    A superluminal antenna element integrates a balun element to better impedance match an input cable or waveguide to a dielectric radiator element, thus preventing stray reflections and consequent undesirable radiation. For example, a dielectric housing material can be used that has a cutout area. A cable can extend into the cutout area. A triangular conductor can function as an impedance transition. An additional cylindrical element functions as a sleeve balun to better impedance match the radiator element to the cable.

  1. Relativistic jet with shock waves like model of superluminal radio source. Jet relativista con ondas de choque como modelo de radio fuentes superluminales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A.; Gomez, J.L.; Marcaide, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the compact radio sources at milliarcsecond angular resolution can be explained in terms of shock waves propagating along bent jets. These jets consist of narrow-angle cones of plasma flowing at bulk relativistic velocities, within tangled magnetic fields, emitting synchrotron radiation. We have developed a numerical code which solves the synchrotron radiation transfer equations to compute the total and polarized emission of bent shocked relativistic jets, and we have applied it to reproduce the compact structure, kenimatic evolution and time flux density evolution of the superluminal radio source 4C 39.25 and to obtain its jet physical parameters. (Author) 23 ref.

  2. Superluminal advanced transmission of X waves undergoing frustrated total internal reflection: the evanescent fields and the Goos-Hänchen effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawi, Amr M; Tawfik, Bassem H; Besieris, Ioannis M

    2002-10-01

    A study of X waves undergoing frustrated total internal reflection at a planar slab is provided. This is achieved by choosing the spectral plane wave components of the incident X wave to fall on the upper interface at angles greater than the critical angle. Thus, evanescent fields are generated in the slab and the peak of the field tunneling through the slab appears to be transmitted at a superluminal speed. Furthermore, it is shown that for deep barrier penetration, the peak of the transmitted field emerges from the rear interface of the slab before the incident peak reaches the front interface. To understand this advanced transmission of the peak of the pulse, a detailed study of the behavior of the evanescent fields in the barrier region is undertaken. The difference in tunneling behavior between deep and shallow barrier penetrations is shown to be influenced by the sense of the Goos-Hänchen shift.

  3. Superluminal motions? A bird-eye view of the experimental situation

    CERN Document Server

    Recami, E

    2001-01-01

    In this article (after some brief theoretical considerations) a bird-eye view is presented -with the help of nine figures- of the various experimental sectors of physics in which Superluminal motions seem to appear. In particular, a panorama is presented of the experiments with evanescent waves and/or tunnelling photons, and with the "localized Superluminal solutions" to the Maxwell equations (e.g., with the so-called X-shaped ones). The present paper is sketchy, but is followed by a large enough bibliography to allow the interested reader deepening the preferred topic.

  4. Gravitational waves within the magnetar model of superluminous supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Wynn C G

    2016-01-01

    The light curve of many supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be explained by a sustained injection of extra energy from its possible central engine, a rapidly rotating strongly magnetic neutron star (i.e., magnetar). The magnetic dipole radiation power that the magnetar supplies comes at the expense of the star's rotational energy. However radiation by gravitational waves (GWs) can be more efficient than magnetic dipole radiation because of its stronger dependence on neutron star spin rate Omega, i.e., Omega^6 (for a static "mountain") or Omega^8 (for a r-mode fluid oscillation) versus Omega^4 for magnetic dipole radiation. Here we use the magnetic field B and initial spin period P_0 inferred from SN and GRB observations to obtain simple constraints on the dimensionless amplitude of the mountain of epsilon 10^-4 (B/10^14 G) (P_0/1 ms) or alpha > 0.01 (B/10^14 G) (P_0/1 ms)^2, light curves are strongly affected, with significant decrease in peak luminosity and increase in time to peak luminosity. ...

  5. Gravitational waves within the magnetar model of superluminous supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2016-11-01

    The light curve of many supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be explained by a sustained injection of extra energy from its possible central engine, a rapidly rotating strongly magnetic neutron star (i.e. magnetar). The magnetic dipole radiation power that the magnetar supplies comes at the expense of the star's rotational energy. However, radiation by gravitational waves (GWs) can be more efficient than magnetic dipole radiation because of its stronger dependence on neutron star spin rate Ω, i.e. Ω6 (for a static `mountain') or Ω8 (for an r-mode fluid oscillation) versus Ω4 for magnetic dipole radiation. Here, we use the magnetic field B and initial spin period P0 inferred from SN and GRB observations to obtain simple constraints on the dimensionless amplitude of the mountain of ε magnetar model. We show that when ε > 10-4(B/1014 G)(P0/1 ms) or α > 0.01(B/1014 G)(P0/1 ms)2, light curves are strongly affected, with significant decrease in peak luminosity and increase in time to peak luminosity. Thus, the GW effects studied here are more pronounced for low B and short P0 but are unlikely to be important in modelling SN and GRB light curves since the amplitudes needed for noticeable changes are quite large.

  6. Superluminality and UV Completion

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, G M

    2007-01-01

    The idea that the existence of a consistent UV completion satisfying the fundamental axioms of local quantum field theory or string theory may impose positivity constraints on the couplings of the leading irrelevant operators in a low-energy effective field theory is critically discussed. Violation of these constraints implies superluminal propagation, in the sense that the low-frequency limit of the phase velocity $v_{\\rm ph}(0)$ exceeds $c$. It is explained why causality is related not to $v_{\\rm ph}(0)$ but to the high-frequency limit $v_{\\rm ph}(\\infty)$ and how these are related by the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation, depending on the sign of the imaginary part of the refractive index $\\Ima n(\\w)$ which is normally assumed positive. Superluminal propagation and its relation to UV completion is investigated in detail in three theories: QED in a background electromagnetic field, where the full dispersion relation for $n(\\w)$ is evaluated numerically for the first time and the role of the null energy con...

  7. Localized coherence of freak waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifah, Arnida L.; van Groesen, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates in detail a possible mechanism of energy convergence leading to freak waves. We give examples of a freak wave as a (weak) pseudo-maximal wave to illustrate the importance of phase coherence. Given a time signal at a certain position, we identify parts of the time signal with successive high amplitudes, so-called group events, that may lead to a freak wave using wavelet transform analysis. The local coherence of the critical group event is measured by its time spreading of the most energetic waves. Four types of signals have been investigated: dispersive focusing, normal sea condition, thunderstorm condition and an experimental irregular wave. In all cases presented in this paper, it is shown that a high correlation exists between the local coherence and the appearance of a freak wave. This makes it plausible that freak waves can be developed by local interactions of waves in a wave group and that the effect of waves that are not in the immediate vicinity is minimal. This indicates that a local coherence mechanism within a wave group can be one mechanism that leads to the appearance of a freak wave.

  8. Relativistic solitons and superluminal signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccari, Attilio [Technical Institute ' G. Cardano' , Piazza della Resistenza 1, Monterotondo, Rome 00015 (Italy)]. E-mail: solitone@yahoo.it

    2005-02-01

    Envelope solitons in the weakly nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation in 1 + 1 dimensions are investigated by the asymptotic perturbation (AP) method. Two different types of solitons are possible according to the properties of the dispersion relation. In the first case, solitons propagate with the group velocity (less than the light speed) of the carrier wave, on the contrary in the second case solitons always move with the group velocity of the carrier wave, but now this velocity is greater than the light speed. Superluminal signals are then possible in classical relativistic nonlinear field equations.

  9. Octonion wave equation and tachyon electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P S Bisht; O P S Negi

    2009-09-01

    The octonion wave equation is discussed to formulate the localization spaces for subluminal and superluminal particles. Accordingly, tachyon electrodynamics is established to obtain a consistent and manifestly covariant equation for superluminal electromagnetic fields. It is shown that the true localization space for bradyons (subluminal particles) is 4 - (three space and one time dimensions) space while that for the description of tachyons is 4 - (three time and one space dimensions) space.

  10. Superluminal propagation: Light cone and Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugnai, D. [' Nello Carrara' Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)]. E-mail: d.mugnai@ifac.cnr.it

    2007-05-14

    Superluminal behavior has been extensively studied in recent years, especially with regard to the topic of superluminality in the propagation of a signal. Particular interest has been devoted to Bessel-X waves propagation, since some experimental results showed that these waves have both phase and group velocities greater that light velocity c. However, because of the lack of an exact definition of signal velocity, no definite answer about the signal propagation (or velocity of information) has been found. The present Letter is a short note that deals in a general way with this vexed question. By analyzing the field of existence of the Bessel X-pulse in pseudo-Euclidean spacetime, it is possible to give a general description of the propagation, and to overcome the specific question related to a definition of signal velocity.

  11. Local Scour Around Piles Under Wave Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国平; 左其华; 黄海龙

    2004-01-01

    The model tests are performed with regular waves, and the effect of wave height, wave period, water depth, scdiment size and pile diameter is evaluated. The shape and size of local scour around piles are studied. There are three typical scour patterns due to wave action. It is found that a relationship exists between the erosion depth and the wave number. An empirical formula of the maximum local scour is thus derived.

  12. Nonlinear phase shifts of modulated light waves with slow and superluminal group delay in stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arditi, Tal; Granot, Er'el; Sternklar, Shmuel

    2007-09-15

    Brillouin amplification with counterpropagating modulated pump and Stokes light leads to nonlinear modulation-phase shifts of the interacting intensity waves. This is due to a partial transformation of the nonmodulated light component at the input into modulated light at the output as a result of a mixing process with the counterpropagating modulated component of the pump and results in an advance or delay of the input modulation. This occurs for interactions over less than half of a modulation wavelength. Milliwatts of power in a kilometer of standard single-mode fiber give significant tunability of the modulation phase.

  13. Cosmology with Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Scovacricchi, Dario; Bacon, David; Sullivan, Mark; Prajs, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) as standardisable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z~3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the "Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae" (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardisation values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalise over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ~100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Omega_m by at least 20% (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia a...

  14. Superluminal Recession Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, T M; Davis, Tamara M.; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2000-01-01

    Hubble's Law, v=HD (recession velocity is proportional to distance), is a theoretical result derived from the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. v=HD applies at least as far as the particle horizon and in principle for all distances. Thus, galaxies with distances greater than D=c/H are receding from us with velocities greater than the speed of light and superluminal recession is a fundamental part of the general relativistic description of the expanding universe. This apparent contradiction of special relativity (SR) is often mistakenly remedied by converting redshift to velocity using SR. Here we show that galaxies with recession velocities faster than the speed of light are observable and that in all viable cosmological models, galaxies above a redshift of three are receding superluminally.

  15. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is invoked to study the effect of solar-wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type-III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type-III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar-flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir-wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Riegel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations {approximately}1%. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action-principle approach is used to develop a theory of nonlinear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability.

  16. Testing local Lorentz invariance with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kostelecky, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of local Lorentz violation on dispersion and birefringence of gravitational waves are investigated. The covariant dispersion relation for gravitational waves involving gauge-invariant Lorentz-violating operators of arbitrary mass dimension is constructed. The chirp signal from the gravitational-wave event GW150914 is used to place numerous first constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation.

  17. Testing local Lorentz invariance with gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan, E-mail: kostelec@indiana.edu [Physics Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Mewes, Matthew [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    The effects of local Lorentz violation on dispersion and birefringence of gravitational waves are investigated. The covariant dispersion relation for gravitational waves involving gauge-invariant Lorentz-violating operators of arbitrary mass dimension is constructed. The chirp signal from the gravitational-wave event GW150914 is used to place numerous first constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation.

  18. Superluminal Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, D S

    1993-01-01

    The new solution of the Einstein equations in empty space is presented. The solution is constructed using Schwarzschild solution but essentially differs from it. The basic properties of the solution are: the existence of a horizon which is a hyperboloid of one sheet moving along its axis with superluminal velocity, right signature of the metric outside the horizon and Minkovsky-flatness of it at infinity outside the horizon. There is also a discussion in the last chapter, including comparing with recent astronomical observations.

  19. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch.

  20. Control methods for localization of nonlinear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubov, Alexey; Andrievsky, Boris

    2017-03-01

    A general form of a distributed feedback control algorithm based on the speed-gradient method is developed. The goal of the control is to achieve nonlinear wave localization. It is shown by example of the sine-Gordon equation that the generation and further stable propagation of a localized wave solution of a single nonlinear partial differential equation may be obtained independently of the initial conditions. The developed algorithm is extended to coupled nonlinear partial differential equations to obtain consistent localized wave solutions at rather arbitrary initial conditions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  1. A Blind Pilot: Who is a Super-Luminal Observer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the nature of a hypothetical super-luminal observer who, as well as a real (sub-light speed observer, perceives the world by light waves. This consideration is due to that fact that the theory of relativity permits different frames of reference, including light-like and super-luminal reference frames. In analogy with a blind pilot on board a supersonic jet aeroplane (or missile, perceived by blind people, it is concluded that the light barrier is observed in the framework of only the light signal exchange experiment.

  2. Slanted snaking bifurcation of localized Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pradenas, Bastián; Clerc, Marcel G; Falcón, Claudio; Gandhi, Punit; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    We report on an experimental, theoretical and numerical study of slanted snaking of spatially localized parametrically excited waves on the surface of a water-surfactant mixture in a Hele-Shaw cell. We demonstrate experimentally the presence of a hysteretic transition to spatially extended parametrically excited surface waves when the acceleration amplitude is varied, as well as the presence of spatially localized waves exhibiting slanted snaking. The latter extend outside the hysteresis loop. We attribute this behavior to the presence of a conserved quantity, the liquid volume, and introduce a universal model which couples the wave amplitude with such a conserved quantity. The model captures both the observed slanted snaking and the presence of localized waves outside the hysteresis loop, as demonstrated by numerical integration of the model equations.

  3. Superluminal Neutrinos and Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, we show that superluminal neutrinos announced by OPERA could be explained by the existence of a monopole, which is left behind after the spontaneous symmetry braking (SSB) phase transition of some scalar fields in the universe. We assume the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole couples to the neutrinos but not photon fields. The monopole causes effective metric to the neutrinos, different from the Minkovski one. We find that the monopoles have influences on neutrinos only within the range about $10^3$ cm. Neutrinos always arrive earlier than photons by the same amount of time, once there exists a monopole on or close to their trajectories. This result reconciles the contradiction between OPERA and supernova neutrinos.

  4. Cosmology with superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scovacricchi, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Bacon, D.; Sullivan, M.; Prajs, S.

    2016-02-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) as standardizable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z ˜ 3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the `Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae' (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardization values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalize over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ≃100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Ωm by at least 20 per cent (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia and 10 000 LSST-like SLSNe can measure Ωm and w to 2 and 4 per cent, respectively. The real power of SLSNe becomes evident when we consider possible temporal variations in w(a), giving possible uncertainties of only 2, 5 and 14 per cent on Ωm, w0 and wa, respectively, from the combination of DES SNe Ia, LSST-like SLSNe and Planck. These errors are competitive with predicted Euclid constraints, indicating a future role for SLSNe for probing the high-redshift Universe.

  5. Control of superluminal transit through a heterogeneous medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, M; Rao, V S C Manga; Gupta, S Dutta

    2004-01-01

    We consider pulse propagation through a two component composite medium (metal inclusions in a dielectric host) with or without cavity mirrors. We show that a very thin slab of such a medium, under conditions of localized plasmon resonance, can lead to significant superluminality with detectable levels of transmitted pulse. A cavity containing the heterogeneous medium is shown to lead to subluminal-to-superluminal transmission depending on the volume fraction of the metal inclusions. The predictions of phase time calculations are verified by explicit calculations of the transmitted pulse shapes. We also demonstrate the independence of the phase time on system width and the volume fraction under specific conditions.

  6. Challenges Confronting Superluminal Neutrino Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evslin, Jarah

    2012-12-01

    This talk opens the CosPA2011 session on OPERA's superluminal neutrino claim. I summarize relevant observations and constraints from OPERA, MINOS, ICARUS, KamLAND, IceCube and LEP as well as observations of SN1987A. I selectively review some models of neutrino superluminality which have been proposed since OPERA's announcement, focusing on a neutrino dark energy model. Powerful theoretical constraints on these models arise from Cohen-Glashow bremsstrahlung and from phase space requirements for the initial neutrino production. I discuss these constraints and how they might be evaded in models in which the maximum velocities of both neutrinos and charged leptons are equal but only superluminal inside of a dense medium.

  7. Challenges Confronting Superluminal Neutrino Models

    CERN Document Server

    Evslin, Jarah

    2011-01-01

    This talk opens the CosPA2011 session on OPERA's superluminal neutrino claim. I summarize relevant observations and constraints from OPERA, MINOS, ICARUS, KamLAND, IceCube and LEP as well as observations of SN1987A. I selectively review some models of neutrino superluminality which have been proposed since OPERA's announcement, focusing on a neutrino dark energy model. Powerful theoretical constraints on these models arise from Cohen-Glashow bremsstrahlung and from phase space requirements for the initial neutrino production. I discuss these constraints and how they might be evaded in models in which the maximum velocities of both neutrinos and charged leptons are equal but only superluminal inside of a dense medium.

  8. Superluminal travel requires negative energies

    OpenAIRE

    Olum, Ken D.

    1998-01-01

    I investigate the relationship between faster-than-light travel and weak-energy-condition violation, i.e., negative energy densities. In a general spacetime it is difficult to define faster-than-light travel, and I give an example of a metric which appears to allow superluminal travel, but in fact is just flat space. To avoid such difficulties, I propose a definition of superluminal travel which requires that the path to be traveled reach a destination surface at an earlier time than any neig...

  9. Localization of Waves in Fractals : Spatial Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Pedro de; Raedt, Hans De; Lagendijk, Ad

    1989-01-01

    Localization of a quantum particle on two-dimensional percolating networks is investigated numerically. Solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for particular initial wave packets we study the spatial behavior of eigenstates for two tight-binding models: the quantum percolation model and the

  10. Local Tensor Radiation Conditions For Elastic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    A local boundary condition is formulated, representing radiation of elastic waves from an arbitrary point source. The boundary condition takes the form of a tensor relation between the stress at a point on an arbitrarily oriented section and the velocity and displacement vectors at the point. The...

  11. A note on superluminal neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, A.

    2012-05-01

    Although characterized by a possible experimental error, the first results of the Opera experiment at CERN have opened up a hot discussion on the possibility of superluminal neutrinos already observed in some space events. In particular, Cohen and Glashow (CG) have considered it simply an error justifying their position on the basis of the bremsstrahlung of electron-positron pairs. In this paper, we would like to discuss this position also in view of the recent derivation of the superluminal limit as a consequence of the classical causality principle. Even if the final answer is related only to the review of all the experimental results, we believe that neutral particles (neutrinos, photons, etc.) might exhibit superluminal behavior also in view of the fact that the analysis performed by Cohen and Glashow does not contain any absolute limit, like that present in the case of the Cherenkov effect in vacuum, which is absolutely impossible, as its violation would require an infinite energy amount. CG conclusions are not in contrast with superluminal neutrinos, which, in turn, are fully compatible with the theoretical analysis reported as well.

  12. Invisibility cloaking without superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perczel, Janos; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Tyc, Tomas, E-mail: jp394@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: tomtyc@physics.muni.cz, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Faculty of Science, Kotlarska 2 and Faculty of Informatics, Botanicka 68a, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Conventional cloaking based on Euclidean transformation optics requires that the speed of light should tend to infinity on the inner surface of the cloak. Non-Euclidean cloaking still needs media with superluminal propagation. Here we show by giving an example that this is no longer necessary.

  13. Popper's Experiment and Superluminal Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Gerjuoy, E; Gerjuoy, Edward; Sessler, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    We comment on Tabesh Qureshi, "Understanding Popper's Experiment," AJP 73, 541 (June 2005), in particular on the implications of its section IV. We show, in the situation envisaged by Popper, that analysis solely with conventional non-relativistic quantum mechanics suffices to exclude the possibility of superluminal communication.

  14. Localization and solitary waves in solid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Champneys, A R; Thompson, J M T

    1999-01-01

    This book is a collection of recent reprints and new material on fundamentally nonlinear problems in structural systems which demonstrate localized responses to continuous inputs. It has two intended audiences. For mathematicians and physicists it should provide useful new insights into a classical yet rapidly developing area of application of the rich subject of dynamical systems theory. For workers in structural and solid mechanics it introduces a new methodology for dealing with structural localization and the related topic of the generation of solitary waves. Applications range from classi

  15. Special relativity and superluminal motions: a discussion of some recent experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recami, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy)]|[Bergamo Univ., Bergamo (Italy). Fac. di Ingegneria]|[State Univ. of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Fontana, F. [Pirelli Cavi, Milan (Italy). R and D sector; Garavaglia, R. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze dell' Informazione

    2000-03-01

    Some experiments, performed at Berkeley, Cologne, Florence, Vienna, Orsay and Rennes led to the claim that something seems to travel with a group velocity larger than the speed c of light in vacuum. Various other experimental results seem to point in the same direction. For instance, localized wavelet-type solutions of Maxwell equations have been found, both theoretically and experimentally, that travel with superluminal speed. Even mounic and electronic neutrinos - it has been proposed - might be tachyons, since their square mass appears to be negative. With regard to the first mentioned experiments, it was very recently claimed by Guenter Nimtz that those results with evanescent waves or tunnelling photons - implying superluminal signal and impulse transmission - violate Einstein causality. This note, on the contrary, discusses that all such results do not place relativistic causality in jeopardy, even if they refer to actual tachyonic motions. In fact, special relativity can cope even with also the known paradoxes , devised for faster than light motion, even if this is not widely recognized. Here the paper shows, in detail and rigorously, how to solve the oldest casual paradox. originally proposed by Tolman, which is the kernel of many further tachyon paradoxes. The key to the solution is a careful application of tachyon mechanics, as it unambiguously follows from special relativity.

  16. Latest Progress on Propagation Characteristics of Superluminous Waves and their Gyroresonance with Energetic Particles%超光速电磁波的传播特性及与高能粒子相互作用研究的新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖伏良; 何兆国; 陈良旭; 贺艺华; 杨昶

    2011-01-01

    超光速(相速度大于光速)电磁波是广泛存在于空间等离子中的高频电磁波,总结了超光速电磁波的产生机制-回旋微波激射不稳定性,介绍了超光速波在地球磁层中的传播特性,分析了其从高纬极光源区传播到低纬区域的基本原因:磁暴时由于等离子层硕压缩,超光速波传播时不会遇上反射,从而能向下传播.重点介绍了超光速波产生的地球辐射带区域高能电子的随机加速与投掷角扩散过程.发现超光速波能量扩散过程一般大于投掷角扩散过程,在合适的条件下超光速波对高投掷角的高能电子主要起随机加速作用,而对低投掷角的高能电子主要起投掷角扩散作用.这些最新进展有助于进一步了解超光速电磁波的激发与传播特性,以及地球辐射带高能电子的动力学行为.%Superluminous (the phase speed higher than the speed of light) electromagnetic waves are widely present in the space plasma with high frequencies. Here, we briefly introduce their generation mechanism-Cyclotron Maser Instability ( CMI). We present discussion on the propagating characteristics of superluminous waves in the Earth's magnetosphere. During high geomagnetic activity, since the plasmapause position moves inward closer to the Earth, the superluminous waves can propagate from their source cavity downward and even through the equatorial plane due to no reflection. We focus on pitch angle scattering and stochastic acceleration of energetic electrons induced by superluminous waves in the radiation belts. Current works show that energy diffusion resulting from such waves is generally higher than pitch angle scattering. Under appropriate conditions, superluminous waves may contribute to both the stochastic acceleration of electrons with larger pitch angle and the loss process of electrons with smaller pitch angles. These recent progresses provide further understanding of the instability and propagation of

  17. Probing Superluminal Neutrinos Via Refraction

    OpenAIRE

    Stebbins, Albert

    2011-01-01

    One phenomenological explanation of superluminal propagation of neutrinos, which may have been observed by OPERA and MINOS, is that neutrinos travel faster inside of matter than in vacuum. If so neutrinos exhibit refraction inside matter and should exhibit other manifestations of refraction, such as deflection and reflection. Such refraction would be easily detectable through the momentum imparted to appropriately shaped refractive material inserted into the neutrino beam. For NuMI this could...

  18. Neutrino oscillations and superluminal propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, Joao

    2011-01-01

    We digress on the implications of recent claims of superluminal neutrino propagation. No matter how we turn it around such behaviour is very odd and sits uncomfortably even within "far-fetched" theories. In the context of non-linear realizations of the Lorentz group (where superluminal misbehaviour is run of the mill) one has to accept rather contrived constructions to predict superluminal properties for the neutrino. The simplest explanation is to require that at least one of the mass states be tachyonic. We show that due to neutrino mixing, the flavor energy does not suffer from the usual runaway pathologies of tachyons. For non-tachyonic mass states the theories become more speculative. A neutrino specific dispersion relation is exhibited, rendering the amplitude of the effect reasonable for a standard Planck energy. This uses the fact that the beam energy is close to the geometrical average of the neutrino and Planck mass; or, seen in another way, the beam energy is unexceptional but its gamma factor is v...

  19. A Photonic mm-Wave Local Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Kimberk, R; Tong, C Y E; Blundell, R; Kimberk, Robert; Hunter, Todd R.; Blundell, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    A photonic millimeter wave local oscillator capable of producing two microwatts of radiated power at 224 GHz has been developed. The device was tested in one antenna of Smithsonian Institution's Submillimeter Array (SMA) and was found to produce stable phase on multiple baselines. Graphical data is presented of correlator output phase and amplitude stability. A description of the system is given in both open and closed loop modes. A model is given which is used to predict the operational behavior. A novel method is presented to determine the safe operating point of the automated system.

  20. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What causes the tremendous explosions of superluminous supernovae? New observations reveal the geometry of one such explosion, SN 2015bn, providing clues as to its source.A New Class of ExplosionsImage of a type Ia supernova in the galaxy NGC 4526. [NASA/ESA]Supernovae are powerful explosions that can briefly outshine the galaxies that host them. There are several different classifications of supernovae, each with a different physical source such as thermonuclear instability in a white dwarf, caused by accretion of too much mass, or the exhaustion of fuel in the core of a massive star, leading to the cores collapse and expulsion of its outer layers.In recent years, however, weve detected another type of supernovae, referred to as superluminous supernovae. These particularly energetic explosions last longer months instead of weeks and are brighter at their peaks than normal supernovae by factors of tens to hundreds.The physical cause of these unusual explosions is still a topic of debate. Recently, however, a team of scientists led by Cosimo Inserra (Queens University Belfast) has obtained new observations of a superluminous supernova that might help address this question.The flux and the polarization level (black lines) along the dominant axis of SN 2015bn, 24 days before peak flux (left) and 28 days after peak flux (right). Blue lines show the authors best-fitting model. [Inserra et al. 2016]Probing GeometryInserra and collaborators obtained two sets of observations of SN 2015bn one roughly a month before and one a month after the superluminous supernovas peak brightness using a spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope in Chile. These observations mark the first spectropolarimetric data for a superluminous supernova.Spectropolarimetry is the practice of obtaining information about the polarization of radiation from an objects spectrum. Polarization carries information about broken spatial symmetries in the object: only if the object is perfectly symmetric can it

  1. Superluminality in the Bi- and Multi Galileon

    CERN Document Server

    de Fromont, Paul; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Matas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We re-explore the Bi- and Multi-Galileon models with trivial asymptotic conditions at infinity and show that propagation of superluminal fluctuations is a common and unavoidable feature of these theories, unlike previously claimed in the literature. We show that all Multi-Galileon theories containing a Cubic Galileon term exhibit superluminalities at large distances from a point source, and that even if the Cubic Galileon is not present one can always find sensible matter distributions in which there are superluminal modes at large distances. In the Bi-Galileon case we explicitly show that there are always superluminal modes around a point source even if the Cubic Galileon is not present. Finally, we briefly comment on the possibility of avoiding superluminalities by modifying the asymptotic conditions at infinity.

  2. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities. Ph. D. Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-10-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is involved to study the effect of solar wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Reigel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations -1 percent. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in random media confirm the localization length predictions of Escande and Souillard for stationary density fluctations. For mobile density fluctuations localized wave packets spread at the propagation velocity of the density fluctuations rather than the group velocity of the waves. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action principle approach is used to develop a theory of non-linear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability. It is argued that localization of electromagnetic waves will allow the instability threshold to be exceeded for the parametric decay discussed above.

  3. Enhancing propagation characteristics of truncated localized waves in silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    The spectral characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica are analyzed. Numerical experiments show that the immunity of the truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica to decay and distortion is enhanced as the non-linearity of the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector gets stronger, in contrast to free-space propagating waves, which suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2011 IEEE.

  4. A multimodal wave spectrum-based approach for statistical downscaling of local wave climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegermiller, Christie; Antolinez, Jose A A; Rueda, Ana C; Camus, Paula; Perez, Jorge; Erikson, Li; Barnard, Patrick; Mendez, Fernando J.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of wave climate by bulk wave parameters is insufficient for many coastal studies, including those focused on assessing coastal hazards and long-term wave climate influences on coastal evolution. This issue is particularly relevant for studies using statistical downscaling of atmospheric fields to local wave conditions, which are often multimodal in large ocean basins (e.g. the Pacific). Swell may be generated in vastly different wave generation regions, yielding complex wave spectra that are inadequately represented by a single set of bulk wave parameters. Furthermore, the relationship between atmospheric systems and local wave conditions is complicated by variations in arrival time of wave groups from different parts of the basin. Here, we address these two challenges by improving upon the spatiotemporal definition of the atmospheric predictor used in statistical downscaling of local wave climate. The improved methodology separates the local wave spectrum into “wave families,” defined by spectral peaks and discrete generation regions, and relates atmospheric conditions in distant regions of the ocean basin to local wave conditions by incorporating travel times computed from effective energy flux across the ocean basin. When applied to locations with multimodal wave spectra, including Southern California and Trujillo, Peru, the new methodology improves the ability of the statistical model to project significant wave height, peak period, and direction for each wave family, retaining more information from the full wave spectrum. This work is the base of statistical downscaling by weather types, which has recently been applied to coastal flooding and morphodynamic applications.

  5. Is OPERA Neutrino Superluminal Propagation similar to Gain-Assisted Superluminal Light Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    In this work we consider a possible conceptual similarity between recent, amazing OPERA experiment of the superluminal propagation of neutrino and experiment of the gain-assisted superluminal light propagation realized about ten years ago. Last experiment refers on the propagation of the light, precisely laser pulse through a medium, precisely caesium atomic gas, with characteristic anomalous dispersion and corresponding negative group-velocity index that implies superluminal propagation of the light through this medium. Nevertheless all this, at it has been pointed out by authors, "is not at odds with causality or special relativity", since it simply represents "a direct consequence of the classical interference between ... different frequency components". We observe that OPERA experiment is in many aspects conceptually very similar to the gain-assisted superluminal light propagation, including superposition of the neutrinos component and superluminality magnitudes. For this reason we suppose that OPERA expe...

  6. A sub-solar metallicity is required for superluminous supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, T -W; Yates, R M; Nicholl, M; Krühler, T; Schady, P; Dennefeld, M; Inserra, C

    2016-01-01

    Host galaxy properties provide strong constraints on the stellar progenitors of superluminous supernovae. By comparing a sample of 18 low-redshift superluminous supernova hosts to a volume-limited galaxy population in the local Universe, we show that sub-solar metallici- ties seems to be a requirement. All superluminous supernovae in hosts with high measured gas-phase metallicities are found to explode at large galactocentric radii, indicating that the metallicity at the explosion site is likely lower than the integrated host value. We also confirm that high specific star-formation rates are a feature of superluminous supernova host galaxies, but interpret this as simply a consequence of the anti-correlation between gas-phase metallic- ity and specific star-formation rate and the requirement of on-going star formation to produce young, massive stars greater than ~ 10-20 M_sun . Based on our sample, we propose an upper limit of ~ 0.5 Z_sun for forming superluminous supernova progenitors (assuming an N2 metal- ...

  7. Wave localization in randomly disordered periodic layered piezoelectric structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengming Li; Yuesheng Wang; Chao Hu; Wenhu Huang

    2006-01-01

    Considering the mechnoelectrical coupling,the localization of SH-waves in disordered periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied.The waves propagating in directions normal and tangential to the layers are considered.The transfer matrices between two consecutive unit cells are obtained according to the continuity conditions.The expressions of localization factor and localization length in the disordered periodic structures are presented.For the disordered periodic piezoelectric structures,the numerical results of localization factor and localization length are presented and discussed.It can be seen from the results that the fequency passbands and stopbands appear for the ordered periodic structures and the wave localization phenomenon occurs in the disordered periodic ones,and the larger the coefficient of variation is,the greater the degree of wave localization is.The widths of stopbands in the ordered periodic structures are very narrow when the properties of the consecutive piezoelectric materials are similar and the intervals of stopbands become broader when a certain material parameter has large changes.For the wave propagating in the direction normal to the layers the localization length has less dependence on the frequency,but for the wave propagating in the direction tangential to the layers the localization length is strongly dependent on the frequency.

  8. Spectrum formation in Superluminous Supernovae (Type I)

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzali, P A; Pian, E; Greiner, J; Kann, D A; ARI-LJMU,; UK,; Garching, MPA; Germany,; Southampton, Univ; INAF-IASFBO,; Italy,; Pisa, SNS; Garching, MPE; Tautenburg,; Germany),

    2016-01-01

    The near-maximum spectra of most superluminous supernovae that are not dominated by interaction with a H-rich CSM (SLSN-I) are characterised by a blue spectral peak and a series of absorption lines which have been identified as OII. SN2011kl, associated with the ultra-long gamma-ray burst GRB111209A, also had a blue peak but a featureless optical/UV spectrum. Radiation transport methods are used to show that the spectra (not including SN2007bi, which has a redder spectrum at peak, like ordinary SNe Ic) can be explained by a rather steep density distribution of the ejecta, whose composition appears to be typical of carbon-oxygen cores of massive stars which can have low metal content. If the photospheric velocity is ~10000-15000 km/s, several lines form in the UV. OII lines, however, arise from very highly excited lower levels, which require significant departures from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium to be populated. These SLSNe are not thought to be powered primarily by 56Ni decay. An appealing scenario is th...

  9. Superluminal Neutrinos from Special Relativity with de Sitter Space-time Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Mu-Lin; Xiao, Neng-Chao; Huang, Wei; Hu, Sen

    2011-01-01

    We explore the recent OPERA experiment of superluminal neutrinos in the framework of Special Relativity with de Sitter space-time symmetry (dS-SR). According to Einstein a photon is treated as a massless particle in the framework of Special Relativity. In Special Relativity (SR) we have the universal parameter $c$, the photon velocity $c_{photon}$ and the phase velocity of a light wave in vacuum $c_{wave}=\\lambda\

  10. Local Runup Amplification By Resonant Wave Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanakis, Themistoklis; Dutykh, Denys

    2011-01-01

    Until now the analysis of long wave runup on a plane beach has been focused on finding its maximum value, failing to capture the existence of resonant regimes. One-dimensional numerical simulations in the framework of the Nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (NSWE) are used to investigate the Boundary Value Problem (BVP) for plane and non-trivial beaches. Monochromatic waves, as well as virtual wave-gage recordings from real tsunami simulations, are used as forcing conditions to the BVP. Resonant phenomena between the incident wavelength and the beach slope are found to occur, which result in enhanced runup of non-leading waves. The evolution of energy reveals the existence of a quasi-periodic state for the case of sinusoidal waves, the energy level of which, as well as the time required to reach that state, depend on the incident wavelength for a given beach slope. Dispersion is found to slightly reduce the value of maximum runup, but not to change the overall picture. Runup amplification occurs for both leadin...

  11. Dynamics of localized structures in vector waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-García, E; Colet, P; San Miguel, M; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Hoyuelos, Miguel; Colet, Pere; Miguel, Maxi San

    1999-01-01

    Dynamical properties of topological defects in a twodimensional complex vector field are considered. These objects naturally arise in the study of polarized transverse light waves. Dynamics is modeled by a Vector Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation with parameter values appropriate for linearly polarized laser emission. Creation and annihilation processes, and selforganization of defects in lattice structures, are described. We find "glassy" configurations dominated by vectorial defects and a melting process associated to topological-charge unbinding.

  12. The Phantom of the OPERA: Superluminal Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a brief review on the experimental measurements of the muon neutrino velocities from the OPERA, Fermilab and MINOS experiments and that of the (anti)-electron neutrino velocities from the supernova SN1987a, and consequently on the theoretical aspects to attribute the data as signals for superluminality of neutrinos. Different scenarios on how to understand and treat the background fields in the standard model extension frameworks are pointed out. Challenges on interpreting the OPERA result as a signal of neutrino superluminality are briefly reviewed and discussed. It is also pointed out that a covariant scenario of Lorentz violation can avoid the refutation on the OPERA experiment.

  13. Spectroscopy of superluminous supernova host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leloudas, G.; Kruehler, T.; Schulze, S

    2015-01-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are very bright explosions that were only discovered recently and that show a preference for occurring in faint dwarf galaxies. Understanding why stellar evolution yields different types of stellar explosions in these environments is fundamental in order to both...... uncover the elusive progenitors of SLSNe and to study star formation in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we present the first results of our project to study SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES, focusing on the sample for which we have obtained spectroscopy. We show that SLSNe-I and SLSNe-R (hydrogen...

  14. On the Lorentz Factor of Superluminal Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Onuchukwu, Chika Christian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the properties of features seen within superluminal sources often referred to as components. Our result indicates a fairly strong correlation of r=0.6 for quasars, r=0.4 for galaxies, and r=0.8 for BL Lac objects in our sample between component sizes and distances from the stationary core. Assumption of free adiabatic expanding plasma enabled us to constrain in general the Lorentz factor for superluminal sources. Ourestimated Lorentz factor of 7 - 17 for quasars, 6 - 13 for galaxies and 4- 9 for BL Lac objects indicate that BL Lac have the lowest range of Lorentz factor.

  15. Observation of image pair creation and annihilation from superluminal scattering sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Matteo; Spalding, Gabriel C; Warburton, Ryan; Lyons, Ashley; Aniculaesei, Constantin; Richards, Joseph M; Leach, Jonathan; Henderson, Robert; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The invariance of the speed of light is one of the foundational pillars of our current understanding of the universe. It implies a series of consequences related to our perception of simultaneity and, ultimately, of time itself. Whereas these consequences are experimentally well studied in the case of subluminal motion, the kinematics of superluminal motion lack direct evidence or even a clear experimental approach. We investigate kinematic effects associated with the superluminal motion of a light source. By using high-temporal-resolution imaging techniques, we directly demonstrate that if the source approaches an observer at superluminal speeds, the temporal ordering of events is inverted and its image appears to propagate backward. Moreover, for a source changing its speed and crossing the interface between subluminal and superluminal propagation regions, we observe image pair annihilation and creation, depending on the crossing direction. These results are very general and show that, regardless of the emitter speed, it is not possible to unambiguously determine the kinematics of an event from imaging and time-resolved measurements alone. This has implications not only for light, but also, for example, for sound and other wave phenomena.

  16. Spectrum formation in superluminous supernovae (Type I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzali, P. A.; Sullivan, M.; Pian, E.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    The near-maximum spectra of most superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) that are not dominated by interaction with a H-rich circum-stellar medium (SLSN-I) are characterized by a blue spectral peak and a series of absorption lines which have been identified as O II. SN 2011kl, associated with the ultra-long gamma-ray burst GRB111209A, also had a blue peak but a featureless optical/ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Radiation transport methods are used to show that the spectra (not including SN 2007bi, which has a redder spectrum at peak, like ordinary SNe Ic) can be explained by a rather steep density distribution of the ejecta, whose composition appears to be typical of carbon-oxygen cores of massive stars which can have low metal content. If the photospheric velocity is ˜10 000-15 000 km s-1, several lines form in the UV. O II lines, however, arise from very highly excited lower levels, which require significant departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium to be populated. These SLSNe are not thought to be powered primarily by 56Ni decay. An appealing scenario is that they are energized by X-rays from the shock driven by a magnetar wind into the SN ejecta. The apparent lack of evolution of line velocity with time that characterizes SLSNe up to about maximum is another argument in favour of the magnetar scenario. The smooth UV continuum of SN 2011kl requires higher ejecta velocities (˜20 000 km s-1): line blanketing leads to an almost featureless spectrum. Helium is observed in some SLSNe after maximum. The high-ionization near-maximum implies that both He and H may be present but not observed at early times. The spectroscopic classification of SLSNe should probably reflect that of SNe Ib/c. Extensive time coverage is required for an accurate classification.

  17. Local Dynamics of Baroclinic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere

    KAUST Repository

    Kavulich, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    The paper investigates the processes that drive the spatiotemporal evolution of baroclinic transient waves in the Martian atmosphere by a simulation experiment with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Mars general circulation model (GCM). The main diagnostic tool of the study is the (local) eddy kinetic energy equation. Results are shown for a prewinter season of the Northern Hemisphere, in which a deep baroclinic wave of zonal wavenumber 2 circles the planet at an eastward phase speed of about 70° Sol-1 (Sol is a Martian day). The regular structure of the wave gives the impression that the classical models of baroclinic instability, which describe the underlying process by a temporally unstable global wave (e.g., Eady model and Charney model), may have a direct relevance for the description of the Martian baroclinic waves. The results of the diagnostic calculations show, however, that while the Martian waves remain zonally global features at all times, there are large spatiotemporal changes in their amplitude. The most intense episodes of baroclinic energy conversion, which take place in the two great plain regions (Acidalia Planitia and Utopia Planitia), are strongly localized in both space and time. In addition, similar to the situation for terrestrial baroclinic waves, geopotential flux convergence plays an important role in the dynamics of the downstream-propagating unstable waves. © 2013 American Meteorological Society.

  18. Pair Production Constraints on Superluminal Neutrinos Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

    2012-02-16

    We revisit the pair creation constraint on superluminal neutrinos considered by Cohen and Glashow in order to clarify which types of superluminal models are constrained. We show that a model in which the superluminal neutrino is effectively light-like can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint. In summary, any model for which the CG pair production process operates is excluded because such timelike neutrinos would not be detected by OPERA or other experiments. However, a superluminal neutrino which is effectively lightlike with fixed p{sup 2} can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint because of energy-momentum conservation. The coincidence involved in explaining the SN1987A constraint certainly makes such a picture improbable - but it is still intrinsically possible. The lightlike model is appealing in that it does not violate Lorentz symmetry in particle interactions, although one would expect Hughes-Drever tests to turn up a violation eventually. Other evasions of the CG constraints are also possible; perhaps, e.g., the neutrino takes a 'short cut' through extra dimensions or suffers anomalous acceleration in matter. Irrespective of the OPERA result, Lorentz-violating interactions remain possible, and ongoing experimental investigation of such possibilities should continue.

  19. Superluminality, Black Holes and Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Goon, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    Under the assumption that a UV theory does not display superluminal behavior, we ask what constraints on superluminality are satisfied in the effective field theory (EFT). We study two examples of effective theories: quantum electrodynamics (QED) coupled to gravity after the electron is integrated out, and the flat-space galileon. The first is realized in nature, the second is more speculative, but they both exhibit apparent superluminality around non-trivial backgrounds. In the QED case, we attempt, and fail, to find backgrounds for which the superluminal signal advance can be made larger than the putative resolving power of the EFT. In contrast, in the galileon case it is easy to find such backgrounds, indicating that if the UV completion of the galileon is (sub)luminal, quantum corrections must become important at distance scales of order the Vainshtein radius of the background configuration, much larger than the naive EFT strong coupling distance scale. Such corrections would be reminiscent of the non-per...

  20. Local energy decay for linear wave equations with variable coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Ryo

    2005-06-01

    A uniform local energy decay result is derived to the linear wave equation with spatial variable coefficients. We deal with this equation in an exterior domain with a star-shaped complement. Our advantage is that we do not assume any compactness of the support on the initial data, and its proof is quite simple. This generalizes a previous famous result due to Morawetz [The decay of solutions of the exterior initial-boundary value problem for the wave equation, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 14 (1961) 561-568]. In order to prove local energy decay, we mainly apply two types of ideas due to Ikehata-Matsuyama [L2-behaviour of solutions to the linear heat and wave equations in exterior domains, Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33-42] and Todorova-Yordanov [Critical exponent for a nonlinear wave equation with damping, J. Differential Equations 174 (2001) 464-489].

  1. Impacts of wave energy conversion devices on local wave climate: observations and modelling from the Perth Wave Energy Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeke, Ron; Hemer, Mark; Contardo, Stephanie; Symonds, Graham; Mcinnes, Kathy

    2016-04-01

    As demonstrated by the Australian Wave Energy Atlas (AWavEA), the southern and western margins of the country possess considerable wave energy resources. The Australia Government has made notable investments in pre-commercial wave energy developments in these areas, however little is known about how this technology may impact local wave climate and subsequently affect neighbouring coastal environments, e.g. altering sediment transport, causing shoreline erosion or accretion. In this study, a network of in-situ wave measurement devices have been deployed surrounding the 3 wave energy converters of the Carnegie Wave Energy Limited's Perth Wave Energy Project. This data is being used to develop, calibrate and validate numerical simulations of the project site. Early stage results will be presented and potential simulation strategies for scaling-up the findings to larger arrays of wave energy converters will be discussed. The intended project outcomes are to establish zones of impact defined in terms of changes in local wave energy spectra and to initiate best practice guidelines for the establishment of wave energy conversion sites.

  2. Space-time measures for subluminal and superluminal motions

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo-Mozo, Benjam\\'\\in

    2014-01-01

    In present work we examine the implications on both, space-time measures and causal structure, of a generalization of the local causality postulate by asserting its validity to all motion regimes, the subluminal and superluminal ones. The new principle implies the existence of a denumerable set of metrical null cone speeds, \\{$c_k\\}$, where $c_1$ is the speed of light in vacuum, and $c_k/c \\simeq \\epsilon^{-k+1}$ for $k\\geq2$, where $\\epsilon^2$ is a tiny dimensionless constant which we introduce to prevent the divergence of the $x, t$ measures in Lorentz transformations, such that their generalization keeps $c_k$ invariant and as the top speed for every regime of motion. The non divergent factor $\\gamma_k$ equals $k\\epsilon^{-1}$ at speed $c_k$. We speak then of $k-$timelike and $k-$null intervals and of k-timelike and k-null paths on space-time, and construct a causal structure for each regime. We discuss also the possible transition of a material particle from the subluminal to the first superluminal regim...

  3. Wave Propagation in Stochastic Spacetimes Localization, Amplification and Particle Creation

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, B L

    1998-01-01

    Here we study novel effects associated with electromagnetic wave propagation in a Robertson-Walker universe and the Schwarzschild spacetime with a small amount of metric stochasticity. We find that localization of electromagnetic waves occurs in a Robertson-Walker universe with time-independent metric stochasticity, while time-dependent metric stochasticity induces exponential instability in the particle production rate. For the Schwarzschild metric, time-independent randomness can decrease the total luminosity of Hawking radiation due to multiple scattering of waves outside the black hole and gives rise to event horizon fluctuations and thus fluctuations in the Hawking temperature.

  4. Localized standing waves in inhomogeneous Schrodinger equations

    CERN Document Server

    Marangell, R; Susanto, H

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinear Schrodinger equation arising from light propagation down an inhomogeneous medium is considered. The inhomogeneity is reflected through a non-uniform coefficient of the non-linear term in the equation. In particular, a combination of self-focusing and self-defocusing nonlinearity, with the self-defocusing region localized in a finite interval, is investigated. Using numerical computations, the extension of linear eigenmodes of the corresponding linearized system into nonlinear states is established, particularly nonlinear continuations of the fundamental state and the first excited state. The (in)stability of the states is also numerically calculated, from which it is obtained that symmetric nonlinear solutions become unstable beyond a critical threshold norm. Instability of the symmetric states is then investigated analytically through the application of a topological argument. Determination of instability of positive symmetric states is reduced to simple geometric properties of the composite phas...

  5. OPERA superluminal neutrinos and Kinematics in Finsler spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Wang, Sai

    2011-01-01

    The OPERA collaboration recently reported that muon neutrinos could be superluminal. More recently, Cohen and Glashow pointed that such superluminal neutrinos would be suppressed since they lose their energies rapidly via bremsstrahlung. In this Letter, we propose that Finslerian nature of spacetime could account for the superluminal phenomena of particles. The Finsler spacetime permits the existence of superluminal behavior of particles while the casuality still holds. A new dispersion relation is obtained in a class of Finsler spacetime. It is shown that the superluminal speed is linearly dependent on the energy per unit mass of the particle. We find that such a superluminal speed formula is consistent with data of OPERA, MINOS and Fermilab-1979 neutrino experiments as well as observations on neutrinos from SN1987a.

  6. Symmetry, causal structure and superluminality in Finsler spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Wang, Sai

    2012-01-01

    The superluminal behaviors of neutrinos were reported by the OPERA collaboration recently. It was also noticed by Cohen and Glashow that, in standard quantum field theory, the superluminal neutrinos would lose their energy via the Cherenkov-like process rapidly. Finslerian special relativity may provide a framework to cooperate with the OPERA neutrino superluminality without Cherenkov-like process. We present clearly the symmetry, causal structure and superluminality in Finsler spacetime. The principle of relativity and the causal law are preserved. The energy and momentum are well defined and conserved in Finslerian special relativity. The Cherenkov-like process is proved to be forbidden kinematically and the superluminal neutrinos would not lose energy in their distant propagations from CERN to the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The energy dependence of neutrino superluminality is studied based on the reported data of the OPERA collaboration as well as other groups.

  7. Impact Localization Using Lamb Wave and Spiral FSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimal, Nischal

    Wear and tear exists in almost every physical infrastructure. Modern day science has something in its pocket to early detect such wear and tear known as Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). SHM features a key role in tracking a structural failure and could prevent loss of human lives and money. The size and prices of presently available defect detection devices make them not suitable for on-site SHM. The exploitation of directional transducers and Lamb wave propagation for SHM has been proposed. The basis of the project was to develop an accurate localization algorithm and implementation of Lamb waves to detect the crack present in the plate like structures. In regards, the use of Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducer (FSAT) was studied. The theory governing the propagation of Lamb wave was reviewed. The derivation of the equations and dispersion curve of Lamb waves are included. FSAT was studied from both theoretical and application view of point. The experiments carried out give us better understanding of the FSAT excitation and Lamb wave generation and detection. The Lamb wave generation and crack localization algorithm was constructed and with the proposed algorithm, simulated impacts are detected.

  8. WAVE LOCALIZATION IN RANDOMLY DISORDERED PERIODIC PIEZOELECTRIC RODS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fengming; Wang Yuesheng; Chen Ali

    2006-01-01

    The wave propagation in periodic and disordered periodic piezoelectric rods is studied in this paper. The transfer matrix between two consecutive unit cells is obtained according to the continuity conditions. The electromechanical coupling of piezoelectric materials is considered.According to the theory of matrix eigenvalues, the frequency bands in periodic structures are studied. Moreover, by introducing disorder in both the dimensionless length and elastic constants of the piezoelectric ceramics, the wave localization in disordered periodic structures is also studied by using the matrix eigenvalue method and Lyapunov exponent method. It is found that tuned periodic structures have the frequency passbands and stopbands and localization phenomenon can occur in mistuned periodic structures. Furthermore, owing to the effect of piezoelectricity, the frequency regions for waves that cannot propagate through the structures are slightly increased with the increase of the piezoelectric constant.

  9. Modulated envelope localized wavepackets associated with electrostatic plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kourakis, I; Kourakis, Ioannis; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinear amplitude modulation of known electrostatic plasma modes is examined in a generic manner, by applying a collisionless fluid model. Both cold (zero-temperature) and warm fluid descriptions are discussed and the results are compared. The moderately nonlinear oscillation regime is investigated by applying a multiple scale technique. The calculation leads to a Nonlinear Schrodinger-type Equation (NLSE), which describes the evolution of the slowly varying wave amplitude in time and space. The NLSE admits localized envelope (solitary wave) solutions of bright- (pulses) or dark- (holes, voids) type, whose characteristics (maximum amplitude, width) depend on intrinsic plasma parameters. Effects like amplitude perturbation obliqueness, finite temperature and defect (dust) concetration are explicitly considered. The relevance with similar highly localized modulated wave structures observed during recent satellite missions is discussed.

  10. Slow waves in locally resonant metamaterials line defect waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Kaina, Nadège; Bourlier, Yoan; Fink, Mathias; Berthelot, Thomas; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-01-01

    The ability of electromagnetic waves to interact with matter governs many fascinating effects involved in fundamental and applied, quantum and classical physics. It is necessary to enhance these otherwise naturally weak effects by increasing the probability of wave/matter interactions, either through field confinement or slowing down of waves. This is commonly achieved with structured materials such as photonic crystal waveguides or coupled resonator optical waveguides. Yet their minimum structural scale is limited to the order of the wavelength which not only forbids ultra-small confinement but also severely limits their performance for slowing down waves. Here we show that line defect waveguides in locally resonant metamaterials can outperform these proposals due to their deep subwavelength scale. We experimentally demonstrate our approach in the microwave domain using 3D printed resonant wire metamaterials, achieving group indices ng as high as 227 over relatively wide frequency bands. Those results corres...

  11. Field signature for apparently superluminal particle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Martin

    2015-05-01

    In the context of Stueckelberg's covariant symplectic mechanics, Horwitz and Aharonovich [1] have proposed a simple mechanism by which a particle traveling below light speed almost everywhere may exhibit a transit time that suggests superluminal motion. This mechanism, which requires precise measurement of the particle velocity, involves a subtle perturbation affecting the particle's recorded time coordinate caused by virtual pair processes. The Stueckelberg framework is particularly well suited to such problems, because it permits pair creation/annihilation at the classical level. In this paper, we study a trajectory of the type proposed by Horwitz and Aharonovich, and derive the Maxwell 4-vector potential associated with the motion. We show that the resulting fields carry a signature associated with the apparent superluminal motion, providing an independent test for the mechanism that does not require direct observation of the trajectory, except at the detector.

  12. Field signature for apparently superluminal particle motion

    CERN Document Server

    Land, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In the context of Stueckelberg's covariant symplectic mechanics, Horwitz and Aharonovich have proposed a simple mechanism by which a particle traveling below light speed almost everywhere may exhibit a transit time that suggests superluminal motion. This mechanism, which requires precise measurement of the particle velocity, involves a subtle perturbation affecting the particle's recorded time coordinate caused by virtual pair processes. The Stueckelberg framework is particularly well suited to such problems, because it permits pair creation/annihilation at the classical level. In this paper, we study a trajectory of the type proposed by Horwitz and Aharonovich, and derive the Maxwell 4-vector potential associated with the motion. We show that the resulting fields carry a signature associated with the apparent superluminal motion, providing an independent test for the mechanism that does not require direct observation of the trajectory, except at the detector.

  13. On the Lorentz factor of superluminal sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chika Christian Onuchukwu; Augustine A.Ubachukwu

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the properties of features seen within superluminal sources often referred to as components.Our result indicates a fairly strong correlation of r ~ 0.5 for quasars,r ~ 0.4 for galaxies and r ~ 0.7 for BL Lac objects in our sample between component sizes and distances from the stationary core.The assumption of free adiabatic expanding plasma enables us to constrain the Lorentz factor for superluminal sources.Our estimated Lorentz factor of γ ~ 9-13 for quasars,γ ~ 7-11for galaxies and γ ~ 4-9 for BL Lac objects indicates that BL Lacs have the lowest range of Lorentz factors.

  14. Ultrasonic wave-based defect localization using probabilistic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, M. D.; Flynn, E. B.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Croxford, A. J.; Kessler, S.

    2012-05-01

    This work presents a new approach rooted in maximum likelihood estimation for defect localization in sparse array guided wave ultrasonic interrogation applications. The approach constructs a minimally-informed statistical model of the guided wave process, where unknown or uncertain model parameters are assigned non-informative Bayesian prior distributions and integrated out of the a posteriori probability calculation. The premise of this localization approach is straightforward: the most likely defect location is the point on the structure with the maximum a posteriori probability of actually being the location of damage (i.e., the most probable location given a set of sensor measurements). The proposed approach is tested on a complex stiffened panel against other common localization approaches and found to have superior performance in all cases.

  15. Localized modulated wave solutions in diffusive glucose–insulin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mvogo, Alain, E-mail: mvogal_2009@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Biophysics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, University of Yaounde (Cameroon); Centre d' Excellence Africain en Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication, University of Yaounde I (Cameroon); Tambue, Antoine [The African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) and Stellenbosch University, 6-8 Melrose Road, Muizenberg 7945 (South Africa); Center for Research in Computational and Applied Mechanics (CERECAM), and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, 7701 Rondebosch (South Africa); Ben-Bolie, Germain H. [Centre d' Excellence Africain en Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication, University of Yaounde I (Cameroon); Laboratory of Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, University of Yaounde (Cameroon); Kofané, Timoléon C. [Centre d' Excellence Africain en Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication, University of Yaounde I (Cameroon); Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, P.O. Box 812, University of Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2016-06-03

    We investigate intercellular insulin dynamics in an array of diffusively coupled pancreatic islet β-cells. The cells are connected via gap junction coupling, where nearest neighbor interactions are included. Through the multiple scale expansion in the semi-discrete approximation, we show that the insulin dynamics can be governed by the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation. The localized solutions of this equation are reported. The results suggest from the biophysical point of view that the insulin propagates in pancreatic islet β-cells using both temporal and spatial dimensions in the form of localized modulated waves. - Highlights: • The dynamics of an array of diffusively coupled pancreatic islet beta-cells is investigated. • Through the multiple scale expansion, we show that the insulin dynamics can be governed by the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation. • Localized modulated waves are obtained for the insulin dynamics.

  16. On the propagation of truncated localized waves in dispersive silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica and free space are numerically analyzed. It is shown that those characteristics are affected by the changes in the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector. Numerical experiments demonstrate that as the non-linearity of this relation gets stronger, the pulses propagating in silica become more immune to decay and distortion whereas the pulses propagating in free-space suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  17. Effect of Local Temperature on the Detecting for Pulse Wave of Local Blood Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available [Objective] Temperature of a subject's external body parts is an interference condition in pulse wave of local blood volume measurement. It is necessary to rule it out. By changing the influence factors, an experiment to research the effect of temperature of subjected part in pulse wave of local blood volume measurement was carried out. [Methods] When the 32 experimenters' left middle finger temperature fall below to 20°C, pulse wave of local blood volume would be recorded detected in real-time until the temperature returned to the measured values before the experiment [Results] While the temperature of subjected part ranged from 26°C to 31°C, the parameters of K', K1', K2' and the amplitude of pulse wave remain basically unchanged. [Conclusion] As a result of the research data, it is stipulated that the pulse wave of local blood volume can be measured only if the finger temperature is in the range of 26-31°C.

  18. Resolving 7 problems with OPERA's superluminal neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Physicists have raised many troubling inconsistencies with the OPERA claim of superluminal neutrinos that cast doubt on its validity. This paper examines ways that 7 of these inconsistencies can be resolved. It also discusses evidence that the electron neutrino is superluminal, based on previously published cosmic ray observations, and secondarily a re-examination of tritium beta decay data.

  19. On the Superluminal Motion of Radio-Loud AGNs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhi-Bin Zhang; Yi-Zhen Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Apparent superluminal motion of different radio-loud AGNs are similarly related with beaming effect. The cosmological expanding effect would play no part in the superluminal motion of radio galaxies, BL Lacertae objects as well as quasars.Meanwhile, we confirm that estimates for apparent velocity app and Doppler boosting factor based on multi-wavelength combination and variability are comparable.

  20. LOCAL STABILITY OF TRAVELLING FRONTS FOR A DAMPED WAVE EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao LUO

    2013-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the long-time behaviour of the travelling fronts of the damped wave equation αutt +ut =uxx-V'(u) on R.The long-time asymptotics of the solutions of this equation are quite similar to those of the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation ut =uxx-V'(u).Whereas a lot is known about the local stability of travelling fronts in parabolic systems,for the hyperbolic equations it is only briefly discussed when the potential V is of bistable type.However,for the combustion or monostable type of V,the problem is much more complicated.In this paper,a local stability result for travelling fronts of this equation with combustion type of nonlinearity is established.And then,the result is extended to the damped wave equation with a case of monostable pushed front.

  1. Localized light waves: Paraxial and exact solutions of the wave equation (a review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, A. P.

    2007-04-01

    Simple explicit localized solutions are systematized over the whole space of a linear wave equation, which models the propagation of optical radiation in a linear approximation. Much attention has been paid to exact solutions (which date back to the Bateman findings) that describe wave beams (including Bessel-Gauss beams) and wave packets with a Gaussian localization with respect to the spatial variables and time. Their asymptotics with respect to free parameters and at large distances are presented. A similarity between these exact solutions and harmonic in time fields obtained in the paraxial approximation based on the Leontovich-Fock parabolic equation has been studied. Higher-order modes are considered systematically using the separation of variables method. The application of the Bateman solutions of the wave equation to the construction of solutions to equations with dispersion and nonlinearity and their use in wavelet analysis, as well as the summation of Gaussian beams, are discussed. In addition, solutions localized at infinity known as the Moses-Prosser “acoustic bullets”, as well as their harmonic in time counterparts, “ X waves”, waves from complex sources, etc., have been considered. Everywhere possible, the most elementary mathematical formalism is used.

  2. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-01

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

  3. High-resolution seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-13

    High-resolution seismic wave simulations often require local refinements in numerical meshes to accurately capture e.g. steep topography or complex fault geometry. Together with explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time step size for ground-motion simulations due to numerical stability conditions. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time stepping scheme to adapt the time step to the element size, allowing nearoptimal time steps everywhere in the mesh. This can potentially lead to significantly faster simulation runtimes.

  4. Wave Localization and Density Bunching in Pair Ion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Swadesh M

    2008-01-01

    By investigating the nonlinear propagation of high intensity electromagnetic (EM) waves in a pair ion plasma, whose symmetry is broken via contamination by a small fraction of high mass immobile ions, it is shown that this new and interesting state of (laboratory created) matter is capable of supporting structures that strongly localize and bunch the EM radiation with density excess in the region of localization. Testing of this prediction in controlled laboratory experiments can lend credence, inter alia, to conjectures on structure formation (via the same mechanism) in the MEV era of the early universe.

  5. Localized modulated wave solutions in diffusive glucose-insulin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvogo, Alain; Tambue, Antoine; Ben-Bolie, Germain H.; Kofané, Timoléon C.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate intercellular insulin dynamics in an array of diffusively coupled pancreatic islet β-cells. The cells are connected via gap junction coupling, where nearest neighbor interactions are included. Through the multiple scale expansion in the semi-discrete approximation, we show that the insulin dynamics can be governed by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. The localized solutions of this equation are reported. The results suggest from the biophysical point of view that the insulin propagates in pancreatic islet β-cells using both temporal and spatial dimensions in the form of localized modulated waves.

  6. Superluminality in the Bi- and Multi-Galileon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fromont, Paul; de Rham, Claudia; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Matas, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    We re-explore the Bi- and Multi-Galileon models with trivial asymptotic conditions at infinity and show that propagation of superluminal fluctuations is a common and unavoidable feature of these theories, unlike previously claimed in the literature. We show that all Multi-Galileon theories containing a Cubic Galileon term exhibit superluminalities at large distances from a point source, and that even if the Cubic Galileon is not present one can always find sensible matter distributions in which there are superluminal modes at large distances. In the Bi-Galileon case we explicitly show that there are always superluminal modes around a point source even if the Cubic Galileon is not present. Finally, we briefly comment on the possibility of avoiding superluminalities by modifying the asymptotic conditions at infinity.

  7. Has superluminal light propagation been observed?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhong

    2000-01-01

    It says in the report$^1$ by Wang et al. that a negative group velocity $u=-c/310$ is obtained and that a pulse advancement shift 62-ns is measured. The authors claim that the negative group velocity is associated with superluminal light propagation and that the pulse advancement is not at odds with causality or special relativity. However, it is shown here that their conclusions above are not true. Furthermore, I give some suggestion concerning a re-definition of group-velocity and a new exp...

  8. Rapid and reliable sky localization of gravitational wave sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    The first detection of gravitational waves by LIGO from the merger of two compact objects has sparked new interest in detecting electromagnetic counterparts to these violent events. For mergers involving neutron stars, it is thought that prompt high-energy emission in gamma rays and x-rays will be followed days to weeks later by an afterglow in visible light, infrared and radio. Rapid sky localization using the data from a network of gravitational wave detectors is essential to maximize the chances of making a joint detection. Here I describe a new technique that is able to produce accurate, fully Bayesian sky maps in seconds or less. The technique can be applied to spin-precessing compact binaries, and can take into account detector calibration and spectral estimation uncertainties.

  9. Launching transverse-electric Localized Waves from a circular waveguide

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Axially symmetric transverse electric (TE) modes of a circular waveguide section are used to synthesize the vector TE Localized Wave (LW) field at the open end of the waveguide section. The necessary excitation coefficients of these modes are obtained by the method of matching, taking advantage of the modal power orthogonality relations. The necessary excitation of modes provided by a number of coaxial loop antennas inserted inside the waveguide section. The antennas currents are computed from the solution of the waveguide excitation inverse problem. The accuracy of the synthesized wave field (compared to the mathematical model) and the power efficiency of the generation technique are evaluated in order to practically realize a launcher for LWs in the microwave regime. © 2011 IEEE.

  10. Localized travelling waves in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schneider, Tobias M

    2016-01-01

    We present two spanwise-localized travelling wave solutions in the asymptotic suction boundary layer, obtained by continuation of solutions of plane Couette flow. One of the solutions has the vortical structures located close to the wall, similar to spanwise-localized edge states previously found for this system. The vortical structures of the second solution are located in the free stream far above the laminar boundary layer and are supported by a secondary shear gradient that is created by a large-scale low-speed streak. The dynamically relevant eigenmodes of this solution are concentrated in the free stream, and the departure into turbulence from this solution evolves in the free stream towards the walls. For invariant solutions in free-stream turbulence, this solution thus shows that that the source of energy of the vortical structures can be a dynamical structure of the solution itself, instead of the laminar boundary layer.

  11. Convection in Binary Fluid Mixtures; 2, Localized Traveling Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Barten, W; Kamps, M; Schmitz, R

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear, spatially localized structures of traveling convection rolls are investigated in quantitative detail as a function of Rayleigh number for two different Soret coupling strengths (separation ratios) with Lewis and Prandtl numbers characterizing ethanol-water mixtures. A finite-difference method was used to solve the full hydrodynamic field equations numerically. Structure and dynamics of these localized traveling waves (LTW) are dominated by the concentration field. Like in the spatially extended convective states ( cf. accompanying paper), the Soret-induced concentration variations strongly influence, via density changes, the buoyancy forces that drive convection. The spatio-temporal properties of this feed-back mechanism, involving boundary layers and concentration plumes, show that LTW's are strongly nonlinear states. Light intensity distributions are determined that can be observed in side-view shadowgraphs. Detailed analyses of all fields are made using colour-coded isoplots, among others. In th...

  12. Numerical turbulence forced through localized random expansion waves

    CERN Document Server

    Mee, A J; Mee, Antony J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2006-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the outer scale of turbulence driven by localized sources, such as supernova explosions in the interstellar medium, we consider a forcing function given by the gradient of gaussian profiles localized at random positions. Different coherence times of the forcing function are considered. In order to isolate the effects specific to the nature of the forcing function we consider the case of an isothermal equation of state and restrict ourselves to forcing amplitudes such that the flow remains subsonic. When the coherence time is short, the outer scale agrees with the scale of the gaussian. Longer coherence times can cause extra power at large scales, but this would not yield power law behavior at scales larger than that of the expansion waves. At scales smaller than the scale of the expansion waves the spectrum is close to power law with a spectral exponent of -2. The resulting flow is virtually free of vorticity. Viscous driving of vorticity turns out to be weak and self-amplification ...

  13. Enhanced Sensitivity in a Superluminal Single Mode DPAL Cavity at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Salloum, Tony; Yablon, Joshua; Tseng, Shih; Shahriar, Selim

    2012-06-01

    The note beat between two counter-propagating beams in a cavity is used to measure the effective change of the length of the cavity or interferometer for applications such as optical gyroscopes, vibrometers, and gravitational wave detectors. We show in this talk how a superluminal single mode laser cavity can enhance the measured note beat dramatically. We consider the inhomogeneous broadening case and study the dependence of the enhancement factor on few key parameters. We also show how Diode Pump Alkali Lasers (DPAL) are excellent candidates for such devices. Using a Rubidium based DPAL, we study the characteristics of these lasers and their effect on the proposed enhanced sensitivity.

  14. Superluminal Energy Transmission in the Goos-Hanchen Shift of Total Reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z Y

    2011-01-01

    This paper is to give a counter example for the theory of relativity. Firstly, the dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves is corresponding to that of a tachyon where the coefficient of proportionality is the squared Planck constant. Then we prove the energy flow velocity S/w of the Goos-Hanchen shift in vacuum is cn.sinI>c as well according to electrodynamics. These two different ways lead to a same conclusion that energy transport in the Goos-Hanchen effect of total reflection is faster than light. It is also helpful to study the tachyon of particle physics and superluminal motion observed in astronomy,etc.

  15. Diffraction effects in microwave propagation at the origin of superluminal behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Ricci, A.M. [Istituto per le Telecomunicazioni e l' Elettronica della Marina Militare ' Giancarlo Vallauri' (Mariteleradar), Viale Italia 72, 57100 Livorno (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: rocco.ruggeri@isc.cnr.it; Agresti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)

    2008-10-27

    Superluminal behaviors, as evidenced by the presence of forerunners, in advanced position with respect to the main luminal peak, have been revealed in microwave propagation experiments by using a radar technique. The results are interpreted on the basis of (fast) complex waves, usually considered only in the near-field region, but still surviving beyond this limit. Consideration of further diffraction effects, as due to geometrical limitations of the experimental set-up, allows for the obtainment of a plausible description of the results.

  16. On the local plane wave methods for in situ measurement of acoustic absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnant, Y.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address a series of so-called local plane wave methods (LPW) to measure acoustic absorption. As opposed to other methods, these methods do not rely on assumptions of the global sound field, like e.g. a plane wave or diffuse field, but are based on a local plane wave assumption. Ther

  17. On Superluminal Particles and the Extended Relativity Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Superluminal particles are studied within the framework of the Extended Relativity theory in Clifford spaces ( C-spaces). In the simplest scenario, it is found that it is the contribution of the Clifford scalar component π of the poly-vector-valued momentum which is responsible for the superluminal behavior in ordinary spacetime due to the fact that the effective mass {M} = sqrt{ M2 - π2 } is imaginary (tachyonic). However, from the point of view of C-space, there is no superluminal (tachyonic) behavior because the true physical mass still obeys M 2>0. Therefore, there are no violations of the Clifford-extended Lorentz invariance and the extended Relativity principle in C-spaces. It is also explained why the charged muons (leptons) are subluminal while its chargeless neutrinos may admit superluminal propagation. A Born's Reciprocal Relativity theory in Phase Spaces leads to modified dispersion relations involving both coordinates and momenta, and whose truncations furnish Lorentz-violating dispersion relations which appear in Finsler Geometry, rainbow-metrics models and Double (deformed) Special Relativity. These models also admit superluminal particles. A numerical analysis based on the recent OPERA experimental findings on alleged superluminal muon neutrinos is made. For the average muon neutrino energy of 17 GeV, we find a value for the magnitude |{M } | = 119.7 MeV that, coincidentally, is close to the mass of the muon m μ =105.7 MeV.

  18. Propagation and localization of acoustic waves in Fibonacci phononic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aynaou, H [Laboratoire de Dynamique et d' Optique des Materiaux, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohamed Premier, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Boudouti, E H El [Laboratoire de Dynamique et d' Optique des Materiaux, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohamed Premier, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Djafari-Rouhani, B [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, UFR de Physique, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Akjouj, A [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, UFR de Physique, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Velasco, V R [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-13

    A theoretical investigation is made of acoustic wave propagation in one-dimensional phononic bandgap structures made of slender tube loops pasted together with slender tubes of finite length according to a Fibonacci sequence. The band structure and transmission spectrum is studied for two particular cases. (i) Symmetric loop structures, which are shown to be equivalent to diameter-modulated slender tubes. In this case, it is found that besides the existence of extended and forbidden modes, some narrow frequency bands appear in the transmission spectra inside the gaps as defect modes. The spatial localization of the modes lying in the middle of the bands and at their edges is examined by means of the local density of states. The dependence of the bandgap structure on the slender tube diameters is presented. An analysis of the transmission phase time enables us to derive the group velocity as well as the density of states in these structures. In particular, the stop bands (localized modes) may give rise to unusual (strong normal) dispersion in the gaps, yielding fast (slow) group velocities above (below) the speed of sound. (ii) Asymmetric tube loop structures, where the loops play the role of resonators that may introduce transmission zeros and hence new gaps unnoticed in the case of simple diameter-modulated slender tubes. The Fibonacci scaling property has been checked for both cases (i) and (ii), and it holds for a periodicity of three or six depending on the nature of the substrates surrounding the structure.

  19. Propagation and localization of acoustic waves in Fibonacci phononic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aynaou, H.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Akjouj, A.; Velasco, V. R.

    2005-07-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of acoustic wave propagation in one-dimensional phononic bandgap structures made of slender tube loops pasted together with slender tubes of finite length according to a Fibonacci sequence. The band structure and transmission spectrum is studied for two particular cases. (i) Symmetric loop structures, which are shown to be equivalent to diameter-modulated slender tubes. In this case, it is found that besides the existence of extended and forbidden modes, some narrow frequency bands appear in the transmission spectra inside the gaps as defect modes. The spatial localization of the modes lying in the middle of the bands and at their edges is examined by means of the local density of states. The dependence of the bandgap structure on the slender tube diameters is presented. An analysis of the transmission phase time enables us to derive the group velocity as well as the density of states in these structures. In particular, the stop bands (localized modes) may give rise to unusual (strong normal) dispersion in the gaps, yielding fast (slow) group velocities above (below) the speed of sound. (ii) Asymmetric tube loop structures, where the loops play the role of resonators that may introduce transmission zeros and hence new gaps unnoticed in the case of simple diameter-modulated slender tubes. The Fibonacci scaling property has been checked for both cases (i) and (ii), and it holds for a periodicity of three or six depending on the nature of the substrates surrounding the structure.

  20. Gravitational Waves in Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS Class II Cosmologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bradley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we consider perturbations of homogeneous and hypersurface orthogonal cosmological backgrounds with local rotational symmetry (LRS, using a method based on the 1 + 1 + 2 covariant split of spacetime. The backgrounds, of LRS class II, are characterised by that the vorticity, the twist of the 2-sheets, and the magnetic part of the Weyl tensor all vanish. They include the flat Friedmann universe as a special case. The matter contents of the perturbed spacetimes are given by vorticity-free perfect fluids, but otherwise the perturbations are arbitrary and describe gravitational, shear, and density waves. All the perturbation variables can be given in terms of the time evolution of a set of six harmonic coefficients. This set decouples into one set of four coefficients with the density perturbations acting as source terms, and another set of two coefficients describing damped source-free gravitational waves with odd parity. We also consider the flat Friedmann universe, which has been considered by several others using the 1 + 3 covariant split, as a check of the isotropic limit. In agreement with earlier results we find a second-order wavelike equation for the magnetic part of the Weyl tensor which decouples from the density gradient for the flat Friedmann universes. Assuming vanishing vector perturbations, including the density gradient, we find a similar equation for the electric part of the Weyl tensor, which was previously unnoticed.

  1. Suppression of spiral waves using intermittent local electric shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jun; Ying He-Ping; Li Yan-Long

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an intermittent local electric shock scheme is proposed to suppress stable spiral waves in the Barkley model by a weak electric shock (about 0.4 to 0.7) imposed on a random selected n × n grids (n = 1-5, compared with the original 256×256 lattice) and monitored synchronically the evolutions of the activator on the grids as the sampled signal of the activator steps out a given threshold (i.e., the electric shock works on the n × n grids if the activator u (≤) 0.4 or u (≥) 0.8). The numerical simulations show that a breakup of spiral is observed in the media state evolution to finally obtain homogeneous states if the electric shock with appropriate intensity is imposed.

  2. Elimination of Anti-spiral Waves by Local Inhomogeneity in Oscillatory Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-cheng Liu; Xiao-fei Wang

    2008-01-01

    Anti-spiral waves are controlled in an oscillatory system by using a local inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity acts as a wave source, and gives rise to the propagating plane waves. It is found that there is a critical pacemaking domain size below which no wave will be created at all. Two types of ordered waves (target waves and traveling waves) are created depending on the geometry of the local inhomogeneity. The competition between the anti-spiral waves and the ordered waves is discussed. Two different competition mechanisma were observed, which are related to the ordered waves obtained from different local inhomogeneities. It is found that traveling waves with either lower frequency or higher frequency can both eliminate the anti-spiral waves, while only the target waves with lower absolute value of frequency can eliminate the anti-spiral waves. This method also applies to outwardly rotating spiral waves.The control mechanism is intuitively explained and the control method is easily operative.

  3. Nonlocal Quantum Information Transfer Without Superluminal Signalling and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walleczek, Jan; Grössing, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    It is a frequent assumption that—via superluminal information transfers—superluminal signals capable of enabling communication are necessarily exchanged in any quantum theory that posits hidden superluminal influences. However, does the presence of hidden superluminal influences automatically imply superluminal signalling and communication? The non-signalling theorem mediates the apparent conflict between quantum mechanics and the theory of special relativity. However, as a `no-go' theorem there exist two opposing interpretations of the non-signalling constraint: foundational and operational. Concerning Bell's theorem, we argue that Bell employed both interpretations, and that he finally adopted the operational position which is associated often with ontological quantum theory, e.g., de Broglie-Bohm theory. This position we refer to as "effective non-signalling". By contrast, associated with orthodox quantum mechanics is the foundational position referred to here as "axiomatic non-signalling". In search of a decisive communication-theoretic criterion for differentiating between "axiomatic" and "effective" non-signalling, we employ the operational framework offered by Shannon's mathematical theory of communication, whereby we distinguish between Shannon signals and non-Shannon signals. We find that an effective non-signalling theorem represents two sub-theorems: (1) Non-transfer-control (NTC) theorem, and (2) Non-signification-control (NSC) theorem. Employing NTC and NSC theorems, we report that effective, instead of axiomatic, non-signalling is entirely sufficient for prohibiting nonlocal communication. Effective non-signalling prevents the instantaneous, i.e., superluminal, transfer of message-encoded information through the controlled use—by a sender-receiver pair —of informationally-correlated detection events, e.g., in EPR-type experiments. An effective non-signalling theorem allows for nonlocal quantum information transfer yet—at the same time

  4. Super-luminous supernovae: 56Ni power versus magnetar radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, Luc; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli; Blondin, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Much uncertainty surrounds the origin of super-luminous supernovae (SNe). Motivated by the discovery of the Type Ic SN2007bi, we study its proposed association with a pair-instability SN (PISN). We compute stellar-evolution models for primordial ~200Msun stars, simulating the implosion/explosion due to the pair-production instability, and use them as inputs for detailed non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations that include non-local energy deposition and non-thermal processes. We retrieve the basic morphology of PISN light curves from red-supergiant, blue-supergiant, and Wolf-Rayet (WR) star progenitors. Although we confirm that a progenitor 100Msun helium core (PISN model He100) fits well the SN2007bi light curve, the low ratios of its kinetic energy and 56Ni mass to the ejecta mass, similar to standard core-collapse SNe, conspire to produce cool photospheres, red spectra subject to strong line blanketing, and narrow line profiles, all conflicting with SN2007bi observations. He-core models of in...

  5. Dynamic aspects of apparent attenuation and wave localization in layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M.M.; Van Wijk, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present a theory for multiply-scattered waves in layered media which takes into account wave interference. The inclusion of interference in the theory leads to a new description of the phenomenon of wave localization and its impact on the apparent attenuation of seismic waves. We use the theory to estimate the localization length at a CO2 sequestration site in New Mexico at sonic frequencies (2 kHz) by performing numerical simulations with a model taken from well logs. Near this frequency, we find a localization length of roughly 180 m, leading to a localization-induced quality factor Q of 360.

  6. Discussions of the Quantum Superluminality%论量子超光速性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志洵

    2012-01-01

    A.Einstein held an opposite attitude towards Quantum Mechanics(QM),which first appeared in 1926 and reached the top in 1935 when he,together with B.Podolsky,N.Rosen published the EPR thesis and it promotes science development in an opposite side.The EPR thesis is based on Special Relativity(SR).Both SR and EPR deny the possibility of faster-than-light.But QM allows the existence of faster-than-light,agreeing to non-locality of QM is the premise of researching in faster-than light.In 1965,during the interview John Bell confided that his unequality was the outcome of EPR thinking,which denied ultra-space effect under EPR thesis,conditions resulted in quite peculiar correlations that QM predicted.The results of Aspect’s experiments were within expectation that QM has never been wrong now and will not in the future despite of strict requirements.Undoubtedly,the experiments proved that Einstein’s ideas didn’t hold water.In Bell’s opinion,to get rid of the difficulties after the announcement of the Aspect’s experiments,it intends to go back to Lorentz and Poincarè,and assume that ether existed as a referential system in which matters went faster than light.Bell repeatedly pointed out that be wanted to go back to ether because EPR had predicted there was something faster than light in the background.…… Since 1992,it is reported that there have been many successful faster than light experiments.Some of them are based on quantum tunneling effect;some are based on classic physical phenomena such as evanescent waves,anomalous dispersion.And in 2008,D.Salart et.al.performed a experiment using entangled photons between two villages separated by 18km.In conclusion,the speed of the influence of quantum entanglement would have to exceed than of light by at least four orders of magnitude,i.e.10 4 c ~ 10 7 c.Anyway,this experiment was the summation of discussions about the EPR thesis for a long time.For the past 25 years Quantum Superluminality was one subject of my

  7. Travelling waves and fold localization in hovercraft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Andrew; Zalek, Steve; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steve

    2013-11-01

    The seal system on hovercraft consists of a series of open-ended fabric cylinders that contact the free surface and, when inflated, form a compliant pressure barrier. Due to a shortening constraint imposed by neighboring seals, bow seals operate in a post-buckled state. We present results from large-scale experiments on these structures. These experiment show the hydroelastic response of seals to be characterized by striking stable and unstable post-buckling behavior. Using detailed 3-d measurements of the deformed seal shape, dominant response regimes are identified. These indicate that mode number decreases with wetted length, and that the form of the buckling packet becomes localized with increased velocity and decreased bending stiffness. Eventually, at a critical pressure, travelling waves emerge. To interpret the wide range of observed behavior, a 2-d nonlinear post-buckling model is developed and compared with the experimental studies. The model shows the importance of seal shortening and the buckling length, which is driven by the balance of hydrodynamic and bending energies. Preliminary scaling laws for the fold amplitude and mode number are presented. The experiments may ultimately provide insight into the bedeviling problem of seal wear. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under grant N00014-10-1-0302, Ms. Kelly B. Cooper, program manager.

  8. Superluminal Motion and Polarization in Blazars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yong-Jiu Wang; Jiang-He Yang; Cheng-Yue Su

    2004-01-01

    A relativistic beaming model has been successfully used to explain the observed properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In this model there are two emission components, a boosted one and an unbeamed one, shown up in the radio band as the core and lobe components. The luminosity ratio of the core to the lobe is defined as the core-dominance parameter (R = LCore/LLobe) The de-beamed radio luminosity (Ldbjet) in the jet is assumed to be proportional to the unbeamed luminosity (Lub) in the co-moving frame, i.e., f = Ldbjet/Lub and f is determined in our previous paper. We further discuss the relationship between BL Lacertae objects(BLs) and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), which are subclasses of blazars with different degrees of polarization, using the calculated values of the ratio f for a sample of superluminal blazars. We found 1) that the BLs show smaller averaged Doppler factors and Lorentz factors, larger viewing angles and higher coredominance parameters than do the FSRQs, and 2) that in the polarization-core dominance parameter plot (P - log R) the BLs and FSRQs occupy a scattered region, but in a revised plot (logP/c(m) - logR), they gather around two different lines, suggesting that they have some different intrinsic properties.

  9. Super-luminous supernovae from PESSTO

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholl, M; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; Chen, T -W; Kotak, R; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; McCrum, M; Margheim, S; Rest, A; Benetti, S; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Smith, K W; Sullivan, M; Young, D R; Baltay, C; Hadjiyska, E; McKinnon, R; Rabinowitz, D; Walker, E S; Feindt, U; Nugent, P; Lawrence, A; Mead, A; Anderson, J P; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Leloudas, G; Mattila, S; Elias-Rosa, N

    2014-01-01

    We present optical spectra and light curves for three hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae followed by the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO). Time series spectroscopy from a few days after maximum light to 100 days later shows them to be fairly typical of this class, with spectra dominated by Ca II, Mg II, Fe II and Si II, which evolve slowly over most of the post-peak photospheric phase. We determine bolometric light curves and apply simple fitting tools, based on the diffusion of energy input by magnetar spin-down, \\Ni decay, and collision of the ejecta with an opaque circumstellar shell. We investigate how the heterogeneous light curves of our sample (combined with others from the literature) can help to constrain the possible mechanisms behind these events. We have followed these events to beyond 100-200 days after peak, to disentangle host galaxy light from fading supernova flux and to differentiate between the models, which predict diverse behaviour at this phase. Models p...

  10. Superluminous Supernovae: No Threat from Eta Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Melott, A. L.; Fields, B. D.; Anthony-Twarog, B. J.

    2008-05-01

    Recently Supernova 2006gy was noted as the most luminous ever recorded, with a total radiated energy of 1044 Joules. It was proposed that the progenitor may have been a massive evolved star similar to η Carinae, which resides in our own galaxy at a distance of about 2.3 kpc. η Carinae appears ready to detonate. Although it is too distant to pose a serious threat as a normal supernova, and given its rotation axis is unlikely to produce a Gamma-Ray Burst oriented toward the Earth, η Carinae is about 30,000 times nearer than 2006gy, and we re-evaluate it as a potential superluminous supernova. We find that given the large ratio of emission in the optical to the X-ray, atmospheric effects are negligible. Ionization of the atmosphere and concomitant ozone depletion are unlikely to be important. Any cosmic ray effects should be spread out over 104 y, and similarly unlikely to produce any serious perturbation to the biosphere. We also discuss a new possible effect of supernovae, endocrine disruption induced by blue light near the peak of the optical spectrum. This is a possibility for nearby supernovae at distances too large to be considered "dangerous” for other reasons. However, due to reddening and extinction by the interstellar medium, η Carinae is unlikely to trigger such effects to any significant degree.

  11. Superluminous supernovae: No threat from Eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C; Fields, Brian D; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J

    2007-01-01

    Recently Supernova 2006gy was noted as the most luminous ever recorded, with a total radiated energy of ~10^44 Joules. It was proposed that the progenitor may have been a massive evolved star similar to Eta Carinae, which resides in our own galaxy at a (poorly determined) distance of ~2.5 kpc. Eta Carinae appears ready to detonate, and in fact had an outburst in 1843. Although it is too distant to pose a serious threat as a normal supernova, and given its rotation axis is unlikely to produce a Gamma Ray Burst oriented toward the Earth, Eta Carinae is about 30,000 times nearer than 2006gy, and we re-evaluate it as a potential superluminous supernova. We find that given the large ratio of emission in the optical to the X-ray, atmospheric effects are negligible. Ionization of the atmosphere and concomitant ozone depletion are unlikely to be important. Any cosmic ray effects should be spread out over ~10^4 y, and similarly unlikely to produce any serious perturbation to the biosphere. We also discuss a new possib...

  12. First stars, hypernovae, and superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Ken'Ichi

    2016-07-01

    After the big bang, production of heavy elements in the early universe takes place starting from the formation of the first (Pop III) stars, their evolution, and explosion. The Pop III supernova (SN) explosions have strong dynamical, thermal, and chemical feedback on the formation of subsequent stars and evolution of galaxies. However, the nature of Pop III stars/supernovae (SNe) have not been well-understood. The signature of nucleosynthesis yields of the first SN can be seen in the elemental abundance patterns observed in extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. We show that the abundance patterns of EMP stars, e.g. the excess of C, Co, Zn relative to Fe, are in better agreement with the yields of hyper-energetic explosions (Hypernovae, (HNe)) rather than normal supernovae. We note the large variation of the abundance patterns of EMP stars propose that such a variation is related to the diversity of the GRB-SNe and posssibly superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). For example, the carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars may be related to the faint SNe (or dark HNe), which could be the explosions induced by relativistic jets. Finally, we examine the various mechanisms of SLSNe.

  13. Tachyons, Lamb shifts and superluminal chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaschitz, R.

    2000-10-01

    An elementary account on the origins of cosmic chaos in an open and multiply connected universe is given; there is a finite region in the open 3-space in which the world-lines of galaxies are chaotic, and the mixing taking place in this chaotic nucleus of the universe provides a mechanism to create equidistribution. The galaxy background defines a distinguished frame of reference and a unique cosmic time order; in this context superluminal signal transfer is studied. Tachyons are described by a real Proca field with negative mass square, coupled to a current of subluminal matter. Estimates on tachyon mixing in the geometric optics limit are derived. The potential of a static point source in this field theory is a damped periodic function. We treat this tachyon potential as a perturbation of the Coulomb potential, and study its effects on energy levels in hydrogenic systems. By comparing the induced level shifts to high-precision Lamb shift measurements and QED calculations, we suggest a tachyon mass of 2.1 keV/c2 and estimate the tachyonic coupling strength to subluminal matter. The impact of the tachyon field on ground state hyperfine transitions in hydrogen and muonium is investigated. Bounds on atomic transition rates effected by tachyon radiation as well as estimates on the spectral energy density of a possible cosmic tachyon background radiation are derived.

  14. Extended Lorentz code of a superluminal particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Kazarian, G

    2012-01-01

    While the OPERA experimental scrutiny is ongoing in the community, in the present article we construct a toy model of {\\it extended Lorentz code} (ELC) of the uniform motion, which will be a well established consistent and unique theoretical framework to explain the apparent violations of the standard Lorentz code (SLC), the possible manifestations of which arise in a similar way in all particle sectors. We argue that in the ELC-framework the propagation of the superluminal particle, which implies the modified dispersion relation, could be consistent with causality. Furthermore, in this framework, we give a justification of forbiddance of Vavilov-Cherenkov (VC)-radiation/or analog processes in vacuum. To be consistent with the SN1987A and OPERA data, we identify the neutrinos from SN1987A and the light as so-called {\\it 1-th type} particles carrying the {\\it individual Lorentz motion code} with the velocity of light $c_{1}\\equiv c$ in vacuum as maximum attainable velocity for all the 1-th type particles. Ther...

  15. Multiple-resonance local wave functions for accurate excited states in quantum Monte Carlo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zulfikri, Habiburrahman; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel class of local multideterminant Jastrow–Slater wave functions for the efficient and accurate treatment of excited states in quantum Monte Carlo. The wave function is expanded as a linear combination of excitations built from multiple sets of localized orbitals that correspond to

  16. Application of local wave time-frequency method in reciprocating mechanical fault diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Wang Fengtao; Ma Xiaojiang

    2006-01-01

    To diagnose the reciprocating mechanical fault. We utilized local wave time-frequency approach. Firstly,we gave the principle. Secondly, the application of local wave time-frequency was given. Finally, we discussed its virtue in reciprocating mechanical fault diagnosis.

  17. How superluminal motion can lead to backward time travel

    CERN Document Server

    Nemiroff, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly asserted that superluminal particle motion can enable backward time travel, but little has been written providing details. It is shown here that the simplest example of a "closed loop" event -- a twin paradox scenario where a single spaceship both traveling out and returning back superluminally -- does {\\it not} result in that ship straightforwardly returning to its starting point before it left. However, a more complicated scenario -- one where the superluminal ship first arrives at an intermediate destination moving subluminally -- can result in backwards time travel. This intermediate step might seem physically inconsequential but is shown to break Lorentz-invariance and be oddly tied to the sudden creation of a pair of spacecraft, one of which remains and one of which annihilates with the original spacecraft.

  18. Universe of superluminal velocities: tests of astrophysics, from dogma-to reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechelnitsky, A.

    The Barrier of speed of light is the most chained and, perhaps, the most unreasonable Interdiction of the standard (astro) physics and cosmology. Its theoretical bases are speculative and unconvincing, and it actually has not been proved by observations from the very beginning of its promulgations. Moreover, it is gradually increase a stream of the observational data frankly contradicting to the Barrier. This monumental Dogma substantially holds down the initiative of researchers and development of sciences about the Universe. Resolving proofs of absence of the Barrier and real existence of superluminal velocities can come, most likely, from the side of observational astrophysics, when appear fair predictions, based on the alternative theory. Predictions and observational Tests, in particular, are those. The advanced astrophysical researches will lead to accumulation of the precision data and construction of histograms of the velocities observable in the Universe (in the centers of galaxies, AGN, blazàrs, BL Lac, etc), which will show: i) Distribution of the transversal (in a picture plane) superluminal velocities has distinct peaks near to the values specified by the alternative theory: (in G[ -6] Shell) β =v/c: 1.77; 1.48; 1.25; 1.05; 0.88; 0.74; 0.62; 0.52; 0.44; (G[ -7] Shell) β =v/c:: 6.48 ; 5.45; 4.58; 3.85; 3.24; 2.72; 2.29; 1.92; 1.62; (G[ -8] Shell) β =v/c: 23.79; 20.00; 16.82; 14.14; 11.89; 10.00; 8.41; 7.07; 5.95 ii) The same peaks are available (already now, - and it can be shown on the basis of the spectroscopic data) in distribution (histograms) of beam (radial) superluminal velocities (with the same multiplicator M = 2 = 1.1892). iii) The predicted property of discreteness, quantization of superluminal velocities (as well as subluminal) velocities is the exclusive pattern, essentially distinguishing alternative representations (Wave Universe Concept [Chechelnitsky 1980-2004]; see, in particular, the bibliography in Advances in Space Research, v

  19. Jet Stability and the Generation of Superluminal and Stationary Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Ivan; Gomez, Jose-Luis; Marti, Jose-Maria; Ibanez, Jose-Maria; Marscher, Alan P.; Alberdi, Antonio; Aloy, Miguel-Angel; Hardee, Philip E.

    2001-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation of the response of an expanding relativistic jet to the ejection of a superluminal component. The simulation has been performed with a relativistic time-dependent hydrodynamical code from which simulated radio maps are computed by integrating the transfer equations for synchrotron radiation. The interaction of the superluminal component with the underlying jet results in the formation of multiple conical shocks behind the main perturbation. These trailing components can be easily distinguished because they appear to be released from the primary superluminal component instead of being ejected from the core. Their oblique nature should also result in distinct polarization properties. Those appearing closer to the core show small apparent motions and a very slow secular decrease in brightness and could be identified as stationary components. Those appearing farther downstream are weaker and can reach superluminal apparent motions. The existence of these trailing components indicates that not all observed components necessarily represent major perturbations at the jet inlet; rather, multiple emission components can be generated by a single disturbance in the jet. While the superluminal component associated with the primary perturbation exhibits a rather stable pattern speed, trailing components have velocities that increase with distance from the core but move at less than the jet speed. The trailing components exhibit motion and structure consistent with the triggering of pinch modes by the superluminal component. The increase in velocity of the trailing components is an indirect consequence of the acceleration of the expanding fluid, which is assumed to be relativistically hot; if observed, such accelerations would therefore favor an electron-positron (as opposed to proton rest mass) dominated jet.

  20. Statistics of Superluminal Motion in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wei Zhang; Jun-Hui Fan

    2008-01-01

    We have collected an up-to-date sample of 123 superluminal sources (84 quasars, 27 BL Lac objects and 12 galaxies) and calculated the apparent velocities (βapp) for 224 components in the sources with the A-CDM model. We checked the relationships between their proper motions, redshifts,βapp and 5 GHz flux densities. Our analysis shows that the radio emission is strongly boosted by the Doppler effect. The superluminal motion and the relativistic beaming boosting effect are, to some extent, the same in active galactic nuclei.

  1. There is Neither Classical Bug with a Superluminal Shadow Nor Quantum Absolute Collapse Nor (Subquantum) Superluminal Hidden Variable

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, V; Krmar, M; Radovanovic, M; Pankovic, Vladan; Predojevic, Milan; Krmar, Miodrag; Radovanovic, Milan

    2005-01-01

    In this work we analyse critically Griffiths's example of the classical superluminal motion of a bug shadow. Griffiths considers that this example is conceptually very close to quantum nonlocality or superluminality,i.e. quantum breaking of the famous Bell inequality. Or, generally, he suggests implicitly an absolute asymmetric duality (subluminality vs. superluminality) principle in any fundamental physical theory.It, he hopes, can be used for a natural interpretation of the quantum mechanics too. But we explain that such Griffiths's interpretation retires implicitly but significantly from usual, Copenhagen interpretation of the standard quantum mechanical formalism. Within Copenhagen interpretation basic complementarity principle represents, in fact, a dynamical symmetry principle (including its spontaneous breaking, i.e. effective hiding by measurement). Similarly, in other fundamental physical theories instead of Griffiths's absolute asymmetric duality principle there is a dynamical symmetry (including it...

  2. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Inserra, C.; McCrum, M.; Kotak, R.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Chen, T.-W.; Smith, K.; Young, D. R.; Sim, S. A.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Tonry, J. L.; Huber, M. E.; Rest, A.; Pastorello, A.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Mattila, S.; Kankare, E.; Kangas, T.; Leloudas, G.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Narayan, G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Foley, R. J.; Lunnan, R.; Soderberg, A.; Sanders, N.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kirshner, R. P.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Botticella, M. T.; Gezari, S.; Urata, Y.; Rodney, S.; Riess, A. G.; Scolnic, D.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K.; Flewelling, H. A.; Magnier, E. A.; Kaiser, N.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, J.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Waters, C.

    2013-10-01

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 1044 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of `pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.

  3. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M; Smartt, S J; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T-W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-10-17

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10(44) ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of (56)Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to (56)Fe via (56)Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10(-6) times that of the core-collapse rate.

  4. Lamb wave band gaps in locally resonant phononic crystal strip waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yuanwei, E-mail: yaoyw@scut.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wu, Fugen [Experiment and Educational Center, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Xin [Department of Physics, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hou, Zhilin [Department of Physics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-01-09

    Using finite element method, we have made a theoretically study of the band structure of Lamb wave in a locally resonant phononic crystal strip waveguide with periodic soft rubber attached on the two sides of epoxy main plate. The numerical results show that the Lamb wave band gap based on local resonant mechanism can be opened up in the stub strip waveguides, and the width of the local resonant band gap is narrower than that based on the Bragg scattering mechanism. The results also show that the stub shape and width have influence on the frequency and width of the Lamb wave band gap. -- Highlights: ► The local resonant Lamb wave band gap can be opened up in a stub strip waveguides. ► The width of the local resonant band gap is narrower than that Bragg scattering band gap. ► The shape and width of the stub have strongly influence on the local resonant band gap.

  5. Localized waves in three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We study the generalized Darboux transformation to the three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. First- and second-order localized waves are obtained by this technique. In first-order localized wave, we get the interactional solutions between first-order rogue wave and one-dark, one-bright soliton respectively. Meanwhile, the interactional solutions between one-breather and first-order rogue wave are also given. In second-order localized wave, one-dark-one-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave is presented in the first component, and two-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave are gained respectively in the other two components. Besides, we observe second-order rogue wave together with one-breather in three components. Moreover, by increasing the absolute values of two free parameters, the nonlinear waves merge with each other distinctly. These results further reveal the interesting dynamic structures of localized waves in the three-component coupled system. Project supported by the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275072 and 11435005), the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120076110024), the Network Information Physics Calculation of Basic Research Innovation Research Group of China (Grant No. 61321064), and Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things, China (Grant No. ZF1213).

  6. Introduction to wave scattering, localization, and mesoscopic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Ping

    1995-01-01

    This book gives readers a coherent picture of waves in disordered media, including multiple scattered waves. The book is intended to be self-contained, with illustrated problems and solutions at the end of each chapter to serve the double purpose of filling out the technical and mathematical details and giving the students exercises if used as a course textbook.The study of wave behavior in disordered media has applications in:Condensed matter physics (semi and superconductor nanostructures and mesoscopic phenomena)Materials science/analytical chemistry (analysis of composite and crystalline structures and properties)Optics and electronics (microelectronic and optoelectronic devices)Geology (seismic exploration of Earths subsurface)

  7. A time-localized response of wave growth process under turbulent winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ge

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Very short time series (with lengths of approximately 40 s or 5~7 wave periods of wind velocity fluctuations and wave elevation were recorded simultaneously and investigated using the wavelet bispectral analysis. Rapid changes in the wave and wind spectra were detected, which were found to be intimately related to significant energy transfers through transient quadratic wind-wave and wave-wave interactions. A possible pattern of energy exchange between the wind and wave fields was further deduced. In particular, the generation and variation of the strong wave-induced perturbation velocity in the wind can be explained by the strengthening and diminishing of the associated quadratic interactions, which cannot be unveiled by linear theories. On small time scales, the wave-wave quadratic interactions were as active and effective in transferring energy as the wind-wave interactions. The results also showed that the wind turbulence was occasionally effective in transferring energy between the wind and the wave fields, so that the background turbulence in the wind cannot be completely neglected. Although these effects are all possibly significant over short times, the time-localized growth of the wave spectrum may not considerably affect the long-term process of wave development.

  8. Accurate eikonal-curvature relation for wave fronts in locally anisotropic reaction-diffusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Hans; Bernus, Olivier; Verschelde, Henri

    2011-09-02

    The dependency of wave velocity in reaction-diffusion (RD) systems on the local front curvature determines not only the stability of wave propagation, but also the fundamental properties of other spatial configurations such as vortices. This Letter gives the first derivation of a covariant eikonal-curvature relation applicable to general RD systems with spatially varying anisotropic diffusion properties, such as cardiac tissue. The theoretical prediction that waves which seem planar can nevertheless possess a nonvanishing geometrical curvature induced by local anisotropy is confirmed by numerical simulations, which reveal deviations up to 20% from the nominal plane wave speed.

  9. Dynamical System Approach to a Coupled Dispersionless System: Localized and Periodic Traveling Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gambo Betchewe; Kuetche Kamgang Victor; Bouetou Bouetou Thomas; Timoleon Crepin Kofane

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of a coupled dispersionlees system describing a current-conducting string with infinite length within a magnetic field.Thus,following a dynamical system approach,we unwrap typical miscellaneous traveling waves including localized and periodic ones.Studying the relative stabilities of such structures through their energy densities,we find that under some boundary conditions,localized waves moving in positive directions are more stable than periodic waves which in contrast stand for the most stable traveling waves in another boundary condition situation.

  10. Experimental signatures of localization in Langmuir wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D.; Bezzerides, B.

    1988-01-01

    Features in certain laser-plasma and ionospheric experiments are identified with the basic properties of Langmuir wave turbulence. Also, a model of caviton nucleation is presented which leads to certain novel scaling predictions. 12 refs., 19 figs.

  11. Extreme localization of light with femtosecond subwavelength rogue waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu

    2015-01-01

    By using theory and experiments, we investigate a new mechanism based on spontaneous synchronization of random waves which generates ultrafast subwavelength rare events in integrated photonic chips. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  12. Hybrid localized waves supported by resonant anisotropic metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogdanov, A. A.; Yermakov, O. Y.; Ovcharenko, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally a new class of surface electromagnetic waves supported by resonant anisotropic metasurface. At certain frequency this type of metasurface demonstrates the topological transition from elliptical to hyperbolic regime.......We study both theoretically and experimentally a new class of surface electromagnetic waves supported by resonant anisotropic metasurface. At certain frequency this type of metasurface demonstrates the topological transition from elliptical to hyperbolic regime....

  13. A Parabolic Equation Approach to Modeling Acousto-Gravity Waves for Local Helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Kevin; Lingevitch, Joseph; Doschek, George

    2016-08-01

    A wide-angle parabolic-wave-equation algorithm is developed and validated for local-helioseismic wave propagation. The parabolic equation is derived from a factorization of the linearized acousto-gravity wave equation. We apply the parabolic-wave equation to modeling acoustic propagation in a plane-parallel waveguide with physical properties derived from helioseismic data. The wavenumber power spectrum and wave-packet arrival-time structure for receivers in the photosphere with separation up to 30° is computed, and good agreement is demonstrated with measured values and a reference spectral model.

  14. Superluminal Physics and Instantaneous Physics as New Trends in Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a similar way as passing from Euclidean Geometry to Non-Euclidean Geometry, we can pass from Subluminal Physics to Superluminal Physics, and further to Instantaneous Physics. In the lights of two consecutive successful CERN experiments with superlumi- nal particles in the Fall of 2011, we believe that these two new fields of research should begin developing.

  15. A method for finding the optimal predictor indices for local wave climate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Paula; Méndez, Fernando J.; Losada, Inigo J.; Menéndez, Melisa; Espejo, Antonio; Pérez, Jorge; Rueda, Ana; Guanche, Yanira

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a method to obtain local wave predictor indices that take into account the wave generation process is described and applied to several locations. The method is based on a statistical model that relates significant wave height with an atmospheric predictor, defined by sea level pressure fields. The predictor is composed of a local and a regional part, representing the sea and the swell wave components, respectively. The spatial domain of the predictor is determined using the Evaluation of Source and Travel-time of wave Energy reaching a Local Area (ESTELA) method. The regional component of the predictor includes the recent historical atmospheric conditions responsible for the swell wave component at the target point. The regional predictor component has a historical temporal coverage ( n-days) different to the local predictor component (daily coverage). Principal component analysis is applied to the daily predictor in order to detect the dominant variability patterns and their temporal coefficients. Multivariate regression model, fitted at daily scale for different n-days of the regional predictor, determines the optimum historical coverage. The monthly wave predictor indices are selected applying a regression model using the monthly values of the principal components of the daily predictor, with the optimum temporal coverage for the regional predictor. The daily predictor can be used in wave climate projections, while the monthly predictor can help to understand wave climate variability or long-term coastal morphodynamic anomalies.

  16. A phase-plane analysis of localized frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putelat, T.; Dawes, J. H. P.; Champneys, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    Sliding frictional interfaces at a range of length scales are observed to generate travelling waves; these are considered relevant, for example, to both earthquake ground surface movements and the performance of mechanical brakes and dampers. We propose an explanation of the origins of these waves through the study of an idealized mechanical model: a thin elastic plate subject to uniform shear stress held in frictional contact with a rigid flat surface. We construct a nonlinear wave equation for the deformation of the plate, and couple it to a spinodal rate-and-state friction law which leads to a mathematically well-posed problem that is capable of capturing many effects not accessible in a Coulomb friction model. Our model sustains a rich variety of solutions, including periodic stick-slip wave trains, isolated slip and stick pulses, and detachment and attachment fronts. Analytical and numerical bifurcation analysis is used to show how these states are organized in a two-parameter state diagram. We discuss briefly the possible physical interpretation of each of these states, and remark also that our spinodal friction law, though more complicated than other classical rate-and-state laws, is required in order to capture the full richness of wave types.

  17. ON TRANSMISSION PROBLEM FOR VISCOELASTIC WAVE EQUATION WITH A LOCALIZED A NONLINEAR DISSIPATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong Ja BAE; Seong Sik KIM

    2013-01-01

    In this article,we consider the global existence and decay rates of solutions for the transmission problem of Kirchhoff type wave equations consisting of two physically different types of materials,one component being a Kirchhoff type wave equation with time dependent localized dissipation which is effective only on a neighborhood of certain part of boundary,while the other being a Kirchhoff type viscoelastic wave equation with nonlinear memory.

  18. ON TRANSMISSION PROBLEM FOR KIRCHHOFF TYPE WAVE EQUATION WITH A LOCALIZED NONLINEAR DISSIPATION IN BOUNDED DOMAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong Ja Bae

    2012-01-01

    In this article,we consider the global existence and decay rates of solutions for the transmission problem of Kirchhoff type wave equations consisting of two physically different types of materials,one component is a Kirchhoff type wave equation with nonlinear time dependent localized dissipation which is effective only on a neighborhood of certain part of the boundary,while the other is a Kirchhoff type wave equation with nonlinear memory.

  19. Superluminal Motion Found In Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Researchers using the Very Large Array (VLA) have discovered that a small, powerful object in our own cosmic neighborhood is shooting out material at nearly the speed of light -- a feat previously known to be performed only by the massive cores of entire galaxies. In fact, because of the direction in which the material is moving, it appears to be traveling faster than the speed of light -- a phenomenon called "superluminal motion." This is the first superluminal motion ever detected within our Galaxy. During March and April of this year, Dr. Felix Mirabel of the Astrophysics Section of the Center for Studies at Saclay, France, and Dr. Luis Rodriguez of the Institute of Astronomy at the National Autonomous University in Mexico City and NRAO, observed "a remarkable ejection event" in which the object shot out material in opposite directions at 92 percent of the speed of light, or more than 171,000 miles per second. This event ejected a mass equal to one-third that of the moon with the power of 100 million suns. Such powerful ejections are well known in distant galaxies and quasars, millions and billions of light-years away, but the object Mirabel and Rodriguez observed is within our own Milky Way Galaxy, only 40,000 light-years away. The object also is much smaller and less massive than the core of a galaxy, so the scientists were quite surprised to find it capable of accelerating material to such speeds. Mirabel and Rodriguez believe that the object is likely a double-star system, with one of the stars either an extremely dense neutron star or a black hole. The neutron star or black hole is the central object of the system, with great mass and strong gravitational pull. It is surrounded by a disk of material orbiting closely and being drawn into it. Such a disk is known as an accretion disk. The central object's powerful gravity, they believe, is pulling material from a more-normal companion star into the accretion disk. The central object is emitting jets of

  20. Folded localized excitations in the (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Yan; Ma Song-Hua; Fang Jian-Ping

    2013-01-01

    By using a mapping approach and a linear variable separation approach,a new family of solitary wave solutions with arbitrary functions for the (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave system (MDWW) is derived.Based on the derived solutions and using some multi-valued functions,we obtain some novel folded localized excitations of the system.

  1. Electromagnetic Waves with Frequencies Near the Local Proton Gryofrequency: ISEF-3 1 AU Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B.

    1993-01-01

    Low Frequency electromagnetic waves with periods near the local proton gyrofrequency have been detected near 1 AU by the magnetometer onboard ISEE-3. For these 1 AU waves two physical processes are possible: solar wind pickup of nuetral (interstellar?) particles and generation by relativistic electron beams propagating from the Sun.

  2. Electromagnetic Waves with Frequencies Near the Local Proton Gryofrequency: ISEF-3 1 AU Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B.

    1993-01-01

    Low Frequency electromagnetic waves with periods near the local proton gyrofrequency have been detected near 1 AU by the magnetometer onboard ISEE-3. For these 1 AU waves two physical processes are possible: solar wind pickup of nuetral (interstellar?) particles and generation by relativistic electron beams propagating from the Sun.

  3. Spatial localization of nonlinear waves spreading in materials in the presence of dislocations and point defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erofeev, V. I.; Leontieva, A. V.; Malkhanov, A. O.

    2017-06-01

    Within the framework of self consistent dynamic problems, the impact of dislocations and point defects on the spatial localization of nonlinear acoustic waves propagating in materials has been studied.

  4. Comment on ``Observation of Superluminal Behaviors in Wave Propagation''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, N. P.; Hagen, C. R.

    2001-07-01

    Two Comments on the Letter by D. Mugnai, A. Ranfagni, and R. Ruggeri, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4830 (2000). Points similar to those made in the following two Comments were made in papers by S. Glasgow and J. Peatross, by M. Peshkin, by L. C. Cune and M. Apostol, by W. Luis Mochán and V. L. Brudny, and by C. Altucci, C. de Lisio, B. Preziosi, and S. Solimeno.

  5. Integrated submm wave receiver with superconductive local oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshelets, VP; Shitov, SV; Filippenko, LV; Ermakov, AB; Luinge, W; Gao, [No Value; Lehikoinen, P; Rogalla, H; Blank, DHA

    1997-01-01

    A fully superconductive integrated receiver is very promising for submm space astronomy where low weight, low power consumption, and limited volume are required. The new versions of the integrated quasioptical submm wave receiver have been designed, fabricated and tested in the frequency range of 45

  6. Lamb Wave Polarization Techniques for Structural Damage Localization and Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    technological applications based on wave propagation, such as optics, seismology , telecommunications, and radar science. As opposed to other fields...Sorrento, Naples, Italy , 2010. 12. Sundaresan, M. J.; Pai, P. F.; Ghoshal, A.; Schulz, M.; Ferguson, F.; Chung, J. F. Methods of Distributed Sensing

  7. Holographic View of the Brain Memory Mechanism Based on Evanescent Superluminal Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Musha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available D. Pollen and M. Trachtenberg proposed the holographic brain theory to help explain the existence of photographic memories in some people. They suggested that such individuals had more vivid memories because they somehow could access a very large region of their memory holograms. Hameroff suggested in his paper that cylindrical neuronal microtubule cavities, or centrioles, function as waveguides for the evanescent photons for quantum signal processing. The supposition is that microtubular structures of the brain function as a coherent fiber bundle set used to store holographic images, as would a fiber-optic holographic system. In this paper, the author proposes that superluminal photons propagating inside the microtubules via evanescent waves could provide the access needed to record or retrieve a quantum coherent entangled holographic memory.

  8. Generation of localized magnetic moments in the charge-density-wave state

    OpenAIRE

    Akzyanov, R. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mechanism explaining the generation of localized magnetic moments in charge-density-wave compounds. Our model Hamiltonian describes an Anderson impurity placed in a host material exhibiting the charge-density wave. There is a region of the model's parameter space, where even weak Coulomb repulsion on the impurity site is able to localize the magnetic moment on the impurity. The phase diagram of a single impurity at T=0 is mapped. To establish the connection with experiment thermo...

  9. Graphene edges; localized edge state and electron wave interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enoki Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structure of massless Dirac fermion in the graphene hexagonal bipartite is seriously modified by the presence of edges depending on the edge chirality. In the zigzag edge, strongly spin polarized nonbonding edge state is created as a consequence of broken symmetry of pseudo-spin. In the scattering at armchair edges, the K-K’ intervalley transition gives rise to electron wave interference. The presence of edge state in zigzag edges is observed in ultra-high vacuum STM/STS observations. The electron wave interference phenomenon in the armchair edge is observed in the Raman G-band and the honeycomb superlattice pattern with its fine structure in STM images.

  10. Numerical study of Anderson localization of terahertz waves in disordered waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Lapointe, C P; Enderli, F; Feurer, T; Skipetrov, S E; Scheffold, F

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical study of electromagnetic wave transport in disordered quasi-one-dimensional waveguides at terahertz frequencies. Finite element method calculations of terahertz wave propagation within LiNbO$_{3}$ waveguides with randomly arranged air-filled circular scatterers exhibit an onset of Anderson localization at experimentally accessible length scales. Results for the average transmission as a function of waveguide length and scatterer density demonstrate a clear crossover from diffusive to localized transport regime. In addition, we find that transmission fluctuations grow dramatically when crossing into the localized regime. Our numerical results are in good quantitative agreement with theory over a wide range of experimentally accessible parameters both in the diffusive and localized regime opening the path towards experimental observation of terahertz wave localization.

  11. Localized Electromagnetic Waves: Interactions with Surfaces and Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nicholas R.

    The interaction of electromagnetic waves with nanostructures is an important area of research for signal processing devices, magnetic data storage, biosensors and a variety of other applications. In this work, we present analytic and numerical calculations for oscillating electric and magnetic fields coupling with excitations in magnetic materials as well as metallic and dielectric materials, near their resonance frequencies. One of the problems with the miniaturization of signal processing components is that there is a cutoff frequency associated with the transverse electric (TE) mode in waveguides. However, it is usually the TE mode which is used to achieve nonreciprocity for devices such as isolators. As a first step to circumvent this problem we looked at the absorption of electromagnetic waves in an antiferromagnet and a ferrite when the incident wave is at an arbitrary angle with respect to the magnetization direction. We calculated reflectivity and attenuated total reflectivity and found absorption and nonreciprocity, asymmetric behavior for waves traveling in opposite directions, for a broad range of propagation angles. Subsequently we also performed calculations for a transverse magnetic mode in a waveguide. The wave was allowed to propagate at an arbitrary angle with respect to the magnetization direction of the ferrite in the waveguide. We again found nonreciprocity for a wide range of angles. Our results show that this system could be used as an on-chip isolator with isolation values over 75 dB/cm in the 50 GHz range. We explored another signal processing device operating in the GHz range: a nonlinear phase shifter. Using Fe as the magnetic material allows the phase shifter to operate over a wide frequency and power range. We found a differential phase shift of greater than 50° over 3 cm for this device. The theoretical results compared well with experimental measurements. Finally, we study surface plasmon polaritons propagating along a metallic

  12. Localization of generic gravitational-wave transients with the early advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Essick, Reed; Katsavounidis, Erik; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo, advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors, will begin collecting science data in 2015. With first detections expected to follow, it is important to quantify how well generic gravitational-wave transients can be localized on the sky. This is crucial for correctly identifying electromagnetic counterparts as well as understanding gravitational-wave physics and source populations. We present a study of sky localization capabilities for two search and parameter estimation algorithms: coherent WaveBurst, a maximum likelihood algorithm operating in close to real-time, and LALInferenceBurst, a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithm developed to recover generic transient signals with latency of a few hours. Furthermore, we focus on the first few years of the advanced detector era, when we expect to only have two (2015) and later three (2016) operational detectors, all below design sensitivity. These detector configurati...

  13. Localized waves supported by the rotating waveguide array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Fangwei; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-09-01

    We show that truncated rotating square waveguide arrays support new types of localized modes that exist even in the linear case, in complete contrast to localized excitations in nonrotating arrays requiring nonlinearity for their existence and forming above the energy flow threshold. These new modes appear either around array center, since rotation leads to the emergence of the effective attractive potential with a minimum at the rotation axis, or in the array corners, in which case localization occurs due to competition between centrifugal force (in terms of quasi-particle analogy) and total internal reflection at the interface of the truncated array. The degree of localization of the central and corner modes mediated by rotation increases with rotation frequency. Stable rotating soliton families bifurcating from linear modes are analyzed in both focusing and defocusing media.

  14. Localized waves supported by the rotating waveguide array

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    We show that truncated rotating square waveguide arrays support new types of localized modes that exist even in the linear case, in complete contrast to localized excitations in nonrotating arrays requiring nonlinearity for their existence and forming above the energy flow threshold. These new modes appear either around array center, since rotation leads to the emergence of the effective attractive potential with a minimum at the rotation axis, or in the array corners, in which case localization occurs due to competition between centrifugal force (in terms of quasi-particle analogy) and total internal reflection at the interface of the truncated array. The degree of localization of the central and corner modes mediated by rotation increases with rotation frequency. Stable rotating soliton families bifurcating from linear modes are analyzed in both focusing and defocusing media.

  15. Simulation study of localization of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional random dipolar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Ye, Zhen

    2003-12-01

    We study the propagation and scattering of electromagnetic waves by random arrays of dipolar cylinders in a uniform medium. A set of self-consistent equations, incorporating all orders of multiple scattering of the electromagnetic waves, is derived from first principles and then solved numerically for electromagnetic fields. For certain ranges of frequencies, spatially localized electromagnetic waves appear in such a simple but realistic disordered system. Dependence of localization on the frequency, radiation damping, and filling factor is shown. The spatial behavior of the total, coherent, and diffusive waves is explored in detail, and found to comply with a physical intuitive picture. A phase diagram characterizing localization is presented, in agreement with previous investigations on other systems.

  16. Local increase of anticyclonic wave activity over northern Eurasia under amplified Arctic warming: WAVE ACTIVITY RESPONSE TO ARCTIC MELTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Daokai [School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing China; Lu, Jian [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Sun, Lantao [CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder Colorado USA; PSD, ESRL, NOAA, Boulder Colorado USA; Chen, Gang [Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles California USA; Zhang, Yaocun [School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing China

    2017-04-10

    In an attempt to resolve the controversy as to whether Arctic sea ice loss leads to more mid-latitude extremes, a metric of finite-amplitude wave activity is adopted to quantify the midlatitude wave activity and its change during the observed period of the drastic Arctic sea ice decline in both ERA Interim reanalysis data and a set of AMIP-type of atmospheric model experiments. Neither the experiment with the trend in the SST or that with the declining trend of Arctic sea ice can simulate the sizable midlatitude-wide reduction in the total wave activity (Ae) observed in the reanalysis, leaving its explanation to the atmospheric internal variability. On the other hand, both the diagnostics of the flux of the local wave activity and the model experiments lend evidence to a possible linkage between the sea ice loss near the Barents and Kara seas and the increasing trend of anticyclonic local wave activity over the northern part of the central Eurasia and the associated impacts on the frequency of temperature extremes.

  17. Multifrequency observations of the superluminal quasar 3C 345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.; Roellig, T. P. L.; Bregman, J. D.; Witteborn, F. C.; Lester, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the continuum properties of the superluminal quasar 3C 345, on the basis of radio, optical, IR, and X-ray frequency monitorings, as well as by means of simultaneous multifrequency spectra extending from the radio through the X-ray bands. Radio outbursts, which appear to follow IR-optical outbursts by about one year, first occur at the highest frequencies, as expected from optical depth effects; the peak flux is nevertheless often reached at several frequencies at once. The beginning of outbursts, as defined by mm-measurements, corresponds to the appearance of the three known 'superluminal' components. An increase in the X-ray flux during 1979-1980 corresponds to increased radio flux, while the IR flux changes in the opposite sense.

  18. The hypothesis of superluminal neutrinos: Comparing OPERA with other data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drago, A.; Masina, I.; Pagliara, G.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA Collaboration reported evidence for muonic neutrinos traveling slightly faster than light in vacuum. While waiting further checks from the experimental community, here we aim at exploring some theoretical consequences of the hypothesis that muonic neutrinos are superluminal, considering...... in particular the tachyonic and the Coleman-Glashow cases. We show that a tachyonic interpretation is not only hardly reconciled with OPERA data on energy dependence, but that it clashes with neutrino production from pion and with neutrino oscillations. A Coleman-Glashow superluminal neutrino beam would also...... have problems with pion decay kinematics for the OPERA setup; it could be easily reconciled with SN1987a data, but then it would be very problematic to account for neutrino oscillations. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2012...

  19. Superluminal Spot Pair Events in Astronomical Settings: Sweeping Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Nemiroff, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Sweeping beams of light can cast spots moving with superluminal speeds across scattering surfaces. Such faster-than-light speeds are well-known phenomena that do not violate special relativity. It is shown here that under certain circumstances, superluminal spot pair creation and annihilation events can occur that provide unique information to observers. These spot pair events are {\\it not} particle pair events -- they are the sudden creation or annihilation of a pair of relatively illuminated spots on a scattering surface. Real spot pair illumination events occur unambiguously on the scattering surface when spot speeds diverge, while virtual spot pair events are observer dependent and perceived only when real spot radial speeds cross the speed of light. Specifically, a virtual spot pair creation event will be observed when a real spot's speed toward the observer drops below $c$, while a virtual spot pair annihilation event will be observed when a real spot's radial speed away from the observer rises above $c...

  20. The hypothesis of superluminal neutrinos: Comparing OPERA with other data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drago, A.; Masina, I.; Pagliara, G.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA Collaboration reported evidence for muonic neutrinos traveling slightly faster than light in vacuum. While waiting further checks from the experimental community, here we aim at exploring some theoretical consequences of the hypothesis that muonic neutrinos are superluminal, considering...... in particular the tachyonic and the Coleman-Glashow cases. We show that a tachyonic interpretation is not only hardly reconciled with OPERA data on energy dependence, but that it clashes with neutrino production from pion and with neutrino oscillations. A Coleman-Glashow superluminal neutrino beam would also...... have problems with pion decay kinematics for the OPERA setup; it could be easily reconciled with SN1987a data, but then it would be very problematic to account for neutrino oscillations. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2012...

  1. Multi-Epoch Spectroscopy of Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Robert; De Cia, Annalisa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leloudas, Giorgos; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Perley, Daniel A.; Vreeswijk, Paul; Yan, Lin

    2016-06-01

    A growing sample of intrinsically rare supernovae is being uncovered by wide-field synoptic surveys, such as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). A fraction of these events have been labeled "superluminous supernovae" due to their peak luminosities, which can exceed normal supernovae by factors of 10 to 100. The power sources for these events and thus their connection to normal luminosity supernovae remains uncertain. Here we present results from 134 spectroscopic observations of 17 hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSN-I) discovered by PTF. We select our targets from the full PTF sample using only spectroscopic information; we do not employ the traditional cut in absolute magnitude (e.g. M physical insights into the nature of these explosions offered by this unique dataset.

  2. Discussions of the Quantum Superluminality%论量子超光速性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志洵

    2012-01-01

    , the experiments proved that Einstein' s ideas didn' t hold water. In Bell' s opinion, to get rid of the difficulties after the announce- ment of the Aspect' s experiments, it intends to go back to Lorentz and Poincare, and assume that ether existed as a referential system in which matters went faster than light. Bell repeatedly pointed out that be wanted to go back to ether because EPR had predicted there was something faster than light in the back- ground. …… Since 1992, it is reported that there have been many successful faster than light experi-ments. Some of them are based on quantum tunneling effect;some are based on classic physical phenome- na such as evanescent waves, anomalous dispersion. And in 2008, D. Salart et. al. performed a experiment using entangled photons between two villages separated by 18km. In conclusion ,the speed of the influence of quantum entanglement would have to exceed than of light by at least four orders of magnitude, i. e. 10^4c 10^7c. Anyway, this experiment was the summation of discussions about the EPR thesis for a long time. For the past 25 years Quantum Superluminality was one subject of my chief study. In 1985 ,we pro- posed the model of quantum potential barrier equivalent circuit. In 1991, we first indicated that there could be the wave velocity vp 〈 0 and vg 〈 0 in the evanescent waves mode of the waveguide below cut off and the book "An Introduction to the Theory of waveguide Below Cut -off " made me get the First Na- tional Scientific and Technology Book Award of China. Moreover, in 2003 we through an experiment in the coaxial photonic crystal, a superluminal group velocity of ( 1.5 - 2.4) c are observed in the stop - band of frequency. In 2005, we suggested the term of General Information Velocity (GIV) ;and in 2010, we sugges- ted the term of Quantum Superluminality ( QS), and also suggested remodel the existing accelerator to dis- cover the superluminal strange electron. Now,this paper discusses some problems of

  3. Subluminal and Superluminal Phenomena in a Four-Level Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ding-An; ZENG Ya-Guang; CAO Hui

    2008-01-01

    In a four-level atomic system,we investigate the light pulse propagation properties interacting with only one laser field.It is shown that in the steady state,the group velocity of the light pulse can be changed from subluminal to superluminal by varying the field detuning.Meanwhile,the effects of the field intensity on the group velocity are also shown.At last,with special parameters,the analytical solution for the group index is also obtained.

  4. Superluminal light propagation via quantum interference in decay channels

    OpenAIRE

    Arun, R.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the propagation of a weak probe light through a coherently driven $Y$-type system. Under the condition that the excited atomic levels decay via same vacuum modes, the effects of quantum interference in decay channels are considered. It is found that the interference in decay channels results in a lossless anomalous dispersion between two gain peaks. We demonstrate that the probe pulse propagation can in principle be switched from subluminal to superluminal due to the decay-induced ...

  5. Regional acidosis locally inhibits but remotely stimulates Ca2+ waves in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kerrie L; Moorhouse, Emma L; Bortolozzi, Mario; Richards, Mark A; Swietach, Pawel; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2017-07-01

    Spontaneous Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes are potentially arrhythmogenic. A powerful controller of Ca2+ waves is the cytoplasmic H+ concentration ([H+]i), which fluctuates spatially and temporally in conditions such as myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion. H+-control of Ca2+ waves is poorly understood. We have therefore investigated how [H+]i co-ordinates their initiation and frequency. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves were imaged (fluo-3) in rat isolated ventricular myocytes, subjected to modest Ca2+-overload. Whole-cell intracellular acidosis (induced by acetate-superfusion) stimulated wave frequency. Pharmacologically blocking sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchange (NHE1) prevented this stimulation, unveiling inhibition by H+. Acidosis also increased Ca2+ wave velocity. Restricting acidosis to one end of a myocyte, using a microfluidic device, inhibited Ca2+ waves in the acidic zone (consistent with ryanodine receptor inhibition), but stimulated wave emergence elsewhere in the cell. This remote stimulation was absent when NHE1 was selectively inhibited in the acidic zone. Remote stimulation depended on a locally evoked, NHE1-driven rise of [Na+]i that spread rapidly downstream. Acidosis influences Ca2+ waves via inhibitory Hi+ and stimulatory Nai+ signals (the latter facilitating intracellular Ca2+-loading through modulation of sarcolemmal Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity). During spatial [H+]i-heterogeneity, Hi+-inhibition dominates in acidic regions, while rapid Nai+ diffusion stimulates waves in downstream, non-acidic regions. Local acidosis thus simultaneously inhibits and stimulates arrhythmogenic Ca2+-signalling in the same myocyte. If the principle of remote H+-stimulation of Ca2+ waves also applies in multicellular myocardium, it raises the possibility of electrical disturbances being driven remotely by adjacent ischaemic areas, which are known to be intensely acidic.

  6. Joint Inversion of Earthquake Source Parameters with local and teleseismic body waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Ni, S.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    In the classical source parameter inversion algorithm of CAP (Cut and Paste method, by Zhao and Helmberger), waveform data at near distances (typically less than 500km) are partitioned into Pnl and surface waves to account for uncertainties in the crustal models and different amplitude weight of body and surface waves. The classical CAP algorithms have proven effective for resolving source parameters (focal mechanisms, depth and moment) for earthquakes well recorded on relatively dense seismic network. However for regions covered with sparse stations, it is challenging to achieve precise source parameters . In this case, a moderate earthquake of ~M6 is usually recorded on only one or two local stations with epicentral distances less than 500 km. Fortunately, an earthquake of ~M6 can be well recorded on global seismic networks. Since the ray paths for teleseismic and local body waves sample different portions of the focal sphere, combination of teleseismic and local body wave data helps constrain source parameters better. Here we present a new CAP mothod (CAPjoint), which emploits both teleseismic body waveforms (P and SH waves) and local waveforms (Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves) to determine source parameters. For an earthquake in Nevada that is well recorded with dense local network (USArray stations), we compare the results from CAPjoint with those from the traditional CAP method involving only of local waveforms , and explore the efficiency with bootstraping statistics to prove the results derived by CAPjoint are stable and reliable. Even with one local station included in joint inversion, accuracy of source parameters such as moment and strike can be much better improved.

  7. Guided Wave Based Crack Detection in the Rivet Hole Using Global Analytical with Local FEM Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Yeasin Bhuiyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with the rivet hole cracks has been formulated using closed-form analytical solution while the local damage interaction, scattering, and mode conversion have been obtained from finite element analysis. The rivet hole cracks (damage in the plate structure gives rise to the non-axisymmetric scattering of Lamb wave, as well as shear horizontal (SH wave, although the incident Lamb wave source (primary source is axisymmetric. The damage in the plate acts as a non-axisymmetric secondary source of Lamb wave and SH wave. The scattering of Lamb and SH waves are captured using wave damage interaction coefficient (WDIC. The scatter cubes of complex-valued WDIC are formed that can describe the 3D interaction (frequency, incident direction, and azimuth direction of Lamb waves with the damage. The scatter cubes are fed into the exact analytical framework to produce the time domain signal. This analysis enables us to obtain the optimum design parameters for better detection of the cracks in a multiple-rivet-hole problem. The optimum parameters provide the guideline of the design of the sensor installation to obtain the most noticeable signals that represent the presence of cracks in the rivet hole.

  8. Energy decay of a variable-coefficient wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent localized damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy decay for the Cauchy problem of the wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent and space-dependent damping. The damping is localized in a bounded domain and near infinity, and the principal part of the wave equation has a variable-coefficient. We apply the multiplier method for variable-coefficient equations, and obtain an energy decay that depends on the property of the coefficient of the damping term.

  9. Fractal dimensions of wave functions and local spectral measures on the Fibonacci chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Nicolas; Jagannathan, Anuradha; Piéchon, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical framework for understanding the wave functions and spectrum of an extensively studied paradigm for quasiperiodic systems, namely the Fibonacci chain. Our analytical results, which are obtained in the limit of strong modulation of the hopping amplitudes, are in good agreement with published numerical data. In the perturbative limit, we show a symmetry of wave functions under permutation of site and energy indices. We compute the wave-function renormalization factors and from them deduce analytical expressions for the fractal exponents corresponding to individual wave functions, as well as their global averages. The multifractality of wave functions is seen to appear at next-to-leading order in ρ . Exponents for the local spectral density are given, in extremely good accord with numerical calculations. Interestingly, our analytical results for exponents are observed to describe the system rather well even for values of ρ well outside the domain of applicability of perturbation theory.

  10. Experimental Study on Local Scour Around A Large Circular Cylinder Under Irregular Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周益人; 陈国平

    2004-01-01

    A series of physical model tests are conducted for local scour around a circular cylinder of a relatively large diameter (0.15 < D/L < 0.5) under the action of irregular waves. The laws of change of the topography around the cylinder are systematically studied. The effects of wave height, wave period, water depth, sediment grain size and cylinder diameter are taken into account. The mechanism of formation of the topography around the cylinder is analyzed. A detailed analysis is given to bed sediment grain size, and it is considered that the depth of scour around the cylinder under wave action is not inversely proportional to the sediment grain diameter. On such a basis, an equation is proposed for calculation of the maximum depth of scour around a cylinder as well as its position under the action of irregular waves.

  11. Non-local features of a hydrodynamic pilot-wave system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbin, Andre; Couchman, Miles; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    A droplet walking on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath constitutes a pilot-wave system of the form envisaged for quantum dynamics by Louis de Broglie: a particle moves in resonance with its guiding wave field. We here present an examination of pilot-wave hydrodynamics in a confined domain. Specifically, we present a one-dimensional water wave model that describes droplets walking in single and multiple cavities. The cavities are separated by a submerged barrier, and so allow for the study of tunneling. They also highlight the non-local dynamical features arising due to the spatially-extended wave field. Results from computational simulations are complemented by laboratory experiments.

  12. Localized atomic basis set in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Vanin, Marco; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    representation. The possibility to switch seamlessly between the two representations implies that simulations employing the local basis can be fine tuned at the end of the calculation by switching to the grid, thereby combining the strength of the two representations for optimal performance. The implementation...... is tested by calculating atomization energies and equilibrium bulk properties of a variety of molecules and solids, comparing to the grid results. Finally, it is demonstrated how a grid-quality structure optimization can be performed with significantly reduced computational effort by switching between...

  13. Identification and mitigation of T-S waves using localized dynamic surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Michael; Tuna, Burak A.; Dell'Orso, Haley

    2016-06-01

    The control of transition from a laminar to a turbulent flow over a flat plate using localized dynamic surface modifications was explored experimentally in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's subsonic wind tunnel. Dynamic surface modification, via a pair of Piezoelectrically Driven Oscillating Surface (PDOS) actuators, was used to excite and control the T-S wave over a flat plate. Creating an upstream, localized small disturbance at the most amplified frequency of fact = 250 Hz led to phase-locking the T-S wave. This enabled observation of the excited T-S wave using phase-locked stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. The growth of the T-S wave as it moved downstream was also measured using this technique (25% growth over four wavelengths of the excited wave). Activation of a downstream PDOS actuator (in addition to the upstream PDOS) at the appropriate amplitude and phase shift resulted in attenuation of the peak amplitude of the coherent velocity fluctuations (by up to 68%) and a substantial reduction of the degree of coherence of the T-S wave. Since the PDOS actuators used in this work were localized, the effect of the control strategy was confined to the region directly downstream of the PDOS actuator.

  14. Broadband Lamb wave trapping in cellular metamaterial plates with multiple local resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-Gang; Li, Yong; Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2015-03-20

    We have investigated the Lamb wave propagation in cellular metamaterial plates constructed by bending-dominated and stretch-dominated unit-cells with the stiffness differed by orders of magnitude at an ultralow density. The simulation results show that ultralight metamaterial plates with textured stubs deposited on the surface can support strong local resonances for both symmetric and anti-symmetric modes at low frequencies, where Lamb waves at the resonance frequencies are highly localized in the vibrating stubs. The resonance frequency is very sensitive to the geometry of textured stubs. By reasonable design of the geometry of resonant elements, we establish a simple loaded-bar model with the array of oscillators having a gradient relative density (or weight) that can support multiple local resonances, which permits the feasibility of a broadband Lamb wave trapping. Our study could be potentially significant in designing ingenious weight-efficient acoustic devices for practical applications, such as shock absorption, cushioning, and vibrations traffic, etc.

  15. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  16. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  17. Local probing of magnetic films by optical excitation of magnetostatic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, A. I.; Kozhaev, M. A.; Vetoshko, P. M.; Dodonov, D. V.; Prokopov, A. R.; Shumilov, A. G.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Berzhanskii, V. N.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    Excitation of volume and surface magnetostatic spin waves in ferrite garnet films by circularly polarized laser pulses utilizing to the inverse magnetooptical Faraday effect has been studied experimentally. The region of excitation of the magnetostatic spin waves is determined by the diameter of the laser beam (˜10 μm). At the same time, the characteristic propagation length of the modes is 30 μm. A method of finding the local characteristics of a magnetic film, in particular, the cubic and uniaxial anisotropy constants, based on the analysis of the azimuthal-angle dependence of the spectrum of the magnetostatic spin waves has been proposed.

  18. Enhanced localization of Dyakonov-like surface waves in left-handed materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crasovan, L. C.; Takayama, O.; Artigas, D.;

    2006-01-01

    We address the existence and properties of hybrid surface waves forming at interfaces between left-handed materials and dielectric birefringent media. The existence conditions of such waves are found to be highly relaxed in comparison to Dyakonov waves existing in right-handed media. We show...... that left-handed materials cause the coexistence of several surface solutions, which feature an enhanced degree of localization. Remarkably, we find that the hybrid surface modes appear for large areas in the parameter space, a key property in view of their experimental observation. © 2006 The American...

  19. Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 deg2 to 20 deg2 will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ˜ 2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  20. Data-driven and calibration-free Lamb wave source localization with sparse sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Joel B; Moura, José M F

    2015-08-01

    Most Lamb wave localization techniques require that we know the wave's velocity characteristics; yet, in many practical scenarios, velocity estimates can be challenging to acquire, are unavailable, or are unreliable because of the complexity of Lamb waves. As a result, there is a significant need for new methods that can reduce a system's reliance on a priori velocity information. This paper addresses this challenge through two novel source localization methods designed for sparse sensor arrays in isotropic media. Both methods exploit the fundamental sparse structure of a Lamb wave's frequency-wavenumber representation. The first method uses sparse recovery techniques to extract velocities from calibration data. The second method uses kurtosis and the support earth mover's distance to measure the sparseness of a Lamb wave's approximate frequency-wavenumber representation. These measures are then used to locate acoustic sources with no prior calibration data. We experimentally study each method with a collection of acoustic emission data measured from a 1.22 m by 1.22 m isotropic aluminum plate. We show that both methods can achieve less than 1 cm localization error and have less systematic error than traditional time-of-arrival localization methods.

  1. THE SUPERLUMINAL CHARACTER OF THE COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM QUASAR 3C-216

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VENTURI, T; PEARSON, TJ; BARTHEL, PD; HERBIG, T

    We report the results of fourth epoch VLBI observations at 4990.99 MHz, with a resolution of approximately 1 mas, of the compact steep-spectrum quasar 3C 216. Superluminal motion in this object is confirmed. Although a constant superluminal expansion at upsilon(app) = 3.9c +/- 0.6 is not ruled out,

  2. Droplet-shaped waves: casual finite-support analogs of X-shaped waves

    CERN Document Server

    Utkin, Andrei B

    2011-01-01

    A model of steady-state X-shaped wave generation by a superluminal (supersonic) pointlike source infinitely moving along a straight line is extended to a more realistic causal scenario of a source pulse launched at time zero and propagating rectilinearly at constant superluminal speed. In the case of infinitely short (delta) pulse, the new model yields an analytical solution, corresponding to the propagation-invariant X-shaped wave clipped by a droplet-shaped support, which perpetually expands along the propagation and transversal directions, thus tending the droplet-shaped wave to the X-shaped one.

  3. Localization of Matter Fields in the 5D Standing Wave Braneworld

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the localization problem of matter fields within the 5D standing wave braneworld. In this model the brane emits anisotropic waves into the bulk with different amplitudes along different spatial dimensions. We show that in the case of increasing warp factor there exist the pure gravitational localization of all kinds of quantum and classical particles on the brane. For classical particles the anisotropy of the background metric is hidden, brane fields exhibit standard Lorentz symmetry in spite of anisotropic nature of the primordial 5D metric.

  4. Diffusive and localization behavior of electromagnetic waves in a two-dimensional random medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Ye, Zhen

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss the transport phenomena of electromagnetic waves in a two-dimensional random system which is composed of arrays of electrical dipoles, following the model presented earlier by Erdogan et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 10, 391 (1993)]. A set of self-consistent equations is presented, accounting for the multiple scattering in the system, and is then solved numerically. A strong localization regime is discovered in the frequency domain. The transport properties within, near the edge of, and nearly outside the localization regime are investigated for different parameters such as filling factor and system size. The results show that within the localization regime, waves are trapped near the transmitting source. Meanwhile, the diffusive waves follow an intuitive but expected picture. That is, they increase with traveling path as more and more random scattering incurs, followed by a saturation, then start to decay exponentially when the travelling path is large enough, signifying the localization effect. For the cases where the frequencies are near the boundary of or outside the localization regime, the results of diffusive waves are compared with the diffusion approximation, showing less encouraging agreement as in other systems [Asatryan et al., Phys. Rev. E 67, 036605 (2003)].

  5. Local Effects on Strain Seismograms at Matsushiro Seismological Observatory - 2. Rayleigh Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi Okamoto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate local effects on strain seismograms for a Rayleigh wave observed at Matsushiro Seismological Observatory, Japan Meteorological Agency, central Japan, by applying a method proposed in a previous report (Okamoto et al. 2007. The method involves examination of polarization angles, local phase velocity, and accuracy of velocity seismograms. The results are as follows: 1 Polarization angles of observed strain seismograms agree with expected ones from those of velocity seismograms also observed at Matsushiro; 2 Local phase velocity estimated by comparison between strain and velocity seismograms is 54% larger than the theoretical value calculated from the PREM velocity model; 3 Velocity spectra observed at Matsushiro have almost the same amplitude as an average of those at F-net observation stations near Matsushiro. These results indicate that both EW and NS component strain seismograms observed at Matsushiro have been reduced by 35% in amplitude for a Rayleigh wave due to local heterogeneity. The local effects on a Rayleigh wave are quite different from that on a Love wave obtained in the previous report.

  6. Simultaneous large band gaps and localization of electromagnetic and elastic waves in defect-free quasicrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianbao; Wang, Zhong; Liu, Wenxing; Wang, Tongbiao; Liu, Nianhua; Liao, Qinghua

    2016-04-18

    We report numerically large and complete photonic and phononic band gaps that simultaneously exist in eight-fold phoxonic quasicrystals (PhXQCs). PhXQCs can possess simultaneous photonic and phononic band gaps over a wide range of geometric parameters. Abundant localized modes can be achieved in defect-free PhXQCs for all photonic and phononic polarizations. These defect-free localized modes exhibit multiform spatial distributions and can confine simultaneously electromagnetic and elastic waves in a large area, thereby providing rich selectivity and enlarging the interaction space of optical and elastic waves. The simulated results based on finite element method show that quasiperiodic structures formed of both solid rods in air and holes in solid materials can simultaneously confine and tailor electromagnetic and elastic waves; these structures showed advantages over the periodic counterparts.

  7. Directional cloaking of flexural waves in a plate with a locally resonant metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Rupin, Matthieu

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical design of a directional invisibility cloak for backward scattered elastic waves propagating in a thin plate (A0 Lamb waves). The directional cloak is based on a set of resonating beams that are attached perpendicular to the plate and are arranged at a sub-wavelength scale in ten concentric rings. The exotic effective properties of this locally resonant metamaterial ensure coexistence of bandgaps and directional cloaking for certain beam configurations over a large frequency band. The best directional cloaking was obtained when the resonators' length decreases from the central to the outermost ring. In this case, flexural waves experience a vanishing index of refraction when they cross the outer layers, leading to a frequency bandgap that protects the central part of the cloak. Numerical simulation shows that there is no back-scattering in these configurations. These results might have applications in the design of seismic-wave protection devices.

  8. Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brueckner, F; Buckland, K; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A D; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drasco, S; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Engel, R; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gehrels, N; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Haris, K; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kozameh, C; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kucharczyk, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuper, B J; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Roux, A Le; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Litvine, V; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martonov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazzolo, G; McAuley, K; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Page, A; Pai, A; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Parisi, M; Parkinson, W; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Poggiani, R; Pöld, J; Postiglione, F; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, M; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodriguez, L; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Röver, C; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R L; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Stefszky, M; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S E; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2013-01-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals...

  9. Simultaneous Local and Teleseismic P-Wave Velocity Tomography in Western Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, C. R.; Alarcon, E.; Ochoa, J.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    In western Mexico, the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North America plate has deformed and fragmented the overriding plate, forming several structural rifts and crustal blocks. To improve the current tomographic images of the continental crust and uppermost mantle in this complex area, we used P-wave arrivals of local and teleseismic earthquakes along with the Fast Marching Method tomography technique. Our traveltime datasets include 2100 local earthquakes P-wave arrival times and 5,062 P-wave relative arrival time residuals of teleseismic earthquakes. The local earthquake phase picking was manually corrected and the relative arrival time residuals were estimated using the Multi-Channel Cross-Correlation method. All earthquakes occurred between 2006 and 2007 and were recorded by seismic stations deployed during the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) experiment. The temporal seismic network consisted of 50 stations equipped with Streckeisen STS-2 and Quanterra Q330. We use an iterative nonlinear tomographic procedure and the fast marching method to map the residual patterns as P wave velocity anomalies. We followed an inversion scheme consisting of: (1) selection of a local and teleseismic earthquake, (2) estimation of improved 1-D reference velocity model, and (3) checkerboard testing to determine the optimum configuration of the velocity nodes, and inversion parameters, finally (4) perform final tomography and results analysis.

  10. Transition, coexistence, and interaction of vector localized waves arising from higher-order effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chong [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Zhan-Ying, E-mail: zyyang@nwu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Zhao, Li-Chen, E-mail: zhaolichen3@163.com [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Wen-Li [Institute of Modern Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2015-11-15

    We study vector localized waves on continuous wave background with higher-order effects in a two-mode optical fiber. The striking properties of transition, coexistence, and interaction of these localized waves arising from higher-order effects are revealed in combination with corresponding modulation instability (MI) characteristics. It shows that these vector localized wave properties have no analogues in the case without higher-order effects. Specifically, compared to the scalar case, an intriguing transition between bright–dark rogue waves and w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons, which occurs as a result of the attenuation of MI growth rate to vanishing in the zero-frequency perturbation region, is exhibited with the relative background frequency. In particular, our results show that the w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons can coexist with breathers, coinciding with the MI analysis where the coexistence condition is a mixture of a modulation stability and MI region. It is interesting that their interaction is inelastic and describes a fusion process. In addition, we demonstrate an annihilation phenomenon for the interaction of two w-shaped solitons which is identified essentially as an inelastic collision in this system. -- Highlights: •Vector rogue wave properties induced by higher-order effects are studied. •A transition between vector rogue waves and solitons is obtained. •The link between the transition and modulation instability (MI) is demonstrated. •The coexistence of vector solitons and breathers coincides with the MI features. •An annihilation phenomenon for the vector two w-shaped solitons is presented.

  11. Would Superluminal Influences Violate the Principle of Relativity?

    CERN Document Server

    Peacock, Kent A

    2013-01-01

    It continues to be alleged that superluminal influences of any sort would be inconsistent with special relativity for the following three reasons: (i) they would imply the existence of a distinguished' frame; (ii) they would allow the detection of absolute motion; and (iii) they would violate the relativity of simultaneity. This paper shows that the first two objections rest upon very elementary misunderstandings of Minkowski geometry and lingering Newtonian intuitions about instantaneity. The third objection has a basis, but rather than invalidating the notion of faster than light influences it points the way to more general conceptions of simultaneity that could allow for quantum nonlocality in a natural way.

  12. Superluminal neutrinos at OPERA confront pion decay kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowsik, Ramanath; Nussinov, Shmuel; Sarkar, Utpal

    2011-12-16

    Violation of Lorentz invariance (VLI) has been suggested as an explanation of the superluminal velocities of muon neutrinos reported by OPERA. In this Letter, we show that the amount of VLI required to explain this result poses severe difficulties with the kinematics of the pion decay, extending its lifetime and reducing the momentum carried away by the neutrinos. We show that the OPERA experiment limits α=(ν(ν)-c)/c<4×10(-6). We then take recourse to cosmic-ray data on the spectrum of muons and neutrinos generated in Earth's atmosphere to provide a stronger bound on VLI: (ν-c)/c<10(-12).

  13. Lommel pulses: an analytic form for localized waves of the focus wave mode type with bandlimited spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Saari, Peeter

    2008-01-07

    A criticism of the focus wave mode (FWM) solution for localized pulses is that it contains backward propagating components that are difficult to generate in many practical situations. We describe a form of FWM where the strength of the backward propagating components is identically zero and derive special cases where the field can be written in an analytic form. In particular, a free-space version of "backward light" pulse is considered, which moves in the opposite direction with respect to all its spectral constituents.

  14. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...... anesthesia with 20 ml. 1% lidocaine with epinephrine. All patients received an intravenous dose of morphine just before ESWL. The patients were comparable with regard to age, sex, weight, morphine dosage, number of shock waves given and duration of treatment. Median pain score and the amount of supplementary...... analgesics were not significantly different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to post-ESWL skin changes. Therefore, EMLA cream can be recommended for ESWL provided it is applied correctly....

  15. Constraining the ellipticity of strongly magnetized neutron stars powering superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Tauris, Thomas M.

    2016-07-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) have been suggested to be powered by strongly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron stars which are often called magnetars. In this process, rotational energy of the magnetar is radiated via magnetic dipole radiation and heats the supernova ejecta. However, if magnetars are highly distorted in their geometric shape, rotational energy is mainly lost as gravitational wave radiation and thus such magnetars cannot power SLSNe. By simply comparing electromagnetic and gravitational wave emission time-scales, we constrain upper limits to the ellipticity of magnetars by assuming that they power the observed SLSNe. We find that their ellipticity typically needs to be less than about a few 10-3. This indicates that the toroidal magnetic field strengths in these magnetars are typically less than a few 1016 G so that their distortions remain small. Because light-curve modelling of SLSNe shows that their dipole magnetic field strengths are of the order of 1014 G, the ratio of poloidal to toroidal magnetic field strengths is found to be larger than ˜0.01 in magnetars powering SLSNe.

  16. Constraining the ellipticity of strongly-magnetized neutron stars powering superluminous supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Moriya, Takashi J

    2016-01-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) have been suggested to be powered by strongly-magnetized, rapidly-rotating neutron stars which are often called magnetars. In this process, rotational energy of the magnetar is radiated via magnetic dipole radiation and heats the supernova ejecta. However, if magnetars are highly distorted in their geometric shape, rotational energy is mainly lost as gravitational wave radiation and thus such magnetars cannot power SLSNe. By simply comparing electromagnetic and gravitational wave emission timescales, we constrain upper limits to the ellipticity of magnetars by assuming that they power the observed SLSNe. We find that their ellipticity typically needs to be less than about a few 1e-3. This indicates that the toroidal magnetic field strengths in these magnetars are typically less than a few 1e16 G so that their distortions remain small. Because light-curve modeling of SLSNe shows that their dipole magnetic field strengths are of the order of 1e14 G, the ratio of poloidal to toro...

  17. The Approximate Solutions of Three-Dimensional Diffusion and Wave Equations within Local Fractional Derivative Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Kamil Jassim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We used the local fractional variational iteration transform method (LFVITM coupled by the local fractional Laplace transform and variational iteration method to solve three-dimensional diffusion and wave equations with local fractional derivative operator. This method has Lagrange multiplier equal to minus one, which makes the calculations more easily. The obtained results show that the presented method is efficient and yields a solution in a closed form. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the high accuracy and fast convergence of this new method.

  18. Suppression of Spiral Waves and Spatiotemporal Chaos Under Local Self-adaptive Coupling Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; WU Ning-Jie; YING He-Ping; YUAN Li-Hua

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a close-loop feedback control is imposed locally on the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FHN) system to suppress the stable spirals and spatiotemporal chaos according to the principle of self-adaptive coupling interaction. The simulation results show that an expanding target wave is stimulated by the spiral waves under dynamic control period when a local area of 5 x 5 grids is controlled, or the spiral tip is driven to the board of the system. It is adso found that the spatiotemporal chaos can be suppressed to get a stable homogeneous state within 50 time units as two local grids are controlled mutually. The mechanism of the scheme is briefly discussed.

  19. New periodic wave solutions, localized excitations and their interaction for (2+1)-dimensional Burgers equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hong-Cai; Ge Dong-Jie; Yu Yao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the B(a)cklund method and the multilinear variable separation approach (MLVSA), this paper finds a general solution including two arbitrary functions for the (2+1)-dimensional Burgers equations. Then a class of new doubly periodic wave solutions for (2+1)-dimensional Burgers equations is obtained by introducing appropriate Jacobi elliptic functions, Weierstrass elliptic functions and their combination in the general solutions (which contains two arbitrary functions). Two types of limit cases are considered. Firstly, taking one of the moduli to be unity and the other zero, it obtains particular wave (called semi-localized) patterns, which is periodic in one direction, but localized in the other direction. Secondly, if both moduli are tending to 1 as a limit, it derives some novel localized excitations (two-dromion solution).

  20. Electromagnetic waves with frequencies near the local proton gyrofrequency: ISEE-3 1 AU observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.; Mok, John; Smith, Edward J.; Mason, Glenn M.; Tan, Lun C.

    1994-01-01

    Low Frequency (LF) electromagnetic waves with periods near the local proton gyrofrequency have been detected in interplanetary space by the magnetometer onboard International-Sun-Earth-Explorer-3 (ISEE-3). Transverse peak-to-peak amplitudes as large as delta vector B/absolute value of B approximately 0.4 have been noted with compressional components (Delta absolute value of B/absolute value of B) typically less than or = 0.1. Generally, the waves have even smaller amplitudes, or are not detectable within the solar wind turbulence. The waves are elliptically/linearly polarized and are often, but not always, found to propagate nearly along vector B(sub zero). Both right- and left-hand polarizations in the spacecraft-frame have been detected. The waves are observed during all orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field, with the Parker spiral orientation being the most common case. Because the waves are detected at and near the local proton cyclotron frequency, the generation mechanism must almost certainly be solar wind pickup of freshly created hydrogen ions. Possible sources for the hydrogen are the Earth's atmosphere, coronal mass ejections from the Sun, comets and interstellar neutral atoms. At this time it is not obvious which potential source is the correct one. Statistical tests employing over one year of ISEE-3 data will be done in the near future to eliminate/confirm some of these possibilities.

  1. Electromagnetic waves with frequencies near the local proton gyrofrequency: ISEE-3 1 AU observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.; Mok, John; Smith, Edward J.; Mason, Glenn M.; Tan, Lun C.

    1994-01-01

    Low Frequency (LF) electromagnetic waves with periods near the local proton gyrofrequency have been detected in interplanetary space by the magnetometer onboard International-Sun-Earth-Explorer-3 (ISEE-3). Transverse peak-to-peak amplitudes as large as delta vector B/absolute value of B approximately 0.4 have been noted with compressional components (Delta absolute value of B/absolute value of B) typically less than or = 0.1. Generally, the waves have even smaller amplitudes, or are not detectable within the solar wind turbulence. The waves are elliptically/linearly polarized and are often, but not always, found to propagate nearly along vector B(sub zero). Both right- and left-hand polarizations in the spacecraft-frame have been detected. The waves are observed during all orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field, with the Parker spiral orientation being the most common case. Because the waves are detected at and near the local proton cyclotron frequency, the generation mechanism must almost certainly be solar wind pickup of freshly created hydrogen ions. Possible sources for the hydrogen are the Earth's atmosphere, coronal mass ejections from the Sun, comets and interstellar neutral atoms. At this time it is not obvious which potential source is the correct one. Statistical tests employing over one year of ISEE-3 data will be done in the near future to eliminate/confirm some of these possibilities.

  2. Multiple-Resonance Local Wave Functions for Accurate Excited States in Quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfikri, Habiburrahman; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-03-08

    We introduce a novel class of local multideterminant Jastrow-Slater wave functions for the efficient and accurate treatment of excited states in quantum Monte Carlo. The wave function is expanded as a linear combination of excitations built from multiple sets of localized orbitals that correspond to the bonding patterns of the different Lewis resonance structures of the molecule. We capitalize on the concept of orbital domains of local coupled-cluster methods, which is here applied to the active space to select the orbitals to correlate and construct the important transitions. The excitations are further grouped into classes, which are ordered in importance and can be systematically included in the Jastrow-Slater wave function to ensure a balanced description of all states of interest. We assess the performance of the proposed wave function in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and excited-state geometry optimization of retinal models whose π → π* state has a strong intramolecular charge-transfer character. We find that our multiresonance wave functions recover the reference values of the total energies of the ground and excited states with only a small number of excitations and that the same expansion can be flexibly used at very different geometries. Furthermore, significant computational saving can also be gained in the orbital optimization step by selectively mixing occupied and virtual orbitals based on spatial considerations without loss of accuracy on the excitation energy. Our multiresonance wave functions are therefore compact, accurate, and very promising for the calculation of multiple excited states of different character in large molecules.

  3. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...... analgesics were not significantly different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to post-ESWL skin changes. Therefore, EMLA cream can be recommended for ESWL provided it is applied correctly....

  4. Effects of ULF waves on local and global energetic particles: Particle energy and species dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. Y.; Yu, J.; Cao, J. B.; Wang, Z. Q.; Yu, Y. Q.; Reeves, G. D.; Li, X.

    2016-11-01

    After 06:13 UT on 24 August 2005, an interplanetary shock triggers large-amplitude ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves (|δB| ≥ 15 nT) in the Pc4-Pc5 wave band (1.6-9 mHz) near the noon geosynchronous orbit (6.6 RE). The local and global effects of ULF waves on energetic particles are observed by five Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at different magnetic local times. The large-amplitude ULF waves cause the synchronous oscillations of energetic electrons and protons (≥75 keV) at the noon geosynchronous orbit. When the energetic particles have a negative phase space density radial gradient, they undergo rapid outward radial diffusion and loss in the wave activity region. In the particle drift paths without strong ULF waves, only the rapidly drifting energetic electrons (≥225 keV) display energy-dispersive oscillations and flux decays, whereas the slowly drifting electrons (<225 keV) and protons (75-400 keV) have no ULF oscillation and loss feature. When the dayside magnetopause is compressed to the geosynchronous orbit, most of energetic electrons and protons are rapidly lost because of open drift trajectories. The global and multicomposition particle measurements demonstrate that the effect of ULF waves on nonlocal particle flux depends on the particle energy and species, whereas magnetopause shadowing effect is independent of the energetic particle species. For the rapidly drifting outer radiation belt particles (≥225 keV), nonlocal particle loss/acceleration processes could also change their fluxes in the entire drift trajectory in the absence of "Dst effect" and substorm injection.

  5. Local Effects on Strain Seismogram at Matsushiro Seismological Observatory - 1. Love Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi Okamoto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a simple method to evaluate local effects on a strain seismogram, and applied the method to investigation of the effects at Matsushiro Seismological Observatory, Japan Meteorological Agency, central Japan, for a Love wave in a period range of 170 - 400 sec. First, we took a ratio of EW to NS component strain for a Love wave on a timefrequency plane. Although NS and EW component strain for a Love wave travelling in any direction have the same amplitude theoretically, the ratio of observed EW to NS component strain was 0.7. Next, we compared the strain seismogram with a velocity seismogram recorded with STS-1 broadband seismometer. A ratio of a partial derivative of a displacement field with respect to time to that with respect to wave propagation direction equals a phase velocity of the wave theoretically. Utilizing the fact, we estimated the phase velocity of a Love wave using the observed velocity and strain seismogram, after NS component strain had been multiplied by 0.7. The result was 24% smaller than the theoretical phase velocity. Finally, we compared the velocity seismogram with other velocity seismograms recorded by STS-1 seismometers at F-net observation stations near Matsushiro and by STS-2 seismometer at Matsushiro, and found that the every deviation from Matsushiro was less than 10%. From these results, we conclude that the EW and NS component strain seismograms have been amplified by factors of 1.32 and 1.88 for a Love wave, respectively. This fact, which may be because of local geology and/or topography effects, must be taken into account when the strain seismogram is used for seismological applications such as the CMT inversion and research on earth¡¦s free oscillations.

  6. Extreme Supernova Models for the Superluminous Transient ASASSN-15lh

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzopoulos, E; Vinko, J; Nagy, A P; Wiggins, B K; Even, W P

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of the unprecedentedly superluminous transient ASASSN-15lh (or SN 2015L) challenges all the power-input models that have been proposed for superluminous supernovae. Here we examine some of the few viable interpretations of ASASSN-15lh in the context of a stellar explosion, involving combinations of one or more power inputs. We model the lightcurve of ASASSN-15lh with a hybrid model that includes contributions from magnetar spin-down energy and hydrogen-poor circumstellar interaction. We also investigate models of pure circumstellar interaction with a massive hydrogen-deficient shell and discuss about the lack of interaction features in the observed spectra. We find that ASASSN-15lh can be best modeled by the energetic core-collapse of a ~40 Msun supernova interacting with a hydrogen-poor shell of ~20 Msun. The circumstellar shell and progenitor mass are consistent with a rapidly rotating pulsational pair-instability supernova progenitor as required for strong interaction following the fin...

  7. Extended Linear and Nonlinear Lorentz Transformations and Superluminality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Faroughy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two broad scenarios for extended linear Lorentz transformations (ELTs are modeled in Section 2 for mixing subluminal and superluminal sectors resulting in standard or deformed energy-momentum dispersions. The first scenario is elucidated in the context of four diverse realizations of a continuous function f ( v , with 0 ≤ f ( v ≤ 1 and f ( 0 = f ( c = 1 , which is fitted in the ELT. What goes in the making of the ELT in this scenario is not the boost speed v , as ascertained by two inertial observers in uniform relative motion (URM, but v × f ( v . The second scenario infers the preexistence of two rest-mass-dependent superluminal speeds whereby the ELTs are finite at the light speed c . Particle energies are evaluated in this scenario at c for several particles, including the neutrinos, and are auspiciously found to be below the GKZ energy cutoff and in compliance with a host of worldwide ultrahigh energy cosmic ray data. Section 3 presents two broad scenarios involving a number of novel nonlinear LTs (NLTs featuring small Lorentz invariance violations (LIVs, as well as resurrecting the notion of simultaneity for limited spacetime events as perceived by two observers in URM. These inquiries corroborate that NLTs could be potent tools for investigating LIVs past the customary LTs.

  8. Local absorbing boundary conditions for nonlinear wave equation on unbounded domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwei; Wu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Jiwei

    2011-09-01

    The numerical solution of the nonlinear wave equation on unbounded spatial domain is considered. The artificial boundary method is introduced to reduce the nonlinear problem on unbounded spatial domain to an initial boundary value problem on a bounded domain. Using the unified approach, which is based on the operator splitting method, we construct the efficient nonlinear local absorbing boundary conditions for the nonlinear wave equation, and give the stability analysis of the resulting boundary conditions. Finally, several numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  9. Damage localization in metallic plate structures using edge-reflected lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimkhanlou, A.; Dubuc, B.; Salamone, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a model-based guided ultrasonic waves imaging algorithm, in which multiple ultrasonic echoes caused by reflections from the plate’s boundaries are leveraged to enhance imaging performance. An analytical model is proposed to estimate the envelope of scattered waves. Correlation between the estimated and experimental data is used to generate images. The proposed method is validated through experimental tests on an aluminum plate instrumented with three low profile piezoelectric transducers. Different damage conditions are simulated including through-thickness holes. Results are compared with two other imaging localization methods, that is, delay and sum and minimum variance.

  10. Nonlinear simplified model to study localization of kinetic Alfvén wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R. P., E-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ac.in; Gaur, Nidhi, E-mail: nidhiphysics@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    We have presented the numerical simulation of the coupled equations governing the dynamics of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and ion acoustic wave in the intermediate β plasma, where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to the background magnetic pressure. We have also developed a simplified model for this nonlinear interaction using the results obtained from the simulation to understand the physics of nonlinear evolution of KAW. Localization of magnetic field intensity of KAW has been studied by means of the simplified model.

  11. Superluminal two-color light in a multiple Raman gain medium

    KAUST Repository

    Kudriašov, V.

    2014-09-17

    We investigate theoretically the formation of two-component light with superluminal group velocity in a medium controlled by four Raman pump fields. In such an optical scheme only a particular combination of the probe fields is coupled to the matter and exhibits superluminal propagation; the orthogonal combination is uncoupled. The individual probe fields do not have a definite group velocity in the medium. Calculations demonstrate that this superluminal component experiences an envelope advancement in the medium with respect to the propagation in vacuum.

  12. Design of a superluminal ring laser gyroscope using multilayer optical coatings with huge group delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Han, Xiang; Wu, Suyong; Huang, Yun; Luo, Hui

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze a superluminal ring laser gyroscope (RLG) using multilayer optical coatings with huge group delay (GD). This GD assisted superluminal RLG can measure the absolute rotation with a giant sensitivity-enhancement factor of ~10(3); while, the broadband FWHM of the enhancement factor can reach 20 MHz. This superluminal RLG is based on a traditional RLG with minimal re-engineering, and beneficial for miniaturization according to theoretical calculation. The idea of using GD coatings as a fast-light medium will shed lights on the design and application of fast-light sensors.

  13. Effect of wave-function localization on the time delay in photoemission from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.-H.; Thumm, U. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We investigate streaking time delays in the photoemission from a solid model surface as a function of the degree of localization of the initial-state wave functions. We consider a one-dimensional slab with lattice constant a{sub latt} of attractive Gaussian-shaped core potentials of width {sigma}. The parameter {sigma}/a{sub latt} thus controls the overlap between adjacent core potentials and localization of the electronic eigenfunctions on the lattice points. Small values of {sigma}/a{sub latt}<<1 yield lattice eigenfunctions that consist of localized atomic wave functions modulated by a ''Bloch-envelope'' function, while the eigenfunctions become delocalized for larger values of {sigma}/a{sub latt} > or approx 0.4. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we calculate photoemission spectra from which we deduce a characteristic bimodal shape of the band-averaged photoemission time delay: as the slab eigenfunctions become increasingly delocalized, the time delay quickly decreases near {sigma}/a{sub latt}=0.3 from relatively large values below {sigma}/a{sub latt}{approx}0.2 to much smaller delays above {sigma}/a{sub latt}{approx}0.4. This change in wave-function localization facilitates the interpretation of a recently measured apparent relative time delay between the photoemission from core and conduction-band levels of a tungsten surface.

  14. Estimation of local pulse wave velocity using arterial diameter waveforms: Experimental validation in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, S.; Craiem, D.; Barra, J. G.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Estimation of arterial stiffness using local pulse wave velocity (PWV) promises to be very useful for noninvasive diagnosis of arteriosclerosis. In this work we estimated in an instrumented sheep, the local aortic pulse wave velocity using two sonomicrometry diameter sensors (separated 7.5 cm) according to the transit time method (PWVTT) with a sampling rate of 4 KHz. We simultaneously measured aortic pressure in order to determine from pressure-diameter loops (PWVPDLoop), the "true" local aortic pulse wave velocity. A pneumatic cuff occluder was implanted in the aorta in order to compare both methods under a wide range of pressure levels. Mean pressure values ranged from 47 to 101 mmHg and mean proximal diameter values from 12.5. to 15.2 mm. There were no significant differences between PWVTT and PWVPDLoop values (451±43 vs. 447±48 cm/s, p = ns, paired t-test). Both methods correlated significantly (R = 0.81, p<0.05). The mean difference between both methods was only -4±29 cm/s, whereas the range of the limits of agreement (mean ± 2 standard deviation) was -61 to +53 cm/s, showing no trend. In conclusion, the diameter waveforms transit time method was found to allow an accurate and precise estimation of the local aortic PWV.

  15. "Regularity Singularities" and the Scattering of Gravity Waves in Approximate Locally Inertial Frames

    CERN Document Server

    Reintjes, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    It is an open question whether solutions of the Einstein-Euler equations are smooth enough to admit locally inertial coordinates at points of shock wave interaction, or whether "regularity singularities" can exist at such points. The term regularity singularity was proposed by the authors as a point in spacetime where the gravitational metric tensor is Lipschitz continuous ($C^{0,1}$), but no smoother, in any coordinate system of the $C^{1,1}$ atlas. An existence theory for shock wave solutions in $C^{0,1}$ admitting arbitrary interactions has been proven for the Einstein-Euler equations in spherically symmetric spacetimes, but $C^{1,1}$ is the requisite smoothness required for space-time to be locally flat. Thus the open problem of regularity singularities is the problem as to whether locally inertial coordinate systems exist at shock waves, within the larger $C^{1,1}$ atlas. Our purpose here is to clarify and motivate the open problem of regularity singularities, and to prove that if locally inertial coordi...

  16. Interfacial wave theory for dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal. I - Local instability mechanism. II - Wave-emission mechanism at the turning point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1989-01-01

    The complicated dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal is studied on the basis of global interfacial wave theory. The local dispersion relation for normal modes is derived in a paraboloidal coordinate system using the multiple-variable-expansion method. It is shown that the global solution in a dendrite growth process incorporates the morphological instability factor and the traveling wave factor.

  17. Modulation of propagation-invariant Localized Waves for FSO communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The novel concept of spatio-Temporal modulation of Nyquist pulses is introduced, and the resulting wave-packets are termed Nyquist Localized Waves (LWs). Ideal Nyquist LWs belong to the generic family of LW solutions and can propagate indefinitely in unbounded media without attenuation or chromatic dispersion. The possibility of modulating Nyquist LWs for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems is demonstrated using two different modulation techniques. The first technique is on-off keying (OOK) with alternate mark inversion (AMI) coding for 1-bit per symbol transmission, and the second one is 16-Ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) for 4-bits per symbol transmission. Aspects related to the performance, detection and generation of the spatio-Temporally coupled wave-packets are discussed and future research directions are outlined. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  18. Local finite-amplitude wave activity as an objective diagnostic of midlatitude extreme weather

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gang; Lu, Jian; Burrows, Alex D.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-12-28

    Midlatitude extreme weather events are responsible for a large part of climate related damage, yet our understanding of these extreme events is limited, partly due to the lack of a theoretical basis for midlatitude extreme weather. In this letter, the local finite-amplitude wave activity (LWA) of Huang and Nakamura [2015] is introduced as a diagnostic of the 500-hPa geopotential height (Z500) to characterizing midlatitude weather events. It is found that the LWA climatology and its variability associated with the Arctic Oscillation (AO) agree broadly with the previously reported blocking frequency in literature. There is a strong seasonal and spatial dependence in the trend13 s of LWA in recent decades. While there is no observational evidence for a hemispheric-scale increase in wave amplitude, robust trends in wave activity can be identified at the regional scales, with important implications for regional climate change.

  19. Model-based compressive sensing for damage localization in Lamb wave inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelli, Alessandro; Di Ianni, Tommaso; Marzani, Alessandro; De Marchi, Luca; Masetti, Guido

    2013-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has emerged as a potentially viable technique for the efficient compression and analysis of high-resolution signals that have a sparse representation in a fixed basis. In this work, we have developed a CS approach for ultrasonic signal decomposition suitable to achieve high performance in Lamb-wave-based defect detection procedures. In the proposed approach, a CS algorithm based on an alternating minimization (AM) procedure is adopted to extract the information about both the system impulse response and the reflectivity function. The implemented tool exploits the dispersion compensation properties of the warped frequency transform as a means to generate the sparsifying basis for the signal representation. The effectiveness of the decomposition task is demonstrated on synthetic signals and successfully tested on experimental Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate. Compared with available strategies, the proposed approach provides an improvement in the accuracy of wave propagation path length estimation, a fundamental step in defect localization procedures.

  20. Fatigue damage localization using time-domain features extracted from nonlinear Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Lu, Ye; Cheng, Li

    2014-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves are sensitive to small-scale fatigue damage that may hardly be identified by traditional techniques. A characterization method for fatigue damage is established based on nonlinear Lamb waves in conjunction with the use of a piezoelectric sensor network. Theories on nonlinear Lamb waves for damage detection are first introduced briefly. Then, the ineffectiveness of using pure frequency-domain information of nonlinear wave signals for locating damage is discussed. With a revisit to traditional gross-damage localization techniques based on the time of flight, the idea of using temporal signal features of nonlinear Lamb waves to locate fatigue damage is introduced. This process involves a time-frequency analysis that enables the damage-induced nonlinear signal features, which are either undiscernible in the original time history or uninformative in the frequency spectrum, to be revealed. Subsequently, a finite element modeling technique is employed, accounting for various sources of nonlinearities in a fatigued medium. A piezoelectric sensor network is configured to actively generate and acquire probing Lamb waves that involve damageinduced nonlinear features. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm is further proposed, presenting results in diagnostic images intuitively. The approach is experimentally verified on a fatigue-damaged aluminum plate, showing reasonably good accuracy. Compared to existing nonlinear ultrasonics-based inspection techniques, this approach uses a permanently attached sensor network that well accommodates automated online health monitoring; more significantly, it utilizes time-domain information of higher-order harmonics from time-frequency analysis, and demonstrates a great potential for quantitative characterization of small-scale damage with improved localization accuracy.

  1. Effects of the local resonance on the wave propagation in periodic frame structures: generalized Newtonian mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Céline; Boutin, Claude; Hans, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the wave propagation in infinite two-dimensional structures made up of the periodic repetition of frames. Such materials are highly anisotropic and, because of lack of bracing, can present a large contrast between the shear and compression deformabilities. Moreover, when the thickness to length ratio of the frame elements is small, these elements can resonate in bending at low frequencies when compressional waves propagate in the structure. The frame size being small compared to the wavelength of the compressional waves, the homogenization method of periodic discrete media is extended to situations with local resonance, and it is applied to identify the macroscopic behavior at the leading order. In particular, the local resonance in bending leads to an effective mass different from the real mass and to the generalization of the Newtonian mechanics at the macroscopic scale. Consequently, compressional waves become dispersive and frequency bandgaps occur. The physical origin of these phenomena at the microscopic scale is also presented. Finally, a method is proposed for the design of such materials.

  2. Local numerical modelling of ultrasonic guided waves in linear and nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packo, Pawel; Radecki, Rafal; Kijanka, Piotr; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic techniques provide improved damage sensitivity compared to linear approaches. The combination of attractive properties of guided waves, such as Lamb waves, with unique features of higher harmonic generation provides great potential for characterization of incipient damage, particularly in plate-like structures. Nonlinear ultrasonic structural health monitoring techniques use interrogation signals at frequencies other than the excitation frequency to detect changes in structural integrity. Signal processing techniques used in non-destructive evaluation are frequently supported by modeling and numerical simulations in order to facilitate problem solution. This paper discusses known and newly-developed local computational strategies for simulating elastic waves, and attempts characterization of their numerical properties in the context of linear and nonlinear media. A hybrid numerical approach combining advantages of the Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) and Cellular Automata for Elastodynamics (CAFE) is proposed for unique treatment of arbitrary strain-stress relations. The iteration equations of the method are derived directly from physical principles employing stress and displacement continuity, leading to an accurate description of the propagation in arbitrarily complex media. Numerical analysis of guided wave propagation, based on the newly developed hybrid approach, is presented and discussed in the paper for linear and nonlinear media. Comparisons to Finite Elements (FE) are also discussed.

  3. Local probing of propagating acoustic waves in a gigahertz echo chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Santos, Paulo V.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2012-04-01

    In the same way that micro-mechanical resonators resemble guitar strings and drums, surface acoustic waves resemble the sound these instruments produce, but moving over a solid surface rather than through air. In contrast with oscillations in suspended resonators, such propagating mechanical waves have not before been studied near the quantum mechanical limits. Here, we demonstrate local probing of surface acoustic waves with a displacement sensitivity of 30amRMSHz-1/2 and detection sensitivity on the single-phonon level after averaging, at a frequency of 932MHz. Our probe is a piezoelectrically coupled single-electron transistor, which is sufficiently fast, non-destructive and localized to enable us to track pulses echoing back and forth in a long acoustic cavity, self-interfering and ringing the cavity up and down. We project that strong coupling to quantum circuits will enable new experiments, and hybrids using the unique features of surface acoustic waves. Prospects include quantum investigations of phonon-phonon interactions, and acoustic coupling to superconducting qubits for which we present favourable estimates.

  4. Joint Inversion for Earthquake Depths Using Local Waveforms and Amplitude Spectra of Rayleigh Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhe; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Zhan, Zhongwen

    2017-01-01

    Reliable earthquake depth is fundamental to many seismological problems. In this paper, we present a method to jointly invert for centroid depths with local (distance distance of 5°-15°) Rayleigh wave amplitude spectra on sparse networks. We use earthquake focal mechanisms and magnitudes retrieved with the Cut-and-Paste (CAP) method to compute synthetic amplitude spectra of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave for a range of depths. Then we grid search to find the optimal depth that minimizes the joint misfit of amplitude spectra and local waveforms. As case studies, we apply this method to the 2008 Wells, Nevada Mw6.0 earthquake and a Mw5.6 outer-rise earthquake to the east of Japan Trench in 2013. Uncertainties estimated with a bootstrap re-sampling approach show that this joint inversion approach constrains centroid depths well, which are also verified by independent teleseismic depth-phase data.

  5. Generation of localized magnetic moments in the charge-density-wave state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akzyanov, Ramil S.; Rozhkov, Alexander V.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a mechanism explaining the generation of localized magnetic moments in charge-density-wave compounds. Our model Hamiltonian describes an Anderson impurity placed in a host material exhibiting the charge-density wave. There is a region of the model's parameter space, where even weak Coulomb repulsion on the impurity site is able to localize the magnetic moment on the impurity. The phase diagram of a single impurity at T = 0 is mapped. To establish the connection with experiment, the thermodynamic properties of a random impurity ensemble is studied. Magnetic susceptibility of the ensemble diverges at low temperature; heat capacity as a function of the magnetic field demonstrates pronounced low field peak. Both features are consistent with experiments on orthorhombic TaS3 and blue bronze.

  6. LOCAL DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS FOR THREE CLASSES OF NONLINEAR WAVE EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xu; Chi-wang Shu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we further develop the local discontinuous Galerkin method to solve three classes of nonlinear wave equations formulated by the general KdV-Burgers type equations, the general fifth-order KdV type equations and the fully nonlinear K(n, n, n)equations, and prove their stability for these general classes of nonlinear equations. The schemes we present extend the previous work of Yan and Shu [30, 31] and of Levy, Shu and Yan [24] on local discontinuous Galerkin method solving partial differential equations with higher spatial derivatives. Numerical examples for nonlinear problems are shown to illustrate the accuracy and capability of the methods. The numerical experiments include stationary solitons, soliton interactions and oscillatory solitary wave solutions.The numerical experiments also include the compacton solutions of a generalized fifthorder KdV equation in which the highest order derivative term is nonlinear and the fully nonlinear K(n, n, n) equations.

  7. Different localized states of travelling-wave convection in a rectangular container

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-Dong; Huang Yong-Nian

    2006-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of localized travelling-wave convection in a binary fluid mixture heated from below in a long rectangular container. Calculations are carried out in a vertical cross section of the rolls perpendicular to their axes. For a negative enough separation ratio, two types of quite different confined states were documented by applying different control processes. One branch of localized travelling waves survives only in a very narrow band within subcritical regime, while another branch straddles the onset of convection existing both in subcritical and supercritical regions. We elucidated that concentration field and its current are key to understand how confined convection is sustained when conductive state is absolutely unstable. The weak structures in the conducting region are demonstrated too.

  8. Interactions of localized wave structures and dynamics in the defocusing coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Yan, Zhenya; Wen, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Yong

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the defocusing coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations from a 3 ×3 Lax pair. The Darboux transformations with the nonzero plane-wave solutions are presented to derive the newly localized wave solutions including dark-dark and bright-dark solitons, breather-breather solutions, and different types of new vector rogue wave solutions, as well as interactions between distinct types of localized wave solutions. Moreover, we analyze these solutions by means of parameters modulation. Finally, the perturbed wave propagations of some obtained solutions are explored by means of systematic simulations, which demonstrates that nearly stable and strongly unstable solutions. Our research results could constitute a significant contribution to explore the distinct nonlinear waves (e.g., dark solitons, breather solutions, and rogue wave solutions) dynamics of the coupled system in related fields such as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, oceanography, and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  9. Modified Kubelka-Munk equations for localized waves inside a layered medium

    OpenAIRE

    Haney, Matthew M.; van Wijk, Kasper

    2007-01-01

    We present a pair of coupled partial differential equations to describe the evolution of the average total intensity and intensity flux of a wavefield inside a randomly layered medium. These equations represent a modification of the Kubelka-Munk equations, or radiative transfer. Our modification accounts for wave interference (e.g., localization), which is neglected in radiative transfer. We numerically solve the modified Kubelka-Munk equations and compare the results to radiative transfer as...

  10. Long-wave approximation for hybridization modeling of local surface plasmonic resonance in nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ben Q; Liu, Changhong

    2011-01-15

    A hybridization model for the localized surface plasmon resonance of a nanoshell is developed within the framework of long-wave approximation. Compared with the existing hybridization model derived from the hydrodynamic simulation of free electron gas, this approach is much simpler and gives identical results for a concentric nanoshell. Also, with this approach, the limitations associated with the original hybridization model are succinctly stated. Extension of this approach to hybridization modeling of more complicated structures such as multiplayered nanoshells is straightforward.

  11. Exotic Localized Coherent Structures of the (2+1)-Dimensional Dispersive Long-Wave Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JieFang

    2002-01-01

    This article is concerned with the extended homogeneous balance method for studying thc abundantlocalized solution structures in the (2-k1)-dimensional dispersive long-wave equations uty + xx + (u2)xy/2 = 0, ηt +(u + u + uxy)x = 0. Starting from the homogeneous balance method, we find that the richness of the localized coherentstructures of the model is caused by the entrance of two variable-separated arbitrary functions. For some special selectionsof the arbitrary functions, it is shown that the localized structures of the model may be dromions, lumps, breathers,instantons and ring solitons.

  12. Exact density functional and wave function embedding schemes based on orbital localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hégely, Bence; Nagy, Péter R.; Ferenczy, György G.; Kállay, Mihály

    2016-08-01

    Exact schemes for the embedding of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function theory (WFT) methods into lower-level DFT or WFT approaches are introduced utilizing orbital localization. First, a simple modification of the projector-based embedding scheme of Manby and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A507 (2014)] is proposed. We also use localized orbitals to partition the system, but instead of augmenting the Fock operator with a somewhat arbitrary level-shift projector we solve the Huzinaga-equation, which strictly enforces the Pauli exclusion principle. Second, the embedding of WFT methods in local correlation approaches is studied. Since the latter methods split up the system into local domains, very simple embedding theories can be defined if the domains of the active subsystem and the environment are treated at a different level. The considered embedding schemes are benchmarked for reaction energies and compared to quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular mechanics (MM) and vacuum embedding. We conclude that for DFT-in-DFT embedding, the Huzinaga-equation-based scheme is more efficient than the other approaches, but QM/MM or even simple vacuum embedding is still competitive in particular cases. Concerning the embedding of wave function methods, the clear winner is the embedding of WFT into low-level local correlation approaches, and WFT-in-DFT embedding can only be more advantageous if a non-hybrid density functional is employed.

  13. Broadband Lamb Wave Trapping in Cellular Metamaterial Plates with Multiple Local Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-Gang; Li, Yong; Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the Lamb wave propagation in cellular metamaterial plates constructed by bending-dominated and stretch-dominated unit-cells with the stiffness differed by orders of magnitude at an ultralow density. The simulation results show that ultralight metamaterial plates with textured stubs deposited on the surface can support strong local resonances for both symmetric and anti-symmetric modes at low frequencies, where Lamb waves at the resonance frequencies are highly localized in the vibrating stubs. The resonance frequency is very sensitive to the geometry of textured stubs. By reasonable design of the geometry of resonant elements, we establish a simple loaded-bar model with the array of oscillators having a gradient relative density (or weight) that can support multiple local resonances, which permits the feasibility of a broadband Lamb wave trapping. Our study could be potentially significant in designing ingenious weight-efficient acoustic devices for practical applications, such as shock absorption, cushioning, and vibrations traffic, etc. PMID:25790858

  14. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of damped guided wave propagation in complex composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave generation, propagation, and interaction with damage in complex composite structures. A local finite element model is deployed to capture the piezoelectric effects and actuation dynamics of the transmitter, while the global domain wave propagation and interaction with structural complexity (structure features and damage) are solved utilizing a local interaction simulation approach (LISA). This hybrid approach allows the accurate modeling of the local dynamics of the transducers and keeping the LISA formulation in an explicit format, which facilitates its readiness for parallel computing. The global LISA framework was extended through the 3D Kelvin-Voigt viscoelasticity theory to include anisotropic damping effects for composite structures, as an improvement over the existing LISA formulation. The global LISA framework was implemented using the compute unified device architecture running on graphic processing units. A commercial preprocessor is integrated seamlessly with the computational framework for grid generation and material property allocation to handle complex structures. The excitability and damping effects are successfully captured by this hybrid model, with experimental validation using the scanning laser doppler vibrometry. To demonstrate the capability of our hybrid approach for complex structures, guided wave propagation and interaction with a delamination in a composite panel with stiffeners is presented.

  15. Characterizing wave propagation to improve indoor step-level person localization using floor vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshekari, Mostafa; Pan, Shijia; Zhang, Pei; Noh, Hae Young

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize frequency-dependent wave propagation of footstep induced floor vibration to improve robustness of vibration-based occupant localization. Occupant localization is an essential part of many smart structure applications (e.g., energy management, patient/customer tracking, etc.). Exist- ing techniques include visual (e.g. cameras and IR sensors), acoustic, RF, and load-based approaches. These approaches have many deployment and operational requirements that limits their adaptation. To overcome these limitations, prior work has utilized footstep-induced vibrations to allow sparse sensor configuration and non-intrusive detection. However, frequency dependent propagation characteristics and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of footstep-induced vibrations change the shape of the signal. Furthermore, estimating the wave propagation velocity for forming the multilateration equations and localizing the footsteps is a challenging task. They, in turn, lead to large errors of localization. In this paper, we present a structural vibration based indoor occupant localization technique using improved time-difference-of-arrival between multiple vibration sensors. In particular we overcome signal distortion by decomposing the signal into frequency components and focusing on high energy components for accurate indoor localization. Such decomposition leverages the frequency-specific propagation characteristics and reduces the effect of low SNR (by choosing the components of highest energy). Furthermore, we develop a velocity calibration method that finds the optimal velocity which minimizes the localization error. We validate our approach through field experiments in a building with human participants. We are able to achieve an average localization error of less than 0.21 meters, which corresponds to a 13X reduction in error when compared to the baseline method using raw data.

  16. Neutrino superluminality without Cherenkov-like processes in Finslerian special relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Wang, Sai; 10.1016/j.physletb.2012.03.002

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Cohen and Glashow [A.G. Cohen, S.L. Glashow, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 107}, 181803 (2011)] pointed out that the superluminal neutrinos reported by the OPERA would lose their energy rapidly via the Cherenkov-like process. The Cherenkov-like process for the superluminal particles would be forbidden if the principle of special relativity holds in any frame instead violated with a preferred frame. We have proposed that the Finslerian special relativity could account for the data of the neutrino superluminality (arXiv:1110.6673[hep-ph]). The Finslerian special relativity preserves the principle of special relativity and involves a preferred direction while consists with the causality. In this paper, we prove that the energy-momentum conservation is preserved and the energy-momentum is well defined in Finslerian special relativity. The Cherenkov-like process is forbidden in the Finslerian special relativity. Thus, the superluminal neutrinos would not lose energy in their distant propagation.

  17. Using wave intensity analysis to determine local reflection coefficient in flexible tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2016-09-06

    It has been shown that reflected waves affect the shape and magnitude of the arterial pressure waveform, and that reflected waves have physiological and clinical prognostic values. In general the reflection coefficient is defined as the ratio of the energy of the reflected to the incident wave. Since pressure has the units of energy per unit volume, arterial reflection coefficient are traditionally defined as the ratio of reflected to the incident pressure. We demonstrate that this approach maybe prone to inaccuracies when applied locally. One of the main objectives of this work is to examine the possibility of using wave intensity, which has units of energy flux per unit area, to determine the reflection coefficient. We used an in vitro experimental setting with a single inlet tube joined to a second tube with different properties to form a single reflection site. The second tube was long enough to ensure that reflections from its outlet did not obscure the interactions of the initial wave. We generated an approximately half sinusoidal wave at the inlet of the tube and took measurements of pressure and flow along the tube. We calculated the reflection coefficient using wave intensity (RdI and RdI(0.5)) and wave energy (RI and RI(0.5)) as well as the measured pressure (RdP) and compared these results with the reflection coefficient calculated theoretically based on the mechanical properties of the tubes. The experimental results show that the reflection coefficients determined by all the techniques we studied increased or decreased with distance from the reflection site, depending on the type of reflection. In our experiments, RdP, RdI(0.5) and RI(0.5) are the most reliable parameters to measure the mean reflection coefficient, whilst RdI and RI provide the best measure of the local reflection coefficient, closest to the reflection site. Additional work with bifurcations, tapered tubes and in vivo experiments are needed to further understand, validate the method

  18. Superluminal solutions to the Klein-Gordon equation and a causality problem

    CERN Document Server

    Borghardt, A A; Karpenko, D Y

    2003-01-01

    We present a new axially symmetric monochromatic free-space solution to the Klein-Gordon equation propagating with a superluminal group velocity and show that it gives rise to an imaginary part of the causal propagator outside the light cone. We address the question about causality of the spacelike paths and argue that the signal with a well-defined wavefront formed by the superluminal modes would propagate in vacuum with the light speed.

  19. Constraints and tests of the OPERA superluminal neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Yuan, Qiang

    2011-12-09

    The superluminal neutrinos detected by OPERA indicate Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) of the neutrino sector at the order of 10(-5). We study the implications of the result in this work. We find that such a large LIV implied by OPERA data will make the neutrino production process π → μ + ν(μ) kinematically forbidden for a neutrino energy greater than about 5 GeV. The OPERA detection of neutrinos at 40 GeV can constrain the LIV parameter to be smaller than 3×10(-7). Furthermore, the neutrino decay in the LIV framework will modify the neutrino spectrum greatly. The atmospheric neutrino spectrum measured by the IceCube Collaboration can constrain the LIV parameter to the level of 10(-12). The future detection of astrophysical neutrinos of galactic sources is expected to be able to give an even stronger constraint on the LIV parameter of neutrinos.

  20. Superluminal Velocities in the Synchronized Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medvedev S. Yu.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the non-gravitational generalization of the special relativity, a problem of possible superluminal motion of particles and signals is considered. It has been proven that for the particles with non-zero mass the existence of anisotropic light barrier with the shape dependent on the reference frame velocity results from the Tangherlini transformations. The maximal possible excess of neutrino velocity over the absolute velocity of light related to the Earth (using th e clock with instantaneous synchronization has been estimated. The illusoriness of t he acausality problem has been illustrated and conclusion is made on the lack of the upper limit of velocities of signals of informational nature.

  1. On the impossibility of superluminal travel: the warp drive lesson

    CERN Document Server

    Barceló, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The question of whether it is possible or not to surpass the speed of light is already centennial. The special theory of relativity took the existence of a speed limit as a principle, the light postulate, which has proven to be enormously predictive. Here we discuss some of its twists and turns when general relativity and quantum mechanics come into play. In particular, we discuss one of the most interesting proposals for faster than light travel: warp drives. Even if one succeeded in creating such spacetime structures, it would be still necessary to check whether they would survive to the switching on of quantum matter effects. Here, we show that the quantum back-reaction to warp-drive geometries, created out of an initially flat spacetime, inevitably lead to their destabilization whenever superluminal speeds are attained. We close this investigation speculating the possible significance of this further success of the speed of light postulate.

  2. "OPERA superluminal neutrinos explained by spontaneous emission and stimulated absorption"

    CERN Document Server

    Torrealba, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In this work it is shown, that for short 3ns neutrino pulses reported by OPERA, a relativistic shape deforming effect of the neutrino distribution function due to spontaneous emission, produces an earlier arrival of 65.8ns in agreement with the reported 62.1ns\\pm 3.7ns, with a RMS of 16.4ns explaining the apparent superluminal effect. It is also shown, that early arrival of long 10500ns neutrinos pulse to Gran Sasso, by 57.8ns with respect to the speed of light, could be explained by a shape deforming effect due to a combination of stimulated absorption and spontaneous emission, while traveling by the decay tunnel that acts as a LASER tube.

  3. Application of Wavelet Packet De-noising in Time-Frequency Analysis of the Local Wave Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-kun; MA Xiao-jiang; WANG Zhen; ZHU Hong

    2003-01-01

    The local wave method is a very good time-frequency method for nonstationary vibration signal analysis. But the interfering noise has a big influence on the accuracy of time-frequency analysis. The wavelet packet de-noising method can eliminate the interference of noise and improve the signal-noise-ratio. This paper uses the local wave method to decompose the de-noising signal and perform a time-frequency analysis. We can get better characteristics. Finally, an example of wavelet packet de-noising and a local wave time-frequency spectrum application of diesel engine surface vibration signal is put forward.

  4. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, George H.; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Grüneis, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

  5. Localized Ionospheric Particle Acceleration and Wave Acceleration of Auroral Ions: Amicist Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kristina A.

    1999-01-01

    Research supported by this grant covered two main topics: auroral ion acceleration from ELF-band wave activity, and from VLF-spikelet (lower hybrid solitary structure) wave activity. Recent auroral sounding rocket data illustrate the relative significance of various mechanisms for initiating auroral ion outflow. Two nightside mechanisms are shown in detail. The first mechanism is ion acceleration within lower hybrid solitary wave events. The new data from this two payload mission show clearly that: (1) these individual events are spatially localized to scales approximately 100 m wide perpendicular to B, in agreement with previous investigations of these structures, and (2) that the probability of occurrence of the events is greatest at times of maximum VLF wave intensity. The second mechanism is ion acceleration by broadband, low frequency electrostatic waves, observed in a 30 km wide region at the poleward edge of the arc. The ion fluxes from the two mechanisms are compared and it is shown that while lower hybrid solitary structures do indeed accelerate ions in regions of intense VLF waves, the outflow from the electrostatic ion wave acceleration region is dominant for the aurora investigated by this sounding rocket, AMICIST. The fluxes are shown to be consistent with DE-1 and Freja outflow measurements, indicating that the AMICIST observations show the low altitude, microphysical signatures of nightside auroral outflow. In this paper, we present a review of sounding rocket observations of the ion acceleration seen nightside auroral zone lower hybrid solitary structures. Observations from Topaz3, Amicist, and Phaze2 are presented on various spatial scales, including the two-point measurements of the Amicist mission. From this collection of observations, we will demonstrate the following characteristics of transverse ion acceleration (TAI) in LHSS. The ion acceleration process is narrowly confined to 90 degrees pitch angle, in spatially confined regions of up to a

  6. Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Barthelmy, S; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J C; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J C; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L C; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Castro, J M G; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; 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    2016-01-01

    A gravitational-wave transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced LIGO detectors on 2015 September 14. The event candidate, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the gravitational wave data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network Circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the gravitational wave sky localization coverage, the timeline and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagn...

  7. In vivo noninvasive method for measuring local wave velocity in femoral arteries of pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Kinnick, Randall; Pislaru, Cristina; Fatemi, Mostafa; Greenleaf, James

    2005-09-01

    We have proposed generating a bending wave in the arterial wall using ultrasound radiation force and measuring the wave velocity along the arterial wall [Zhang et al., IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 52, 642-652 (2005)]. Here, we report the results of in vivo studies on pigs. The pig was anesthetized, and a micromanometer tip catheter was inserted into the femoral artery to measure luminal pressure. A water bath was created on the animal's groin to allow unimpeded access of the ultrasound beams to the femoral artery. The femoral artery was first located using a 13-MHz linear-array transducer. Then, a vibro-acoustography image was obtained to ensure precise positioning of the excitation force relative to the artery. The artery was excited by the force transducer and the resulting vibration of the arterial wall was measured by a sensing Doppler transceiver. Measured wave velocity was 3.1 m/s at 300 Hz. With this new method wave velocity over a distance of 5 mm, and therefore stiffness of arteries, can be measured locally and non-invasively. Measurement time is short in a few tens of milliseconds, which allows pressure dependence and pharmacological effect on the wall properties to be measured at different cardiac times.

  8. The effect of the localization of Q wave myocardial infarction on ventricular electromechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Christine A; Ramzy, Ihab S; Li, Wei; Sutton, Richard; Coats, Andrew; Gibson, Derek G; Henein, Michael Y

    2002-08-01

    The exact location of a Q wave myocardial infarction has an important effect on overall left ventricular function. To assess the effect of localization of Q wave infarction on left ventricular minor and long axis function, with particular reference to electromechanical disturbances. We studied 72 patients with Q wave myocardial infarction; 35 anterior, age 61+/-15 years and 37 inferior, age 62+/-12 years. ECG intervals were automatically measured by Hewlett-Packard Pagewriter and LV dimension and filling velocities studied by transthoracic echocardiography and simultaneous phonocardiogram. Findings were compared with 21 controls of similar age. Heart rate and all ECG intervals were similar in the two patient groups and controls. QRS axis was more to the left in patients with inferior MI. Normal septal q wave was absent in lead V5 and V6 in 33/35 (94%) patients with anterior MI and in only 3/37 (8%) with inferior MI, pchange in early diastole. This disturbance in electromechanical behaviour might play an important role in the differing outcomes between the two different sites of myocardial infarction.

  9. Tangent Bifurcation of Band Edge Plane Waves, Dynamical Symmetry Breaking and Vibrational Localization

    CERN Document Server

    Flach, S

    1995-01-01

    We study tangent bifurcation of band edge plane waves in nonlinear Hamiltonian lattices. The lattice is translationally invariant. We argue for the breaking of permutational symmetry by the new bifurcated periodic orbits. The case of two coupled oscillators is considered as an example for the perturbation analysis, where the symmetry breaking can be traced using Poincare maps. Next we consider a lattice and derive the dependence of the bifurcation energy on the parameters of the Hamiltonian function in the limit of large system sizes. A necessary condition for the occurence of the bifurcation is the repelling of the band edge plane wave's frequency from the linear spectrum with increasing energy. We conclude that the bifurcated orbits will consequently exponentially localize in the configurational space.

  10. Effect of localized microstructural evolution on higher harmonic generation of guided wave modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gloria; Liu, Yang; Yao, Xiaochu; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2015-03-01

    Higher harmonic generation of ultrasonic waves has the potential to be used to detect precursors to macroscale damage of phenomenon like fatigue due to microstructural evolution contributing to nonlinear material behavior. Aluminum plates having various plastic zone sizes were plastically deformed to different levels. The fundamental shear horizontal mode was then generated in the plate samples via a magnetostrictive transducer. After propagating through the plastic zone the primary wave mode (SH0) and its third harmonic (sh0) were received by a second transducer. Results of a parallel numerical study using the S1-s2 Lamb mode pair, where sensitivity to changes in third order elastic constants were investigated, are described within the context of the experimental results. Specimens used within both studies are geometrically similar and have double edge notches for dog bone samples that introduce localized plastic deformation. Through both studies, the size of the plastic zone with respect to the propagation distance and damage intensity influence the higher harmonics.

  11. Unstable spiral waves and local Euclidean symmetry in a model of cardiac tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O. [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This paper investigates the properties of unstable single-spiral wave solutions arising in the Karma model of two-dimensional cardiac tissue. In particular, we discuss how such solutions can be computed numerically on domains of arbitrary shape and study how their stability, rotational frequency, and spatial drift depend on the size of the domain as well as the position of the spiral core with respect to the boundaries. We also discuss how the breaking of local Euclidean symmetry due to finite size effects as well as the spatial discretization of the model is reflected in the structure and dynamics of spiral waves. This analysis allows identification of a self-sustaining process responsible for maintaining the state of spiral chaos featuring multiple interacting spirals.

  12. Explicit local time-stepping methods for time-dependent wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Semi-discrete Galerkin formulations of transient wave equations, either with conforming or discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretizations, typically lead to large systems of ordinary differential equations. When explicit time integration is used, the time-step is constrained by the smallest elements in the mesh for numerical stability, possibly a high price to pay. To overcome that overly restrictive stability constraint on the time-step, yet without resorting to implicit methods, explicit local time-stepping schemes (LTS) are presented here for transient wave equations either with or without damping. In the undamped case, leap-frog based LTS methods lead to high-order explicit LTS schemes, which conserve the energy. In the damped case, when energy is no longer conserved, Adams-Bashforth based LTS methods also lead to explicit LTS schemes of arbitrarily high accuracy. When combined with a finite element discretization in space with an essentially diagonal mass matrix, the resulting time-marching scheme...

  13. Transport and localization of waves in ladder-shaped lattices with locally $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Ba Phi

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically the transport and localization properties of waves in ordered and disordered ladder-shaped lattices with local $\\mathcal{PT}$ symmetry. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmittance and the reflectance for the individual channels and the Lyapunov exponent for the whole system. In the absence of disorder, we find that when the gain/loss parameter $\\rho$ is smaller than the interchain coupling parameter $t_{v}$, the transmittance and the reflectance are periodic functions of the system size, whereas when $\\rho$ is larger than $t_{v}$, the transmittance is found to be an exponentially-decaying function while the reflectance attains a saturation value in the thermodynamic limit. For a fixed system size, there appear perfect transmission resonances in each individual channel at several values of the gain/loss strength smaller than $t_{v}$. A singular behavior of the transmittance is also found to appear at various values of $\\rho$ for a given system size. When disorder is inse...

  14. Wave-packet dynamics in one-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger lattices: local vs. nonlocal nonlinear effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Phi [Central University of Construction, Tuy Hoa (Viet Nam); Kim, Ki Hong [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    We study numerically the dynamics of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger lattices with both local and nonlocal nonlinearities. Using the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation generalized by including a nonlocal nonlinear term, we calculate four different physical quantities as a function of time, which are the return probability to the initial excitation site, the participation number, the root-mean-square displacement from the excitation site and the spatial probability distribution. We investigate the influence of the nonlocal nonlinearity on the delocalization to self-trapping transition induced by the local nonlinearity. In the non-self-trapping region, we find that the nonlocal nonlinearity compresses the soliton width and slows down the spreading of the wave packet. In the vicinity of the delocalization to self-trapping transition point and inside the self-trapping region, we find that a new kind of self-trapping phenomenon, which we call partial self-trapping, takes place when the nonlocal nonlinearity is sufficiently strong.

  15. Complex-periodic spiral waves in confluent cardiac cell cultures induced by localized inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seong-min; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2005-07-01

    Spatiotemporal wave activities in excitable heart tissues have long been the subject of numerous studies because they underlie different forms of cardiac arrhythmias. In particular, understanding the dynamics and the instabilities of spiral waves have become very important because they can cause reentrant tachycardia and their subsequent transitions to fibrillation. Although many aspects of cardiac spiral waves have been investigated through experiments and model simulations, their complex properties are far from well understood. Here, we show that intriguing complex-periodic (such as period-2, period-3, period-4, or aperiodic) spiral wave states can arise in monolayer tissues of cardiac cell culture in vitro, and demonstrate that these different dynamic states can coexist with abrupt and spontaneous transitions among them without any change in system parameters; in other words, the medium supports multistability. Based on extensive image data analysis, we have confirmed that these spiral waves are driven by their tips tracing complex orbits whose unusual, meandering shapes are formed by delicate interplay between localized conduction blocks and nonlinear properties of the culture medium. Author contributions: S.-m.H. and K.J.L. designed research; S.-m.H. and T.Y.K. performed research; S.-m.H. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; S.-m.H., T.Y.K., and K.J.L. analyzed data; and S.-m.H. and K.J.L. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: IBI, interbeat interval; P-n, period-n.

  16. Hybrid local FEM/global LISA modeling of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a hybrid modeling technique for the efficient simulation of guided wave propagation and interaction with damage in composite structures. This hybrid approach uses a local finite element model (FEM) to compute the excitability of guided waves generated by piezoelectric transducers, while the global domain wave propagation, wave-damage interaction, and boundary reflections are modeled with the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). A small-size multi-physics FEM with non-reflective boundaries (NRB) was built to obtain the excitability information of guided waves generated by the transmitter. Frequency-domain harmonic analysis was carried out to obtain the solution for all the frequencies of interest. Fourier and inverse Fourier transform and frequency domain convolution techniques are used to obtain the time domain 3-D displacement field underneath the transmitter under an arbitrary excitation. This 3-D displacement field is then fed into the highly efficient time domain LISA simulation module to compute guided wave propagation, interaction with damage, and reflections at structural boundaries. The damping effect of composite materials was considered in the modified LISA formulation. The grids for complex structures were generated using commercial FEM preprocessors and converted to LISA connectivity format. Parallelization of the global LISA solution was achieved through Compute Unified Design Architecture (CUDA) running on Graphical Processing Unit (GPU). The multi-physics local FEM can reliably capture the detailed dimensions and local dynamics of the piezoelectric transducers. The global domain LISA can accurately solve the 3-D elastodynamic wave equations in a highly efficient manner. By combining the local FEM with global LISA, the efficient and accurate simulation of guided wave structural health monitoring procedure is achieved. Two numerical case studies are presented: (1) wave propagation in a unidirectional CFRP composite plate

  17. Effect of Distortion Ratio on Local Scour Under Tidal Currents and Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦希萍; 董凤舞

    2004-01-01

    Five generalized physical models of different distortion ratios were built according to DOU Guo-ren' s similarity theory of total sediment transport modeling for estuarine and coastal regions. Experiments on local scour in front of groins were made under the actions of tidal currents and waves with clear and sediment entraining water. The scour depths under different dynamic actions are compared. The effect of the distortion ratio on the depth of scour hole is discussed. A relationship between scour depths for distorted and undistorted models is given.

  18. Tunable THz Generation by the Interaction of a Super-luminous Laser Pulse with Biased Semiconductor Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Zigler, A.

    2006-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is electromagnetic radiation in the range between several hundred and a few thousand GHz. It covers the gap between fast-wave electronics (millimeter waves) and optics (infrared). This spectral region offers enormous potential for detection of explosives and chemical/biological agents, non-destructive testing of non-metallic structural materials and coatings of aircraft structures, medical imaging, bio-sensing of DNA stretching modes and high-altitude secure communications. The development of these applications has been hindered by the lack of powerful, tunable THz sources with controlled waveform. The need for such sources is accentuated by the strong, but selective absorption of THz radiation during transmission through air with high vapor content. The majority of the current experimental work relies on time-domain spectroscopy using fast electrically biased photoconductive sources in conjunction with femto-second mode-locked Ti:Sapphire lasers. These sources known as Large Aperture Photoconductive Antennas (LAPA) have very limited tunability, relatively low upper bound of power and no bandwidth control. The paper presents a novel source of THz radiation known as Miniature Photoconductive Capacitor Array (MPCA). Experiments demonstrated tunability between .1 - 2 THz, control of the relative bandwidth Δf/f between .5-.01, and controlled pulse length and pulse waveform (temporal shape, chirp, pulse-to-pulse modulation etc.). Direct scaling from the current device indicates efficiency in excess of 30% at 1 THz with 1/f2 scaling at higher frequencies, peak power of 100 kW and average power between .1-1 W. The physics underlying the MPCA is the interaction of a super-luminous ionization front generated by the oblique incidence of a Ti:Sapphire laser pulse on a semiconductor crystal (ZnSe) biased with an alternating electrostatic field, similar to that of a frozen wave generator. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the

  19. TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Huber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep slow wave activity (SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, increasing in proportion to the length of prior wakefulness and decreasing during sleep. However, the process responsible for SWA regulation is not known. We showed recently that SWA increases locally after a learning task involving a circumscribed brain region, suggesting that SWA may reflect plastic changes triggered by learning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis directly, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in conjunction with high-density EEG in humans. We show that 5-Hz TMS applied to motor cortex induces a localized potentiation of TMS-evoked cortical EEG responses. We then show that, in the sleep episode following 5-Hz TMS, SWA increases markedly (+39.1+/-17.4%, p<0.01, n = 10. Electrode coregistration with magnetic resonance images localized the increase in SWA to the same premotor site as the maximum TMS-induced potentiation during wakefulness. Moreover, the magnitude of potentiation during wakefulness predicts the local increase in SWA during sleep. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide direct evidence for a link between plastic changes and the local regulation of sleep need.

  20. Spatial localization and azimuthal wave numbers of Alfvén waves generated by drift-bounce resonance in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Mager

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial localization and azimuthal wave numbers m of poloidal Alfvén waves generated by energetic particles in the magnetosphere are studied in the paper. There are two factors that cause the wave localization across magnetic shells. First, the instability growth rate is proportional to the distribution function of the energetic particles, hence waves must be predominantly generated on magnetic shells where the particles are located. Second, the frequency of the generated poloidal wave must coincide with the poloidal eigenfrequency, which is a function of the radial coordinate. The combined impact of these two factors also determines the azimuthal wave number of the generated oscillations. The beams with energies about 10 keV and 150 keV are considered. As a result, the waves are shown to be strongly localized across magnetic shells; for the most often observed second longitudinal harmonic of poloidal Alfvén wave (N=2, the localization region is about one Earth radius across the magnetic shells. It is shown that the drift-bounce resonance condition does not select the m value for this harmonic. For 10 keV particles (most often involved in the explanation of poloidal pulsations, the azimuthal wave number was shown to be determined with a rather low accuracy, -100<m<0. The 150 keV particles provide a little better but still a poor determination of this value, -90<m<-70. For the fundamental harmonic (N=1, the azimuthal wave number is determined with a better accuracy, but both of these numbers are too small (if the waves are generated by 150 keV particles, or the waves are generated on magnetic shells (in 10 keV case which are too far away. The calculated values of γ/ω are not large enough to overcome the damping on the ionosphere. All these have cast some suspicion on the possibility of the drift-bounce instability to generate poloidal pulsations in the magnetosphere.

  1. Nonlinear wave dynamics near phase transition in PT-symmetric localized potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear wave propagation in parity-time symmetric localized potentials is investigated analytically near a phase-transition point where a pair of real eigenvalues of the potential coalesce and bifurcate into the complex plane. Necessary conditions for a phase transition to occur are derived based on a generalization of the Krein signature. Using the multi-scale perturbation analysis, a reduced nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived for the amplitude of localized solutions near phase transition. Above the phase transition, this ODE predicts a family of stable solitons not bifurcating from linear (infinitesimal) modes under a certain sign of nonlinearity. In addition, it predicts periodically-oscillating nonlinear modes away from solitons. Under the opposite sign of nonlinearity, it predicts unbounded growth of solutions. Below the phase transition, solution dynamics is predicted as well. All analytical results are compared to direct computations of the full system and good agreement is observed.

  2. Nonlinear wave dynamics near phase transition in $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric localized potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear wave propagation in parity-time ($\\mathcal{PT}$) symmetric localized potentials is investigated analytically near a phase-transition point where a pair of real eigenvalues of the potential coalesce and bifurcate into the complex plane. Necessary conditions for phase transition to occur are derived based on a generalization of the Krein signature. Using multi-scale perturbation analysis, a reduced nonlinear ODE model is derived for the amplitude of localized solutions near phase transition. Above phase transition, this ODE model predicts a family of stable solitons not bifurcating from linear (infinitesimal) modes under a certain sign of nonlinearity. In addition, it predicts periodically-oscillating nonlinear modes away from solitons. Under the opposite sign of nonlinearity, it predicts unbounded growth of solutions. Below phase transition, solution dynamics is predicted as well. All analytical results are compared to direct computations of the full system and good agreement is observed.

  3. Interaction of Kelvin waves and non-locality of the energy transfer in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Laurie, Jason; Nazarenko, Sergey; Rudenko, Oleksii

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the physics of interacting Kelvin Waves (KWs) is highly non-trivial and cannot be understood on the basis of pure dimensional reasoning only. A consistent theory of KWs turbulence in superfluids should be based on explicit knowledge of the details of their interactions. To achieve this, we present a detailed calculation and comprehensive analysis of the interaction coefficients for KWs, thereby fixing previous mistakes stemming from unaccounted contributions. As a first application of this analysis, we show that the previously suggested Kozik-Svistunov energy spectrum of KWs, which has been often used for analysis of experimental and numerical data in superfluid turbulence, is irrelevant, because it is based on an erroneous assumption of the locality of the energy transfer through scales. We also demonstrate weak non-locality of the inverse cascade spectrum with a constant particle-number flux and find resulting logarithmic corrections to this spectrum.

  4. Distorted Waves with Exact Non-Local Exchange a Canonical Function Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhreddine, K; Vien, G N; Tannous, C; Langlois, J M; Robaux, O

    2002-01-01

    It is shown how the Canonical Function approach can be used to obtain accurate solutions for the distorted wave problem taking account of direct static and polarisation potentials and exact non-local exchange. Calculations are made for electrons in the field of atomic hydrogen and the phaseshifts are compared with those obtained using a modified form of the DWPO code of McDowell and collaborators: for small wavenumbers our approach avoids numerical instabilities otherwise present. Comparison is also made with phaseshifts calculated using local equivalent-exchange potentials and it is found that these are inaccurate at small wavenumbers. Extension of our method to the case of atoms having other than s-type outer shells is dicussed.

  5. On topology optimization of acoustic metamaterial lattices for locally resonant bandgaps of flexural waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Uddin, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Optimized topology of bi-material acoustic metamaterial lattice plates is studied for maximized locally resonant bandgap of flexural guided waves. Optimized layout of the two relatively stiff and compliant material phases in the design domain is explored, free from any restrictions on the topology and shape of the relevant domains. Multiobjective optimization is performed through which maximized effective stiffness or minimized overall mass of the bandgap topology is additionally ensured. Extreme and selected intermediate optimized topologies of Pareto fronts are presented and their bandgap efficiencies and effective stiffness are compared. The bi-material constitution of selected topologies are further altered and modal band structure of resultant multilateral and porous designs are evaluated. Novel, core-shell like, locally resonant bandgaps are introduced. It is shown that how the bandgap efficiency and structural mass and/or stiffness can be optimized through optimized microstructural design of the matrix...

  6. On the local properties of highly nonlinear unsteady gravity water waves. Part 1. Slowdown, kinematics and energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Barthelemy, X; Peirson, W L; Dias, F; Allis, M

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic properties of unsteady highly non-linear 3D wave groups have been investigated using a numerical wave tank. Although carrier wave speeds based on zero-crossing analysis remain within +-7% of linear theory predictions, crests and troughs locally undertake a systematic cyclical leaning from forward to backward as the crests/troughs transition through their maximum amplitude. Consequently, both crests and troughs slow down by approximately 15% of the linear velocity, in sharp contrast to the predictions of finite amplitude Stokes steady wavetrain theory. Velocity profiles under the crest maximum have been investigated and surface values in excess of 1.8 times the equivalent Stokes velocity can be observed. Equipartitioning between depth-integrated kinetic and potential energy holds globally on the scale of the wave group. However, equipartitioning does not occur at crests and troughs (even for low amplitude Stokes waves), where the local ratio of potential to total energy varies systemically as a f...

  7. Shear Wave Splitting from Local Earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we investigate crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), by analyzing shear wave splitting from local earthquake data. The NMSZ is centrally located in the United States, spanning portions of western Tennessee, northeastern Arkansas, and southeastern Missouri. The NMSZ is also the location in which three of the largest known earthquakes took place in North America, occurring in 1811-1812. Although many seismic studies have been performed in this region, there is no consensus about which driving mechanism could satisfy both the current observations, as well as the historically observed seismicity. Therefore, it is important to continue investigating the NMSZ, to gain a better understanding of its seismicity, and the possible mechanisms that drive it. The automated technique developed by Savage et al. (2010) is used to perform the shear wave splitting measurements at 120 seismic stations within the NMSZ. The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis provided data for 1151 earthquakes spanning the years 2003-2011. The initial event selection was reduced to 245 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 4.6, which fell within the shear wave window of one or more of the stations. The results of this study provide information about orientation of microcracks in the upper portion of the crust; future work will include analysis for temporal and spatial variations in order to assess the state of stress in the region.

  8. Localization and Broadband Follow-up of the Gravitational-wave Transient GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavagliá, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Castro, J. M. G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. 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M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; InterPlanetary Network; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K. S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; J-GEM Collaboration; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; La Silla–QUEST Survey; Bersier, D. F.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C. G.; Piascik, A. S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I. A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Liverpool Telescope Collaboration; Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Collaboration; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; MASTER Collaboration; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; MAXI Collaboration; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Williams, A.; Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) Collaboration; Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Wright, D. E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS Collaboration; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Chen, T.-W.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; PESSTO Collaboration; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Pi of Sky Collaboration; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; SkyMapper Collaboration; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F. E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Swift Collaboration; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; TAROT, Zadko, Algerian National Observatory, C2PU Collaboration; Beroiz, M.; Peñuela, T.; Macri, L. M.; Oelkers, R. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J. L.; DePoy, D. L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N. A.; Benacquista, M.; TOROS Collaboration; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C. G.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Thoene, C. C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.; VISTA Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline, and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.

  9. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xingjiang; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Yanjun; Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five percent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio $\\gtrsim$ 30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW meas...

  10. Response of a chemical wave to local pulse irradiation in the ruthenium-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shogo; Ezaki, Takato; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Kei; Nishiura, Yasumasa

    2015-04-14

    The photo-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction system was investigated to understand the response of wave propagation to local pulse stimulation in an excitable field. When the chemical wave was irradiated with a bright pulse or a dark pulse, the speed of wave propagation decreased or increased. The timing of pulse irradiation that significantly affected the speed of chemical wave propagation was different with the bright and dark pulses. That is, there is a sensitive point in the chemical wave. The experimental results were qualitatively reproduced by a numerical calculation based on a three-variable Oregonator model that was modified for the photosensitive BZ reaction. These results suggest that the chemical wave is sensitive to the timing of pulse irradiation due to the rates of production of an activator and an inhibitor in the photochemical reaction.

  11. Rapid guided wave delamination detection and quantification in composites using global-local sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a rapid guided ultrasonic wave inspection approach through global inspection by phased array beamforming and local damage evaluation via wavenumber analysis. The global-local approach uses a hybrid system consisting of a PZT wafer and a non-contact laser vibrometer. The overall inspection is performed in two steps. First, a phased array configured by a small number of measurements performs beamforming and beamsteering over the entire plate in order to detect and locate the presence of the damage. A local area is identified as target damage area for the second step. Then a high density wavefield measurement is taken over the target damage area and a spatial wavenumber imaging is performed to quantitatively evaluate the damage. The two-step inspection has been applied to locate and quantify impact-induced delamination damage in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite plate. The detected delamination location, size and shape agree well with those of an ultrasonic C-scan. For the test case studied in this work the global-local approach reduced the total composite inspection (damage detection and characterization) time by ∼97% compared to using a full scan approach.

  12. Gain-assisted superluminal propagation and rotary drag of photon and surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naveed; Amin Bacha, Bakht; Iqbal, Azmat; Ur Rahman, Amin; Afaq, A.

    2017-07-01

    Superluminal propagation of light is a well-established phenomenon and has motivated immense research interest that has led to state-of-the-art knowledge and potential applications in the emerging technology of quantum optics and photonics. This study presents a theoretical analysis of the gain-assisted superluminal light propagation in a four-level N -type atomic system by exploiting the scheme of electromagnetically induced gain and superluminal propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) along the gain-assisted atomic-metal interface simultaneously. In addition, a theoretical demonstration is presented on the comparison between Fresnel's rotary photon drag and SPP drag in view of light polarization state rotation by rotating the coherent atomic medium and the atomic-metal interface, respectively. Analogous to photon drag in the superluminal anomalous dispersion region where light polarization rotation occurs opposite the rotation of the gain-assisted atomic medium, the rotation of the atomic-metal interface also rotates the polarization state of SPPs opposite the rotation of the interface. This further confirms the superluminal nature of SPPs propagating along the interface with negative group velocity. Rabi frequencies of the control and pump fields considerably modify both photon and SPP drag coefficients. Metal conductivity also controls SPP propagation.

  13. Waves on Thin Plates: A New (Energy Based) Method on Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Lengliné, Olivier; Daniel, Guillaume; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2016-04-01

    Noisy acoustic signal localization is a difficult problem having a wide range of application. We propose a new localization method applicable for thin plates which is based on energy amplitude attenuation and inversed source amplitude comparison. This inversion is tested on synthetic data using a direct model of Lamb wave propagation and on experimental dataset (recorded with 4 Brüel & Kjær Type 4374 miniature piezoelectric shock accelerometers, 1 - 26 kHz frequency range). We compare the performance of this technique with classical source localization algorithms, arrival time localization, time reversal localization, localization based on energy amplitude. The experimental setup consist of a glass / plexiglass plate having dimensions of 80 cm x 40 cm x 1 cm equipped with four accelerometers and an acquisition card. Signals are generated using a steel, glass or polyamide ball (having different sizes) quasi perpendicular hit (from a height of 2-3 cm) on the plate. Signals are captured by sensors placed on the plate on different locations. We measure and compare the accuracy of these techniques as function of sampling rate, dynamic range, array geometry, signal to noise ratio and computational time. We show that this new technique, which is very versatile, works better than conventional techniques over a range of sampling rates 8 kHz - 1 MHz. It is possible to have a decent resolution (3cm mean error) using a very cheap equipment set. The numerical simulations allow us to track the contributions of different error sources in different methods. The effect of the reflections is also included in our simulation by using the imaginary sources outside the plate boundaries. This proposed method can easily be extended for applications in three dimensional environments, to monitor industrial activities (e.g boreholes drilling/production activities) or natural brittle systems (e.g earthquakes, volcanoes, avalanches).

  14. Rapidly Rising Transients in the Supernova - Superluminous Supernova Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D Andrew; Bildsten, Lars; Leloudas, Giorgos; Hardin, Delphine; Prajs, Szymon; Perley, Daniel A; Svirski, Gilad; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Katz, Boaz; McCully, Curtis; Cenko, S Bradley; Lidman, Chris; Sullivan, Mark; Valenti, Stefano; Astier, Pierre; Balland, Cristophe; Carlberg, Ray G; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Pain, Reynald; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas; Rich, James; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina

    2015-01-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t_{rise}~10d) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M_{peak}~-20) - one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as a Type II SN due to broad Halpha emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Halpha (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si II (as seen in Type Ia SNe), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM) and magnetar spindown can not r...

  15. Spectropolarimetry of Superluminous Supernovae: Insight into Their Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, C.; Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Smartt, S. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectropolarimetric observations of a hydrogen-free superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.1136, namely SN 2015bn. The transient shows significant polarization at both of the observed epochs: one 24 days before maximum light in the rest-frame, and the other at 27 days after peak luminosity. Analysis of the Q - U plane suggests the presence of a dominant axis and no physical departure from the main axis at either epoch. The polarization spectrum along the dominant axis is characterized by a strong wavelength dependence and an increase in the signal from the first to the second epoch. We use a Monte Carlo code to demonstrate that these properties are consistent with a simple toy model that adopts an axisymmetric ellipsoidal configuration for the ejecta. We find that the wavelength dependence of the polarization is possibly due to a strong wavelength dependence in the line opacity, while the higher level of polarization at the second epoch is a consequence of the increase in the asphericity of the inner layers of the ejecta or the fact that the photosphere recedes into less spherical layers. The geometry of the SLSN is similar to that of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe connected to GRB, while the overall evolution of the ejecta shape could be consistent with a central engine.

  16. Spectral evolution of superluminal components in parsec-scale jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mimica, P; Agudo, I; Martí, J M; Gómez, J L; Miralles, J A

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We present numerical simulations of the spectral evolution and radio emission of superluminal components in relativistic jets. We have developed an algorithm (SPEV) for the transport of a population of non-thermal particles (NTPs). For very large values of the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic field energy density ($\\sim 6\\times 10^4$), quiescent over-pressured jet models show substantial spectral evolution compared to models whithout radiative losses. Larger values of the magnetic field yield much shorter jets. Larger magnetic fields result in shorter losses-dominated regimes, with a rapid and intense radiation of energy. We also show that jets with a positive photon spectral index may result if the lower limit $\\gamma_min$ of the NTP energy distribution is placed close or above a threshold $\\gamma_M$, where the synchrotron function R has its maximum. A temporary increase of the Lorentz factor at the jet inlet produces a traveling perturbation that appears in the synthetic maps as a radio componen...

  17. The Trails of Superluminal Jet Components in 3C 111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadler, M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Homan, D. C.; Agudo, I.; Kellermann, K. I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Lister, M. L.; Zensus, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The parsec-scale radio jet of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 has been monitored since 1995 as part of the 2cm Survey and MOJAVE monitoring observations conducted with the VLBA. Here, we present results from 18 epochs of VLBA observations of 3C 111 and from 18 years of radio flux density monitoring observations conducted at the University of Michigan. A major radio flux-density outburst of 3C 111 occurred in 1996 and was followed by a particularly bright plasma ejection associated with a superluminal jet component. This major event allows us to study a variety of processes associated with outbursts of radio-loud AGN in much greater detail than possible in other cases: the primary perturbation gives rise to the formation of a forward and a backward-shock, which both evolve in characteristically different ways and allow us to draw conclusions about the workflow of jet-production events; the expansion, acceleration and recollimation of the ejected jet plasma in an environment with steep pressure and density gradients are revealed; trailing components are formed in the wake of the primary perturbation as a result of Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities from the interaction of the jet with the external medium. The jet-medium interaction is further scrutinized by the linear-polarization signature of jet components traveling along the jet and passing a region of steep pressure/density gradients.

  18. The Trails of Superluminal Jet Components in 3C111

    CERN Document Server

    Kadler, M; Perucho, M; Kovalev, Y Y; Homan, D C; Agudo, I; Kellermann, K I; Aller, M F; Aller, H D; Lister, M L; Zensus, J A

    2008-01-01

    In 1996, a major radio flux-density outburst occured in the broad-line radio galaxy 3C111. It was followed by a particularly bright plasma ejection associated with a superluminal jet component, which has shaped the parsec-scale structure of 3C111 for almost a decade. Here, we present results from 18 epochs of Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations conducted since 1995 as part of the VLBA 2 cm Survey and MOJAVE monitoring programs. This major event allows us to study a variety of processes associated with outbursts of radio-loud AGN in much greater detail than has been possible in other cases: the primary perturbation gives rise to the formation of a leading and a following component, which are interpreted as a forward and a backward-shock. Both components evolve in characteristically different ways and allow us to draw conclusions about the work flow of jet-production events; the expansion, acceleration and recollimation of the ejected jet plasma in an environment with steep pressure and density gradien...

  19. Zooming In on the Progenitors of Superluminous Supernovae With HST

    CERN Document Server

    Lunnan, R; Berger, E; Rest, A; Fong, W; Scolnic, D; Jones, D; Soderberg, A M; Challis, P M; Drout, M R; Foley, R J; Huber, M E; Kirshner, R P; Leibler, C; Marion, G H; McCrum, M; Milisavljevic, D; Narayan, G; Sanders, N E; Smartt, S J; Smith, K W; Tonry, J L; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Flewelling, H; Kudritzki, R -P; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame ultraviolet imaging of the host galaxies of 16 hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), including 11 events from the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey. Taking advantage of the superb angular resolution of HST, we characterize the galaxies' morphological properties, sizes and star formation rate densities. We determine the SN locations within the host galaxies through precise astrometric matching, and measure physical and host-normalized offsets, as well as the SN positions within the cumulative distribution of UV light pixel brightness. We find that the host galaxies of H-poor SLSNe are irregular, compact dwarf galaxies, with a median half-light radius of just 0.9 kpc. The UV-derived star formation rate densities are high ( ~ 0.1 M_sun/yr/kpc^2), suggesting that SLSNe form in overdense environments. Their locations trace the UV light of their host galaxies, with a distribution intermediate between that of LGRBs (which are strongly clustered on the brightest regi...

  20. On the nature of Hydrogen-rich Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Inserra, C; Gall, E E E; Leloudas, G; Chen, T -W; Schulze, S; Jerkstarnd, A; Nicholl, M; Anderson, J P; Arcavi, I; Benetti, S; Cartier, R A; Childress, M; Della Valle, M; Flewelling, H; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Gutierrez, C P; Hosseinzadeh, G; Howell, D A; Huber, M; Kankare, E; Magnier, E A; Maguire, K; McCully, C; Prajs, S; Primak, N; Scalzo, R; Schmidt, B P; Smith, K W; Tucker, B E; Valenti, S; Wilman, M; Young, D R; Yuan, F

    2016-01-01

    We present observational data for two hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), namely SN 2013hx and PS15br. These objects, together with SN 2008es are the only SLSNe showing a distinct, broad H$\\alpha$ feature during the photospheric phase and also do not show any clear sign of interaction between fast moving ejecta and circumstellar shells in their early spectra. Therefore we classify them as SLSN II as distinct from the known class of SLSN IIn. Both transients show a slow decline at later times, and monitoring of SN 2013hx out to 300 days after explosion indicates that the luminosity in this later phase does have a contribution from interaction. We detect strong, multi-component H$\\alpha$ emission at 240 days past maximum which we interpret as an indication of interaction of the ejecta with an asymmetric, clumpy circumstellar material. The spectra and photometric evolution of the two objects are similar to some bright type II (or type IIL) supernovae, although they have much higher luminosity and evo...

  1. A cannonball model of gamma-ray bursts superluminal signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2000-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that the long-duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows are produced by highly relativistic jets emitted in supernova explosions. We propose that the result of the event is not just a compact object plus the ejecta: within a day, a fraction of the parent star falls back to produce a thick accretion disk. The subsequent accretion generates jets and constitutes the GRB ``engine'', as in the observed ejection of relativistic ``cannonballs'' of plasma by microquasars and active galactic nuclei. The GRB is produced as the jetted cannonballs exit the supernova shell reheated by the collision, re-emitting their own radiation and boosting the light of the shell. They decelerate by sweeping up interstellar matter, which is accelerated to cosmic-ray energies and emits synchrotron radiation: the afterglow. We emphasize here a smoking-gun signature of this model of GRBs: the superluminal motion of the afterglow, that can be searched for ---the sooner the better--- in the particular...

  2. Spectropolarimetry of superluminous supernovae: insight into their geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Inserra, C; Sim, S A; Smartt, S J

    2016-01-01

    We present the first spectropolarimetric observations of a hydrogen-free superluminous supernova at z=0.1136, namely SN 2015bn. The transient shows significant polarization at both the observed epochs: one 24 days before maximum light in the rest-frame, and the subsequent at 27 days after peak luminosity. Analysis of the Q-U plane suggests the presence of a dominant axis and no physical departure from the main axis at either epoch. The polarization spectrum along the dominant axis is characterized by a strong wavelength dependence and an increase in the signal from the first to the second epoch. We use a Monte Carlo code to demonstrate that these properties are consistent with a simple toy model that adopts an axi-symmetric ellipsoidal configuration for the ejecta. We find that the wavelength dependence of the polarisation is possibly due to a strong wavelength dependence in the line opacity, while the higher level of polarisation at the second epoch is a consequence of the increase in the asphericity of the ...

  3. Astronomy. ASASSN-15lh: A highly super-luminous supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Subo; Shappee, B J; Prieto, J L; Jha, S W; Stanek, K Z; Holoien, T W-S; Kochanek, C S; Thompson, T A; Morrell, N; Thompson, I B; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Brown, J S; Bufano, F; Chen, Ping; Conseil, E; Danilet, A B; Falco, E; Grupe, D; Kiyota, S; Masi, G; Nicholls, B; Olivares E, F; Pignata, G; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G V; Szczygiel, D M; Woźniak, P R

    2016-01-15

    We report the discovery of ASASSN-15lh (SN 2015L), which we interpret as the most luminous supernova yet found. At redshift z = 0.2326, ASASSN-15lh reached an absolute magnitude of Mu ,AB = -23.5 ± 0.1 and bolometric luminosity Lbol = (2.2 ± 0.2) × 10(45) ergs s(-1), which is more than twice as luminous as any previously known supernova. It has several major features characteristic of the hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe-I), whose energy sources and progenitors are currently poorly understood. In contrast to most previously known SLSNe-I that reside in star-forming dwarf galaxies, ASASSN-15lh appears to be hosted by a luminous galaxy (MK ≈ -25.5) with little star formation. In the 4 months since first detection, ASASSN-15lh radiated (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10(52) ergs, challenging the magnetar model for its engine. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Long-duration superluminous supernovae at late times

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; Nicholl, M; Chen, T -W; Krühler, T; Sollerman, J; Taubenberger, S; Gal-Yam, A; Kankare, E; Maguire, K; Fraser, M; Valenti, S; Sullivan, M; Cartier, R; Young, D R

    2016-01-01

    We present nebular-phase observations and spectral models of Type Ic superluminous supernovae. LSQ14an and SN 2015bn both display late-time spectra similar to SN 2007bi, and the class shows strong similarity with broad-lined Type Ic SNe such as SN 1998bw. Near-infrared observations of SN 2015bn at +315d show a strong Ca II triplet, O I 9263, O I 1.13 micron and Mg I 1.50 micron, but no strong He, Si, or S emission. The high Ca II NIR/[Ca II] 7291, 7323 ratio of 2 indicates a high electron density of n_e >~ 10^8 cm^{-3}. Spectral models of oxygen-zone emission are investigated to put constraints on the emitting region. Models require M(O) >~ 10 Msun to produce enough [O I] 6300, 6364 luminosity to match observed levels, irrespective of the powering situation and the density. This is an argument against shell collisions from pair-instability pulsations for explaining the powering, as these shells are limited to a few solar masses in published models. The high oxygen-zone mass, supported by high estimated magnes...

  5. The Volumetric Rate of Superluminous Supernovae at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Prajs, S; Smith, M; Levan, A; Karpenka, N V; Edwards, T D P; Walker, C R; Wolf, W M; Balland, C; Carlberg, R; Howell, A; Lidman, C; Pain, R; Pritchet, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) at z~1, measured using archival data from the first four years of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We develop a method for the photometric classification of SLSNe to construct our sample. Our sample includes two previously spectroscopically-identified objects, and a further new candidate selected using our classification technique. We use the point-source recovery efficiencies from Perrett et.al. (2010) and a Monte Carlo approach to calculate the rate based on our SLSN sample. We find that the three identified SLSNe from SNLS give a rate of 91 (+76/-36) SNe/Yr/Gpc^3 at a volume-weighted redshift of z=1.13. This is equivalent to 2.2 (+1.8/-0.9) x10^-4 of the volumetric core collapse supernova rate at the same redshift. When combined with other rate measurements from the literature, we show that the rate of SLSNe increases with redshift in a manner consistent with that of the cosmic star formati...

  6. Rates of Superluminous Supernovae at z~0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Quimby, Robert M; Akerlof, Car; Wheeler, J Craig

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) based on 5 events discovered with the ROTSE-IIIb telescope. We gather light curves of 19 events from the literature and our own unpublished data and employ crude k-corrections to constrain the pseudo-absolute magnitude distributions in the rest frame ROTSE-IIIb (unfiltered) band pass for both the hydrogen poor (SLSN-I) and hydrogen rich (SLSN-II) populations. We find that the peak magnitudes of the available SLSN-I are narrowly distributed ($M = -21.7 \\pm 0.4$) in our unfiltered band pass and may suggest an even tighter intrinsic distribution when the effects of dust are considered, although the sample may be skewed by selection and publication biases. The presence of OII features near maximum light may uniquely signal a high luminosity event, and we suggest further observational and theoretical work is warranted to assess the possible utility of such SN 2005ap-like SLSN-I as distance indicators. Using the pseudo-absolute magnitude distribut...

  7. RAPIDLY RISING TRANSIENTS IN THE SUPERNOVA—SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA GAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93111 (United States); Wolf, William M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bildsten, Lars; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Katz, Boaz [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Hardin, Delphine; Astier, Pierre; Balland, Cristophe [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and University of Paris VI and VII, F-75005 Paris (France); Prajs, Szymon; Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Perley, Daniel A. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Svirski, Gilad [Racah Institute for Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lidman, Chris [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Carlberg, Ray G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Conley, Alex, E-mail: iarcavi@lcogt.net [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-389 (United States); and others

    2016-03-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t{sub rise} ≈ 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M{sub peak} ≈ −20)—one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as an SN II due to broad Hα emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Hα (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si ii (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a “Type 1.5 SN” scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.

  8. What do the remnants of superluminous supernovae look like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloudas, G.

    2016-06-01

    The remnants of core-collapse supernovae often present significant asymmetries while those of thermonuclear supernovae are, more or less, spherically symmetric. As superluminous supernovae (SLSN) do not occur in Milky Way-type galaxies (they prefer metal-poor starburst dwarfs), our chances of studying directly a SLSN remnant are very limited, except perhaps in the Magellanic clouds. Therefore, the only way of probing the SLSN geometry, and thus identifying potential SLSN remnant candidates, is through polarimetry of the explosions themselves. I will present the first polarimetric observations of SLSNe obtained through a dedicated ToO program at the VLT. LSQ14mo is a SLSN-I that showed only a very limited degree of polarisation (P = 0.52%), which corresponds to an upper limit of 10% in the photosphere asphericity. In addition, this signal can be entirely due to interstellar polarisation in the host galaxy. This is perhaps surprising as the leading models for H-poor SLSNe involve a magnetar or CSM interaction, i.e. configurations that are not expected to be spherically symmetric. Observations of a SLSN-II yielded a more significant degree of polarisation, while preliminary analysis for a SLSN-R reveals similarly low levels of asphericity as for LSQ14mo.

  9. Causal evolution of wave packets

    CERN Document Server

    Eckstein, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from the optimal transport theory adapted to the relativistic setting we formulate the principle of a causal flow of probability and apply it in the wave packet formalism. We demonstrate that whereas the Dirac system is causal, the relativistic-Schr\\"odinger Hamiltonian impels a superluminal evolution of probabilities. We quantify the causality breakdown in the latter system and argue that, in contrast to the popular viewpoint, it is not related to the localisation properties of the states.

  10. Comment on: Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation through a Bose-Einstein condensate cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    In a recent theoretical article [S.H. Kazemi, S. Ghanbari, M. Mahmoudi, Eur. Phys. J. D 70, 1 (2016)], Kazemi et al. claim to have demonstrated superluminal light transmission in an optomechanical system where a Bose-Einstein condensate serves as the mechanical oscillator. In fact the superluminal propagation is only inferred from the existence of a minimum of transmission of the system at the probe frequency. This condition is not sufficient and we show that, in all the cases where superluminal propagation is claimed by Kazemi et al., the propagation is in reality subluminal. Moreover, we point out that the system under consideration is not minimum-phase-shift. The Kramers-Kronig relations then only fix a lower limit to the group delay and we show that these two quantities have sometimes opposite signs.

  11. Observation of image pair creation and annihilation from superluminal scattering sources

    CERN Document Server

    Clerici, Matteo; Warburton, Ryan E; Lyons, Ashley; Aniculaesei, Constantin; Richards, Joseph M; Leach, Jonathan; Henderson, Robert; Faccio, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The invariance of the speed of light implies a series of consequences related to our perception of simultaneity and of time itself. Whilst these consequences are experimentally well studied for subluminal speeds, the kinematics of superluminal motion lack direct evidence. Using high temporal resolution imaging techniques, we demonstrate that if a source approaches an observer at superluminal speeds, the temporal ordering of events is inverted and its image appears to propagate backwards. If the source changes its speed, crossing the interface between sub- and super-luminal propagation, we observe image pair annihilation and creation. These results show that it is not possible to unambiguously determine the kinematics of an event from imaging and time-resolved measurements alone.

  12. Inverse Doppler shift and control field as coherence generators for the stability in superluminal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, Fazal; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Khan, Salman

    2015-05-01

    A gain-based four-level atomic medium for the stability in superluminal light propagation using control field and inverse Doppler shift as coherence generators is studied. In regimes of weak and strong control field, a broadband and multiple controllable transparency windows are, respectively, identified with significantly enhanced group indices. The observed Doppler effect for the class of high atomic velocity of the medium is counterintuitive in comparison to the effect of the class of low atomic velocity. The intensity of each of the two pump fields is kept less than the optimum limit reported in [M. D. Stenner and D. J. Gauthier, Phys. Rev. A 67, 063801 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.063801] for stability in the superluminal light pulse. Consequently, superluminal stable domains with the generated coherence are explored.

  13. Comment on "Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation through a Bose-Einstein condensate cavity system"

    CERN Document Server

    Macke, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    In a recent theoretical article [Eur. Phys. J. D 70, 1 (2016)], Kazemi et al. claim to have demonstrated superluminal light transmission in an optomechanical system where a Bose-Einstein condensate serves as the mechanical oscillator. In fact the superluminal propagation is only inferred from the existence of a minimum of transmission of the system at the probe frequency. This condition is not sufficient and we show that, in all the cases where superluminal propagation is claimed by Kazemi et al., the propagation is in reality subluminal. Moreover, we point out that the system under consideration is not minimum-phase-shift. The Kramers-Kronig relations then only fix a lower limit to the group delay and we show that these two quantities have sometimes opposite signs.

  14. A method for detecting crack wave arrival time and crack localization in a tunnel by using moving window technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Chul; Park, Tae Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Source localization in a dispersive medium has been carried out based on the time-of-arrival-differences (TOADs) method: a triangulation method and a circle intersection technique. Recent signal processing advances have led to calculation TOAD using a joint time-frequency analysis of the signal, where a short-time Fourier transform(STFT) and wavelet transform can be included as popular algorithms. The time-frequency analysis method is able to provide various information and more reliable results such as seismic-attenuation estimation, dispersive characteristics, a wave mode analysis, and temporal energy distribution of signals compared with previous methods. These algorithms, however, have their own limitations for signal processing. In this paper, the effective use of proposed algorithm in detecting crack wave arrival time and source localization in rock masses suggest that the evaluation and real-time monitoring on the intensity of damages related to the tunnels or other underground facilities is possible. Calculation of variances resulted from moving windows as a function of their size differentiates the signature from noise and from crack signal, which lead us to determine the crack wave arrival time. Then, the source localization is determined to be where the variance of crack wave velocities from real and virtual crack localization becomes a minimum. To validate our algorithm, we have performed experiments at the tunnel, which resulted in successful determination of the wave arrival time and crack localization.

  15. On the exploitation of mode localization in surface acoustic wave MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, T. H.; Gallacher, B. J.; Grigg, H. T. D.

    2017-05-01

    Mode localization sensing has been recently introduced as an alternative resonant sensing protocol. It has been shown to exhibit several advantages over other resonant methods, in particular a potential for higher sensitivity and rejection of common mode noise. This paper expounds the principles of utilising surface acoustic waves (SAW) to create a mode localization sensor. A generalised geometry consisting of a pair of coupled resonant cavities is introduced and an analytical solution found for the displacement fields within the cavities. The solution is achieved by coupling the internal cavity solutions using a ray tracing method. The results of the analytical solution are compared to a numerical solution found using commercial finite element method (FEM) software; exact agreement is found between the two solutions. The insight gained from the analytical model enables the determination of critical design parameters. A brief analysis is presented showing analogous operation to previous examples of mode localization sensors. The sensitivity of the device is shown to depend nonlinearly on the number of periods in the array coupling the two cavities.

  16. Transmission, reflection and localization of waves in one-dimensional amplifying media with nonlinear gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Phi [Central University of Construction, Tuy Hoa (Viet Nam); Kim, Ki Hong [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    We study theoretically the influence of nonlinear gain effects on the transmission and the Anderson localization of waves in both uniform and random one-dimensional amplifying media by using the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation. In uniform amplifying media with nonlinear gain, we find that the strong oscillatory behavior of the transmittance and the reflectance for odd and even values of the sample length disappears for large nonlinearities. The exponential decay rate of the transmittance in the asymptotic limit is found to be independent of nonlinear gain. In random amplifying media, we find that the maximum values of the disorder-averaged logarithmic transmittance and reflectance depend nonmonotonically on the strength of nonlinear gain. We also find that the localization length is independent of nonlinear gain. In other words, the Anderson localization is neither enhanced nor weakened due to nonlinear gain. In both the uniform and the random cases, the crossover length, which is the critical length for the amplification to be efficient, is strongly reduced by the nonlinear nature of the gain.

  17. Energy decomposition analysis of intermolecular interactions using a block-localized wave function approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Gao, Jiali; Peyerimhoff, Sigrid D.

    2000-04-01

    An energy decomposition scheme based on the block-localized wave function (BLW) method is proposed. The key of this scheme is the definition and the full optimization of the diabatic state wave function, where the charge transfer among interacting molecules is deactivated. The present energy decomposition (ED), BLW-ED, method is similar to the Morokuma decomposition scheme in definition of the energy terms, but differs in implementation and the computational algorithm. In addition, in the BLW-ED approach, the basis set superposition error is fully taken into account. The application of this scheme to the water dimer and the lithium cation-water clusters reveals that there is minimal charge transfer effect in hydrogen-bonded complexes. At the HF/aug-cc-PVTZ level, the electrostatic, polarization, and charge-transfer effects contribute 65%, 24%, and 11%, respectively, to the total bonding energy (-3.84 kcal/mol) in the water dimer. On the other hand, charge transfer effects are shown to be significant in Lewis acid-base complexes such as H3NSO3 and H3NBH3. In this work, the effect of basis sets used on the energy decomposition analysis is addressed and the results manifest that the present energy decomposition scheme is stable with a modest size of basis functions.

  18. The Distribution of Coalescing Compact Binaries in the Local Universe: Prospects for Gravitational-Wave Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Zemp, Marcel; Diemand, Jürg; Mandel, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    Merging compact binaries are the most viable and best studied candidates for gravitational wave (GW) detection by the fully operational network of ground-based observatories. In anticipation of the first detections, the expected distribution of GW sources in the local universe is of considerable interest. Here we investigate the full phase space distribution of coalescing compact binaries at $z = 0$ using dark matter simulations of structure formation. The fact that these binary systems acquire large barycentric velocities at birth (``kicks") results in merger site distributions that are more diffusely distributed with respect to their putative hosts, with mergers occurring out to distances of a few Mpc from the host halo. Redshift estimates based solely on the nearest galaxy in projection can, as a result, be inaccurate. On the other hand, large offsets from the host galaxy could aid the detection of faint optical counterparts and should be considered when designing strategies for follow-up observations. The...

  19. Tunable compression of template banks for fast gravitational-wave detection and localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Alvin J. K.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2016-06-01

    One strategy for reducing the online computational cost of matched-filter searches for gravitational waves is to introduce a compressed basis for the waveform template bank in a grid-based search. In this paper, we propose and investigate several tunable compression schemes for a general template bank. Through offline compression, such schemes are shown to yield faster detection and localization of signals, along with moderately improved sensitivity and accuracy over coarsened banks at the same level of computational cost. This is potentially useful for any search involving template banks, and especially in the analysis of data from future space-based detectors such as eLISA, for which online grid searches are difficult due to the long-duration waveforms and large parameter spaces.

  20. Prospects for Gravitational Wave Searches for Core-Collapse Supernovae within the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kiranjyot; Branchesi, Marica; Zanolin, Michele; Szczepanczyk, Marek; LIGO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present an updated estimate of the intrinsic (vs observed) core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) rate within 20 Mpc from Earth, which is roughly the largest distance of interest for the searches for gravitational waves (GWs) from CCSNe with laser interferometers. Recognizing that CCSN galaxy host models are morphologically dependent, we separate the galaxies within 20 Mpc into the local field and Virgo cluster and account for biases, such as galactic plane absorption. The improved estimation of the CCSNe rate within 20 Mpc is 430 +/- 21 CCSNe Century -1 Mpc-1. We also discuss the Feldman-Cousins and GRB methodologies for detecting CCSNe when there are multiple CCSNe optical triggers, as predicted for advanced LIGO data science runs. Illustrative examples of the sensitivity improvement with respect to the single-event current approaches are provided for rapidly rotating semi-analytical models of GW emissions and real (publicly released) LIGO data.

  1. Master equation for a chemical wave front with perturbation of local equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekan, P.; Lemarchand, A.; Nowakowski, B.

    2011-08-01

    In order to develop a stochastic description of gaseous reaction-diffusion systems, which includes a reaction-induced departure from local equilibrium, we derive a modified expression of the master equation from analytical calculations based on the Boltzmann equation. We apply the method to a chemical wave front of Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piskunov type, whose propagation speed is known to be sensitive to small perturbations. The results of the modified master equation are compared successfully with microscopic simulations of the particle dynamics using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The modified master equation constitutes an efficient tool at the mesoscopic scale, which incorporates the nonequilibrium effect without need of determining the particle velocity distribution function.

  2. Local-Oscillator Noise Coupling in Balanced Homodyne Readout for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Steinlechner, Sebastian; Bell, Angus S; Danilishin, Stefan L; Gläfke, Andreas; Gräf, Christian; Hennig, Jan-Simon; Houston, E Alasdair; Huttner, Sabina H; Leavey, Sean S; Pascucci, Daniela; Sorazu, Borja; Spencer, Andrew; Strain, Kenneth A; Wright, Jennifer; Hild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The second generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are quickly approaching their design sensitivity. For the first time these detectors will become limited by quantum back-action noise. Several back-action evasion techniques have been proposed to further increase the detector sensitivity. Since most proposals rely on a flexible readout of the full amplitude- and phase-quadrature space of the output light field, balanced homodyne detection is generally expected to replace the currently used DC readout. Up to now, little investigation has been undertaken into how balanced homodyne detection can be successfully transferred from its ubiquitous application in table-top quantum optics experiments to large-scale interferometers with suspended optics. Here we derive implementation requirements with respect to local oscillator noise couplings and highlight potential issues with the example of the Glasgow Sagnac Speed Meter experiment, as well as for a future upgrade to the Advanced LIGO detectors.

  3. Decay of density waves in coupled one-dimensional many-body-localized systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelovšek, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This work analyzes the behavior of coupled disordered one-dimensional systems as modelled by identical fermionic Hubbard chains with the on-site potential disorder and coupling emerging through the interchain hopping t'. The study is motivated by the experiment on fermionic cold atoms on a disordered lattice, where a decay rate of the quenched density wave was measured. We present a derivation of the decay rate Γ within perturbation theory and show that, even at large disorder along the chains, the interaction leads to finite Γ >0 , the mechanism being the interaction-induced coupling of in-chain localized and interchain extended single-fermion states. Explicit expressions for Γ are presented for a weak interaction U U >t' . It is shown that, in both regimes, Γ increases with the interchain hopping t', as well as decreases with increasing disorder.

  4. TRAVELING WAVES IN A BIOLOGICAL REACTION-DIFFUSION MODEL WITH STRONG GENERIC DELAY KERNEL AND NON-LOCAL EFFECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we consider the reaction diffusion equations with strong generic delay kernel and non-local effect,which models the microbial growth in a flow reactor.The existence of traveling waves is established for this model.More precisely,using the geometric singular perturbation theory,we show that traveling wave solutions exist provided that the delay is sufficiently small with the strong generic delay kernel.

  5. The volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae at z ˜ 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajs, S.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, M.; Levan, A.; Karpenka, N. V.; Edwards, T. D. P.; Walker, C. R.; Wolf, W. M.; Balland, C.; Carlberg, R.; Howell, D. A.; Lidman, C.; Pain, R.; Pritchet, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) at z ˜ 1.0, measured using archival data from the first four years of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We develop a method for the photometric classification of SLSNe to construct our sample. Our sample includes two previously spectroscopically identified objects, and a further new candidate selected using our classification technique. We use the point-source recovery efficiencies from Perrett et al. and a Monte Carlo approach to calculate the rate based on our SLSN sample. We find that the three identified SLSNe from SNLS give a rate of 91^{+76}_{-36} SNe yr-1 Gpc-3 at a volume-weighted redshift of z = 1.13. This is equivalent to 2.2^{+1.8}_{-0.9}× 10^{-4} of the volumetric core-collapse supernova rate at the same redshift. When combined with other rate measurements from the literature, we show that the rate of SLSNe increases with redshift in a manner consistent with that of the cosmic star formation history. We also estimate the rate of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts based on the events discovered by the Swift satellite, and show that it is comparable to the rate of SLSNe, providing further evidence of a possible connection between these two classes of events. We also examine the host galaxies of the SLSNe discovered in SNLS, and find them to be consistent with the stellar-mass distribution of other published samples of SLSNe.

  6. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  7. High order local absorbing boundary conditions for acoustic waves in terms of farfield expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar, Vianey; Acosta, Sebastian; Dastrup, Blake

    2017-03-01

    We devise a new high order local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for radiating problems and scattering of time-harmonic acoustic waves from obstacles of arbitrary shape. By introducing an artificial boundary S enclosing the scatterer, the original unbounded domain Ω is decomposed into a bounded computational domain Ω- and an exterior unbounded domain Ω+. Then, we define interface conditions at the artificial boundary S, from truncated versions of the well-known Wilcox and Karp farfield expansion representations of the exact solution in the exterior region Ω+. As a result, we obtain a new local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for a bounded problem on Ω-, which effectively accounts for the outgoing behavior of the scattered field. Contrary to the low order absorbing conditions previously defined, the error at the artificial boundary induced by this novel ABC can be easily reduced to reach any accuracy within the limits of the computational resources. We accomplish this by simply adding as many terms as needed to the truncated farfield expansions of Wilcox or Karp. The convergence of these expansions guarantees that the order of approximation of the new ABC can be increased arbitrarily without having to enlarge the radius of the artificial boundary. We include numerical results in two and three dimensions which demonstrate the improved accuracy and simplicity of this new formulation when compared to other absorbing boundary conditions.

  8. Interpolation across a muffin-tin interstitial using localized linear combinations of spherical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Yoshiro; Andersen, O. K.

    2016-08-01

    A method for 3D interpolation between hard spheres is described. The function to be interpolated could be the charge density between atoms in condensed matter. Its electrostatic potential is found analytically, and so are various integrals. Periodicity is not required. The interpolation functions are localized structure-adapted linear combinations of spherical waves, the so-called unitary spherical waves (USWs), ψR L(" close=")ɛn)">ɛ ,r , centered at the spheres R , where they have cubic-harmonic character L . Input to the interpolation are the coefficients in the cubic-harmonic expansions of the target function at and slightly outside the spheres; specifically, the values and the three first radial derivatives labeled by d =0 (value) and 1-3 (derivatives). To fit this, we use USWs with four negative energies, ɛ =ɛ1,ɛ2,ɛ3 , and ɛ4. Each interpolation function, ϱd R L(r ), is actually a linear combination of these four sets of USWs with the following properties. (1) It is centered at a specific sphere where it has a specific cubic-harmonic character and radial derivative. (2) Its value and the first three radial derivatives vanish at all other spheres and for all other cubic-harmonic characters, and is therefore highly localized, essentially inside its Voronoi cell. Value-and-derivative (v&d) functions were originally introduced and used by Methfessel [Phys. Rev. B 38, 1537 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevB.38.1537], but only for the first radial derivative. Explicit expressions are given for the v&d functions and their Coulomb potentials in terms of the USWs at the four energies, plus ɛ0≡0 for the potentials. The coefficients, as well as integrals over the interstitial such as the electrostatic energy, are given entirely in terms of the structure matrix, SR L ,R'L', describing the slopes of the USWs at the five energies and their expansions in Hankel functions. For open structures, additional constraints are installed to pinpoint the interpolated function deep

  9. The superluminal radio source 4c 39. 25 as relativistic jet prototype. El cuasar superluminal 4C 93. 25 como prototipo de jet relativistia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A.; Gomez, J.L.; Marcaide, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a numerical code which solves the synchrotron radiation transfer equations to compute the total and polarized emission of bent shocked relativistic jets, and we have applied it to reproduce the compact structure, kinematic evolution of the superluminal radio source 4C 39.25 contains a bent relativistic jet which is misaligned relative to the observer near the core region, leading to a relatively low core brightness. (Author) 12 refs.

  10. Localization and implication of oblique whistler wave in the magnetopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    Nonlinear interaction between highly oblique whistler wave and ion acoustic wave pertinent to magnetopause has been investigated. The density perturbation in whistler wave is supposed to be originated due to the presence of ion acoustic wave in the background. The ponderomotive force components arising due to the high amplitude pump wave, viz., whistler wave are constituted in the nonlinear dynamics of low frequency ion acoustic wave. The coupled nonlinear dynamical equations are then modelled in the form of modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation by considering adiabatic response of low frequency ion acoustic wave. The numerical simulation of this coupled nonlinear equation is performed to study the temporal evolution of nonlinear whistler wave. The obtained simulation results show that the temporal evolution also leads to the cascade of broadband turbulence spectrum at smaller wavelengths. The relevance of the obtained results with the observations of THEMIS spacecraft in the magnetopause region has been pointed out.

  11. Two-state model based on the block-localized wave function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong

    2007-06-01

    The block-localized wave function (BLW) method is a variant of ab initio valence bond method but retains the efficiency of molecular orbital methods. It can derive the wave function for a diabatic (resonance) state self-consistently and is available at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) levels. In this work we present a two-state model based on the BLW method. Although numerous empirical and semiempirical two-state models, such as the Marcus-Hush two-state model, have been proposed to describe a chemical reaction process, the advantage of this BLW-based two-state model is that no empirical parameter is required. Important quantities such as the electronic coupling energy, structural weights of two diabatic states, and excitation energy can be uniquely derived from the energies of two diabatic states and the adiabatic state at the same HF or DFT level. Two simple examples of formamide and thioformamide in the gas phase and aqueous solution were presented and discussed. The solvation of formamide and thioformamide was studied with the combined ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical Monte Carlo simulations, together with the BLW-DFT calculations and analyses. Due to the favorable solute-solvent electrostatic interaction, the contribution of the ionic resonance structure to the ground state of formamide and thioformamide significantly increases, and for thioformamide the ionic form is even more stable than the covalent form. Thus, thioformamide in aqueous solution is essentially ionic rather than covalent. Although our two-state model in general underestimates the electronic excitation energies, it can predict relative solvatochromic shifts well. For instance, the intense π →π* transition for formamide upon solvation undergoes a redshift of 0.3eV, compared with the experimental data (0.40-0.5eV).

  12. The local structure factor near an interface; beyond extended capillary-wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Evans, R.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the local structure factor S (zq) at a free liquid-gas interface in systems with short-ranged intermolecular forces and determine the corrections to the leading-order, capillary-wave-like, Goldstone mode divergence of S (zq) known to occur for parallel (i.e. measured along the interface) wavevectors q\\to 0 . We show from explicit solution of the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation that for distances z far from the interface, where the profile decays exponentially, S (zq) splits unambiguously into bulk and interfacial contributions. On each side of the interface, the interfacial contributions can be characterised by distinct liquid and gas wavevector dependent surface tensions, {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , which are determined solely by the bulk two-body and three-body direct correlation functions. At high temperatures, the wavevector dependence simplifies and is determined almost entirely by the appropriate bulk structure factor, leading to positive rigidity coefficients. Our predictions are confirmed by explicit calculation of S (zq) within square-gradient theory and the Sullivan model. The results for the latter predict a striking temperature dependence for {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , and have implications for fluctuation effects. Our results account quantitatively for the findings of a recent very extensive simulation study by Höfling and Dietrich of the total structure factor in the interfacial region, in a system with a cut-off Lennard-Jones potential, in sharp contrast to extended capillary-wave models which failed completely to describe the simulation results.

  13. Simulation study of planar and nonplanar super rogue waves in an electronegative plasma: Local discontinuous Galerkin method

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Aboelenen, Tarek

    2017-05-01

    Planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic super rogue waves in an unmagnetized electronegative plasma are investigated, both analytically (for planar geometry) and numerically (for planar and nonplanar geometries). Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonplanar/modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE), which describes a slow modulation of the nonlinear wave amplitude. The local modulational instability of the ion-acoustic structures governed by the planar and nonplanar NLSE is reported. Furthermore, the existence region of rogue waves is strictly defined. The parameters used in our calculations are from the lab observation data. The local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method is used to find rogue wave solutions of the planar and nonplanar NLSE and to prove L2 stability of this method. Also, it is found that the numerical simulations and the exact (analytical) solutions of the planar NLSE match remarkably well and numerical examples show that the convergence orders of the proposed LDG method are N + 1 when polynomials of degree N are used. Moreover, it is noted that the spherical rogue waves travel faster than their cylindrical counterpart. Also, the numerical solution showed that the spherical and cylindrical amplitudes of the localized pulses decrease with the increase in the time | τ |.

  14. Study on the Superluminal Group Velocity in a Coaxial Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuGuizhen; HuangZhixun; GuanJian

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the superluminal group velocity in a coaxial photonic crystal is studied. The simulation of the effective refraction index in coaxial photonic crystal is performed. The group velocity is calculated based on the transmission line equations and compared with experimental results.

  15. Revealing the binary origin of Type Ic superluminous supernovae through nebular hydrogen emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Liu, Zheng-Wei; Mackey, Jonathan; Chen, Ting-Wan; Langer, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    We propose that nebular Hα emission, as detected in the Type Ic superluminous supernova iPTF13ehe, stems from matter that is stripped from a companion star when the supernova ejecta collide with it. The temporal evolution, the line broadening, and the overall blueshift of the emission are consistent with this interpretation. We scale the nebular Hα luminosity predicted for Type Ia supernovae in single-degenerate systems to derive the stripped mass required to explain the Hα luminosity of iPTF13ehe. We find a stripped mass of 0.1-0.9 solar masses, assuming that the supernova luminosity is powered by radioactivity or magnetar spin down. Because a central heating source is required to excite the Hα emission, an interaction-powered model is not favored for iPTF13ehe if the Hα emission is from stripped matter. We derive a companion mass of more than 20 solar masses and a binary separation of less than about 20 companion radii based on the stripping efficiency during the collision, indicating that the supernova progenitor and the companion formed a massive close binary system. If Type Ic superluminous supernovae generally occur in massive close binary systems, the early brightening observed previously in several Type Ic superluminous supernovae may also be due to the collision with a close companion. Observations of nebular hydrogen emission in future Type Ic superluminous supernovae will enable us to test this interpretation.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of the superluminal Galactic source GRS 1915+105 during the 1994 September outburst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    CastroTirado, A.J.; Geballe, T.R.; Lund, Niels

    1996-01-01

    We have obtained K-band IR spectra of the superluminal Galactic source GRS 1915+105 on two different dates. The second spectrum, obtained immediately after a bright X-ray outburst in 1994 September, has shown prominent H and He emission lines. The lines are not Doppler shifted, as are those obser...

  17. Superluminal neutrinos and extra dimensions: constraints from the null energy condition

    OpenAIRE

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    In light of the recent results from the OPERA collaboration, indicating that neutrinos can travel superluminally, I review a simple extra-dimensional strategy for accommodating such behavior; and I also explain why it is hard in this strategy to avoid violating the null energy condition somewhere in the extra dimensions.

  18. NEW SUPERLUMINAL QUASAR-1633+382 AND THE BLAZAR-GAMMA-RAY CONNECTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BARTHEL, PD; CONWAY, JE; MYERS, ST; PEARSON, TJ; READHEAD, ACS

    1995-01-01

    We report detection of superluminal motion in the core of 4C 38.41, associated with the z = 1.814 quasar 1633+382. The dominant nucleus in the similar to 30 kpc triple morphology of the radio source displays a core-jet structure on the milliarcsecond scale, and a jet component is found moving

  19. Elastic wave localization in two-dimensional phononic crystals with one-dimensional random disorder and aperiodicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Wang, Yue-Sheng

    2011-03-01

    The band structures of in-plane elastic waves propagating in two-dimensional phononic crystals with one-dimensional random disorder and aperiodicity are analyzed in this paper. The localization of wave propagation is discussed by introducing the concept of the localization factor, which is calculated by the plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method. By treating the random disorder and aperiodicity as the deviation from the periodicity in a special way, three kinds of aperiodic phononic crystals that have normally distributed random disorder, Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequence in one direction and translational symmetry in the other direction are considered and the band structures are characterized using localization factors. Besides, as a special case, we analyze the band gap properties of a periodic planar layered composite containing a periodic array of square inclusions. The transmission coefficients based on eigen-mode matching theory are also calculated and the results show the same behaviors as the localization factor does. In the case of random disorders, the localization degree of the normally distributed random disorder is larger than that of the uniformly distributed random disorder although the eigenstates are both localized no matter what types of random disorders, whereas, for the case of Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro structures, the band structures of Thue-Morse sequence exhibit similarities with the quasi-periodic (Fibonacci) sequence not present in the results of the Rudin-Shapiro sequence.

  20. Group velocity of neutrino waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indumathi, D.; Kaul, Romesh K.; Murthy, M. V. N.; Rajasekaran, G.

    2012-03-01

    We follow up on the analysis of Mecozzi and Bellini (arxiv:arXiv:1110.1253v1) where they showed, in principle, the possibility of superluminal propagation of neutrinos, as indicated by the recent OPERA result. We refine the analysis by introducing wave packets for the superposition of energy eigenstates and discuss the implications of their results with realistic values for the mixing and mass parameters in a full three neutrino mixing scenario. Our analysis shows the possibility of superluminal propagation of neutrino flavour in a very narrow range of neutrino parameter space. Simultaneously this reduces the number of observable events drastically. Therefore, the OPERA result cannot be explained in this frame-work.

  1. Group velocity of neutrino waves

    CERN Document Server

    Indumathi, D; Murthy, M V N; Rajasekaran, G

    2011-01-01

    We follow up on the analysis of Mecozzi and Bellini (arXiv:1110:1253v1) where they showed, in principle, the possibility of superluminal propagation of neutrinos, as indicated by the recent OPERA result. We refine the analysis by introducing wave packets for the superposition of energy eigenstates and discuss the implications of their results with realistic values for the mixing and mass parameters in a full three neutrino mixing scenario. Our analysis shows the possibility of superluminal propagation of neutrino flavour in a very narrow range of neutrino parameter space. However, the explanation of the OPERA result is outside this possibility. This result, if confirmed by other experiments, can be explained through matter effects via a possible new interaction.

  2. Localization of s-Wave and Quantum Effective Potential of a Quasi-free Particle with Position-Dependent Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Guo-Xing; XIANG Yang; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the s-wave for a quasi-free particle with position-dependent mass (PDM) have been discussed in details. Differed from the system with constant mass in which the localization of the s-wave for the free quantum particle around the origin only occurs in two dimensions, the quasi-free particle with PDM can experience attractive forces in D dimensions except D=1 when its mass function satisfies some conditions. The effective mass of a particle varying with its position can induce effective interaction, which may be attractive in some cases. The analytical expressions of the eigenfunctions and the corresponding probability densities for the s-waves of the two- and three-dimensional systems with a special PDM are given, and the existences of localization around the origin for these systems are shown.

  3. Annihilation and creation of rotating waves by a local light pulse in a protoplasmic droplet of the Physarum plasmodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Seiji; Ueda, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    Pattern dynamics plays a fundamental role in biological functions from cell to organ in living systems, and the appearance of rotating waves can lead to pathological situations. Basic dynamics of rotating waves of contraction-relaxation activity under local perturbation is studied in a newly developed protoplasmic droplet of the Physarum plasmodium. A light pulse is applied by irradiating circularly a quarter of the droplet showing a single rotating wave. The oscillation pattern changes abruptly only when the irradiation is applied at a part of the droplet near the maximal contraction. The abrupt changes are as follows: the rotating wave disappears or is displaced when the irradiation area is very close to the center of the rotating wave, while new rotating waves are created when the irradiation area is far from the center of the rotating wave. These results support the hypothesis that the phase response curve has a discontinuous change (type 0 resetting) from delay to advance around the maximal contraction. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to “vulnerability” in excitable media and biological systems in general.

  4. Wave overtopping simulator on a 1/15 slope protected by two local grass species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of wave overtopping during storms was simulated by the Wave Overtopping Simulator on a 1/15 grass covered slope. The four 'Wave Overtopping Simulator' tests were done within the framework of the Research project 'Super sea dike with high safety level and environmental friendly' funded

  5. Enhanced localization of Dyakonov-like surface waves in left-handed materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crasovan, L. C.; Takayama, O.; Artigas, D.

    2006-01-01

    We address the existence and properties of hybrid surface waves forming at interfaces between left-handed materials and dielectric birefringent media. The existence conditions of such waves are found to be highly relaxed in comparison to Dyakonov waves existing in right-handed media. We show that...

  6. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  7. New non-local lattice models for the description of wave dispersion in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Sokratis N.; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.

    2015-03-01

    The propagation of longitudinal waves through concrete materials is strongly affected by dispersion. This is clearly indicated experimentally from the increase of phase velocity at low frequencies whereas many attempts have been made to explain this behavior analytically. Since the classical elastic theory for bulk media is by default non-dispersive, enhanced theories have been developed. The most commonly used higher order theory is the dipolar gradient elastic theory which takes into account the microstructural effects in heterogeneous media like concrete. The microstructural effects are described by two internal length scale parameters (g and h) which correspond to the micro-stiffness and micro-inertia respectively. In the current paper, this simplest possible version of the general gradient elastic theory proposed by Mindlin is reproduced through non-local lattice models consisting of discrete springs and masses. The masses simulate the aggregates of the concrete specimen whereas the springs are the mechanical similitude of the concrete matrix. The springs in these models are connecting the closest masses between them as well as the second or third closest to each other masses creating a non-local system of links. These non-neighboring interactions are represented by massless springs of constant stiffness while on the other hand one cannot neglect the significant mass of the springs connecting neighboring masses as this is responsible for the micro-inertia term. The major advantage of the presented lattice models is the fact that the considered microstructural effects can be accurately expressed as a function of the size and the mechanical properties of the microstructure.

  8. P wave crustal velocity structure in the greater Mount Rainier area from local earthquake tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Seth C.; Lees, Jonathan M.; Malone, Stephen D.

    1999-05-01

    We present results from a local earthquake tomographic imaging experiment in the greater Mount Rainier area. We inverted P wave arrival times from local earthquakes recorded at permanent and temporary Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network seismographs between 1980 and 1996. We used a method similar to that described by Lees and Crosson [1989], modified to incorporate the parameter separation method for decoupling the hypocenter and velocity problems. In the upper 7 km of the resulting model there is good correlation between velocity anomalies and surface geology. Many focal mechanisms within the St. Helens seismic zone have nodal planes parallel to the epicentral trend as well as to a north-south trending low-velocity trough, leading us to speculate that the trough represents a zone of structural weakness in which a moderate (M 6.5-7.0) earthquake could occur. In contrast, the western Rainier seismic zone does not correlate in any simple way with anomaly patterns or focal mechanism fault planes, leading us to infer that it is less likely to experience a moderate earthquake. A ˜10 km-wide low-velocity anomaly occurs 5 to 18 km beneath the summit of Mount Rainier, which we interpret to be a signal of a region composed of hot, fractured rock with possible small amounts of melt or fluid. No systematic velocity pattern is observed in association with the southern Washington Cascades conductor. A midcrustal anomaly parallels the Olympic-Wallowa lineament as well as several other geophysical trends, indicating that it may play an important role in regional tectonics.

  9. Effect of magnetic islands on the localization of kinetic Alfvén wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Rajesh Kumar, E-mail: rajanraj.rai7@gmail.com; Sharma, Swati, E-mail: swati.sharma704@gmail.com; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Goldstein, M. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have revealed an intimate link between magnetic reconnection and turbulence. Observations show that kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) play a very crucial role in magnetic reconnection and have been a topic of interest from decades in the context of turbulence and particle heating. In the present paper, we study the role that KAW plays in the formation of coherent structures/current sheets when KAW is propagating in the pre-existing fully developed chain of magnetic islands. We derived the dynamical equation of KAW in the presence of chain of magnetic islands and solved it using numerical simulations well as analytic tools. Due to pre-existing chain of magnetic islands, KAW splits into coherent structures and the scale size of these structures along transverse directions (with respect to background magnetic field) comes out to be either less than or greater than ion gyro radius. Therefore, the present work may be the first step towards understanding how magnetic reconnection generated islands may affect the KAW localization and eventually contribute to magnetic turbulence. In this way the present approach may be helpful to understand the interplay between magnetic reconnection and turbulence in ion diffusion region.

  10. Weak localization of electromagnetic waves and radar polarimetry of Saturn's rings

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I

    2008-01-01

    We use a state-of-the-art physics-based model of electromagnetic scattering to analyze average circular polarization ratios measured for the A and B rings of Saturn at a wavelength of 12.6 cm. This model is directly based on the Maxwell equations and accounts for the effects of polarization, multiple scattering, weak localization of electromagnetic waves, and ring particle nonsphericity. Our analysis is based on the assumption that the observed polarization ratios are accurate, mutually consistent, and show a quasi-linear dependence on the opening angle. Also, we assume that the ring system is not strongly stratified in the vertical direction. Our numerical simulations rule out the model of spherical ring particles, favor the model of ring bodies in the form of nearly spherical particles with small-scale surface roughness, and rule out nonspherical particles with aspect ratios significantly exceeding 1.2. They also favor particles with effective radii in the range 4-10 cm and definitely rule out effective rad...

  11. Exotic Localized Coherent Structures of the (2+1)—Dimensional Dispersive Long—Wave Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJie-Fang

    2002-01-01

    This article is concerned with the extended homogeneous balance method for studying the abundant localized solution structures in the (2+1)-dimensional dispersive long-wave equations uty+ηxx+(u2)xy/2=0,ηt+(uη+u+uxy)x=0.Starting from the homogeneous balance method,we find that the richness of the localized coberent structures of the model is caused by the entrance of two variable-separated arbitrary functions.for some special selections of the arbitrary functions,it is shown that the localized structures of the model may be dromions,lumps,breathers,instantons and ring solitons.

  12. Multi-site delamination detection and quantification in composites through guided wave based global-local sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a guided wave based global-local sensing method for rapid detection and quantification of multi-site delamination damage in large composite panels. The global-local approach uses a hybrid system consisting of a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) for generating guided waves and a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for acquiring guided wave data. The global-local method is performed in two steps. First, a phased array configured of a small number of SLDV scan points (for example 10×10 points in a rectangular grid array) performs inspection over the entire plate to detect and locate damage. Local areas are identified as potential damage regions for the second step. Then high density wavefield measurements are taken over the identified areas and wavefield analysis is performed to quantitatively evaluate the damage. For the proof of concept in case with multi-site damage, the global-local approach is demonstrated on a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite plate with two sites of impact-induced delamination damage. In the first step, the locations of two delamination sites are detected by the phased array method. In the second step, the delamination size and shape are evaluated using wavefield analysis. The detected delamination location, size and shape agree well with those of ultrasonic C-scan and the method led to a 93% reduction in inspection time compared to a full SLDV dense grid scan.

  13. INVESTIGATION OF THE SCATTERING OF HARMONIC ELASTIC WAVES BY TWO COLLINEAR SYMMETRIC CRACKS USING THE NON-LOCAL THEORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周振功; 王彪

    2001-01-01

    The scattering of harmonic waves by two collinear symmetric cracks is studied using the non-local theory. A one-dimensional non-local kernel was used to replace a twodimensional one for the dynamic problem to obtain the stress occurring at the crack tips. The Fourier transform was applied and a mixed boundary value problem was formulated. Then a set of triple integral equations was solved by using Schmidt's method. This method is more exact and more reasonable than Eringen' s for solving this problem. Contrary to the classical elasticity solution, it is found that no stress singularity is present at the crack tip. The non- local dynamic elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at the crack tip, thus allowing for a fracture criterion based on the maximum dynamic stress hypothesis. The finite hoop stress at the crack tip depends on the crack length, the lattice parameter and the circular frequency of incident wave.

  14. Magnetic field dependence of the lowest-frequency edge-localized spin wave mode in a magnetic nanotriangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C S; Lim, H S; Wang, Z K; Ng, S C; Kuok, M H; Adeyeye, A O

    2011-03-01

    An understanding of the spin dynamics of nanoscale magnetic elements is important for their applications in magnetic sensing and storage. Inhomogeneity of the demagnetizing field in a non-ellipsoidal magnetic element results in localization of spin waves near the edge of the element. However, relative little work has been carried out to investigate the effect of the applied magnetic fields on the nature of such localized modes. In this study, micromagnetic simulations are performed on an equilateral triangular nanomagnet to investigate the magnetic field dependence of the mode profiles of the lowest-frequency spin wave. Our findings reveal that the lowest-frequency mode is localized at the base edge of the equilateral triangle. The characteristics of its mode profile change with the ground state magnetization configuration of the nanotriangle, which, in turn, depends on the magnitude of the in-plane applied magnetic field.

  15. Elimination of spiral waves in a locally connected chaotic neural network by a dynamic phase space constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Oku, Makito; He, Guoguang; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-16

    In this study, a method is proposed that eliminates spiral waves in a locally connected chaotic neural network (CNN) under some simplified conditions, using a dynamic phase space constraint (DPSC) as a control method. In this method, a control signal is constructed from the feedback internal states of the neurons to detect phase singularities based on their amplitude reduction, before modulating a threshold value to truncate the refractory internal states of the neurons and terminate the spirals. Simulations showed that with appropriate parameter settings, the network was directed from a spiral wave state into either a plane wave (PW) state or a synchronized oscillation (SO) state, where the control vanished automatically and left the original CNN model unaltered. Each type of state had a characteristic oscillation frequency, where spiral wave states had the highest, and the intra-control dynamics was dominated by low-frequency components, thereby indicating slow adjustments to the state variables. In addition, the PW-inducing and SO-inducing control processes were distinct, where the former generally had longer durations but smaller average proportions of affected neurons in the network. Furthermore, variations in the control parameter allowed partial selectivity of the control results, which were accompanied by modulation of the control processes. The results of this study broaden the applicability of DPSC to chaos control and they may also facilitate the utilization of locally connected CNNs in memory retrieval and the exploration of traveling wave dynamics in biological neural networks.

  16. Comparison of the effectiveness of local corticosteroid injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyazal, Münevver Serdaroğlu; Devrimsel, Gül

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine and compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy and local corticosteroid injection in patients with lateral epicondylitis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty-four patients with lateral epicondylitis were randomly divided into extracorporeal shock wave therapy and steroid injection groups. Patients were evaluated using hand grip strength, visual analog scale, and short-form McGill pain questionnaire at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks post-treatment. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant increase in hand grip strength and decreases on the visual analog scale and short form McGill pain questionnaire overtime. There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of improvement in hand grip strength and on the short-form McGill pain questionnaire between groups at 4 weeks post-treatment, whereas the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group showed better results on the visual analog scale. The percentages of improvements in all 3 parameters were higher in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group than in the injection group at 12 weeks post-treatment. [Conclusion] Both the extracorporeal shock wave therapy and steroid injection were safe and effective in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. However, extracorporeal shock wave therapy demonstrated better outcomes than steroid injection at the long-term follow-up.

  17. Selection of the optimum combination of responses for Wave Buoy Analogy - An approach based on local sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2016-01-01

    One method to estimate the wave spectrum onboard ships is to use measured ship responses. In this method, known also as Wave Buoy Analogy, amongst various responses that are available from sensor measurements, a couple of responses (at least three) are usually utilized. Selec-tion of the best...... combination of ship responses is important. Optimally, this selection should not be implemented manually in onboard applications. Therefore, availability of an automatic response selection procedure would be a great advantage for decision support. In this paper, a local sensitivity analysis is applied...

  18. Fractality of wave functions on a Cayley tree: Difference between tree and locally treelike graph without boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, K. Â. S.; Mirlin, A. Â. D.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate analytically and numerically eigenfunction statistics in a disordered system on a finite Bethe lattice (Cayley tree). We show that the wave-function amplitude at the root of a tree is distributed fractally in a large part of the delocalized phase. The fractal exponents are expressed in terms of the decay rate and the velocity in a problem of propagation of a front between unstable and stable phases. We demonstrate a crucial difference between a loopless Cayley tree and a locally treelike structure without a boundary (random regular graph) where extended wave functions are ergodic.

  19. Wave intensity amplification and attenuation in non-linear flow: implications for the calculation of local reflection coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynard, Jonathan; Penny, Daniel J; Smolich, Joseph J

    2008-12-05

    Local reflection coefficients (R) provide important insights into the influence of wave reflection on vascular haemodynamics. Using the relatively new time-domain method of wave intensity analysis, R has been calculated as the ratio of the peak intensities (R(PI)) or areas (R(CI)) of incident and reflected waves, or as the ratio of the changes in pressure caused by these waves (R(DeltaP)). While these methods have not yet been compared, it is likely that elastic non-linearities present in large arteries will lead to changes in the size of waves as they propagate and thus errors in the calculation of R(PI) and R(CI). To test this proposition, R(PI), R(CI) and R(DeltaP) were calculated in a non-linear computer model of a single vessel with various degrees of elastic non-linearity, determined by wave speed and pulse amplitude (DeltaP(+)), and a terminal admittance to produce reflections. Results obtained from this model demonstrated that under linear flow conditions (i.e. as DeltaP(+)-->0), R(DeltaP) is equivalent to the square-root of R(PI) and R(CI) (denoted by R(PI)(p) and R(CI)(p)). However for non-linear flow, pressure-increasing (compression) waves undergo amplification while pressure-reducing (expansion) waves undergo attenuation as they propagate. Consequently, significant errors related to the degree of elastic non-linearity arise in R(PI) and R(CI), and also R(PI)(p) and R(CI)(p), with greater errors associated with larger reflections. Conversely, R(Delta)(P) is unaffected by the degree of non-linearity and is thus more accurate than R(PI) and R(CI).

  20. Extreme Wave Simulation due to Typhoon Bolaven based on locally Enhanced Fine-Mesh Unstructured Grid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ok; Choi, Byung Ho; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2016-04-01

    The performance of an integrally coupled wave-tide-surge model using the unstructured mesh system has been tested for the typhoon Bolaven which is regarded as the most powerful storm to strike the Korean Peninsula in nearly a decade with wind gusts measured up to 50 m/s, causing serious damages with 19 victims. Use of the unstructured mesh in coastal sea regions of marginal scale allows all energy from deep to shallow waters to be seamlessly followed; the physics of wave-circulation interactions can be then correctly resolved. The model covers the whole Yellow and East China Seas with locally refined meshes near the regions of Gageo Island (offshore southwestern corner of the Korean Peninsula) and south of Jeju Island (Gangjeong and Seogwipo ports). The wind and pressure fields during the passage of typhoon Bolaven are generated by the blending method. Generally the numerical atmospheric model cannot satisfactorily reproduce the strength of typhoons due to dynamic and resolution restrictions. In this study we could achieve an improved conservation of the typhoon strength by blending the Holland typhoon model result by the empirical formula onto the ambient meteorological fields of NCEP dataset. The model results are compared with the observations and the model performance is then evaluated. The computed wave spectrums for one and two dimensions are compared with the observation in Ieodo station. Results show that the wind wave significantly enhances the current intensity and surge elevation, addressing that to incorporate the wave-current interaction effect in the wave-tide-surge coupled model is important for the accurate prediction of current and sea surface elevation as well as extreme waves in shallow coastal sea regions. The resulting modeling system can be used for hindcasting and forecasting the wave-tide-surges in marine environments with complex coastlines, shallow water depth and fine sediment.

  1. ELASTIC WAVE LOCALIZATION IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL PHONONIC CRYSTALS WITH ONE-DIMENSIONAL QUASI-PERIODICITY AND RANDOM DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Chen; Yuesheng Wang; Guilan Yu; Yafang Guo; Zhengdao Wang

    2008-01-01

    The band structures of both in-plane and anti-plane elastic waves propagating in two-dimensional ordered and disordered (in one direction) phononic crystals are studied in this paper. The localization of wave propagation due to random disorder is discussed by introducing the concept of the localization factor that is calculated by the plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method. By treating the quasi-periodicity as the deviation from the periodicity in a special way, two kinds of quasi phononic crystal that has quasi-periodicity (Fibonacci sequence) in one direction and translational symmetry in the other direction are considered and the band structures are characterized by using localization factors. The results show that the localization factor is an effective parameter in characterizing the band gaps of two-dimensional perfect, randomly disordered and quasi-periodic phcnonic crystals. Band structures of the phononic crystals can be tuned by different random disorder or changing quasi-periodic parameters. The quasi phononic crystals exhibit more band gaps with narrower width than the ordered and randomly disordered systems.

  2. A non-parametric method for automatic determination of P-wave and S-wave arrival times: application to local micro earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawles, Christopher; Thurber, Clifford

    2015-08-01

    We present a simple, fast, and robust method for automatic detection of P- and S-wave arrivals using a nearest neighbours-based approach. The nearest neighbour algorithm is one of the most popular time-series classification methods in the data mining community and has been applied to time-series problems in many different domains. Specifically, our method is based on the non-parametric time-series classification method developed by Nikolov. Instead of building a model by estimating parameters from the data, the method uses the data itself to define the model. Potential phase arrivals are identified based on their similarity to a set of reference data consisting of positive and negative sets, where the positive set contains examples of analyst identified P- or S-wave onsets and the negative set contains examples that do not contain P waves or S waves. Similarity is defined as the square of the Euclidean distance between vectors representing the scaled absolute values of the amplitudes of the observed signal and a given reference example in time windows of the same length. For both P waves and S waves, a single pass is done through the bandpassed data, producing a score function defined as the ratio of the sum of similarity to positive examples over the sum of similarity to negative examples for each window. A phase arrival is chosen as the centre position of the window that maximizes the score function. The method is tested on two local earthquake data sets, consisting of 98 known events from the Parkfield region in central California and 32 known events from the Alpine Fault region on the South Island of New Zealand. For P-wave picks, using a reference set containing two picks from the Parkfield data set, 98 per cent of Parkfield and 94 per cent of Alpine Fault picks are determined within 0.1 s of the analyst pick. For S-wave picks, 94 per cent and 91 per cent of picks are determined within 0.2 s of the analyst picks for the Parkfield and Alpine Fault data set

  3. Diffraction of localized shear wave at the edge of semi-infinite crack in compound elastic space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryan E.Kh.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffraction of localized shear plane Love`s wave, falling from infinity in a piecewise-homogeneous elastic space weakened by a semi-infinite crack parallel to the line of heterogeneity is considered. With the help of Fourier transform, mixed boundary value problem of diffraction of elastic waves is reduced to the problem of Riemann type theory of analytic functions on the real axis with the right part of the generalized Dirac function . Obtaining in generalized functions solution of functional equations allowed us to obtain the distribution of wave field in each subregion of elastic space, as well as asymptotic formulas defining the characteristics of the diffraction field in remote areas.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Local Scour Around A Large Circular Cylinder Under Wave Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明; 滕斌

    2001-01-01

    A horizontal two-dimensional numerical model is developed for estimation of sediment transport and sea bed change around a large circular cylinder under wave action. The wave model is based on an elliptic mild slope equation.The wave-induced current by the gradient of radiation stress is considered and a depth integrated shallow water equation is applied to the calculation of the current. The mass transport velocity and the bed shear stress due to streaming are considered, which are important factors affecting the sediment transport around a structure due to waves, especially in reflective areas. Wave-current interaction is taken into account in the model for computing the bed shear stress. The model is implemented by a finite element method. The results of this model are compared with those from other methods and agree well with experimental data.

  5. Multi-resonance tunneling of acoustic waves in two-dimensional locally-resonant phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aichao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Zhu, Liang; Yu, Lingang; Ma, Jian; Zou, Yang; Li, Min; Wu, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Multi-resonance tunneling of acoustic waves through a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) is demonstrated by substituting dual Helmholtz resonators (DHRs) for acoustically-rigid scatterers in the PC. Due to the coupling of the incident waves with the acoustic multi-resonance modes of the DHRs, acoustic waves can tunnel through the PC at specific frequencies which lie inside the band gaps of the PC. This wave tunneling transmission can be further broadened by using the multilayer Helmholtz resonators. Thus, a PC consisting of an array of dual/multilayer Helmholtz resonators can serve as an acoustic band-pass filter, used to pick out acoustic waves with certain frequencies from noise.

  6. Local helioseismic and spectroscopic analyses of interactions between acoustic waves and a sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Rajaguru, S P; Sankarasubramanian, K; Couvidat, S; 10.1088/2041-8205/721/2/L86

    2010-01-01

    Using a high cadence imaging spectropolarimetric observation of a sunspot and its surroundings in magnetically sensitive (FeI 6173 A) and insensitive (FeI 7090 A) upper photospheric absorption lines, we map the instantaneous wave phases and helioseismic travel times as a function of observation height and inclination of magnetic field to the vertical. We confirm the magnetic inclination angle dependent transmission of incident acoustic waves into upward propagating waves, and derive (1) proof that helioseismic travel times receive direction dependent contributions from such waves and hence cause errors in conventional flow inferences, (2) evidences for acoustic wave sources beneath the umbral photosphere, and (3) significant differences in travel times measured from the chosen magnetically sensitive and insensitive spectral lines.

  7. Local Wave Propagation in the Kachchh Basin, India: Synergy With the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, C. A.; Kang, D.; Bodin, P.; Horton, S.

    2002-12-01

    Aftershocks of the Mw7.6 Bhuj earthquake are used to infer velocity structure and the nature of wave propagation within the Kachchh Basin, India. The data were collected from a joint MAEC/ISTAR deployment of seismographs within 3 weeks of the main event and from existing broadband stations in the region under the India Meteorological Department. Waveforms are available from events that span the entire thickness of the crust and display a variety of wave propagation effects due to low-velocity near-surface site structure and larger structure of the Mesozoic Kachchh basin. These effects include near-site, high frequency reverberations in P and S waves, Sp and Ps mode conversions, PL waves within the Mesozoic basin, basin S multiples, and surface waves. Surface wave group velocity dispersion yields estimates of basin shear wave velocity, and when coupled to analysis of large observed Sp conversions, give a migrated image of stratigraphy within the Banni plains that agrees favorably with published stratigraphy. Identification of basin structure effects allows constraints to be placed on aftershock source depths that are needed in evaluating standard earthquake locations. Structure models are used to construct Green's functions for determining source parameters through waveform modeling. Although stations of the aftershock network were situated on a variety of sites that varied from consolidated Mesozoic bedrock to unconsolidated recent sediments, all stations show major wave propagation effects due to basin fill that must be included in source parameter estimation. These effects seen in India have many similarities to wave propagation effects observed within the Mississippi embayment from microearthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) of the central U.S. Joint waveform studies are motivating new ways of understanding wave propagation and source processes within both areas.

  8. Influence of local mechanical properties of high strength steel from large size forged ingot on ultrasonic wave velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont-Marillia, Frederic; Jahazi, Mohamad; Lafreniere, Serge; Belanger, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    In the metallurgical industry, ultrasonic inspection is routinely used for the detection of defects. For the non-destructive inspection of small high strength steel parts, the material can be considered isotropic. However, when the size of the parts under inspection is large, the isotropic material hypothesis does not necessarily hold. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation in mechanical properties such as grain size, Young's modulus, Poissons ratio, chemical composition on longitudinal and transversal ultrasonic wave velocities. A 2 cm thick slice cut from a 40-ton bainitic steel ingot that was forged and heat treated was divided into 875 parallelepiped samples of 2x4x7 cm3. A metallurgical study has been performed to identify the phase and measure the grain size. Ultrasonic velocity measurements at 2.25 MHz for longitudinal and transversal waves were performed. The original location of the parallelepiped samples in the large forged ingot, and the measured velocities were used to produce an ultrasonic velocity map. Using a local isotropy assumption as well as the local density of the parallelepiped samples calculated from the chemical composition of the ingot provided by a previously published study, Youngs modulus and Poissons ratio were calculated from the longitudinal and transversal wave velocities. Micro-tensile test was used to validate Youngs modulus obtained by the ultrasonic wave velocity and an excellent agreement was observed.

  9. Self-similar wave produced by local perturbation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz shear-layer instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepffner, Jérôme; Blumenthal, Ralf; Zaleski, Stéphane

    2011-03-11

    We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability excited by a localized perturbation yields a self-similar wave. The instability of the mixing layer was first conceived by Helmholtz as the inevitable growth of any localized irregularity into a spiral, but the search and uncovering of the resulting self-similar evolution was hindered by the technical success of Kelvin's wavelike perturbation theory. The identification of a self-similar solution is useful since its specific structure is witness of a subtle nonlinear equilibrium among the forces involved. By simulating numerically the Navier-Stokes equations, we analyze the properties of the wave: growth rate, propagation speed and the dependency of its shape upon the density ratio of the two phases of the mixing layer.

  10. Localized Structures on Periodic Background Wave of (2+1)-Dimensional Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli System via an Object Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present an object reduction for nonlinear partial differential equations. As a concrete example of its applications in physical problems, this method is applied to the (2+1)-dimensional Boiti-Leon-Pempinelli system, which has the extensive physics background, and an abundance of exact solutions is derived from some reduction equations. Based on the derived solutions, the localized structures under the periodic wave background are obtained.

  11. A Non-Mainstream Viewpoint on Apparent Superluminal Phenomena in AGN Jet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wen-Po Liu; Li-Yan Liu; Chun-Cheng Wang

    2014-09-01

    The group velocity of light in material around the AGN jet is acquiescently one ( as a unit), but this is only a hypothesis. Here, we re-derive apparent superluminal and Doppler formulas for the general case (it is assumed that the group velocity of light in the uniform and isotropic medium around a jet (a beaming model) is not necessarily equal to one, e.g., Araudo et al. (2010) thought that there may be dense clouds around AGN jet base), and show that the group velocity of light close to one could seriously affect apparent superluminal phenomena and Doppler effect in the AGN jet (when the viewing angle and Lorentz factor take some appropriate values).

  12. Emission of correlated photon pairs from superluminal perturbations in dispersive media

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Francesco Dalla; Cacciatori, Sergio Luigi; Faccio, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We develop a perturbative theory that describes a superluminal refractive perturbation propagating in a dispersive medium and the subsequent excitation of the quantum vacuum zero-point fluctuations. We find a process similar to the anomalous Doppler effect: photons are emitted in correlated pairs and mainly within a Cerenkov-like cone, one on the forward and the other in backward directions. The number of photon pairs emitted from the perturbation increases strongly with the degree of superluminality and under realizable experimental conditions, it can reach up to ~0.01 photons per pulse. Moreover, it is in principle possible to engineer the host medium so as to modify the effective group refractive index. In the presence of "fast light" media, e.g. a with group index smaller than unity, a further ~10x enhancement may be achieved and the photon emission spectrum is characterized by two sharp peaks that, in future experiments would clearly identify the correlated emission of photon pairs.

  13. Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation through a Bose-Einstein condensate cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamide Kazemi, S.; Ghanbari, S.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of a probe laser field in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate is studied. The transmission properties of the system are investigated and it is shown that the group velocity of the probe pulse field can be controlled by Rabi frequency of the pump laser field. The effect of the decay rate of the cavity photons on the group velocity is studied and it is demonstrated that for small values of the decay rates, the light propagation switches from subluminal to superluminal just by changing the Rabi frequency of the pump field. Then, the gain-assisted superluminal light propagation due to the cross-Kerr nonlinearity is established in cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate. Such behavior can not appear in the pump-probe two-level atomic systems in the normal phase. We also find that the amplification is achieved without inversion in the population of the quantum energy levels.

  14. Sub- and super-luminal light propagation using a Rydberg state

    CERN Document Server

    Bharti, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study to investigate sub- and super-luminal light propagation in a rubidium atomic system consisting of a Rydberg state by using density matrix formalism. The analysis is performed in a 4-level vee+ladder system interacting with a weak probe, and strong control and switching fields. The dispersion and absorption profiles are shown for stationary atoms as well as for moving atoms by carrying out Doppler averaging at room temperature. We also present the group index variation with control Rabi frequency and observe that a transparent medium can be switched from sub- to super-luminal propagation in the presence of switching field. Finally, the transient response of the medium is discussed, which shows that the considered 4-level scheme has potential applications in absorptive optical switching.

  15. Self-accelerating Massive Gravity: Superluminality, Cauchy Surfaces and Strong Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Motloch, Pavel; Joyce, Austin; Motohashi, Hayato

    2015-01-01

    Self-accelerating solutions in massive gravity provide explicit, calculable examples that exhibit the general interplay between superluminality, the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem, and strong coupling. For three particular classes of vacuum solutions, one of which is new to this work, we construct the conformal diagram for the characteristic surfaces on which isotropic stress-energy perturbations propagate. With one exception, all solutions necessarily possess spacelike characteristics, indicating perturbative superluminality. Foliating the spacetime with these surfaces gives a pathological frame where kinetic terms of the perturbations vanish, confusing the Hamiltonian counting of degrees of freedom. This frame dependence distinguishes the vanishing of kinetic terms from strong coupling of perturbations or an ill-posed Cauchy problem. We give examples where spacelike characteristics do and do not originate from a point where perturbation theory breaks down and where spacelike surfaces do or do not inte...

  16. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  17. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  18. Discusses on the Tesla Scalar Waves%试论Tesla标量波

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志洵

    2014-01-01

    Nikola Tesla was the pioneer of science-technology civilization in the past,his scalar waves are very interesting in terms of their practical use for energy and information transfer. As is well known, the radio waves and light waves are transverse waves,but the Tesla scalar wave more like a vibration of e-lectromagnetic potential expanding and contracting in the direction of propagation. In the research of elec-tromagnetic theory,the physical reality of vector potential and scalar potential were verified by the experi-ments,it is support of the Tesla scalar waves. We see such situation in the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the quantum entangled states,they are the non-force interactions,Tesla scalar wave also has this effect. In this paper,we find out the reasons of Tesla wave’ s superluminality. Firstly,the quantum dynamics non-locality emerged from the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Secondary,the near field effect on the evanescent-state alike. Then the possibility of Tesla longitudinal waves superluminal propagation are possible. But the situation here requires much experiments.%Nikola Tesla是现代科技文明的创始人之一;他的标量波不但可用于能量和信息传输,而且非常有趣。如所周知无线电波和光波都是横波,但Tesla标量波更像电磁势在传播方向上的扩张和收缩。在电磁理论研究中,实验均证明了矢势和标势的物理实在性,这是对Tesla标量波理念的支持。我们已知像Aharonov-Bohm效应和量子纠缠态这类非力效应的情况,Tesla标量波也是这种效应。  本文提出了Tesla波可能有超光速性的原因:首先是Aharonov-Bohm效应具有量子力学非局域性;其次是类消失态的近场效应;因此Tesla纵波以超光速传播是可能的。但还应做更多的实验。

  19. On determination of the geometric cosmological constant from the OPERA experiment of superluminal neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Mu-Lin; Hu, Sen; Huang, Wei; Xiao, Neng-Chao

    2011-01-01

    The recent OPERA experiment of superluminal neutrinos has deep consequences in cosmology. In cosmology a fundamental constant is the cosmological constant. From observations one can estimate the effective cosmological constant $\\Lambda_{eff}$ which is the sum of the quantum zero point energy $\\Lambda_{dark energy}$ and the geometric cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. The OPERA experiment can be applied to determine the geometric cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. It is the first time to distingui...

  20. Swift and LT UV and optical observations of type IIn superluminous supernova 2017gir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Zach; Kuin, Paul; Chandra, Poonam; Ashall, Chris; Malesani, Daniele; Pastorello, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    We observed the field of the type IIn superluminous supernova 2017gir (ATLAS17jsb, Tonry et al. 2017; Lyman et al. 2017, ATel 10674) with Swift via a target-of-opportunity for three epochs (6th, 16th and 19th of September, 2017) in the three UVOT UV filters (w1, m1, w2). The SN is clearly detected in all three filters, and it is seen that its brightness fades over this timescale.

  1. Properties of Magnetars Mimicking 56Ni-powered Light Curves in Type IC Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Chen, Ting-Wan; Langer, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Many Type Ic superluminous supernovae have light-curve decline rates after their luminosity peak, which are close to the nuclear decay rate of {}56{Co}, consistent with the interpretation that they are powered by {}56{Ni} and possibly pair-instability supernovae. However, their rise times are typically shorter than those expected from pair-instability supernovae, and Type Ic superluminous supernovae are often suggested to be powered by magnetar spin-down. If magnetar spin-down is actually a major mechanism to power Type Ic superluminous supernovae, it should be able to produce decline rates similar to the {}56{Co} decay rate rather easily. In this study, we investigate the conditions for magnetars under which their spin-down energy input can behave like the {}56{Ni} nuclear decay energy input. We find that an initial magnetic field strength within a certain range is sufficient to keep the magnetar energy deposition within a factor of a few of the {}56{Co} decay energy for several hundreds of days. Magnetar spin-down needs to be by almost pure dipole radiation with the braking index close to three to mimic {}56{Ni} in a wide parameter range. Not only late-phase {}56{Co}-decay-like light curves, but also rise time and peak luminosity of most {}56{Ni}-powered light curves can be reproduced by magnetars. Bolometric light curves for more than 700 days are required to distinguish the two energy sources solely by them. We expect that more slowly declining superluminous supernovae with short rise times should be found if they are mainly powered by magnetar spin-down.

  2. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vago, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this thesis, the author demonstrates that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements discussed were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at altitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. The results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse.

  3. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vago, J.L.; Kintner, P.M.; Chesney, S.W.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Lynch, K.A.; Moore, T.E.; Pollock, C.J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States) New Hampshire Univ., Durham (United States) NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this paper we demonstrate that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements we discuss were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at latitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. Our results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse. 50 refs.

  4. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, J. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Chesney, S. W.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lynch, K. A.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this paper we demonstrate that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements we discuss were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at latitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. Our results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse.

  5. Considerations about the apparent ''superluminal expansions'' observed in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recami, E.; Castellino, A.; Maccarrone, G.D.; Rodono, M.

    1986-06-11

    The orthodox models devised to explain the apparent ''superluminal expansions'' observed in astrophysics - and here briefly summarized and discussed together with the experimental data - do not seem to be too much successful, especially when confronted with the most recent observations, suggesting complicated expansion patterns, even with possible accelerations. At this point it may be, therefore, of some interest to explore the possible alternative models in which actual Superluminal motions take place. To prepare the ground, we start from a variational principle, introduce the elements of a tachyon mechanics within special relativity, and argue about the expected behaviour of tachyonic objects when interacting (gravitationally, for instance) among themselves or with ordinary matter. We then review and develop the simplet ''Superluminal models'', paying particular attention to the observations which they would give rise to. We conclude that some of them appear to be physically acceptable and are statistically favoured with respect to the orthodox ones.

  6. Localization of Dispersive Alfvén Wave in Solar wind plasmas and Turbulent Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind turbulence at large inertial scales is well known for decades and believed to consist of Alfvén cascade. The inertial range of Solar wind turbulence can be described by a magnetohydrodynamic model. But at small scales the MHD description is not valid. At scales of the order of proton inertial length, Alfvén cascade excites kinetic Alfvén wave or fast wave or whistler wave that carries wave energy to smaller scales. On the other hand, parallel propagating right(R) and left(L) circularly polarized Alfvén/ ion cyclotron wave in the framework of Hall MHD are also thought to be essential ingredients of the solar wind turbulence. Recently, He et.al[1] have used the magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft to calculate the magnetic helicities in the solar wind turbulence and reported the possible existence of Alfvén -cyclotron waves and their coexistence with the right handed polarized fluctuations. In the present article we intend to study the right circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) and their role in the solar wind turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term causes the dispersion of the AW which, in the present study, is considered on account of the finite frequency (frequency comparable to ion gyro frequency) of the pump wave. Filamentation instability has been reported to occur for the case of circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) propagating parallel to ambient magnetic field. In the present study, the instability arises on account of the transverse density perturbations of the acoustic wave that may couple nonlinearly with the Alfvén wave and the driven ponderomotive force sequentially leads to growth of density perturbations. Numerical simulation involves finite difference method for the time domain and pseudo spectral method for the spatial domain. The power spectrum is investigated which shows a steepening for scales larger than the proton inertial length. These findings have been reported by Alexandrova et al

  7. P-Wave Velocity Tomography from Local Earthquakes in Western Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Chávez, Juan A.; Escudero, Christian R.; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco J.; Bandy, William L.

    2016-10-01

    In western Mexico, the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North America plate has deformed and fragmented the overriding plate, forming several structural rifts and crustal blocks. To obtain a reliable subsurface image of the continental crust and uppermost mantle in this complex area, we used P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes along with the Fast Marching Method tomography technique. We followed an inversion scheme consisting of (1) the use of a high-quality earthquake catalog and corrected phase picks, (2) the selection of earthquakes using a maximum location error threshold, (3) the estimation of an improved 1-D reference velocity model, and (4) the use of checkerboard testing to determine the optimum configuration of the velocity nodes and inversion parameters. Surprisingly, the tomography results show a very simple δVp distribution that can be described as being controlled by geologic structures formed during two stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates. The earlier period represents the initial stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath western Mexico; the later period represents the more advanced stage of rifting where the Rivera and Cocos plates had separated sufficiently to allow melt to accumulate below the Colima Volcanic complex. During the earlier period (14 or 10-1.6 Ma), NE-SW-oriented structures/lineaments (such as the Southern Colima Rift) were formed as the two plates separated. During the second period (1.6 Ma to the present), the deformation is attributed to magma, generated within and above the tear zone between the Rivera and Cocos plates, rising beneath the region of the Colima Volcanic Complex. The rising magma fractured the overlying crust, forming a classic triple-rift junction geometry. This triple-rift system is confined to the mid- to lower crust perhaps indicating that this rifting process is still in an early stage. This fracturing, along with fluid circulation and associated

  8. P-Wave Velocity Tomography from Local Earthquakes in Western Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Chávez, Juan A.; Escudero, Christian R.; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco J.; Bandy, William L.

    2015-11-01

    In western Mexico, the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North America plate has deformed and fragmented the overriding plate, forming several structural rifts and crustal blocks. To obtain a reliable subsurface image of the continental crust and uppermost mantle in this complex area, we used P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes along with the Fast Marching Method tomography technique. We followed an inversion scheme consisting of (1) the use of a high-quality earthquake catalog and corrected phase picks, (2) the selection of earthquakes using a maximum location error threshold, (3) the estimation of an improved 1-D reference velocity model, and (4) the use of checkerboard testing to determine the optimum configuration of the velocity nodes and inversion parameters. Surprisingly, the tomography results show a very simple δVp distribution that can be described as being controlled by geologic structures formed during two stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates. The earlier period represents the initial stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath western Mexico; the later period represents the more advanced stage of rifting where the Rivera and Cocos plates had separated sufficiently to allow melt to accumulate below the Colima Volcanic complex. During the earlier period (14 or 10-1.6 Ma), NE-SW-oriented structures/lineaments (such as the Southern Colima Rift) were formed as the two plates separated. During the second period (1.6 Ma to the present), the deformation is attributed to magma, generated within and above the tear zone between the Rivera and Cocos plates, rising beneath the region of the Colima Volcanic Complex. The rising magma fractured the overlying crust, forming a classic triple-rift junction geometry. This triple-rift system is confined to the mid- to lower crust perhaps indicating that this rifting process is still in an early stage. This fracturing, along with fluid circulation and associated

  9. Importance of quantification of local site effects based on wave propagation in seismic microzonation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kumar; J P Narayan

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the three most important aspects of seismic microzonation namely prediction of fundamental frequency (F0) of soil deposit, aggravation factor (aggravation factor is simply the extra spectral amplification due to complex 2D site effects over the 1D response of the soil column) and the spatial variability of the ground motion caused by the basin-edge induced Love waves. The predicted F0 of single, double and three-soil-layered models revealed that the available empirical relations to predict the F0 of layered soil deposits are inadequate. We recommend the use of analytical or numerical methods to predict such an important parameter based on wave propagation effects. An increase of amplitude of Love wave, strain level and average aggravation factor (AAF) with increase of impedance contrast was obtained. Based on the trend of rate of decrease of AAF and maximum strain with offset from the basin-edge, we can qualitatively infer that the effects of induced Love wave may reduce to a negligible value after a traveled distance of 6.5–10.0 (where is the wavelength corresponding to the 0 of soil layer). The obtained increase of strain level with the decrease of distance between two receiver points used for the computation of strain reflects that structures having spatial extent smaller than the may suffer damage due to the basin-edge induced surface waves. The fast rate of decrease of strain with the offset from the strong lateral discontinuity (SLD)/basin-edge may be attributed to the dispersive nature of Love wave. We can incorporate the increased spectral amplification due to the induced surface waves in the form of aggravation factor but till date we have no effective way to incorporate the effects of developed strain by induced surface waves in seismic microzonation or in building codes.

  10. Shear Wave Splitting Intensity of the Maule, Chile Rupture Zone: Results from Teleseismic and Local Aftershock Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, M. E.; Russo, R. M.; Chevrot, S.

    2015-12-01

    We calculated the shear wave splitting intensity (SI) of the Maule, Chile rupture zone (32°S-39°S) to constrain the seismic anisotropy of the region. Our data are from 80 of the temporary seismometers deployed as part of the IMAD (International Maule Aftershock Deployment) geophysical networks to capture the aftershocks of the Mw 8.8 megathrust event in 2010. We implemented the multichannel analysis method of Chevrot (2000) to measure the SI of 64 teleseismic SKS phases in addition to the fast orientations ϕ and splitting delays δt measured with the method of Silver & Chan (1991). To measure the SI of local aftershocks, we modified the method to allow for use of the upgoing S phase from local events in and above the Nazca slab after correcting for the initial event polarization. We compared our results with other measurement methods (Silver and Chan 1991, Wolfe and Silver 1998) that solve for splitting parameters to examine the robustness of the shear wave splitting intensity method, particularly for local datasets. The results we obtained using the splitting intensity method for the teleseismic data show an overall fast direction that is parallel to the absolute plate motion of the Nazca plate that is subducting beneath the South American plate. These results are consistent with the results we calculated using the Wolfe and Silver method. SI deriving from S waves that originate in the Nazca slab or deeper SA lithosphere are likely to reveal patterns of crustal fabric, and hence differ from the SI of the teleseismic shear waves.

  11. Three-dimensional two-fluid investigation of 3D-localized magnetic reconnection and its relation to whistler waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Dae; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    A full three-dimensional computer code was developed in order to simulate a 3D-localized magnetic reconnection. We assume an incompressible two-fluid regime where the ions are stationary, and electron inertia and Hall effects are present. We solve a single dimensionless differential equation for perturbed magnetic fields with arbitrary background fields. The code has successfully reproduced both experimental and analytic solutions to resonance and Gendrin mode whistler waves in a uniform background field. The code was then modified to model 3D-localized magnetic reconnection as a 3D-localized perturbation on a hyperbolic-tangent background field. Three-dimensional properties that are asymmetric in the out-of-plane direction have been observed. These properties pertained to magnetic field lines, electron currents and their convection. Helicity and energy have also been examined, as well as the addition of a guide field.

  12. Local Causality, Probability and Explanation

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    In papers published in the 25 years following his famous 1964 proof John Bell refined and reformulated his views on locality and causality. Although his formulations of local causality were in terms of probability, he had little to say about that notion. But assumptions about probability are implicit in his arguments and conclusions. Probability does not conform to these assumptions when quantum mechanics is applied to account for the particular correlations Bell argues are locally inexplicable. This account involves no superluminal action and there is even a sense in which it is local, but it is in tension with the requirement that the direct causes and effects of events are nearby.

  13. Quasi-local energy-momentum and two-surface characterization of the pp-wave spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Szabados, L B

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper the determination of the {\\it pp}-wave metric form the geometry of certain spacelike two-surfaces is considered. It has been shown that the vanishing of the Dougan--Mason quasi-local mass m_{\\}, associated with the smooth boundary \\:=\\partial\\Sigma\\approx S^2 of a spacelike hypersurface \\Sigma, is equivalent to the statement that the Cauchy development D(\\Sigma) is of a {\\it pp}-wave type geometry with pure radiation, provided the ingoing null normals are not diverging on \\ and the dominant energy condition holds on D(\\Sigma). The metric on D(\\Sigma) itself, however, has not been determined. Here, assuming that the matter is a zero-rest-mass-field, it is shown that both the matter field and the {\\it pp}-wave metric of D(\\Sigma) are completely determined by the value of the zero-rest-mass-field on \\ and the two dimensional Sen--geometry of \\ provided a convexity condition, slightly stronger than above, holds. Thus the {\\it pp}-waves can be characterized not only by the usual Cauchy data on...

  14. Wave propagation through random media: A local method of small perturbations based on the Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Ralf

    1990-01-01

    Propagation of sound through the turbulent atmosphere is a statistical problem. The randomness of the refractive index field causes sound pressure fluctuations. Although no general theory to predict sound pressure statistics from given refractive index statistics exists, there are several approximate solutions to the problem. The most common approximation is the parabolic equation method. Results obtained by this method are restricted to small refractive index fluctuations and to small wave lengths. While the first condition is generally met in the atmosphere, it is desirable to overcome the second. A generalization of the parabolic equation method with respect to the small wave length restriction is presented.

  15. Propagation of a linear wave created by a spatially localized perturbation in a regular lattice and punctured Lagrangian manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrokhotov, S. Yu.; Nazaikinskii, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The following results are obtained for the Cauchy problem with localized initial data for the crystal lattice vibration equations with continuous and discrete time: (i) the asymptotics of the solution is determined by Lagrangian manifolds with singularities ("punctured" Lagrangian manifolds); (ii) Maslov's canonical operator is defined on such manifolds as a modification of a new representation recently obtained for the canonical operator by the present authors together with A. I. Shafarevich (Dokl. Ross. Akad. Nauk 46 (6), 641-644 (2016)); (iii) the projection of the Lagrangian manifold onto the configuration plane specifies a bounded oscillation region, whose boundary (which is naturally referred to as the leading edge front) is determined by the Hamiltonians corresponding to the limit wave equations; (iv) the leading edge front is a special caustic, which possibly contains stronger focal points. These observations, together with earlier results, lead to efficient formulas for the wave field in a neighborhood of the leading edge front.

  16. A proposal for a feasible quantum-optical scheme to test for the existence of superluminal signals via quantum mechanical entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Kalamidas, Demetrios A

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by a proposal from Greenberger [Physica Scripta T76, p.57 (1998) ] for superluminal signaling, and inspired by an experiment from Mandel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, p.318 (1991) ] showing interference effects within multi-particle entanglement without coincidence detection, we propose a feasible quantum-optical scheme that purports to manifest the capacity for superluminal transfer of information between distant parties.

  17. The effect of local corticosteroid injection on F-wave conduction velocity and sympathetic skin response in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Orhan; Aygül, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; Ozdemir, Gökhan; Odabaş, Faruk Omer; Kaya, M Dursun; Ulvi, Hızır

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of steroid injection for the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), with F-wave parameters and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Seventeen hands of 10 women patients were treated with local steroid injection with 2-month follow-up. All patients underwent single injection into the carpal tunnel. Response to injection was measured nerve conduction studies (NCSs), median nerve F waves, and SSR before and after treatment. To determine the normal values, 42 hands of 21 healthy women were also studied. There was a significant improvement of sensory and motor nerve conduction values when compared to baseline values (P sensory distal latency and the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar nerve were improved 35 and 65%, respectively. The maximum, mean F-wave amplitudes and chronodispersion showed a slight improvement with respect to baseline values and controls, but statistical significance was not achieved after treatment. Although no statistically significant improvements were observed in SSR parameters, slightly decreased amplitudes and increased habituation of SSR were noted at the end of the treatment. The present study shows that the local steroid injection results in improvement in NCSs values, but the F-wave parameters were not effectual in short-term outcome of CTS treatment. These findings suggest that the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar wrist-to-digit 4 are better parameters in the median nerve recovery after treatment than the median sensory distal latency. Furthermore, the SSR does not seem to be a sensitive method in follow-up of CTS treatment.

  18. Translation of waves along quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature two-dimensional local induction approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gorder, Robert A., E-mail: Robert.VanGorder@maths.ox.ac.uk [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    In a recent paper, we give a study of the purely rotational motion of general stationary states in the two-dimensional local induction approximation (2D-LIA) governing superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit [B. Svistunov, “Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit,” Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)]. Such results demonstrated that variety of stationary configurations are possible from vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion in addition to commonly discussed configurations such as helical or planar states. However, the filaments (or, more properly, waves along these filaments) can also exhibit translational motion along the axis of orientation. In contrast to the study on vortex configurations for purely rotational stationary states, the present paper considers non-stationary states which exhibit a combination of rotation and translational motions. These solutions can essentially be described as waves or disturbances which ride along straight vortex filament lines. As expected from our previous work, there are a number of types of structures that can be obtained under the 2D-LIA. We focus on non-stationary states, as stationary states exhibiting translation will essentially take the form of solutions studied in [R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)], with the difference being translation along the reference axis, so that qualitative appearance of the solution geometry will be the same (even if there are quantitative differences). We discuss a wide variety of general properties of these non-stationary solutions and derive cases in which they reduce to known stationary states. We obtain various routes to Kelvin waves along vortex filaments and demonstrate that if the phase and amplitude of a disturbance both propagate with the same wave speed, then Kelvin waves will result. We also consider the self

  19. Wave scattering of complex local site in a layered half-space by using a multidomain IBEM: incident plane SH waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Zhenning; Yin, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    A multidomain indirect boundary element method (IBEM) is proposed to study the wave scattering of plane SH waves by complex local site in a layered half-space. The new method, using both the full-space and layered half-space Green's functions as its fundamental solutions can also be regarded as a coupled method of the full-space IBEM and half-space IBEM. First, the whole model is decomposed into independent closed regions and an opened layered half-space region with all of the irregular interfaces; then, fictitious uniformly distributed loads are applied separately on the boundaries of each region, and scattered fields of the closed regions and the opened layered half-space region are constructed by calculating the full-space and layered half-space Green's functions, respectively; finally, all of the regions are assembled to establish the linear algebraic system that arises from discretization. The densities of the distributed loads are determined directly by solving the algebraic system. The accuracy and capability of the new approach are verified extensively by comparing its results with those of published approaches for a class of hills, valleys and embedded inclusions. And the capability of the new method is further displayed when it is used to investigate a hill-triple layered valley-hill coupled topography in a multilayered half-space. All of the numerical calculations presented in this paper demonstrate that the new method is very suitable for solving multidomain coupled multilayered wave scattering problems with the merits of high accuracy and representing the scattered fields in different kinds of regions more reasonably and flexibly.

  20. Consistent pattern of local adaptation during an experimental heat wave in a pipefish-trematode host-parasite system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne H Landis

    Full Text Available Extreme climate events such as heat waves are expected to increase in frequency under global change. As one indirect effect, they can alter magnitude and direction of species interactions, for example those between hosts and parasites. We simulated a summer heat wave to investigate how a changing environment affects the interaction between the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle as a host and its digenean trematode parasite (Cryptocotyle lingua. In a fully reciprocal laboratory infection experiment, pipefish from three different coastal locations were exposed to sympatric and allopatric trematode cercariae. In order to examine whether an extreme climatic event disrupts patterns of locally adapted host-parasite combinations we measured the parasite's transmission success as well as the host's adaptive and innate immune defence under control and heat wave conditions. Independent of temperature, sympatric cercariae were always more successful than allopatric ones, indicating that parasites are locally adapted to their hosts. Hosts suffered from heat stress as suggested by fewer cells of the adaptive immune system (lymphocytes compared to the same groups that were kept at 18°C. However, the proportion of the innate immune cells (monocytes was higher in the 18°C water. Contrary to our expectations, no interaction between host immune defence, parasite infectivity and temperature stress were found, nor did the pattern of local adaptation change due to increased water temperature. Thus, in this host-parasite interaction, the sympatric parasite keeps ahead of the coevolutionary dynamics across sites, even under increasing temperatures as expected under marine global warming.

  1. Experiments on localized wireless power transmission using a magneto-inductive wave two-dimensional metamaterial cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son Pham, Thanh; Kumara Ranaweera, Aruna; Dinh Lam, Vu; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we propose a magneto-inductive wave (MIW) metamaterial cavity for enhanced mid-range wireless power transfer (WPT) applications. Cavity operation is achieved by controlling the propagation of MIWs at lower megahertz frequencies. The cavity is realized by omitting a cell and thereby breaking the periodicity of the closely coupled metamaterial slabs. The cavity in the proposed metamaterial effectively confines the MIWs into a subwavelength region. Consequently, it localizes the magnetic field in the WPT region and provides enhanced power transmission. When the proposed MIW metamaterial cavity is used, the measured efficiency improves significantly from 8.7 to 54.9%.

  2. Fast decay of solutions for linear wave equations with dissipation localized near infinity in an exterior domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryo, Ikehata

    Uniform energy and L2 decay of solutions for linear wave equations with localized dissipation will be given. In order to derive the L2-decay property of the solution, a useful device whose idea comes from Ikehata-Matsuyama (Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33) is used. In fact, we shall show that the L2-norm and the total energy of solutions, respectively, decay like O(1/ t) and O(1/ t2) as t→+∞ for a kind of the weighted initial data.

  3. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in

  4. A search for the analogue to Cherenkov radiation by high energy neutrinos at superluminal speeds in ICARUS

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Mannocchi, G.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Periale, L.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Cohen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA collaboration [1] has claimed evidence of superluminal propagation between CERN and the LNGS with . We find that the neutrino energy distribution of the ICARUS events in LAr agrees with the expectations from the Monte Carlo predictions from an unaffected energy distribution of beam from CERN. Our results therefore refute a superluminal interpretation of the OPERA result according to the Cohen and Glashow prediction [2] for a weak currents analog to Cherenkov radiation. In particular no events with a superluminal Cherenkov like e+e- pair or gamma emission have been directly observed inside the fiducial volume of the "bubble chamber like" ICARUS TPC-LAr detector, setting much stricter limits to the value of delta comparable with the one due to the observations from the SN1987A.

  5. Localized auroral disturbance in the morning sector of topside ionosphere as a standing electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinin, E.M.; Israelevich, P.L.; Nikolaeva, N.S.; Podgornyi, I.M.; Kutiev, I.

    1985-06-01

    The fine structure and plasma properties of an auroral disturbance observed with the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite are analyzed. The disturbance was detected in the morning sector of the sky at an altitude of about 850 km in December of 1981. Strong jumps (about 80 mV/m) in the electric and magnetic fields and fluctuations of ion density were detected within the disturbance. The electric and magnetic fields were characterized by a distinct spatial-temporal relationship typical for a standing quasi-monochromatic wave with a frequency of 1 Hz. The ratio of the amplitudes of electric and magnetic fluctuations was equal to the velocity of Alfven waves. The strong parallel component of the electric field (about 30 mV/m) and the large ion density of the fluctuations indicate changes in the plasma properties of the disturbance. The possibility of anomalous resistivity effects in the disturbance is also briefly considered. 23 references.

  6. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, T.D.; Abernathy, M.R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.X.; Adya, V.B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P.A.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M.C.; Arceneaux, C.C.; Areeda, J.S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K.G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S.M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M.K.M.; Baker, P.T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.W.; Barayoga, J.C.; Barclay, S.E.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A.S.; Bell, C.J.; Berger, B.K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C.P.L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I.A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M.A.; Blackburn, J.K.; Blair, C.D.; Blair, D.G.; Blair, R.M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T.P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B.A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P.R.; Braginsky, V.B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J.E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A.F.; Brown, D.A.; Brown, D.D.; Brown, N.M.; Buchanan, C.C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H.J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R.L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J.C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J.B.; Cannon, K.C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J.C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.B.; Baiardi, L.C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S.J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H.Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H.S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J.H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J.A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C.A.; Coughlin, M.W.; Coughlin, S.B.; Coulon, J.P.; Countryman, S.T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E.E.; Coward, D.M.; Cowart, M.J.; Coyne, D.C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J.D.E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S.G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S.L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N.S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.S.; Daw, E.J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M.C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K.L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T.P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R.W.P.; Driggers, J.C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.E.; Edo, T.B.; Edwards, M.C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S.S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R.C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M.M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E.C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R.P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T.T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V.V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.A.G.; Gair, J.R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J.A.; Giardina, K.D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, G.; Castro, J.M.G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N.A.; Gorodetsky, M.L.; Gossan, S.E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P.B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A.C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G.M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.K.; Gushwa, K.E.; Gustafson, E.K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.J.; Hall, B.R.; Hall, E.D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M.M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M.D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.M.; Harry, I.W.; Hart, M.J.; Hartman, M.T.; Haster, C.J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I.S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A.W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K.A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S.E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D.E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D.J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.A.; Howell, E.J.; Hu, Y.M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E.A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S.H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D.R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H.N.; Isac, J.M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B.R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.W.; Jones, D.I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R.J.G.; Ju, L.; H. K; Kalaghatgi, C.V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J.B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M.S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J.S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F.Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E.A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.M.; King, E.J.; King, P.J.; Kinzel, D.L.; Kissel, J.S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S.M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W.Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B.D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P.D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, H.K.; Lee, H.M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J.R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.M.; Li, T.G.F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T.B.; Lockerbie, N.A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A.L.; Lord, J.E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.D.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A.P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D.M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G.L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A.S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I.W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D.V.; Marx, J.N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T.J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D.E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S.C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D.J.; McWilliams, S.T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G.D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R.A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P.M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E.E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V.P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S.R.P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C.J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S.R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C.M.; Mueller, C.L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A.W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.T.; Nielsen, A.B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M.E.N.; Nuttall, L.K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G.H.; Oh, J.J.; Oh, S.H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D.J.; Ottens, R.S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B.J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.A.; Palamos, J.R.; Palashov, O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B.C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M.A.; Paris, H.R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B.L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I.M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L.R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G.A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F.J.; Rabeling, D.S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C.M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D.H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S.D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N.A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.G.; Roma, V.J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J.H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E.J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J.R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B.S.; Saulson, P.R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R.L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; R. Schilling$^; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B.F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S.M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D.A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M.S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D.H.; Shoemaker, D.M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A.D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A.M.; Slagmolen, B.J.J.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R.J.E.; Son, E.J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A.K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B.C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K.A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N.A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A.L.; Summerscales, T.Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P.J.; Swinkels, B.L.; Szczepanczyk, M.J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D.B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S.P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M.P.; Thomas, E.G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K.A.; Thorne, K.S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K.V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; C.V. Torres$^; Torrie, C.I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M.C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Urban, A.L.; Usman, S.A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D.C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J.V.; van Veggel, A.A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D.J.; Vinet, J.Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W.D.; Vyatchanin, S.P.; Wade, A.R.; Wade, L.E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R.L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J.T.; White, D.J.; Whiting, B.F.; Williams, R.D.; Williamson, A.R.; Willis, J.L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C.C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C.C.; Yap, M.J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X.J.; Zucker, M.E.; Zuraw, S.E.; Zweizig, J.; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M.E.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A.P.; Edwards, P.G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R.J.; Voronkov, M.A.; Whiting, M.T.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J.C.; Oates, S.R.; Zhang, B.B.; Hu, Y.D.; Kubanek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellon, A.; Garcia-Cerezo, A.; Munoz, V.F.; Perez, C.; Castillo-Carrion, S.; Castro, J.M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-Garcia, M.D.; Pata, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J.A.; Konig, S.; Rendon, F.; de J. Mateo, T.; Fernandez-Munoz, R.; Yock, P.C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W.H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I.H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W.H.; Claret, A.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Pandey, S.B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Abbott, T.M.C.; Abdalla, F.B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R.A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F.J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P.S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C.E.; D'Andrea, C.B.; da Costa, L.N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H.T.; Dietrich, J.P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M.R.; Eifler, T.F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A.E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D.A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R.J.; Fong, W.F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D.B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C.L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.W.; Goldstein, D.A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R.A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.J.; Johnson, M.D.; Johnson, M.W.G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.G.; Kind, M.C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T.S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M.A.G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B.D.; Miller, C.J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R.C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A.A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A.K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A.C.; Rykoff, E.S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R.C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.E.C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R.C.; Tucker, D.L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A.R.; Wechsler, R.H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M.S.; Zhang, B.B.; Hui, C.M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M.M.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R.M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H.F.; Blackburn, L.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T.J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P.A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L.R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S.W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dominguez, A.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E.C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G.A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I.A.; Grove, J.E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A.K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.W.; Hill, A.B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M.N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M.N.; McEnery, J.E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A.A.; Monzani, M.E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J.S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T.A.; Racusin, J.L.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.M.; Sgro, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E.J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D.J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J.B.; Thompson, D.J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D.F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T.M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K.S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L.A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J.P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; Kasliwal, M.M.; Singer, L.P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A.A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S.V.; Aptekar, R.L.; Frederiks, D.D.; Svinkin, D.S.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D.M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K.S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; Bersier, D.F.; Bode, M.F.; Collins, C.A.; Copperwheat, C.M.; Darnley, M.J.; Galloway, D.K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C.G.; Piascik, A.S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I.A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Broderick, J.W.; Fender, R.P.; Jonker, P.G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B.W.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N.M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T.M.O.; Gaensler, B.M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D.L.; Morales, M.F.; Tingay, S.J.; Wayth, R.B.; Williams, A.; Smartt, S.J.; Chambers, K.C.; Smith, K.W.; Huber, M.E.; Young, D.R.; Wright, D.E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E.A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C.W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J.P.; Botticella, M.T.; Chen, T.W.; Valle, M.D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J.D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cwiek, A.; Cwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Onken, C.A.; Scalzo, R.A.; Schmidt, B.P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; Evans, P.A.; Kennea, J.A.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S.B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F.E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Racusin, J.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; Beroiz, M.; Penuela, T.; Macri, L.M.; Oelkers, R.J.; Lambas, D.G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J.L.; DePoy, D.L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N.A.; Benacquista, M.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A.J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C.G.; McMahon, R.G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de U. Postigo, A.; Thoene, C.C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.

    2016-01-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current electromagnetic follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the electromagnetic follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  7. Prospects for early localization of gravitational-wave signals from compact binary coalescences with advanced detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dietz, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A leading candidate source of detectable gravitational waves is the inspiral and merger of pairs of stellar-mass compact objects. The advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo detectors will allow scientists to detect inspiral signals from more massive systems and at earlier times in the detector band, than with first generation detectors. The signal from a coalescence of two neutron stars is expected to stay in the sensitive band of advanced detectors for several minutes, thus allowing detection befo...

  8. Load-Differential Imaging for Detection and Localization of Fatigue Cracks Using Lamb Waves (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    fatigue cracks. Ohara et al. [20] recently introduced a nonlinear ultrasonic imaging method whereby a phased array was used to create linear and...recent years, and indicates both its promise and pitfalls. Different sensor array geometries have been proposed to implement guided wave NDE and SHM...different 2-D compact phased arrays and applied beamforming to compare the angular range for damage detection of the five geometries. One

  9. Observation of local radio emission associated with type III radio bursts and Langmuir waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    The first clear detection of fundamental and harmonic radiation from the type III radio source region is presented. This radiation is characterized by its lack of frequency drift, its short rise and decay times, its relative weakness compared to the remotely observed radiation and its temporal coincidence with observed Langmuir waves. The observations were made with the radio and plasma frequency (URAP) receivers on the Ulysses spacecraft between about 1 and 2 AU from the Sun.

  10. Superluminal Propagation and Acausality of Nonlinear Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, S; Ong, Y C; Waldron, A

    2013-01-01

    Massive gravity is an old idea: trading geometry for mass. Much effort has been expended on establishing a healthy model, culminating in the current ghost-free version. We summarize here our recent findings -- that it is still untenable -- because it is locally acausal: CTC solutions can be constructed in a small neighborhood of any event.

  11. 超光速佯谬和中微子%Superluminal Paradox and Neutrino

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪光炯

    2002-01-01

    爱因斯坦的狭义相对论和因果原理意味着任何运动物体的速度不能超过光在真空中的速度.然而,有许多讨论超光速运动粒子的尝试,这些讨论或者是在狭义相对论的框架下进行的,或者是超越了狭义相对论.这些讨论都遇到一系列难以克服的困难,即"超光速佯谬".文中详细分析了这种佯谬,并证明它在与狭义相对论兼容的量子理论中显然是不出现的.在实在世界中,中微子最可能是一种超光速粒子.%Einstein′s theory of special relativity (SR) and the principle of causality imply that the speed of any moving object can not exceed that of light in a vacuum (c). However, there were many attempts in literature discussing the particle moving with speed u>c(called as superluminal particle or tachyon) either in the scheme of SR or beyond it. These theories all encountered a series of insurmountable difficulties which will be named "superluminal paradox"in this paper. We will analyze it in some detail and then prove that the paradox disappears unambiguously in quantum theory, which is compatible with SR. Most likely, the superluminal particle in real world is just a kind of known particle, the neutrino.

  12. Non-invasive localization of atrial ectopic beats by using simulated body surface P-wave integral maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Eduardo J.; Lozano, Miguel; Martínez-Mateu, Laura; Atienza, Felipe; Saiz, Javier; Sebastian, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive localization of continuous atrial ectopic beats remains a cornerstone for the treatment of atrial arrhythmias. The lack of accurate tools to guide electrophysiologists leads to an increase in the recurrence rate of ablation procedures. Existing approaches are based on the analysis of the P-waves main characteristics and the forward body surface potential maps (BSPMs) or on the inverse estimation of the electric activity of the heart from those BSPMs. These methods have not provided an efficient and systematic tool to localize ectopic triggers. In this work, we propose the use of machine learning techniques to spatially cluster and classify ectopic atrial foci into clearly differentiated atrial regions by using the body surface P-wave integral map (BSPiM) as a biomarker. Our simulated results show that ectopic foci with similar BSPiM naturally cluster into differentiated non-intersected atrial regions and that new patterns could be correctly classified with an accuracy of 97% when considering 2 clusters and 96% for 4 clusters. Our results also suggest that an increase in the number of clusters is feasible at the cost of decreasing accuracy. PMID:28704537

  13. Poly(methyl methacrylate) particles for local drug delivery using shock wave lithotripsy: In vitro proof of concept experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Eliav; Shani, Yoav; Zilberman, Meital; Scheinowitz, Mickey

    2015-08-01

    To leverage current local drug delivery systems methodology, there is vast use of polymeric particles serving as drug carriers to assure minimal invasive therapy with little systemic distribution of the released drug. There is an increasing interest in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) serving as carriers in drug delivery. The study aims to develop PMMA carriers for localized drug delivery and release system, combining innovative biomaterial technology and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), and to study the effect of SWL on various concentrations of PMMA particles. We prepared PMMA particles that contain horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using a double emulsion technique, and investigated the mechanism of in vitro drug release from the carriers following exposure to SWL. We investigated the correlation between production method modifications, concentrations of the carriers subjected to SWL, and shock wave patterns. We successfully produced PMMA particles as drug carriers and stimulated the release of their contents by SWL; their polymeric shell can be shattered externally by SWL treatment, leading to release of the encapsulated drug. HRP enzyme activity was maintained following the encapsulation process and exposure to high dose of SWL pulses. Increased shock wave number results in increased shattering and greater fragmentation of PMMA particles. The results demonstrate a dose-response release of HRP; quantitation of the encapsulated HRP from the carriers rises with the number of SWL. Moreover, increased concentration of particles subjected to the same dose of SWL results in a significant increase of the total HRP release. Our research offers novel technique and insights into new, site-specific drug delivery and release systems.

  14. Long Period Seismic Waves Developped at Local Distances and Their Importance for EEWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan Ertan, Esra; Pınar, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Long period ground motions is an highly importance topic nowadays because of the number of the large-scale structures increases day by day in metropolitan areas. Their effect on the large-scale structure (high rise buildings, suspension bridges, off-shore oil drilling platforms etc.) are more perceivable than small structures. Studies show that long period ground motions especially occurs in distant sedimentary basins with the help of the path effects. (Koketsu and Miyake, 2008) Period of the waves is ranging from several to ten seconds and that causes dramatic resonance and severe damage to the structures which are located in deep sedimentary basins (Furumura et al., 2013). There are so many examples of how destructive these waves can be. A devastating example is Mexico City, which is located 400 km away from the 1985 Michoacan Earthquake (Mw=8.0) epicenter, where 300 buldings collapsed and 800 buildings were demolished beyond repair. (Celebi et al, 1987). Another example is 2003 Tokachi-oki Earthquake associated with severe damage on large oil tanks, and fires lasting two days at the city of Tomakomani 250 km away from the source (Koketsu et al, 2005). Lots of studies revealed that the sedimentary basins amplifiy the long period seismic waves. In the case of Marmara Region, three important basins namely Çınarcık, Central and Tekirdaǧ Basins exist in Marmara Sea. The primary objective of the proposed study is to investigate if any relations exist between basins structures and generation of long period seismic waves which can be effective in Istanbul Metropolitan Area and develop reliable early warning applications or systems for structures which are under such risk. Three types of algorithms are in use for EEW applications used for this study, Virtual Seismologist, PRESTo and ELARMS2. The early warning signal is communicated to the appropriate server shut-down systems of the recipient facilities, that automatically decide proper action based on the alarm

  15. Solitons and nonlinear waves along quantum vortex filaments under the low-temperature two-dimensional local induction approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    Very recent experimental work has demonstrated the existence of Kelvin waves along quantized vortex filaments in superfluid helium. The possible configurations and motions of such filaments is of great physical interest, and Svistunov previously obtained a Hamiltonian formulation for the dynamics of quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature limit under the assumption that the vortex filament is essentially aligned along one axis, resulting in a two-dimensional (2D) problem. It is standard to approximate the dynamics of thin filaments by employing the local induction approximation (LIA), and we show that by putting the two-dimensional LIA into correspondence with the first equation in the integrable Wadati-Konno-Ichikawa-Schimizu (WKIS) hierarchy, we immediately obtain solutions to the two-dimensional LIA, such as helix, planar, and self-similar solutions. These solutions are obtained in a rather direct manner from the WKIS equation and then mapped into the 2D-LIA framework. Furthermore, the approach can be coupled to existing inverse scattering transform results from the literature in order to obtain solitary wave solutions including the analog of the Hasimoto one-soliton for the 2D-LIA. One large benefit of the approach is that the correspondence between the 2D-LIA and the WKIS allows us to systematically obtain vortex filament solutions directly in the Cartesian coordinate frame without the need to solve back from curvature and torsion. Implications of the results for the physics of experimentally studied solitary waves, Kelvin waves, and postvortex reconnection events are mentioned.

  16. Closed timelike curves, superluminal signals, and "free will" in universal quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolic, H

    2010-01-01

    We explore some implications of the hypothesis that quantum mechanics (QM) is universal, i.e., that QM does not merely describe information accessible to observers, but that it also describes the observers themselves. From that point of view, "free will" (FW) - the ability of experimentalists to make free choices of initial conditions - is merely an illusion. As a consequence, by entangling a part of brain (responsible for the illusion of FW) with a distant particle, one may create nonlocal correlations that can be interpreted as superluminal signals. In addition, if FW is an illusion, then QM on a closed timelike curve can be made consistent even without the Deutch nonlinear consistency constraint.

  17. On determination of the geometric cosmological constant from the OPERA experiment of superluminal neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Mu-Lin; Huang, Wei; Xiao, Neng-Chao

    2011-01-01

    The recent OPERA experiment of superluminal neutrinos has deep consequences in cosmology. In cosmology a fundamental constant is the cosmological constant. From observations one can estimate the effective cosmological constant $\\Lambda_{eff}$ which is the sum of the quantum zero point energy $\\Lambda_{dark energy}$ and the geometric cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. The OPERA experiment can be applied to determine the geometric cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. It is the first time to distinguish the contributions of $\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda_{dark energy}$ from each other by experiment. The determination is based on an explanation of the OPERA experiment in the framework of Special Relativity with de Sitter space-time symmetry.

  18. Superluminal Neutrinos from Special Relativity with de Sitter Space-time Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Mu-Lin; Huang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    We explore the recent OPERA experiment of superluminal neutrinos in the framework of Special Relativity with de Sitter space-time symmetry (dS-SR). According to Einstein, the photon is treated as the massless particle in the SR mechanics. The meanings of the universal parameter $c$ and the photon velocity $c_{photon}$ in SR have been analyzed. $c$ can be determined by means of the velocity-composition law in SR kinematically. And $c_{photon}$ is determined by the dispersion relations of SR. It is revealed that $c=c_{photon}$ in Einstein's Special Relativity (E-SR), but $c\

  19. SGC Switching Between Subluminal to Superluminal Propagation in V-Type Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ding-An; GUO Hong; BAI Yan-Feng; SUN Hui; ZENG Ya-Guang

    2006-01-01

    For a V-type three-level atomic system with two closely spaced upper levels, we investigate the light pulse propagation properties with only one laser field. Due to spontaneously generated coherence, the group velocity of the light pulse can be changed from subluminal to superluminal. The effects of the field intensity and the two-upper level splitting on the group velocity are also shown. At last, an analytical expression for the group velocity is given in the case of a weak field.

  20. Coastal-Trapped wave by local wind on Todos Santos Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, E.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical study, forced with summer wind, found that the BTS circulation is characterized by two systems: one at the exterior with a strong southward flow that enters to the bay but limited by the 35 m isobath and the other at the rest of the bay. The circulation, in the interior, oscillates between two spatial structures: one in which the general circulation is anticyclonic for two-three days overall the bay, producing a large eddy and a small cyclonic eddy in front of Ensenada's port. Then the anticyclonic eddy evolves to produce the second spatial structure by splitting into two counter rotating eddies making the original anticyclonic to be limited to the northern side of the bay and last three-four days and the small cyclonic eddy reverses its circulation. A study from velocity measurements, found amplification and attenuation of the mean flow with a three-day period in agreement with Mateos et al. (2009). Sea level, temperature and velocities fields, from numerical model, were analyzed to study the generation of coastal-trapped wave on Todos Santos Bay, Mexico. The model included the California Current System and synoptic winds, which are mainly towards the equator. The wind causes a net Southward water transport. In consequence, a bulge of water is formed at the south of the bay and the three-dimensional temperature structure shows a vertical homogeneous upper part of the water column (< 6 m) with a latitudinal gradient. This bulge of water is released every four to five days, as an internal coastal-trapped wave, and the vertical stratification becomes stronger. This coastal-trapped wave explains the current variability with period of three-five days reported in previous studies.

  1. Global localization of in-pipe robot based on ultra-long wave antenna array and global position system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Haiming; Zhang Xiaohua; Chen Hongjun; Sun Dongchang; Sun Yongtai

    2009-01-01

    A global localization system of in-pipe robot is introduced in this paper. Global position system (GPS) is applied to monitor the motion of robot along the whole pipeline which is equally divided into many segments by tracking stations. The definite segment in which robot existing can be detected and this is long-range localization. Ultra-long wave (ULW) is adopted to solve the problem of metallic shielding and realize effective communication between inside and outside of pipeline. ULW emitter is carried by robot. When the plant is broken or defects on pipe-wall are inspected, the robot will stop moving. Antenna array is presented and disposed upon the definite segment to search the accurate location of robot, and this is short-range localization. In this paper, five-antenna array is adopted and an effective linear signal fusion algorithm is presented. The localization precision reaches R<25cm. By tests in Shengli oil field, the whole system is verified with robust solutions.

  2. Optical precursors from classical waves to single photons

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, JF; Loy, MMT; Du, Shengwang

    2013-01-01

    Ever since Einstein’s special relativity in 1905, the principle of invariant light speed in vacuum has been attracting attention from a wide range of disciplines. How to interpret the principle of light speed? Is light referred to continuous light, or light pulse with definite boundaries? Recent discovery of superluminal medium triggered vigorous discussion within the Physics community. Can communication via such “superluminal channel” break the speed limit and thus violate causality principle? Or, will a single photon, which is not governed by classical laws of Physics, tend to break the speed limit? To solve these problems, in this Brief we bring in optical precursor, the theoretical works for which started as early as 1914. This is a typical optical phenomenon combining wave propagation theory and light-wave interaction. Both theory and experimental works are covered in this Brief. The study of precursor verifies that the effective information carried by light pulses can never exceed the speed of lig...

  3. Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of Wave Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    interesting that the role of the second order term (£0) in equation (2.11) is different from typical nonlinear pde’s studied, such as KdV , that harbor...the commonly used form of the CH equation. An important point is that other nonlinear pde’s like Kdv , which can successfully propagate localized

  4. More about tunnelling times and superluminal tunnelling (Hartmann effect)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olkhovsky, V.S. [Ukrainian Akademy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. for Nuclear Research]|[INFN-Sezione di Catania (Italy); Recami, E. [Bergamo Univ. (Italy). Facolta` di Ingegneria]|[State Univ. at Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Raciti, F. [Catania Univ. (Italy); Zaichenko, A. [Ukrainian Akademy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. for Nuclear Reserch

    1995-05-01

    Aims of the present paper are: (i) presenting and analysing the results of various numerical calculations on the penetration and return times <{tau}{sub Pen}>, <{tau}{sub Ret}>, during tunnelling inside a rectangular potential barrier, for various penetration depths x{sub f}; (ii) putting forth and discussing suitable definitions, besides of the mean values, also of the variances (or dispersions) D{sub {tau}T} and D{sub {tau}R} for the time durations of transmission and reflection processes; (iii) mentioning, moreover, that our definition <{tau}{sub T}> for the average transmission time results to constitute an improvement of the ordinary dwell- time formula; (iv) commenting, at last, on the basis of the new numerical results, upon some recent criticism by C.R. Leavens. The paper stresses that numerical evaluations confirm that the approach implied, and implies, the existence of the Hartmann effect: an effect that in these days (due to the theoretical connections between tunnelling and evanescent-wave propagation) is receiving - at Cologne, Berkeley, Florence and Vienna - indirect, but quite interesting, experimental verification.

  5. Light propagation in local and linear media: Fresnel-Kummer wave surfaces with 16 singular points

    CERN Document Server

    Favaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the Fresnel wave surfaces of transparent biaxial media have 4 singular points, located on two special directions. We show that, in more general media, the number of singularities can exceed 4. In fact, a highly symmetric linear material is proposed whose Fresnel surface exhibits 16 singular points. Because, for every linear material, the dispersion equation is quartic, we conclude that 16 is the maximum number of singularities. The identity of Fresnel and Kummer surfaces, which holds true for media with a certain symmetry (zero skewon piece), provides an elegant interpretation of the results. We describe a metamaterial realization for our linear medium with 16 singular points. It is found that an appropriate combination of metal bars, split-ring resonators, and magnetized particles can generate the correct permittivity, permeability, and magnetoelectric moduli. Lastly, we discuss the arrangement of the singularities in terms of Kummer's (16,6)-configuration of points and planes. An investigat...

  6. Quantum interference by localized scattering waves of gapless helical modes in narrow strips of topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum interference in scattering from a potential offset is investigated in narrow strips of two-dimensional systems described by the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang Hamiltonian. Attention is focused on the situations where the transmission in the scattering region takes place around the Dirac point of topological insulators when the hybridization energy gap is eliminated by utilizing transverse interference. Apart from conventional periodic transmission modulation that takes place when the length of the potential offset region is varied, resonant disappearances of reflection occur for short potential offsets. The anomalous resonance appears not only for the four-band Hamiltonian but also for the two-band Hamiltonian, manifesting the generality of the phenomenon. Evanescent-like waves excited around the potential steps are indicated to be responsible for the anomalous behavior. The interference states can couple with each other and generic reduction in the amplitude of transmission modulation occurs upon coupling with the periodic modulation.

  7. Converted seismic wave analysis in the Gulf of Corinth region by using local eartquake records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, D.; Virieux, J.; Monfret, T.; Monteiller, V.; Got, J.-L.; Lyon-Caen, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the framework of the 3F Corinth project, we have analyzed seismograms of passive tomographic experiments deployed previously around the Aigion area in the western Gulf of Corinth. We have successfully tracked possible converted PS and SP phases. These phases might bring constraints in tectonic and geometrical description of this extension zone. Seismic data recorded by both a two months passive tomographic experiment in 1991 and an aftershock study in 1995 have been organized for converted phase analysis. In order to do so, obtaining an accurate background smooth velocity structure was essential. Therefore we have developed both a seismic tomographic linearized inversion and a global search investigation of converted phases on an arbitrary interface using the same interpolation of velocity structure, travel-time estimation and partial differential kernel for the tomographic part. A smooth velocity structure is deduced from our data set which reproduces globally previous tomographic results. We introduced a curved interface described by a B-spline interpolation without any modification of the background velocity structure. Transmitted as well as reflected PS and SP theoretical travel-times are computed for different interface geometries and depths. Move-out and mutes of seismograms are performed by using these theoretical travel-times. On these windows, different signal processing techniques, based on component rotation, component product, polarization analysis and stacking techniques, are applied in order to emphasize seismic wave energy associated with converted phases. We have detected an important concentration of seismic wave energy associated with a sub-horizontal interface lying between 5 km and 8 km in relation with our background structure. Sensibility of energy concentration with respect to the shape on the interface will be presented and discussed. The detection of possible flat interface at the bottom of the superficial crust will introduce

  8. The superluminous supernova PS1-11ap: bridging the gap between low and high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Rest, A; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; Rodney, S A; Chen, T -W; Howell, D A; Huber, M E; Pastorello, A; Tonry, J L; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R -P; Chornock, R; Berger, E; Smith, K; Botticella, M T; Foley, R J; Fraser, M; Milisavljevic, D; Nicholl, M; Riess, A G; Stubbs, C W; Valenti, S; Wood-Vasey, W M; Wright, D; Young, D R; Drout, M; Czekala, I; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Sweeney, W; Wainscoat, R J

    2013-01-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic coverage of the superluminous supernova (SLSN) PS1-11ap, discovered with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey at z = 0.524. This intrinsically blue transient rose slowly to reach a peak magnitude of M_u = -21.4 mag and bolometric luminosity of 8 x 10^43 ergs^-1 before settling onto a relatively shallow gradient of decline. The observed decline is significantly slower than those of the superluminous type Ic SNe which have been the focus of much recent attention. Spectroscopic similarities with the lower redshift SN2007bi and a decline rate similar to 56Co decay timescale initially indicated that this transient could be a candidate for a pair instability supernova (PISN) explosion. Overall the transient appears quite similar to SN2007bi and the lower redshift object PTF12dam. The extensive data set, from 30 days before peak to 230 days after, allows a detailed and quantitative comparison with published models of PISN explosions. We find that the PS1-11ap data do no...

  9. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholl, M; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T -W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-01-01

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10^44 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-30 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae...

  10. The evolution of superluminous supernova LSQ14mo and its interacting host galaxy system

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, T -W; Smartt, S J; Mazzali, P A; Yates, R M; Moriya, T J; Inserra, C; Langer, N; Kruehler, T; Pan, Y -C; Kotak, R; Galbany, L; Schady, P; Wiseman, P; Greiner, J; Schulze, S; Man, A W S; Jerkstrand, A; Smith, K W; Dennefeld, M; Baltay, C; Bolmer, J; Kankare, E; Knust, F; Maguire, K; Rabinowitz, D; Rostami, S; Sullivan, M; Young, D R

    2016-01-01

    We present and analyse an extensive dataset of the superluminous supernova LSQ14mo (z = 0.256), consisting of a multi-colour lightcurve from -30 d to +70 d in the rest-frame and a series of 6 spectra from PESSTO covering -7 d to +50 d. This is among the densest spectroscopic coverage, and best-constrained rising lightcurve, for a fast-declining hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova. The bolometric lightcurve can be reproduced with a millisecond magnetar model with ~ 4 M_sol ejecta mass, and the temperature and velocity evolution is also suggestive of a magnetar as the power source. Spectral modelling indicates that the SN ejected ~ 6 M_sol of CO-rich material with a kinetic energy of ~ 7 x 10^51 erg, and suggests a partially thermalised additional source of luminosity between -2 d and +22 d. This may be due to interaction with a shell of material originating from pre-explosion mass loss. We further present a detailed analysis of the host galaxy system of LSQ14mo. PESSTO and GROND imaging show three spatially ...

  11. Predictions for signatures of the quark-nova in superluminous supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyed, Rachid; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2009-01-01

    [Abridged] Superluminous Supernovae (SN2006gy, SN2005gj, SN2005ap, SN2008fz, SN2003ma) have been a challenge to explain by standard models. We present an alternative scenario involving a quark-nova (QN), an explosive transition of the newly born neutron star to a quark star in which a second explosion (delayed) occurs inside the already expanding ejecta of a normal SN. The reheated SN ejecta can radiate at higher levels for longer periods of time primarily due to reduced adiabatic expansion losses, unlike the standard SN case. Our model is successfully applied to SN2006gy, SN2005gj, SN2005ap, SN2008fz, SN2003ma with encouraging fits to the lightcurves. There are four predictions in our model: (i) superluminous SNe optical lightcurves should show a double-hump with the SN hump at weaker magnitudes occurring days to weeks before the QN; (ii) Two shock breakouts should be observed vis-a-vis one for a normal SN. Depending on the time delay, this would manifest as two distinct spikes in the X-ray region or a broad...

  12. Superluminal motion in a compact steep spectrum radio source 3C 138

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Z Q; Kameno, S; Chen, Y J

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of 5 GHz VLBI observations of a compact steep spectrum source 3C 138. The data are consistent with the western end being the location of the central activity. The observed offset between different frequencies in the central region of 3C 138 can be accounted for by a frequency dependent shift of the synchrotron self-absorbed core. Our new measurements confirm the existence of a superluminal motion, but its apparent velocity of 3.3c is three times slower than the reported one. This value is consistent with the absence of parsec-scale counter-jet emission in the inner region, but seems still too high to allow the overall counter-jet to be seen in terms of Doppler boosting of an intrinsically identical jet. Either an interaction of jet with central dense medium, or an intrinsically asymmetrical jet must be invoked to reconcile the detected superluminal speed with the observed large scale asymmetry in 3C 138.

  13. ASASSN-15lh: A Superluminous Ultraviolet Rebrightening Observed by Swift and Hubble

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J; Cooke, Jeff; Olaes, Melanie; Quimby, Robert M; Baade, Dietrich; Gehrels, Neil; Hoeflich, Peter; Maund, Justyn; Mould, Jeremy; Patat, Ferdinando; Wang, Lifan; Wheeler, J Craig

    2016-01-01

    We present and discuss ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry from the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-ray limits from the X-Ray Telescope on Swift and imaging polarimetry and UV/optical spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of ASASSN-15lh. It has been classified as a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN I) more luminous than any other supernova observed. From the polarimetry we determine that the explosion was only mildly asymmetric. We find the flux of ASASSN-15lh to increase strongly into the UV, with a UV luminosity a hundred times greater than the hydrogen-rich, UV-bright SLSN II SN~2008es. A late rebrightening -- most prominent at shorter wavelengths -- is seen about two months after the peak brightness, which by itself is as bright as a superluminous supernova. ASASSN-15lh is not detected in the X-rays in individual observations or when the data are summed into two separate bins for the early phase and the rebrightening. The HST UV spectrum during the rebrightening is do...

  14. Two superluminous supernovae from the early universe discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, D A; Lidman, C; Sullivan, M; Conley, A; Astier, P; Carlberg, C Balland R G; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra and lightcurves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M_U = -22.7 is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and gives a rare glimpse into the restframe ultraviolet where these supernovae put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but based on the supernova spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ~ 1.5. Both supernovae have similar observer-frame griz lightcurves, which map to restframe lightcurves in the U-band and UV, rising in ~ 20 restframe days or longer, and declining over a similar timescale. The lightcurves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra to theoretical models, and identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectrum of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6...

  15. Direct observation of strong localization of quasi-two-dimensional light waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Scattering of surface plasmon polaritons on rough metal surfaces is investigated by using scanning near-field optical microscopy. Different scattering regimes, i.e. single, double and multiple scattering, are observed and related to the spatial Fourier spectra of the corresponding near......-field optical images. For the regime of strong multiple scattering, the near-field optical images exhibit spatially localized (within 150-250 nm) intensity enhancement by 10-50 times. This feature is attributed to strong localization of surface polaritons due to interference effects in multiple scattering...... caused by surface roughness. Similar bright light spots are observed with light scattering by silver colloid clusters deposited on glass substrates. Differences and similarities in these scattering phenomena are discussed....

  16. Experimental investigation of local properties and statistics of optical vortices in random wave fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Miyamoto, Y.;

    2005-01-01

    We present the first direct experimental evidence of the local properties of optical vortices in a random laser speckle field. We have observed the Berry anisotropy ellipse describing the anisotropic squeezing of phase lines close to vortex cores and quantitatively verified the Dennis angular...... momentum rule for its phase. Some statistics associated with vortices, such as density, anisotropy ellipse eccentricity, and its relation to zero crossings of real and imaginary parts of the random field, are also investigated by experiments....

  17. On the local wellposedness of 3-D water wave problem with vorticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article,we first present an equivalent formulation of the free boundary problem to 3-D incompressible Euler equations,then we announce our local wellposedness result concerning the free boundary problem in Sobolev space provided that there is no self-intersection point on the initial surface and under the stability assumption that(?)p/(?)n(ξ)|t=0≤-2c0<0 withξbeing restricted to the initial surface.

  18. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  19. Extensions of Born’s rule to non-linear quantum mechanics, some of which do not imply superluminal communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Bassam; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-08-01

    Nonlinear modifications of quantum mechanics have a troubled history. They were initially studied for many promising reasons: resolving the measurement problem, formulating a theory of quantum mechanics and gravity, and understanding the limits of standard quantum mechanics. However, certain non-linear theories have been experimentally tested and failed. More significantly, it has been shown that, in general, deterministic non-linear theories can be used for superluminal communication. We highlight another serious issue: the distribution of measurement results predicted by non-linear quantum mechanics depends on the formulation of quantum mechanics. In other words, Born’s rule cannot be uniquely extended to non-linear quantum mechanics. We present these generalizations of Born’s rule, and then examine whether some exclude superluminal communication. We determine that a large class do not allow for superluminal communication, but many lack a consistent definition. Nonetheless, we find a single extension of Born’s rule with a sound operational definition, and that does not exhibit superluminal communication. The non-linear time-evolution leading to a certain measurement event is driven by the state conditioned on measurements that lie within the past light cone of that event.

  20. Superluminal Radio Features in the M87 Jet and the Site of Flaring TeV Gamma-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, C C; Stawarz, L

    2007-01-01

    Superluminal motion is a common feature of radio jets in powerful gamma-ray emitting active galactic nuclei. Conventionally, the variable emission is assumed to originate near the central supermassive black-hole where the jet is launched on parsec scales or smaller. Here, we report the discovery of superluminal radio features within a distinct flaring X-ray emitting region in the jet of the nearby radio galaxy M87 with the Very Long Baseline Array. This shows that these two phenomenological hallmarks -- superluminal motion and high-energy variability -- are associated, and we place this activity much further (>=120 pc) from the ``central engine'' in M87 than previously thought in relativistic jet sources. We argue that the recent excess very high-energy TeV emission from M87 reported by the H.E.S.S. experiment originates from this variable superluminal structure, thus providing crucial insight into the production region of gamma-ray emission in more distant blazars.

  1. Localized injection of large-amplitude Pc 1 waves and electron temperature enhancement near the plasmapause observed by DE2 in the upper ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyemori, T.; Sugiura, M.; Oka, A.; Morita, Y.; Ishii, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Brace, L. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The relation between electron temperature enhancement and large amplitude Pc 1 wave injections in the upper ionosphere is investigated using the data obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 2 spacecraft. Results can be summarized as follows: (1) The region of the temperature enhancement coincides with that of the wave injection which is latitudinally very narrow (less than 100 km) in comparison with the wavelength along the ambient magnetic field (several hundred kilometers). (2) The duration of the wave injection (or the temperature enhancement) seems to be less than a few hours even under quiet geomagnetic conditions, and/or the injection seems to be very localized, not only latitudinally, but also longitudinally. (3) The appearance and the magnitude of temperature enhancement depend on both the wave amplitude and the satellite altitude. (4) Two of the 22 events that were analyzed show a clear enhancement of low-energy electron flux (5 to 30 eV) at the wave injection, and the flux is field-aligned both downward and upward. The region of the temperature enhancement coincides with that of the downward electron flux. From these results, it is suggested that the temperature enhancement which accompanies large-amplitude waves with Pc 1 pulsation frequencies (0.2 to 5 Hz) is caused by the direct acceleration of thermal electrons at low altitudes by the parallel electric field (0.01 to 0.001 mV/m) of the ion-cyclotron waves (kinetic Alfven waves) having an oblique wave normal.

  2. The stability of second sound waves in a rotating Darcy-Brinkman porous layer in local thermal non-equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayeb, I. A.; Elbashir, T. B. A.

    2017-08-01

    The linear and nonlinear stabilities of second sound waves in a rotating porous Darcy-Brinkman layer in local thermal non-equilibrium are studied when the heat flux in the solid obeys the Cattaneo law. The simultaneous action of the Brinkman effect (effective viscosity) and rotation is shown to destabilise the layer, as compared to either of them acting alone, for both stationary and overstable modes. The effective viscosity tends to favour overstable modes while rotation tends to favour stationary convection. Rapid rotation invokes a negative viscosity effect that suppresses the stabilising effect of porosity so that the stability characteristics resemble those of the classical rotating Benard layer. A formal weakly nonlinear analysis yields evolution equations of the Landau-Stuart type governing the slow time development of the amplitudes of the unstable waves. The equilibrium points of the evolution equations are analysed and the overall development of the amplitudes is examined. Both overstable and stationary modes can exhibit supercritical stability; supercritical instability, subcritical instability and stability are not possible. The dependence of the supercritical stability on the relative values of the six dimensionless parameters representing thermal non-equilibrium, rotation, porosity, relaxation time, thermal diffusivities and Brinkman effect is illustrated as regions in regime diagrams in the parameter space. The dependence of the heat transfer and the mean heat flux on the parameters of the problem is also discussed.

  3. Continuous spontaneous localization wave function collapse model as a mechanism for the emergence of cosmological asymmetries in inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañate, Pedro; Pearle, Philip; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The inflationary account for the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure falls short of actually explaining the generation of primordial anisotropies and inhomogeneities. This description starts from a symmetric background, and invokes symmetric dynamics, so it cannot explain asymmetries. To generate asymmetries, we present an application of the continuous spontaneous localization model of wave function collapse in the context of inflation. This modification of quantum dynamics introduces a stochastic nonunitary component to the evolution of the inflaton field perturbations. This leads to passage from a homogeneous and isotropic stage to another, where the quantum uncertainties in the initial state of inflation transmute into the primordial inhomogeneities and anisotropies. We show, by proper choice of the collapse-generating operator, that it is possible to achieve compatibility with the precise observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  4. Stochastic process of pragmatic information for 2D spiral wave turbulence in globally and locally coupled Alief-Panfilov oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Jun; Miyata, Hajime; Konno, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-01

    Recently, complex dynamics of globally coupled oscillators have been attracting many researcher's attentions. In spite of their numerous studies, their features of nonlinear oscillator systems with global and local couplings in two-dimension (2D) are not understood fully. The paper focuses on 2D states of coherent, clustered and chaotic oscillation especially under the effect of negative global coupling (NGC) in 2D Alief-Panfilov model. It is found that the tuning NGC can cause various new coupling-parameter dependency on the features of oscillations. Then quantitative characterization of various states of oscillations (so called spiral wave turbulence) is examined by using the pragmatic information (PI) which have been utilized in analyzing multimode laser, solar activity and neuronal systems. It is demonstrated that the dynamics of the PI for various oscillations can be characterized successfully by the Hyper-Gamma stochastic process.

  5. Shear wave elastography for localization of prostate cancer lesions and assessment of elasticity thresholds: implications for targeted biopsies and active surveillance protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Katharina; Salomon, Georg; Beyer, Burkhard; Schiffmann, Jonas; Simonis, Kathrin; Graefen, Markus; Budaeus, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Shear wave elastography allows the detection of cancer by using focused ultrasound pulses for locally deforming tissue. The differences in tissue elasticity and stiffness have been used increasingly in breast cancer imaging and help detect potential tumor lesions in the prostate. In this study we localized prostate cancer lesions using shear wave elastography before radical prostatectomy and assessed the examiner independent elasticity threshold for cancer foci detection. Shear wave elastography scanning of the whole prostate was performed before radical prostatectomy in 60 consecutive patients with high, intermediate and low risk disease. Localization of suspected lesions and density threshold (kPa) were recorded in up to 12 areas and resulted in 703 different fields. Shear wave elastography findings were correlated with final pathology. Initially 381 areas were used to establish shear wave elastography cutoffs (development cohort 32 patients). Subsequently these cutoffs were validated in 322 areas (validation cohort 28 patients). Using shear wave elastography significant differences were recorded for the elasticity of benign tissue vs prostate cancer nodules at 42 kPa (range 29 to 71.3) vs 88 kPa (range 54 to 132) (all p cancer lesion diameter was 26 mm (range 18 to 41). Applying the most informative cutoff of 50 kPa to the validation cohort resulted in 80.9% and 69.1% sensitivity and specificity, respectively, and 74.2% accuracy for detecting cancer nodules based on final pathological finding. The corresponding positive and negative predictive values were 67.1% and 82.2%, respectively. Shear wave elastography allows the identification of cancer foci based on shear wave elastography differences. Moreover, reliable cutoffs for this approach can be established, allowing examiner independent localization of prostate cancer foci. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Localization and Broadband Follow-Up of the Gravitational-Wave Transient GW150914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    and present the sky localization of the first observed compactbinary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-rayCoordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localizationcoverage, the timeline, and depth...... of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger,there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadbandcampaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broadcapabilities...

  7. Controlling spiral wave with target wave in oscillatory systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fu-Cheng; Wang Xiao-Fei; Li Xue-Chen; Dong Li-Fang

    2007-01-01

    Spiral waves have been controlled by generating target waves with a localized inhomogeneity in the oscillatory medium. The competition between the spiral waves and target waves is discussed. The effect of the localized inhomogeneity size has also been studied.

  8. Addendum to "Travelling waves for a non-local Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation" [J. Differential Equations 257 (3) (2014) 720-758

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, C. M.; Achleitner, F.

    2017-01-01

    We add a theorem to F. Achleitner, C.M. Cuesta and S. Hittmeir (2014) [1]. In that paper we studied travelling wave solutions of a Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers type equation with a non-local diffusion term. In particular, the proof of existence and uniqueness of these waves relies on the assumption that the exponentially decaying functions are the only bounded solutions of the linearised equation. In this addendum we prove this assumption and thus close the existence and uniqueness proof of travelling wave solutions.

  9. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  10. Characterization of Miniature Millimeter-Wave Vivaldi Antenna for Local Multipoint Distribution Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents first, an efficient measurement technique to characterize the input impedance of a Vivaldi antenna, second, a simple technique to impedance match a Vivaldi antenna to a 50 Ohm feed line and lastly, a desktop arrangement to determine the directional gain of a Vivaldi antenna. The characterization is done using a microwave wafer probe station, a ground-signal microwave probe, impedance standard substrate and an automatic network analyzer. The Vivaldi antenna with a matching transformer has a VSVIR close to unity and a gain of about 10 dB over the frequency band of 27.5 to 28.35 GHz which is allocated for local multipoint distribution service (LMDS).

  11. Symmetry breaking of localized discrete matter waves induced by spin–orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E.R. Caianiello”, CNISM and INFN–Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Universitá di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Abdullaev, F.Kh., E-mail: fatkhulla@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Kulliyyah of Science, International Islamic University of Malaysia, 25200 Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2015-10-02

    We study localized nonlinear excitations of a dilute Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) with spin–orbit coupling in a deep optical lattice (OL). For this we introduce a tight-binding model that includes the spin–orbit coupling (SOC) at the discrete level in the form of a generalized discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Existence and stability of discrete solitons of different symmetry types is demonstrated. Quite interestingly, we find three distinctive regions in which discrete solitons undergo spontaneously symmetry breaking, passing from on-site to inter-site and to asymmetric, simply by varying the interatomic interactions. Existence ranges of discrete solitons with inter-site symmetry depend on SOC and shrink to zero as the SOC parameter is increased. Asymmetric discrete solitons appear as novel excitations specific of the SOC. Possible experimental implementation of these results is briefly discussed.

  12. Transverse relativistic effects in paraxial wave interference

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We consider relativistic deformations of interfering paraxial waves moving in the transverse direction. Owing to superluminal transverse phase velocities, noticeable deformations of the interference patterns arise when the waves move with respect to each other with non-relativistic velocities. Similar distortions also appear on a mutual tilt of the interfering waves, which causes a phase delay analogous to the relativistic time delay. We illustrate these observations by the interference between a vortex wave beam and a plane wave, which exhibits a pronounced deformation of the radial fringes into a fork-like pattern (relativistic Hall effect). Furthermore, we describe an additional relativistic motion of the interference fringes (a counter-rotation in the vortex case), which become noticeable at the same non-relativistic velocities.

  13. Nuclear Containment Inspection Using AN Array of Guided Wave Sensors for Damage Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, A. C.; Fisher, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear power plant containments are typically both the last line of defense against the release of radioactivity to the environment and the first line of defense to protect against intrusion from external objects. As such, it is important to be able to locate any damage that would limit the integrity of the containment itself. Typically, a portion of the containment consists of a metallic pressure boundary that encloses the reactor primary circuit. It is made of thick steel plates welded together, lined with concrete and partially buried, limiting areas that can be visually inspected for corrosion damage. This study presents a strategy using low frequency (corrosion-like damage several meters from the probe in a mock-up of the containment vessel. A magnetostrictive sensor (MsS) is scanned across the width of the vessel, acquiring waveforms at a fixed interval. A beam forming strategy is used to localize the defects. Experimental results are presented for a variety of damage configurations, demonstrating the efficacy of this technique for detecting damage smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength.

  14. Investigation on relationship between epicentral distance and growth curve of initial P-wave propagating in local heterogeneous media for earthquake early warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kyosuke; Tsuno, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    In the earthquake early warning (EEW) system, the epicenter location and magnitude of earthquakes are estimated using the amplitude growth rate of initial P-waves. It has been empirically pointed out that the growth rate becomes smaller as epicentral distance becomes far regardless of the magnitude of earthquakes. So, the epicentral distance can be estimated from the growth rate using this empirical relationship. However, the growth rates calculated from different earthquakes at the same epicentral distance mark considerably different values from each other. Sometimes the growth rates of earthquakes having the same epicentral distance vary by 104 times. Qualitatively, it has been considered that the gap in the growth rates is due to differences in the local heterogeneities that the P-waves propagate through. In this study, we demonstrate theoretically how local heterogeneities in the subsurface disturb the relationship between the growth rate and the epicentral distance. Firstly, we calculate seismic scattered waves in a heterogeneous medium. First-ordered PP, PS, SP, and SS scatterings are considered. The correlation distance of the heterogeneities and fractional fluctuation of elastic parameters control the heterogeneous conditions for the calculation. From the synthesized waves, the growth rate of the initial P-wave is obtained. As a result, we find that a parameter (in this study, correlation distance) controlling heterogeneities plays a key role in the magnitude of the fluctuation of the growth rate. Then, we calculate the regional correlation distances in Japan that can account for the fluctuation of the growth rate of real earthquakes from 1997 to 2011 observed by K-NET and KiK-net. As a result, the spatial distribution of the correlation distance shows locality. So, it is revealed that the growth rates fluctuate according to the locality. When this local fluctuation is taken into account, the accuracy of the estimation of epicentral distances from initial P-waves

  15. 3D Simulations of Relativistic Precessing Jets Probing the Structure of Superluminal Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Aloy, M A; Gómez, J L; Agudo, I; Müller, E; Ibanyez, J M; Aloy, Miguel Angel; Marti, Jose Maria; Gomez, Jose Luis; Agudo, Ivan; Mueller, Ewald; Ibanyez, Jose Maria

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a three-dimensional, relativistic, hydrodynamic simulation of a precessing jet into which a compact blob of matter is injected. A comparison of synthetic radio maps computed from the hydrodynamic model, taking into account the appropriate light travel time delays, with those obtained from observations of actual superluminal sources shows that the variability of the jet emission is the result of a complex combination of phase motions, viewing angle selection effects, and non-linear interactions between perturbations and the underlying jet and/or the external medium. These results question the hydrodynamic properties inferred from observed apparent motions and radio structures, and reveal that shock-in-jet models may be overly simplistic.

  16. Superluminal Propagation Caused by Radiative Corrections in a Uniform Electromagnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, Noburo

    2012-01-01

    We consider the effect of radiative corrections on the maximum velocity of propagation of neutral scalar fields in a uniform electromagnetic field. The propagator of neutral scalar fields interacting with charged fields depends on the electromagnetic field through charged particle loops. The kinetic terms of the scalar fields are corrected and the maximum velocity of the scalar particle becomes greater or less than unity. We show that the maximum velocity becomes greater than unity in a simple example, a neutral scalar field coupled with two charged Dirac fields by Yukawa interaction. The maximum velocity depends on the frame of reference and causality is not violated. We discuss the possibility of this superluminal propagation in the Standard Model.

  17. Superluminal Neutrinos and a Curious Phenomenon in the Relativistic Quantum Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Matone, Marco

    2011-01-01

    OPERA's results, if confirmed, pose the question of superluminal neutrinos. We investigate the kinematics defined by the quantum version of the relativistic Hamilton-Jacobi equation, i.e. E^2=p^2c^2+m^2c^4+2mQc^2, with Q the quantum potential of the free particle. The key point is that the quantum version of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is a third-order differential equation, so that it has integration constants which are missing in the Schr\\"odinger and Klein-Gordon equations. In particular, a non-vanishing imaginary part of an integration constant leads to a quantum correction to the expression of the velocity which is curiously in agreement with OPERA's results.

  18. `Superluminal' Photon Propagation in QED in Curved Spacetime is Dispersive and Causal

    CERN Document Server

    Hollowood, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    It is now well-known that vacuum polarisation in QED can lead to superluminal low-frequency phase velocities for photons propagating in curved spacetimes. In a series of papers, we have shown that this quantum phenomenon is dispersive and have calculated the full frequency dependence of the refractive index, explaining in detail how causality is preserved and various familiar results from quantum field theory such as the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation and the optical theorem are realised in curved spacetime. These results have been criticised in a recent paper by Akhoury and Dolgov arXiv:1003.6110 [hep-th], who assert that photon propagation is neither dispersive nor necessarily causal. In this note, we point out a series of errors in their work which have led to this false conclusion.

  19. Can pair-instability supernova models match the observations of superluminous supernovae?

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyreva, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of so-called superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are discovered. It is believed that at least some of them with slowly fading light curves originate in stellar explosions induced by the pair instability mechanism. Recent stellar evolution models naturally predict pair instability supernovae (PISNe) from very massive stars at wide range of metallicities (up to Z=0.006, Yusof et al. 2013). In the scope of this study we analyse whether PISN models can match the observational properties of SLSNe with various light curve shapes. Specifically, we explore the influence of different degrees of macroscopic chemical mixing in PISN explosive products on the resulting observational properties. We artificially apply mixing to the 250 Msun PISN evolutionary model from Kozyreva et al. (2014) and explore its supernova evolution with the one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. The greatest success in matching SLSN observations is achieved in the case of an extreme macroscopic mixing, where all r...

  20. Negative and Superluminal Group Velocity Propagation with Narrow Pulse in a Coaxial Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Xiao-Juan; ZHOU Wei; LI Lin; TENG Li-Hu; FENG Bao-Ying; ZHENG Sheng-Feng; WANG Feng-Wei

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of electric signal along a spatially periodic impedance mismatched transmission line group. Anomalous dispersion is caused by the periodically mismatched impedance structure and a forbidden band appears near 8 MHz in transmission. The group velocity of the amplitude-modulated signal is augmented up to infinity, even -3.89c (c the speed of light in vacuum) in the forbidden region with the amplitude of the modulated signal increasing. When the carrier sinusoid signal is modulated in amplitude by the modulating sinusoid signal, of which the peak is superimposed with a narrow pulse at fivefold frequency, the superluminal group velocity also occurs. The experiment failed to show whether the propagation velocity of narrow pulse exceeds c or not.

  1. SN 2012au: A GOLDEN LINK BETWEEN SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR LOWER-LUMINOSITY COUNTERPARTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Margutti, Raffaella; Drout, Maria R.; Marion, G. Howie; Sanders, Nathan E.; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Chornock, Ryan; Berger, Edo; Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, Pete; Kirshner, Robert P.; Dittmann, Jason; Bieryla, Allyson; Kamble, Atish; Chakraborti, Sayan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T. [6127 Wilder Lab, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Levesque, Emily M., E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); and others

    2013-06-20

    We present optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2012au, a slow-evolving supernova (SN) with properties that suggest a link between subsets of energetic and H-poor SNe and superluminous SNe. SN 2012au exhibited conspicuous Type-Ib-like He I lines and other absorption features at velocities reaching Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} km s{sup -1} in its early spectra, and a broad light curve that peaked at M{sub B} = -18.1 mag. Models of these data indicate a large explosion kinetic energy of {approx}10{sup 52} erg and {sup 56}Ni mass ejection of M{sub Ni} Almost-Equal-To 0.3 M{sub Sun} on par with SN 1998bw. SN 2012au's spectra almost one year after explosion show a blend of persistent Fe II P-Cyg absorptions and nebular emissions originating from two distinct velocity regions. These late-time emissions include strong [Fe II], [Ca II], [O I], Mg I], and Na I lines at velocities {approx}> 4500 km s{sup -1}, as well as O I and Mg I lines at noticeably smaller velocities {approx}< 2000 km s{sup -1}. Many of the late-time properties of SN 2012au are similar to the slow-evolving hypernovae SN 1997dq and SN 1997ef, and the superluminous SN 2007bi. Our observations suggest that a single explosion mechanism may unify all of these events that span -21 {approx}< M{sub B} {approx}< -17 mag. The aspherical and possibly jetted explosion was most likely initiated by the core collapse of a massive progenitor star and created substantial high-density, low-velocity Ni-rich material.

  2. Extreme Supernova Models for the Super-luminous Transient ASASSN-15lh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Vinko, J.; Nagy, A. P.; Wiggins, B. K.; Even, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    The recent discovery of the unprecedentedly super-luminous transient ASASSN-15lh (or SN 2015L) with its UV-bright secondary peak challenges all the power-input models that have been proposed for super-luminous supernovae. Here we examine some of the few viable interpretations of ASASSN-15lh in the context of a stellar explosion, involving combinations of one or more power inputs. We model the light curve of ASASSN-15lh with a hybrid model that includes contributions from magnetar spin-down energy and hydrogen-poor circumstellar interaction. We also investigate models of pure circumstellar interaction with a massive hydrogen-deficient shell and discuss the lack of interaction features in the observed spectra. We find that, as a supernova, ASASSN-15lh can be best modeled by the energetic core-collapse of an ˜40 M ⊙ star interacting with a hydrogen-poor shell of ˜20 M ⊙. The circumstellar shell and progenitor mass are consistent with a rapidly rotating pulsational pair-instability supernova progenitor as required for strong interaction following the final supernova explosion. Additional energy injection by a magnetar with an initial period of 1-2 ms and magnetic field of 0.1-1 × 1014 G may supply the excess luminosity required to overcome the deficit in single-component models, but this requires more fine-tuning and extreme parameters for the magnetar, as well as the assumption of efficient conversion of magnetar energy into radiation. We thus favor a single-input model where the reverse shock formed in a strong SN ejecta-circumstellar matter interaction following a very powerful core-collapse SN explosion can supply the luminosity needed to reproduce the late-time UV-bright plateau.

  3. A plausible (overlooked) super-luminous supernova in the Sloan digital sky survey stripe 82 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Kozłowski, Szymon; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Djorgovski, S. George; Mahabal, Ashish A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Koposov, Sergey, E-mail: zkostrzewa@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: simkoz@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wyrzykow@astrouw.edu.pl [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    We present the discovery of a plausible super-luminous supernova (SLSN), found in the archival data of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, called PSN 000123+000504. The supernova (SN) peaked at m {sub g} < 19.4 mag in the second half of 2005 September, but was missed by the real-time SN hunt. The observed part of the light curve (17 epochs) showed that the rise to the maximum took over 30 days, while the decline time lasted at least 70 days (observed frame), closely resembling other SLSNe of SN 2007bi type. The spectrum of the host galaxy reveals a redshift of z = 0.281 and the distance modulus of μ = 40.77 mag. Combining this information with the SDSS photometry, we found the host galaxy to be an LMC-like irregular dwarf galaxy with an absolute magnitude of M{sub B} = –18.2 ± 0.2 mag and an oxygen abundance of 12+log [O/H]=8.3±0.2; hence, the SN peaked at M {sub g} < –21.3 mag. Our SLSN follows the relation for the most energetic/super-luminous SNe exploding in low-metallicity environments, but we found no clear evidence for SLSNe to explode in low-luminosity (dwarf) galaxies only. The available information on the PSN 000123+000504 light curve suggests the magnetar-powered model as a likely scenario of this event. This SLSN is a new addition to a quickly growing family of super-luminous SNe.

  4. Characterization by a time-frequency method of classical waves propagation in one-dimensional lattice : effects of the dispersion and localized nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Richoux, Olivier; Hardy, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an application of time-frequency methods to characterize the dispersion of acoustic waves travelling in a one-dimensional periodic or disordered lattice made up of Helmholtz resonators connected to a cylindrical tube. These methods allow (1) to evaluate the velocity of the wave energy when the input signal is an acoustic pulse ; (2) to display the evolution of the spectral content of the transient signal ; (3) to show the role of the localized nonlinearities on the propagation .i.e the emergence of higher harmonics. The main result of this paper is that the time-frequency methods point out how the nonlinearities break the localization of the waves and/or the filter effects of the lattice.

  5. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure in the greater Mount Rainier area from local earthquake tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Seth Charles

    1997-08-01

    One of the most striking features of seismicity in western Washington is the clustering of crustal earthquakes into one of several zones of concentrated seismicity. In this dissertation I explore the hypothesis that geologic structures, in conjunction with regional tectonic forces, are primarily responsible for controlling the location of seismicity in parts of western Washington. The primary tool for testing this hypothesis is a 3-dimensional image of the P-wave velocity structure of the greater Mount Rainier area that I derive using local earthquake tomography. I use P-wave arrival times from local earthquakes occurring between 1980 and 1996 recorded at short-period vertical component stations operated by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network (PNSN) and 18 temporary sites operated during a field experiment in 1995 and 1996. The tomographic methodology I use is similar to that described by Lees and Crosson (1989, 1990). In addition, I use the parameter separation method to decouple the hypocenter and velocity problems, don't use station corrections, and use ray-bending for 3-D raytracing, allowing for a full non-linear inversion. In the upper 4 km several low velocity features show good correlation with the Carbon River, Skate Creek, and Morton anticlines, as well as the Chehalis, Tacoma, and Seattle basins. There is also good correlation between high velocity features and surface exposures of several plutons. One seismic zone, the St. Helens Seismic Zone, correlates well with a planar low velocity feature. This correlation supports the idea that this seismic zone reflects a continuous structure roughly 50 km in length. A second zone, the Western Rainier Seismic Zone (WRSZ), does not correlate in any simple way with anomaly patterns, suggesting that the WRSZ does not represent a distinct fault. A 10 km-wide low velocity anomaly occurs 8 to 18 km beneath Mount Rainier, which I interpret to be due to a thermal aureole associated with the magmatic system beneath

  6. iPTF Search for an Optical Counterpart to Gravitational Wave Trigger GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, M M; Singer, L P; Corsi, A; Cao, Y; Barlow, T; Bhalerao, V; Bellm, E; Cook, D; Duggan, G E; Ferretti, R; Frail, D A; Horesh, A; Kendrick, R; Kulkarni, S R; Lunnan, R; Palliyaguru, N; Laher, R; Masci, F; Manulis, I; Miller, A A; Nugent, P E; Perley, D; Prince, T A; Rana, J; Rebbapragada, U; Sesar, B; Singhal, A; Surace, J; Van Sistine, A

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) autonomously responded to and promptly tiled the error region of the first gravitational wave event GW150914 to search for an optical counterpart. Only a small fraction of the total localized region was immediately visible in the Northern night sky, due both to sun-angle and elevation constraints. Here, we report on the transient candidates identified and rapid follow-up undertaken to determine the nature of each candidate. Even in the small area imaged of 135 sq. deg., after extensive filtering, 8 candidates were deemed worthy of additional follow-up. Within two hours, all 8 were spectroscopically classified by the Keck II telescope. Curiously, even though such events are rare, one of our candidates was a superluminous supernova. We obtained radio data with the Very Large Array and X-ray follow-up with the Swift satellite for this transient. None of our candidates appear to be associated with the gravitational wave trigger, which is unsurprising given that GW...

  7. Crustal seismic anisotropy beneath Shillong plateau - Assam valley in North East India: Shear-wave splitting analysis using local earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Antara; Baruah, Santanu; Piccinini, Davide; Saikia, Sowrav; Phukan, Manoj K.; Chetia, Monisha; Kayal, J. R.

    2017-10-01

    We present crustal anisotropy estimates constrained by shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis using local earthquakes in the Shillong plateau and Assam valley area, North East India (NE India) region. Splitting parameters are determined using an automated cross-correlation (CC) method. We located 330 earthquakes recorded by 17 broadband seismic stations during 2001-2014 in the study area. Out of these 330 events, seismograms of 163 events are selected for the SWS analysis. Relatively small average delay times (0.039-0.084 s) indicate existence of moderate crack density in the crust below the study area. It is found that fast polarization directions vary from station to station depending on the regional stress system as well as geological conditions. The spatial pattern of crustal anisotropy in the area is controlled mostly by tectonic movement of the Indian plate towards NE. Presence of several E-W and N-S trending active faults in the area also play an important role on the observed pattern of crustal anisotropy.

  8. Green's function of a massless scalar field in curved space-time and superluminal phase velocity of the retarded potential

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2012-01-01

    We study a retarded potential solution of a massless scalar field in curved space-time. In a special ansatz for a particle at rest whose magnitude of the (scalar) charge is changing with time, we found an exact analytic solution. The solution indicates that the phase velocity of the retarded potential of a non-moving scalar charge is position dependent, and may easily be greater than the speed of light at a given point. In the case of the Schwarzschild space-time, at the horizon, the phase velocity becomes infinitely faster than the coordinate speed of light at that point. Superluminal phase velocity is relatively common phenomenon, with the the phase velocity of the massive Klein-Gordon field as the best known example. We discuss why it is possible to have modes with superluminal phase velocity even for a massless field.

  9. 超光速:可能与不可能%On the Superluminal Movement:Possible and Impossible?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄政新

    2012-01-01

    The OPERA experimental results indicate that neutrinos move even faster than the speed of light,which triggers extensive skepticism with regards of Einstein's assertion that superluminal movement does not exists in nature.This paper first makes a brief review to the history of tachyon(faster-than-light particle) research home and abroad in the past half-century.It then points out that:(1) there is no solid and sufficient reason in Einstein's assertion that superluminal movement does not exists in nature;(2) so far there is no solid experimental foundation for those currently established superluminal theories;(3) a correct superluminal theory should return to special relativity under extreme conditions(i.e.when the velocity approaches the speed of light).%"奥佩拉"(OPERA)实验结果显示中微子运动得比光速还快。这引起许多人对爱因斯坦关于自然界不存在超光速运动这一断言的怀疑。本文回顾了半个世纪以来国内外快子(超光速粒子)研究的简要历史。接着,本文指出:(1)爱因斯坦断言自然界不存在超光速运动是没有充分理由的;(2)所有已建立的超光速理论都没有坚实的实验基础;(3)一个正确的超光理论在极限条件下(当速度趋于光速时)时应当回归狭义相对论。

  10. A seismic attenuation zone below Popocatépetl volcano inferred from coda waves of local earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Novelo-Casanova; A. Martínez-Bringas

    2005-01-01

    Using a single scattering model, weighted averages of the quality factor Qc were estimated at 6 Hz for coda wave windows 25s after S-wave arrival at depths ranging from 2 to 10 km and magnitudes between 2 and 3. Considering Qc -1 as intrinsic attenuation, we find a zone of seismic wave attenuation between 6 and 8 km depth attributed to the presence of magma and partial melting of rock.

  11. Two superluminous supernovae from the early universe discovered by the supernova legacy survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Kasen, D. [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Lidman, C. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Sullivan, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-389 (United States); Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and University of Paris VI and VII, F-75005 Paris (France); Carlberg, R. G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Fouchez, D. [CPPM, CNRS-IN2P3 and University Aix Marseille II, Case 907, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V. [DSM/IRFU/SPP, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrett, K. [DRDC Ottawa, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1A 0Z4 (Canada); Pritchet, C. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-12-20

    We present spectra and light curves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae (SNe) discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M{sub U} = –22.7 it is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and it gives a rare glimpse into the rest-frame ultraviolet where these SNe put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but on the basis of the SN spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ∼ 1.5. Both SNe have similar observer-frame griz light curves, which map to rest-frame light curves in the U band and UV, rising in ∼20 rest-frame days or longer and declining over a similar timescale. The light curves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra with theoretical models, and we identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectra of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6 and find that they are consistent with an expanding explosion of only a few solar masses of carbon, oxygen, and other trace metals. Thus, the progenitors appear to be related to those suspected for SNe Ic. A high kinetic energy, 10{sup 52} erg, is also favored. Normal mechanisms of powering core-collapse or thermonuclear SNe do not seem to work for these SNe. We consider models powered by {sup 56}Ni decay and interaction with circumstellar material, but we find that the creation and spin-down of a magnetar with a period of 2 ms, a magnetic field of 2 × 10{sup 14} G, and a 3 M {sub ☉} progenitor provides the best fit to the data.

  12. On the application of locally adaptive unstructured grids to the problems of blast wave propagation and attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, E.V.; Saito, T.; Takayama, K. [Tohoku Univ., Inst. of Fluid Science, Shock Wave Research Center, Sendai (Japan)]. E-mail: timo@ceres.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp; Voinovich, P.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Supercomputer Center at the A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Galyukov. A.O. [Soft-Impact Ltd., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tahir, R.B.; Molder, S. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The problem of blast wave propagation and attenuation have always been of considerable basic and practical interest. Due to diffraction effects, reflections and possible focusing, blast wave intensity may vary considerably even at the same distance from the explosion center. From the computational point of view, these problems deal typically with computational domains of complex geometry, often requiring the resolution of gas dynamics phenomena having characteristic scales much smaller than the scale of a computational domain. This paper presents experiences and capabilities in applying the above techniques to various practical problems involving blast wave propagation and attenuation.

  13. Revealing the binary origin of Type Ic superluminous supernovae through nebular hydrogen emission

    CERN Document Server

    Moriya, Takashi J; Mackey, Jonathan; Chen, Ting-Wan; Langer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We propose that nebular Halpha emission as detected in the Type Ic superluminous supernova iPTF13ehe stems from matter which is stripped from a companion star when the supernova ejecta collide with it. The temporal evolution, the line broadening, and the overall blueshift of the emission are consistent with this interpretation. We scale the nebular Halpha luminosity predicted for Type Ia supernovae in single-degenerate systems to derive the stripped mass required to explain the Halpha luminosity of iPTF13ehe. We find a stripped mass of 0.1 - 0.9 solar masses, assuming that the supernova luminosity is powered by radioactivity or magnetar spin down. Because a central heating source is required to excite the Halpha emission, an interaction-powered model is not favored for iPTF13ehe. We derive a companion mass of more than 20 solar masses and a binary separation of less than about 20 companion radii based on the stripping efficiency during the collision, indicating that the supernova progenitor and the companion ...

  14. A plausible (overlooked) super-luminous supernova in the SDSS Stripe 82 data

    CERN Document Server

    Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Djorgovski, S George; Glikman, Eilat; Mahabal, Ashish A

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a plausible super-luminous supernova (SLSN), found in the archival data of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, called PSN 000123+000504. The supernova peaked at M_g<-21.3 mag in the second half of September 2005, but was missed by the real-time supernova hunt. The observed part of the light curve (17 epochs) showed that the rise to the maximum took over 30 days, while the decline time lasted at least 70 days (observed frame), closely resembling other SLSNe of SN2007bi type. Spectrum of the host galaxy reveals a redshift of z=0.281 and the distance modulus of \\mu=40.77 mag. Combining this information with the SDSS photometry, we found the host galaxy to be an LMC-like irregular dwarf galaxy with the absolute magnitude of M_B=-18.2+/-0.2 mag and the oxygen abundance of 12+log[O/H]=8.3+/-0.2. Our SLSN follows the relation for the most energetic/super-luminous SNe exploding in low-metallicity environments, but we found no clear evidence for SLSNe to explode in low-luminosity ...

  15. On the early-time excess emission in hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Vreeswijk, Paul M; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Perley, Daniel A; Quimby, Robert M; Waldman, Roni; Sullivan, Mark; Yan, Lin; Ofek, Eran O; Fremling, Christoffer; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Valenti, Stefano; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D Andrew; Filippenko, Alexei V; Cenko, S Bradley; Yaron, Ofer; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Cao, Yi; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Horesh, Assaf; Rubin, Adam; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Nugent, Peter E; Laher, Russ; Rebbapragada, Umaa D; Woźniak, Przemysław; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R

    2016-01-01

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) PTF12dam and iPTF13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF12dam is very similar in duration (~10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2-3 mag fainter) compared to those observed in other SLSNe-I, such as SN2006oz, LSQ14bdq and DES14X3taz. In contrast, the long-duration (>30 days) early excess emission in iPTF13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time light-curve decline in both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni and $^{56}$Co, the amount of nickel req...

  16. Superluminal non-ballistic jet swing in the quasar NRAO 150 revealed by mm-VLBI

    CERN Document Server

    Agudo, I; Krichbaum, T P; Marscher, A P; Gonidakis, I; Diamond, P J; Perucho, M; Alef, W; Graham, D A; Witzel, A; Zensus, J A; Bremer, M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Barrena, R

    2007-01-01

    NRAO 150 -a compact and bright radio to mm source showing core/jet structure- has been recently identified as a quasar at redshift z=1.52 through a near-IR spectral observation. To study the jet kinematics on the smallest accessible scales and to compute the first estimates of its basic physical properties, we have analysed the ultra-high-resolution images from a new monitoring program at 86 GHz and 43 GHz with the GMVA and the VLBA, respectively. An additional archival and calibration VLBA data set, covering from 1997 to 2007, has been used. Our data shows an extreme projected counter-clock-wise jet position angle swing at an angular rate of up to ~11 deg./yr within the inner ~31 pc of the jet, which is associated with a non-ballistic superluminal motion of the jet within this region. The results suggest that the magnetic field could play an important role in the dynamics of the jet in NRAO 150, which is supported by the large values of the magnetic field strength obtained from our first estimates. The extre...

  17. An extreme ultraviolet excess in the superluminous supernova Gaia16apd reveals a powerful central engine

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholl, M; Margutti, R; Blanchard, P K; Milisavljevic, D; Challis, P; Metzger, B D; Chornock, R

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) in the last decade, it has been known that these events exhibit bluer spectral energy distributions than other supernova subtypes, with significant output in the ultraviolet. However, the event Gaia16apd seems to outshine even the other SLSNe at rest-frame wavelengths below $\\sim 3000$ \\AA. Yan et al (2016) have recently presented HST UV spectra and attributed the UV flux to low metallicity and hence reduced line blanketing. Here we present UV and optical light curves over a longer baseline in time, revealing a rapid decline at UV wavelengths despite a typical optical evolution. Combining the published UV spectra with our own optical data, we demonstrate that Gaia16apd has a much hotter continuum than virtually any SLSN at maximum light, but it cools rapidly thereafter and is indistinguishable from the others by $\\sim 10$-15 days after peak. Comparing the equivalent widths of UV absorption lines with those of other events, we show that the excess UV cont...

  18. Gaia16apd -- a link between fast-and slowly-declining type I superluminous supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kangas, T; Mattila, S; Lundqvist, P; Fraser, M; Hardy, L K; Stritzinger, M D; Cappellaro, E; Elias-Rosa, N; Harmanen, J; Hsiao, E Y; Kankare, E; Nielsen, M B; Reynolds, T M; Rhodes, L; Somero, A; Wyrzykowski, L

    2016-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical and infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of the type Ic superluminous supernova (SLSN) Gaia16apd, covering its evolution from 27 d before the $g$-band peak to the nebular phase, including the latest spectrum ever obtained for a fast-declining type Ic SLSN at 150.9 d. Gaia16apd is one of the closest SLSNe known ($z = 0.102\\pm0.001$), with detailed optical and \\emph{Swift} ultraviolet (UV) band observations covering the peak. Gaia16apd is a spectroscopically typical type Ic SLSN, exhibiting the characteristic blue early spectra with O {\\sc ii} absorption, and reaches a peak $M_{g} = -21.8 \\pm 0.1$ mag. However, photometrically it exhibits an evolution intermediate between the fast- and slowly-declining type Ic SLSNe, with an early evolution closer to the fast-declining events. It is unusually UV-bright even for a SLSN, reaching a non-$K$-corrected $M_{uvm2} \\simeq -23.2$ mag, the only other type Ic SLSN with similar UV brightness being SN 2010gx. This event highlights the...

  19. H i Absorption in the Steep-Spectrum Superluminal Quasar 3C 216.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlström; Vermeulen; Taylor; Conway

    1999-11-01

    The search for H i absorption in strong compact steep-spectrum sources is a natural way to probe the neutral gas contents in young radio sources. In turn, this may provide information about the evolution of powerful radio sources. The recently improved capabilities of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope have made it possible to detect a 0.31% (19 mJy) deep neutral atomic hydrogen absorption line associated with the steep-spectrum superluminal quasar 3C 216. The redshift (z=0.67) of the source shifts the frequency of the 21 cm line down to the ultra-high-frequency (UHF) band (850 MHz). The exact location of the H i-absorbing gas remains to be determined by spectral line VLBI observations at 850 MHz. We cannot exclude that the gas might be extended on galactic scales, but we think it is more likely to be located in the central kiloparsec. Constraints from the lack of X-ray absorption probably rule out obscuration of the core region, and we argue that the most plausible site for the H i absorption is in the jet-cloud interaction observed in this source.

  20. Polarimetry of the Superluminous Supernova LSQ14mo: No Evidence for Significant Deviations from Spherical Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloudas, Giorgos; Patat, Ferdinando; Maund, Justyn R.; Hsiao, Eric; Malesani, Daniele; Schulze, Steve; Contreras, Carlos; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Taddia, Francesco; Wheeler, J. Craig; Gorosabel, Javier

    2015-12-01

    We present the first polarimetric observations of a Type I superluminous supernova (SLSN). LSQ14mo was observed with VLT/FORS2 at five different epochs in the V band, with the observations starting before maximum light and spanning 26 days in the rest frame (z = 0.256). During this period, we do not detect any statistically significant evolution (\\lt 2σ ) in the Stokes parameters. The average values we obtain, corrected for interstellar polarization in the Galaxy, are Q = -0.01% (±0.15%) and U = -0.50% (±0.14%). This low polarization can be entirely due to interstellar polarization in the SN host galaxy. We conclude that, at least during the period of observations and at the optical depths probed, the photosphere of LSQ14mo does not present significant asymmetries, unlike most lower-luminosity hydrogen-poor SNe Ib/c. Alternatively, it is possible that we may have observed LSQ14mo from a special viewing angle. Supporting spectroscopy and photometry confirm that LSQ14mo is a typical SLSN I. Further studies of the polarization of Type I SLSNe are required to determine whether the low levels of polarization are a characteristic of the entire class and to also study the implications for the proposed explosion models.

  1. Host-Galaxy Properties of 32 Low-Redshift Superluminous Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Perley, Daniel A; Yan, Lin; Vreeswijk, Paul; De Cia, Annalisa; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Filippenko, Alexei V; Graham, Melissa L; Nugent, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    We present ultraviolet through near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the host galaxies of all superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory prior to 2013, and derive measurements of their luminosities, star-formation rates, stellar masses, and gas-phase metallicities. We find that Type I (hydrogen-poor) SLSNe are found almost exclusively in low-mass (M 0.5 Z_sun. Extremely low metallicities are not required, and indeed provide no further increase in the relative SLSN rate. Several SLSN-I hosts are undergoing vigorous starbursts, but this may simply be a side effect of metallicity dependence: dwarf galaxies tend to have bursty star-formation histories. Type-II (hydrogen-rich) SLSNe are found over the entire range of galaxy masses and metallicities, and their integrated properties do not suggest a strong preference for (or against) low-mass/low-metallicity galaxies. Two hosts exhibit unusual properties: PTF 10uhf is a Type I SLSN in a massive, luminous infrared galaxy at re...

  2. SN 2012aa - a transient between Type Ibc core-collapse and superluminous supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, R; Silverman, J M; Pastorello, A; Fransson, C; Drake, A; Taddia, F; Fremling, C; Kankare, E; Kumar, B; Cappellaro, E; Bose, S; Benetti, S; Filippenko, A V; Valenti, S; Nyholm, A; Ergon, M; Sutaria, F; Kumar, B; Pandey, S B; Nicholl, M; Garcia-Alvarez, D; Tomasella, L; Karamehmetoglu, E; Migotto, K

    2016-01-01

    Context: Research on supernovae (SNe) over the past decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are much more luminous (by $\\sim2$ mag) than canonical core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). These events with visual peak magnitudes $\\lesssim-21$ are called superluminous SNe (SLSNe). Aims: There are a few intermediate events which have luminosities between these two classes. Here we study one such object, SN 2012aa. Methods: The optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the event were conducted over a time span of about 120 days. Results: With V_abs at peak ~-20 mag, the SN is an intermediate-luminosity transient between regular SNe Ibc and SLSNe. It also exhibits an unusual secondary bump after the maximum in its light curve. We interpret this as a manifestation of SN-shock interaction with the CSM. If we would assume a $^{56}$Ni-powered ejecta, the bolometric light curve requires roughly 1.3 M_sun of $^{56}$Ni and an ejected mass of ~14 M_sun. This would also imply a high kin...

  3. Polarimetry of the superluminous supernova LSQ14mo: no evidence for significant deviations from spherical symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Leloudas, Giorgos; Maund, Justyn R; Hsiao, Eric; Malesani, Daniele; Schulze, Steve; Contreras, Carlos; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian D; Taddia, Francesco; Wheeler, J Craig; Gorosabel, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We present the first polarimetric observations of a Type I superluminous supernova (SLSN). LSQ14mo was observed with VLT/FORS2 at 5 different epochs in the V band, observations starting before maximum light and spanning 26 days in the rest-frame (z=0.256). During this period, we do not detect any statistically significant evolution (< 2$\\sigma$) in the Stokes parameters. The average values we obtain, corrected for interstellar polarisation in the Galaxy, are Q = -0.01% ($\\pm$ 0.15%) and U = - 0.50% ($\\pm$ 0.14%). This low polarisation can be entirely due to interstellar polarisation in the SN host galaxy. We conclude that, at least during the period of observations and at the optical depths probed, the photosphere of LSQ14mo does not present significant asymmetries, unlike most lower-luminosity hydrogen-poor SNe Ib/c. Alternatively, it is possible that we may have observed LSQ14mo from a special viewing angle. Supporting spectroscopy and photometry confirm that LSQ14mo is a typical SLSN I. Further studies ...

  4. Pulsational Pair-instability Model for Superluminous Supernova PTF12dam: Interaction and Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Blinnikov, Sergei; Sorokina, Elena; Quimby, Robert; Baklanov, Petr

    2017-02-01

    Being a superluminous supernova, PTF12dam can be explained by a 56Ni-powered model, a magnetar-powered model, or an interaction model. We propose that PTF12dam is a pulsational pair-instability supernova, where the outer envelope of a progenitor is ejected during the pulsations. Thus, it is powered by a double energy source: radioactive decay of 56Ni and a radiative shock in a dense circumstellar medium. To describe multicolor light curves and spectra, we use radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the STELLA code. We found that light curves are well described in the model with 40 M⊙ ejecta and 20–40 M⊙ circumstellar medium. The ejected 56Ni mass is about 6 M⊙, which results from explosive nucleosynthesis with large explosion energy (2–3) × 1052 erg. In comparison with alternative scenarios of pair-instability supernova and magnetar-powered supernova, in the interaction model, all the observed main photometric characteristics are well reproduced: multicolor light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities.

  5. Compared propagation characteristics of superluminal and slow light in SOA and EDFA based on rectangle signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Sun, Zhenchao; Mao, Yaya; Liu, Lanlan; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Based on the general mechanism of the coherent population oscillations (CPO) in the Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) and Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), the group time delay of rectangle signal propagating in the active media is deduced. Compared with the sinusoidal signal, the time delay difference between the fundamental harmonics (FHFD: fundamental harmonic fractional delay) is first investigated in detail for the rectangle signal which is more popularly used in the digital signal systems. The plenty of simulations based on the propagation equations and some experiments for the sinusoidal and rectangle signals are used to analyze the differences and evaluate the slow and superluminal light effects. Furthermore, the time delay/advance always takes place accompanying with the signal distortion, which is evaluated by the total harmonic distortion (THD). The distortion caused by the SOA is smaller than that by the EDFA. A factor Q which is defined to evaluate the trade-off between the FHFD and the THD, shows that higher input power or higher optical gain is better for optical signal processing and optical telecommunications, and the SOA is more suitable for the higher modulation frequency (>10 GHz).

  6. A Triple-energy-source Model for Superluminous Supernova iPTF13ehe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. Q.; Liu, L. D.; Dai, Z. G.; Wang, L. J.; Wu, X. F.

    2016-09-01

    Almost all superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) whose peak magnitudes are ≲ -21 mag can be explained by the 56Ni-powered model, the magnetar-powered (highly magnetized pulsar) model, or the ejecta-circumstellar medium (CSM) interaction model. Recently, iPTF13ehe challenged these energy-source models, because the spectral analysis shows that ˜ 2.5{M}⊙ of 56Ni have been synthesized, but are inadequate to power the peak bolometric emission of iPTF13ehe, while the rebrightening of the late-time light curve (LC) and the Hα emission lines indicate that the ejecta-CSM interaction must play a key role in powering the late-time LC. Here we propose a triple-energy-source model, in which a magnetar together with some amount (≲ 2.5{M}⊙ ) of 56Ni may power the early LC of iPTF13ehe, while the late-time rebrightening can be quantitatively explained by an ejecta-CSM interaction. Furthermore, we suggest that iPTF13ehe is a genuine core-collapse supernova rather than a pulsational pair-instability supernova candidate. Further studies on similar SLSNe in the future would eventually shed light on their explosion and energy-source mechanisms.

  7. DES13S2cmm: The First Superluminous Supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, A; Sullivan, M; Nichol, R C; Barbary, K; Biswas, R; Brown, P J; Covarrubias, R A; Finley, D A; Fischer, J A; Foley, R F; Goldstein, D; Gupta, R R; Kessler, R; Kovacs, E; Kuhlmann, S E; Lidman, C; March, M; Nugent, P E; Sako, M; Smith, R C; Spinka, H; Wester, W; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F; Allam, S S; Banerji, M; Bernstein, J P; Bernstein, R A; Carnero, A; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Eifler, T; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J A; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J L; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roe, N A; Romer, A K; Rykoff, E; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B X; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Santos, M Soares-; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D L; Wechsler, R H; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 +/- 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find M_U_peak = -21.05 +0.10 -0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass host galaxy (log(M/M_sun) = 9.3 +/- 0.3); consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the b...

  8. Comments on Musha's theorem that an evanescent photon in the microtubule is a superluminal particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Syamala D

    2014-07-01

    Takaaki Musha's research of high performance quantum computation in living systems is motivated by the theories of Penrose and Hameroff that microtubules in the brain function as quantum computers, and by those of Jibu and Yasue that the quantum states of microtubules depend upon boson condensates of evanescent photons. His work is based on the assumption that the evanescent photons described by Jibu et al. are superluminal and that they are tachyons defined and discussed by well-known physicists such as Sudarshan, Feinberg and Recami. Musha gives a brief justification for the assumption and sometimes calls it a theorem. However, the assumption is not valid because Jibu et al. stated that the evanescent photons have transmission speed smaller than that of light and that their mass is real and momentum is imaginary whereas a tachyon's mass is imaginary and momentum is real. We show here that Musha's proof of the "theorem" has errors and hence his theorem/assumption is not valid. This article is not meant to further discuss any biological aspects of the brain but only to comment on the consistency of the quantum-physical aspects of earlier work by Musha et al.

  9. SN 2015bn: a detailed multi-wavelength view of a nearby superluminous supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholl, M; Smartt, S J; Margutti, R; Kamble, A; Alexander, K D; Chen, T -W; Inserra, C; Arcavi, I; Blanchard, P K; Cartier, R; Chambers, K C; Childress, M J; Chornock, R; Cowperthwaite, P S; Drout, M; Flewelling, H A; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Galbany, L; Harmanen, J; Holoien, T W -S; Hosseinzadeh, G; Howell, D A; Huber, M E; Jerkstrand, A; Kankare, E; Kochanek, C S; Lin, Z -Y; Lunnan, R; Magnier, E A; Maguire, K; McCully, C; McDonald, M; Metzger, B D; Milisavljevic, D; Mitra, A; Reynolds, T; Saario, J; Shappee, B J; Smith, K W; Valenti, S; Villar, V A; Waters, C; Young, D R

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of SN 2015bn (= PS15ae = CSS141223-113342+004332 = MLS150211-113342+004333), a Type I superluminous supernova (SLSN) at $z=0.1136$. As well as being one of the closest SLSNe, it is intrinsically brighter ($M_U\\approx-23.1$) and in a fainter host ($M_B\\approx-16.0$) than other SLSNe at $z\\sim0.1$. We collected the most extensive dataset for an SLSN I to date, including spectroscopy and UV to NIR photometry from $-$50 to +250 d from maximum light. SN 2015bn is a slowly-declining SLSN, but exhibits surprising undulations in the light curve on a timescale of 30-50 d, which are more pronounced in the UV. The spectrum resembles other SLSNe, but our well-sampled data reveal extraordinarily slow evolution except for a rapid transformation between +7 and +30 d. We detect weak features that we tentatively suggest may be hydrogen and helium. At late times, blue colours and a trio of lines around 6000 \\AA\\ seem to distinguish slowly-declining SLSNe from faster ones. We derive physical properties i...

  10. Experimental demonstration of a new radiation mechanism: emission by an oscillating, accelerated, superluminal polarization current

    CERN Document Server

    Ardavan, A; Ardavan, H; Fopma, J; Halliday, D; Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    We describe the experimental implementation of a superluminal ({\\it i.e.} faster than light {\\it in vacuo}) polarization current distribution that both oscillates and undergoes centripetal acceleration. Theoretical treatments lead one to expect that the radiation emitted from each volume element of such a polarization current will comprise a \\v{C}erenkov-like envelope with two sheets that meet along a cusp. The emission from the experimental machine is in good agreement with these expectations, the combined effect of the volume elements leading to tightly-defined beams of a well-defined geometry, determined by the source speed and trajectory. In addition, over a restricted range of angles, we detect the presence of cusps in the emitted radiation. These are due to the detection over a short time period (in the laboratory frame) of radiation emitted over a considerably longer period of source time. Consequently, the intensity of the radiation at these angles was observed to decline more slowly with increasing d...

  11. Observation of wave generation and non-local perturbations in the atmosphere during the passage of a typhoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Anandan; V N Sureshbabu; C J Pan; S Vijayabhaskara Rao

    2013-06-01

    During the passage of typhoon Kujira in April 2003 near to the northeast of Taiwan, atmospheric radar at Chung-Li (24° 58′N, 121° 11′E) was continuously operated. The data collected from profiler radar was used to investigate the impact of typhoon on generating waves and other atmospheric disturbances. Result showed that the typhoon and the associated wind disturbances can generate atmospheric waves with varied periodicity even when the core was far away from the land. The waves were quite prominent when the core was closer to the mountain. Observations show that these waves propagate vertically upward for many kilometers and getting trapped in higher altitudes. The radar reflectivity at the tropopause during the event showed that stable layer structure was very weak. Further, the enhancement in ozone measurement at the ground level was observed when the typhoon was near to radar site.

  12. 环境温度对指端容积脉搏波检测精度的影响%Effect of local temperature on the detecting for pulse wave of local blood volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高鑫; 闫亭亭; 邵常哲; 杨琳; 张松; 杨益民

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨环境温度对指端容积脉搏波的影响.方法 用凉水将32名受试者手指温度降至20℃,检测其容积脉搏波,并用温度计实时检测温度,记录波形,至手指温度恢复到实验前测量数值.结果 当被测部位温度在26~31℃时,所获得的容积脉搏波参数K′、K1′、K2′及容积脉搏波幅值均无显著差异.结论 当手指温度高于26℃时可进行指端容积脉搏波的检测,在26~31℃检测获得的容积脉搏波的基本参数无显著差异.%To investigate the effect of temperature on subjected part in pulse wave of local blood volume measurement. Methods When the 32 experimenters' finger temperature fall below 20 ℃ , their pulse waves of local blood volume are recorded until the temperature returns to the original and the temperature of finger are real-time detected. Results While the temperature of subjected part ranges from 26℃ to 31℃, the parameters of K', Kt', K2'and the amplitude of pulse wave are unchanged. Conclusions Only if the finger temperature is in the range of 26℃to 31℃ , can the pulse wave of local blood volume be measured.

  13. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  14. Lapse-time dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-07-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: firstly, we evaluate the contribution of surface and body wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Secondly, we compare the lapse-time behavior in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  15. Nonlinear local parallel acceleration of electrons through Landau trapping by oblique whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Artemyev, Anton; Mourenas, Didier; Mozer, Forrest; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous observations of electron velocity distributions and chorus waves by the Van Allen Probe B are analyzed to identify long-lasting (more than 6 h) signatures of electron Landau resonant interactions with oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt. Such Landau resonant interactions result in the trapping of ˜1-10 keV electrons and their acceleration up to 100-300 keV. This kind of process becomes important for oblique whistler mode waves having a significant electric field component along the background magnetic field. In the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, such resonant interactions then lead to the formation of a plateau in the parallel (with respect to the geomagnetic field) velocity distribution due to trapping of electrons into the wave effective potential. We demonstrate that the electron energy corresponding to the observed plateau remains in very good agreement with the energy required for Landau resonant interaction with the simultaneously measured oblique chorus waves over 6 h and a wide range of L shells (from 4 to 6) in the outer belt. The efficient parallel acceleration modifies electron pitch angle distributions at energies ˜50-200 keV, allowing us to distinguish the energized population. The observed energy range and the density of accelerated electrons are in reasonable agreement with test particle numerical simulations.

  16. Some aspects of dispersive horizons: lessons from surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chaline, J; Maïssa, P; Rousseaux, G

    2012-01-01

    Hydrodynamic surface waves propagating on a moving background flow experience an effective curved space-time. We discuss experiments with gravity waves and capillary-gravity waves in which we study hydrodynamic black/white-hole horizons and the possibility of penetrating across them. Such possibility of penetration is due to the interaction with an additional "blue" horizon, which results from the inclusion of surface tension in the low-frequency gravity-wave theory. This interaction leads to a dispersive cusp beyond which both horizons completely disappear. We speculate the appearance of high-frequency "superluminal" corrections to be a universal characteristic of analogue gravity systems, and discuss their relevance for the trans-Planckian problem. We also discuss the role of Airy interference in hybridising the incoming waves with the flowing background (the effective spacetime) and blurring the position of the black/white-hole horizon.

  17. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall.

  18. THE HOST GALAXY OF THE SUPER-LUMINOUS SN 2010gx AND LIMITS ON EXPLOSIVE {sup 56}Ni PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ting-Wan; Smartt, Stephen J.; Kotak, Rubina; McCrum, Matt; Fraser, Morgan [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Pastorello, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Valenti, Stefano [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Super-luminous supernovae have a tendency to occur in faint host galaxies which are likely to have low mass and low metallicity. While these extremely luminous explosions have been observed from z = 0.1 to 1.55, the closest explosions allow more detailed investigations of their host galaxies. We present a detailed analysis of the host galaxy of SN 2010gx (z = 0.23), one of the best studied super-luminous type Ic supernovae. The host is a dwarf galaxy (M{sub g} = -17.42 {+-} 0.17) with a high specific star formation rate. It has a remarkably low metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) = 7.5 {+-} 0.1 dex as determined from the detection of the [O III] {lambda}4363 line. This is the first reliable metallicity determination of a super-luminous stripped-envelope supernova host. We collected deep multi-epoch imaging with Gemini + GMOS between 240 and 560 days after explosion to search for any sign of radioactive {sup 56}Ni, which might provide further insights on the explosion mechanism and the progenitor's nature. We reach griz magnitudes of m{sub AB} {approx} 26, but do not detect SN 2010gx at these epochs. The limit implies that any {sup 56}Ni production was similar to or below that of SN 1998bw (a luminous type Ic SN that produced around 0.4 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni). The low volumetric rates of these supernovae ({approx}10{sup -4} of the core-collapse population) could be qualitatively matched if the explosion mechanism requires a combination of low-metallicity (below 0.2 Z{sub Sun }), high progenitor mass (>60 M{sub Sun }) and high rotation rate (fastest 10% of rotators).

  19. Second harmonic generation in metal nano-spheres: full-wave analytical solution with both local-surface and nonlocal-bulk nonlinear sources

    CERN Document Server

    Capretti, Antonio; Negro, Luca Dal; Miano, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-wave analytical solution for the problem of second-harmonic generation from spherical particles made of lossy centrosymmetric materials. Both the local-surface and nonlocalbulk nonlinear sources are included in the generation process, under the undepleted-pump approximation. The solution is derived in the framework of the Mie theory by expanding the pump field, the non-linear sources and the second-harmonic fields in series of spherical vector wave functions. We apply the proposed solution to the second-harmonic generation properties of noble metal nano-spheres as function of the polarization, the pump wavelength and the particle size. This approach provides a rigorous methodology to understand second-order optical processes in metal nanoparticles, and to design novel nanoplasmonic devices in the nonlinear regime.

  20. The superluminous supernova PS1-11ap: bridging the gap between low and high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrum, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Kotak, R.; Rest, A.; Jerkstrand, A.; Inserra, C.; Rodney, S. A.; Chen, T.-W.; Howell, D. A.; Huber, M. E.; Pastorello, A.; Tonry, J. L.; Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Smith, K.; Botticella, M. T.; Foley, R. J.; Fraser, M.; Milisavljevic, D.; Nicholl, M.; Riess, A. G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Valenti, S.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wright, D.; Young, D. R.; Drout, M.; Czekala, I.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic coverage of the superluminous supernova (SLSN) PS1-11ap, discovered with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey at z = 0.524. This intrinsically blue transient rose slowly to reach a peak magnitude of Mu = -21.4 mag and bolometric luminosity of 8 × 1043 erg s-1 before settling on to a relatively shallow gradient of decline. The observed decline is significantly slower than those of the SLSNe-Ic which have been the focus of much recent attention. Spectroscopic similarities with the lower redshift SN2007bi and a decline rate similar to 56Co decay time-scale initially indicated that this transient could be a candidate for a pair instability supernova (PISN) explosion. Overall the transient appears quite similar to SN2007bi and the lower redshift object PTF12dam. The extensive data set, from 30 d before peak to 230 d after, allows a detailed and quantitative comparison with published models of PISN explosions. We find that the PS1-11ap data do not match these model explosion parameters well, supporting the recent claim that these SNe are not pair instability explosions. We show that PS1-11ap has many features in common with the faster declining SLSNe-Ic, and the light-curve evolution can also be quantitatively explained by the magnetar spin-down model. At a redshift of z = 0.524, the observer-frame optical coverage provides comprehensive rest-frame UV data and allows us to compare it with the SLSNe recently found at high redshifts between z = 2 and 4. While these high-z explosions are still plausible PISN candidates, they match the photometric evolution of PS1-11ap and hence could be counterparts to this lower redshift transient.