WorldWideScience

Sample records for superlattice nanowire pattern

  1. Magnetic Bloch oscillations in nanowire superlattice rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, D S

    2004-05-14

    The recent growth of semiconductor nanowire superlattices encourages hope that Bloch-like oscillations in such structures formed into rings may soon be observed in the presence of a time-dependent magnetic flux threading the ring. These magnetic Bloch oscillations are a consequence of Faraday's law; the time-dependent flux produces an electromotive force around the ring, thus leading to the Bloch-like oscillations. In the spectroscopic domain, generalized Wannier-Stark states are found that are manifestations of the emf-induced localization of the states.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivities of superlattice nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨决宽; 陈云飞; 颜景平

    2003-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate heat transfer in superlattice nanowires. Results show that for fixed period length superlattice nanowires, the ratio of the total interfacial thermal resistance to the total thermal resistance and the effective thermal conductivities are invariant with the changes in interface numbers. Increasing the period length leads to an increase in the average interfacial thermal resistance, which indicates that the interfacial thermal resistance depends not only on the materials that constitute the alternating segments of superlattice nanowires, but also on the lattice strain throughout the segments. The modification of the lattice structure due to the lattice mismatch should be taken into account in the acoustic mismatch model. Simulation results also demonstrated the size confinement effect on the thermal conductivities for low dimensional structures, i.e. the thermal conductivities and the interfacial thermal resistance increase as the nanowire cross-sectional area increases.

  3. Nonlinear thermoelectric efficiency of superlattice-structured nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbaschi, Hossein; Lovén, John; Courteaut, Klara; Wacker, Andreas; Leijnse, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate nonlinear ballistic thermoelectric transport in a superlattice-structured nanowire. By a special choice of nonuniform widths of the superlattice barriers—analogous to antireflection coating in optical systems—it is possible to achieve a transmission which comes close to a square profile as a function of energy. We calculate the low-temperature output power and power-conversion efficiency of a thermoelectric generator based on such a structure and show that the efficiency remains high also when operating at a significant power. To provide guidelines for experiments, we study how the results depend on the nanowire radius, the number of barriers, and on random imperfections in barrier width and separation. Our results indicate that high efficiencies can indeed be achieved with today's capabilities in epitaxial nanowire growth.

  4. Optical Properties of Rotationally Twinned Nanowire Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Jiming; Bell, David C.; Capasso, Federico

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a technique so that both transmission electron microscopy and microphotoluminescence can be performed on the same semiconductor nanowire over a large range of optical power, thus allowing us to directly correlate structural and optical properties of rotationally twinned zinc ble...

  5. Molecular dynamics study of the lattice thermal conductivity of Kr/Ar superlattice nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yunfei; Li Deyu; Yang Juekuan; Wu Yonghua; Lukes, J.R.; Majumdar, Arun

    2004-06-15

    The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method has been used to calculate the lattice thermal conductivities of Ar and Kr/Ar nanostructures in order to study the effects of interface scattering, boundary scattering, and elastic strain on lattice thermal conductivity. Results show that interface scattering poses significant resistance to phonon transport in superlattices and superlattice nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the Kr/Ar superlattice nanowire is only about ((1)/(3)) of that for pure Ar nanowires with the same cross-sectional area and total length due to the additional interfacial thermal resistance. It is found that nanowire boundary scattering provides significant resistance to phonon transport. As the cross-sectional area increases, the nanowire boundary scattering decreases, which leads to increased nanowire thermal conductivity. The ratio of the interfacial thermal resistance to the total effective thermal resistance increases from 30% for the superlattice nanowire to 42% for the superlattice film. Period length is another important factor affecting the effective thermal conductivity of the nanostructures. Increasing the period length will lead to increased acoustic mismatch between the adjacent layers, and hence increased interfacial thermal resistance. However, if the total length of the superlattice nanowire is fixed, reducing the period length will lead to decreased effective thermal conductivity due to the increased number of interfaces. Finally, it is found that the interfacial thermal resistance decreases as the reference temperature increases, which might be due to the inelastic interface scattering.

  6. Spin Filtering in a Nanowire Superlattice by Dresselhause Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samad Javidan

    2011-01-01

    @@ An InAs/GaSb nanowire Superlattice using GaAs for the impure layers is proposed.Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling eliminates spin degeneracy, induces one miniband in the superlattices to split into two minibands and leads to complete spin polarization and excellent filtering by optimizing the well and barrier widths and GaAs layer distances.

  7. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengxiang

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M1 = silver or nickel) layer, 5 - 100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut ≈300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of theM1 layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M2 is electrodeposited (M2 = gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M1 layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 um sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowirenanowire junctions. The resistance, R, of single gold nanowires was measured in situ during electrooxidation in aqueous 0.10 M sulfuric acid. Electrooxidation caused the formation of a gold oxide that is approximately 0.8 monolayers (ML) in thickness at +1.1 V vs saturated mercurous sulfate reference electrode (MSE) based upon coulometry and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. As the gold nanowires were electrooxidized, R increased by an amount that depended on the wire thickness, ranging from

  8. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10-5 Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  9. Shape-controlled synthesis of palladium and copper superlattice nanowires for high-stability hydrogen sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dachi; Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Fonseca, Luis F.; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin; Hunter, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    For hydrogen sensors built with pure Pd nanowires, the instabilities causing baseline drifting and temperature-driven sensing behavior are limiting factors when working within a wide temperature range. To enhance the material stability, we have developed superlattice-structured palladium and copper nanowires (PdCu NWs) with random-gapped, screw-threaded, and spiral shapes achieved by wet-chemical approaches. The microstructure of the PdCu NWs reveals novel superlattices composed of lattice groups structured by four-atomic layers of alternating Pd and Cu. Sensors built with these modified NWs show significantly reduced baseline drifting and lower critical temperature (259.4 K and 261 K depending on the PdCu structure) for the reverse sensing behavior than those with pure Pd NWs (287 K). Moreover, the response and recovery times of the PdCu NWs sensor were of ~9 and ~7 times faster than for Pd NWs sensors, respectively.

  10. Ultra-low Thermal Conductivity in Si/Ge Hierarchical Superlattice Nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xin; Wang, Lili; Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Pu; To, Albert C; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-11-16

    Due to interfacial phonon scattering and nanoscale size effect, silicon/germanium (Si/Ge) superlattice nanowire (SNW) can have very low thermal conductivity, which is very attractive for thermoelectrics. In this paper, we demonstrate using molecular dynamics simulations that the already low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge SNW can be further reduced by introducing hierarchical structure to form Si/Ge hierarchical superlattice nanowire (H-SNW). The structural hierarchy introduces defects to disrupt the periodicity of regular SNW and scatters coherent phonons, which are the key contributors to thermal transport in regular SNW. Our simulation results show that periodically arranged defects in Si/Ge H-SNW lead to a ~38% reduction of the already low thermal conductivity of regular Si/Ge SNW. By randomizing the arrangement of defects and imposing additional surface complexities to enhance phonon scattering, further reduction in thermal conductivity can be achieved. Compared to pure Si nanowire, the thermal conductivity reduction of Si/Ge H-SNW can be as large as ~95%. It is concluded that the hierarchical structuring is an effective way of reducing thermal conductivity significantly in SNW, which can be a promising path for improving the efficiency of Si/Ge-based SNW thermoelectrics.

  11. Low-Temperature Thermal Conductance in Superlattice Nanowire with Structural Defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Jun; LIU Jing-Feng; LI Shui

    2008-01-01

    Using the scattering-matrix cascading method, we investigate the effect of structural defect on the acoustic phonon transmission and thermal conductance in the superlattice nanowire at low temperatures. In the present system, the phonon transmissions exhibit quite complex oscillatory behaviour. It is found that a lateral defect in an otherwise periodic structure significantly decrease the thermal conductance and completely washes away the transmission quantization. However, the appreciable transmission quantization survives in the presence of a longitudinal defect whereas a good quantization plateau of thermal conductance emerges below the universal level in a wide temperature range with the lateral defect.

  12. Shape-controlled synthesis of palladium and copper superlattice nanowires for high-stability hydrogen sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dachi; Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Fonseca, Luis F; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin; Hunter, Gary W

    2014-01-20

    For hydrogen sensors built with pure Pd nanowires, the instabilities causing baseline drifting and temperature-driven sensing behavior are limiting factors when working within a wide temperature range. To enhance the material stability, we have developed superlattice-structured palladium and copper nanowires (PdCu NWs) with random-gapped, screw-threaded, and spiral shapes achieved by wet-chemical approaches. The microstructure of the PdCu NWs reveals novel superlattices composed of lattice groups structured by four-atomic layers of alternating Pd and Cu. Sensors built with these modified NWs show significantly reduced baseline drifting and lower critical temperature (259.4 K and 261 K depending on the PdCu structure) for the reverse sensing behavior than those with pure Pd NWs (287 K). Moreover, the response and recovery times of the PdCu NWs sensor were of ~9 and ~7 times faster than for Pd NWs sensors, respectively.

  13. Binding energy of exciton in a nanowire superlattice in magnetic and electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvan-Moya, J E; Gutierrez, W [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia A.A. 678 (Colombia); Moscoso, C, E-mail: edogalvan@gmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia A.A. 5997 (Colombia)

    2010-02-01

    We study the binding energy of excitons in a cylindrical GaAs/Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As nanowire superlattice, embedded in Ga{sub 1-y}Al{sub y}As matrix, in the presence of magnetic and electric fields applied parallel to the growth direction. We express the exciton trial function as a product of one-particle wave functions of the electron and the hole with variationally determined envelope function, which describes the exciton intrinsic properties and depends only on the electron-hole separation. By using a functional derivative technique, we derive a differential equation for this envelope function, which we solve numerically. By varying the wire radius, interwell barrier width and well sizes we obtain binding energies ranging in character from one for strongly coupled superlattice to that for a system of stack of isolated disks. The behaviour of the binding energies and the charge distributions as functions of the interwell coupling, well sizes, and the external fields is consistently described with our simple formalism.

  14. Intrinsic nanotwin effect on thermal boundary conductance in bulk and single-nanowire twinning superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Aaron; Tran, Chan; Sansoz, Frederic

    2016-05-01

    Coherent twin boundaries form periodic lamellar twinning in a wide variety of semiconductor nanowires, and they are often viewed as near-perfect interfaces with reduced phonon and electron scattering behaviors. Such unique characteristics are of practical interest for high-performance thermoelectrics and optoelectronics; however, insufficient understanding of twin-size effects on thermal boundary resistance poses significant limitations for potential applications. Here, using atomistic simulations and ab initio calculations, we report direct computational observations showing a crossover from diffuse interface scattering to superlatticelike behavior for thermal transport across nanoscale twin boundaries present in prototypical bulk and nanowire Si examples. Intrinsic interface scattering is identified for twin periods ≥22.6 nm, but it also vanishes below this size to be replaced by ultrahigh Kapitza thermal conductances. Detailed analysis of vibrational modes shows that modeling twin boundaries as atomically thin 6 H -Si layers, rather than phonon scattering interfaces, provides an accurate description of effective cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities in twinning superlattices, as a function of the twin period thickness.

  15. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition: a method for patterning electrically continuous metal nanowires on dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chenxiang; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Taggart, David K; Yang, Fan; Thompson, Michael A; Güell, Aleix G; Yang, Yongan; Penner, Reginald M

    2008-09-23

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M(1)=silver or nickel) layer, 5-100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A (+) photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut approximately 300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of the M(1) layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M(2) is electrodeposited (M(2)=gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M(1) layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 microm sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowire-nanowire junctions.

  16. Coupled multiphysics, barrier localization, and critical radius effects in embedded nanowire superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick; Bonilla, Luis L.

    2013-06-01

    The new contribution of this paper is to develop a cylindrical representation of an already known multiphysics model for embedded nanowire superlattices (NWSLs) of wurtzite structure that includes a coupled, strain dependent 8-band k .p Hamiltonian in cylindrical coordinates and investigate the influence of coupled piezo-electromechanical effects on the barrier localization and critical radius in such NWSLs. The coupled piezo-electromechanical model for semiconductor materials takes into account the strain, piezoelectric effects, and spontaneous polarization. Based on the developed 3D model, the band structures of electrons (holes) obtained from results of modeling in Cartesian coordinates are in good agreement with those values obtained from our earlier developed 2D model in cylindrical coordinates. Several parameters such as lattice mismatch, piezo-electric fields, valence, and conduction band offsets at the heterojunction of AlxGa1-xN/GaN superlattice can be varied as a function of the Al mole fraction. When the band offsets at the heterojunction of AlxGa1-xN/GaN are very small and the influence of the piezo-electromechanical effects can be minimized, then the barrier material can no longer be treated as an infinite potential well. In this situation, it is possible to visualize the penetration of the Bloch wave function into the barrier material that provides an estimation of critical radii of NWSLs. In this case, the NWSLs can act as inversion layers. Finally, we investigate the influence of symmetry of the square and cylindrical NWSLs on the band structures of electrons in the conduction band.

  17. Harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG LiFang; XIE WeiXia; ZHAO HaiTao; FAN WeiLi

    2009-01-01

    We report a harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in air/argon mixture at atmospheric pressure.The bifurcation scenario of harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern with the applied voltage increasing is given.The phase diagram of the pattern types as a function of the applied voltage and the air-concentration is obtained.The hysteresis of pattern transitions at the upward and downward stage of the applied voltage is observed.The correlation measurements indicate that harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern is an interleaving of two different transient sublattices.The spatial power spectrum demonstrates that harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern has two separate wave vectors.Both small wave vector qh and big wave vector Kh,belong to the harmonic mode,and they obey a triad resonant interaction q1h + q2h,=Kh.

  18. Surface Patterning and Nanowire Biosensor Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the preparation and characterization of three systems where surfaces of solid matter are interfaced with organic and biomolecular components, with the aim of creating (I) Patterned surfaces and (II) Functional nanowire sensor platforms for bionanotechnological applications...... assembled monolayer on gold, a technique useful for creating diverse monolayer patterns in a direct-write fashion. Addition of a second alkanethiol forms a topologically ultra flat but chemically patterned surface, which by inspection with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed...

  19. Fabrication of patterned polymer nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hao; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Su; Han, Ray P S; Das, Suman; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2011-02-22

    A method for the large-scale fabrication of patterned organic nanowire (NW) arrays is demonstrated by the use of laser interference patterning (LIP) in conjunction with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching. The NW arrays can be fabricated after a short ICP etching of periodic patterns produced through LIP. Arrays of NWs have been fabricated in UV-absorbent polymers, such as PET (polyethylene terephthalate) and Dura film (76% polyethylene and 24% polycarbonate), through laser interference photon ablation and in UV transparent polymers such as PVA (polyvinyl acetate) and PP (polypropylene) through laser interference lithography of a thin layer of photoresist coated atop the polymer surface. The dependence of the structure and morphology of NWs as a function of initial pattern created by LIP and the laser energy dose in LIP is discussed. The absence of residual photoresist atop the NWs in UV-transparent polymers is confirmed through Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Transport in semiconductor nanowire superlattices described by coupled quantum mechanical and kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, M; Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Melnik, R V N; Prabhakar, S

    2013-08-21

    In this paper we develop a kinetic model for the analysis of semiconductor superlattices, accounting for quantum effects. The model consists of a Boltzmann-Poisson type system of equations with simplified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisions, obtained from the general time-dependent Schrödinger-Poisson model using Wigner functions. This system for superlattice transport is supplemented by the quantum mechanical part of the model based on the Ben-Daniel-Duke form of the Schrödinger equation for a cylindrical superlattice of finite radius. The resulting energy spectrum is used to characterize the Fermi-Dirac distribution that appears in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision, thereby coupling the quantum mechanical and kinetic parts of the model. The kinetic model uses the dispersion relation obtained by the generalized Kronig-Penney method, and allows us to estimate radii of quantum wire superlattices that have the same miniband widths as in experiments. It also allows us to determine more accurately the time-dependent characteristics of superlattices, in particular their current density. Results, for several experimentally grown superlattices, are discussed in the context of self-sustained coherent oscillations of the current density which are important in an increasing range of current and potential applications.

  1. High-density gold nanowire arrays by lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujdic, Justin E; Sargisian, Alan P; Shao, Jingru; Ye, Tao; Menke, Erik J

    2011-07-01

    Here we describe a new method for preparing multiple arrays of parallel gold nanowires with dimensions and separation down to 50 nm. This method uses photolithography to prepare an electrode consisting of a patterned nickel film on glass, onto which a gold and nickel nanowire array is sequentially electrodeposited. After the electrodeposition, the nickel is stripped away, leaving behind a gold nanowire array, with dimensions governed by the gold electrodeposition parameters, spacing determined by the nickel electrodeposition parameters, and overall placement and shape dictated by the photolithography.

  2. Simple and Superlattice Turing Patterns in Reaction-Diffusion Systems Bifurcation, Bistability, and Parameter Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, S L; Judd, Stephen L.; Silber, Mary

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the competition between both simple (e.g. stripes, hexagons) and ``superlattice'' (super squares, super hexagons) Turing patterns in two-component reaction-diffusion systems. ``Superlattice'' patterns are formed from eight or twelve Fourier modes, and feature structure at two different length scales. Using perturbation theory, we derive simple analytical expressions for the bifurcation equation coefficients on both rhombic and hexagonal lattices. These expressions show that, no matter how complicated the reaction kinectics, the nonlinear reaction terms reduce to just four effective terms within the bifurcation equation coefficients. Moreover, at the hexagonal degeneracy -- when the quadratic term in the hexagonal bifurcation equation disappears -- the number of effective system parameters drops to two, allowing a complete characterization of the possible bifurcation results at this degeneracy. The general results are then applied to specific model equations, to investigate the stabilit...

  3. Formation mechanism of dot-line square superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang, E-mail: donglfhbu@163.com, E-mail: pyy1616@163.com; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Xinpu [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Pan, Yuyang, E-mail: donglfhbu@163.com, E-mail: pyy1616@163.com [College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the formation mechanism of the dot-line square superlattice pattern (DLSSP) in dielectric barrier discharge. The spatio-temporal structure studied by using the intensified-charge coupled device camera shows that the DLSSP is an interleaving of three different subpatterns in one half voltage cycle. The dot square lattice discharges first and, then, the two kinds of line square lattices, which form square grid structures discharge twice. When the gas pressure is varied, DLSSP can transform from square superlattice pattern (SSP). The spectral line profile method is used to compare the electron densities, which represent the amounts of surface charges qualitatively. It is found that the amount of surface charges accumulated by the first discharge of DLSSP is less than that of SSP, leading to a bigger discharge area of the following discharge (lines of DLSSP instead of halos of SSP). The spatial distribution of the electric field of the surface charges is simulated to explain the formation of DLSSP. This paper may provide a deeper understanding for the formation mechanism of complex superlattice patterns in DBD.

  4. Selective MBE-growth of GaN nanowires on patterned substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, Timo; Gotschke, Tobias; Stoica, Toma; Limbach, Friedrich; Calarco, Raffaella [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Center Juelich GmbH (Germany); JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Self assembled III-nitride nanowires are promising candidates for optoelectronic devices. The precise control of size and position of the nanowires is crucial for further applications. We demonstrate the selective growth of arranged GaN nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on an AlN buffer. The position of each nanowire is controlled by a thin silicon oxide mask, patterned by electron beam lithography. The dependence of selectivity and nanowire morphology on the growth parameters and mask properties are investigated. We change the substrate temperature and the Ga-flux, retaining nitrogen rich conditions, which are suitable for self-assembled nanowire growth. Samples with different masks are produced, varying the thickness and the layout. The diameter of the holes and their distance from each other vary across the pattern. We discuss the influence of these parameters on the nanowire growth and morphology.

  5. Surface Patterning and Nanowire Biosensor Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    surface. A central limitation to this biosensor principle is the screening of analyte charge by mobile ions in electrolytes with physiological ionic strength. To overcome this problem, we propose to use as capture agents proteins which undergo large conformational changes. Using structure based protein...... be biofunctionalized, integrated in FETs, and used to detect charged species, as shown for H+ ions for pH sensing....... assembly on e.g. glass surfaces, providing parallel patterning via gentle and oriented protein immobilization. Such protein patterns are useful for miniaturized bioassays of protein function. Second, in a very different approach, we use a highly focused laser beam to locally desorb alkanethiols from a self...

  6. Shear Alignment of Diblock Copolymers for Patterning Nanowire Meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Kyle T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Metallic nanowire meshes are useful as cheap, flexible alternatives to indium tin oxide – an expensive, brittle material used in transparent conductive electrodes. We have fabricated nanowire meshes over areas up to 2.5 cm2 by: 1) mechanically aligning parallel rows of diblock copolymer (diBCP) microdomains; 2) selectively infiltrating those domains with metallic ions; 3) etching away the diBCP template; 4) sintering to reduce ions to metal nanowires; and, 5) repeating steps 1 – 4 on the same sample at a 90° offset. We aligned parallel rows of polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) [PS(48.5 kDa)-b-P2VP(14.5 kDa)] microdomains by heating above its glass transition temperature (Tg ≈ 100°C), applying mechanical shear pressure (33 kPa) and normal force (13.7 N), and cooling below Tg. DiBCP samples were submerged in aqueous solutions of metallic ions (15 – 40 mM ions; 0.1 – 0.5 M HCl) for 30 – 90 minutes, which coordinate to nitrogen in P2VP. Subsequent ozone-etching and sintering steps yielded parallel nanowires. We aimed to optimize alignment parameters (e.g. shear and normal pressures, alignment duration, and PDMS thickness) to improve the quality, reproducibility, and scalability of meshes. We also investigated metals other than Pt and Au that may be patterned using this technique (Cu, Ag).

  7. Study on hexagonal super-lattice pattern with surface discharges in dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Lifang; Niu, Xuejiao; Gao, Yenan; Zhang, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern with surface discharges (SDs) in dielectric barrier discharge is investigated by intensified charge-coupled device. The pattern is composed of the bright spot and the dim spot which is located at the centroid of surrounding other three bright spots. The phase diagram of the pattern as a function of the gas pressure and the argon concentration is given. The instantaneous images indicate that the bright spot emerging at the front of the current pulse is formed by the volume discharge (VD), and dim spot occurring at the tail of the current pulse is formed by the SD. The above result shows that the SD is induced by the VD. The simulation of the electric fields of wall charges accumulated by VDs confirms that the dim spot is formed by the confluences of the SDs of surrounding other three bright spots. By using optical emission spectrum method, both the molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the SD are larger than that of the VD.

  8. Hierarchical Materials Design by Pattern Transfer Printing of Self-Assembled Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Taejong; Yun, Hongseok; Fleury, Blaise; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Jo, Pil Sung; Wu, Yaoting; Oh, Soong-Ju; Cargnello, Matteo; Yang, Haoran; Murray, Christopher B.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2017-02-08

    We demonstrate the fabrication of hierarchical materials by controlling the structure of highly ordered binary nanocrystal superlattices (BNSLs) on multiple length scales. Combinations of magnetic, plasmonic, semiconducting, and insulating colloidal nanocrystal (NC) building blocks are self-assembled into BNSL membranes via the liquid–interfacial assembly technique. Free-standing BNSL membranes are transferred onto topographically structured poly(dimethylsiloxane) molds via the Langmuir–Schaefer technique and then deposited in patterns onto substrates via transfer printing. BNSLs with different structural motifs are successfully patterned into various meso- and microstructures such as lines, circles, and even three-dimensional grids across large-area substrates. A combination of electron microscopy and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements confirm the ordering of NC building blocks in meso- and micropatterned BNSLs. This technique demonstrates structural diversity in the design of hierarchical materials by assembling BNSLs from NC building blocks of different composition and size by patterning BNSLs into various size and shape superstructures of interest for a broad range of applications.

  9. Hierarchical Materials Design by Pattern Transfer Printing of Self-Assembled Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Taejong; Yun, Hongseok; Fleury, Blaise; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Jo, Pil Sung; Wu, Yaoting; Oh, Soong-Ju; Cargnello, Matteo; Yang, Haoran; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2017-03-08

    We demonstrate the fabrication of hierarchical materials by controlling the structure of highly ordered binary nanocrystal superlattices (BNSLs) on multiple length scales. Combinations of magnetic, plasmonic, semiconducting, and insulating colloidal nanocrystal (NC) building blocks are self-assembled into BNSL membranes via the liquid-interfacial assembly technique. Free-standing BNSL membranes are transferred onto topographically structured poly(dimethylsiloxane) molds via the Langmuir-Schaefer technique and then deposited in patterns onto substrates via transfer printing. BNSLs with different structural motifs are successfully patterned into various meso- and microstructures such as lines, circles, and even three-dimensional grids across large-area substrates. A combination of electron microscopy and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements confirm the ordering of NC building blocks in meso- and micropatterned BNSLs. This technique demonstrates structural diversity in the design of hierarchical materials by assembling BNSLs from NC building blocks of different composition and size by patterning BNSLs into various size and shape superstructures of interest for a broad range of applications.

  10. Electrically robust silver nanowire patterns transferrable onto various substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-Shi; Liu, Chuan; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Cao, Wu; Qiu, Jing-Shen; Shieh, Han-Ping D.; Yang, Bo-Ru

    2016-03-01

    We report a facile technique for patterning and transferring silver nanowires (AgNWs) onto various substrates. By employing only UV/O3 and vapor treatment of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), we are able to accurately manipulate the surface energy via alternating the terminal groups of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, so as to assist selective formation and exfoliation of AgNW films. A simple UV/O3 treatment on PDMS enables uniform, well-defined, and highly conductive patterns of AgNWs after spin-coating. A vapor treatment of HMDS lowers the surface energy of the oxidized PDMS so that the patterned AgNWs embedded in an epoxy resin (EPR) are cleanly transferred from the PDMS to the target substrate. It is found that the AgNW-EPR composite on polyethylene glycol terephthalate (PET) exhibits remarkable durability under the bending test, tape test, ultrasonic treatment in water, and immersion of chemical solvents. In addition, we demonstrate that the AgNW-EPR composite work well as conductive patterns on the oxidized PDMS, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), paper, and curved glass. The facile technique extends the applicability of AgNWs in the field of electronics, and it is potentially applicable to other nanomaterials.We report a facile technique for patterning and transferring silver nanowires (AgNWs) onto various substrates. By employing only UV/O3 and vapor treatment of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), we are able to accurately manipulate the surface energy via alternating the terminal groups of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, so as to assist selective formation and exfoliation of AgNW films. A simple UV/O3 treatment on PDMS enables uniform, well-defined, and highly conductive patterns of AgNWs after spin-coating. A vapor treatment of HMDS lowers the surface energy of the oxidized PDMS so that the patterned AgNWs embedded in an epoxy resin (EPR) are cleanly transferred from the PDMS to the target substrate. It is found that the AgNW-EPR composite on polyethylene

  11. Focused ion beam patterning to dielectrophoretically assemble single nanowire based devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Ferrara, V; Massera, E; Francia, G Di [ENEA Research Center, P.le E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy); Alfano, B, E-mail: vera.laferrara@portici.enea.i [University of Naples ' Federico II' , P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2010-02-01

    Direct-write processing is increasingly taking place in nanodevice fabrication. In this work, Focused Ion Beam (FIB), a powerful tool in maskless micromachining, is used for electrode patterning onto a silicon/silicon nitride substrate. Then a single palladium nanowire is assembled between electrodes by means of dielectrophoresis (DEP). The nanowire morphology depends on the electrode pattern when DEP conditions are fixed. FIB/DEP combination overcomes the problem of nanowire electrical contamination due to gallium ion bombardment and the as-grown nanowire retains its basic electrical properties. Single nanowire based devices have been fabricated with this novel approach and have been tested as hydrogen sensors, confirming the reliability of this technology.

  12. Patterning effects on magnetic reversal properties in epitaxial-grown Laves phase DyFe{sub 2}/YFe{sub 2} superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K., E-mail: K.Wang@hqu.edu.cn [College of Information Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen city 361021 (China); Chen, R.F.; Chen, C.W. [College of Information Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen city 361021 (China); Ward, R.C.C. [Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    A large-scale striped array with 7.5 µm width has been fabricated in an epitaxial (110) single crystal [20 Å DyFe{sub 2}/80 Å YFe{sub 2}]{sub 40} superlattice using a UV direct writing system. The [−112] direction perpendicular to the [1−11] easy axis of the YFe{sub 2} layers, which dominate the magnetic behavior in the soft-layer-rich sample, was chosen to be patterned. The reversal behavior of the patterned superlattice was investigated by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements. Both the switching fields and the exchange springs in the superlattices were found to be significantly affected by the patterning. Pronounced change in the coercivity was observed with the field applied along the patterned [−112] direction due to a considerable induced anisotropy, which is estimated to be 2.1×10{sup 4} erg/cm{sup 3}. When the field is applied along the [1−11] direction a reduction of 9% in the irreversible switching field was presented. This agrees well with the ratio of 8% of the shape anisotropy to the value of the hard layers along the [1−11] direction. Nevertheless, the small bending field remains unaffected after patterning due to a strong Fe–Fe exchange field. - Highlights: • We investigate the magnetic reversal properties of patterned epitaxial-grown Laves phase single crystal DyFe{sub 2}/YFe{sub 2} superlattice. • We find both the switching fields and the exchange springs in the superlattices can be significantly affected by the patterning. • The bending field in the superlattice remains unaffected after patterning due to a strong Fe–Fe exchange field.

  13. Laser patterning of transparent conductive metal nanowire coatings: simulation and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Simon J; Cann, Maria; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan; Milne, David

    2014-01-21

    Transparent and electrically conductive metal nanowire networks are possible replacements for costly indium tin oxide (ITO) films in many optoelectronic devices. ITO films are regularly patterned using pulsed lasers so similar technologies could be used for nanowire coatings to define electrode structures. Here, the effects of laser irradiation on conducting silver nanowire coatings are simulated and then investigated experimentally for networks formed by spray deposition onto transparent substrates. The ablation threshold fluence is found experimentally for such nanowire networks and is then related to film thickness. An effective model using finite-element heat transfer analysis is examined to look at energy dissipation through these nanowire networks and used to understand mechanisms at play in the laser-material interactions. It is demonstrated that the three-dimensional nature of these coatings and the relative ratios of the rates of lateral to vertical heat diffusion are important controlling parameter affecting the ablation threshold.

  14. Patterned transparent electrode with a continuous distribution of silver nanowires produced by an etching-free patterning method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwonwoo; Park, Ji Sun; Han, Jong Hun; Choi, Yunsu; Chung, Dae Sung; Kim, Se Hyun

    2017-02-01

    The outstanding electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of silver nanowire transparent electrodes are attractive for use in many optoelectronic devices, and the recent developments related to these electrodes have led to their commercialization. To more fully utilize the advantages of this technology, developing new process technologies in addition to performance improvements is important. In this report, we propose a novel ultra-simple patterning technology to generate a silver nanowire transparent layer and a unique patterned structure with continuously distributed silver nanowires without any etched areas. The patterning is conducted by exposure to ultraviolet light and rinsing. The exposed and unexposed regions of the resulting layer have dramatically different electrical conductivities, which produces an electrical pathway without using any etching or lift-off processes. The unique patterned structure produced by this etching-free method creates hardly any optical difference between the two regions and results in excellent visibility of the patterned transparent electrode layer.

  15. Magnetic domain wall motion in notch patterned permalloy nanowire devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ting-Chieh; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Mishra, Amit K.; Das, Bipul; Wu, Jong-Ching, E-mail: phjcwu@cc.ncue.edu.tw

    2015-11-01

    We report a study of magnetization reversal process of notch-patterned permalloy (Py) nanowires (NWs) by using an in-situ magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Three neighboring straight NWs and an individual straight NW with discs connected to the wires ends are fabricated by standard electron beam lithography through a lift-off technique. MFM images are taken in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field applied along the wires length. As a result, the nucleation, pinning and depinning of domain walls (DWs) along the NW are observed. The artificial constraints (notch) in such symmetrical geometry of NWs indeed serve as pinning sites to pin the DWs. The nature of magnetization reversal, pinning field and depinning field for the DWs that are observed in these permalloy NWs, indicate the key roles of notch depth, the terminal connection structure of NW end and the inter-wire interaction among the NWs. The in-situ MFM measurements are examined with the micromagnetic simulations. Consequently, good agreements are obtained for the DW structures and the effect of DWs pining/depinning, however a dissimilarity in experimental and simulation observations for the direction of propagation of DWs in NWs needs further investigation.

  16. Synthesis and efficient field emission characteristics of patterned ZnO nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永爱; 吴朝兴; 郑泳; 郭太良

    2012-01-01

    Patterned ZnO nanowires were successfully synthesized on ITO electrodes deposited on the glass substrate by using a simple thermal evaporation approach.The morphology,crystallinity and optical properties of ZnO nanowires were characterized by scanning electron microscopy,X-ray diffraction,energy dispersive X-ray and photoluminescence spectroscopy.Their field emission characteristics were also investigated.SEM images showed that the ZnO nanowires,with a diameter of 100-200 nm and length up to 5μm,were highly uniform and well distributed on the linear ITO electrodes.The field emission measurement indicated that patterned ZnO nanowire arrays have a turn-on field of 1.6 V/μm at current density of 1 μA/cm2 and a threshold field of 4.92 V/μm at current density of 1 mA/cm2 at an emitter-anode gap of 700 μm.The current density rapidly reached 2.26 mA/cm2 at an applied field of 5.38 V/μm.The fluctuation of emission current was lower than 5% for 4.5 h.The low turn-on field,high current density and good stability of patterned ZnO nanowire arrays indicate that it is a promising candidate for field emission application.

  17. Superplastic behavior of silica nanowires obtained by direct patterning of silsesquioxane-based precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Mustafa; Wollschläger, Nicole; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad; Österle, Werner; Leblebici, Yusuf; Erdem Alaca, B.

    2017-03-01

    Silica nanowires spanning 10 μm-deep trenches are fabricated from different types of silsesquioxane-based precursors by direct e-beam patterning on silicon followed by release through deep reactive ion etching. Nanowire aspect ratios as large as 150 are achieved with a critical dimension of about 50 nm and nearly rectangular cross-sections. In situ bending tests are carried out inside a scanning electron microscope, where the etch depth of 10 μ {{m}} provides sufficient space for deformation. Silica NWs are indeed observed to exhibit superplastic behavior without fracture with deflections reaching the full etch depth, about two orders of magnitude larger than the nanowire thickness. A large-deformation elastic bending model is utilized for predicting the deviation from the elastic behavior. The results of forty different tests indicate a critical stress level of 0.1–0.4 GPa for the onset of plasticity. The study hints at the possibility of fabricating silica nanowires in a monolithic fashion through direct e-beam patterning of silsesquioxane-based resins. The fabrication technology is compatible with semiconductor manufacturing and provides silica nanowires with a very good structural integrity.

  18. Patterning challenges in advanced device architectures: FinFETs to nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, N.; Milenin, A. P.; Tao, Z.; Hubert, H.; Altamirano-Sanchez, E.; Veloso, A.; Witters, L.; Waldron, N.; Ragnarsson, L.-Å.; Kim, M. S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Mertens, H.; Raghavan, P.; Piumi, D.; Collaert, N.; Barla, K.; Thean, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Si FinFET scaling is getting more difficult due to extremely narrow fin width control and power dissipation. Nanowire FETs and high mobility channel are attractive options for CMOS scaling. Nanowire FETs can maintain good electrostatics with relaxed nanowire diameter. High mobility channel can provide good performance at low power operation. However their fin patterning is challenging due to fins consisted of different materials or fragile high mobility material. Controlled etch and strip are necessary for good fin cd and profile control. Fin height increase is a general trend of scaled FinFETs and nanowire FETs, which makes patterning difficult not only in fin, but also in gate, spacer and replacement metal gate. It is important that gate and spacer etch have high selectivity to fins and good cd and profile control even with high aspect ratio of fin and gate. Work function metal gate patterning in scaled replacement metal gate module needs controlled isotropic etch without damaging gate dielectric. SF6 based etch provides sharp N-P boundary and improved gate reliability.

  19. Mask-Free Patterning of High-Conductivity Metal Nanowires in Open Air by Spatially Modulated Femtosecond Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Yang; Dong, Xianzi; Qu, Liangti; Duan, Xuanming; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-10-28

    A novel high-resolution nanowire fabrication method is developed by thin-film patterning using a spatially modulated femtosecond laser pulse. Deep subwavelength (≈1/13 of the laser wavelength) and high conductivity (≈1/4 of the bulk gold) nanowires are fabricated in the open air without using masks, which offers a single-step arbitrary direct patterning approach for electronics, plasmonics, and optoelectronics nanodevices.

  20. Large-area alignment of tungsten oxide nanowires over flat and patterned substrates for room-temperature gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Ju, Yanrui; Payamyar, Payam; Primc, Darinka; Rao, Jingyi; Willa, Christoph; Koziej, Dorota; Niederberger, Markus

    2015-01-02

    Alignment of nanowires over a large area of flat and patterned substrates is a prerequisite to use their collective properties in devices such as gas sensors. In this work, uniform single-crystalline ultrathin W18 O49 nanowires with diameters less than 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 have been synthesized, and, despite their flexibility, assembled into thin films with high orientational order over a macroscopic area by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Alignment of the tungsten oxide nanowires was also possible on top of sensor substrates equipped with electrodes. Such sensor devices were found to exhibit outstanding sensitivity to H2 at room temperature.

  1. Wafer-Level Patterned and Aligned Polymer Nanowire/Micro- and Nanotube Arrays on any Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Morber, Jenny Ruth

    2009-05-25

    A study was conducted to fabricate wafer-level patterned and aligned polymer nanowire (PNW), micro- and nanotube arrays (PNT), which were created by exposing the polymer material to plasma etching. The approach for producing wafer-level aligned PNWs involved a one-step inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching process. The polymer nanowire array was fabricated in an ICP reactive ion milling chamber with a pressure of 10mTorr. Argon (Ar), O 2, and CF4 gases were released into the chamber as etchants at flow rates of 15 sccm, 10 sccm, and 40 sccm. Inert gasses, such as Ar-form positive ions were incorporated to serve as a physical component to assist in the material degradation process. One power source (400 W) was used to generate dense plasma from the input gases, while another power source applied a voltage of approximately 600V to accelerate the plasma toward the substrate.

  2. Laterally patterned spin-valve superlattice: Magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brüssing, F.; Devishvili, A.; Zabel, H. [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Toperverg, B. P. [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Theory Division, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Badini Confalonieri, G. A. [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, E-28049 CSIC Madrid (Spain); Theis-Bröhl, K. [University of Applied Science, An der Karlstadt 8, 27568 Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2015-04-07

    The magnetization reversal of magnetic multilayers with spin-valve like characteristics, patterned into an array of parallel stripes, was structurally and magnetically analyzed, in detail, via x-ray scattering, magnetometry, and polarized neutron reflectivity. Each stripe contains a multiple repetition of the layer sequence [Fe/Cr/Co/Cr]. X-ray and neutron scattering maps of the patterned multilayer show rich details resulting from the superposition of Bragg peaks representing the lateral in-plane periodicity and the out-of-plane multilayer period. Detailed analysis of specular and off-specular polarized neutron intensity was used to ascertain the antiparallel alignment of the Co and Fe magnetization within the kink region of their combined hysteresis loop between the coercive fields of Fe and Co layers. This includes also an examination of domain formation and inter- as well as intra-stripe correlation effects upon magnetization reversal. Our combined study shows that the shape induced anisotropy via patterning is capable of overriding the four-fold crystal anisotropy but is unable to eliminate the ripple domain state of the Co layers, already present in the continuous multilayer.

  3. Magnetic Graphene Nanohole Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Decai; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wei; Liu, Feng

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of nano-holes (NHs) patterned in graphene using first principles calculations. We show that superlattices consisting of a periodic array of NHs form a new family of 2D crystalline "bulk" magnets whose collective magnetic behavior is governed by inter-NH spin-spin interaction. They exhibit long-range magnetic order well above room temperature. Furthermore, magnetic semiconductors can be made by doping magnetic NHs into semiconducting NH superlattices. Our findings offer a new material system for fundamental studies of spin-spin interaction and magnetic ordering in low dimensions, and open up the exciting opportunities of making engineered magnetic materials for storage media and spintronics applications.

  4. Influence of surface defects on superlattice patterns in graphene on graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remskar, Maja; Jelenc, Janez

    2016-09-01

    Superstructures observed by scanning tunnelling microscopy on graphite have been reported several decades ago, but the interest in these superstructures recently intensified due to their occurrence in graphene grown on different substrates. Generally accepted explanation of origin of these superstructures is an overlap of disoriented top layer of graphite and the underlying graphite single crystal, which causes moiré pattern. Here we present experimental findings that the orientation of the superstructure is influenced by surface defects and edges of graphene. Superstructures in graphene put on graphite exist even if the graphene is not supported by graphite over its entire area. The modulation of the density of states influences the strength of intra-layer carbon bonds in such a way that the graphene breaks along the superstructure minima. The tunnelling conductance of the areas with superstructures is enhanced with regard to bulk graphite.

  5. Odd electron diffraction patterns in silicon nanowires and silicon thin films explained by microtwins and nanotwins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayron, Cyril; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Mouchet, Celine; Secouard, Christopher; Rouviere, Emmanuelle; Simonato, Jean-Pierre [CEA DRT, LITEN, Minatec, 38 - Grenoble (France); Den Hertog, Martien; Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, DSM, INAC, Minatec, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2009-04-15

    Odd electron diffraction patterns (EDPs) have been obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on silicon nanowires grown via the vapour-liquid- solid method and on silicon thin films deposited by electron beam evaporation. Many explanations have been given in the past, without consensus among the scientific community: size artifacts, twinning artifacts or, more widely accepted, the existence of new hexagonal Si phases. In order to resolve this issue, the microstructures of Si nanowires and Si thin films have been characterized by TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and highresolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Despite the differences in the geometries and elaboration processes, the EDPs of the materials show great similarities. The different hypotheses reported in the literature have been investigated. It was found that the positions of the diffraction spots in the EDPs could be reproduced by simulating a hexagonal structure with c/a=12(2/3){sup 1/2}, but the intensities in many EDPs remained unexplained. Finally, it was established that all the experimental data, i.e. EDPs and HRTEM images, agree with a classical cubic silicon structure containing two microstructural defects: (i) overlapping {sigma}3 microtwins which induce extra spots by double diffraction, and (ii) nanotwins which induce extra spots as a result of streaking effects. It is concluded that there is no hexagonal phase in the Si nanowires and the Si thin films presented in this work. (orig.)

  6. Odd electron diffraction patterns in silicon nanowires and silicon thin films explained by microtwins and nanotwins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayron, Cyril; Den Hertog, Martien; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Mouchet, Céline; Secouard, Christopher; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Rouviere, Emmanuelle; Simonato, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Odd electron diffraction patterns (EDPs) have been obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on silicon nanowires grown via the vapour–liquid–solid method and on silicon thin films deposited by electron beam evaporation. Many explanations have been given in the past, without consensus among the scientific community: size artifacts, twinning artifacts or, more widely accepted, the existence of new hexagonal Si phases. In order to resolve this issue, the microstructures of Si nanowires and Si thin films have been characterized by TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Despite the differences in the geometries and elaboration processes, the EDPs of the materials show great similarities. The different hypotheses reported in the literature have been investigated. It was found that the positions of the diffraction spots in the EDPs could be reproduced by simulating a hexagonal structure with c/a = 12(2/3)1/2, but the intensities in many EDPs remained unexplained. Finally, it was established that all the experimental data, i.e. EDPs and HRTEM images, agree with a classical cubic silicon structure containing two microstructural defects: (i) overlapping Σ3 microtwins which induce extra spots by double diffraction, and (ii) nanotwins which induce extra spots as a result of streaking effects. It is concluded that there is no hexagonal phase in the Si nanowires and the Si thin films presented in this work. PMID:22477767

  7. Cathodoluminescence studies of GaAs nano-wires grown on shallow-trench-patterned Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ling; Fan, Wen-Chung; Ku, Jui-Tai; Chang, Wen-Hao; Chen, Wei-Kuo; Chou, Wu-Ching [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Ko, Chih-Hsin; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, You-Ru; Wann, Clement H [Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Ltd, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chao-Wei; Chen, Yung-Feng; Su, Yan-Kuin, E-mail: acceptor.ep89g@nctu.edu.tw, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-19

    The optical properties of GaAs nano-wires grown on shallow-trench-patterned Si(001) substrates were investigated by cathodoluminescence. The results showed that when the trench width ranges from 80 to 100 nm, the emission efficiency of GaAs can be enhanced and is stronger than that of a homogeneously grown epilayer. The suppression of non-radiative centers is attributed to the trapping of both threading dislocations and planar defects at the trench sidewalls. This approach demonstrates the feasibility of growing nano-scaled GaAs-based optoelectronic devices on Si substrates.

  8. Alignment of human cardiomyocytes on laser patterned biphasic core/shell nanowire assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karin; Lee, Juseok; Haidar, Ayman; Martinez Miró, Marina; Akkan, Cagri Kaan; Veith, Michael; Cenk Aktas, Oral; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim

    2014-12-01

    The management of end stage heart failure patients is only possible by heart transplantation or by the implantation of artificial hearts as a bridge for later transplantation. However, these therapeutic strategies are limited by a lack of donor hearts and by the associated complications, such as coagulation and infection, due to the used artificial mechanical circulatory assist devices. Therefore, new strategies for myocardial regenerative approaches are under extensive research to produce contractile myocardial tissue in the future to replace non-contractile myocardial ischemic and scarred tissue. Different approaches, such as cell transplantation, have been studied intensively. Although successful approaches have been observed, there are still limitations to the application. It is envisaged that myocardial tissue engineering can be used to help replace infarcted non-contractile tissue. The developed tissue should later mimic the aligned fibrillar structure of the extracellular matrix and provide important guidance cues for the survival, function and the needed orientation of cardiomyocytes. Nanostructured surfaces have been tested to provide a guided direction that cells can follow. In the present study, the cellular adhesion/alignment of human cardiomyocytes and the biocompatibility have been investigated after cultivation on different laser-patterned nanowires compared with unmodified nanowires. As a result, the nanostructured surfaces possessed good biocompatibility before and after laser modification. The laser-induced scalability of the pattern enabled the growth and orientation of the adhered myocardial tissue. Such approaches may be used to modify the surface of potential scaffolds to develop myocardial contractile tissue in the future.

  9. Comparative analysis of serial and parallel laser patterning of Ag nanowire thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Harim; Lee, Myeongkyu

    2017-03-01

    Ag nanowire (AgNW) films solution-coated on a glass substrate were laser-patterned in two different ways. For the conventional serial process, a pulsed ultraviolet laser of 30 kHz repetition rate and ∼20 ns pulse width was employed as the laser source. For parallel patterning, the film was directly irradiated by a spatially-modulated Nd:YAG laser beam that has a low repetition rate of 10 kHz and a shorter pulse width of 5 ns. While multiple pulses with energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm2 were required to pattern the film in the serial process, a single pulse with energy density of 0.16 J/cm2 completely removed AgNWs in the parallel patterning. This may be explained by the difference in patterning mechanism. In the parallel process using short pulses of 5 ns width, AgNWs can be removed in their solid state by the laser-induced thermo-elastic force, while they should be evaporated in the serial process utilizing a high-repetition rate laser. Important process parameters such as threshold energy density, speed, and available feature sizes are comparatively discussed for the two patterning

  10. Facile Patterning of Ag Nanowires Network by Micro-Contact Printing of Siloxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-09-07

    A simple, low-cost, scalable patterning method has been demonstrated for chemically welded Ag nanowires (AgNWs) network. The chemically welded network of AgNWs on substrates has been patterned by modified microcontact printing (μCP). As an ink for the μCP, uncured high-viscosity siloxane polymer has been applied. Using elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp that has been replicated from micromachined Si master mold by metal-assisted chemical etching, the printed siloxane ink materials have been cured by simple UV/ozone exposure for 3 min, which acts as an etch barrier in ensuing wet-removal of exposed AgNWs network. The proposed patterning technique has no limitation in the choice of substrates and pattern shape, in addition to high resolution. The patterned AgNWs network electrodes have shown excellent optical, electrical, and mechanical performances, such as high flexibility (up to ∼10%) and stretchability (up to 40%). Finally, the patterned AgNWs network electrodes have been applied as a transparent heater, which can be used for rapid raindrop removal or deicing of car windows and outside mirrors. This can be a valuable help for driving safety under harsh weather conditions.

  11. Vertical nanowire architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfl-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires and statistics: A statistical process for reading ultradense arrays of nanostructured materials is presented (see image). The experimental realization is achieved through selective nanowire growth using porous alumina templates. The statistical patterning approach is found to provide ri...

  12. Nanowire-based thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Azhar; Chen, Yixi; Vasiraju, Venkata; Vaddiraju, Sreeram

    2017-07-01

    Research on thermoelectrics has seen a huge resurgence since the early 1990s. The ability of tuning a material’s electrical and thermal transport behavior upon nanostructuring has led to this revival. Nevertheless, thermoelectric performances of nanowires and related materials lag far behind those achieved with thin-film superlattices and quantum dot-based materials. This is despite the fact that nanowires offer many distinct advantages in enhancing the thermoelectric performances of materials. The simplicity of the strategy is the first and foremost advantage. For example, control of the nanowire diameters and their surface roughnesses will aid in enhancing their thermoelectric performances. Another major advantage is the possibility of obtaining high thermoelectric performances using simpler nanowire chemistries (e.g., elemental and binary compound semiconductors), paving the way for the fabrication of thermoelectric modules inexpensively from non-toxic elements. In this context, the topical review provides an overview of the current state of nanowire-based thermoelectrics. It concludes with a discussion of the future vision of nanowire-based thermoelectrics, including the need for developing strategies aimed at the mass production of nanowires and their interface-engineered assembly into devices. This eliminates the need for trial-and-error strategies and complex chemistries for enhancing the thermoelectric performances of materials.

  13. Superlattice Optical Bistability Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    multilayer heterojunction and superlattice device applications. 2.0 Growth Studies The MBE growth of mercury compound is still relatively new and novel...These superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy in a MBE system specifically designed to handle mercury . MBE is an ultrahigh vacuum evaporative...therefore the growth process is not as well understood as that of III-V semiconductor - compounds . In HgTe-CdTe superlattices the CdTe deposition is

  14. Interlayer couplings, Moiré patterns, and 2D electronic superlattices in MoS2/WSe2 hetero-bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chendong; Chuu, Chih-Piao; Ren, Xibiao; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Jin, Chuanhong; Chou, Mei-Yin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2017-01-01

    By using direct growth, we create a rotationally aligned MoS2/WSe2 hetero-bilayer as a designer van der Waals heterostructure. With rotational alignment, the lattice mismatch leads to a periodic variation of atomic registry between individual van der Waals layers, exhibiting a Moiré pattern with a well-defined periodicity. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and first-principles calculations, we investigate interlayer coupling as a function of atomic registry. We quantitatively determine the influence of interlayer coupling on the electronic structure of the hetero-bilayer at different critical points. We show that the direct gap semiconductor concept is retained in the bilayer although the valence and conduction band edges are located at different layers. We further show that the local bandgap is periodically modulated in the X-Y direction with an amplitude of ~0.15 eV, leading to the formation of a two-dimensional electronic superlattice. PMID:28070558

  15. Interlayer couplings, Moiré patterns, and 2D electronic superlattices in MoS 2 /WSe 2 hetero-bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chendong

    2017-01-07

    By using direct growth, we create a rotationally aligned MoS2/WSe2 hetero-bilayer as a designer van der Waals heterostructure. With rotational alignment, the lattice mismatch leads to a periodic variation of atomic registry between individual van der Waals layers, exhibiting a Moiré pattern with a well-defined periodicity. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and first-principles calculations, we investigate interlayer coupling as a function of atomic registry. We quantitatively determine the influence of interlayer coupling on the electronic structure of the hetero-bilayer at different critical points. We show that the direct gap semiconductor concept is retained in the bilayer although the valence and conduction band edges are located at different layers. We further show that the local bandgap is periodically modulated in the X-Y direction with an amplitude of ~0.15 eV, leading to the formation of a two-dimensional electronic superlattice.

  16. Effect of Ag nanowire addition into nanoparticle paste on the conductivity of Ag patterns printed by gravure offset method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Ki-Hun; Lee, Chan-Jae; Kwak, Min-Gi; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Kim, Kwang-Seok; Jung, Seung-Boo; Kim, Jong-Woong

    2014-11-01

    This paper focuses on the effect of Ag nanowire addition into a commercial Ag nanopaste and the printability evaluation of the mixed paste by the gravure offset printing methodology. Ag nanowires were synthesized by a modified polyol method, and a small amount of them was added into a commercial metallic paste based on Ag nanoparticles of 50 nm in diameter. Two annealing temperatures were selected for comparison, and electrical conductivity was measured by four point probe method. As a result, the hybrid mixture could be printed by the gravure offset method for patterning fine lines up to 15 μm width with sharp edges and scarce spreading. The addition of the Ag nanowires was significantly efficient for enhancement of electrical conductivity of the printed lines annealed at a low temperature (150 degrees C), while the effect was somewhat diluted in case of high temperature annealing (200 degrees C). The experimental results were discussed with the conduction mechanism in the printed conductive circuits with a schematic description of the electron flows in the printed lines.

  17. Single-step electropolymerization patterning of a polypyrrole nanowire by ultra-short pulses via an AFM cantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kihwan; Lee, Gyudo; Jung, Huihun; Kim, Chi Hyun; Seo, Jongbum; Yoon, Dae Sung; Lee, Sang Woo; Kwon, Taeyun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinsung, E-mail: yusuklee@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: tkwon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-03

    Conducting polymers (CPs) have attracted a great deal of attention due to their unique properties; these properties are useful in implementing various functional devices, such as memory, and chemical and biological sensors. In particular, the nanopatterning of CPs is a key technology that will accelerate the adoption of CPs in fabricating nanoscaled multifunctional devices. This paper presents an innovative technique for forming polypyrrole nanowire (PPy-NW) patterns, without any additional pretreatment on the gold surface, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultra-short pulse voltage. Applying the ultra-short pulse voltage to the AFM tip has the following advantage: since the electrochemical current is extremely localized around the tip, the successful formation of CP nanowires results. This is because the pulse width is much shorter than the resistor-capacitor (RC) time constant of the equivalent electrochemical circuit of our experimental set-up. This paper provides systematic results regarding the dimensional variation of the PPy-NW patterns produced by varying the electrical conditions of the ultra-short pulse, such as the pulse amplitude, width, and frequency. The results show that use of an ultra-short pulse is essential in fabricating PPy-NW patterns. Additionally, an ultra-short pulse offers excellent pattern controllability for both width (353 nm {approx} 3.37 {mu}m) and height (2.0 {approx} 88.3 nm).

  18. Gallium loading of gold seed for high yield of patterned GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulanger, J. P.; Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R., E-mail: lapierr@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    A method is presented for maximizing the yield and crystal phase purity of vertically aligned Au-assisted GaAs nanowires grown with an SiO{sub x} selective area epitaxy mask on GaAs (111)B substrates. The nanowires were grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy system. During annealing, Au VLS seeds will alloy with the underlying GaAs substrate and collect beneath the SiO{sub x} mask layer. This behavior is detrimental to obtaining vertically aligned, epitaxial nanowire growth. To circumvent this issue, Au droplets were pre-filled with Ga assuring vertical yields in excess of 99%.

  19. Ballistic miniband conduction in a graphene superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Menyoung; Wallbank, John R.; Gallagher, Patrick; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-09-01

    Rational design of long-period artificial lattices yields effects unavailable in simple solids. The moiré pattern in highly aligned graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures is a lateral superlattice with high electron mobility and an unusual electronic dispersion whose miniband edges and saddle points can be reached by electrostatic gating. We investigated the dynamics of electrons in moiré minibands by measuring ballistic transport between adjacent local contacts in a magnetic field, known as the transverse electron focusing effect. At low temperatures, we observed caustics of skipping orbits extending over hundreds of superlattice periods, reversals of the cyclotron revolution for successive minibands, and breakdown of cyclotron motion near van Hove singularities. At high temperatures, electron-electron collisions suppress focusing. Probing such miniband conduction properties is a necessity for engineering novel transport behaviors in superlattice devices.

  20. Patterned growth of ZnO nanowires on flexible substrates for enhanced performance of flexible piezoelectric nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dechao; Qiu, Yu; Jiang, Qingyu; Guo, Zhaoshuai; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Jin; Zong, Yang; Feng, Qiuxia; Sun, Xiaoling

    2017-02-01

    Flexible piezoelectric nanogenerators (NGs) based on patterned growth of ZnO nanowires (PNWs) by the hydrothermal method are proposed for high-efficiency energy harvesting applications. The use of the PNWs in ZnO-based FPNGs results in a significant improvement in terms of the magnitude of the output currents of up to 6 times when compared with pristine ZnO NW-based FPNGs without patterned growth mode. The maximum output current was measured to be about 150 nA, which was enough to drive some micro/nanoelectronic devices. The improved output performance is mainly attributed to the patterned growth mode in FPNGs, which may significantly reduce the piezoelectric potential screening effect caused by free electrons in ZnO. This strategy may provide a highly promising platform as energy harvesting devices for viable industrial applications in portable/wearable nanodevices.

  1. EDITORIAL: Nanowires Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Chennupati

    2010-02-01

    Nanowires are considered as building blocks for the next generation of electronics, photonics, sensors and energy applications. One-dimensional nanostructures offer unique opportunities to control the density of states of semiconductors, and in turn their electronic and optical properties. Nanowires allow the growth of axial heterostructures without the constraints of lattice mismatch. This provides flexibility to create heterostructures of a broad range of materials and allows integration of compound semiconductor based optoelectronic devices with silicon based microelectronics. Nanowires are widely studied and the number of papers published in the field is growing exponentially with time. Already nanowire lasers, nanowire transistors, nanowire light emitting diodes, nanowire sensors and nanowire solar cells have been demonstrated. This special issue on semiconductor nanowires features 17 invited papers from leading experts in the field. In this special issue, the synthesis and growth of semiconductor nanowires of a broad range of materials have been addressed. Both axial and radial heterostructures and their structural properties have been discussed. Electrical transport properties of nanowires have been presented, as well as optical properties and carrier dynamics in a range of nanowires and nanowire heterostructures. Devices such as nanowire lasers and nanowire sensors have also been discussed. I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for suggesting this special issue and inviting me to serve as the Guest Editor. Sincere thanks are due to all the authors for their contributions to this special issue. I am grateful to the reviewers and editorial staff at Semiconductor Science and Technology and the Institute of Physics Publishing for their excellent efforts. Special thanks are due to Dr Claire Bedrock for coordinating this special issue.

  2. Formation of Self-Connected Si0.8Ge0.2 Lateral Nanowires and Pyramids on Rib-Patterned Si(1 1 10) Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Chen, Gang; Lu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    In this work, Si0.8Ge0.2 is deposited onto the rib-patterned Si (1 1 10) template oriented in the [1 -1 0] direction. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that the rib sidewalls reshape into pyramid-covered (0 0 1) and smooth {1 1 3} facets, respectively, while the {1 0 5} facets-bounded lateral SiGe nanowires dominate the rib top along the [5 5 -1] direction. At both the rib shoulder sites and the pyramid vacancy sites, self-connecting occurs between the meeting nanowire and pyramids to form elongated huts, which are driven by the minimization of the total energy density according to the finite-element simulations results. These results suggest a convenient solution to form lateral SiGe nanowires covering multi-faceted surfaces on the patterned template.

  3. Formation of Self-Connected Si0.8Ge0.2 Lateral Nanowires and Pyramids on Rib-Patterned Si(1 1 10) Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Chen, Gang; Lu, Wei

    2017-12-01

    In this work, Si0.8Ge0.2 is deposited onto the rib-patterned Si (1 1 10) template oriented in the [1 -1 0] direction. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that the rib sidewalls reshape into pyramid-covered (0 0 1) and smooth {1 1 3} facets, respectively, while the {1 0 5} facets-bounded lateral SiGe nanowires dominate the rib top along the [5 5 -1] direction. At both the rib shoulder sites and the pyramid vacancy sites, self-connecting occurs between the meeting nanowire and pyramids to form elongated huts, which are driven by the minimization of the total energy density according to the finite-element simulations results. These results suggest a convenient solution to form lateral SiGe nanowires covering multi-faceted surfaces on the patterned template.

  4. Relaxing the electrostatic screening effect by patterning vertically-aligned silicon nanowire arrays into bundles for field emission application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Yung-Jr, E-mail: yungjrhung@gmail.com [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-sen University, No. 70, Lienhai Rd., Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, San-Liang [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Beng, Looi Choon [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Chang, Hsuan-Chen [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yung-Jui [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Sec. 4, Keelung Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    Top-down fabrication strategies are proposed and demonstrated to realize arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowire bundles and bundle arrays of carbon nanotube–silicon nanowire (CNT–SiNW) heterojunctions, aiming for releasing the electrostatic screening effect and improving the field emission characteristics. The trade-off between the reduction in the electrostatic screening effect and the decrease of emission sites leads to an optimal SiNW bundle arrangement which enables the lowest turn-on electric field of 1.4 V/μm and highest emission current density of 191 μA/cm{sup 2} among all testing SiNW samples. Benefiting from the superior thermal and electrical properties of CNTs and the flexible patterning technologies available for SiNWs, bundle arrays of CNT–SiNW heterojunctions show improved and highly-uniform field emission with a lower turn-on electric field of 0.9 V/μm and higher emission current density of 5.86 mA/cm{sup 2}. The application of these materials and their corresponding fabrication approaches is not limited to the field emission but can be used for a variety of emerging fields like nanoelectronics, lithium-ion batteries, and solar cells. - Highlights: • Aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) bundle arrays are realized with top-down methods. • Growing carbon nanotubes atop SiNW bundle arrays enable uniform field emission. • A turn-on field of 0.9 V/μm and an emission current of > 5 mA/cm{sup 2} are achieved.

  5. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes over vertically aligned silicon nanowire bundles for achieving uniform field emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yung-Jr; Huang, Yung-Jui; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lee, San-Liang

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication strategy is proposed to enable precise coverage of as-grown carbon nanotube (CNT) mats atop vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) bundles in order to realize a uniform bundle array of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions over a large sample area. No obvious electrical degradation of as-fabricated SiNWs is observed according to the measured current-voltage characteristic of a two-terminal single-nanowire device. Bundle arrangement of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions is optimized to relax the electrostatic screening effect and to maximize the field enhancement factor. As a result, superior field emission performance and relatively stable emission current over 12 h is obtained. A bright and uniform fluorescent radiation is observed from CNT-SiNW-based field emitters regardless of its bundle periodicity, verifying the existence of high-density and efficient field emitters on the proposed CNT-SiNW bundle arrays.

  6. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which ...

  7. Fabrication of ultrahigh-density nanowires by electrochemical nanolithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hongquan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An approach has been developed to produce silver nanoparticles (AgNPs rapidly on semiconductor wafers using electrochemical deposition. The closely packed AgNPs have a density of up to 1.4 × 1011 cm-2 with good size uniformity. AgNPs retain their shape and position on the substrate when used as nanomasks for producing ultrahigh-density vertical nanowire arrays with controllable size, making it a one-step nanolithography technique. We demonstrate this method on Si/SiGe multilayer superlattices using electrochemical nanopatterning and plasma etching to obtain high-density Si/SiGe multilayer superlattice nanowires.

  8. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Remeika, Mikas

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  9. Broadband light-absorption InGaN photoanode assisted by imprint patterning and ZnO nanowire growth for energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Junjie; Quang Dang, Vinh; Li, Hongjian; Moon, Sungjin; Li, Panpan; Kim, Yangdoo; Kim, Chaehyun; Choi, Jinyoung; Choi, Hakjong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Lee, Heon

    2017-01-01

    In this research, an InGaN-based photoanode with a broadband light-absorption range from ultraviolet to green, patterned by imprint lithography and branched by ZnO nanowires, has been applied to water splitting. Over the solar spectrum range, the absorbance increases due to the scattering effect of the micro-structure compared to that of flat surface InGaN, which reaches a maximum of over 90% at 380 nm as ZnO nanowires are further employed in this novel photoanode. Consequently, the induced photocurrent density of the InGaN photoanode with a domelike structure and ZnO nanowires on the surface shows a remarkable enhancement of seven times that of the one with a flat surface. Further investigation indicates the wet-etching process for defect removal has an essential impact on photocurrent efficiency. This design demonstrates an innovative approach for water splitting.

  10. Heteroepitaxial Patterned Growth of Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed ZnO Nanowires on GaN Using Laser Interference Ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Dajun

    2010-08-23

    A simple two-step method of fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed ZnO nanowires on gallium nitride (GaN) substrates is described. The method combines laser interference ablation (LIA) and low temperature hydrothermal decomposition. The ZnO nanowires grow heteroepitaxially on unablated regions of GaN over areas spanning 1 cm2, with a high degree of control over size, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are utilized to study the structural characteristics of the LIA-patterned GaN substrate in detail. These studies reveal the possible mechanism for the preferential, site-selective growth of the ZnO nanowires. The method demonstrates high application potential for wafer-scale integration into sensor arrays, piezoelectric devices, and optoelectronic devices. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Magnetism in lanthanide superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Sarthour, R.S.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of heavy rare-earth superlattices have revealed the stabilization of novel magnetic phases chat are not present in bulk materials. The most striking result is the propagation of the magnetic ordering through nonmagnetic spacer materials. Here we describe some recent X......-ray magnetic resonant scattering studies of light rare-earth superlattices, which illuminate the mechanism of interlayer coupling, and provide access to different areas of Physics. such as the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. Magnetic X-ray diffraction is found to be particularly well suited...... to the study of the modulated magnetic structures in superlattices, and provides unique information on the conduction-electron spin-density wave responsible for the propagation of magnetic order. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Architectural Engineering of Nanowire Network Fine Pattern for 30 μm Wide Flexible Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diode Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yunsheng; Ding, Ke; Wu, Zhicong; Chen, Hongting; Li, Wenbo; Zhao, Sheng; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jun; Hu, Bin

    2016-11-22

    Replacing rigid metal oxides with flexible alternatives as a next-generation transparent conductor is important for flexible optoelectronic devices. Recently, nanowire networks have emerged as a new type of transparent conductor and have attracted wide attention because of their all-solution-based process manufacturing and excellent flexibility. However, the intrinsic percolation characteristics of the network determine that its fine pattern behavior is very different from that of continuous films, which is a critical issue for their practical application in high-resolution devices. Herein, a simple optimization approach is proposed to address this issue through the architectural engineering of the nanowire network. The aligned and random silver nanowire networks are fabricated and compared in theory and experimentally. Remarkably, network performance can be notably improved with an aligned structure, which is helpful for external quantum efficiency and the luminance of quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) when the network is applied as the bottom-transparent electrode. More importantly, the advantage introduced by network alignment is also of benefit to fine pattern performance, even when the pattern width is narrowed to 30 μm, which leads to improved luminescent properties and lower failure rates in fine QLED strip applications. This paradigm illuminates a strategy to optimize nanowire network based transparent conductors and can promote their practical application in high-definition flexible optoelectronic devices.

  13. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  14. Plasmon-assisted local temperature control to pattern individual semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Linyou; Barsic, David N; Guichard, Alex R; Brongersma, Mark L

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate a new versatile strategy to rapidly heat and cool subdiffraction-limited volumes of material with a focused light beam. The local temperature rise is obtained by exploiting the unique optical properties of metallic nanostructures that facilitate efficient light-to-heat conversion through the excitation of surface plasmons (collective electron oscillations). By locally heating nanoscale metallic catalysts, growth of semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanotubes can be initiated and controlled at arbitrarily prespecified locations and down to the single nanostructure level in a room-temperature chamber. This local heating strategy can be orders of magnitude (>10(5)) more energy efficient than conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tools in which an entire chamber/substrate is heated. For these reasons, it has great potential for use in process- and energy-efficient assembly of nanowires into complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible device architectures. In general, the high degree of spatial and temporal control over nanoscale thermal environments afforded by this method inspires new pathways for manipulating a range of important thermally stimulated processes and the development of novel photothermal devices.

  15. pH driven addressing of silicon nanowires onto Si3N4/SiO2 micro-patterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloarec, Jean-Pierre; Chevalier, Céline; Genest, Jonathan; Beauvais, Jacques; Chamas, Hassan; Chevolot, Yann; Baron, Thierry; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    pH was used as the main driving parameter for specifically immobilizing silicon nanowires onto Si3N4 microsquares at the surface of a SiO2 substrate. Different pH values of the coating aqueous solution enabled to experimentally distribute nanowires between silicon nitride and silicon dioxide: at pH 3 nanowires were mainly anchored on Si3N4; they were evenly distributed between SiO2 and Si3N4 at pH 2.8; and they were mainly anchored on SiO2 at pH 2. A theoretical model based on DLVO theory and surface protonation/deprotonation equilibria was used to study how, in adequate pH conditions, Si nanowires could be anchored onto specific regions of a patterned Si3N4/SiO2 surface. Instead of using capillary forces, or hydrophilic/hydrophobic contrast between the two types of materials, the specificity of immobilization could rely on surface electric charge contrasts between Si3N4 and SiO2. This simple and generic method could be used for addressing a large diversity of nano-objects onto patterned substrates.

  16. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.;

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  17. Dynamic square superlattice of Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Tuckerman, Laurette

    2014-11-01

    Faraday waves are computed in a 3D container using BLUE, a code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. A new dynamic superlattice pattern is described which consists of a set of square waves arranged in a two-by-two array. The corners of this array are connected by a bridge whose position oscillates in time between the two diagonals.

  18. Selective-area catalyst-free MBE growth of GaN nanowires using a patterned oxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, T; Gotschke, T; Limbach, F; Stoica, T; Calarco, R

    2011-03-04

    GaN nanowires (NWs) were grown selectively in holes of a patterned silicon oxide mask, by rf-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE), without any metal catalyst. The oxide was deposited on a thin AlN buffer layer previously grown on a Si(111) substrate. Regular arrays of holes in the oxide layer were obtained using standard e-beam lithography. The selectivity of growth has been studied varying the substrate temperature, gallium beam equivalent pressure and patterning layout. Adjusting the growth parameters, GaN NWs can be selectively grown in the holes of the patterned oxide with complete suppression of the parasitic growth in between the holes. The occupation probability of a hole with a single or multiple NWs depends strongly on its diameter. The selectively grown GaN NWs have one common crystallographic orientation with respect to the Si(111) substrate via the AlN buffer layer, as proven by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Based on the experimental data, we present a schematic model of the GaN NW formation in which a GaN pedestal is initially grown in the hole.

  19. "Drawing with nanotubes": creating nanowires with complex geometries by pulsed electrodeposition on self-organized carbon nanotube patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarden, Tohar S; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2010-11-10

    We present a new approach for the creation of nanowires with well-defined complex geometries by electrodeposition onto self-organized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The concept is demonstrated by generation of continuous Au nanowires with various geometries, including parallel arrays, serpentines, and coils. The generality of this approach is further illustrated by synthesizing Bi(2)Te(3) nanowires. Our concept of "drawing with nanotubes" offers to combine different material properties with complex geometries on the route to new functional nanosystems.

  20. Electrochemically grown rough-textured nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Postetter, David; Saragnese, Daniel [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States); Papadakis, Stergios J. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (United States); Gracias, David H., E-mail: dgracias@jhu.ed [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Nanowires with a rough surface texture show unusual electronic, optical, and chemical properties; however, there are only a few existing methods for producing these nanowires. Here, we describe two methods for growing both free standing and lithographically patterned gold (Au) nanowires with a rough surface texture. The first strategy is based on the deposition of nanowires from a silver (Ag)-Au plating solution mixture that precipitates an Ag-Au cyanide complex during electrodeposition at low current densities. This complex disperses in the plating solution, thereby altering the nanowire growth to yield a rough surface texture. These nanowires are mass produced in alumina membranes. The second strategy produces long and rough Au nanowires on lithographically patternable nickel edge templates with corrugations formed by partial etching. These rough nanowires can be easily arrayed and integrated with microscale devices.

  1. Patterning of self-assembled monolayers by phase-shifting mask and its applications in large-scale assembly of nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Dakuan; Wang, Jianyu; Sheng, Yun; Wang, Xinran; Chen, Kunji; Zhou, Minmin [Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yan, Shancheng [Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046 (China); Shen, Jiancang; Pan, Lijia; Shi, Yi, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Micro-structures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-01-26

    A nonselective micropatterning method of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) based on laser and phase-shifting mask (PSM) is demonstrated. Laser beam is spatially modulated by a PSM, and periodic SAM patterns are generated sequentially through thermal desorption. Patterned wettability is achieved with alternating hydrophilic/hydrophobic stripes on octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers. The substrate is then used to assemble CdS semiconductor nanowires (NWs) from a solution, obtaining well-aligned NWs in one step. Our results show valuably the application potential of this technique in engineering SAMs for integration of functional devices.

  2. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C., E-mail: cwang@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Cao, J. C., E-mail: jccao@mail.sim.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terahertz Solid-State Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  3. A Method to Pattern Silver Nanowires Directly on Wafer-Scale PDMS Substrate and Its Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Namsun; Kim, Youngseok; Kim, Sohee

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a fabrication method of microsized AgNW patterns based on poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate using a poly(p-xylylene) (parylene) stencil technique. Various patterns of AgNW conductive sheets were created on the wafer scale area in the forms of straight and serpentine lines, texts, and symbols, which dimensions ranged from a few tens of micrometers to hundreds of micrometers. We demonstrated the electrical performance of straight line and serpentine line patterned AgNW electrodes when subjected to mechanical strains. The gauge factor and stretchability ranged from 0.5 to 55.2 at 2% uniaxial strain and from 4.7 to 55.7%, respectively, depending on the shapes and structures of the AgNW electrodes. Using the developed AgNW patterning technique, we fabricated strain sensors to detect small body signals epidermally such as hand motion, eye blink and heart rate. Also, tactile sensors were fabricated and exhibited the sensitivity of 3.91 MPa(-1) in the pressure range lower than 50 kPa, and 0.28 MPa(-1) in the pressure range greater than 50 kPa up to 1.3 MPa. From these results, we concluded that the proposed technique enables the fabrication of reliable AgNW patterns on wafer-scale PDMS substrate and the potential applications for various flexible electronic devices.

  4. Jaynes Cummings Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A classical realization of the Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model, describing the interaction of a two-level atom with a quantized cavity mode, is proposed based on light transport in engineered waveguide superlattices. The optical setting enables to visualize in Fock space dynamical regimes not yet accessible in quantum systems, providing new physical insights into the deep strong coupling regime of the JC model. In particular, bouncing of photon number wave packets in Hilbert space and revivals of populations are explained as generalized Bloch oscillations in an inhomogeneous tight-binding lattice.

  5. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  6. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Yassitepe, Emre; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Janmohamed, Alyf; Lan, Xinzheng; Levina, Larissa; Comin, Riccardo; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-12-02

    Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  7. Self-Assembled PbSe Nanowire:Perovskite Hybrids

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-02

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Inorganic semiconductor nanowires are of interest in nano- and microscale photonic and electronic applications. Here we report the formation of PbSe nanowires based on directional quantum dot alignment and fusion regulated by hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite surface ligands. All material synthesis is carried out at mild temperatures. Passivation of PbSe quantum dots was achieved via a new perovskite ligand exchange. Subsequent in situ ammonium/amine substitution by butylamine enables quantum dots to be capped by butylammonium lead iodide, and this further drives the formation of a PbSe nanowire superlattice in a two-dimensional (2D) perovskite matrix. The average spacing between two adjacent nanowires agrees well with the thickness of single atomic layer of 2D perovskite, consistent with the formation of a new self-assembled semiconductor nanowire:perovskite heterocrystal hybrid.

  8. Magnetic Rare-Earth Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Gibbs, D.; Böni, P.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic structures of several single‐crystal, magnetic rare‐earth superlattice systems grown by molecular‐beam epitaxy are reviewed. In particular, the results of recent neutron diffraction investigations of long‐range magnetic order in Gd‐Y, Dy‐Y, Gd‐Dy, and Ho‐Y periodic superlattices...... are presented. In the Gd‐Y system, an antiphase domain structure develops for certain Y layer spacings, whereas modified helical moment configurations are found to occur in the other systems, some of which are commensurate with the chemical superlattice wavelength. References are made to theoretical interaction...

  9. Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Al-Shamery, Katharina;

    Single crystalline nanowires from fluorescing organic molecules like para-phenylenes or thiophenes are supposed to become key elements in future integrated optoelectronic devices [1]. For a sophisticated design of devices based on nanowires the basic principles of the nanowire formation have...

  10. Aging in Magnetic Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Pleimling, Michel; Binek, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Aging phenomena can be observed in non-equilibrium systems with slow relaxation dynamics. Magnetic specimens with well defined interactions and dimensions can serve as model systems for universal aspects of aging. Magnetic thin films provide access to a wide range of microscopic parameters. Superlattice structures allow tuning the intra and inter-plane exchange and enable geometrical confinement of the spin fluctuations. We use Co/Cr thin film superlattices to study magnetic aging. The static and dynamic magnetic properties are affected via the Co and Cr film thicknesses. The Curie temperature of the Co films is reduced from the bulk value by geometrical confinement. Cr provides antiferromagnetic coupling between the Co films. In-plane magnetic set fields of some 10-100 mT are applied and the sample is exposed to the latter for various waiting times. After removing the field, relaxation of the magnetization is recorded via longitudinal Kerr-magnetometry and SQUID. The relaxation data are analyzed by scaling plots revealing universal aspects of aging. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, DMR-0904999, and MRSEC.

  11. Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, S. Y.; Allotey, F. K. A.; Adjepong, S. K.

    1993-10-01

    Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice has been studied for acoustic wave whose wavelength lambda = 2pi/q is smaller than the mean free path of the electrons l (where ql approaches 1). Unlike the homogeneous bulk material where Weinreich relation is independent of the wave number q in the superlattice we observe a dependence on q i.e. spatial dispersion. In the presence of applied constant field E a threshold value was obtained where the acoustoelectric current changes direction.

  12. Nanowire sensors and arrays for chemical/biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Ramanathan, K.; Bangar, M. A.; Chen, W.; Mulchandan, A.; Myung, N. V.

    2005-01-01

    We report electrochemical growth of single nanowire based sensors using e-beam patterned electrolyte channels, potentially enabling the controlled fabrication of individually addressable high density arrays. The electrodeposition technique results in nanowires with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. Using this technique, we have fabricated single palladium nanowires with diameters ranging between 75 nm and 300 nm and conducting polymer nanowires (polypyrrole and polyaniline) with diameters between 100 nm and 200 nm. Using these single nanowires, we have successfully demonstrated gas sensing with Pd nanowires and pH sensing with polypirrole nanowires.

  13. Phoxonic Hybrid Superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Redondo, Elena; Huesmann, Hannah; El Boudouti, El-Houssaine; Tremel, Wolfgang; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Fytas, George

    2015-06-17

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the direction-dependent elastic and electromagnetic wave propagation in a supported film of hybrid PMMA (poly[methyl-methacrylate])-TiO2 superlattice (SL). In the direction normal to the layers, this one-dimensional periodic structure opens propagation band gaps for both hypersonic (GHz) phonons and near-UV photons. The high mismatch of elastic and optical impedance results in a large dual phoxonic band gap. The presence of defects inherent to the spin-coating fabrication technique is sensitively manifested in the band gap region. Utilizing Brillouin light scattering, phonon propagation along the layers was observed to be distinctly different from propagation normal to them and can, under certain conditions (SL thickness and substrate elasticity), reveal the nanomechanical properties of the constituent layers. Besides the first realization of unidirectional phoxonic behavior, hybrid (soft-hard) periodic materials are a promising simple platform for opto-acoustic interactions and applications such as filters and Bragg mirrors.

  14. Superconducting superlattices 2: Native and artificial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozovic, I.; Pavuna, D. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This volume is composed of 26 papers presented at the symposium. Topics covered include the following: high-{Tc} superlattices: intrinsic and artificial; low-{Tc} superlattices and multilayers; and theory.

  15. Fabrication of DNA nanowires by orthogonal self-assembly and DNA intercalation on a Au patterned Si/SiO2 surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Katsuaki; Tonegawa, Naoya; Fujii, Sho; Hikida, Jiro; Nozoye, Hisakazu; Tsutsui, Ken; Wada, Yasuo; Chikira, Makoto; Haga, Masa-Aki

    2008-11-18

    A novel Ru complex bearing both an acridine group and anchoring phosphonate groups was immobilized on a surface in order to capture double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs) from solution. At low surface coverage, the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image revealed the "molecular dot" morphology with the height of the Ru complex ( approximately 2.5 nm) on a mica surface, indicating that four phosphonate anchor groups keep the Ru complex in an upright orientation on the surface. Using a dynamic molecular combing method, the DNA capture efficiency of the Ru complex on a mica surface was examined in terms of the effects of the number of molecular dots and surface hydrophobicity. The immobilized surface could capture DNAs; however, the optimal number of molecular dots on the surface as well as the optimal pull-up speed exist to obtain the extended dsDNAs on the surface. Applying this optimal condition to a Au-patterned Si/SiO 2 (Au/SiO 2) surface, the Au electrode was selectively covered with the Ru complex by orthogonal self-assembly of 4-mercaptbutylphosphonic acid (MBPA), followed by the formation of a Zr (4+)-phosphonate layer and the Ru complex. At the same time, the remaining SiO 2 surface was covered with octylphosphonic acid (OPA) by self-assembly. The selective immobilization of the Ru complex only on the Au electrode was identified by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging on the chemically modified Au/SiO 2 surface. The construction of DNA nanowires on the Au/SiO 2 patterned surface was accomplished by the molecular combing method of the selective immobilized Ru complex on Au electrodes. These interconnected nanowires between Au electrodes were used as a scaffold for the modification of Pd nanoparticles on the DNA. Furthermore, Cu metallization was achieved by electroless plating of Cu metal on a priming of Pd nanoparticles on the Pd-covered DNA nanowires. The resulting Cu nanowires showed a metallic behavior with relatively high resistance.

  16. Nanowire Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Couteau C.; Larrue A.; Wilhelm C.; Soci C.

    2015-01-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, fl...

  17. Nanowire-decorated microscale metallic electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Antohe, V.A.;

    2008-01-01

    of lithographically defined metallic microelectrodes. The anodization of the aluminum permits electroplating only on top of the metallic electrodes, leading to the nanowire patterns having the same shape as the underlying metallic tracks. The variation in the fabricated structures between the patterned and non......The fabrication of metallic nanowire patterns within anodic alumina oxide (AAO) membranes on top of continuous conducting substrates are discussed. The fabrication protocol is based on the realization of nanowire patterns using supported nanoporous alumina templates (SNAT) prepared on top......-patterned substrates can be interpreted in terms of different behavior during anodization. The improved quality of fabricated nanowire patterns is clearly demonstrated by the SEM imaging and the uniform growth of nanowires inside the alumina template is observed without any significant height variation....

  18. Controllable hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires arrays on Al-doped ZnO seed layer and patterning of ZnO nanowires arrays via surface modification of substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jin [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Que Wenxiu, E-mail: wxque@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Jia Qiaoying [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Ye Xiangdong; Ding Yucheng [State Key Laboratory of Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2011-09-15

    ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays are assembled on the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) seed layer by a hydrothermal process. Effects of the temperature and growth time of the hydrothermal process on morphological and photoluminescence properties of the as-assembled ZnO NW arrays are characterized and studied. Results indicate that the length and diameter of the ZnO NWs increase with a lengthening of the growth time at 80 deg. C and the hydrothermal temperature has a significant effect on the growth rate and the photoluminescence properties of the ZnO NW arrays. The patterned AZO seed layer is fabricated on a silicon substrate by combining a sol-gel process with an electron-beam lithography process, as well as a surface fluorination technique, and then the ZnO NW arrays are selectively grown on those patterned regions of the AZO seed layer by the hydrothermal process. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra of the patterned ZnO NW arrays shows that only a strong UV emission at about 380 nm is observed, which implies that few crystal defects exist inside the as-grown ZnO NW arrays.

  19. Multiferroicity in Perovskite Manganite Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yong-Mei; Jiang, Xue-Fan; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Multiferroic properties of short period perovskite type manganite superlattice ((R1MnO3)n/(R2MnO3)n (n=1,2,3)) are considered within the framework of classical Heisenberg model using Monte Carlo simulation. Our result revealed the interesting behaviors in Mn spins structure in superlattice. Apart from simple plane spin cycloid structure which is shown in all manganites including bulk, film, and superlattice here in low temperature, a non-coplanar spiral spin structure is exhibited in a certain temperature range when n equals 1, 2 or 3. Specific heat, spin-helicity vector, spin correlation function, spin-helicity correlation function, and spin configuration are calculated to confirm this non-coplanar spiral spin structure. These results are associated with the competition among exchange interaction, magnetic anisotropy, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant No. 11447136

  20. Perovskite Superlattices as Tunable Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, H. M.; Harshavardhan, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that superlattices that comprise alternating epitaxial layers of dissimilar paraelectric perovskites can exhibit large changes in permittivity with the application of electric fields. The superlattices are potentially useful as electrically tunable dielectric components of such microwave devices as filters and phase shifters. The present superlattice approach differs fundamentally from the prior use of homogeneous, isotropic mixtures of base materials and dopants. A superlattice can comprise layers of two or more perovskites in any suitable sequence (e.g., ABAB..., ABCDABCD..., ABACABACA...). Even though a single layer of one of the perovskites by itself is not tunable, the compositions and sequence of the layers can be chosen so that (1) the superlattice exhibits low microwave loss and (2) the interfacial interaction between at least two of the perovskites in the superlattice renders either the entire superlattice or else at least one of the perovskites tunable.

  1. Superlattice Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Rama

    2002-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated a significant enhancement in thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) at 300K, of about 2.4 in p-type Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 superlattices, using the concept of phonon-blocking electron-transmitting superlattice structures [1]. The phonon blocking arises from a complex localization-like behavior for phonons in nano-structured superlattices and the electron transmission is facilitated by optimal choice of band-offsets in these semiconductor hetero-structures. We will also discuss the ZT 1.2 results in n-type Bi2Te3/Bi2Te3-xSex superlattices and our initial understanding on the reasons behind the less-than-dramatic performance of these materials compared to the p-type superlattices. Due to the high ZT of the material, devices potentially offer high coefficient of performance (COP) in solid-state refrigeration. The thin-film devices, resulting from rather simple microelectronic processing, allow high cooling power densities to be achieved for a variety of high-power electronic applications. We have obtained 32K and 40K sub-ambient cooling at 298K and 353K, respectively, in these superlattice micro-thermoelements with potential localized active-cooling power densities approaching 700 W/cm2. In addition to high-performance (in terms of COP) and power densities, these thin-film microdevices are also extremely fast-acting, within 10 microsec and about a factor of 23,000 better than bulk thermoelectric technology. Thus, these are of significance for preventing thermal run-away in high-power electronics. We will present results to demonstrate this concept with infrared imaging of cooling/heating with superlattice micro-devices. We will also discuss outstanding issues such as heat removal from the heat sink towards the full exploitation of this technology. In addition, we will compare the state-of-the-art with other thin-film superlattice materials and device concepts. [1] R. Venkatasubramanian, E. Siivola, T. Colpitts, and B.C. O’Quinn, Thin

  2. Stretchable and transparent electrodes based on patterned silver nanowires by laser-induced forward transfer for non-contacted printing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Teppei; Mandamparambil, Rajesh; Martinus Peterus van Bragt, Dirk; Jiu, Jinting; Koga, Hirotaka; van den Brand, Jeroen; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) are excellent candidate electrode materials in next-generation wearable devices due to their high flexibility and high conductivity. In particular, patterning techniques for AgNWs electrode manufacture are very important in the roll-to-roll printing process to achieve high throughput and special performance production. It is also essential to realize a non-contact mode patterning for devices in order to keep the pre-patterned components away from mechanical damages. Here, we report a successful non-contact patterning of AgNWs-based stretchable and transparent electrodes by laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique. The technique was used to fabricate a 100% stretchable electrode with a width of 200 μm and electrical resistivity 10-4 Ωcm. Experiments conducted integrating the stretchable electrode on rubber substrate in which LED was pre-fabricated showed design flexibility resulting from non-contact printing. Further, a patterned transparent electrode showed over 80% in optical transmittance and less than 100 Ω sq-1 in sheet resistance by the optimized LIFT technique.

  3. Stretchable and transparent electrodes based on patterned silver nanowires by laser-induced forward transfer for non-contacted printing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Teppei; Mandamparambil, Rajesh; van Bragt, Dirk Martinus Peterus; Jiu, Jinting; Koga, Hirotaka; van den Brand, Jeroen; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; den Toonder, Jaap M J; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2016-11-11

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) are excellent candidate electrode materials in next-generation wearable devices due to their high flexibility and high conductivity. In particular, patterning techniques for AgNWs electrode manufacture are very important in the roll-to-roll printing process to achieve high throughput and special performance production. It is also essential to realize a non-contact mode patterning for devices in order to keep the pre-patterned components away from mechanical damages. Here, we report a successful non-contact patterning of AgNWs-based stretchable and transparent electrodes by laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique. The technique was used to fabricate a 100% stretchable electrode with a width of 200 μm and electrical resistivity 10(-4) Ωcm. Experiments conducted integrating the stretchable electrode on rubber substrate in which LED was pre-fabricated showed design flexibility resulting from non-contact printing. Further, a patterned transparent electrode showed over 80% in optical transmittance and less than 100 Ω sq(-1) in sheet resistance by the optimized LIFT technique.

  4. Nanowires: properties, applications and synthesis via porous anodic aluminium oxide template

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaya Sarkar; Gobinda Gopal Khan; A Basumallick

    2007-06-01

    Quasi one-dimensional nanowires possess unique electrical, electronic, thermoelectrical, optical, magnetic and chemical properties, which are different from that of their parent counterpart. The physical properties of nanowires are influenced by the morphology of the nanowires, diameter dependent band gap, carrier density of states etc. Nanowires hold lot of promises for different applications. Basic electronic devices like junction diodes, transistors, FETs and logic gates can be fabricated by using semiconductor and superlattice nanowires. Thermoelectric cooling system can be fabricated by using metallic nanowires. Semiconductor nanowire junctions can be used for different opto-electronic applications. Moreover, periodic arrays of magnetic nanowires hold high potential for recording media application. Nanowires are also potential candidates for sensor and bio-medical applications. In the present article, the physical and chemical properties of nanowires along with their probable applications in different fields have been reviewed in detail. The review also includes highlights of the synthesis of nanowires via porous anodic aluminium oxide template since the technique is simple, cost-effective and a low temperature technique.

  5. Complex band structure and superlattice electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J. N.; McGill, T. C.

    1981-04-01

    The complex band structures of the bulk materials which constitute the alternating layer (001) semiconductor-semiconductor superlattice are investigated. The complex bands near the center of the Brillouin zone in the [001] direction are studied in detail. The decay lengths of superlattice states whose energies lie in the bulk band gaps of one of the semiconductors are determined from the dispersion curves of these bands for imaginary k-->. This method is applied using a tight-binding band-structure calculation to two superlattices: the AlAs-GaAs superlattice and the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. The decay lengths of AlAs-GaAs superlattice conduction-band minimum states are found to be substantially shorter than those for the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. These differences in the decay of the states in the two superlattices result in differences in the variation of the conduction-band effective masses with the thickness of the AlAs and CdTe layers. The conduction-band effective masses increase more rapidly with AlAs thickness in the AlAs-GaAs superlattice than with CdTe thickness in the CdTe-HgTe superlattice.

  6. Isolated structures in two-dimensional optical superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xin-Hao; Yang, Bao-Guo; Xu, Xia; Tang, Peng-Ju; Zhou, Xiao-Ji

    2017-10-01

    Overlaying commensurate optical lattices with various configurations called superlattices can lead to exotic lattice topologies and, in turn, a discovery of novel physics. In this study, by overlapping the maxima of lattices, a new isolated structure is created, while the interference of minima can generate various "sublattice" patterns. Three different kinds of primitive lattices are used to demonstrate isolated square, triangular, and hexagonal "sublattice" structures in a two-dimensional optical superlattice, the patterns of which can be manipulated dynamically by tuning the polarization, frequency, and intensity of laser beams. In addition, we propose the method of altering the relative phase to adjust the tunneling amplitudes in "sublattices". Our configurations provide unique opportunities to study particle entanglement in "lattices" formed by intersecting wells and to implement special quantum logic gates in exotic lattice geometries.

  7. Isolated Structures in Two-Dimensional Optical Superlattice

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Xinhao; Xu, Xia; Tang, Pengju; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2016-01-01

    Overlaying commensurate optical lattices with various configurations called superlattices can lead to exotic lattice topologies and, in turn, a discovery of novel physics. In this study, by overlapping the maxima of lattices, a new isolated structure is created, while the interference of minima can generate various "sublattice" patterns. Three different kinds of primitive lattices are used to demonstrate isolated square, triangular, and hexagonal "sublattice" structures in a two-dimensional optical superlattice, the patterns of which can be manipulated dynamically by tuning the polarization, frequency, and intensity of laser beams. In addition, we propose the method of altering the relative phase to adjust the tunneling amplitudes in "sublattices." Our configurations provide unique opportunities to study particle entanglement in "lattices" formed by intersecting wells and to implement special quantum logic gates in exotic lattice geometries.

  8. Phonon-induced polariton superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, Jr., M. M.; Poel, Mike van der; Santos, P. V.;

    2006-01-01

    We show that the coherent interaction between microcavity polaritons and externally stimulated acoustic phonons forms a tunable polariton superlattice with a folded energy dispersion determined by the phonon population and wavelength. Under high phonon concentration, the strong confinement of the...... of the optical and excitonic polariton components in the phonon potential creates weakly coupled polariton wires with a virtually flat energy dispersion....

  9. Epitaxy, thin films and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagd Christensen, Morten

    1997-05-01

    This report is the result of structural investigations of 3d transition metal superlattices consisting of Fe/V, Cr/Mn, V/Mn and Fe/Mn, and a structural and magnetic study of a series of Ho/Pr alloys. The work includes preparation and characterization of substrates as well as growth of thin films and Fe/V superlattices by molecular beam epitaxy, including in-situ characterization by reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Structural characterization has been done by x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on the rotating copper anode at Risoe, and at synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Brookhaven, and the neutron scattering was done at the Danish research reactor DR3 at Risoe. In addition to longitudinal scans, giving information about the structural parameters in the modulation direction, non-specular scans were also performed. This type of scans gives information about in-plane orientation and lattice parameters. From the analysis, structural information is obtained about lattice parameters, epitaxial strain, coherence lengths and crystallographic orientation for the superlattice systems, except Fe/Mn superlattices, which could not be modelled. For the Ho/Pr alloys, x-ray magnetic scattering was performed, and the crystal and magnetic structure was investigated. (au) 14 tabs.; 58 ills., 96 refs.

  10. Nanowire photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated electronic circuitry ranks among the most disruptive and transformative technologies of the 20th century. Even though integrated circuits are ubiquitous in modern life, both fundamental and technical constraints will eventually test the limits of Moore's law. Nanowire photonic circuitry constructed from myriad one-dimensional building blocks offers numerous opportunities for the development of next-generation optical information processors and spectroscopy. However, several challenges remain before the potential of nanowire building blocks is fully realized. We cover recent advances in nanowire synthesis, characterization, lasing, integration, and the eventual application to relevant technical and scientific questions.

  11. Self-catalyzed ternary core-shell GaAsP nanowire arrays grown on patterned Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunyan; Wu, Jiang; Aagesen, Martin; Holm, Jeppe; Hatch, Sabina; Tang, Mingchu; Huo, Suguo; Liu, Huiyun

    2014-08-13

    The growth of self-catalyzed ternary core-shell GaAsP nanowire (NW) arrays on SiO2 patterned Si(111) substrates has been demonstrated by using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. A high-temperature deoxidization step up to ∼ 900 °C prior to NW growth was used to remove the native oxide and/or SiO2 residue from the patterned holes. To initiate the growth of GaAsP NW arrays, the Ga predeposition used for assisting the formation of Ga droplets in the patterned holes, was shown to be another essential step. The effects of the patterned-hole size on the NW morphology were also studied and explained using a simple growth model. A lattice-matched radial GaAsP core-shell NW structure has subsequently been developed with room-temperature photoluminescence emission around 740 nm. These results open up new perspectives for integrating position-controlled III-V NW photonic and electronic structures on a Si platform.

  12. Analytical Study of Electromagnetic Wave in Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical description of soliton solutions and exact analytical solutions in the sine-Gordon equation is extended to superlattice physics. A family of interesting exact solutions and a new exact analytical solution have been obtained for the electromagnetic wave propagating through a superlattice. In more general cases, the vector potential along the propagating direction obeys the sine-Gordon equation. Some mathematical results of theoretical investigation are given for different cases in superlattices.

  13. Self-Organized Growth of Alloy Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, E.; Floro, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lagally, M.G.; Liu, F.; Tersoff, J.; Venezuela, P.

    1998-10-19

    We predict theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the spontaneous formation of a superlattice during crystal growth. When a strained alloy grows by "step flow", the steps at the surface form periodic bunches. The resulting modulated strain biases the incorporation of the respective alloy components at different steps in the bunch, leading to the formation of a superlattice. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy for SiGe grown on Si give clear evidence for such spontaneous superlattice formation.

  14. Germanium nanowires grown using different catalyst metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, R.C., E-mail: riama@ifsp.edu.br [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Área de Ciências, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Rua Américo Ambrósio, 269, Jd. Canaã, Sertãozinho, CEP 14169-263 (Brazil); Kamimura, H.; Munhoz, R.; Rodrigues, A.D. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Leite, E.R. [Departamento de Química – LIEC, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    Germanium nanowires have been synthesized by the well known vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using gold, silver, cooper, indium and nickel as catalyst metals. The influence of metal seeds on nanowires structural and electronic transport properties was also investigated. Electron microscopy images demonstrated that, despite differences in diameters, all nanowires obtained presented single crystalline structures. X-ray patterns showed that all nanowires were composed by germanium with a small amount of germanium oxide, and the catalyst metal was restricted at the nanowires' tips. Raman spectroscopy evidenced the long range order in the crystalline structure of each sample. Electrical measurements indicated that variable range hopping was the dominant mechanism in carrier transport for all devices, with similar hopping distance, regardless the material used as catalyst. Then, in spite of the differences in synthesis temperatures and nanowires diameters, the catalyst metals have not affected the composition and crystalline quality of the germanium nanowires nor the carrier transport in the germanium nanowire network devices. - Highlights: • Ge nanowires were grown by VLS method using Au, Ag, Cu, In and Ni as catalysts. • All nanowires presented high single crystalline quality and long range order. • Devices showed semiconducting behavior having VRH as dominant transport mechanism. • The metal catalyst did not influence structural properties or the transport mechanism.

  15. Nanowire Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couteau, C.; Larrue, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Soci, C.

    2015-05-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  16. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  17. Magnetostatic Interaction in Fe-Co Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Elbaile

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrays of Fe-Co alloy nanowires with diameter around 35 nm and several micrometers in length have been synthesized by codepositing Fe and Co into porous anodic alumina. The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of the nanowires (hysteresis loops and remanence curves were characterized by SEM, TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and VSM, respectively. The XRD patterns indicate that the Fe-Co nanowires present a body-centered cubic (bcc structure and a preferred (110 orientation perpendicular to the template surface. From the hysteresis loops obtained with the magnetic field applied in the axis direction of the nanowires, we can observe that the coercive field slightly decreases when the nanowire length increases. This magnetic behaviour is analyzed considering the shape anisotropy and the dipolar interactions among nanowires.

  18. Spin-dependent optical superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Dai, Han-Ning; Sun, Hui; Reingruber, Andreas; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-07-01

    We propose and implement a lattice scheme for coherently manipulating atomic spins. Using a vector light shift and a superlattice structure, we demonstrate experimentally its capability on addressing spins in double wells and square plaquettes with subwavelength resolution. The quantum coherence of spin manipulations is verified through measuring atom tunneling and spin exchange dynamics. Our experiment presents a building block for engineering many-body quantum states in optical lattices for realizing quantum simulation and computation tasks.

  19. Interwell excitons in GaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Sayed, Karim El; Sanders, G.;

    1997-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect excitons in superlattices with narrow minibands is investigated experimentally. The interwell exciton is similar to the first Wannier-Stark localized exciton of an electrically biased superlattice. However, in the present case the localization is mediated by th...

  20. 图案化ZnO纳米线阵列制备与应用的研究进展%Progress in Preparation and Application of Patterned ZnO Nanowire Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雪梅; 俎喜红; 张政; 黄海亮; 易国斌

    2013-01-01

    Various patterning technologies of ZnO nanowire arrays,such as electron beam lithography,nanosphere lithography,laser interferometric lithography,nanoimprint lithography and block copolymer nanolithography,are reviewed.And the applications of patterned ZnO nanowire arrays in functional devices,such as sensors,UV detectors and solar cells,etc,are introduced.The advantages,values and problems in the preparation and application of patterned ZnO nanowire arrays are analyzed,and its development trend is previewed.%综述了多种图案化制备ZnO纳米线阵列的技术,包括电子束光刻技术、纳米球蚀刻技术、激光干涉光刻技术、纳米压印技术和嵌段共聚物蚀刻技术等.介绍了图案化ZnO纳米线阵列在传感器、太阳能电池和UV检测器等功能器件中的应用进展,分析了图案化ZnO纳米线阵列制备与应用中的优点、意义及存在的问题,并展望了其未来发展趋势.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of ZnO Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Michael Hsuan-Yi; Mao Samuel; Henning Feick; Yan Haoquan; Wu Yiying; Hennes Kind; Richard Russo; Eicke Weber; Yang Peidong

    2004-01-01

    Zinc oxide is a wide bandgap (3.37 eV) semiconductor with a hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure. ZnO prepared in nanowire form may be used as a nanosized ultraviolet light-emitting source. In this study, ZnO nanowires were prepared by vapor-phase transport of Zn vapor onto gold-coated silicon substrates in a tube furnace heated to 900 C. Gold serves as a catalyst to capture Zn vapor during nanowire growth.Size control of ZnO nanowires has been achieved by varying the gold film thickness, using fine gold clusters, or tuning other growth conditions. Nanowire diameters ranging from 20 - 200 nm and lengths between 2 - 40 μm can be made. Structural characterization of the nanowires was mainly performed using powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Orientational control of ZnO nanowires can be achieved by growing the nanowires on sapphire substrates. Nearly perfect lattice match between the (002) c-axis growth of ZnO nanowires and the (110) a-plane surface of sapphire substrate allows vertical growth of ZnO nanowires. Fabrication of patterned ZnO nanowire array was then made by patterning the gold layer on the sapphire substrates.Optical characterization of the ZnO nanowires using a He-Cd laser (325 nm) shows that the nanowires possess a strong emission band around 375 - 380 nm. Room temperature power-dependent photoluminescence study using a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 3-ns pulse width) shows that the nanowires exhibit lasing emission property. This is the first nanowire system displaying such phenomenon.

  2. Revisiting HOPG superlattices: Structure and conductance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sumati; Kolekar, Sadhu; Deshpande, Aparna

    2017-04-01

    Superlattices observed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been studied extensively by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The interest in the study of graphite superlattices has seen a resurgence since the discovery of graphene. Single layer graphene, bilayer graphene, and few layer graphene can now be grown on different substrates. The adherence of graphene to various substrates often leads to a periodic out-of-plane modulation and superlattices due to lattice mismatch. In this paper, we report STM imaging and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) of different kinds of superlattices on HOPG characterized by a variation in lattice periodicities. Our study also shows evidence of the displacement of the topmost HOPG layer by scanning different areas of the same superlattice. A correlation between the lattice periodicity with its conductance properties is derived. The results of this work are important for understanding the origin of the superlattice structure on HOPG. Investigation of such superlattices may open up possible ways to modify two dimensional electron systems to create materials with tailored electronic properties.

  3. 2D wave-front shaping in optical superlattices using nonlinear volume holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Hong, Xu-Hao; Lu, Rong-Er; Yue, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Chao; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear volume holography is employed to realize arbitrary wave-front shaping during nonlinear processes with properly designed 2D optical superlattices. The concept of a nonlinear polarization wave in nonlinear volume holography is investigated. The holographic imaging of irregular patterns was performed using 2D LiTaO3 crystals with fundamental wave propagating along the spontaneous polarization direction, and the results agree well with the theoretical predictions. This Letter not only extends the application area of optical superlattices, but also offers an efficient method for wave-front shaping technology.

  4. Exact Surface States in Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Qiongtao

    2012-01-01

    We develop an analytical method to derive exact surface states in photonic superlattices. In a kind of infinite bichromatic superlattices satisfying some certain conditions, we analytically obtain their in-gap states, which are superpositions of finite numbers of unstable Bloch waves. By using the unstable in-gap states, we construct exactly several stable surface states in various photonic superlattices. We analytically explore the parametric dependence of these exact surface states. Our analysis provides an exact demonstration for the existence of surface states and would be also helpful to understand surface states in other lattice systems.

  5. Magnetic structure of holmium-yttrium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehan, D.A.; McMorrow, D.F.; Cowley, R.A.;

    1993-01-01

    that the superlattices have high crystallographic integrity: the structural coherence length parallel to the growth direction is typically almost-equal-to 2000 angstrom, while the interfaces between the two elements are well defined and extend over approximately four lattice planes. The magnetic structures were......We present the results of a study of the chemical and magnetic structures of a series of holmium-yttrium superlattices and a 5000 angstrom film of holmium, all grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. By combining the results of high-resolution x-ray diffraction with detailed modeling, we show...... determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The moments on the Ho3+ ions in the superlattices form a basal-plane helix. From an analysis of the superlattice structure factors of the primary magnetic satellites, we are able to determine separately the contributions made by the holmium and yttrium...

  6. Interwell excitons in GaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Sayed, Karim El; Sanders, G.;

    1996-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect excitons in superlattices with narrow minibands is theoretically and experimentally investigated. We identify the experimental conditions for the observation of interwell excitons and find a distinct excitonic state energetically located between the Is exciton ...

  7. Polyadic Cantor superlattices with variable lacunarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggard, D L; Jaggard, A D

    1997-02-01

    Reflection and transmission properties of polyadic fractal superlattices are formulated, solved analytically, and characterized for variations in stage of growth, fractal dimension, and lacunarity. This is the first time to our knowledge that the effect of lacunarity on wave interactions with such structures has been considered. The results are summarized by families of reflection data that we denote twist plots. A new doubly recursive computational technique efficiently provides the reflection and transmission coefficients for a large class of Cantor superlattices with numerous interfaces.

  8. Analytical Study of Electromagnetic Wave in Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINChang; ZHANGXiu-Lian

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical description of soliton solutions and exact analytical solutions in the sine-Gordon equation is extended to superlattice physics. A family of interesting exact solutions and a new exact analytical solution have been obtained for the electromagnetic wave propagating through a superlattice. In more general cases, the vector potential along the propagating direction obeys the sine-Gordon equation. Some mathematical results of theoretical investigation are given for different cases in supedattices.

  9. HgTe-CdTe SUPERLATTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D; Mcgill, T.

    1984-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic properties of HgTe-CdTe superlattices. The band gap as a function of layer thickness, effective masses normal to the layer plane and tunneling length are compared to the corresponding (Hg, Cd)Te alloys. We find that the superlattice possesses a number of properties that may make it superior to the corresponding alloy as an infrared material.

  10. Joule heating in nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Fangohr, H.; Chernyshenko, D.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, G.

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat is simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) ...

  11. A highly reliable copper nanowire/nanoparticle ink pattern with high conductivity on flexible substrate prepared via a flash light-sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung-Jun; Park, Sung-Hyeon; Moon, Chang-Jin; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2015-03-18

    In this work, copper nanowires (NWs) and Cu nanoparticles (NPs) were employed to increase the reliability of a printed electrode pattern under mechanical bending fatigue. The fabricated Cu NW/NP inks with different weight fractions of Cu NWs were printed on a polyimide substrate and flash light-sintered within a few milliseconds at room temperature under ambient conditions. Then, 1000 cycles of outer and inner bending fatigue tests were performed using a lab-made fatigue tester. The flash light-sintered Cu NW/NP ink film with 5 wt % Cu NWs prepared under the flash light-sintering conditions (12.5 J·cm–2 irradiation energy, 10 ms pulse duration, and one pulse) showed a lower resistivity (22.77 μΩ·cm) than those of the only Cu NPs and Cu NWs ink (94.01 μΩ·cm and 104.15 μΩ·cm, respectively). In addition, the resistance change (ΔR·R0(–1)) of the 5 wt % Cu NWs Cu NW/NP film was greatly enhanced to 4.19 compared to the 92.75 of the Cu NPs film obtained under mechanical fatigue conditions over 1000 cycles and an outer bending radius of 7 mm. These results were obtained by the densification and enhanced mechanical flexibility of flash light-sintered Cu NW/NP network, which resulted in prevention of crack initiation and propagation. To characterize the Cu NW/NP ink film, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used.

  12. Fabrication of Polypyrrole Nanowire and Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Large area highly uniform and ordered polypyrrole nanowire and nanotubearrays were fabricated by chemical oxidation polymerization with the help of a porousanodic aluminium oxide (AAO template. Under 0.2 moL/L pyrrole (H2O and 0.2 moL/LFeCl3 (H2O pattern, polypyrrole nanowire arrays were obtained after 2.0 hourspolymerization reaction in a two-compartment reaction cell. When the reaction wasstopped after 15 minutes, polypyrrole nanotube arrays have been formed. The diameter,length and density of compositive nanowires and nanotubes could be controlled byparameters of AAO template.

  13. Strong reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in superlattices and quantum dot superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, V. M.; Nika, D. L.; Cocemasov, A. I.; Isacova, C. I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal transport is theoretically investigated in the planar Si/Ge superlattices and Si/Ge quantum dot superlattices. The phonon states in the considered nanostructures are obtained using the Face-centered Cubic Cell model of lattice dynamics. A significant reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity is revealed in both considered structures in a wide range of temperatures from 100 K to 400 K. This effect is explained by the removal of the high-energy and high-velocity phonon modes from the heat flux due to their localization in superlattice segments and the phonon scattering on the interfaces. The obtained results show prospects of the planar superlattices and quantum-dot superlattices for thermoelectric and thermo-insulating applications.

  14. Ultrasound focusing images in superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukihiro; Tamura, Shin-ichiro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-03-04

    We study theoretically ultrasound focusing in periodic multilayered structures, or superlattices, by solving the wave equation with the Green function method and calculating the transmitted ultrasound amplitude images of both the longitudinal and transverse modes. The constituent layers assumed are elastically isotropic but the periodically stacked structure is anisotropic. Thus anisotropy of ultrasound propagation is predicted even at low frequencies and it is enhanced significantly at higher frequencies due to the zone-folding effect of acoustic dispersion relations. An additional effect studied is the interference of ultrasound (known as the internal diffraction), which can be recognized when the propagation distance is comparable to the ultrasound wavelength. Numerical examples are developed for millimetre-scale Al/polymer multilayers used recently for imaging experiment with surface acoustic waves. (author)

  15. Self-organized magnetic nanowire arrays based on alumina and titania templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prida, V M; Pirota, K R; Navas, D; Asenjo, A; Hernández-Vélez, M; Vázquez, M

    2007-01-01

    Densely packed arrays of magnetic nanowires have been synthesized by electrodeposition filling of nanopores in alumina and titania membranes formed by self-assembling during anodization process. Emphasis is made on the control of the production parameters leading to ordering degree and lattice parameter of the array as well as nanowires diameter and length. Structural, morphological and magnetic properties exhibited by nanowire arrays have been studied for several nanowire compositions, different ordering degree and for different nanowire aspect ratios. The magnetic behaviour of nanowires array is governed by the balance between different energy contributions: shape anisotropy of individual nanowires, the magnetostatic interaction of dipolar origin among nanowires, and magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies induced by the pattern templates. These novel nanocomposites, based on ferromagnetic nanowires embedded in anodic nanoporous templates, are becoming promising candidates for technological applications such as functionalised arrays for magnetic sensing, ultrahigh density magnetic storage media or spin-based electronic devices.

  16. PHASE TRANSITION PROPERTIES OF A TWO COMPONENT FINITE MAGNETIC SUPERLATTICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIAO-GUANG; LIU NING-NING; PAN SHAO-HUA; YANG GUO-ZHEN

    2000-01-01

    We study an (l, n) finite superlattice, which consists of two alternative magnetic materials(components) of l and n atomic layers, respectively. Based on the Ising model, we examine the phase transition properties of the magnetic superlattice. By transfer matrix method we derive the equation for Curie temperature of the superlattice. Numerical results are obtained for the dependence of Curie temperature on the thickness and exchange constants of the superlattice.

  17. Toward optimized light utilization in nanowire arrays using scalable nanosphere lithography and selected area growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaria, Anuj R; Yao, Maoqing; Chi, Chunyung; Huang, Ningfeng; Lin, Chenxi; Li, Ruijuan; Povinelli, Michelle L; Dapkus, P Daniel; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-06-13

    Vertically aligned, catalyst-free semiconducting nanowires hold great potential for photovoltaic applications, in which achieving scalable synthesis and optimized optical absorption simultaneously is critical. Here, we report combining nanosphere lithography (NSL) and selected area metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (SA-MOCVD) for the first time for scalable synthesis of vertically aligned gallium arsenide nanowire arrays, and surprisingly, we show that such nanowire arrays with patterning defects due to NSL can be as good as highly ordered nanowire arrays in terms of optical absorption and reflection. Wafer-scale patterning for nanowire synthesis was done using a polystyrene nanosphere template as a mask. Nanowires grown from substrates patterned by NSL show similar structural features to those patterned using electron beam lithography (EBL). Reflection of photons from the NSL-patterned nanowire array was used as a measure of the effect of defects present in the structure. Experimentally, we show that GaAs nanowires as short as 130 nm show reflection of <10% over the visible range of the solar spectrum. Our results indicate that a highly ordered nanowire structure is not necessary: despite the "defects" present in NSL-patterned nanowire arrays, their optical performance is similar to "defect-free" structures patterned by more costly, time-consuming EBL methods. Our scalable approach for synthesis of vertical semiconducting nanowires can have application in high-throughput and low-cost optoelectronic devices, including solar cells.

  18. Chemical Sensing with Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Reginald M.

    2012-07-01

    Transformational advances in the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensors and biosensors have been achieved over the past two to three years. These advances have arisen from a better understanding of the mechanisms of transduction operating in these devices, innovations in nanowire fabrication, and improved methods for incorporating receptors into or onto nanowires. Nanowire-based biosensors have detected DNA in undiluted physiological saline. For silicon nanowire nucleic acid sensors, higher sensitivities have been obtained by eliminating the passivating oxide layer on the nanowire surface and by substituting uncharged protein nucleic acids for DNA as the capture strands. Biosensors for peptide and protein cancer markers, based on both semiconductor nanowires and nanowires of conductive polymers, have detected these targets at physiologically relevant concentrations in both blood plasma and whole blood. Nanowire chemical sensors have also detected several gases at the parts-per-million level. This review discusses these and other recent advances, concentrating on work published in the past three years.

  19. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhihuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in “volumetric modes,”which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry–Perot (FP, and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width, tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal, core–shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption and downward transitions (emission of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this “rate management” scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  20. Magneto-transport measurements of domain wall propagation in individual multi segmented cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2016-03-01

    Magnetotransport measurements were performed on multisegmented Co/Ni nanowires fabricated by template-assisted electrodeposition. Individual nanowires were isolated and electrodes patterned to study their magnetization reversal process. The magnetoresistance reversal curve of the multisegmented nanowire exhibits a step in the switching field. Micromagnetic simulations of the magnetization reversal process are in agreement with the experimental findings and attribute the step at the switching field to the pinning of a domain wall at the interface of the Co/Ni nanowire.

  1. Anisotropy in layered half-metallic Heusler alloy superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadani, Javad G.; Munira, Kamaram; Sivakumar, Chockalingam; Butler, William H. [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Romero, Jonathon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Ma, Jianhua; Ghosh, Avik W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    We show that when two Heusler alloys are layered in the [001], [110], or [111] directions for various thicknesses to form a superlattice, the Slater-Pauling rule may still be satisfied and the resulting superlattice is often half-metallic with gaps comparable to or larger than those of its constituents. In addition, uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is induced because of the differences in the electronic structure of the two Heuslers in the superlattice. Various full-full, full-half, and half-half Heusler superlattices are studied, and potential half-metallic superlattices with perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy are identified.

  2. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  3. Magnetic properties of rare earth superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, C J T

    2001-01-01

    Single-crystal Tm/Y and Tm/Lu superlattices have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their chemical structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction. Magnetisation measurements have revealed a more complicated phase diagram than that of pure Tm. Application of a field along the c-direction gave rise to an extra transition, and transitions were detected for the superlattices when the field was applied along the b-axis. In neutron diffraction studies, c-axis longitudinally modulated magnetic structures were found for both Tm/Y and Tm/Lu, which propagate coherently through the non-magnetic layers. In the case of Tm/Lu superlattices, there is evidence for ordering of the basal plane components.

  4. Electrical transport engineering of semiconductor superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Aliasghar

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of doping concentration on band structures of electrons and electrical transmission in a typical aperiodic semiconductor superlattice consisting of quantum well and barrier layers, theoretically. For this purpose, we assume that each unit cell of the superlattice contains alternately two types of material GaAs (as a well) and GaAlAs (as a barrier) with six sublayers of two materials. Our calculations are based on the generalized Kronig-Penny (KP) model and the transfer matrix method within the framework of the parabolic conductance band effective mass approximation in the coherent regime. This model reduces the numerical calculation time and enables us to use the transfer matrix method to investigate transport in the superlattices. We show that by varying the doping concentration and geometrical parameters, one can easily block the transmission of the electrons. The numerical results may be useful in designing of nanoenergy filter devices.

  5. Electrical transport engineering of semiconductor superlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, Aliasghar, E-mail: aashokri@tpnu.ac.ir

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of doping concentration on band structures of electrons and electrical transmission in a typical aperiodic semiconductor superlattice consisting of quantum well and barrier layers, theoretically. For this purpose, we assume that each unit cell of the superlattice contains alternately two types of material GaAs (as a well) and GaAlAs (as a barrier) with six sublayers of two materials. Our calculations are based on the generalized Kronig–Penny (KP) model and the transfer matrix method within the framework of the parabolic conductance band effective mass approximation in the coherent regime. This model reduces the numerical calculation time and enables us to use the transfer matrix method to investigate transport in the superlattices. We show that by varying the doping concentration and geometrical parameters, one can easily block the transmission of the electrons. The numerical results may be useful in designing of nanoenergy filter devices.

  6. Energy Band Calculations for Maximally Even Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Richard; Byrd, Jason

    2007-03-01

    Superlattices are multiple-well, semiconductor heterostructures that can be described by one-dimensional potential wells separated by potential barriers. We refer to a distribution of wells and barriers based on the theory of maximally even sets as a maximally even superlattice. The prototypical example of a maximally even set is the distribution of white and black keys on a piano keyboard. Black keys may represent wells and the white keys represent barriers. As the number of wells and barriers increase, efficient and stable methods of calculation are necessary to study these structures. We have implemented a finite-element method using the discrete variable representation (FE-DVR) to calculate E versus k for these superlattices. Use of the FE-DVR method greatly reduces the amount of calculation necessary for the eigenvalue problem.

  7. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Rongke; Huang Andong [School of Science, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Li Da; Zhang Zhidong, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research and International Centre for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-10-19

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  8. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Ferreira, W. P.; Farias, G. A.; Ferreira, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov–Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born–von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov–Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  9. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D R; Chaves, A; Ferreira, W P; Farias, G A; Ferreira, R

    2017-04-26

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov-Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born-von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  10. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  11. Theory of Semiconducting Superlattices and Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Core excitons ir. superlattices We have developed the first theory of Hjalmarsor.- Frenke ’ core excitons in superlattices, and applied it to strained...technique has been described are accelerated. A kinetic tempcrature TK is defined as by Kirkpatrick et al.31 and uses thr Monte Carlo algo- the average...classical kinetic energy of the atoms, rithm of Metropolis et al.32 Monte Carlo steps are taken 3/2kTK=(l/N)4rn’mlv,, where i=1,2, . . . ,n is the

  12. FABRICATION OF PHOTONIC CRYSTAL WITH SUPERLATTICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cheng; Chen Haihua; Zhang Jizhong; Wei Hongmei; Gu Zhongze

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique was used to fabricate three-dimensional photonic crystals with superlattices. The super structure was fabricated by assembling monodispersed microspheres in the grooves of the scales of morpho butterfly, which makes the photonic crystal being composed of two kinds of different photonic structures (natural groove structure of butterfly wing and artificial microspherical colloids arrangement). The superstructural photonic crystal exhibits some unique optical properties different from both the butterfly wing and the colloidal crystal. The approach exhibited here provides a new way for fabricate photonic crystals with superlattices.

  13. Tunneling in quantum superlattices with variable lacunarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villatoro, Francisco R. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Monsoriu, Juan A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jmonsori@fis.upv.es

    2008-05-19

    Fractal superlattices are composite, aperiodic structures comprised of alternating layers of two semiconductors following the rules of a fractal set. The scattering properties of polyadic Cantor fractal superlattices with variable lacunarity are determined. The reflection coefficient as a function of the particle energy and the lacunarity parameter present tunneling curves, which may be classified as vertical, arc, and striation nulls. Approximate analytical formulae for such curves are derived using the transfer matrix method. Comparison with numerical results shows good accuracy. The new results may be useful in the development of band-pass energy filters for electrons, semiconductor solar cells, and solid-state radiation sources up to THz frequencies.

  14. Superlattice structure of Ce{sup 3+}-doped BaMgF{sub 4} fluoride crystals - x-ray diffraction, electron spin-resonance, and optical investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaga, M.; Hattori, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Kodama, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Akita (Japan); Ishizawa, N. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Honda, M. [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto (Japan); Shimamura, K.; Fukuda, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2001-09-14

    The x-ray diffraction patterns for Ce{sup 3+}-doped BaMgF{sub 4} (BMF) crystals suggest the existence of superlattice structure. The superlattice model is consistent with the characterization of the 4f{sup 1} ground state of Ce{sup 3+} as a probe ion using the electron spin-resonance (ESR) technique. The distinct Ce{sup 3+} luminescence spectra with different peak energies and lifetimes also support the superlattice model. Although the detailed superlattice structure could not be analysed using the diffraction spots, a model has been proposed, taking into account the eight Ce{sup 3+} polyhedra with different anion coordinations in the unit cell of the BMF crystal obtained from the ESR experiments. (author)

  15. Resonant x-ray scattering in perovskite manganite superlattice. Observation of 'orbital superlattice'

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyama, T; Ohsumi, H; Murakami, Y; Wakabayashi, Y; Izumi, M; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of resonant X-ray scattering (RXS) measurement of superlattices which consist of La sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 5 MnO sub 3 and La sub 0 sub . sub 6 sub 0 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 0 MnO sub 3 multilayers. An interference technique made it possible to observe RXS reflections from ferro-type orbital ordering in the superlattices. RXS can reveal the local circumstances around specific atoms in materials regulated atomically. In this experiment, we observed that the superlattice is actually composed of two kinds of layers with different lattice distortion states, presenting 'orbital superlattices', in which layers with different orbital states are stacked alternately in an atomic scale. (author)

  16. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar...... cells. Resonance effects between the light and nanowire causes an inherent concentration of the sunlight into the nanowires, and means that a sparse array of nanowires (less than 5% of the area) can absorb all the incoming light. The resonance effects, as well as a graded index of refraction, also traps...... the light. The concentration and light trapping means that single junction nanowire solar cells have a higher theoretical maximum efficiency than equivalent planar solar cells. We have demonstrated the built-in light concentration of nanowires, by growing, contacting and characterizing a solar cell...

  17. Stability of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, M.; Wallmann, I.;

    2011-01-01

    The morphological stability of organic nanowires over time and under thermal load is of major importance for their use in any device. In this study the growth and stability of organic nanowires from a naphthyl end-capped thiophene grown by organic molecular beam deposition is investigated via...... atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aging experiments under ambient conditions already show substantial morphological changes. Nanoscopic organic clusters, which initially coexist with the nanowires, vanish within hours. Thermal annealing of nanowire samples leads to even more pronounced morphology changes......, such as a strong decrease in nanowire number density, a strong increase in nanowire height, and the formation of new types of crystallites. This happens even before sublimation of organic material starts. These experiments also shine new light on the formation process of the nanowires....

  18. Interface bands in carbon nanotube superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskolski, W.; Pelc, M. [Instytut Fizyki UMK, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Santos, H.; Chico, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ayuela, A. [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales (Facultad de Quimicas), and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), 20080 Donostia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    We study the electronic band structure of several carbon nanotube superlattices built of two kinds of intermolecular junctions: (12, 0)/(6, 6) and (8, 0)/(14, 0). In particular, we focus on the energy bands originating from interface states. We find that in case of the metallic (12, 0)/(6, 6) superlattices, the interface bands change periodically their character from bonding- to antibonding-like vs. increasing length of the (6, 6) tube. We show that these changes are related to the decay of the charge density Friedel oscillations in the metallic (6, 6) tube. However, when we explore other chiralities without rotational symmetry, no changes in bondingantibonding character are observed for semiconductor superlattices, as exemplified in the case of (8, 0)/(14, 0) superlattices. Our results indicate that unless metallic tubes are employed in the junctions, the bonding-antibonding crossings are not present (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Gold nanowires fabricated by immersion plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Shen, Fang-Yee; Huang, Fon-Shan

    2008-05-14

    The growth mechanism of oriented Au nanowires fabricated by immersion plating was investigated. Both n-type crystal Si (c-Si) and amorphous Si (a-Si) with an electron-beam (E-beam) patterned resist nanotrench were immersed into the plating bath HAuCl(4)/HF. For the Au nanowires fabricated on c-Si, voids, nanograins, and clusters were observed at various plating conditions, time and temperature. The voids were often found in the center of the Au nanowires due to there being fewer nucleation sites on the c-Si surface. However, Au can easily nucleate on the surface of a-Si and form continuous Au nanowires with grain sizes about 10-50 nm. The resistivities of Au nanowires with width 105 nm fabricated on a-Si are about 4.4-6.5 µΩ cm. After annealing at 200 °C for 30 min in N(2) ambient, the resistivities are lowered to about 3.0-3.9 µΩ cm, measured in an atomic force microscope (AFM) in contact mode. The grain size of Au is in the range of ∼50-100 nm. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination and grazing incident x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis were also carried out to study the morphology and crystalline structure of the Au nanowires.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis of strontium phosphate chloride nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, W. M.; Wong, C. T.; Li, Z. Y.; Luk, K. D. K.; Chan, W. K.; Yang, C.; Chiu, K. Y.; Xu, B.; Lu, W. W.

    2007-08-01

    Strontium phosphate chloride nanowire was synthesized via a solvothermal treatment of strontium tri-polyphosphate and Collin salt in 1,4-dioxane at 150 °C. The effects of 1,4-dioxane concentration on particle morphology, crystallinity and phase purity were investigated in this study. The specimen morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the concentration of 1,4-dioxane was below 10%, micron-sized whisker was the dominant form. At 20-25% concentration of 1,4-dioxane, strontium phosphate chloride single-crystalline nanowire was 31±12 nm in diameter and 1.43±0.6 μm in length with an aspect ratio of 52.28±29.41. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this nanowire matched with that of strontium phosphate chloride (JCPDS #083-0973). When 1,4-dioxane concentration exceeded 25%, nanorod aggregate was the dominant form instead of nanowire. At 20-25% 1,4-dioxane concentration suitable strontium concentration combine with high chemical potential environment favors the formation of nanowires. By adding 1,4-dioxane impure phase such as β-strontium hydrogen phosphate, nanorod formation was suppressed. This method provides an efficient way to synthesize high aspect ratio strontium phosphate chloride nanowire. It has potential bioactive nanocomposite, high mechanical performance bioactive bone cement filler and fluorescent material applications.

  1. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-12-01

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  2. Exchange bias in Fe/Cr double superlattices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J. S.; Felcher, G. P.; Inomata, A.; Goyette, R.; Nelson, C.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-11-30

    Utilizing the oscillatory interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/Cr superlattices, we have constructed ''double superlattice'' structures where a ferromagnetic (F) and an antiferromagnetic (AF) Fe/Cr superlattice are coupled through a Cr spacer. The minor hysteresis loops in the magnetization are shifted from zero field, i.e., the F superlattice is exchange biased by the AF one. The double superlattices are sputter-deposited with (211) epitaxy and possess uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude of the bias field is satisfactorily described by the classic formula for collinear spin structures. The coherent structure and insensitivity to atomic-scale roughness makes it possible to determine the spin distribution by polarized neutron reflectivity, which confirms that the spin structure is collinear. The magnetic reversal behavior of the double superlattices suggests that a realistic model of exchange bias needs to address the process of nucleating local reverse domains.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin Disulfide (SnS2 Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jen-Bin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ordered tin disulfide (SnS2 nanowire arrays were first fabricated by sulfurizing the Sn nanowires, which are embedded in the nanochannels of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO template. SnS2nanowire arrays are highly ordered and highly dense. X-ray diffraction (XRD and corresponding selected area electron diffraction (SAED patterns demonstrate the SnS2nanowire is hexagonal polycrystalline. The study of UV/Visible/NIR absorption shows the SnS2nanowire is a wide-band semiconductor with three band gap energies (3.3, 4.4, and 5.8 eV.

  4. Waveguide-coupled nanowire as an optical antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Laurent; Bruyant, Aurélien; Renault, Mikael; Hadjar, Yassine; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Apuzzo, Aniello; Lérondel, Gilles; Morand, Alain; Benech, Pierre; Le Coarer, Etienne; Blaize, Sylvain

    2013-11-01

    We study the optical coupling between a gold nanowire and a silver ion-exchanged waveguide, with special emphasis on the nanowire antenna radiation pattern. We measure the radiation patterns of waveguide-coupled gold nanowires with a height of 70 nm and width of 50 or 150 nm in the 450-700 nm spectral range for TE and TM polarizations. We perform a systematic theoretical study on the wavelength, polarization, nanowire size, and material dependences on the properties of the radiation pattern. We also give some elements concerning absorption and near-field. Experiments and calculations show localized plasmon resonance for the polarization orthogonal to the wire (far-field resonance at 580 nm for the smallest wire and 670 nm for the widest). It is shown that a great variety of radiation patterns can be obtained, together with a high sensitivity to a change of one parameter, particularly near-resonance.

  5. Photon transport enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in disordered superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, Pin-Chun; McMillan, James; Tsai, Min-An; Lu, Ming; Panoiu, Nicolae; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-01-01

    One of the daunting challenges in optical physics is to accurately control the flow of light at the subwavelength scale, by patterning the optical medium one can design anisotropic media. The light transport can also be significantly affected by Anderson localization, namely the wave localization in a disordered medium, a ubiquitous phenomenon in wave physics. Here we report the photon transport and collimation enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in chip-scale dispersion engineered anisotropic media. We demonstrate a new type of anisotropic photonic structure in which diffraction is nearly completely arrested by cascaded resonant tunneling through transverse guided resonances. By perturbing the shape of more than 4,000 scatterers in these superlattices we add structural disordered in a controlled manner and uncover the mechanism of disorder-induced transverse localization at the chip-scale. Arrested spatial divergence is captured in the power-law scaling, along with exponential asymmetric mode profil...

  6. Transport properties of graphene under periodic and quasiperiodic magnetic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Tao, E-mail: luweitao@lyu.edu.cn [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Wang, Shun-Jin [Department of Physics, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Wang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Hua [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Li, Wen [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China)

    2013-08-15

    We study the transmission of Dirac electrons through the one-dimensional periodic, Fibonacci, and Thue–Morse magnetic superlattices (MS), which can be realized by two different magnetic blocks arranged in certain sequences in graphene. The numerical results show that the transmission as a function of incident energy presents regular resonance splitting effect in periodic MS due to the split energy spectrum. For the quasiperiodic MS with more layers, they exhibit rich transmission patterns. In particular, the transmission in Fibonacci MS presents scaling property and fragmented behavior with self-similarity, while the transmission in Thue–Morse MS presents more perfect resonant peaks which are related to the completely transparent states. Furthermore, these interesting properties are robust against the profile of MS, but dependent on the magnetic structure parameters and the transverse wave vector.

  7. Spin-polarized transport in graphene nanoribbon superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xin-Xin; Xie Yue-E; OuYang Tao; Chen Yuan-Ping

    2012-01-01

    By the Green's function method,we investigate spin transport properties of a zigzag graphene nanoribbon superlattice (ZGNS) under a ferromagnetic insulator and edge effect.The exchange splitting induced by the ferromagnetic insulator eliminates the spin degeneracy,which leads to spin-polarized transport in structure.Spin-dependent minibands and minigaps are exhibited in the conductance profile near the Fermi energy.The location and width of the miniband are associated with the geometry of the ZGNS.In the optimal structure,the spin-up and spin-down minibands can be separated completely near the Fermi energy.Therefore,a wide,perfect spin polarization with clear stepwise pattern is observed,i.e.,the perfect spin-polarized transport can be tuned from spin up to spin down by varying the electron energy.

  8. Preparation, characterization, physical properties, and photoconducting behaviour of anthracene derivative nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jinchong; Yin, Zongyou; Yang, Bo; Liu, Yi; Ji, Li; Guo, Jun; Huang, Ling; Liu, Xuewei; Yan, Qingyu; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Qichun

    2011-11-01

    Organic nanowires of 9,10-dibromoanthracene (DBA) and 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (DCNA) were obtained by adding the THF solution of DBA/DCNA into water containing P123 surfactants. The as-prepared nanowires were characterized by UV-vis, fluorescence spectra, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). We found that DBA and DCNA nanowires emitted green light rather than blue light for molecules in THF solution. The red-shift UV and fluorescent spectra of DBA and DCNA nanowires implied that these nanowires were formed through J-aggregation. The photoconducting study of DBA/DCNA nanowire-based network on rGO/SiO2/Si shows different photocurrent behaviors upon irradiation, which displayed that electron transfer from DCNA nanowire to rGO was stronger than that of DBA nanowires to rGO.Organic nanowires of 9,10-dibromoanthracene (DBA) and 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (DCNA) were obtained by adding the THF solution of DBA/DCNA into water containing P123 surfactants. The as-prepared nanowires were characterized by UV-vis, fluorescence spectra, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). We found that DBA and DCNA nanowires emitted green light rather than blue light for molecules in THF solution. The red-shift UV and fluorescent spectra of DBA and DCNA nanowires implied that these nanowires were formed through J-aggregation. The photoconducting study of DBA/DCNA nanowire-based network on rGO/SiO2/Si shows different photocurrent behaviors upon irradiation, which displayed that electron transfer from DCNA nanowire to rGO was stronger than that of DBA nanowires to rGO. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD patterns and simulations, and FT-IR spectra. CCDC reference numbers 840471. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10655d

  9. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao; A Govindaraj

    2001-10-01

    Synthesis and characterization of nanotubes and nanowires constitute an important part of nanoscience since these materials are essential bui lding units for several devices. We have prepared aligned carbon nanotube bundles and Y-junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. The aligned bundles are useful for field emission display while the Y-junction nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have be en obt a ined. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with the aspect ratio. GaN nanowires show excellent photoluminescence characteristics. It has been possible to synthesise nanotubes and nanowires of metal chalcogenides by employing different strategies.

  10. Advances in nanowire bioelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Dai, Xiaochuan; Lieber, Charles M.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires represent powerful building blocks for next generation bioelectronics given their attractive properties, including nanometer-scale footprint comparable to subcellular structures and bio-molecules, configurable in nonstandard device geometries readily interfaced with biological systems, high surface-to-volume ratios, fast signal responses, and minimum consumption of energy. In this review article, we summarize recent progress in the field of nanowire bioelectronics with a focus primarily on silicon nanowire field-effect transistor biosensors. First, the synthesis and assembly of semiconductor nanowires will be described, including the basics of nanowire FETs crucial to their configuration as biosensors. Second, we will introduce and review recent results in nanowire bioelectronics for biomedical applications ranging from label-free sensing of biomolecules, to extracellular and intracellular electrophysiological recording.

  11. Joule heating in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangohr, Hans; Chernyshenko, Dmitri S.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, Guido

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat are simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) silicon wafers, and (thick) diamond wafers. The spatially resolved increase in temperature as a function of time is computed. For effectively three-dimensional substrates (where the substrate thickness greatly exceeds the nanowire length), we identify three different regimes of heat propagation through the substrate: regime (i), where the nanowire temperature increases approximately logarithmically as a function of time. In this regime, the nanowire temperature is well described analytically by You [Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2399441 89, 222513 (2006)]. We provide an analytical expression for the time tc that marks the upper applicability limit of the You model. After tc, the heat flow enters regime (ii), where the nanowire temperature stays constant while a hemispherical heat front carries the heat away from the wire and into the substrate. As the heat front reaches the boundary of the substrate, regime (iii) is entered, where the nanowire and substrate temperature start to increase rapidly. For effectively two-dimensional substrates (where the nanowire length greatly exceeds the substrate thickness), there is only one regime in which the temperature increases logarithmically with time for large times, before the heat front reaches the substrate boundary. We provide an analytical expression, valid for all pulse durations, that allows one to accurately compute this temperature increase in the nanowire on thin substrates.

  12. Generic nano-imprint process for fabrication of nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, Aurelie; Hocevar, Moira; Algra, Rienk E; Timmering, Eugene C; Verschuuren, Marc A; Immink, George W G; Verheijen, Marcel A; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories Eindhoven, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Diedenhofen, Silke L [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics c/o Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Vlieg, E, E-mail: e.p.a.m.bakkers@tue.nl [IMM, Solid State Chemistry, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-10

    A generic process has been developed to grow nearly defect-free arrays of (heterostructured) InP and GaP nanowires. Soft nano-imprint lithography has been used to pattern gold particle arrays on full 2 inch substrates. After lift-off organic residues remain on the surface, which induce the growth of additional undesired nanowires. We show that cleaning of the samples before growth with piranha solution in combination with a thermal anneal at 550 deg. C for InP and 700 deg. C for GaP results in uniform nanowire arrays with 1% variation in nanowire length, and without undesired extra nanowires. Our chemical cleaning procedure is applicable to other lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography, and therefore represents a generic process.

  13. Silicon nanowire photodetectors made by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ni, Chuan; Sarangan, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanowires have unique optical effects, and have potential applications in photodetectors. They can exhibit simple optical effects such as anti-reflection, but can also produce quantum confined effects. In this work, we have fabricated silicon photodetectors, and then post-processed them by etching nanowires on the incident surface. These nanowires were produced by a wet-chemical etching process known as the metal-assisted-chemical etching, abbreviated as MACE. N-type silicon substrates were doped by thermal diffusion from a solid ceramic source, followed by etching, patterning and contact metallization. The detectors were first tested for functionality and optical performance. The nanowires were then made by depositing an ultra-thin film of gold below its percolation thickness to produce an interconnected porous film. This was then used as a template to etch high aspect ratio nanowires into the face of the detectors with a HF:H2O2 mixture.

  14. Contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with nanowire clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying-Chih; Chiang, Cheng-Kun; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Nanowire arrays with various agglomeration patterns were synthesized by adjusting the solvent evaporation rates. Nanowires with 200 nm diameter and 2-25 microm in length were fabricated from an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous template. Various drying treatments were applied to develop nanostructured surfaces with topological differences. Due to surface tension forces, copper nanowires after thermal and evaporative drying treatments agglomerated into clusters, while supercritical drying technique provided excellent bundled-free and vertically-standing nanowire arrays. Although all dried surfaces exhibited hydrophobic nature, the contact angle hysteresis, or the difference between advancing and receding angles, was found to be larger on those surfaces with bundled nanowire clusters. To explain the difference, the wetted solid fraction on each surface was calculated using the Cassie-Baxter model to show that the hysteresis was contributed by liquid/solid contact area on the textured surfaces.

  15. Superlattices: problems and new opportunities, nanosolids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Superlattices were introduced 40 years ago as man-made solids to enrich the class of materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The field metamorphosed to quantum wells and quantum dots, with ever decreasing dimensions dictated by the technological advancements in nanometer regime. In recent years, the field has gone beyond semiconductors to metals and organic solids. Superlattice is simply a way of forming a uniform continuum for whatever purpose at hand. There are problems with doping, defect-induced random switching, and I/O involving quantum dots. However, new opportunities in component-based nanostructures may lead the field of endeavor to new heights. The all important translational symmetry of solids is relaxed and local symmetry is needed in nanosolids.

  16. Ultrafast structural dynamics of perovskite superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerner, M.; Korff Schmising, C. von; Zhavoronkov, N.; Elsaesser, T. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany); Bargheer, M. [Universitaet Potsdam, Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Potsdam (Germany); Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond X-ray diffraction provides direct insight into the ultrafast reversible lattice dynamics of materials with a perovskite structure. Superlattice (SL) structures consisting of a sequence of nanometer-thick layer pairs allow for optically inducing a tailored stress profile that drives the lattice motions and for limiting the influence of strain propagation on the observed dynamics. We demonstrate this concept in a series of diffraction experiments with femtosecond time resolution, giving detailed information on the ultrafast lattice dynamics of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic superlattices. Anharmonically coupled lattice motions in a SrRuO{sub 3}/PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SRO/PZT) SL lead to a switch-off of the electric polarizations on a time scale of the order of 1 ps. Ultrafast magnetostriction of photoexcited SRO layers is demonstrated in a SRO/SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) SL. (orig.)

  17. Tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C L Roy

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to report a study of tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices (SSL); specially, we have analysed diverse features of transmission coefficient of SSL. The SSL we have considered is Ga0.7Al0.3As–GaAs which has been drawing considerable attention during the recent past on account of some typical features of its band structure. We have indicated how our results would help fabrication of ultra high speed devices.

  18. Electroluminescent, polycrystalline cadmium selenide nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvazian, Talin; van der Veer, Wytze E; Xing, Wendong; Yan, Wenbo; Penner, Reginald M

    2013-10-22

    Electroluminescence (EL) from nanocrystalline CdSe (nc-CdSe) nanowire arrays is reported. The n-type, nc-CdSe nanowires, 400-450 nm in width and 60 nm in thickness, were synthesized using lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition, and metal-semiconductor-metal (M-S-M) devices were prepared by the evaporation of two gold contacts spaced by either 0.6 or 5 μm. These M-S-M devices showed symmetrical current voltage curves characterized by currents that increased exponentially with applied voltage bias. As the applied biased was increased, an increasing number of nanowires within the array "turned on", culminating in EL emission from 30 to 50% of these nanowires at applied voltages of 25-30 V. The spectrum of the emitted light was broad and centered at 770 nm, close to the 1.74 eV (712 nm) band gap of CdSe. EL light emission occurred with an external quantum efficiency of 4 × 10(-6) for devices with a 0.60 μm gap between the gold contacts and 0.5 × 10(-6) for a 5 μm gap-values similar to those reported for M-S-M devices constructed from single-crystalline CdSe nanowires. Kelvin probe force microscopy of 5 μm nc-CdSe nanowire arrays showed pronounced electric fields at the gold electrical contacts, coinciding with the location of strongest EL light emission in these devices. This electric field is implicated in the Poole-Frenkel minority carrier emission and recombination mechanism proposed to account for EL light emission in most of the devices that were investigated.

  19. Synthesis and magnetic properties of Fe100-xMox alloy nanowire arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Hua; Gao Da-Qiang; Xue De-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The Fe100-xMox (13≤ x≤ 25) alloy nanowire arrays are synthesized by electrodeposition of Fe2+and Mo2+ with different ionic ratios into the anodic aluminum oxide templates. The crystals of Fe100-xMox alloy nanowires gradually change from polycrystalline phase to amorphous phase with the increase of the Mo content and the nanowires are of amorphous structure when the Mo content reaches 25 at%, which are revealed by the X-ray diffraction and the selected area electron diffraction patterns. As the Mo content increases, the magnetic hysteresis loops of Fe100-xMox alloy nanowires in parallel to the nanowire axis are not rectangular and the slopes of magnetic hysteresis loops increase.Those results indicate that the magnetostatic interactions between nanowires and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy both have significant influences on the magnetization reversal process of the nanowire arrays.

  20. Manganites in Perovskite Superlattices: Structural and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Jilili, Jiwuer

    2016-07-13

    structure of bulk CaMnO3 and LaNiO3. An onsite Coulomn interaction term U is tested for both the Mn and Ni atoms. G-type antiferromagnetism and insulating properties of CaMnO3 are reproduced with U = 3 eV and ferromagnetic ordering is favorable when CaMnO3 is strained to the substrate lattice constant. This implies that the CaMnO3 magnetism is sensitive to both strain and the U parameter. Antiparallel orientation of the Mn and Ti moments has been found experimentally in the BiMnO3/SrTiO3 superlattice. By introducing O defects at different layers, we find similar patterns when the defect is located in the BiO layer. The structural, electronic and magnetic properties are analysed. Strong hybridization between the d3z2−r2 orbitals of the Mn and Ti atoms near the O defect is found. The effect of uniaxial strain for the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas and the interfacial Ti magnetic moments of the (LaMnO3)2/(SrTiO3)2 superlattice are investigated. By tuning the strain state from compressive to tensile, we predict under which conditions the spin-polarization of the electron gas is enhanced. Since the thickness ratio of the superlattice correlates with the strain state, we also study the structural, electronic and magnetism trends of (LaMnO3)n/(SrTiO3)m superlattices with varying layer thicknesses. The main finding is that half-metallicity will vanish for n, m > 8. Reduction of the minority band gaps with increasing n and m originates mainly from an energetic downshift of the Ti dxy states. Along with these, the interrelation between the interface geometry and the electronic properties of the antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic superlattice BiFeO3/ La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 is investigated. The magnetic and optical properties are also analysed by first principles calculations. The half-metallic character of bulk La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 is maintained in the superlattice, which implies potential applications on spintronics and memory devices.

  1. MBE growth and characterisation of light rare-earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.

    1996-01-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy growth techniques which have already successfully produced a range of heavy rare-earth superlattices have now been extended to produce superlattices of two light rare-earth elements, Nd/Pr, as well as superlattices and alloy films of a heavy/light system, Ho/Pr. High......-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis shows the Nd/Pr superlattices to be of high structural quality, while the Ho/Pr superlattices are significantly less so. In the Ho/Pr superlattices, Pr is found to retain its bulk dhcp crystal structure even in thin layers (down to 6 atomic planes thick) sandwiched between...... thick layers of hcp Ho. In addition, neutron diffraction studies of the He/Pr superlattices have shown that the helical Ho magnetic order is not coherent through the dhcp Pr layers, in contrast to previous hcp/hcp superlattices Ho/Y, Ho/Lu and Ho/Er. The series of Ho:Pr alloy films has shown structural...

  2. Wave-function reconstruction in a graded semiconductor superlattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, V. G.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Meinhold, D.

    2004-01-01

    We reconstruct a test wave function in a strongly coupled, graded well-width superlattice by resolving the spatial extension of the interband polarisation and deducing the wave function employing non-linear optical spectroscopy. The graded gap superlattice allows us to precisely control the dista...

  3. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  4. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    -catalyzed nanowire growth, and grown GaAs1−xPx nanowires with different inclusions of P(x) directly on silicon. The incorporation of P was generally higher in nanowires than for planar growth at identical P flux percentage. More interestingly, the percentage of P in the nanowire was found to be a concave function...... of the percentage of P in the flux, while for planar growth it was a convex function. We have demonstrated GaAs0.8P0.2 nanowires and further grown a shell surrounding the core with the same composition. The lattice matched GaAsP core-shell nanowire were doped to produce radial p-i-n junctions in each...... of the nanowires, some of which were removed from their growth substrate and turned into single nanowire solar cells (SNWSC). The best device showed a conversion efficiency of 6.8% under 1.5AMG 1-sun illumination. In order to improve the efficiency a surface passivating shell consisting of highly doped, wide...

  5. Current responsivity of semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatov, Anatoly A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed for curr......The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed...... for currently available superlattice diodes show that both the magnitudes and the roll-off frequencies of the responsivity are strongly influenced by an excitation of hybrid plasma-Bloch oscillations which are found to be eigenmodes of the system in the THz-frequency band. The expected room temperature values...

  6. Plasmon nanoparticle superlattices as optical-frequency magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2012-07-02

    Nanocrystal superlattices have emerged as a new platform for bottom-up metamaterial design, but their optical properties are largely unknown. Here, we investigate their emergent optical properties using a generalized semi-analytic, full-field solver based on rigorous coupled wave analysis. Attention is given to superlattices composed of noble metal and dielectric nanoparticles in unary and binary arrays. By varying the nanoparticle size, shape, separation, and lattice geometry, we demonstrate the broad tunability of superlattice optical properties. Superlattices composed of spherical or octahedral nanoparticles in cubic and AB(2) arrays exhibit magnetic permeabilities tunable between 0.2 and 1.7, despite having non-magnetic constituents. The retrieved optical parameters are nearly polarization and angle-independent over a broad range of incident angles. Accordingly, nanocrystal superlattices behave as isotropic bulk metamaterials. Their tunable permittivities, permeabilities, and emergent magnetism may enable new, bottom-up metamaterials and negative index materials at visible frequencies.

  7. Transverse magnetic mode along THz waveguides with biased superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceituno, P. [Dpto. Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, 38206 Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: paceitun@ull.es; Hernandez-Cabrera, A. [Dpto. Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, 38206 Tenerife (Spain); Vasko, F.T. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS Ukraine, Pr. Nauki 41, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine)

    2008-05-15

    We study the propagation of transverse magnetic modes arising from a waveguide consisting on a GaAs-based superlattice located at vacuum-dielectric interface. The transverse mode is generated by the ultrafast intersubband response of the superlattice subjected to a high-frequency electric field. The superlattice is also subjected to a homogeneous bias potential to get a biased superlattice with equipopulated levels. The heterostructure is analyzed through the tight-binding approximation, and considering the level broadening caused by different scattering processes (homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening mechanisms). We pay special attention to the dispersion relations of the complex dielectric permittivity because of real and imaginary parts of this function play a key role in wide miniband superlattices.

  8. Theory of silicon superlattices - Electronic structure and enhanced mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, J. A.; Krishnamurthy, S.

    1983-01-01

    A realistic tight-binding band-structure model of silicon superlattices is formulated and used to study systems of potential applied interest, including periodic layered Si-Si(1-x)Ge(x) heterostructures. The results suggest a possible new mechanism for achieving enhanced transverse carrier mobility in such structures: reduced transverse conductivity effective masses associated with the superlattice band structure. For electrons in 100-line-oriented superlattices, a reduced conductivity mass arises intrinsically from the lower symmetry of the superlattice and its unique effect on the indirect bulk silicon band gap. An order of magnitude estimate of the range of mobility enhancement expected from this mechanism appears to be consistent with preliminary experimental results on Si-Si(1-x)Ge(x) superlattices.

  9. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  10. Fabrication of a Silicon Nanowire on a Bulk Substrate by Use of a Plasma Etching and Total Ionizing Dose Effects on a Gate-All-Around Field-Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong-Il; Han, Jin-Woo; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2016-01-01

    The gate all around transistor is investigated through experiment. The suspended silicon nanowire for the next generation is fabricated on bulk substrate by plasma etching method. The scallop pattern generated by Bosch process is utilized to form a floating silicon nanowire. By combining anisotropic and istropic silicon etch process, the shape of nanowire is accurately controlled. From the suspended nanowire, the gate all around transistor is demonstrated. As the silicon nanowire is fully surrounded by the gate, the device shows excellent electrostatic characteristics.

  11. Cellular interactions on hierarchical poly(ε-caprolactone) nanowire micropatterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ke; Gan, Zhihua

    2012-09-26

    A double template method to fabricate poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) hierarchical patterned nanowires with highly ordered nano- and microscaled topography was developed in this study. The topography of PCL film with a patterned nanowire surface can be easily and well controlled by changing the template and melting time of PCL film on the templates. The surface morphology, water contact angle, protein adsorption, and cell growth behavior on the PCL films with different surface structures were well studied. The results revealed that the PCL nanowire arrays and the hierarchical patterned nanowires showed higher capability of protein adsorption and better cell growth than the PCL film with smooth surface. Typically, the PCL surface with hierarchical nanowire patterns was most favorable for cell attachment and proliferation. The present study was innovative at fabrication of polymer substrates with hierarchical architecture of nanowires inside microscaled islands to gain insight into the cell response to this unique topography and to develop a new method of constructing the bionic surface for tissue engineering applications.

  12. Stratigraphy of a diamond epitaxial three-dimensional overgrowth using doping superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, F.; Fiori, A.; Araujo, D.; Eon, D.; Villar, M. P.; Bustarret, E.

    2016-05-01

    The selective doped overgrowth of 3D mesa patterns and trenches has become an essential fabrication step of advanced monolithic diamond-based power devices. The methodology here proposed combines the overgrowth of plasma-etched cylindrical mesa structures with the sequential growth of doping superlattices. The latter involve thin heavily boron doped epilayers separating thicker undoped epilayers in a periodic fashion. Besides the classical shape analysis under the scanning electron microscope relying on the appearance of facets corresponding to the main crystallographic directions and their evolution toward slow growing facets, the doping superlattices were used as markers in oriented cross-sectional lamellas prepared by focused ion beam and observed by transmission electron microscopy. This stratigraphic approach is shown here to be applicable to overgrown structures where faceting was not detectable. Intermediate growth directions were detected at different times of the growth process and the periodicity of the superlattice allowed to calculate the growth rates and parameters, providing an original insight into the planarization mechanism. Different configurations of the growth front were obtained for different sample orientations, illustrating the anisotropy of the 3D growth. Dislocations were also observed along the lateral growth fronts with two types of Burger vector: b 01 1 ¯ = /1 2 [ 01 1 ¯ ] and b 112 = /1 6 [ 112 ] . Moreover, the clustering of these extended defects in specific regions of the overgrowth prompted a proposal of two different dislocation generation mechanisms.

  13. Ultra-long metal nanowire arrays on solid substrate with strong bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultra-long metal nanowire arrays with large circular area up to 25 mm in diameter were obtained by direct electrodeposition on metalized Si and glass substrates via a template-based method. Nanowires with uniform length up to 30 μm were obtained. Combining this deposition process with lithography technology, micrometre-sized patterned metal nanowire array pads were successfully fabricated on a glass substrate. Good adhesion between the patterned nanowire array pads and the substrate was confirmed using scanning acoustic microscopy characterization. A pull-off tensile test showed strong bonding between the nanowires and the substrate. Conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM measurements showed that approximately 95% of the nanowires were electrically connected with the substrate, demonstrating its viability to use as high-density interconnect.

  14. Te-doping of self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suomalainen, S., E-mail: soile.suomalainen@tut.fi; Hakkarainen, T. V.; Salminen, T.; Koskinen, R.; Guina, Mircea [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Honkanen, M. [Department of Material Science, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Luna, E. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    Tellurium (Te)-doping of self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. The effect of Te-doping on the morphological and crystal structure of the NWs is investigated by scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The study reveals that the lateral growth rate increases and axial growth rate decreases with increasing Te doping level. The changes in the NW morphology can be reverted to some extent by changing the growth temperature. At high doping levels, formation of twinning superlattice is observed alongside with the (111)-facetted sidewalls. Finally, the incorporation of Te is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Nonlinear THz response of metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichao; Andersen, David R.

    2016-11-01

    We study the third order THz nonlinear response of metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon superlattices in the presence of an elliptically-polarized excitation field using the time dependent perturbation theory. For a one-dimensional Kronig-Penney potential of infinite length, the nonlinear response can be described perturbatively by a low energy \\mathbf{k}\\centerdot \\mathbf{p} N-photon coupling model. Remarkably, as shown by Burset et al the energy dispersion of the metallic band in the direction parallel to the superlattice wavevector is independent of the applied superlattice potential while the energy dispersion in the direction perpendicular to the superlattice wavevector depends strongly on the superlattice parameters. As a result, we predict novel behavior for the nonlinear response of single layer metallic acGNR superlattices to an applied elliptically-polarized electric field. Our work shows that the superlattice potential, periodicity, Fermi level, excitation field polarization state, and temperature all play a significant role in the resulting THz nonlinear conductances.

  16. Transfer Matrix for Fibonacci Dielectric Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡祥宝

    2001-01-01

    The transfer matrices, which transfer the amplitudes of the electric fields of second- and third-harmonic waves from one side of the interface to the other, are defined for layers joined coherently, and the total transfer matrices for several sequential interfaces can be simply obtained by multiplication of the matrices. Using the transfer matrix method, the interacting processes of second- and third-harmonic waves in a one-dimensional finite Fibonacci dielectric superlattice are investigated. Applying the numerical procedure described in this letter, the dependence of the second- and third-harmonic fields on sample thickness is obtained. The numerical results agree with the quasi-phase-matching theory.

  17. Einstein's Photoemission from Quantum Confined Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 83th Birthday of Late Professor B. R. Nag, D.Sc., formerly Head of the Departments of Radio Physics and Electronics and Electronic Science of the University of Calcutta, a firm believer of the concept of theoretical minimum of Landau and an internationally well known semiconductor physicist, to whom the second author remains ever grateful as a student and research worker from 1974-2004. In this paper, an attempt is made to study, the Einstein's photoemission (EP) from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum well heavily doped superlattices (QWHDSLs) with graded interfaces in the presence of quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated electron dispersion relations within the frame work of k · p formalism. The EP from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum wells of heavily doped effective mass superlattices respectively has been presented under magnetic quantization. Besides the said emissions, from the quantum dots of the aforementioned heavily doped SLs have further investigated for the purpose of comparison and complete investigation in the context of EP from quantum confined superlattices. Using appropriate SLs, it appears that the EP increases with increasing surface electron concentration and decreasing film thickness in spiky manners, which are the characteristic features of such quantized hetero structures. Under magnetic quantization, the EP oscillates with inverse quantizing magnetic field due to Shuvnikov-de Haas effect. The EP increases with increasing photo energy in a step-like manner and the numerical values of EP with all the physical variables are totally band structure dependent for all the cases. The most striking features are that the presence of poles in the dispersion relation of the materials in the absence of band tails create the complex energy spectra in the corresponding HD constituent materials of such quantum confined superlattices and effective electron

  18. Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires on patterned Si substrates using self-catalyzed growth for vertical-type optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Kenichi, E-mail: ken-kawa@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (NanoQuine), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Sudo, Hisao; Matsuda, Manabu; Takemoto, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi [Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0197 (Japan); Arakawa, Yasuhiko [Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (NanoQuine), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-01-05

    Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires (NWs) on SiO{sub 2}-mask-pattered Si substrates were reported using self-catalyzed InP NWs. Self-catalyzed growth was performed using low growth temperatures and high group-III flow rates, and vertical InP NWs were formed on the mask openings. The diameter and tapering of the self-catalyzed InP NWs were controlled by the introduction of HCl and H{sub 2}S gases during the NW growth, and InP NWs that have a straight region with decreased diameter were formed. Radial InP/InAsP/InP quantum wells (QWs) were grown on the sidewall of the vertical InP NWs on Si substrates. Room-temperature photoluminescence of single NWs from the QW was clearly observed, which exhibited the potential of building blocks for vertical-type optical devices on Si substrates.

  19. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  20. Variation in electrical properties of gamma irradiated cadmium selenate nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, R.P., E-mail: chauhanrpc@gmail.com; Rana, Pallavi, E-mail: prana.phy@gmail.com; Narula, Chetna; Panchal, Suresh; Choudhary, Ritika

    2016-07-15

    Preparation of low-dimensional materials attracts more and more interest in the last few years, mainly due to the wide field of potential commercial applications ranging from life sciences, medicine and biotechnology to communication and electronics. One-dimensional systems are the smallest dimension structures that can be used for efficient transport of electrons and thus expected to be critical to the function and integration of nanoscale devices. Nanowires with well controlled morphology and extremely high aspect ratio can be obtained by replicating a nanoporous polymer ion-track membrane with cylindrical pores of controlled dimensions. With this technique, materials can be deposited within the pores of the membrane by electrochemical reduction of the desired ion. In the present study, cadmium selenate nanowires were synthesized potentiostatically via template method. These synthesized nanowires were then exposed to gamma rays by using a {sup 60}Co source at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. Structural, morphological, electrical and elemental characterizations were made in order to analyze the effect of gamma irradiation on the synthesized nanowires. I–V measurements of cadmium selenate nanowires, before and after irradiation were made with the help of Keithley 2400 source meter and Ecopia probe station. A significant change in the electrical conductivity of cadmium selenate nanowires was found after gamma irradiation. The crystallography of the synthesized nanowires was also studied using a Rigaku X-ray diffractrometer equipped with Cu-Kα radiation. XRD patterns of irradiated samples showed no variation in the peak positions or phase change.

  1. Variation in electrical properties of gamma irradiated cadmium selenate nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Rana, Pallavi; Narula, Chetna; Panchal, Suresh; Choudhary, Ritika

    2016-07-01

    Preparation of low-dimensional materials attracts more and more interest in the last few years, mainly due to the wide field of potential commercial applications ranging from life sciences, medicine and biotechnology to communication and electronics. One-dimensional systems are the smallest dimension structures that can be used for efficient transport of electrons and thus expected to be critical to the function and integration of nanoscale devices. Nanowires with well controlled morphology and extremely high aspect ratio can be obtained by replicating a nanoporous polymer ion-track membrane with cylindrical pores of controlled dimensions. With this technique, materials can be deposited within the pores of the membrane by electrochemical reduction of the desired ion. In the present study, cadmium selenate nanowires were synthesized potentiostatically via template method. These synthesized nanowires were then exposed to gamma rays by using a 60Co source at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. Structural, morphological, electrical and elemental characterizations were made in order to analyze the effect of gamma irradiation on the synthesized nanowires. I-V measurements of cadmium selenate nanowires, before and after irradiation were made with the help of Keithley 2400 source meter and Ecopia probe station. A significant change in the electrical conductivity of cadmium selenate nanowires was found after gamma irradiation. The crystallography of the synthesized nanowires was also studied using a Rigaku X-ray diffractrometer equipped with Cu-Kα radiation. XRD patterns of irradiated samples showed no variation in the peak positions or phase change.

  2. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  3. Influence of Deviation on Optical Transmission through Aperiodic Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hai-Long; YANG Xiang-Bo; LAN Sheng; HU Wei

    2007-01-01

    We propose a deviation model and study the influences of the relative error and sensitivity of a machine on the transmission coefficients (TCs) of Fibonacci superlattices. It is found that for a system with fewer layers, the influence of deviation can be ignored. When superlattices become more complicated, they may be fabricated by a machine with suitable relative error and possess the designed value of TC. However, when the number of system layers exceeds some critical value, superlattices should be manufactured only by precise machines. The influence of the sensitivity is also discussed.

  4. ZnSe/ZnSeTe Superlattice Nanotips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young SJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors report the growth of ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips on oxidized Si(100 substrate. It was found the nanotips exhibit mixture of cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures. It was also found that photoluminescence intensities observed from the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips were much larger than that observed from the homogeneous ZnSeTe nanotips. Furthermore, it was found that activation energies for the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips with well widths of 16, 20, and 24 nm were 76, 46, and 19 meV, respectively.

  5. ZnSe/ZnSeTe Superlattice Nanotips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the growth of ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips on oxidized Si(100) substrate. It was found the nanotips exhibit mixture of cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures. It was also found that photoluminescence intensities observed from the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips were much larger than that observed from the homogeneous ZnSeTe nanotips. Furthermore, it was found that activation energies for the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips with well widths of 16, 20, and 24 nm were 76, 46, and 19 meV, respectively. PMID:20672085

  6. Raman fingerprint of aligned graphene/h-BN superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Axel; Park, Jaesung; Yang, Huafeng; Elias, Daniel; Mayorov, Alexander S; Yu, Geliang; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Gorbachev, Roman V; Lazzeri, Michele; Geim, Andre K; Casiraghi, Cinzia

    2013-11-13

    Graphene placed on hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) experiences a superlattice (Moiré) potential, which leads to a strong reconstruction of graphene's electronic spectrum with new Dirac points emerging at sub-eV energies. Here we study the effect of such superlattices on graphene's Raman spectrum. In particular, the 2D Raman peak is found to be exquisitely sensitive to the misalignment between graphene and h-BN lattices, probably due to the presence of a strain distribution with the same periodicity of the Moiré potential. This feature can be used to identify graphene superlattices with a misalignment angle smaller than 2°.

  7. Sculptured 3D twister superlattices embedded with tunable vortex spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Denz, Cornelia; Joseph, Joby

    2011-09-01

    We present diverse reconfigurable complex 3D twister vortex superlattice structures in a large area embedded with tunable vortex spirals as well as dark rings, threaded by vortex helices. We demonstrate these tunable complex chiral vortex superlattices by the superposition of relatively phase engineered plane waves. The generated complex 3D twister lattice vortex structures are computationally as well as experimentally analyzed using various tools to verify the presence of phase singularities. Our observation indicates the application-specific flexibility of our approach to tailor the transverse superlattice spatial irradiance profile of these longitudinally whirling vortex-cluster units and dark rings.

  8. Aging in Co/Cr Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Pleimling, M.; Binek, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    Aging phenomena are observed in various systems brought into non-equilibrium and subsequently showing slow relaxation dynamics. Magnetic specimens with well defined interactions and dimensions can serve as model systems for universal aspects of aging. Magnetic thin films provide access to a wide range of microscopic parameters. Superlattice structures allow tuning the intra and inter-plane exchange and enable geometrical confinement of the spin fluctuations. We use Co/Cr thin film superlattices to study magnetic aging. The static and dynamic properties are affected via the Co and Cr film thicknesses. TC of the Co films is reduced from the bulk value by geometrical confinement. Non-ergodic behavior sets in at a tunable temperature T^* in a range of some 100K above zero. Cr provides antiferromagnetic coupling between the Co films. Non-equilibrium spin states are set via low field cooling in 5mT in-plane magnetic field to below T^*. Next various in-plane magnetic set fields of some 10-100 mT are applied and the sample is exposed to the latter for various waiting times tw, respectively. After removing the field, relaxation of the magnetization is recorded via longitudinal Kerr-magnetometry. The relaxation data are analyzed by scaling plots revealing universal aspects of aging. Financial support by Teledyne-Isco, NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC.

  9. Thermodynamics of Co/Cr superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Sahoo, S.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Binek, Ch.

    2008-03-01

    Progress in ultra thin film growth has resulted in many novel surface and interface induced properties of artificial heterostuctures. Here, we study magnetic superlattices of ultrathin Co and Cr films grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy methodology at a base pressure below 1x10-10 mbar. Our approach is based on controlling two distinct magnetic degrees of freedom. First, the critical temperature, Tc, of individual Co films is tailored via geometrical confinement of the correlation length perpendicular to the film. Various thickness dependent values, Tc(d), between zero and the bulk Curie temperature of 1388 K are realized. Second, the Tc-tailored Co films are antiferromagnetically coupled through Cr interlayer films. The oscillating coupling strength is tailored via the Cr interlayer thickness. The resulting thermodynamic properties of such Co/Cr superlattices are studied with the help of SQUID magnetometry. Particular emphasis is laid on tailoring magnetic entropy changes in the vicinity of room temperature. X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity are used to correlate structural data with the magnetic properties.

  10. Materialization of single multicomposite nanowire: entrapment of ZnO nanoparticles in polyaniline nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present materialization of single multicomposite nanowire (SMNW-entrapped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs via an electrochemical growth method, which is a newly developed fabrication method to grow a single nanowire between a pair of pre-patterned electrodes. Entrapment of ZnO NPs was controlled via different conditions of SMNW fabrication such as an applied potential and mixture ratio of NPs and aniline solution. The controlled concentration of ZnO NP results in changes in the physical properties of the SMNWs, as shown in transmission electron microscopy images. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity and elasticity of SMNWs show improvement over those of pure polyaniline nanowire. The new nano-multicomposite material showed synergistic effects on mechanical and electrical properties, with logarithmical change and saturation increasing ZnO NP concentration.

  11. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-12-19

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  12. SYNTHESIS OF COPPER NANOWIRES

    OpenAIRE

    POLAT, Sevim; Tigan, Doğancan

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the science and engineering of functional systems conducted at nanoscale that is between 1 and 100 nanometers. In the past years, it has been demonstrated that nanowires can be used in many areas, increasing their popularity. These areas primarily include ap-plications related to energy, environment and electronics. In these applications, many prototype products have been demonstrated with nan-owires, such as solar cells, flexible displays, transistors and light emitting dio...

  13. Surface and size effects on the electrical properties of Cu nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaojian; Lilley, Carmen M.; Bode, Matthias; Divan, Ralu

    2008-07-01

    Copper nanowires were patterned with e-beam lithography and fabricated with a copper film deposited by e-beam evaporation. Various electrical properties of these nanowires (including resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and failure current density) were characterized. It was experimentally found that surface and size have apparent effects on the electrical properties. Smaller values for the temperature coefficient of resistance and higher failure current density were found for Cu nanowires with decreasing wire width. The experimental finding of width dependent failure current density also agrees with finding for theoretical heat transfer of the nanowire and substrate system as calculated with the finite element method.

  14. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Mi-Young; Bocklage, Lars; Meier, Guido; Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-18

    Full-field magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy at high spatial resolution down to 20 nm is used to directly observe field-driven domain wall motion in notch-patterned permalloy nanowires. The depinning process of a domain wall around a notch exhibits a stochastic nature in most nanowires. The stochasticity of the domain wall depinning sensitively depends on the geometry of the nanowire such as the wire thickness, the wire width, and the notch depth. We propose an optimized design of the nanowire for deterministic domain wall depinning field at a notch.

  15. The effect of substrate on magnetic properties of Co/Cu multilayer nanowire arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Yong; Wang Jian-Bo; Liu Qing-Fang; Han Xiang-Hua; Xue De-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Ordered Co/Cu multilayer nanowire arrays have been fabricated into anodic aluminium oxide templates with Ag and Cu substrate by direct current electrodeposition.This paper studies the morphology,structure and magnetic properties by transmission electron microscopy,selective area electron diffraction,x-ray diffraction,and vibrating sample magnetometer.X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that both as-deposited nanowire arrays films exhibit face-centred cubic structure.Magnetic measurements indicate that the easy magnetization direction of Co/Cu multilayer nanowire arrays films on Ag substrate is perpendicular to the long axis of nanowire,whereas the easy magnetization direction of the sample with Cu substrate is parallel to the long axis of nanowire.The change of easy magnetization direction attributed to different substrates,and the magnetic properties of the nanowire arrays are discussed.

  16. Deflecting Easy-axis of Fe304 Single Crystal Nanowires by Magnetic-field-induced Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Wang; S. Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    In order to control the orientation of easy-axis of magnetic nanowires, FesO4 single crystal nanowires with easy-axis perpendicular to wire-axis were prepared successfully by means of a magnetic-field-induced method. Analysis of X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction pattern showed that there was a wide-angle deflection of easy-axis in the prepared Fe304 nanowires. A high saturation magnetization (82 emu/g) of the FesO4 nanowires was achieved at room temperature. The benefits and mechanism of the deflection of easy-axis from its wire-axis in FesO4 single crystal nanowires were discussed. The results are expected to broaden the magnetic properties of traditional ferrite nanowires.

  17. Structural influences on quantum transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frielinghaus, Robert; Sladek, Kamil; Trellenkamp, Stefan; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Floehr, Kilian [II. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Weirich, Thomas E. [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy GFE, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Schaepers, Thomas [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures such as InAs nanowires are candidates for future semiconductor nanoscale devices. However their atomic arrangement usually differs from device to device leading to fluctuations in the electrical properties as e.g. the electron phase coherence length. Using a special sample design we present quantum transport measurements together with transmission electron micrographs (TEM) taken from the same individual InAs nanowires. The as-grown nanowires are selectively placed on holes patterned in a TEM membrane. Low-temperature magnetotransport measurements of these suspended nanowires reveal universal conductance fluctuations that allow for the determination of the phase coherence length without any influence of the substrate. Variations in the transport behavior are correlated to the atomically resolved structure observed in TEM.

  18. Fabrication of YBCO nanowires with anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadras, Sedigheh, E-mail: dadras@alzahra.ac.ir; Aawani, Elaheh

    2015-10-15

    We have fabricated YBCO nanowires by using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template and sol–gel method, to investigate the fundamental properties of the one-dimensional nanostructure YBCO high-temperature superconductor and enhance its applications. The field-emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction pattern results have shown forming of Y-123 nanowires in the template. As an outcome, the YBCO nanowires, prepared by dipping AAO template into YBCO sol method, have average diameter of about 38 nm and length of 1 μm; this is an optimum nanowire sample with larger diameter and length. The resistance–temperature measurement indicates that the onset critical temperature of these samples occurs at 91 K, and the resistance of the optimum sample at onset transition is 10 times lower than the other sample.

  19. Quantum Transport: The Link between Standard Approaches in Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    Theories describing electrical transport in semiconductor superlattices can essentially be divided in three disjoint categories: (i) transport in a miniband; (ii) hopping between Wannier-Stark ladders; and (iii) sequential tunneling. We present a quantum transport model, based on nonequilibrium...

  20. Plasmonic Enhanced Type-II Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  1. k.p theory of freestanding narrow band gap semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ning; Liao, Gaohua; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from narrow band gap semiconductors GaSb, InSb and InAs. The nanowires are described by the eight-band k.p Hamiltonians and the band structures are computed by means of the finite element method in a mixture basis consisting of linear triangular elements inside the nanowires and constrained Hermite triangular elements near the boundaries. The nanowires with two crystallographic orientations, namely the [001] and [111] orientations, and with different cross-sectional shapes are considered. For each orientation, the nanowires of the three narrow band gap semiconductors are found to show qualitatively similar characteristics in the band structures. However, the nanowires oriented along the two different crystallographic directions are found to show different characteristics in the valence bands. In particular, it is found that all the conduction bands show simple, good parabolic dispersions in both the [001]- and [111]-oriented nanowires, while the top valence bands show double-maximum structures in the [001]-oriented nanowires, but single-maximum structures in the [111]-oriented nanowires. The wave functions and spinor distributions of the band states in these nanowires are also calculated. It is found that significant mixtures of electron and hole states appear in the bands of these narrow band gap semiconductor nanowires. The wave functions exhibit very different distribution patterns in the nanowires oriented along the [001] direction and the nanowires oriented along the [111] direction. It is also shown that single-band effective mass theory could not reproduce all the band state wave functions presented in this work.

  2. Molybdenum oxide nanowires: synthesis & properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Mai

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum oxide nanowires have been found to show promise in a diverse range of applications, ranging from electronics to energy storage and micromechanics. This review focuses on recent research on molybdenum oxide nanowires: from synthesis and device assembly to fundamental properties. The synthesis of molybdenum oxide nanowires will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of recent progress on molybdenum oxide nanowire based devices and an examination of their properties. Finally, we conclude by considering future developments.

  3. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  4. The soliton properties of dipole domains in superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张启义; 田强

    2002-01-01

    The formation and propagation of dipole domains in superlattices are studied both by the modified discrete driftmodel and by the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The spatiotemporal distribution of the electric field and electrondensity are presented. The numerical results are compared with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrodingerequation and analysed. It is shown that the numerical solutions agree with the soliton solutions of the nonlinearSchrodinger equation. The dipole electric-field domains in semiconductor superlattices have the properties of solitons.

  5. Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0048 TR-2015-0048 SUPERLATTICE INTERMEDIATE BAND SOLAR CELL ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE Alexandre Freundlich...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0232 Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...band solar cell incorporating low dimensional structures made with dilute nitrogen alloys of III-V semiconductors is investigated theoretically and

  6. Experimental evidence of delocalized states in random dimer superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Bellani, V.; Díez, E.; Hey, R.; Toni, L.; Tarricone, L.; Parravicini, G.B.; Domínguez-Adame Acosta, Francisco; Gómez-Alcalá, R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the electronic properties of GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices with intentional correlated disorder by means of photoluminescence and vertical dc resistance. The results are compared to those obtained in ordered and uncorrelated disordered superlattices. We report the first experimental evidence that spatial correlations inhibit localization of states in disordered low-dimensional systems, as our previous theoretical calculations suggested, in contrast to the earlier belief that all eigensta...

  7. Synthesis and stress relaxation of ZnO/Al-doped ZnO core-shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Ma, Fei; Li, Qian-Qian; Dong, Ce-Zhou; Ma, Da-Yan; Wang, Hong-Tao; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2013-04-07

    Doping nanostructures is an effective method to tune their electrical and photoelectric properties. Taking ZnO nanowires (NWs) as a model system, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be adopted for the realization of a doping process by the homo-epitaxial growth of a doped shell on the NW core. The Al-doped ZnO NWs have a layered superlattice structure with dopants mainly occupying the interstitial positions. After annealing, Al(3+) ions diffuse into the ZnO matrix and occupy substitutional locations, which is desirable for dopant activation. The stress accumulated during epitaxial growth is relaxed by the nucleation of dislocations, dislocation dipoles and anti-phase boundaries. We note that the proposed method can be easily adopted for doping different types of nanostructures, and fabricating superlattices and multiple quantum wells on NWs in a controllable way.

  8. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowires-loaded Sb-doped SnO2-ZnO Micrograting Pattern via Direct Imprinting-assisted Hydrothermal Growth and Its Selective Detection of Acetone Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hak-Jong; Choi, Seon-Jin; Choo, Soyoung; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Heon

    2016-01-08

    We propose a novel synthetic route by combining imprinting transfer of a Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO)-ZnO composite micrograting pattern (MP), i.e., microstrip lines, on a sensor substrate and subsequent hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) for producing a hierarchical ZnO NW-loaded ATO-ZnO MP as an improved chemo-resistive sensing layer. Here, ATO-ZnO MP structure with 3-μm line width, 9-μm pitch, and 6-μm height was fabricated by direct transfer of mixed ATO and ZnO nanoparticle (NP)-dispersed resists, which are pre-patterned on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. ZnO NWs with an average diameter of less than 50 nm and a height of 250 nm were quasi-vertically grown on the ATO-ZnO MP, leading to markedly enhanced surface area and heterojunction composites between each ATO NP, ZnO NP, and ZnO NW. A ZnO NW-loaded MP sensor with a relative ratio of 1:9 between ATO and ZnO (1:9 ATO-ZnO), exhibited highly sensitive and selective acetone sensing performance with 2.84-fold higher response (R air/R gas = 12.8) compared to that (R air/R gas = 4.5) of pristine 1:9 ATO-ZnO MP sensor at 5 ppm. Our results demonstrate the processing advantages of direct imprinting-assisted hydrothermal growth for large-scale homogeneous coating of hierarchical oxide layers, particularly for applications in highly sensitive and selective chemical sensors.

  9. Coherent quantum transport features in carbon superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, R.; Henley, S. J.; Silva, S. R. P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-10-01

    Whilst resonant transmission is well understood and can be fully harnessed for crystalline superlattices, a complete picture has not yet emerged for disordered superlattices. It has proven difficult to tune resonant transmission in disordered diamond-like carbon (DLC) superlattices as conventional models are not equipped to incorporate significant structural disorder. In this work, we present concurrent experimental and theoretical analysis which addresses resonant transmission in DLC superlattices. Devices were fabricated by growing alternate layers of DLC with different percentages of sp3 hybridized carbon.Coherent quantum transport effects were demonstrated in these structurally disordered DLC superlattices through distinct current modulation with negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage (I-V) measurements. A model was developed using tight-binding calculations assuming a random variation of the hopping integral to simulate structural (bond-length) disorder. Calculations of the I-V characteristics compliment the interpretation of the measurements and illustrate that while DLC superlattice structures are unlike their classical counterparts, the near-field structural order will help with the confinement of quantised states. The present model provides an empirical guide for tailoring the properties of future devices, giving rise to much hope that carbon electronics operating at high frequencies over large areas can now be developed.

  10. Carbon-coated nanoparticle superlattices for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yiliguma, Affa; Wang, Yifei; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) superlattices represent a unique material architecture for energy conversion and storage. Recent reports on carbon-coated NP superlattices have shown exciting electrochemical properties attributed to their rationally designed compositions and structures, fast electron transport, short diffusion length, and abundant reactive sites via enhanced coupling between close-packed NPs, which are distinctive from their isolated or disordered NP or bulk counterparts. In this minireview, we summarize the recent developments of highly-ordered and interconnected carbon-coated NP superlattices featuring high surface area, tailorable and uniform doping, high conductivity, and structure stability. We then introduce the precisely-engineered NP superlattices by tuning/studying specific aspects, including intermetallic structures, long-range ordering control, and carbon coating methods. In addition, these carbon-coated NP superlattices exhibit promising characteristics in energy-oriented applications, in particular, in the fields of lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells, and electrocatalysis. Finally, the challenges and perspectives are discussed to further explore the carbon-coated NP superlattices for optimized electrochemical performances.

  11. Microstructure characterization of SiC nanowires as reinforcements in composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Ronghua [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yang, Wenshu, E-mail: yws001003@163.com [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, Ping [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an, 710024 (China); Hussain, Murid [Department of Chemical Engineering, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, M.A. Jinnah Building, Defence Road, Off Raiwind Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Xiu, Ziyang; Wu, Gaohui; Wang, Pingping [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-05-15

    SiC nanowires have been rarely investigated or explored along their axial direction by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here we report the investigation of the cross-section microstructure of SiC nanowires by embedding them into Al matrix. Morphology of SiC nanowires was cylindrical with smooth surface or bamboo shape. Cubic (3C-SiC) and hexagonal structure (2H-SiC) phases were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High density stacking faults were observed in both the cylindrical and bamboo shaped nanowires which were perpendicular to their axial direction. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns of the cylindrical and bamboo shaped SiC nanowires both in the perpendicular and parallel direction to the axial direction were equivalent in the structure. After calculation and remodeling, it has been found that the SAED patterns were composed of two sets of diffraction patterns, corresponding to 2H-SiC and 3C-SiC, respectively. Therefore, it could be concluded that the SiC nanowires are composed of a large number of small fragments that are formed by hybrid 3C-SiC and 2H-SiC structures. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Cross-section microstructure of SiC nanowires was observed in Al composite. • Cylindrical with smooth surface or bamboo shape SiC nanowires were found. • The cylindrical and bamboo shaped SiC nanowires were equivalent in structure. • Structure of SiC nanowires was remodeled. • SiC nanowires are composed of hybrid 3C-SiC and 2H-SiC structures.

  12. Ion beam studies in strained layer superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Pathak, A P; Bhattacharya, D P; Dev, B N; Ghosh, S; Goswami, D K; Lakshmi-Bala, S; Nageswara-Rao, S V S; Satyam, P V; Siddiqui, A M; Srivastava, S K; Turos, A

    2002-01-01

    The potential device application of semiconductor heterostructures and strained layer superlattices has been highlighted. Metal organic chemical vapour deposition grown In sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 3 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 7 As/InP lattice-matched structure has been irradiated by 130 MeV Ag sup 1 sup 3 sup + and studied by RBS/Channelling using 3.5 MeV He sup 2 sup + ions. Ion irradiation seems to have induced a finite tensile strain in the InGaAs layer, indicating thereby that ion beam mixing occurs at this energy. Other complementary techniques like high resolution XRD and STM are needed to conclude the structural modifications in the sample.

  13. Nonreciprocal Multiferroic Superlattices with Broken Parity Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenghua; Zhang, Weiyi

    Multiferroic materials are characterized by the coexistence of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic (or antiferromagnetic) orders, the coupling to lattice vibration can be invoked either through piezoelectric or piezomagnetic effects. In this paper, the polaritonic band structures of multiferroic superlattices composed of oppositely polarized domains are investigated using the generalized transfer matrix method. For the primitive cell with broken parity symmetry, the polaritonic band structure is asymmetrical with respect to the forward and backward propagation directions (nonreciprocality). In particular, the band extreme points move away from the Brillouin zone center. This asymmetry in band-gap positions and widths can be used to design compact one-way optical isolators, while the extremely slow light velocities near the asymmetrical upper edges of lower bands includes the essential ingredients for designing slow light devices.

  14. Magnetocaloric properties of Co/Cr superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Skomski, Ralph; Sellmyer, David; Binek, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured materials aiming on refrigeration applications are experimentally realized by molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of Co/Cr superlattices using mean-field theoretical concepts as guiding principles.footnotetextT. Mukherjee, S. Sahoo, R. Skomski, D. J. Sellmyer, and Ch. Binek, Phys. Rev. B 79, 144406-1-9 (2009). Magnetocaloric properties are deduced from measurements of the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization of our samples. More generally, the potential of artificial antiferromagnets for near room-temperature refrigeration is explored. The effects of intra-plane and inter-plane exchange interactions on the magnetic phase diagram in Ising-type model systems are revisited in mean-field considerations with special emphasis on tailoring magnetocaloric properties. The experimental results are discussed in light of our theoretical findings, and extrapolations for future improved nanostructures are provided. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC.

  15. Magnetic Field in Superlattices Semiconductors of Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a study on the super-semiconductor networks, using the Kronig-Penney model for the effective mass approximation, and then the calculations for the application of the magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the layers of super lattices crystals. The magnetic field applied parallel to the layers, was used to adjust the resonance of a higher energy subband of a well by thermal excitation with a lower energy subband of the adjacent well, increasing energy levels in its tunneling rate. We use the formalism of Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics. Introducing the calculations in a systematic way in superlattices for each semiconductor quantum well to assess their energy spectrum systematically studied.

  16. Development of Strained-Layer Superlattice (SLS) IR Detector Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) detectors are a new class of detectors.   In our FY12 IRAD “Strained Layer Superlattice Infrared Detector Array...

  17. The Novel Semiconductor Nanowire Heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Q.Hu; Y.Bando; J.H.Zhan; D.Golberg

    2007-01-01

    1 Results If one-dimensional heterostructures with a well-defined compositional profile along the wire radial or axial direction can be realized within semiconductor nanowires, new nano-electronic devices,such as nano-waveguide and nano-capcipator, might be obtained. Here,we report the novel semiconducting nanowire heterostructures:(1) Si/ZnS side-to-side biaxial nanowires and ZnS/Si/ZnS sandwich-like triaxial nanowires[1],(2) Ga-Mg3N2 and Ga-ZnS metal-semiconductor nanowire heterojunctions[2-3]and (3) ...

  18. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  19. Template free synthesis of free-standing silver nanowhisker and nanocrown superlattice by interfering femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshiki; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Momoo, Kazuma; Hiromoto, Takuya

    2014-09-01

    We report the fabrication and control of a nanostructure superlattice of silver using a solid-liquid-solid (SLS) mechanism induced on a silver thin film by interfering femtosecond laser irradiation. An interference pattern induces fluid flows of silver, which is followed by freezing of a free-standing nanowhisker, nanobump, or nanocrown superlattice fixed on a substrate. The smallest curvature radius of the nanowhisker’s apex was 4 nm, which is smaller than one-fifth of the silver nanorods fabricated by chemosynthesis. The SLS process is a superior alternative to sequential bottom-up processes involving bottom-up synthesis of nanorods, purification, alignment or self-assembling, stabilization, and preservation.

  20. Crossover from Incoherent to Coherent Phonon Scattering in Epitaxial Oxide Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-08

    of the superlattices. Figure 3a shows a high-resolution, short-angular-range θ–2θ X - ray diffraction (XRD) scan of a (STO)6/(CTO)6 superlattice...function of interface density. We do so by synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides and systematically varying the interface density, with unit-cell precision, using two

  1. Piezoresistive boron doped diamond nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Wang, Xinpeng

    2016-09-13

    A UNCD nanowire comprises a first end electrically coupled to a first contact pad which is disposed on a substrate. A second end is electrically coupled to a second contact pad also disposed on the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is doped with a dopant and disposed over the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is movable between a first configuration in which no force is exerted on the UNCD nanowire and a second configuration in which the UNCD nanowire bends about the first end and the second end in response to a force. The UNCD nanowire has a first resistance in the first configuration and a second resistance in the second configuration which is different from the first resistance. The UNCD nanowire is structured to have a gauge factor of at least about 70, for example, in the range of about 70 to about 1,800.

  2. Piezoresistive boron doped diamond nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Wang, Xinpeng

    2017-07-04

    A UNCD nanowire comprises a first end electrically coupled to a first contact pad which is disposed on a substrate. A second end is electrically coupled to a second contact pad also disposed on the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is doped with a dopant and disposed over the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is movable between a first configuration in which no force is exerted on the UNCD nanowire and a second configuration in which the UNCD nanowire bends about the first end and the second end in response to a force. The UNCD nanowire has a first resistance in the first configuration and a second resistance in the second configuration which is different from the first resistance. The UNCD nanowire is structured to have a gauge factor of at least about 70, for example, in the range of about 70 to about 1,800.

  3. Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 22-April-2013 to 21-April-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design...15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Dots , Optoelectronic Applications, Charge Transfer, Superlattices, Density Functional Theory, Coupling...FA2386-13-1-4074 “ Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation” April 21, 2014 PI and Co-PI

  4. Magnetron sputtering synthesis of large area well-ordered boron nanowire arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Limin; ZHANG; Ze; WANG; Wenkui

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensionally nanostructured materials, such as nanowires and nanotubes, are the smallest dimensional structures for efficient transport of electrons and excitons, and are therefore critical building blocks for nanoscale electronic and mechanical devices. In this paper, boron nanowires with uniform diameters from 20 to 80nm were synthesized by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering of pure boron powder and B2O3 powder mixtures in argon atmosphere. The boron nanowires produced stand vertically on the substrate surface to form well-ordered arrays over large areas with selforganized arrangements without involvement of any template and patterned catalyst. The high-density boron nanowires are parallel to each other and well distributed, forming highly ordered and uniform arrays. A more interesting and unique feature of the boron nanowires is that most of their tips are flat rather than hemispherical in morphologies.Detailed studies on its structure and composition indicate that boron nanowires are amorphous. Boron nanowire appears as a new member in the family of one-dimensional nanostructures. Considering the unique properties of boron-rich solids and other nanostructures, it is reasonable to expect that the boron nanowires will display some exceptional and interesting properties. A vapor-cluster-solid (VCS) mechanism was proposed to explain the growth of boron nanowires based on our experimental observations.

  5. Magnetoimpedance of Permalloy nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getlawi, Saleh; Gao, Haibin; Koblischka, Michael; Hartmann, Uwe [Inst. of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The magneto-impedance (MI) effect was studied extensively on amorphous wires, ribbons, and on multilayer thin films. This effect involves huge changes of the complex impedance of soft magnetic materials upon applying an external magnetic field. In this contribution we explore the MI effect on Permalloy nanowires. Nanowires of lengths of 40-60 mu and widths of 200-400 nm were prepared by electron beam lithography (EBL) and a lift-off process. Electrodes for the transport measurements and platinum contacts were fabricated by focused-ion-beam(FIB)-based methods. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was employed to observe the magnetic domain structures of the nanowires. For high frequency measurement, the sample was placed on a microwave transmission line consisting of two gold microstrip lines. MI measurements were performed in the range from 10 MHz to 3 GHz.

  6. Electrodeposition of Cobalt Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sungbok; Hong, Kimin [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    We developed an electroplating process of cobalt nanowires of which line-widths were between 70 and 200 nm. The plating electrolyte was made of CoSO{sub 4} and an organic additive, dimethyldithiocarbamic acid ester sodium salt (DAESA). DAESA in plating electrolytes had an accelerating effect and reduced the surface roughness of plated cobalt thin films. We obtained void-free cobalt nanowires when the plating current density was 6.25 mA/cm{sup 2} and DAESA concentration was 1 mL/L.

  7. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  8. Quasi-Dirac points in one-dimensional graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Tseng, P.; Hsueh, W.J., E-mail: hsuehwj@ntu.edu.tw

    2016-08-26

    Quasi-Dirac points (QDPs) with energy different from the traditional Dirac points (TDPs) have been found for the first time in one-dimensional graphene superlattices. The angular-averaged conductance reaches a minimum value at the QDPs, at which the Fano factor approaches 1/3. Surprisingly, the minimum conductance at these QDPs may be lower than that at the TDPs under certain conditions. This is remarkable as the minimum conductance attainable in graphene superlattices was believed to appear at TDPs. - Highlights: • Quasi-Dirac points (QDPs) are found for the first time in one-dimensional graphene superlattices. • The QDP is different from the traditional Dirac points (TDPs) in graphene superlattices. • The angular-averaged conductance reaches a minimum value at the QDPs, at which the Fano factor approaches 1/3. • The minimum conductance at these QDPs may be lower than that at the TDPs under certain conditions. • The minimum conductance attainable in graphene superlattices was believed to appear at TDPs.

  9. Nanowire Photonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-22

    analogy with the etching technique used to delineate the axial p-i-n diode regions, an SEM image of the cross-section of a radial p-i-n Si-nanowire...on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Dublin, Ireland Plenary Address: “The Opportunities & Challenges Facing Nanotechnology” 7

  10. Growth and properties of low-dimensional III-V semiconductor nanowire heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Martin

    2010-08-25

    symmetry from cubic zinc-blende to hexagonal wurtzite structure, while the chemical composition of the material remains constant. The GaAs nanowires synthesized with the Au-free technique can be grown under conditions where a statistical wurtzite/zinc-blende polytypism occurs. A novel method for the direct correlation at the nanoscale of structural and optical properties of single GaAs nanowires is developed in order to characterize the resulting statistically distributed quantum heterostructures. Nanowires consisting of {approx}100% wurtzite and nanowires presenting zinc-blende/wurtzite polytypism are studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The photoluminescence of wurtzite GaAs is found to be consistent with a bulk wurtzite band gap of 1.50 eV, slightly smaller compared to the zinc-blende GaAs band gap. In the polytypic nanowires, it is shown that the regions that are predominantly composed of either zinc-blende or wurtzite phase show photoluminescence emission close to the according bulk band gaps, while regions composed of a non periodic superlattice of wurtzite and zinc-blende phases exhibit a redshift of the photoluminescence spectra as low as 1.455 eV. The dimensions of the quantum heterostructures are correlated with the light emission, allowing us to estimate the band offsets of {delta}E{sub CB}=53{+-}20 meV and {delta}E{sub VB}=76{+-}12 meV between the two crystalline phases. These results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical band structure calculations. (orig.)

  11. Interlayer diffusion studies of a Laves phase exchange spring superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Kohn, A; Wang, S G; Ward, R C C

    2011-03-23

    Rare earth Laves phase (RFe(2)) superlattice structures grown at different temperatures are studied using x-ray reflectivity (XRR), x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The optimized molecular beam epitaxy growth condition is matched with the XRR simulation, showing minimum diffusion/roughness at the interfaces. Electron microscopy characterization reveals that the epitaxial growth develops from initial 3D islands to a high quality superlattice structure. Under this optimum growth condition, chemical analysis by electron energy loss spectroscopy with high spatial resolution is used to study the interface. The analysis shows that the interface roughness is between 0.6 and 0.8 nm and there is no significant interlayer diffusion. The locally sharp interface found in this work explains the success of simple structural models in predicting the magnetic reversal behavior of Laves exchange spring superlattices.

  12. Rabi Oscillations in Realistic Superlattice with Finite Bloch Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wen-Bin; ZHANG Ping; LUO Ying; ZHAO Xian-Geng

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical processes taking place in nanodevices by high-frequency dc-ac fields. We found that Rabi oscillations between minibands are clearly identified under theoretical resonant conditions derived by an ideal two-band superlattice model, the resonant conditions have broadened, and the amount of broadening is about four times of the Rabi oscillation frequency. We also want to elucidate the role of different mechanisms that could lead to loss of quantum coherence. Our results show how the dephasing effects of disorder of interface roughness and doping fluctuation that after some periods destroy coherent oscillations, such as Rabi oscillations,can be reduced dramatically if we apply a bias static electric field to the superlattice system. The doping fluctuation dephasing effect is much stronger than that of interface roughness in the coherent process of realistic superlattices.

  13. Defect enhanced spin and valley polarizations in silicene superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Lu, Wei-Tao; Li, Yun-Fang; Han, Hai-Hua

    2017-04-01

    We studied the effect of a defect of superlattice on the spin and valley dependent transport properties in silicene, where there is an abnormal barrier in height. It is found that the transmission resonance is greatly suppressed, because the symmetry of superlattice structure is destroyed by the defect. The spin-up and spin-down electrons near the K and K ‧ valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices and defects. Therefore, the conductances are strongly dependent on the spin and valley of electron. By adjusting the defect strength properly, the spin and valley polarizations could be dramatically enhanced in a wide energy region. Furthermore, the result suggests an application of the structure as a defect-controlled switch.

  14. The magnetic structure of holmium-erbium superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMorrow, D.F. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Simpson, J.A.; Cowley, R.A.; Jehan, D.A.; Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R. [Oxford Physics, Clarendon Lab. (United Kingdom); Thurston, T.R.; Gibbs, D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of completing crystal-field anisotropies on magnetic order has been investigated in a series of Ho/Er superlattices using neutron and resonant x-ray magnetic diffraction techniques. The neutron diffraction reveals that for temperatures in the interval T{sub N}(Er) {le} T {le} T{sub N}(Ho) the Ho basal-plane order propagates coherently through the paramagnetic Er, and that below T{sub N}(Er) the longitudinal component of the Er moments fails to order across the Ho block. The magnetic superlattice peaks observed in the x-ray scattering display an anomalous energy dependence: a sharp resonance is found at L{sub III}(Ho), with no resonance visible at L{sub III}(Er). These results are discussed with reference to models of exchange in metallic superlattices.

  15. Electronic states of InSe/GaSe superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkoç, Ş.; Allahverdi, K.; Ibrahim, Z.

    1994-06-01

    Analysis of recent publications revealed an increasing interest in epitaxial growth of InSe/GaSe superlattice. Within the effective mass theory we carried out self-consistent calculations of the confined and itinerant electronic states, potential profile and charge density distribution of InSe/GaSe superlattice, where the InSe layers are the well and the GaSe layers the barrier. Calculations were performed for three types of doping: uniform, modulated in the well, and modulated in the barrier. It has been found that the Coulomb interaction in the well and barrier forces the formation of localized states in the barrier region. The possibility of an insulator-metal transition in InSe/GaSe superlattice is predicted for modulation doping in the barrier and for a doping level n = 10 19cm-3. A decrease of the barrier height has been found for modulation doping in the well.

  16. Numerical simulation of super-square patterns in Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kahouadji, L; Tuckerman, L S; Shin, S; Chergui, J; Juric, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the first simulations of the Faraday instability using the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in domains much larger than the characteristic wavelength of the pattern. We use a massively parallel code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. Simulations performed in rectangular and cylindrical domains yield complex patterns. In particular, a superlattice-like pattern similar to those of [Douady & Fauve, Europhys. Lett. 6, 221-226 (1988); Douady, J. Fluid Mech. 221, 383-409 (1990)] is observed. The pattern consists of the superposition of two square superlattices.

  17. Electric and magnetic superlattices in trilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Salah; Chan, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of one dimensional Kronig-Penney type of periodic electric and vector potential on ABC-trilayer graphene superlattices are investigated. The energy spectra obtained with periodic vector potentials shows the emergence of extra Dirac points in the energy spectrum with finite energies. For identical barrier and well widths, the original as well as the extra Dirac points are located in the ky = 0 plane. An asymmetry between the barrier and well widths causes a shift in the extra Dirac points away from the ky = 0 plane. Extra Dirac points having same electron hole crossing energy as that of the original Dirac point as well as finite energy Dirac points are generated in the energy spectrum when periodic electric potential is applied to the system. By applying electric and vector potential together, the symmetry of the energy spectrum about the Fermi level is broken. A tunable band gap is induced in the energy spectrum by applying both electric and vector potential simultaneously with different barrier and well widths.

  18. Negative capacitance in multidomain ferroelectric superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Pavlo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Hadjimichael, Marios; Fernandez-Pena, Stéphanie; Sené, Anaïs; Luk'Yanchuk, Igor; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    The stability of spontaneous electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is fundamental to many of their current applications, which range from the simple electric cigarette lighter to non-volatile random access memories. Research on nanoscale ferroelectrics reveals that their behaviour is profoundly different from that in bulk ferroelectrics, which could lead to new phenomena with potential for future devices. As ferroelectrics become thinner, maintaining a stable polarization becomes increasingly challenging. On the other hand, intentionally destabilizing this polarization can cause the effective electric permittivity of a ferroelectric to become negative, enabling it to behave as a negative capacitance when integrated in a heterostructure. Negative capacitance has been proposed as a way of overcoming fundamental limitations on the power consumption of field-effect transistors. However, experimental demonstrations of this phenomenon remain contentious. The prevalent interpretations based on homogeneous polarization models are difficult to reconcile with the expected strong tendency for domain formation, but the effect of domains on negative capacitance has received little attention. Here we report negative capacitance in a model system of multidomain ferroelectric-dielectric superlattices across a wide range of temperatures, in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. Using a phenomenological model, we show that domain-wall motion not only gives rise to negative permittivity, but can also enhance, rather than limit, its temperature range. Our first-principles-based atomistic simulations provide detailed microscopic insight into the origin of this phenomenon, identifying the dominant contribution of near-interface layers and paving the way for its future exploitation.

  19. Intrinsic noncollinear magnetization in Fe/Cr superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yartseva, N.S., E-mail: yartseva@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, UD of RAS, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Yartsev, S.V. [ZAO NPO “Spektr”, 14 Berezovskiy 623700 (Russian Federation); Demangeat, C. [UFR de Physique et d’Ingéniérie, Université de Strasbourg, 3 rue de l’Université, 67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic moments distribution in Fe{sub 3}Cr{sub n} superlattice series with fixed middle Fe monolayer and number of Cr monolayers (MLs) n from 1 to 45 is computed in the framework of collinear and noncollinear Periodic Anderson model. The superlattices are composed of layers in (0 0 1) and (1 1 0) plane with ideal interface. The total energy shows that noncollinear orientation of the magnetic moments remains the ground state for all superlattices with Cr thickness above 5 MLs. Distribution of the magnetic moments for Fe/Cr(0 0 1) superlattices depends on parity of the Cr MLs. For odd numbers Cr magnetic moments are canted and symmetrically distributed between the neighboring Fe slabs. The values of Cr moments are enhanced at the interface and weakened to the bulk in the middle. For even numbers of Cr MLs quasi-helicoidal magnetic moments distribution consisting of two interleaved spirals is found. The moments are screwing sequentially from Fe/Cr interface to perpendicular orientation, keeping the angles and moments for some successive MLs, and then continue screwing towards the next interface. In Fe/Cr(1 1 0) superlattices the magnetic moments of two nonequivalent atoms in the monolayer are canted to each other near Fe/Cr interface and then swing the direction on perpendicular to the fixed Fe moments. - Highlights: • Frustration destroys the collinear magnetization in Fe/Cr superlattices. • Spin spiral were investigated within basic noncollinear Periodic Anderson Model. • Total energy of the spin spiral is generally more stable than collinear magnetization. • Neither step nor alloying at the Fe/Cr interface is necessary for Spin Spiral stability. • The two interleaved spirals calculated are similar to Fishman’s helical state.

  20. Statistical Molecular Dynamics Study of (111 and (100 Ni Nanocontacts: Evidences of Pentagonal Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. García-Mochales

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present molecular dynamics calculations on the evolution of Ni nanowires stretched along the (111 and (100 directions, and at two different temperatures. Using a methodology similar to that required to build experimental conductance histograms, we construct minimum crosssection histograms H(Sm. These histograms are useful to understand the type of favorable atomic configurations appearing during the nanowire breakage. We have found that minimum crosssection histograms obtained for (111 and (100 stretching directions are rather different. When the nanowire is stretched along the (111 direction, monomer and dimer-like configurations appear, giving rise to well-defined peaks in H(Sm. On the contrary, (100 nanowire stretching presents a different breaking pattern. In particular, we have found, with high probability, the formation of staggered pentagonal nanowires, as it has been reported for other metallic species.

  1. CNTs/mesostructured silica core-shell nanowires via interfacial surfactant templating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; QIAO ShiZhang; YAN ZiFeng; ZHENG HuaJun; LI Li; DING RongGang; LU GaoQing(Max)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/mesostructured silica core-shell nanowires with a carbon nanotube core and controllable highly ordered periodic mesoporous silica shell are syntheiszed via the interfacial surfac-tant template. The core-shell nanowires are characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and nitrogen sorption/desorption. The results indicate that the core-shell nanowires have highly ordered periodic mesoporous silica shell (space group p6mm), high BET sur-face area and narrow pore size distribution. Moreover, the morphology of core-shell nanowires can be controlled by the pH value. The core-shell nanowires have promising applications in biosensors, nanoprobes and energy storage due to their good dispersibility in polar solvents.

  2. Structural, electrical and magnetic properties of single Au-Ni/NiO-Au nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinweg, Corinna; Sewcz, Rene; Baldus, Sabrina; Fischer, Saskia F. [Werkstoffe und Nanoelektronik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Daub, Mihaela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany); Nielsch, Kornelius [Multifunctional Nanostructures, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Ferromagnetic metallic nanowires are of high interest for magnetic sensing and storage applications. However, due to surface oxidation of the nanowires electrical contacts easily lead to high-contact resistances of a few k{omega}. Here, we present multisegmented Au-Ni(NiO)-Au nanowires with a direct Au-Ni interface. Individual nanowires were laterally contacted in a four-terminal geometry via optical lithography, electron-beam lithography, thermal evaporation and lift-off patterning. The nanowires exhibit low-ohmic contacts of about 20 {omega}. The resistivity decreases with the temperature (300 K to 4.2 K) and is in the order of that of high-purity bulk nickel. The longitudinal anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is about 1.5 % at 80 K and decreases with higher temperatures, 0.5 % at 300 K. The coercive field and the AMR are investigated for different angles between the current and magnetic field.

  3. Raman-induced Spin-Orbit Coupling in Optical Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junru; Huang, Wujie; Shteynas, Boris; Burchesky, Sean; Top, Furkan; Jamison, Alan; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme for spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of ultracold atoms. Instead of internal (hyperfine) states, two lowest bands in an optical superlattice were used as pseudospins. A Raman process was implemented to provide coupling between pseudospin and momentum. With single internal state and far-detuned beams used, our new scheme will allow convenient generalisation to a wide range of atoms. Pseudospin interaction is tuneable by controlling the superlattice, allowing us to study many-body phenomena in SOC systems such as the stripe phase.

  4. The solition properties of dipole domains in superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张启义; 田强

    2002-01-01

    The formation and propagation of dipole domains in superlattices are studied both by the modified discrete drift model and by the nonlinear schroedinger equation,the spatiotemporal distribution of the electric field and electron density are presented.The numerical results are compared with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and analysed.It is shown that the numerical solutions agree with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation.The dipole electric-field domains in semiconductor superlattices have the properties of solitons.

  5. Spin-dependent terahertz oscillator based on hybrid graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, E.; Miralles, K.; Domínguez-Adame, F. [GISC, Departamento Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gaul, C., E-mail: cgaul@pks.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    We theoretically study the occurrence of Bloch oscillations in biased hybrid graphene systems with spin-dependent superlattices. The spin-dependent potential is realized by a set of ferromagnetic insulator strips deposited on top of a gapped graphene nanoribbon, which induce a proximity exchange splitting of the electronic states in the graphene monolayer. We numerically solve the Dirac equation and study Bloch oscillations in the lowest conduction band of the spin-dependent superlattice. While the Bloch frequency is the same for both spins, we find the Bloch amplitude to be spin dependent. This difference results in a spin-polarized ac electric current in the THz range.

  6. Photon BLOCH oscillations in porous silicon optical superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, V; del Río, J A; Malpuech, G; Zamfirescu, M; Kavokin, A; Coquillat, D; Scalbert, D; Vladimirova, M; Gil, B

    2004-03-01

    We report the first observation of oscillations of the electromagnetic field in an optical superlattice based on porous silicon. These oscillations are an optical equivalent of well-known electronic Bloch oscillations in crystals. Elementary cells of our structure are composed by microcavities whose coupling gives rise to the extended collective modes forming optical minigaps and minibands. By varying thicknesses of the cavities along the structure axis, we have created an effective electric field for photons. A very high quality factor of the confined optical state of the Wannier-Stark ladder may allow lasing in porous silicon-based superlattices.

  7. Binding Graphene Sheets Together Using Silicon: Graphene/Silicon Superlattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a superlattice consisting of graphene and monolayer thick Si sheets and investigate it using a first-principles density functional theory. The Si layer is found to not only strengthen the interlayer binding between the graphene sheets compared to that in graphite, but also inject electrons into graphene, yet without altering the most unique property of graphene: the Dirac fermion-like electronic structure. The superlattice approach represents a new direction for exploring basic science and applications of graphene-based materials.

  8. Fluorescence x-ray standing wave study on (AlAs)(GaAs) superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Lessmann, A; Munkholm, A; Schuster, M; Riechert, H; Materlik, G

    1999-01-01

    X-ray standing waves (XSW) were used to investigate the structure of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown (AlAs) sub 3 (GaAs) sub 7 short-period superlattices (SPSL). The modulation of the Al K, As L, and Ga L x-ray fluorescence induced by XSW was measured at the zero-order superlattice (SL) satellite (AlAs)(GaAs)(004,0) and the GaAs(004) substrate Bragg reflection. From the shape of the fluorescence yield modulations and the diffraction pattern, a model of the interfaces is derived by comparing the experimental data with dynamical calculations of the x-ray wave field distribution and reflectivity. A straightforward analysis of the fluorescence measurements at the SL satellite shows that in AlAs layers a high crystalline order is established, whereas in GaAs layers a fraction of the Ga and As atoms is not on ideal lattice sites, but is displaced towards the substrate. The data can be explained by a model in which, at each AlAs/GaAs interface of the GaAs layers, two Ga atom planes are displaced by 0.035 nm and 0...

  9. High-mobility capacitively-induced two-dimensional electrons in a lateral superlattice potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, T. M.; Laroche, D.; Huang, S.-H.; Chuang, Y.; Li, J.-Y.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a lateral periodic potential modulation, two-dimensional electrons may exhibit interesting phenomena, such as a graphene-like energy-momentum dispersion, Bloch oscillations, or the Hofstadter butterfly band structure. To create a sufficiently strong potential modulation using conventional semiconductor heterostructures, aggressive device processing is often required, unfortunately resulting in strong disorder that masks the sought-after effects. Here, we report a novel fabrication process flow for imposing a strong lateral potential modulation onto a capacitively induced two-dimensional electron system, while preserving the host material quality. Using this process flow, the electron density in a patterned Si/SiGe heterostructure can be tuned over a wide range, from 4.4 × 1010 cm−2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm−2, with a peak mobility of 6.4 × 105 cm2/V·s. The wide density tunability and high electron mobility allow us to observe sequential emergence of commensurability oscillations as the density, the mobility, and in turn the mean free path, increase. Magnetic-field-periodic quantum oscillations associated with various closed orbits also emerge sequentially with increasing density. We show that, from the density dependence of the quantum oscillations, one can directly extract the steepness of the imposed superlattice potential. This result is then compared to a conventional lateral superlattice model potential. PMID:26865160

  10. Fluorescence x-ray standing wave study on (AlAs)(GaAs) superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessmann, A.; Brennan, S.; Munkholm, A. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory SSRL/SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schuster, M.; Riechert, H. [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Munich (Germany); Materlik, G. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB/DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-05-21

    X-ray standing waves (XSW) were used to investigate the structure of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown (AlAs){sub 3}(GaAs){sub 7} short-period superlattices (SPSL). The modulation of the Al K, As L, and Ga L x-ray fluorescence induced by XSW was measured at the zero-order superlattice (SL) satellite (AlAs)(GaAs)(004,0) and the GaAs(004) substrate Bragg reflection. From the shape of the fluorescence yield modulations and the diffraction pattern, a model of the interfaces is derived by comparing the experimental data with dynamical calculations of the x-ray wave field distribution and reflectivity. A straightforward analysis of the fluorescence measurements at the SL satellite shows that in AlAs layers a high crystalline order is established, whereas in GaAs layers a fraction of the Ga and As atoms is not on ideal lattice sites, but is displaced towards the substrate. The data can be explained by a model in which, at each AlAs/GaAs interface of the GaAs layers, two Ga atom planes are displaced by 0.035 nm and 0.008 nm and one As atom plane by 0.023 nm. The displacements within the GaAs layers exhibit a mirror symmetry with respect to the centre of each layer. (author)

  11. Electric Conductivity of Phosphorus Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Xiang; LI Hui; ZHANG Xue-Qing; LIEW Kim-Meow

    2009-01-01

    We present the structures and electrical transport properties of nanowires made from different strands of phosphorus chains encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Optimized by density function theory, our results indicate that the conductance spectra reveal an oscillation dependence on the size of wires. It can be seen from the density of states and current-voltage curves that the structure of nanowires affects their properties greatly. Among them,the DNA-like double-helical phosphorus nanowire exhibits the distinct characteristic of an approximately linear I - V relationship and has a higher conductance than others. The transport properties of phosphorus nanowires are highly correlated with their microstructures.

  12. A Molecular Mechanics Study of Morphologic Interaction between Graphene and Si Nanowires on a SiO2 Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the morphologic interaction between graphene and Si nanowires on a SiO2 substrate, using molecular mechanics simulations. Two cases are considered: (1 a graphene nanoribbon intercalated by a single Si nanowire on a SiO2 substrate and (2 a blanket graphene flake intercalated by an array of Si nanowires evenly patterned in parallel on a SiO2 substrate. Various graphene morphologies emerge from the simulation results of these two cases, which are shown to depend on both geometric parameters (e.g., graphene nanoribbon width, nanowire diameter, and nanowire spacing and material properties (e.g., graphene-nanowire and graphene-substrate bonding strength. While the quantitative results at the atomistic resolution in this study can be further used to determine the change of electronic properties of graphene under morphologic regulation, the qualitative understandings from this study can be extended to help exploring graphene morphology in other material systems.

  13. Radiation Channels Close to a Plasmonic Nanowire Visualized by Back Focal Plane Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Nicolai; Piatkowski, Dawid; Ciesielski, Richard; Mackowski, Sebastian; Hartschuh, Achim

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the angular radiation patterns, a key characteristic of an emitting system, from individual silver nanowires decorated with rare earth ion-doped nanocrystals. Back focal plane radiation patterns of the nanocrystal photoluminescence after local two-photon excitation can be described by two emission channels: Excitation of propagating surface plasmons in the nanowire followed by leakage radiation and direct dipolar emission observed also in the absence of the nanowire. Theoretical modeling reproduces the observed radiation patterns which strongly depend on the position of excitation along the nanowire. Our analysis allows to estimate the branching ratio into both emission channels and to determine the diameter dependent surface plasmon quasi-momentum, important parameters of emitter-plasmon structures. PMID:24131299

  14. Extraordinarily high conductivity of flexible adhesive films by hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed Ajmal, C.; Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-06-01

    Highly conductive flexible adhesive (CFA) film was developed using micro-sized silver flakes (primary fillers), hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires (secondary fillers) and nitrile butadiene rubber. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were synthesized by decorating silver nanowires with silver nanoparticle clusters using bifunctional cysteamine as a linker. The dispersion in ethanol was excellent for several months. Silver nanowires constructed electrical networks between the micro-scale silver flakes. The low-temperature surface sintering of silver nanoparticles enabled effective joining of silver nanowires to silver flakes. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires provided a greater maximum conductivity (54 390 S cm-1) than pure silver nanowires, pure multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles in nitrile butadiene rubber matrix. The resistance change was smallest upon bending when the hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were employed. The adhesion of the film on polyethylene terephthalate substrate was excellent. Light emitting diodes were successfully wired to the CFA circuit patterned by the screen printing method for application demonstration.

  15. Chemical-vapour-deposition growth and electrical characterization of intrinsic silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, B. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique (LTM)-UMR 5129 CNRS, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: bassem.salem@cea.fr; Dhalluin, F.; Baron, T. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique (LTM)-UMR 5129 CNRS, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Jamgotchian, H.; Bedu, F.; Dallaporta, H. [CRMC-N, Faculte des Sciences de Luminy, Case 913, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Gentile, P.; Pauc, N. [CEA-DRFMC/SiNaPS, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Hertog, M.I. den; Rouviere, J.L. [CEA-DRFMC/SP2M/LEMMA GEM-minatec, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Ferret, P. [CEA-Leti, DOPT, 17 Rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-15

    In this work, we present the elaboration and the electrical characterisation of undoped silicon nanowires (SiNWs) which are grown via vapour-liquid-solid mechanism using Au nucleation catalyst and SiH{sub 4} as the silicon source. The nanowires were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. An electrical test structure was realized by a dispersion of the nanowires on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate with photolithography pre-patterned Au/Ti microelectrodes. The connexion is made on a single nanowire using a cross beam plate form allowing scanning electron microscopy imaging and the deposition of tungsten wiring by focussed ion beam deposition. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanowires are linear which indicates an ohmic contact between tungsten allow and SiNWs. The total resistance of the nanowires increases from 135 M{omega} to 5 G{omega} when the diameter decreases from 190 to 130 nm. This effect is may be due to the reduction of the conductive inner volume of the nanowires and to charged defects at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface if we assume that the contact resistance is constant. Moreover, gate-dependent current versus bias voltage measurement show that the nanowires exhibit a field effect response characteristic of a p-type semiconductor.

  16. Superconductor-insulator transition in nanowires and nanowire arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, J.E.; Schön, G.; Shnirman, A.; Fuse, T.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Rotzinger, H.; Verbruggen, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowires are the dual elements to Josephson junctions, with quantum phase-slip (QPS) processes replacing the tunneling of Cooper pairs. When the QPS amplitude ES is much smaller than the inductive energy EL, the nanowire responds as a superconducting inductor. When the inductive ene

  17. Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors: Sensing Simplicity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mescher, M.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are structures made from silicon with at least one spatial dimension in the nanometer regime (1-100 nm). From these nanowires, silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be constructed. Since their introduction in 2001 silicon nanowire field-effect transistors have been studied

  18. Aging of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Osadnik, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    attribute, making them especially interesting for light generation in OLEDs and for light-harvesting devices such as solar cells. Functionalization of the molecules allows the customization of optical and electrical properties. However, aging of the wires might lead to a considerable decrease in device...... performance over time. In this study the morphological stability of organic nanoclusters and nanowires from the methoxy functionalized quaterphenylene, 4,4'''dimethoxy-1,1':4',1''4'',1'''-quaterphenylene (MOP4), is investigated in detail. Aging experiments conducted by atomic force microscopy under ambient...... conditions already expose substantial changes in sample morphology within hours. Clusters show Ostwald ripening, whereas nanowires reveal strong faceting and even fragmentation. All these aging effects are ascribed to the influence of water vapor. Decay curves (cluster number vs. time) for clusters...

  19. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  20. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of silver molybdate nanowires, nanorods and multipods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Nagaraju; G T Chandrappa; Jacques Livage

    2008-06-01

    Silver molybdate nanowires, nanorods and multipods like structures have been prepared by an organic free hydrothermal process using ammonium molybdate and silver nitrate solutions. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns reveal that the silver molybdate belongs to anorthic structure. The thickness, 200–500 nm, for silver molybdate nanorods/wires and 2–5 m for microrods are identified from SEM images. UV-visible spectrum of silver molybdate nanorods/nanowires shows maximum absorbance at 408 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum exhibits UV emission at 335 nm, violet emission at 408 nm and a weak green emission at 540 nm. The influence of hydrothermal synthesis conditions on silver molybdate nanowires, nanorods and multipods compositions were established.

  2. In-Plane Bistable Nanowire For Memory Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, B; Yamashita, K; Fujita, H; Toshiyoshi, H

    2008-01-01

    We present a nanomechanical device design to be used in a non-volatile mechanical memory point. The structure is composed of a suspended slender nanowire (width : 100nm, thickness 430nm length : 8 to 30$\\mu$m) clamped at its both ends. Electrodes are placed on each sides of the nanowire and are used to actuate the structure (writing, erasing) and to measure the position through a capactive bridge (reading). The structure is patterned by electron beam lithography on a pre-stressed thermally grown silicon dioxide layer. When later released, the stressed material relaxes and the beam buckles in a position of lower energy. Such symmetric beams, called Euler beams, show two stable deformed positions thus form a bistable structure. This paper will present the fabrication, simulation and mechanical and electrical actuation of an in plane bistable nanowire. Final paper will include a section on FEM simulations.

  3. Preparation and characterization of fully separated gold nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Jakub, E-mail: jakub.siegel@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Heitz, Johannes [Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University, 4040 Linz (Austria); Reznickova, Alena; Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of laterally ordered separated Au nanowire arrays on PET is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The process is based on evaporation of Au on PET template in glancing angle geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resulting nanowires are organized in parallel arrays of approximately 2500 wires. - Abstract: We reported on the development of an unconventional approach for the physical synthesis of laterally ordered self-organized arrays of well-separated metallic nanowires supported on nanostructured dielectric templates. The method, combining nanoscale patterning of the polyethylene terephthalate substrate by polarized light of excimer laser with glancing angle deposition of the gold, provides an interesting alternative to lithography-based nanopatterning approaches. Separation of individual nanowires is manifested by anisotropy of their electrical properties. Focused ion beam equipped scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that the resulting nanowires were organized in parallel arrays of approximately 2500 wires with an average length of about 1000 {mu}m and uniform width of about 150 nm.

  4. A chemically-responsive nanojunction within a silver nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wendong; Hu, Jun; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Donavan, Keith C; Yan, Wenbo; Wu, Ruqian; Penner, Reginald M

    2012-03-14

    The formation of a nanometer-scale chemically responsive junction (CRJ) within a silver nanowire is described. A silver nanowire was first prepared on glass using the lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition method. A 1-5 nm gap was formed in this wire by electromigration. Finally, this gap was reconnected by applying a voltage ramp to the nanowire resulting in the formation of a resistive, ohmic CRJ. Exposure of this CRJ-containing nanowire to ammonia (NH(3)) induced a rapid (resistance change that was as large as ΔR/R(0) = (+)138% in 7% NH(3) and observable down to 500 ppm NH(3). Exposure to water vapor produced a weaker resistance increase of ΔR/R(0,H(2)O) = (+)10-15% (for 2.3% water) while nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) exposure induced a stronger concentration-normalized resistance decrease of ΔR/R(0,NO(2)) = (-)10-15% (for 500 ppm NO(2)). The proposed mechanism of the resistance response for a CRJ, supported by temperature-dependent measurements of the conductivity for CRJs and density functional theory calculations, is that semiconducting p-type Ag(x)O is formed within the CRJ and the binding of molecules to this Ag(x)O modulates its electrical resistance.

  5. DNA-templated nanowires as sacrificial materials for creating nanocapillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jacob T.; Becerril, Hector A.; Yang, Weichun; Larsen, Megan G.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2008-08-01

    DNA has shown great promise as a template for the controlled localization of various materials and the construction of wires with nanometer-dimension cross sections. We have recently developed a strategy for fabrication of nanocapillaries, using DNA-templated nanowires as a sacrificial material. We first form metal nanowires through the selective electrochemical deposition of nickel atop a surface-aligned DNA molecule. We then deposit a thin layer of silicon dioxide on top of the DNA nanostructures. Next, we photolithographically pattern openings over the ends of the wires and etch through the silicon dioxide layer to expose the metal nanowires. Finally, we etch out the DNA-templated nickel nanowires. This process results in the formation of nanocapillaries having the same dimensions as the originally formed DNA-templated nanowires. We have characterized these DNA-templated nanocapillaries using atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These constructs have potential for application in nanofluidics, power generation, sample preconcentration, and chemical sensing.

  6. Superlattice conductivity sign change induced by intense electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.; Ionkina, E. S.

    2016-07-01

    The current density in a superlattice exposed to a quantizing electric field and the terahertz field has been calculated. The calculations have been carried out taking into account inelastic scattering of charge carriers by phonons. The possibility of an absolute negative conductivity, i.e., the emergence of electric current opposing the direction of the quantizing electric field, has been demonstrated.

  7. Strong impact of impurity bands on domain formation in superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    The formation of electric field domains in doped semiconductor superlattices is described within a microscopic model. Due to the presence of impurity bands in low-doped samples the current-voltage characteristic is essentially different compared to medium-doped samples. (C) 1998 Published by Else...

  8. Coherent magnetic structures in terbium/holmium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    1997-01-01

    Neutron-scattering techniques have been used to investigate the magnetic properties of three Tb/Ho superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. It is revealed that for temperatures in the range T = 10 to T-N(Ho)approximate to 130 K, there is a basal-plane ferromagnetic alignment of Tb moments...

  9. The structural and magnetic properties of holmium/scandium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    1997-01-01

    The properties of Ho/Sc superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have been investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Structural studies reveal the novel existence of more than one a lattice parameter. Examining the magnetic properties, it is found that the Ho 4f...

  10. Magnetic structures of holmium-lutetium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swaddling, P.P.; Cowley, R.A.; Ward, R.C.C.;

    1996-01-01

    Alloys and superlattices of Ho and Lu have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their magnetic structures determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The 4f moments in the alloys form a helix at all compositions with the moments aligned in the basal plane perpendicular to the wave vector...

  11. Bypassing of a barrier by dissociated and superlattice dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhushan, Karihaloo

    1975-01-01

    Very simple procedures are used to calculate the upper and lower bounds for the applied stress required for the leading extended (superlattice) dislocation in a group of n coplanar screw dislocations of like sign with Burgers vector b to bypass a noncoplanar perfect screw dislocation with Burgers...... vector mb (m...

  12. Type-II superlattice photodiodes: an alternative for VLWIR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gail J.; Houston, Shanee; Szmulowicz, Frank; Mahalingam, Krishnamur; Haugan, Heather; Wei, Yajun; Gin, Aaron; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2003-09-01

    In the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) band, λ>14 microns, the detector materials are currently limited to extrinsic semiconductors. These extrinsic materials can be either heavily doped bulk semiconductor, like silicon or germanium, or a doped quantum well heterostructure. An alternative choice that provides the opportunity for higher temperature operation for VLWIR sensing is an intrinsic material based on a type-II InAs/Ga(In)Sb superlattice. There are many possible designs for these superlattices which will produce the same narrow band gap by adjusting individual layer thicknesses, indium content or substrate orientation. The infrared properties of various compositions and designs of these type-II superlattices have been studied. In the past few years, excellent results have been obtained on photoconductive and photodiode samples designed for infrared detection beyond 15 microns. An overview of the status of this material system will be presented. In addition, the latest experimental results for superlattice photodiodes with cut-off wavelengths as long as 30 microns will be covered.

  13. Heterojunction and superlattice detectors for infrared to ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2016-07-01

    The interest in Infrared and Ultraviolet detectors has increased immensely due to the emergence of important applications over a wide range of activities. Detectors based on free carrier absorption known as Hetero-junction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HEIWIP) detectors and variations of these heterojunction structures to be used as intervalence band detectors for a wide wavelength region are presented. Although this internal photoemission concept is valid for all semiconductor materials systems, using a well-studied III-V system of GaAs/AlxGa1-x As to cover a wide wavelength range from UV to far-infrared (THz) is an important development in detector technology. Using the intervalence band (heavy hole, light hole and split off) transitions for high operating temperature detection of mid Infrared radiation is also discussed. A promising new way to extend the detection wavelength threshold beyond the standard threshold connected with the energy gap in a GaAs/AlxGa1-x As system is also presented. Superlattice detector technology, which is another promising detector architecture, can be optimized using both Type I and Type II heterostructures. Here the focus will be on Type II Strained Layer (T2SL) Superlattice detectors. T2SL Superlattices based on InAs/(In,GA)Sb have made significant improvements demonstrating focal plane arrays operating around 80 K and with multiple band detection capability. A novel spectroscopic method to evaluate the band offsets of both heterojunction and superlattice detectors is also discussed.

  14. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.;

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...

  15. Single quantum dot nanowire photodetectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.; Van Weert, M.H.M.; Reimer, M.E.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report InP nanowire photodetectors with a single InAsP quantum dot as light absorbing element. With excitation above the InP band gap, the nanowire photodetectors are efficient (quantum efficiency of 4%). Under resonant excitation of the quantum dot, the photocurrent amplitude depends on the line

  16. Single quantum dot nanowire photodetectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.; Van Weert, M.H.M.; Reimer, M.E.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report InP nanowire photodetectors with a single InAsP quantum dot as light absorbing element. With excitation above the InP band gap, the nanowire photodetectors are efficient (quantum efficiency of 4%). Under resonant excitation of the quantum dot, the photocurrent amplitude depends on the

  17. Designing Optical Properties in DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael Brendan

    A grand challenge of modern science has been the ability to predict and design the properties of new materials. This approach to the a priori design of materials presents a number of challenges including: predictable properties of the material building blocks, a programmable means for arranging such building blocks into well understood architectures, and robust models that can predict the properties of these new materials. In this dissertation, we present a series of studies that describe how optical properties in DNA-programmed nanoparticle superlattices can be predicted prior to their synthesis. The first chapter provides a history and introduction to the study of metal nanoparticle arrays. Chapter 2 surveys and compares several geometric models and electrodynamics simulations with the measured optical properties of DNA-nanoparticle superlattices. Chapter 3 describes silver nanoparticle superlattices (rather than gold) and identifies their promise as plasmonic metamaterials. In chapter 4, the concept of plasmonic metallurgy is introduced, whereby it is demonstrated that concepts from materials science and metallurgy can be applied to the optical properties of mixed metallic plasmonic materials, unveiling rich and tunable optical properties such as color and asymmetric reflectivity. Chapter 5 presents a comprehensive theoretical exploration of anisotropy (non-spherical) in nanoparticle superlattice architectures. The role of anisotropy is discussed both on the nanoscale, where several desirable metamaterial properties can be tuned from the ultraviolet to near-infrared, and on the mesoscale, where the size and shape of a superlattice is demonstrated to have a pronounced effect on the observed far-field optical properties. Chapter 6 builds upon those theoretical data presented in chapter 5, including the experimental realization of size and shape dependent properties in DNA-programmed superlattices. Specifically, nanoparticle spacing is explored as a parameter that

  18. Do Twin Boundaries Always Strengthen Metal Nanowires?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Yongfeng; Huang Hanchen

    2008-01-01

    Abstract It has been widely reported that twin boundaries strengthen nanowires regardless of their morphology—that is, the strength of nanowires goes up as twin spacing goes down. This article shows that twin boundaries do not always strengthen nanowires. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the authors show that whether twin boundaries strengthen nanowires depends on the necessary stress for dislocation nucleation, which in turn depends on surface morphologies. When nanowire...

  19. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  20. Fabrication and characterization of PEDOT nanowires based on self-assembled peptide nanotube lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Castillo, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate the use of self-assembled peptide nanotube structures as masking material in a rapid, mild and low cost fabrication of polymerized p-toluenesulfonate doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:TsO) nanowire device. In this new fabrication approach the PEDOT......:TsO nanowire avoids all contact with any organic solvents otherwise traditionally used in clean room fabrication. This can be achieved due to the intriguing properties of the self-assembled peptide nanotubes utilized as a dry etching mask for the patterning of the PEDOT:TsO nanowire. The peptide nanotubes...

  1. Structural and optical properties of periodically ordered ZnO nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.B.CUI

    2009-01-01

    Periodically ordered ZnO nanowire arrays were fabricated by a combination of soft templates created by electron beam lithography and an electrochemical process. Individual ZnO nanowires were pre-cisely placed in desired locations to form two-dimensional periodic structures with specific patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and light diffraction measurements confirmed the long-range ordered structures in the nanowire arrays. Variable temperature photoluminescence revealed both band edge and defect emissions. The obtained photonic structures may have potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices.

  2. Structural and optical properties of periodically ordered ZnO nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Periodically ordered ZnO nanowire arrays were fabricated by a combination of soft templates created by electron beam lithography and an electrochemical process. Individual ZnO nanowires were precisely placed in desired locations to form two-dimensional periodic structures with specific patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and light diffraction measurements confirmed the long-range ordered structures in the nanowire arrays. Variable temperature photoluminescence revealed both band edge and defect emissions. The obtained photonic structures may have potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Controlling light emission from single-photon sources using photonic nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Chen, Yuntian; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The photonic nanowire has recently emerged as an promising alternative to microcavity-based single-photon source designs. In this simple structure, a geometrical effect ensures a strong coupling between an embedded emitter and the optical mode of interest and a combination of tapers and mirrors...... are used to tailor the far-field emission pattern. This non-resonant approach relaxes the demands to fabrication perfection, allowing for record-high measured efficiency of fabricated nanowire single-photon sources. We review recent progress in photonic nanowire technology and present next generation...

  4. Modifications in structural and electrical properties of gamma irradiated CdSe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Manju, E-mail: manjuyadav.jnv@gmail.com; Rana, Pallavi, E-mail: prana.phy@gmail.com; Chauhan, R.P., E-mail: chauhanrpc@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    Semiconducting nanowires have gained huge interest of researchers due to their interesting properties and potential application in the field of nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Present study reports the effect of gamma (γ) irradiation on structural and electrical properties of CdSe nanowires. These nanowires were synthesized by a template assisted electrodeposition method which provides uniform and standing nanowires of cylindrical shape. These synthesized nanowires were exposed to gamma rays using a {sup 60}Co source. Before and after irradiation, the nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Keithley 2400 series source meter to study their structural and electrical properties. XRD patterns of irradiated samples showed increase in grain size with radiation dose and increase in the peak intensity was observed corresponding to different planes of hexagonal CdSe structure. SEM images confirmed the cylindrical morphology of nanowires and EDX analysis revealed the stoichiometric formation of CdSe. The electrical properties from I–V characteristics showed an enhancement in the electrical conductivity of the nanowires with radiation dose and applied potential. This modification in electrical conductivity may be attributed to decrease in grain boundary scattering of charge carriers. - Highlights: • CdSe nanowires were synthesized via the template-assisted electrodeposition method. • Synthesized nanowires were irradiated with gamma rays using {sup 60}Co source. • In XRD spectra, no shifting was observed in 2θ position of peaks with irradiation. • An enhancement in the electrical conductivity observed with radiation and potential.

  5. Towards low-dimensional hole systems in Be-doped GaAs nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, A. R.; Gluschke, J. G.; Krogstrup, P.; Sørensen, C. B.; Nygård, J.; Micolich, A. P.

    2017-03-01

    GaAs was central to the development of quantum devices but is rarely used for nanowire-based quantum devices with InAs, InSb and SiGe instead taking the leading role. p-type GaAs nanowires offer a path to studying strongly confined 0D and 1D hole systems with strong spin-orbit effects, motivating our development of nanowire transistors featuring Be-doped p-type GaAs nanowires, AuBe alloy contacts and patterned local gate electrodes towards making nanowire-based quantum hole devices. We report on nanowire transistors with traditional substrate back-gates and EBL-defined metal/oxide top-gates produced using GaAs nanowires with three different Be-doping densities and various AuBe contact processing recipes. We show that contact annealing only brings small improvements for the moderately doped devices under conditions of lower anneal temperature and short anneal time. We only obtain good transistor performance for moderate doping, with conduction freezing out at low temperature for lowly doped nanowires and inability to reach a clear off-state under gating for the highly doped nanowires. Our best devices give on-state conductivity 95 nS, off-state conductivity 2 pS, on-off ratio ˜ {10}4, and sub-threshold slope 50 mV/dec at T=4 K. Lastly, we made a device featuring a moderately doped nanowire with annealed contacts and multiple top-gates. Top-gate sweeps show a plateau in the sub-threshold region that is reproducible in separate cool-downs and indicative of possible conductance quantisation highlighting the potential for future quantum device studies in this material system.

  6. Control of Cross-Sections and Optical Nonlinearity of Pt Nanowires and the Roughness Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review our fabrication of Pt nanowire arrays on MgO(110 faceted templates by a shadow deposition method and our control of their cross-sectional shapes by adjusting the deposition directions of platinum. We obtained nanowire arrays with Cs and C2v macroscopic symmetries. These macroscopic symmetries influence optical second harmonic generation (SHG susceptibility elements of the nanowire arrays sensitively. On the other hand, the roughness of the nanowires had an effect on the rotational SHG patterns as a function of the sample rotation angle around the surface normal. We tried to explain the pattern change by a second-order perturbation scheme with respect to the roughness amplitude.

  7. Formation mechanism and properties of CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Demchenko, Denis O.; Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Erdonmez, Can K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-08-11

    The mechanism of formation of recently fabricated CdS-Ag{sub 2}S nanorod superlattices is considered and their elastic properties are predicted theoretically based on experimental structural data. We consider different possible mechanisms for the spontaneous ordering observed in these 1D nanostructures, such as diffusion-limited growth and ordering due to epitaxial strain. A simplified model suggests that diffusion-limited growth partially contributes to the observed ordering, but cannot account for the full extent of the ordering alone. The elastic properties of bulk Ag{sub 2}S are predicted using a first principles method and are fed into a classical valence force field (VFF) model of the nanostructure. The VFF results show significant repulsion between Ag{sub 2}S segments, strongly suggesting that the interplay between the chemical interface energy and strain due to the lattice mismatch between the two materials drives the spontaneous pattern formation.

  8. Piezoelectrics by Design: A Route through Short-period Perovskite Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Hena; Saha-Dasgupta, T

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory, we study piezoelectricity in short-period superlattices made with combination of ferroelectric and paraelectric components and exhibiting polar discontinuities. We show that piezoelectric response of such a superlattice can be tuned both in terms of sign and magnitude with a choice of its components. As these superlattices with nonswitchable polarization do not undergo ferroelectric transitions, we predict them to exhibit a robust piezoelectric response with weaker temperature dependence compared to their bulk counterparts.

  9. Lattice dislocation in Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Taha, H.T. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2009-12-15

    Modified formulas were used to calculate lattice thermal expansion, specific heat and Bulk modulus for Si nanowires with diameters of 115, 56, 37 and 22 nm. From these values and Gruneisen parameter taken from reference, mean lattice volumes were found to be as 20.03 A{sup 3} for the bulk and 23.63, 29.91, 34.69 and 40.46 A{sup 3} for Si nanowire diameters mentioned above, respectively. Their mean bonding length was calculated to be as 0.235 nm for the bulk and 0.248, 0.269, 0.282 and 0.297 nm for the nanowires diameter mentioned above, respectively. By dividing the nanowires diameter on the mean bonding length, number of layers per each nanowire size was found to be as 230, 104, 65 and 37 for the diameters mentioned above, respectively. Lattice dislocations in 22 nm diameter wire were found to be from 0.00324 nm for the 1st central lattice to 0.2579 nm for the last surface lattice. Such dislocation was smaller for larger wire diameters. Dislocation concentration found to change in Si nanowires according to the proportionalities of surface thickness to nanowire radius ratios.

  10. Picosecond luminescence approach to vertical transport in GaAs/GaAlAs superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaud, B.; Chomette, A.; Lambert, B.; Regreny, A.; Romestain, R.; Edel, P.

    1986-03-01

    Picosecond luminescence of GaAs/GaAlAs superlattices has been measured at 5 K. Asymetrical structures where one larger well is introduced at 9000 Å from the surface are studied. It is then possible to estimate the mean transfer time of photoexcited carriers through 9000 Å of superlattice. This time is found to be about 4 nsec in a 40/40 Å superlattice and 800 psec in a 30/30 Å one. This evidences the rather high mobility of small period superlattices in the growth direction.

  11. A GaAssolarAlAs superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnerl, S.; Pesahl, S.; Schomburg, E.; Grenzer, J.; Renk, K. F.; Pellemans, H. P. M.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Pavel'ev, D. G.; Koschurinov, Yu.; Ignatov, A. A.; Melzer, B.; Ustinov, V.; Ivanov, S.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a GaAs/AlAs, wide-miniband, superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses (operated at room temperature); the autocorrelator is based on the THz radiation-induced reduction of current through the superlattice. THz radiation (frequency 7.2 THz) from the FELIX (free-electron laser for infrared experiments) was coupled into the superlattice with an antenna system. We measured the current reduction for two time-delayed pulses and found that the signal decreased when the time delay was smaller than the pulse duration. With this superlattice autocorrelator we were able to resolve laser pulses that had a duration of a few picoseconds.

  12. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, K. V., E-mail: malyshev@bmstu.ru [Electronics and Laser Technology Department, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-28

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh–Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F{sup 0}{sub 11}(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional “cubic” diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  13. Quasi free-standing silicene in a superlattice with hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2013-11-12

    We study a superlattice of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride by first principles calculations and demonstrate that the interaction between the layers of the superlattice is very small. As a consequence, quasi free-standing silicene is realized in this superlattice. In particular, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved. Due to the wide band gap of hexagonal boron nitride, the superlattice realizes the characteristic physical phenomena of free-standing silicene. In particular, we address by model calculations the combined effect of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and an external electric field, which induces a transition from a semimetal to a topological insulator and further to a band insulator.

  14. Feshbach shape resonance for high Tc pairing in superlattices of quantum stripes and quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bianconi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   The Feshbach shape resonances in the interband pairing in superconducting superlattices of quantum wells or quantum stripes is shown to provide the mechanism for high Tc superconductivity. This mechanism provides the Tc amplification driven by the architecture of material: superlattices of quantum wells (intercalated graphite or diborides and superlattices of quantum stripes (doped high Tc cuprate perovskites where the chemical potential is tuned to a Van Hove-Lifshitz singularity (vHs in the electronic energy spectrum of the superlattice associated with the change of the Fermi surface dimensionality in one of the subbands.

  15. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F011(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional "cubic" diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  16. High Coefficient of Performance HgCdTe And Metallic Superlattice-Based Thermoelectric Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of nanoscale superlattices (SLs) as the active elements of high efficiency thermoelectric coolers. Recent models predict that the...

  17. Fabrication of polymer nanowires via maskless O2 plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ke; Wathuthanthri, Ishan; Liu, Yuyang; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2014-04-25

    In this paper, we introduce a simple fabrication technique which can pattern high-aspect-ratio polymer nanowire structures of photoresist films by using a maskless one-step oxygen plasma etching process. When carbon-based photoresist materials on silicon substrates are etched by oxygen plasma in a metallic etching chamber, nanoparticles such as antimony, aluminum, fluorine, silicon or their compound materials are self-generated and densely occupy the photoresist polymer surface. Such self-masking effects result in the formation of high-aspect-ratio vertical nanowire arrays of the polymer in the reactive ion etching mode without the necessity of any artificial etch mask. Nanowires fabricated by this technique have a diameter of less than 50 nm and an aspect ratio greater than 20. When such nanowires are fabricated on lithographically pre-patterned photoresist films, hierarchical and hybrid nanostructures of polymer are also conveniently attained. This simple and high-throughput fabrication technique for polymer nanostructures should pave the way to a wide range of applications such as in sensors, energy storage, optical devices and microfluidics systems.

  18. Inkjet-printed transparent nanowire thin film features for UV photodetectors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shih Pin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple and effective direct printing method was developed to print patterned nanowire thin films for UV detection. Inks containing silver or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanowires were first formulated adequately to form stable suspension for inkjet printing applications. Sedimentation tests were also carried out to characterize the terminal velocity and dispersion stability of nanowires to avoid potential nozzle clogging problems. The well-dispersed silver nanowire ink was then inkjet printed on PET films to form patterned electrodes. Above the electrodes, another layer of TiO2 nanowires was also printed to create a highly transparent photodetector with >80% visible transmittance. The printed photodetector showed a fairly low dark current of 10-12-10-14 A with a high on/off ratio of 2000 to UV radiation. Under a bias voltage of 2 V, the detector showed fast responses to UV illumination with a rise time of 0.4 s and a recovery time of 0.1 s. More photo currents can also be collected with a larger printed electrode area. In summary, this study shows the feasibility of applying inkjet printing technology to create nanowire thin films with specific patterns, and can be further employed for photoelectric applications. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  19. Growth and properties of In(Ga)As nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertenberger, Simon

    2012-10-15

    In this thesis the integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires on silicon (Si) platform by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. All nanowires are grown without the use of foreign catalysts such as Au to achieve high purity material. First, InAs nanowires are grown in a self-assembled manner on SiO{sub x}-masked Si(111) where pinholes in the silicon oxide serve as nucleation spots for the nanowires. This leads to the growth of vertically aligned, (111)-oriented nanowires with hexagonal cross-section. Based on this simple process, the entire growth parameter window is investigated for InAs nanowires, revealing an extremely large growth temperature range from 380 C to 580 C and growth rates as large as 6 μ/h. Complex quantitative in-situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry experiments during nanowire growth and post-growth thermal decomposition studies support these findings and indicate a very high thermal stability up to >540 C for InAs nanowires. Furthermore, the influence of the As/In ratio on the nanowire growth is studied revealing two distinct growth regimes, i.e., an In-rich regime for lower As fluxes and an As-rich regime for larger As fluxes, where the latter shows characteristic saturation of the nanowire aspect ratio. For the catalyst-free growth, detailed investigation of the growth mechanism is performed via a combination of in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM,TEM). An abrupt onset of nanowire growth is observed in RHEED intensity and in-plane lattice parameter evolution. Furthermore, completely droplet-free nanowires, continuous radial growth, constant vertical growth rate and growth interruption experiments suggest a vapor-solid growth mode for all investigated nanowire samples. Moreover, site-selective (positioned) growth of InAs nanowires on pre-patterned SiO{sub 2} masked Si(111) substrates is demonstrated which is needed for ultimate control of

  20. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  1. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  2. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  3. Improved seedless hydrothermal synthesis of dense and ultralong ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Jinghua; Hu Jie; Li Sisi; Zhang Fan; Liu Jun; Shi Jian; Li Xin; Chen Yong [Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS-ENS-UPMC UMR 8640, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Tian Zhongqun, E-mail: yong.chen@ens.fr [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and LIA CNRS XiamENS ' NanoBioChem' , College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, Fujian (China)

    2011-06-17

    Seedless hydrothermal synthesis has been improved by introducing an adequate content of ammonia into the nutrient solution, allowing the fabrication of dense and ultralong ZnO nanowire arrays over large areas on a substrate. The presence of ammonia in the nutrient solution facilitates the high density nucleation of ZnO on the substrate which is critical for the nanowire growth. In order to achieve an optimal growth, the growth conditions have been studied systematically as a function of ammonia content, growth temperature and incubation time. The effect of polyethyleneimine (PEI) has also been studied but shown to be of no benefit to the nucleation of ZnO. Ultradense and ultralong ZnO nanowires could be obtained under optimal growth conditions, showing no fused structure at the foot of the nanowire arrays. Due to different reaction kinetics, four growth regimes could be attributed, including the first fast growth, equilibrium phase, second fast growth and final erosion. Combining this simple method with optical lithography, ZnO nanowires could be grown selectively on patterned areas. In addition, the as-grown ZnO nanowires could be used for the fabrication of a piezoelectric nanogenerator. Compared to the device of ZnO nanowires made by other methods, a more than twice voltage output has been obtained, thereby proving an improved performance of our growth method.

  4. Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membrane-Assisted Fabrication of β-In2S3Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In this study, β-In2S3nanowires were first synthesized by sulfurizing the pure Indium (In) nanowires in an AAO membrane. As FE-SEM results, β-In2S3nanowires are highly ordered, arranged tightly corresponding to the high porosity of the AAO membrane used. The diameter of the β-In2S3nanowires is about 60 nm with the length of about 6–8 μm. Moreover, the aspect ratio of β-In2S3nanowires is up to 117. An EDS analysis revealed the β-In2S3nanowires with an atomic ratio of nearly S/In = 1.5. X-ray diffraction and corresponding selected area electron diffraction patterns demonstrated that the β-In2S3nanowire is tetragonal polycrystalline. The direct band gap energy (Eg) is 2.40 eV from the optical measurement, and it is reasonable with literature. PMID:20596400

  5. Highly sensitive single polyaniline nanowire biosensor for the detection of immunoglobulin G and myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Innam; Luo, Xiliang; Cui, Xinyan Tracy; Yun, Minhee

    2011-01-01

    A single polyaniline (PANI) nanowire-based biosensor was established to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) and myoglobin (Myo), which is one of the cardiac biomarkers. The single PANI nanowires were fabricated via an electrochemical growth method, in which single nanowires were formed between a pair of patterned electrodes. The single PANI nanowires were functionalized with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of IgG or Myo via a surface immobilization method, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), and N-Hydroxysuccinimde (NHS). The functionalization was then verified by Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The target proteins of IgG and Myo were detected by measuring the conductance change of functionalized single PANI nanowires owing to the capturing of target proteins by mAbs. The detection limit was found to be 3 ng/mL for IgG and 1.4 ng/mL for Myo. No response was observed when single nanowires were exposed to a non-specific protein demonstrating excellent specificity to expected target detection. Together with the fast response time (a few seconds), high sensitivity, and good specificity, this single PANI nanowire-based biosensor shows great promise in the detection of cardiac markers and other proteins. PMID:21269820

  6. DC electrodeposition of NiGa alloy nanowires in AAO template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleki, K. [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanjabi, S., E-mail: sanjabi@modares.ac.ir [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alemipour, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    NiGa alloy nanowires were electrodeposited from an acidic sulfate bath into nanoporous anodized alumina oxide (AAO). This template was fabricated by two-step anodizing. The effects of bath composition and current density were explored on the Ga content of electrodeposited nanowires. The Ga content in the deposits was increased by increasing both Ga in the bath composition and electrodepositing current density. The NiGa alloy nanowires were synthesized for Ga content up to 2–4% without significant improving the magnetic properties. Above this threshold Ga clusters were formed and decreased the magnetic properties of the nanowires. For Ga content of the alloy above 30%, the wires were too short and incomplete. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the significant increase of Ga content in the nanowires, changes the FCC crystal structure of Ni to an amorphous phase. It also causes a sizeable increase in the Ga cluster size; these both lead to a significant reduction in the coercivity and the magnetization respectively. - Highlights: • NiGa alloy nanowires were electrodeposited from acidic sulphate baths into nanoporous anodized alumina oxide (AAO) template. • The Ga content was increased by increasing the Ga in the bath composition and electrodeposition current density. • The magnetic parameters such as coercivity and magnetization were not changed for the alloy nanowire with Ga content less than 4%.

  7. Towards low-dimensional hole systems in Be-doped GaAs nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, A. R.; Gluschke, J. G.; Jeppesen, Peter Krogstrup

    2017-01-01

    GaAs was central to the development of quantum devices but is rarely used for nanowire-based quantum devices with InAs, InSb and SiGe instead taking the leading role. p-type GaAs nanowires offer a path to studying strongly confined 0D and 1D hole systems with strong spin–orbit effects, motivating...... our development of nanowire transistors featuring Be-doped p-type GaAs nanowires, AuBe alloy contacts and patterned local gate electrodes towards making nanowire-based quantum hole devices. We report on nanowire transistors with traditional substrate back-gates and EBL-defined metal/oxide top......}^{4}$, and sub-threshold slope 50 mV/dec at $T=4$ K. Lastly, we made a device featuring a moderately doped nanowire with annealed contacts and multiple top-gates. Top-gate sweeps show a plateau in the sub-threshold region that is reproducible in separate cool-downs and indicative of possible conductance...

  8. Fabrication of Nano-Micro Hybrid Structures by Replication and Surface Treatment of Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonho Jeong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanowire structures have attracted attention in various fields, since new characteristics could be acquired in minute regions. Especially, Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO is widely used in the fabrication of nanostructures, which has many nanosized pores and well-organized nano pattern. Using AAO as a template for replication, nanowires with a very high aspect ratio can be fabricated. Herein, we propose a facile method to fabricate a nano-micro hybrid structure using nanowires replicated from AAO, and surface treatment. A polymer resin was coated between Polyethylene terephthalate (PET and the AAO filter, roller pressed, and UV-cured. After the removal of aluminum by using NaOH solution, the nanowires aggregated to form a micropattern. The resulting structure was subjected to various surface treatments to investigate the surface behavior and wettability. As opposed to reported data, UV-ozone treatment can enhance surface hydrophobicity because the UV energy affects the nanowire surface, thus altering the shape of the aggregated nanowires. The hydrophobicity of the surface could be further improved by octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS coating immediately after UV-ozone treatment. We thus demonstrated that the nano-micro hybrid structure could be formed in the middle of nanowire replication, and then, the shape and surface characteristics could be controlled by surface treatment.

  9. Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membrane-Assisted Fabrication of β-In2S3Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chih-Jung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, β-In2S3nanowires were first synthesized by sulfurizing the pure Indium (In nanowires in an AAO membrane. As FE-SEM results, β-In2S3nanowires are highly ordered, arranged tightly corresponding to the high porosity of the AAO membrane used. The diameter of the β-In2S3nanowires is about 60 nm with the length of about 6–8 μm. Moreover, the aspect ratio of β-In2S3nanowires is up to 117. An EDS analysis revealed the β-In2S3nanowires with an atomic ratio of nearly S/In = 1.5. X-ray diffraction and corresponding selected area electron diffraction patterns demonstrated that the β-In2S3nanowire is tetragonal polycrystalline. The direct band gap energy (Eg is 2.40 eV from the optical measurement, and it is reasonable with literature.

  10. Structural, optical and ethanol sensing properties of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johari, Anima, E-mail: animajohari@gmail.com; Sharma, Manish [Center for Applied Research in Electronics (CARE), IIT Delhi, Hauz khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Johari, Anoopshi [THDC Institute of Hydropower Institute of Engineering and Technology, Tehri-249124 (India); Bhatnagar, M. C. [Physics Department, IIT Delhi, Hauz khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2014-04-24

    In present work, one-dimensional nanostructure of Cu-doped Tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) was synthesized by using thermal evaporation method in a tubular furnace under Nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ambience. The growth was carried out at atmospheric pressure. SEM and TEM images reveal the growth of wire-like nanostructures of Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} on Si substrate. The XRD analysis confirms that the synthesized SnO{sub 2} nanowires have tetragonal rutile structure with polycrystalline nature and X-ray diffraction pattern also showed that Cu gets incorporated into the SnO{sub 2} lattice. EDX spectra confirm the doping of Cu into SnO{sub 2} nanowires and atomic fraction of Cu in nanowires is ∼ 0.5 at%. The Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) growth mechanism for Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires was also confirmed by EDX spectra. The optical properties of as grown Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowires were studied by using UV-vis spectra which concludes the band gap of about 3.7 eV. As synthesized single Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire based gas sensor exhibit relatively good performance to ethanol gas. This sensing behaviour offers a suitable application of the Cu-doped SnO{sub 2} nanowire sensor for detection of ethanol gas.

  11. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  12. Selective layer disordering in intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattices with silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jonathan J., Jr.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Vawter, Gregory A.; Montaño, Ines

    2015-06-01

    Selective layer disordering in an intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattice using a silicon nitride (SiNx) capping layer is demonstrated. The SiNx capped superlattice exhibits suppressed layer disordering under high-temperature annealing. Additionally, the rate of layer disordering is reduced with increased SiNx thickness. The layer disordering is caused by Si diffusion, and the SiNx layer inhibits vacancy formation at the crystal surface and ultimately, the movement of Al and Ga atoms across the heterointerfaces. Patterning of the SiNx layer results in selective layer disordering, an attractive method to integrate active and passive III-nitride-based intersubband devices.

  13. X-ray crystal truncation rod scattering from MBE grown (CaF 2-SrF 2)/Si(111) superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, J.; Itoh, Y.; Shimura, T.; Takahashi, I.; Alvarez, J. C.; Sokolov, N. S.

    1994-01-01

    Flouride CaF 2-SrF 2 superlattices (SLs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied by means of X-ray diffractometry for the first time. The diffraction patterns showed reasonably good crystalline quality of the SLs and a type-B epitaxial relation to the Si(111) substrate. From the analysis of the crystal truncation rod (CTR) profiles, based on the pseudomorphic model, it was obtained that despite the same high temperature (770°C) of formation of the CaF 2/Si(111) interface its structure depended on the growth temperature of the SLs. The shape of the CTR profiles confirmed the existence of the superlattice which consists of one or two monolayer thick SrF 2 layers. Some CaF 2/SrF 2-interface roughness was noticeable.

  14. Growth of GaN/AlxGa1-xN (x=0.65) Superlattices on Si(111) Substrates Using RF-MBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Superlattices with varying GaN well widths (2, 3, 6, 9 nm) and fixed AlGaN barrier (8 nm) with high Al-content (x=0.65) were grown. Streaky RHEED patterns indicated 2D growth mode for the superlattices. XRD measurements showed multiple satellite peaks corresponding to uniform periodicity of the GaN/AlGaN pairs. The AlGaN barrier XRD peak also shifted with increasing well widths, while the GaN XRD peak was nominally unchanged. Room temperature photoluminescence experiments revealed peak emissions at energies lower than the bulk GaN energy gap. The large red shift with respect to the bulk gap is attributed to significant Stark effect for wide multiple quantum wells.

  15. Advances in the characterization of InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörl, A.; Daumer, V.; Hugger, T.; Kohn, N.; Luppold, W.; Müller, R.; Niemasz, J.; Rehm, R.; Rutz, F.; Schmidt, J.; Schmitz, J.; Stadelmann, T.; Wauro, M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports on advances in the electro-optical characterization of InAs/GaSb short-period superlattice infrared photodetectors with cut-off wavelengths in the mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared ranges. To facilitate in-line monitoring of the electro-optical device performance at different processing stages we have integrated a semi-automated cryogenic wafer prober in our process line. The prober is configured for measuring current-voltage characteristics of individual photodiodes at 77 K. We employ it to compile a spatial map of the dark current density of a superlattice sample with a cut-off wavelength around 5 μm patterned into a regular array of 1760 quadratic mesa diodes with a pitch of 370 μm and side lengths varying from 60 to 350 μm. The different perimeter-to-area ratios make it possible to separate bulk current from sidewall current contributions. We find a sidewall contribution to the dark current of 1.2×10-11 A/cm and a corrected bulk dark current density of 1.1×10-7 A/cm2, both at 200 mV reverse bias voltage. An automated data analysis framework can extract bulk and sidewall current contributions for various subsets of the test device grid. With a suitable periodic arrangement of test diode sizes, the spatial distribution of the individual contributions can thus be investigated. We found a relatively homogeneous distribution of both bulk dark current density and sidewall current contribution across the sample. With the help of an improved capacitance-voltage measurement setup developed to complement this technique a residual carrier concentration of 1.3×1015 cm-3 is obtained. The work is motivated by research into high performance superlattice array sensors with demanding processing requirements. A novel long-wavelength infrared imager based on a heterojunction concept is presented as an example for this work. It achieves a noise equivalent temperature difference below 30 mK for realistic operating conditions.

  16. Catalytically activated palladium@platinum nanowires for accelerated hydrogen gas detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Yu; Hemminger, John C; Penner, Reginald M

    2015-03-24

    Platinum (Pt)-modified palladium (Pd) nanowires (or Pd@Pt nanowires) are prepared with controlled Pt coverage. These Pd@Pt nanowires are used as resistive gas sensors for the detection of hydrogen gas in air, and the influence of the Pt surface layer is assessed. Pd nanowires with dimensions of 40 nm (h) × 100 nm (w) × 50 μm (l) are first prepared using lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition. A thin Pt surface layer is electrodeposited conformally onto a Pd nanowire at coverages, θPt, of 0.10 monolayer (ML), 1.0 ML, and 10 ML. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements is consistent with a layer-by-layer deposition mode for Pt on the Pd nanowire surface. The resistance of a single Pd@Pt nanowire is measured during the exposure of these nanowires to pulses of hydrogen gas in air at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 5.0 vol %. Both Pd nanowires and Pd@Pt nanowires show a prompt and reversible increase in resistance upon exposure to H2 in air, caused by the conversion of Pd to more resistive PdHx. Relative to a pure Pd nanowire, the addition of 1.0 ML of Pt to the Pd surface alters the H2 detection properties of Pd@Pt nanowires in two ways. First, the amplitude of the relative resistance change, ΔR/R0, measured at each H2 concentration is reduced at low temperatures (T = 294 and 303 K) and is unaffected at higher temperatures (T = 316, 344, and 376 K). Second, response and recovery rates are both faster at all temperatures in this range and for all H2 concentrations. For higher θPt = 10 ML, sensitivity to H2 is dramatically reduced. For lower θPt = 0.1 ML, no significant influence on sensitivity or the speed of response/recovery is observed.

  17. Extreme Band Engineering of III-Nitride Nanowire Heterostructures for Electronic and Photonic Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, ATM Golam

    Bottom-up nanowires are attractive for realizing semiconductor devices with extreme heterostructures because strain relaxation through the nanowire sidewalls allows the combination of highly lattice mismatched materials without creating dislocations. The resulting nanowires are used to fabricate light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, solar cells, and sensors. The aim of this work is to investigate extreme heterostructures, which are impossible or very hard to realize in conventional planar films, exploiting the strain accommodation property of nanowires and engineer their band structure for novel electronic and photonic applications. To this end, in this thesis, III-Nitride semiconductor nanowires are investigated. In the first part of this work, a complete growth phase diagram of InN nanowires on silicon using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy is developed, and structural and optical characteristics are mapped as a function of growth parameters. Next, a novel up-side down pendeoepitaxial growth of InN forming mushroom-like microstructures is demonstrated and detail structural and optical characterizations are performed. Based on this, a method to grow strain-free large area single crystalline InN or thin film is proposed and the growth of InN on patterned GaN is investigated. The optimized growth conditions developed for InN are further used to grow InGaN nanowires graded over the whole composition range. Numerical energy band simulation is performed to better understand the effect of polarization charge on photo-carrier transport in these extremely graded nanowires. A novel photodetector device with negative differential photocurrent is demonstrated using the graded InGaN nanowires. In the second part of this thesis, polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are investigated. The electrical and optical properties of the nanowire heterostructure are engineered and optimized for ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet applications. The electrical

  18. Zn₃P₂-Zn₃As₂ solid solution nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyung Soon; Park, Kidong; Jang, Dong Myung; Jung, Chan Su; Park, Jeunghee; Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Jin-Gyu

    2015-02-11

    Semiconductor alloy nanowires (NWs) have recently attracted considerable attention for applications in optoelectronic nanodevices because of many notable properties, including band gap tunability. Zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) and zinc arsenide (Zn3As2) belong to a unique pseudocubic tetragonal system, but their solid solution has rarely been studied. Here In this study, we synthesized composition-tuned Zn3(P1-xAsx)2 NWs with different crystal structures by controlling the growth conditions during chemical vapor deposition. A first type of synthesized NWs were single-crystalline and grew uniformly along the [110] direction (in a cubic unit cell) over the entire compositional range (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) explored. The use of an indium source enabled the growth of a second type of NWs, with remarkable cubic-hexagonal polytypic twinned superlattice and bicrystalline structures. The growth direction of the Zn3P2 and Zn3As2 NWs was also switched to [111] and [112], respectively. These structural changes are attributable to the Zn-depleted indium catalytic nanoparticles which favor the growth of hexagonal phases. The formation of a solid solution at all compositions allowed the continuous tuning of the band gap (1.0-1.5 eV). Photocurrent measurements were performed on individual NWs by fabricating photodetector devices; the single-crystalline NWs with [110] growth direction exhibit a higher photoconversion efficiency compared to the twinned crystalline NWs with [111] or [112] growth direction.

  19. Photoacoustic transformation of Bessel light beams in magnetoactive superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mityurich, G. S., E-mail: George-mityurich@mail.ru [Belarusian Trade and Economics University of Consumer Cooperatives (Belarus); Chernenok, E. V.; Sviridova, V. V.; Serdyukov, A. N. [Gomel State University (Belarus)

    2015-03-15

    Photoacoustic transformation of the TE mode of a Bessel light beam (BLB) has been studied for piezoelectric detection in short-period superlattices formed by magnetoactive crystals of bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 12}GeO{sub 20}) and bismuth silicate (Bi{sub 12}SiO{sub 20}) types. It is shown that the resulting signal amplitude can be controlled using optical schemes of BLB formation with a tunable cone angle. A resonant increase in the signal amplitude has been found in the megahertz range of modulation frequencies and its dependences on the BLB modulation frequency, geometric sizes of the two-layer structure and piezoelectric transducer, radial coordinate of the polarization BLB mode, and dissipative superlattice parameters are analyzed.

  20. Thermodynamics and Magnetocaloric properties of Fe/Cr Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Michalski, S.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Binek, Ch.

    2011-03-01

    We explore MC properties of tailored Fe/Cr superlattices involving simple 3d metals. Our multilayers are fabricated by pulsed laser deposition with emphasis on maximizing magnetic entropy changes near room temperature. We use nanostructuring to tailor magnetic interaction and exploit geometrical confinement in order to fit the FM to paramagnetic transition temperature of the FM constituent films. In concert this leads to an optimized global metamagnetic transition maximizing the isothermal entropy change. Thermodynamic and MC properties of such Fe/Cr superlattices are studied with the help of SQUID magnetometry. Entropy changes are deduced via the Maxwell relation in single phase regions and via the Clausis-Clapeyron relations at first order metamagnetic transitions, X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity are used to correlate structural data with the magnetic properties. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC Grant No. 0820521.

  1. Measuring spin correlations in optical lattices using superlattice potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind; Andersen, Brian Møller; Bruun, Georg Morten;

    2011-01-01

    We suggest two experimental methods for probing both short- and long-range spin correlations of atoms in optical lattices using superlattice potentials. The first method involves an adiabatic doubling of the periodicity of the underlying lattice to probe neighboring singlet (triplet) correlations...... for fermions (bosons) by the occupation of the resulting vibrational ground state. The second method utilizes a time-dependent superlattice potential to generate spin-dependent transport by any number of prescribed lattice sites, and probes correlations by the resulting number of doubly occupied sites....... For experimentally relevant parameters, we demonstrate how both methods yield large signatures of antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly repulsive fermionic atoms in a single shot of the experiment. Lastly, we show how this method may also be applied to probe d-wave pairing, a possible ground-state candidate...

  2. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Jonas R. F., E-mail: jonas.iasd@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC) - Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  3. Coupled bloch-phonon oscillations in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekorsy; Bartels; Kurz; Kohler; Hey; Ploog

    2000-07-31

    We investigate coherent Bloch oscillations in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs superlattices with electronic miniband widths larger than the optical phonon energy. In these superlattices the Bloch frequency can be tuned into resonance with the optical phonon. Close to resonance a direct coupling of Bloch oscillations to LO phonons is observed which gives rise to the coherent excitation of LO phonons. The density necessary for driving coherent LO phonons via Bloch oscillations is about 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the density necessary to drive coherent LO phonons in bulk GaAs. The experimental observations are confirmed by the theoretical description of this phenomenon [A.W. Ghosh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1084 (2000)].

  4. Resonant tunnelling in a Fibonacci bilayer graphene superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sinha, C. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Biswas, R. [Department of Physics, PK College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal (India)

    2010-02-15

    The transmission coefficients (TCs) and angularly averaged conductance for quasi-particle transport are studied for a bilayer graphene superlattice arranged according to the Fibonacci sequence. The transmission is found to be symmetric around the superlattice growth direction and highly sensitive to the direction of the quasi-particle incidence. The transmission spectra are fragmented and appear in groups due to the quasi-periodicity of the system. The average conductance shows interesting structures sharply dependent on the height of the potential barriers between two graphene strips. The low-energy conductance due to Klein transmission is substantially modified by the inclusion of quasi-periodicity in the system. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Phonons in Ge/Si superlattices with Ge quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Milekhin, A G; Pchelyakov, O P; Schulze, S; Zahn, D R T

    2001-01-01

    Ge/Si superlattices with Ge quantum dots obtained by means of molecular-beam epitaxy were investigated by means of light Raman scattering under resonance conditions. These structures are shown to have oscillation properties of both two-dimensional and zero-dimensional objects. Within spectrum low-frequency range one observes twisted acoustic phonons (up to 15 order) typical for planar superlattices. Lines of acoustic phonons are overlapped with a wide band of continuous emission. Analysis of frequencies of Ge and Ge-Si optical phonons shows that Ge quantum dots are pseudoamorphous ones and mixing of Ge and Si atoms is a negligible one. One detected low-frequency shift of longitudinal optical phonons at laser excitation energy increase (2.54-2.71 eV)

  6. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alexander S.; Peteu, Serban F.; Ly, James V.; Requicha, Aristides A. G.; Thompson, Mark E.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-01

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  7. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou Chongwu [Laboratory for Molecular Robotics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)], E-mail: requicha@usc.edu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 {mu}m, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  8. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  9. Vibrational spectra of nanowires measured using laser doppler vibrometry and STM studies of epitaxial graphene : an LDRD fellowship report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura Butler

    2009-09-01

    MWNTs, their vibration spectra was more extensively studied. The thermal vibration spectra of Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles was measured under both ambient and low-vacuum conditions. The operational deflection shapes of the vibrating Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles was also measured, allowing confirmation of the eigenmodes of vibration. The modulus of the crystalline nanoneedles was 84.3 {+-} 1.0 GPa. Gas damping is the dominate mechanism of energy loss for nanowires oscillating under ambient conditions. The measured quality factors, Q, of oscillation are in line with theoretical predictions of air damping in the free molecular gas damping regime. In the free molecular regime, Q{sub gas} is linearly proportional to the density and diameter of the nanowire and inversely proportional to the air pressure. Since the density of the Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles is three times that of the MWNTs, the Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles have greater Q at atmospheric pressures. Our initial measurements of Q for Ag{sub 2}Ga nanoneedles in low-vacuum (10 Torr) suggest that the intrinsic Q of these nanoneedles may be on the order of 1000. The epitaxial carbon that grows after heating (000{bar 1}) silicon carbide (SiC) to high temperatures (1450-1600) in vacuum was also studied. At these high temperatures, the surface Si atoms sublime and the remaining C atoms reconstruct to form graphene. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to characterize the quality of the few-layer graphene (FLG) surface. The XPS studies were useful in confirming the graphitic composition and measuring the thickness of the FLG samples. STM studies revealed a wide variety of nanometer-scale features that include sharp carbon-rich ridges, moire superlattices, one-dimensional line defects, and grain boundaries. By imaging these features with atomic scale resolution, considerable insight into the growth mechanisms of FLG on the carbon-face of SiC is obtained.

  10. Strong Ionization in carbon Nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Kaymak, Vural; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N; Rocca, Jorge J

    2015-01-01

    Surfaces covered with nanostructures, such as nanowire arrays, have shown to facilitate a significantly higher absorption of laser energy as compared to flat surfaces. Due to the efficient coupling of the laser energy, highly energetic electrons are produced, which in turn can emit intense ultrafast X-ray pulses. In the present work we use full three dimensional PIC simulations to analyze the behavior of arrays of carbon nanowires $400 nm$ in diameter, irradiated by a $\\lambda_0 = 400 nm$ laser pulse of $60 fs$ duration at FWHM and a vector potential of $a_0 = 18$. We analyze the ionization dynamics of the nanowires. We investigate the difference of the ionization strength and structure between linearly and circularly polarized laser beam. The nanowires are found to be fully ionized after about 30 laser cycles. Circularly polarized light reveals a slightly stronger ionization effect.

  11. Heterogenous Material Integration and Band Engineering With Type II Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    of chemical vapor deposited graphene transferred to SiO2 . Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 122108 (2011). 113 Ferrari, A. C. Raman spectroscopy of graphene ...extrinsic performance limits of graphene devices on SiO2 . Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 206-209 (2008). 130 Fang, T., Konar, A., Xing, H. & Jena, D. Mobility...AlSb strained layer superlattices. 15. SUBJECT TERMS crystal growth, characterization, semiconductor fabrication, infrared detectors, graphene

  12. Transparent conducting oxides: a δ-doped superlattice approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Valentino R; Seo, Sung S Ambrose; Lee, Suyoun; Kim, Jun Sung; Choi, Woo Seok; Okamoto, Satoshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-08-11

    Metallic states appearing at interfaces between dissimilar insulating oxides exhibit intriguing phenomena such as superconductivity and magnetism. Despite tremendous progress in understanding their origins, very little is known about how to control the conduction pathways and the distribution of charge carriers. Using optical spectroscopic measurements and density-functional theory (DFT) simulations, we examine the effect of SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layer thickness on the optical transparency and carrier distribution in La δ-doped STO superlattices. We experimentally observe that these metallic superlattices remain highly transparent to visible light; a direct consequence of the appropriately large gap between the O 2p and Ti 3d states. In superlattices with relatively thin STO layers, we predict that three-dimensional conduction would occur due to appreciable overlap of quantum mechanical wavefunctions between neighboring δ-doped layers. These results highlight the potential for using oxide heterostructures in optoelectronic devices by providing a unique route for creating novel transparent conducting oxides.

  13. Interface disorder and transport properties in HTC/CMR superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, N.; Guimpel, J.; Sirena, M.; Steren, L.B.; Campillo, G.; Saldarriaga, W.; Gomez, M.E

    2004-08-01

    The physical properties of superlattices are affected by interface disorder, like roughness and interdiffusion. X-ray diffraction allows its measurement through modeling and structure refinement. The high-T{sub c} RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (RBCO) and colossal magnetoresistance La{sub x}A{sub 1-x}MnO{sub 3} (LAMO) perovskites are interesting superlattice partners given their similar lattice parameters and because the combination of magnetic and superconducting properties is interesting for both basic and applied research. We have investigated the structural and transport properties of YBCO/La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} and GdBCO/La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.04}MnO{sub 3} superlattices grown by sputtering on (1 0 0)MgO. We find a roughness of 1 RBCO unit cell and a 30% interdiffusion in the same length from the interfaces for all samples. The superconducting behavior is found strongly dependent on the LAMO layer thickness.

  14. Shape-Anisotropy Driven Symmetry Transformations in Nanocrystal Superlattice Polymorphs

    KAUST Repository

    Bian, Kaifu

    2011-04-26

    Despite intense research efforts by research groups worldwide, the potential of self-assembled nanocrystal superlattices (NCSLs) has not been realized due to an incomplete understanding of the fundamental molecular interactions governing the self-assembly process. Because NCSLs reside naturally at length-scales between atomic crystals and colloidal assemblies, synthetic control over the properties of constituent nanocrystal (NC) building blocks and their coupling in ordered assemblies is expected to yield a new class of materials with remarkable optical, electronic, and vibrational characteristics. Progress toward the formation of suitable test structures and subsequent development of NCSL-based technologies has been held back by the limited control over superlattice spacing and symmetry. Here we show that NCSL symmetry can be controlled by manipulating molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface and the surrounding solvent. Specifically, we demonstrate solvent vapor-mediated NCSL symmetry transformations that are driven by the orientational ordering of NCs within the lattice. The assembly of various superlattice polymorphs, including face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, is studied in real time using in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) under controlled solvent vapor exposure. This approach provides quantitative insights into the molecular level physics that controls solvent-ligand interactions and assembly of NCSLs. Computer simulations based on all-atom molecular dynamics techniques confirm several key insights gained from experiment. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Theory of THz harmonic generation in semiconductor superlattices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mauro F.; Winge, David O.; Wacker, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Superlattices are artificial structures with a wide range of applications and open possibilities for controlling and study transport and optical [M.F. Pereira Jr., Phys. Rev. B 52, (1995)] properties of semiconductors. In this work, we start from the full Nonequilibrium Greens Functions approach [A. Wacker et a, IEEE Journal of Sel. Top. in Quantum Electron.,19 1200611, (2013),T. Schmielau and M.F. Pereira, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 231111, (2009)] to obtain Voltage-Current curves and compare them with experiments. By adjusting the numerical solutions of the corresponding Dyson equations to a simple model, analytical solutions are given for the nonlinear response of a biased superlattice under sub-THz radiation. The frequency multiplication process leading to multiple harmonicgeneration is described. This hybrid approach leads to predictive simulations and may have important application for a new generation of devices where the superlattices are used as both sources and detectors and may be particular useful for high resolution transient spectroscopy [A.A. Yablokov et at, IEEE Transactions on THz Science and Technology 5, 845 (2015)].

  16. Manganite/Cuprate Superlattice as Artificial Reentrant Spin Glass

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Junfeng

    2016-05-04

    Emerging physical phenomena at the unit-cell-controlled interfaces of transition-metal oxides have attracted lots of interest because of the rich physics and application opportunities. This work reports a reentrant spin glass behavior with strong magnetic memory effect discovered in oxide heterostructures composed of ultrathin manganite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and cuprate La2CuO4 (LCO) layers. These heterostructures are featured with enhanced ferromagnetism before entering the spin glass state: a Curie temperature of 246 K is observed in the superlattice with six-unit-cell LSMO layers, while the reference LSMO film with the same thickness shows much weaker magnetism. Furthermore, an insulator-metal transition emerges at the Curie temperature, and below the freezing temperature the superlattices can be considered as a glassy ferromagnetic insulator. These experimental results are closely related to the interfacial spin reconstruction revealed by the first-principles calculations, and the dependence of the reentrant spin glass behavior on the LSMO layer thickness is in line with the general phase diagram of a spin system derived from the infinite-range SK model. The results of this work underscore the manganite/cuprate superlattices as a versatile platform of creating artificial materials with tailored interfacial spin coupling and physical properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskin, Menderes

    2011-05-01

    We study the ground-state phases of the Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice in two dimensions, including the superfluid phase and the Mott and charge-density-wave insulators. First, we discuss the single-particle Hofstadter problem, and show that the presence of a checkerboard superlattice gives rise to a magnetic flux-independent energy gap in the excitation spectrum. Then, we consider the many-particle problem, and derive an analytical mean-field expression for the superfluid-Mott and superfluid-charge-density-wave insulator phase transition boundaries. Finally, since the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice is in many ways similar to that of the extended Bose-Hubbard model, we comment on the effects of magnetic field on the latter model, and derive an analytical mean-field expression for the superfluid-insulator phase transition boundaries as well. This work is supported by Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (FP7-PEOPLE-IRG-2010-268239).

  18. Spectral properties of Fibonacci superlattices formed using armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A. M.; Litvynchuk, S. I.; Bagliuk, S. V.; Lazarenko, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss and analyze the dependence spectra of the transmission coefficient T on the quasiparticle energy E of one variety of graphene-based Fibonacci superlattices (SL). The SL is built from armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNR), and the quasi-periodicity is produced by metal-like (MGNR) and semiconductor (SCGNR) ribbons, placed along the lattice growth axis in accordance with the Fibonacci sequence, which are used as individual SL elements. It is shown that the difference in the values of quantized transverse quasi-momentum of electrons in MGNR and SCGNR is enough to form an effective quasi-periodic modulation in the examined structure (no additional factors required), and the optimal nanoribbon width range for this purpose is determined. We also analyzed the dependence of the spectral properties of the test structure on the geometric parameters of the superlattice, and the external electrostatic potential. We paid particular attention to the fact that each Fibonacci generation had a Dirac superlattice band gap. The results of the study can be useful in the determination of optimal parameters for graphene-based nanoelectronic devices.

  19. Thermoelectric properties of strontium titanate superlattices incorporating niobium oxide nanolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2014-04-22

    A novel superlattice structure based on epitaxial nanoscale layers of NbOx and Nb-doped SrTiO3 is fabricated using a layer-by-layer approach on lattice matched LAO substrates. The absolute Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the [(NbOx) a/(Nb-doped SrTiO3)b]20 superlattices (SLs) were found to increase with decreasing layer thickness ratio (a/b ratio), reaching, at high temperatures, a power factor that is comparable to epitaxial Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STNO) films (∼0.7 W m-1 K-1). High temperature studies reveal that the SLs behave as n-type semiconductors and undergo an irreversible change at a varying crossover temperature that depends on the a/b ratio. By use of high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, the irreversible changes are identified to be due to a phase transformation from cubic NbO to orthorhombic Nb2O5, which limits the highest temperature of stable operation of the superlattice to 950 K. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. Structure and magnetic properties of thin films and superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Bentall, M J

    2002-01-01

    Thin layers of rare earth elements and Laves phase superlattices were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Their structure and magnetic properties have been probed using x-ray and neutron scattering, magnetisation measurements and high resolution electron microscopy. When holmium is grown on yttrium, the x-ray scattering from layers with a thickness below T sub c ' 115 A is characteristic of a pseudomorphic layer with the same in-plane lattice parameter as the yttrium substrate to within 0.05%. For layers above T sub c ' there is a sharp reduction in misfit strain which is probably due to the creation of edge dislocations. When gadolinium is grown on yttrium, no sharp change of strain of the thin layer was observed up to a thickness of 2920 A. This is characteristic of a pseudomorphic layer, and a failure to nucleate dislocations. For the Laves phase superlattices, a study of the x-ray scattering near several Bragg reflections revealed the presence of numerous superlattice peaks, showing that the samples exhib...

  1. Reversible solvent vapor-mediated phase changes in nanocrystal superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Korgel, Brian A

    2011-04-26

    Colloidal nanocrystals are being explored for use in a variety of applications, from solar cells to transistors to medical diagnostics and therapy. Ordered assemblies of nanocrystals, or superlattices, are one particularly interesting class of these materials, in which the nanocrystals serve as modular building blocks to construct nanostructures by self-assembly with spatial and temporal complexity and unique properties. From a fundamental perspective, the nanocrystals are simple molecular models that can be manipulated and studied to test statistical mechanical and thermodynamic models of crystallization and disorder. An article by Bian et al. in this issue of ACS Nano reports surprising new phase behavior in semiconductor nanocrystal superlattices: reversible transitions between non-close-packed body-centered cubic (bcc) and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, and close-packed face-centered cubic (fcc) structures, observed by real-time in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements, upon solvent vapor exposure and increased interparticle separation. These studies offer new insight and raise new questions about superlattice structure and the forces that control self-assembly. Accompanying computer simulations show that ligand-ligand interactions are important. Furthermore, it appears that ligand-coated nanocrystals have more in common with soft microphase-separated materials, like diblock copolymers and surfactant assemblies, than previously realized.

  2. Shape-anisotropy driven symmetry transformations in nanocrystal superlattice polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Kaifu; Choi, Joshua J; Kaushik, Ananth; Clancy, Paulette; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Hanrath, Tobias

    2011-04-26

    Despite intense research efforts by research groups worldwide, the potential of self-assembled nanocrystal superlattices (NCSLs) has not been realized due to an incomplete understanding of the fundamental molecular interactions governing the self-assembly process. Because NCSLs reside naturally at length-scales between atomic crystals and colloidal assemblies, synthetic control over the properties of constituent nanocrystal (NC) building blocks and their coupling in ordered assemblies is expected to yield a new class of materials with remarkable optical, electronic, and vibrational characteristics. Progress toward the formation of suitable test structures and subsequent development of NCSL-based technologies has been held back by the limited control over superlattice spacing and symmetry. Here we show that NCSL symmetry can be controlled by manipulating molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface and the surrounding solvent. Specifically, we demonstrate solvent vapor-mediated NCSL symmetry transformations that are driven by the orientational ordering of NCs within the lattice. The assembly of various superlattice polymorphs, including face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, is studied in real time using in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) under controlled solvent vapor exposure. This approach provides quantitative insights into the molecular level physics that controls solvent-ligand interactions and assembly of NCSLs. Computer simulations based on all-atom molecular dynamics techniques confirm several key insights gained from experiment.

  3. Do Twin Boundaries Always Strengthen Metal Nanowires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Huang, Hanchen

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported that twin boundaries strengthen nanowires regardless of their morphology-that is, the strength of nanowires goes up as twin spacing goes down. This article shows that twin boundaries do not always strengthen nanowires. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the authors show that whether twin boundaries strengthen nanowires depends on the necessary stress for dislocation nucleation, which in turn depends on surface morphologies. When nanowires are circular cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is high and the presence of twin boundaries lowers this stress; twin boundaries soften nanowires. In contrast, when nanowires are square cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is low, and a higher stress is required for dislocations to penetrate twin boundaries; they strengthen nanowires.

  4. Do Twin Boundaries Always Strengthen Metal Nanowires?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yongfeng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been widely reported that twin boundaries strengthen nanowires regardless of their morphology—that is, the strength of nanowires goes up as twin spacing goes down. This article shows that twin boundaries do not always strengthen nanowires. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the authors show that whether twin boundaries strengthen nanowires depends on the necessary stress for dislocation nucleation, which in turn depends on surface morphologies. When nanowires are circular cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is high and the presence of twin boundaries lowers this stress; twin boundaries soften nanowires. In contrast, when nanowires are square cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is low, and a higher stress is required for dislocations to penetrate twin boundaries; they strengthen nanowires.

  5. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  6. Magnetic optical bifunctional CoPt3/Co multilayered nanowire arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏轶坤; 闫志龙; 吴喜明; 刘欢; 任肖; 杨海涛

    2015-01-01

    CoPt3/Co multilayered nanowire (NW) arrays are synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition into nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. The electrochemistry deposition parameters are determined by cyclic voltammetry to realize the well control of the ratio of Co to Pt and the length of every segment. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show that both Co and CoPt3 NWs exhibit face-centered cubic ( f cc) structures. In the UV-visible absorption spectra, CoPt3/Co NW arrays show a red-shift with respect to pure CoPt3NWs. Compared with the pure Co nanowire arrays, the CoPt3/Co multilayered nanowire arrays show a weak shape anisotropy and well-modulated magnetic properties. CoPt3/Co multilayered nanowires are highly encouraging that new families of bimetallic nanosystems may be developed to meet the needs of nanomaterials in emerging multifunctional nanotechnologies.

  7. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe2O3 nanowires on iron substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-05-01

    α-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanowires have been grown by simple thermal oxidation of iron foil at 700°C in a moist oxygen flow. It was observed that the growth of nanowires highly depends on the texture of the iron substrate, in particular the presence of [110] oriented iron grains. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigation of as-grown sample revealed that the growth of nanowires has definite orientation relation with the underlying oxide grains Fe3O4 (magnetite) and FeO (wustite), which can be interpreted by the primary orientation relationships of topotaxial growth of iron oxides. The observation can pave the way for patterning of the nanowire growth by controlling the texture of original substrate. Samples were also characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  8. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on iron substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Himanshu, E-mail: himsri@rrcat.gov.in; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2016-05-23

    α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) nanowires have been grown by simple thermal oxidation of iron foil at 700°C in a moist oxygen flow. It was observed that the growth of nanowires highly depends on the texture of the iron substrate, in particular the presence of [110] oriented iron grains. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigation of as-grown sample revealed that the growth of nanowires has definite orientation relation with the underlying oxide grains Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) and FeO (wustite), which can be interpreted by the primary orientation relationships of topotaxial growth of iron oxides. The observation can pave the way for patterning of the nanowire growth by controlling the texture of original substrate. Samples were also characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  9. Temperature dependent growth and optical properties of SnO2 nanowires and nanobelts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S P Mondal; S K Ray; J Ravichandran; I Manna

    2010-08-01

    SnO2 nanowires and nanobelts have been grown by the thermal evaporation of Sn powders. The growth of nanowires and nanobelts has been investigated at different temperatures (750–1000°C). The field emission scanning electron microscopic and transmission electron microscopic studies revealed the growth of nanowires and nano-belts at different growth temperatures. The growth mechanisms of the formation of the nanostructures have also been discussed. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the nanowires and nanobelts are highly crystalline with tetragonal rutile phase. UV-visible absorption spectrum showed the bulk bandgap value (∼ 3.6 eV) of SnO2. Photoluminescence spectra demonstrated a Stokes-shifted emission in the wavelength range 558–588 nm. The Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed the formation of stoichiometric SnO2 at different growth temperatures.

  10. Directed deposition of silicon nanowires using neopentasilane as precursor and gold as catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Kämpken

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the applicability of neopentasilane (Si(SiH34 as a precursor for the formation of silicon nanowires by using gold nanoparticles as a catalyst has been explored. The growth proceeds via the formation of liquid gold/silicon alloy droplets, which excrete the silicon nanowires upon continued decomposition of the precursor. This mechanism determines the diameter of the Si nanowires. Different sources for the gold nanoparticles have been tested: the spontaneous dewetting of gold films, thermally annealed gold films, deposition of preformed gold nanoparticles, and the use of “liquid bright gold”, a material historically used for the gilding of porcelain and glass. The latter does not only form gold nanoparticles when deposited as a thin film and thermally annealed, but can also be patterned by using UV irradiation, providing access to laterally structured layers of silicon nanowires.

  11. Plasmonic nanowires arranged in Fibonacci number chain: Excitation angle-dependent optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Raghuwanshi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Herein we numerically study the excitation angle-dependant far-field and near-field optical properties of vertical plasmonic nanowires arranged in an unconventional linear geometry: Fibonacci number chain. The first five numbers in the Fibonacci series (1, 1, 2, 3, 5 were mapped to the size of gold nanowires, and arranged in a linear chain to study their optical interactions, and compared them to conventional chain of vertical gold nanowires. By harnessing the radiative and evanescent coupling regimes in the geometry, we found a systematic variation in the far-field extinction and near-field confinement in the geometries. Our simulation studies revealed enhanced backscattered intensity in the far-field radiation pattern at excitation angles along the chain-length of Fibonacci geometry, which was otherwise absent for conventional chain of plasmonic nanowires. Such angular reconfiguration of optical fields in unconventional linear geometries can be harnessed for tunable on-chip plasmonics.

  12. Individual Pd nanowire hydrogen sensors fabricated by electron-beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kye Jin; Lee, Jun Min; Lee, Eunsongyi; Lee, Wooyoung

    2009-04-01

    We report on the hydrogen gas (H2) sensing performance of lithographically patterned Pd nanowires as a function of the nanowire thickness and H2 concentration. A combination of electron-beam lithography and a lift-off process has been utilized to fabricate four-terminal devices based on individual Pd nanowires with width w = 300 nm, length l = 10 µm, and thickness t = 20-400 nm from continuous Pd films. The variation of the resistance and sensitivity at 20 000 ppm H2 of Pd nanowires was found to be much lager than at 10 000 ppm H2, which can be explained by an α-β phase transition occurring at 20 000 ppm H2. This is confirmed by the observation of hysteresis behavior in the resistance versus H2 concentration for Pd thin films. The response time was found to decrease with decreasing thickness regardless of H2 concentration due to a higher surface-to-volume ratio and a higher clamping effect. A single Pd nanowire with t = 100 nm was found to successfully detect H2 at a detection limit of 20 ppm. Our results suggest that lithographically patterned Pd nanowires can be used as hydrogen gas sensors to quantitatively detect H2 over a wide range of concentrations.

  13. Individual Pd nanowire hydrogen sensors fabricated by electron-beam lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Kye Jin; Lee, Jun Min; Lee, Eunsongyi; Lee, Wooyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: wooyoung@yonsei.ac.kr

    2009-04-01

    We report on the hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) sensing performance of lithographically patterned Pd nanowires as a function of the nanowire thickness and H{sub 2} concentration. A combination of electron-beam lithography and a lift-off process has been utilized to fabricate four-terminal devices based on individual Pd nanowires with width w = 300 nm, length l = 10 {mu}m, and thickness t = 20-400 nm from continuous Pd films. The variation of the resistance and sensitivity at 20 000 ppm H{sub 2} of Pd nanowires was found to be much lager than at 10 000 ppm H{sub 2}, which can be explained by an {alpha}-{beta} phase transition occurring at 20 000 ppm H{sub 2}. This is confirmed by the observation of hysteresis behavior in the resistance versus H{sub 2} concentration for Pd thin films. The response time was found to decrease with decreasing thickness regardless of H{sub 2} concentration due to a higher surface-to-volume ratio and a higher clamping effect. A single Pd nanowire with t = 100 nm was found to successfully detect H{sub 2} at a detection limit of 20 ppm. Our results suggest that lithographically patterned Pd nanowires can be used as hydrogen gas sensors to quantitatively detect H{sub 2} over a wide range of concentrations.

  14. Individual Pd nanowire hydrogen sensors fabricated by electron-beam lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Kye Jin; Lee, Jun Min; Lee, Eunsongyi; Lee, Wooyoung

    2009-04-01

    We report on the hydrogen gas (H2) sensing performance of lithographically patterned Pd nanowires as a function of the nanowire thickness and H2 concentration. A combination of electron-beam lithography and a lift-off process has been utilized to fabricate four-terminal devices based on individual Pd nanowires with width w = 300 nm, length l = 10 microm, and thickness t = 20-400 nm from continuous Pd films. The variation of the resistance and sensitivity at 20 000 ppm H2 of Pd nanowires was found to be much lager than at 10 000 ppm H2, which can be explained by an alpha-beta phase transition occurring at 20 000 ppm H2. This is confirmed by the observation of hysteresis behavior in the resistance versus H2 concentration for Pd thin films. The response time was found to decrease with decreasing thickness regardless of H2 concentration due to a higher surface-to-volume ratio and a higher clamping effect. A single Pd nanowire with t = 100 nm was found to successfully detect H2 at a detection limit of 20 ppm. Our results suggest that lithographically patterned Pd nanowires can be used as hydrogen gas sensors to quantitatively detect H2 over a wide range of concentrations.

  15. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-07-27

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices.

  16. Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors: Sensing Simplicity?

    OpenAIRE

    Mescher, M

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are structures made from silicon with at least one spatial dimension in the nanometer regime (1-100 nm). From these nanowires, silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be constructed. Since their introduction in 2001 silicon nanowire field-effect transistors have been studied because of their promising application as selective sensors for biological and chemical species. Their large surface-to-volume ratio promises an increased sensitivity compared to conventional, plan...

  17. Controlling nanowire emission profile using conical taper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics.......The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics....

  18. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  19. Hysteresis loops and susceptibility of a transverse Ising nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhou, S.; Essaoudi, I. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux et Modelisation, des Systemes, (LP2MS), Unite Associee au CNRST-URAC 08, University of Moulay Ismail, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, B.P. 11201 Meknes (Morocco); Ainane, A., E-mail: ainane@pks.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux et Modelisation, des Systemes, (LP2MS), Unite Associee au CNRST-URAC 08, University of Moulay Ismail, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, B.P. 11201 Meknes (Morocco); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik Complexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Str. 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses (LPMD), Institut de Chimie, Physique et Materiaux (ICPM), 1 Bd. Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Saber, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux et Modelisation, des Systemes, (LP2MS), Unite Associee au CNRST-URAC 08, University of Moulay Ismail, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, B.P. 11201 Meknes (Morocco); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik Complexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Str. 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Dujardin, F. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses (LPMD), Institut de Chimie, Physique et Materiaux (ICPM), 1 Bd. Arago, 57070 Metz (France)

    2012-08-15

    In this work, the magnetization, susceptibility, and hysteresis loops of a magnetic nanowire are described by the transverse Ising model using the effective field theory within a probability distribution technique. The effects of the exchange interaction between core/shell and the external fields on the magnetization and the susceptibility of the system are examined. Some characteristic phenomena are found in the thermal variations, depending on the ratios of the physical parameters in the shell and the core. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the effective-field theory with a probability distribution technique to investigate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties of a magnetic nanowire in the presence of both the longitudinal and the transverse field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triple hysteresis loop patterns for magnetic nanowire are observed which may have potential in producing a multi-state memory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our theoretical predictions may be a reference for future experimental studies on the magnetic nanowire.

  20. Radial growth of zinc oxide nanowire for piezoelectric nanogenerator application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Safa

    2017-04-01

    Nano- and micro-self-biased sensors employed environmental harvested energy, which are provided by different methods, such as piezoelectric. Piezoelectric materials are capable of producing electrical energy from environmental mechanical force. In this paper, a radial layer of well-arrayed hexagonal zinc oxide nanowires is grown on carbon fiber substrate using a two-step Chemical deposition method of metal salt growth. The resulted morphology is examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) micrographs and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern which indicates the quality and the crystallization order of the samples. In addition, composition of the material is studied using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method. The results show that zinc oxide nanowires are well managed in vertical direction on the cylindrical carbon fibers. The hexagonal nanowires are grown with a length from 206 to 286 nm (Nanometer) and the diameter from 75 to 103 nm. The results of FTIR spectroscopy and XRD also illustrate the wurtzite structure of zinc oxide. The synthesized nanowires are then applied in a flexible capacitive piezoelectric nanogenerator consisting of a thin Ag layer as the upper contact and a carbon substrate as the back contact which are separated by a PMMA dielectric film. The output current and voltage are measured by applying a random pulse mechanical force on the upper contact. A maximum voltage and current of 14 mV (millivolt) and 20 nA (nanoampere) are generated at the output of nanogenerator, respectively.

  1. Controlling the Geometries of Si Nanowires through Tunable Nanosphere Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luping; Fang, Yin; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Kedi; Limburg, Connor; Jiang, Peng; Ziegler, Kirk J

    2017-02-14

    A tunable nanosphere lithography (NSL) technique is combined with metal-assisted etching of silicon (Si) to fabricate ordered, high-aspect-ratio Si nanowires. Non-close-packed structures are directly prepared via shear-induced ordering of the nanospheres. The spacing between the nanospheres is independent of their diameters and tuned by changing the loading of nanospheres. Nanowires with spacings between 110 and 850 nm are easily achieved with diameters between 100 and 550 nm. By eliminating plasma or heat treatment of the nanospheres, the diameter of the nanowires fabricated is nearly identical to the nanosphere diameter in the suspension. The elimination of this step helps avoid common drawbacks of traditional NSL approaches, leading to the high-fidelity, large-scale fabrication of highly crystalline, nonporous Si nanowires in ordered hexagonal patterns. The ability to simultaneously control the diameter and spacing makes the NSL technique more versatile and expands the range of geometries that can be fabricated by top-down approaches.

  2. Smaller is faster and more sensitive: the effect of wire size on the detection of hydrogen by single palladium nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Cheng, Ming; Hemminger, John C; Penner, Reginald M

    2010-09-28

    Palladium nanowires prepared using the lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) method are used to detect hydrogen gas (H2). These palladium nanowires are prepared by electrodepositing palladium from EDTA-containing solutions under conditions favoring the formation of β-phase PdHx. The Pd nanowires produced by this procedure are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These nanowires have a mean grain diameter of 15 nm and are composed of pure Pd with no XPS-detectable bulk carbon. The four-point resistance of 50-100 μm segments of individual nanowires is used to detect H2 in N2 and air at concentrations ranging from 2 ppm to 10%. For low [H2] recovery rates at all H2 concentrations from, 5 ppm to 10%. For 12 devices, response and recovery times are correlated with the surface area/volume ratio of the palladium detection element. We conclude that the kinetics of hydrogen adsorption limits the observed response rate seen for the nanowire, and that hydrogen desorption from the nanowire limits the observed recovery rate; proton diffusion within PdHx does not limit the rates of either of these processes.

  3. Epitaxy-enabled vapor-liquid-solid growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanowires with controlled orientations

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2014-08-13

    Controlling the morphology of nanowires in bottom-up synthesis and assembling them on planar substrates is of tremendous importance for device applications in electronics, photonics, sensing and energy conversion. To date, however, there remain challenges in reliably achieving these goals of orientation-controlled nanowire synthesis and assembly. Here we report that growth of planar, vertical and randomly oriented tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires can be realized on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates via the epitaxy-assisted vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, by simply regulating the growth conditions, in particular the growth temperature. This robust control on nanowire orientation is facilitated by the small lattice mismatch of 1.6% between ITO and YSZ. Further control of the orientation, symmetry and shape of the nanowires can be achieved by using YSZ substrates with (110) and (111), in addition to (100) surfaces. Based on these insights, we succeed in growing regular arrays of planar ITO nanowires from patterned catalyst nanoparticles. Overall, our discovery of unprecedented orientation control in ITO nanowires advances the general VLS synthesis, providing a robust epitaxy-based approach toward rational synthesis of nanowires. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies of the structure and optical properties of nickel phthalocyanine nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Wei; Ju, Haidong; Zou, Taoyu; Qiao, Zhenfang; Gong, Hao; Wang, Hai

    2016-12-01

    By using organic vapor phase deposition method, nickel phthalocyanines (NiPc) nanowires were successfully prepared, and the effects of heating temperature on the structural and optical properties of NiPc nanowires were investigated. Both the crystal structures of NiPc powders and nanowires are studied by x-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The lattice constants of NiPc nanowires from the fitting of XRD patterns are a = 13.04 Å, b = 3.75 Å, c = 24.32 Å, β = 94.10°, belonging to the space group of monoclinic (P21/c). X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests main peaks at 284.82 eV and 286.18 eV for C-C and C-N bonds and two peaks at 397.8 eV and 398.8 eV for N-C and the N-Ni bonds, respectively, in NiPc nanowires. FTIR spectra show a structural transition from powder to nanowire. The optical properties of NiPc nanowires have been investigated via a comparison between theoretical and experimental approaches. The most significant absorption peaks of NiPc nanowires in the visible region are located at 626 nm and 672 nm, showing a blue shift comparing with the β-NiPc. We have also theoretically revealed the excitation energies in NiPc single molecule and dimer in the form of α and β phases using time-dependent density-functional theory. These theoretical results are in qualitative agreement with the measurements of optical properties. Moreover, no noticeable change in crystalline form is shown when tuning the heating temperature from 420 °C to 450 °C, suggesting a wide synthesis temperature window. The reduced Ni-Ni distance indicated a clear advantage over powder in terms of potential applications in organic electronics.

  5. Nonlinear optical response in Kronig-Penney type graphene superlattice in terahertz regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijuan; Yuan, Rui-Yang; Zhao, Xin; Lv, Jing; Yan, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The terahertz nonlinear optical response in Kronig-Penney (KP) type graphene superlattice is demonstrated. The single-, triple- and quintuple-frequencies of the fifth-order nonlinear responses are investigated for different frequencies and temperatures with the angle φ along the periodicity of the superlattice toward the external field tuning from 0 to π/2. The results show that the fifth-order nonlinear optical conductance of graphene superlattice is enhanced in the terahertz regime when φ = 0, i.e. an external field is applied along the periodicity of the superlattice. The fifth-order nonlinear optical conductances at φ = 0 for different frequencies and temperatures are calculated. The results show that the nonlinear optical conductance is enhanced in low frequency and low temperature. Our results suggest that KP type graphene superlattices are preferred structures for developing graphene-based nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics devices.

  6. ON THE CHARACTERIZATION OF METALLIC SUPERLATTICE STRUCTURES BY X—RAY DIFFRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINGXU; WenxueYU; 等

    1999-01-01

    To solve the problem on the microstructural characterization of metallic superlattices,taking the NiFe/Cu superlattices as example,we show that the sturctures of metallic superlattices can be characterized exactly by combining low-angle X-ray diffraction with high-angle X-ray diffraction.First,we determine exactly the total film thickness by a straightforward and precise method based on a modified Bragg law from the subsidiary maxima around the low-angle X-ray diffraction peak.Then.by combining with the simulation of high-angle X-ray diffraction.we obtain the sturctural parameters such as the superlattice period,the sublayer and buffer thickness,This characterization procedure is also applicable to other types of metallic superlattices.

  7. Mapping the local structure of nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    . Nano Beam Electron Diffraction (NBED) is shown to be a powerful technique to reveal strain near the interface of compositional change in heterostructured semiconductor nanowires. Furthermore, the relative orientation of the nanowires is studied by means of NBED revealing the nanowires to be very...

  8. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    -ray diffraction is performed with a MBE system attached to a synchrotron beam line. The evolution in crystal structure is monitored for different growth conditions and can be correlated to post growth analysis in TEM. This type of studies gives much more detailed information on formation of the crystal structure......This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x...... by a systematic study to optimize the growth conditions; first the Au deposition, then the growth temperature and finally the beam fluxes. For further control of the growth, Au droplets have been positioned with electron beam lithography and large scale arrays with a > 99 % yield have been made on 2 inch...

  9. Mechanical behaviors of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yujie; An, Xianghai; Liao, Xiaozhou

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical behaviors of nanowires (NWs) are significantly different from those of their bulk materials because of their small dimensions. Determining the mechanical performance of NWs and understanding their deformation behavior are crucial for designing and manufacturing NW-based devices with predictable and reproducible operation. Owing to the difficulties to manipulate these nanoscale materials, nanomechanical testing of NWs is always challenging, and errors can be readily introduced in the measured mechanical data. Here, we survey the techniques that have been developed to quantify the mechanical properties and to understand the deformation mechanisms of NWs. We also provide a general review of the mechanical properties and deformation behaviors of NWs and discuss possible sources responsible for the discrepancy of measured mechanical properties. The effects of planar defects on the mechanical behavior of NWs are also reviewed.

  10. Mechanical characterization of a single gold nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming; Liu, Xiaojun; Chang, Feng-Cheng; Deka, Juti R

    2013-08-01

    Mechanical properties of gold nanowires were individually determined in this investigation using a multifunctional nanomanipulator inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Gold nanowires were synthesized by an electrochemical deposition technique. Three different characterization techniques including tensile, buckling and bending tests were adapted to quantitatively determine Young's modulus, yield stress and failure stress of the gold nanowires. The mechanical characterizations show that the nanowires were highly flexible in nature. The excellent resilience and the ability to store elastic energy in these nanowires confirm their potential applications in nano electromechanical devices.

  11. Micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2015-05-27

    This chapter reviews micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires and their ordered arrays. It starts with a description of the theoretical background of micromagnetism. The chapter discusses main magnetization reversal modes, domain wall types, and state diagrams in cylindrical nanowires of different types and sizes. The results of the hysteresis process in individual nanowires and nanowire arrays also are presented. Modeling results are compared with experimental ones. The chapter also discusses future trends in nanowire applications in relation to simulations, such as current-driven dynamics, spintronics, and spincaloritronics. The main micromagnetic programs are presented and discussed, together with the corresponding links.

  12. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  13. Ballistic superconductivity in semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Gül, Önder; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Nowak, Michał P.; Wimmer, Michael; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; de Vries, Folkert K.; van Veen, Jasper; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Bommer, Jouri D. S.; van Woerkom, David J.; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Cassidy, Maja C.; Koelling, Sebastian; Goswami, Srijit; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2017-07-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have opened new research avenues in quantum transport owing to their confined geometry and electrostatic tunability. They have offered an exceptional testbed for superconductivity, leading to the realization of hybrid systems combining the macroscopic quantum properties of superconductors with the possibility to control charges down to a single electron. These advances brought semiconductor nanowires to the forefront of efforts to realize topological superconductivity and Majorana modes. A prime challenge to benefit from the topological properties of Majoranas is to reduce the disorder in hybrid nanowire devices. Here we show ballistic superconductivity in InSb semiconductor nanowires. Our structural and chemical analyses demonstrate a high-quality interface between the nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor that enables ballistic transport. This is manifested by a quantized conductance for normal carriers, a strongly enhanced conductance for Andreev-reflecting carriers, and an induced hard gap with a significantly reduced density of states. These results pave the way for disorder-free Majorana devices.

  14. Large-scale electrohydrodynamic organic nanowire printing, lithography, and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-03-01

    Although the many merits of organic nanowires (NWs), a reliable process for controllable and large-scale assembly of highly-aligned NW parallel arrays based on ``individual control (IC)'' of NWs must be developed since inorganic NWs are mainly grown vertically on substrates and thus have been transferred to the target substrates by any of several non-individually controlled (non-IC) methods such as contact-printing technologies with unidirectional massive alignment, and the random dispersion method with disordered alignment. Controlled alignment and patterning of individual semiconducting NWs at a desired position in a large area is a major requirement for practical electronic device applications. Large-area, high-speed printing of highly-aligned individual NWs that allows control of the exact numbers of wires, and dimensions and their orientations, and its use in high-speed large-area nanolithography is a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we use a high-speed electrohydrodynamic organic nanowire printer to print large-area organic semiconducting nanowire arrays directly on device substrates in an accurately individually-controlled manner; this method also enables sophisticated large-area nanowire lithography for nano-electronics. We achieve an unprecedented high maximum field-effect mobility up to 9.7 cm2 .V-1 .s-1 with extremely low contact resistance (<5.53 Ω . cm) even in nano-channel transistors based on single-stranded semiconducting NWs. We also demonstrate complementary inverter circuit arrays consist of well-aligned p-type and n-type organic semiconducting NWs. Extremely fast nanolithography using printed semiconducting nanowire arrays provide a very simple, reliable method of fabricating large-area and flexible nano-electronics.

  15. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  16. Electrically Injected UV-Visible Nanowire Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Changyi; Li, Qiming; Liu, Sheng; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting -Shan; Chow, Weng W.; Leung, Benjamin; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lu, Tzu-Ming

    2015-09-01

    There is strong interest in minimizing the volume of lasers to enable ultracompact, low-power, coherent light sources. Nanowires represent an ideal candidate for such nanolasers as stand-alone optical cavities and gain media, and optically pumped nanowire lasing has been demonstrated in several semiconductor systems. Electrically injected nanowire lasers are needed to realize actual working devices but have been elusive due to limitations of current methods to address the requirement for nanowire device heterostructures with high material quality, controlled doping and geometry, low optical loss, and efficient carrier injection. In this project we proposed to demonstrate electrically injected single nanowire lasers emitting in the important UV to visible wavelengths. Our approach to simultaneously address these challenges is based on high quality III-nitride nanowire device heterostructures with precisely controlled geometries and strong gain and mode confinement to minimize lasing thresholds, enabled by a unique top-down nanowire fabrication technique.

  17. Laser Modified ZnO/CdSSe Core-Shell Nanowire Arrays for Micro-Steganography and Improved Photoconduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junpeng; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Minrui; Zhang, Hongji; Lim, Sharon Xiaodai; Tok, Eng Soon; Sow, Chorng Haur

    2014-09-01

    Arrays of ZnO/CdSSe core/shell nanowires with shells of tunable band gaps represent a class of interesting hybrid nanomaterials with unique optical and photoelectrical properties due to their type II heterojunctions and chemical compositions. In this work, we demonstrate that direct focused laser beam irradiation is able to achieve localized modification of the hybrid structure and chemical composition of the nanowire arrays. As a result, the photoresponsivity of the laser modified hybrid is improved by a factor of ~3. A 3D photodetector with improved performance is demonstrated using laser modified nanowire arrays overlaid with monolayer graphene as the top electrode. Finally, by controlling the power of the scanning focused laser beam, micropatterns with different fluorescence emissions are created on a substrate covered with nanowire arrays. Such a pattern is not apparent when imaged under normal optical microscopy but the pattern becomes readily revealed under fluorescence microscopy i.e. a form of Micro-Steganography is achieved.

  18. Electrochemical fabrication of (TMTSF)2X (X = PF6, BF4, CIO4) nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youn Jung; Kim, Yonha; Kim, Gyu Tae; Kang, Woun; Noh, Dong-Youn

    2012-07-01

    TMTSF-based (TMTSF = tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene = C10H12Se4) charge-transfer salt nanowires were fabricated using the galvanostatic deposition technique that was assisted by an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. By applying a low current density of 1-2 microA/cm2 for more than one month, nanowire arrays with diameters of approximately 150 nm and lengths of approximately 6 microm were obtained. The length of nanowires can be controlled by the duration of the constant current application. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDX) analysis confirmed that selenium is one of the main components of the nanowires. The micro-Raman (v3C == C) and FT-IR spectra (v3PF6-, v3BF4-, v3CIO4-) indicated that the nanowire arrays had the (TMTSF)2X (X = PF6, BF4, CIO4) phase. The TEM images and the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns indicate that the nanowires were not single crystals, but the current-voltage characteristic that was measured with the four-terminal method showed the conductivity of the (TMTSF)2PF6 single crystals (sigmaRT = 1.6 S/cm) at room temperature.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of single-crystalline zinc tin oxide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jen-Bin; Wu, Po-Feng; Lin, Hsien-Sheng; Lin, Ya-Ting; Lee, Hsuan-Wei; Kao, Chia-Tze; Liao, Wei-Hsiang; Young, San-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline zinc tin oxide (ZTO; zinc oxide with heavy tin doping of 33 at.%) nanowires were first synthesized using the electrodeposition and heat treatment method based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane, which has an average diameter of about 60 nm. According to the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) results, the synthesized ZTO nanowires are highly ordered and have high wire packing densities. The length of ZTO nanowires is about 4 μm, and the aspect ratio is around 67. ZTO nanowires with a Zn/(Zn + Sn) atomic ratio of 0.67 (approximately 2/3) were observed from an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and corresponding selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns demonstrated that the ZTO nanowire is hexagonal single-crystalline. The study of ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared (UV/Vis/NIR) absorption showed that the ZTO nanowire is a wide-band semiconductor with a band gap energy of 3.7 eV.

  20. Fabrication of superconducting NbN meander nanowires by nano-imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yang; Li-Hua, Liu; Lu-Hui, Ning; Yi-Rong, Jin; Hui, Deng; Jie, Li; Yang, Li; Dong-Ning, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD), as a new type of superconducting single photon detector (SPD), has a broad application prospect in quantum communication and other fields. In order to prepare SNSPD with high performance, it is necessary to fabricate a large area of uniform meander nanowires, which is the core of the SNSPD. In this paper, we demonstrate a process of patterning ultra-thin NbN films into meander-type nanowires by using the nano-imprint technology. In this process, a combination of hot embossing nano-imprint lithography (HE-NIL) and ultraviolet nano-imprint lithography (UV-NIL) is used to transfer the meander nanowire structure from the NIL Si hard mold to the NbN film. We have successfully obtained a NbN nanowire device with uniform line width. The critical temperature (Tc) of the superconducting NbN meander nanowires is about 5 K and the critical current (Ic) is about 3.5 μA at 2.5 K. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CBA00106 and 2009CB929102) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104333 and 10974243).

  1. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  2. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, E.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green’s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  3. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  4. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  5. Dynamics of alkyl chains in monolayer protected metal clusters and their superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, R [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mitra, S [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Johnson, M [Institute Lau-Langevin, BP156, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Pradeep, T [Department of Chemistry and SAIF, IITm, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2007-12-15

    Alkyl chains dynamics in monolayer protected metal cluster (MPC) systems of gold and silver have been studied by the quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. Isolated MPCs investigated are 6, 12 and 18 carbon n-alkyl chain thiolate protected 4 nm diameter gold clusters while the superlattices are their silver analogues. Evolution of dynamics with temperature is found to be very different in the isolated clusters and their superlattices. While continuous evolution of the dynamics of the monolayer was observed in isolated MPCs, it is abrupt in superlattice systems and occurs at a temperature consistent with the superlattice melting detected in calorimetry measurements. A model where the chain undergoes uniaxial rotational diffusion with additional body axis fluctuation was found to describe the data consistently. For the superlattice systems, the chains are found to be held by strong inter-chain interactions below the superlattice melting. The data from the planar silver thiolate systems show similar behavior like the superlattice systems, consistent with the calorimetric data.

  6. The Role of Ligand Packing Frustration in Body-Centered Cubic (bcc) Superlattices of Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Yu, Yixuan; Bosoy, Christian A; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Korgel, Brian A

    2015-07-02

    This paper addresses the assembly of body centered-cubic (bcc) superlattices of organic ligand-coated nanocrystals. First, examples of bcc superlattices of dodecanethiol-capped Au nanocrystals and oleic acid-capped PbS and PbSe nanocrystals are presented and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). These superlattices tend to orient on their densest (110) superlattice planes and exhibit a significant amount of {112} twinning. The same nanocrystals deposit as monolayers with hexagonal packing, and these thin films can coexist with thicker bcc superlattice layers, even though there is no hexagonal plane in a bcc lattice. Both the preference of bcc in bulk films over the denser face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattice structure and the transition to hexagonal monolayers can be rationalized in terms of packing frustration of the ligands. A model is presented to calculate the difference in entropy associated with capping ligand packing frustration in bcc and fcc superlattices.

  7. Progress in MBE grown type-II superlattice photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cory J.; Li, Jian V.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the status of GaSb/InAs type-II superlattice diodes grown and fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory designed for infrared absorption in the 8-12(mu)m range. Recent devices have produced detectivities as high as 8x10 to the tenth power Jones with a differential resistance-area product greater than 6 Ohmcm(sup 2) at 80K with a long wavelength cutoff of approximately 12(mu)m. The measured quantum efficiency of these front-side illuminated devices is close to 30% in the 10-11(mu)m range without antireflection coatings.

  8. Zener tunneling of light waves in an optical superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulinyan, Mher; Oton, Claudio J; Gaburro, Zeno; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Toninelli, Costanza; Wiersma, Diederik S

    2005-04-01

    We report on the observation of Zener tunneling of light waves in spectral and time-resolved transmission measurements, performed on an optical superlattice made of porous silicon. The structure was designed to have two photonic minibands, spaced by a narrow frequency gap. A gradient in the refractive index was introduced to create two optical Wannier-Stark ladders and, at a critical value of the optical gradient, tunneling between energy bands was observed in the form of an enhanced transmission peak and a characteristic time dependence of the transmission.

  9. Theory of the Fermi-level energy in semiconductor superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luscombe, J.H. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA)); Aggarwal, R. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA)); Reed, M.A. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (USA)); Frensley, W.R. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas (USA)); Luban, M. (Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Ames Lab., IA (USA))

    1991-09-15

    A theoretical study of the properties of the Fermi level in semiconductor superlattices (SL's) is made which is based upon the carrier occupation of the minibands in thermal equilibrium. We find, for a fixed carrier density and temperature, that the SL Fermi level can differ significantly from that obtained using commonly employed three-dimensional approximations, depending upon the relative spacings and widths of the minibands, with the SL Fermi level being higher than the corresponding bulk value. We find that the SL Fermi level is a sensitive function of the relative widths of the quantum wells and barriers.

  10. The DUV Stability of Superlattice-Doped CMOS Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T.; Dickie, M.; Cheng, P.; Greer, H. F.; Nikzad, S.; Sgro, J.; Tsur, S.

    2013-01-01

    JPL and Alacron have recently developed a high performance, DUV camera with a superlattice doped CMOS imaging detector. Supperlattice doped detectors achieve nearly 100% internal quantum efficiency in the deep and far ultraviolet, and a single layer, Al2O3 antireflection coating enables 64% external quantum efficiency at 263nm. In lifetime tests performed at Applied Materials using 263 nm pulsed, solid state and 193 nm pulsed excimer laser, the quantum efficiency and dark current of the JPL/Alacron camera remained stable to better than 1% precision during long-term exposure to several billion laser pulses, with no measurable degradation, no blooming and no image memory at 1000 fps.

  11. Electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hemeng; Li, Changan; Song, Yun [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Tianxing, E-mail: txma@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Li-Gang, E-mail: sxwlg@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Lin, Hai-Qing [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices using transfer matrix method. By introducing two kinds of gradient potentials of square barriers along electrons propagation direction, we find that Bloch oscillations up to terahertz can occur. Wannier-Stark ladders, as the counterpart of Bloch oscillation, are obtained as a series of equidistant transmission peaks, and the localization of the electronic wave function is also signature of Bloch oscillation. Furthermore, the period of Bloch oscillation decreases linearly with increasing gradient of barrier potentials.

  12. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy of quantum wells and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach-Ashkenasy, N.; Kronik, L.; Shapira, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Rosenwaks, Y.; Hanna, M.C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Leibovitch, M.; Ram, P. [Physics Department, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) has been employed to monitor optical transitions in quantum well and superlattice structures at room temperature. Excellent agreement is found between theoretical predictions of heavy hole and electron energy level positions and the observed transitions. The results show that using this technique, the complete band diagram of the quantum structure may be constructed. SPS emerges as a powerful tool capable of monitoring optical transitions above the lowest one in a simple to interpret, contactless, and nondestructive way. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Complex Electric-Field Induced Phenomena in Ferroelectric/Antiferroelectric Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herchig, Ryan Christopher

    Perovskite ferroelectrics and antiferroelectrics have attracted a lot of attention owing to their potential for device applications including THz sensors, solid state cooling, ultra high density computer memory, and electromechanical actuators to name a few. The discovery of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale provides not only new and exciting possibilities for device miniaturization, but also a way to study the fundamental physics of nanoscale phenomena in these materials. Ferroelectric nanowires show a rich variety of physical characteristics which are advantageous to the design of nanoscale ferroelectric devices such as exotic dipole patterns, a strong dependence of the polarization and phonon frequencies on the electrical and mechanical boundary conditions, as well as a dependence of the transition temperatures on the diameter of the nanowire. Antiferroelectricity also exists at the nanoscale and, due to the proximity in energy of the ferroelectric and antiferroelectric phases, a phase transition from the ferroelectric to the antiferroelectric phase can be facilitated through the application of the appropriate mechanical and electrical boundary conditions. While much progress has been made over the past several decades to understand the nature of ferroelectricity/antiferroelectricity in nanowires, many questions remain unanswered. In particular, little is known about how the truncated dimensions affect the soft mode frequency dynamics or how various electrical and mechanical boundary conditions might change the nature of the phase transitions in these ferroelectric nanowires. Could nanowires offer a distinct advantage for solid state cooling applications? Few studies have been done to elucidate the fundamental physics of antiferroelectric nanowires. How the polarization in ferroelectric nanowires responds to a THz electric field remains relatively underexplored as well. In this work, the aim is to to develop and use computational tools that allow first

  14. A force sensor using nanowire arrays to understand biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Prasana K.; Cavalli, Alessandro; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Murillo, Duber M.; Souza, Alessandra A.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the cellular signaling and function at the nano-bio interface can pave the way towards developing next-generation smart diagnostic tools. From this perspective, limited reports detail so far the cellular and subcellular forces exerted by bacterial cells during the interaction with abiotic materials. Nanowire arrays with high aspect ratio have been used to detect such small forces. In this regard, live force measurements were performed ex-vivo during the interaction of Xylella fastidiosa bacterial cells with InP nanowire arrays. The influence of nanowire array topography and surface chemistry on the response and motion of bacterial cells was studied in detail. The nanowire arrays were also functionalized with different cell adhesive promoters, such as amines and XadA1, an afimbrial protein of X.fastidiosa. By employing the well-defined InP nanowire arrays platform, and single cell confocal imaging system, we were able to trace the bacterial growth pattern, and show that their initial attachment locations are strongly influenced by the surface chemistry and nanoscale surface topography. In addition, we measure the cellular forces down to few nanonewton range using these nanowire arrays. In case of nanowire functionalized with XadA1, the force exerted by vertically and horizontally attached single bacteria on the nanowire is in average 14% and 26% higher than for the pristine array, respectively. These results provide an excellent basis for live-cell force measurements as well as unravel the range of forces involved during the early stages of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

  15. Plasmonic Properties of Vertically Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanowires (NWs/Ag sheath composites were produced to investigate plasmonic coupling between vertically aligned NWs for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS applications. In this investigation, two types of vertical NW arrays were studied; those of ZnO NWs grown on nanosphere lithography patterned sapphire substrate via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS mechanism and Si NW arrays produced by wet chemical etching. Both types of vertical NW arrays were coated with a thin layer of silver by electroless silver plating for SERS enhancement studies. The experimental results show extremely strong SERS signals due to plasmonic coupling between the NWs, which was verified by COMSOL electric field simulations. We also compared the SERS enhancement intensity of aligned and random ZnO NWs, indicating that the aligned NWs show much stronger and repeatable SERS signal than those grown in nonaligned geometries.

  16. Numerical simulation of supersquare patterns in Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, L.; Périnet, N.; Tuckerman, L. S.; Shin, S.; Chergui, J.; Juric, D.

    2015-06-01

    We report the first simulations of the Faraday instability using the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in domains much larger than the characteristic wavelength of the pattern. We use a massively parallel code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. Simulations performed in rectangular and cylindrical domains yield complex patterns. In particular, a superlattice-like pattern similar to those of [Douady & Fauve, Europhys. Lett. 6, 221-226 (1988); Douady, J. Fluid Mech. 221, 383-409 (1990)] is observed. The pattern consists of the superposition of two square superlattices. We conjecture that such patterns are widespread if the square container is large compared to the critical wavelength. In the cylinder, pentagonal cells near the outer wall allow a square-wave pattern to be accommodated in the center.

  17. Silicon nanowires as intracellular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, John F.

    Semiconductor nanowire devices are an exciting class of materials for biomedical and electrophysiology applications, with current studies primarily delivering substrate bound devices through mechanical abrasion or electroporation. However, the ability to distribute these devices in a drug-like fashion is an important step in developing next-generation active therapeutic devices. In this work, we will discuss the interaction of label free Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with cellular systems, showing that they can be internalized in multiple cell lines, and undergo an active 'burst-like' transport process. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  18. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  19. Reconfigurable nanowire electronics - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, W. M.; Heinzig, A.; Trommer, J.; Martin, D.; Grube, M.; Mikolajick, T.

    2014-12-01

    Reconfigurable nanowire transistors merge the electrical properties of unipolar n- and p-type FETs into a single type of device with identic technology, geometry and composition. These four-terminal nanowire transistors employ an electric signal to dynamically program unipolar n- or p-type behavior. More than reducing the technological complexity, they open up the possibility of dynamically programming the functions of circuits at the device level, i.e. enabling a fine-grain reconfiguration of complex functions. We will review different reconfigurable concepts, analyze the transport properties and finally assess their maturity for building circuits.

  20. ZnO nanowire arrays with and without cavity tops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongyu; Quan Baogang; Tang Haoying; Guo Chuanfei [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang Peng, E-mail: pjiang@nanoctr.cn [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Yu Aifang [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Xie Sishen, E-mail: ssxie@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Zhonglin, E-mail: zhong.wang@mse.gatech.edu [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)

    2011-10-03

    Highlights: {yields} ZnO NW array structure was formed on a ZnO-seed-layer-patterned Si substrate. {yields} Both e-beam lithography and a wet chemical method were employed. {yields} A bubble-assisted method was used for constructing ZnO nanowire arrays with cavity tops. {yields} ZnO NW array structures with different morphologies exhibited different photoluminescence properties. - Abstract: We report a new bubble-assisted growing and etching method for constructing ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays with cavity tops. Firstly, a ZnO NW array structure was formed on a ZnO-seed-layer-patterned Si substrate by combining e-beam lithography and a wet chemical method. Secondly, a new kind of ZnO NW array with cavity tops could be formed by a subsequent bubble-assisted growing and etching. These ZnO NW array structures with different morphologies exhibited different photoluminescence properties, showing their potential applications in lasing cavities, stimulated emitters, nanogenerator, photocatalysis and light-emitting diodes. The bubble-assisted etching method will open a new door for morphology design of ZnO and other semiconductor nanowire arrays at special sites.

  1. Elastic superlattices with simultaneously negative effective mass density and shear modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Mora, I. S.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Pérez-Rodríguez, F.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of superlattices with layers of rubber and polyurethane foam, which can be either conventional or auxetic. Phononic dispersion calculations show a second pass band for transverse modes inside the lowest band gap of the longitudinal modes. In such a band, the superlattices behave as a double-negative elastic metamaterial since the effective dynamic mass density and shear modulus are both negative. The pass band is associated to a Fabry-Perot resonance band which turns out to be very narrow as a consequence of the high contrast between the acoustic impedances of the superlattice components.

  2. Physical properties of ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system in electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Wei; Lo Veng-Cheong; Bai Bao-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the differential operator technique, a transverse Ising model (TIM) in the effective-field theory is developed to study the physical properties of a ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system. The effects of an external electric field on the polarization, susceptibility and pyroelectric coefficient of the ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system are discussed in detail. The susceptibility of the ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system decreases with the increase of the electric field, implying that the polarization is weak.

  3. The intensive terahertz electroluminescence induced by Bloch oscillations in SiC natural superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, Vladimir; Andrianov, Alexandr; Petrov, Alexey; Zakhar'in, Alexey; Lepneva, Ala; Shkrebiy, Pavel

    2012-10-09

    : We report on efficient terahertz (THz) emission from high-electric-field-biased SiC structures with a natural superlattice at liquid helium temperatures. The emission spectrum demonstrates a single line, the maximum of which shifts linearly with increases in bias field. We attribute this emission to steady-state Bloch oscillations of electrons in the SiC natural superlattice. The properties of the THz emission agree fairly with the parameters of the Bloch oscillator regime, which have been proven by high-field electron transport studies of SiC structures with natural superlattices.

  4. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...... density approximation (LDA) with a semi-empirical correction for the ‘‘LDA gap error’’. A similarity is observed between the results of calculations for an InGaN/GaN superlattice (with one monolayer of InGaN) and the experimental results. This indicates that the fabricated InN quantum wells may contain...

  5. Effect of the degree of disorder on electronic and optical properties in random superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E. G.; Su, W. P.; Ting, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional tight-binding calculation is developed and used to study disorder effects in a realistic random superlattice. With increasing disorder, a tendency of possible indirect-direct band-gap transition is suggested. Direct evidence of mobility edges between localized and extended states in three-dimensional random systems is given. As system disorder increases, the optical absorption intensities increase dramatically from five to forty-five times stronger than the ordered (GaAs)(sub 1)/(AlAs)(sub 1) superlattice. It is believed that the degree of disorder significantly affects electronic and optical properties of GaAs/AlAs random superlattices.

  6. Optical Properties of Self-Organized PbS Quantum Dot Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Chang-Hui; YAO Lian-Zeng; MU Ji-Mei; SHI Gang; ZHANG Li-De

    2000-01-01

    Self-organization of PbS into quantum dot superlattices has been demonstrated for the first time, and hexaplanar colloidal crystals 1 - 10 μm in size made from PbS quantum dots 3 - 6 nm in diameter are revealed in transmissionelectron microscope micrographs, and the inner structures of the superlattices can be seen by a high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra have been recorded. The ordering of the superlattices is crucial for the understanding of the fundamental properties of quantum-dot arrays, as well as for their optimal utilization in optical and electronic applications.

  7. Thermodynamics of the adsorption of flexible polymers on nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Thomas, E-mail: tvogel@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Gross, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.gross@itp.uni-leipzig.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik and Centre for Theoretical Sciences (NTZ), Universität Leipzig, Postfach 100 920, D-04009 Leipzig (Germany); Soft Matter Systems Research Group, Center for Simulational Physics, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Bachmann, Michael, E-mail: bachmann@smsyslab.org [Soft Matter Systems Research Group, Center for Simulational Physics, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900 Cuiabá , Mato Grosso (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-03-14

    Generalized-ensemble simulations enable the study of complex adsorption scenarios of a coarse-grained model polymer near an attractive nanostring, representing an ultrathin nanowire. We perform canonical and microcanonical statistical analyses to investigate structural transitions of the polymer and discuss their dependence on the temperature and on model parameters such as effective wire thickness and attraction strength. The result is a complete hyperphase diagram of the polymer phases, whose locations and stability are influenced by the effective material properties of the nanowire and the strength of the thermal fluctuations. Major structural polymer phases in the adsorbed state include compact droplets attached to or wrapping around the wire, and tubelike conformations with triangular pattern that resemble ideal boron nanotubes. The classification of the transitions is performed by microcanonical inflection-point analysis.

  8. Crystallographically driven magnetic behaviour of arrays of monocrystalline Co nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yu P.

    2014-11-07

    Cobalt nanowires, 40 nm in diameter and several micrometers long, have been grown by controlled electrodeposition into ordered anodic alumina templates. The hcp crystal symmetry is tuned by a suitable choice of the electrolyte pH (between 3.5 and 6.0) during growth. Systematic high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis of the electron diffraction patterns reveals a dependence of crystal orientation from electrolyte pH. The tailored modification of the crystalline signature results in the reorientation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and increasing experimental coercivity and squareness with decreasing polar angle of the \\'c\\' growth axis. Micromagnetic modeling of the demagnetization process and its angular dependence is in agreement with the experiment and allows us to establish the change in the character of the magnetization reversal: from quasi-curling to vortex domain wall propagation modes when the crystal \\'c\\' axis tilts more than 75° in respect to the nanowire axis.

  9. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  10. Observation of 'hidden' planar defects in boron carbide nanowires and identification of their orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe; Cao, Baobao; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Youfei; Li, Deyu; Xu, Terry T

    2014-01-15

    The physical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their structures, and planar defects in particular could significantly affect the behavior of the nanowires. In this work, planar defects (twins or stacking faults) in boron carbide nanowires are extensively studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that these defects can easily be invisible, i.e., no presence of characteristic defect features like modulated contrast in high-resolution TEM images and streaks in diffraction patterns. The simplified reason of this invisibility is that the viewing direction during TEM examination is not parallel to the (001)-type planar defects. Due to the unique rhombohedral structure of boron carbide, planar defects are only distinctive when the viewing direction is along the axial or short diagonal directions ([100], [010], or 1¯10) within the (001) plane (in-zone condition). However, in most cases, these three characteristic directions are not parallel to the viewing direction when boron carbide nanowires are randomly dispersed on TEM grids. To identify fault orientations (transverse faults or axial faults) of those nanowires whose planar defects are not revealed by TEM, a new approach is developed based on the geometrical analysis between the projected preferred growth direction of a nanowire and specific diffraction spots from diffraction patterns recorded along the axial or short diagonal directions out of the (001) plane (off-zone condition). The approach greatly alleviates tedious TEM examination of the nanowire and helps to establish the reliable structure-property relations. Our study calls attention to researchers to be extremely careful when studying nanowires with potential planar defects by TEM. Understanding the true nature of planar defects is essential in tuning the properties of these nanostructures through manipulating their structures.

  11. Observation of ‘hidden’ planar defects in boron carbide nanowires and identification of their orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The physical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their structures, and planar defects in particular could significantly affect the behavior of the nanowires. In this work, planar defects (twins or stacking faults) in boron carbide nanowires are extensively studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that these defects can easily be invisible, i.e., no presence of characteristic defect features like modulated contrast in high-resolution TEM images and streaks in diffraction patterns. The simplified reason of this invisibility is that the viewing direction during TEM examination is not parallel to the (001)-type planar defects. Due to the unique rhombohedral structure of boron carbide, planar defects are only distinctive when the viewing direction is along the axial or short diagonal directions ([100], [010], or 1¯10) within the (001) plane (in-zone condition). However, in most cases, these three characteristic directions are not parallel to the viewing direction when boron carbide nanowires are randomly dispersed on TEM grids. To identify fault orientations (transverse faults or axial faults) of those nanowires whose planar defects are not revealed by TEM, a new approach is developed based on the geometrical analysis between the projected preferred growth direction of a nanowire and specific diffraction spots from diffraction patterns recorded along the axial or short diagonal directions out of the (001) plane (off-zone condition). The approach greatly alleviates tedious TEM examination of the nanowire and helps to establish the reliable structure–property relations. Our study calls attention to researchers to be extremely careful when studying nanowires with potential planar defects by TEM. Understanding the true nature of planar defects is essential in tuning the properties of these nanostructures through manipulating their structures. PMID:24423258

  12. Low dark current N structure superlattice MWIR photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Muti, Abdullah; Turan, Rasit; Ergun, Yuksel; Aydinli, Atilla

    2014-06-01

    Commercially available read out integrated circuits (ROICs) require the FPA to have high dynamic resistance area product at zero bias (R0A) which is directly related to dark current of the detector. Dark current arises from bulk and surface contributions. Recent band structure engineering studies significantly suppressed the bulk contribution of the type-II superlattice infrared photodetectors (N structure, M structure, W structure). In this letter, we will present improved dark current results for unipolar barrier complex supercell superlattice system which is called as "N structure". The unique electronic band structure of the N structure increases electron-hole overlap under bias, significantly. N structure aims to improve absorption by manipulating electron and hole wavefunctions that are spatially separated in T2SLs, increasing the absorption while decreasing the dark current. In order to engineer the wavefunctions, we introduce a thin AlSb layer between InAs and GaSb layers in the growth direction which also acts as a unipolar electron barrier. Despite the difficulty of perfect lattice matching of InAs and AlSb, such a design is expected to reduce dark current. Experiments were carried out on Single pixel with mesa sizes of 100 × 100 - 700 × 700 μm photodiodes. Temperature dependent dark current with corresponding R0A resistance values are reported.

  13. Weak Topological Insulators in PbTe/SnTe superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Liu, Junwei; Fu, Liang; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Chaoxing

    2014-03-01

    It is desirable to realize topological phases in artificial structures by engineering electronic band structures. In this paper, we investigate (PbTe)m(SnTe)2n-m superlattices along the [001] direction and find a robust weak topological insulator phase for a large variety of layer numbers m and 2 n - m . We confirm this topologically non-trivial phase by calculating Z2 topological invariants and topological surface states based on the first-principles calculations. We show that the folding of Brillouin zone due to the superlattice structure plays an essential role in inducing topologically non-trivial phases in this system. This mechanism can be generalized to other systems in which band inversion occurs at multiple momenta, and gives us a brand-new way to engineer topological materials in artificial structures. We acknowledge support from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China and the National Natural Science Foundation of China. LF is supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  14. Beating the amorphous limit in thermal conductivity by superlattices design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-16

    The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We have discovered that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts.

  15. Type-ii binary superlattices for infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razeghi, M.; Mohseni, H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston (United States); Brown, G. J. [WPAFB, Colombus (United States)

    2001-12-01

    III-V quantum wells and superlattices based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb, and related compounds have attracted many attentions due to their unique band alignments and physical properties. Recently, novel electronic and optoelectronic heterostructures have been proposed from this material system for hundred gigahertz logic circuits, terahertz transistors. RTDs, infrared lasers, and infrared detectors. In this paper we will describe the ongoing research at the Center for Quantum Devices to develop the theory, modeling, growth, characterization, and device fabrication techniques for this material system. We have demonstarted the first uncooled infrared detectors from type-II superlattices. The measured detectivity is more than 1 x 10{sup 8} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W at 10.6 {mu}m at room temperature which is higher than the commercially available uncooled photon detectors at similar wavelength. In paralle, we have demonstraed the first high-performance p-i-n type-II photodiode in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range operating at T=80K. The devices with cutoff wavelength of 16 mm showed a responsivity of 3.5 A/W at 80 K leading to a detectivity of {approx}1.51x10{sup 10} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W. Similar devices with cutoff wavelengths up to 25 {mu}m was demonstrated at 80 K. To enhance this technology further, we plan to move from quantum wells to quantum wire and quantum dots.

  16. Microemulsion-based synthesis of copper nanodisk superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Zhao, Yanbao; Guo, Wenjing; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-06-01

    Nanocrystal superlattices (NCSs) comprised of self-assembled copper nanodisks were successfully synthesized in quaternary W/O microemulsions containing Span 80-Tween 80, liquid paraffin and n-butanol. Morphologies, structure and thermal properties of the Cu nanocrystals were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). The reaction conditions which effect the growth of the Cu nanodisks were explored, and a mechanism for the formation of the Cu NCSs is proposed. XRD and TEM studies show that the as-synthesized Cu nanodisks exhibit a cubic crystal structure, and FT-IR and TG analysis show that the surfaces of the Cu nanodisks are covered with surfactants, which assist in the formation of the superlattice and prevent the oxidation of the Cu nanocrystals. Variation of the reaction parameters such as mass ratio of the surfactants and the presence of oleic acid is found to have a significant effect on the formation of the Cu nanodisks.

  17. Commensurability oscillations in a two-dimensional lateral superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John; Long, Andrew; Grant, David; Chowdhury, Suja

    2000-03-01

    We have calculated and measured conduction in a two-dimensional electron gas subject to a weak two-dimensional periodic potential and a normal magnetic field. Simulations with a potential Vx \\cos(2π x/a) + Vy \\cos(2π y/a) show the usual commensurability oscillations in ρ_xx(B) with Vx alone. The introduction of Vy suppresses these oscillations, rather than introducing the additional oscillations in ρ_yy(B) expected from previous perturbation theories. We explain this in terms of drift of the guiding center of cyclotron motion along contours of an effective potential: open orbits of the guiding center contribute to conduction but closed orbits do not. All orbits are closed in a symmetric superlattice with |V_x| = |V_y| and commensurability oscillations are therefore quenched. Experiments on etched superlattices confirm this picture. Conventional lattice-matched samples give a symmetric potential and weak oscillations; the symmetry is broken by the piezoelectric effect in stressed samples, leading to strong oscillations. Periodic modulation of the magnetic field can be treated in the same way, which explains previous experimental results.

  18. Magnetic domain wall energy in Ni/Co superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoki, Kentaro; Nishimura, Takashi; Harimoto, Shotaro; Shiratsuchi, Yu, E-mail: shiratsuchi@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2014-12-15

    The magnetic domain wall energy density σ{sub W} of a Ni/Co superlattice possessing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was determined using the magnetic domain theory derived by Kooy and Enz (1960). To determine σ{sub W}, we obtained the saturation magnetization, magnetic domain period, and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy by individual measurements. Using the magnetic domain period and the ferromagnetic layer thickness, we first determined the dipolar length. The estimated dipolar length was about 15–25 nm, which is in good agreement with the change in the magnetization curve with the ferromagnetic layer thickness. By using the dipolar length and saturation magnetization, the σ{sub W} was calculated to be 4–7 erg/cm{sup 2}. - Highlights: • Magnetic domain wall energy of a Ni/Co superlattice was determined experimentally. • The magnetic domain wall energy was estimated to be 4–8 erg/cm{sup 2}. • Using estimated value, the magnetization curves were reproduced well. • The estimated value is reasonable compared with the other ferromagnetic materials.

  19. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-01-01

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rare-earth system were rarely developed. Here, we develop a new type of ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting PMA based on abundant Heusler alloy families. The superlattice is formed by [MnGa/Co2FeAl] unit with their magnetizations antiparallel aligned. The effective anisotropy (Kueff) over 6 Merg/cm3 is obtained, and the SL can be easily built on various substrates with flexible lattice constants. The coercive force, saturation magnetization and Kueff of SLs are highly controllable by varying the thickness of MnGa and Co2FeAl layers. The SLs will supply a new choice for magnetic recording and spintronics memory application such as magnetic random access memory.

  20. Fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monozon, B. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-02-01

    Wannier-Mott excitons in a semiconductor layered superlattice (SL) are investigated analytically for the case that the period of the superlattice is much smaller than the 2D exciton Bohr radius. Additionally we assume the presence of a longitudinal external static electric field directed parallel to the SL axis. The exciton states and the optical absorption coefficient are derived in the tight-binding and adiabatic approximations. Strong and weak electric fields providing spatially localized and extended electron and hole states, respectively, are studied. The dependencies of the exciton states and the exciton absorption spectrum on the SL parameters and the electric field strength are presented in an explicit form. We focus on the fine structure of the ground quasi-2D exciton level formed by the series of closely spaced energy levels adjacent from the high frequencies. These levels are related to the adiabatically slow relative exciton longitudinal motion governed by the potential formed by the in-plane exciton state. It is shown that the external electric fields compress the fine structure energy levels, decrease the intensities of the corresponding optical peaks and increase the exciton binding energy. A possible experimental study of the fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption is discussed.

  1. Broadband mid-infrared superlattice light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, R. J.; Provence, S. R.; Norton, D. T.; Boggess, T. F.; Prineas, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice light-emitting diodes were fabricated to form a device that provides emission over the entire 3-5 μm mid-infrared transmission window. Variable bandgap emission regions were coupled together using tunnel junctions to emit at peak wavelengths of 3.3 μm, 3.5 μm, 3.7 μm, 3.9 μm, 4.1 μm, 4.4 μm, 4.7 μm, and 5.0 μm. Cascading the structure recycles the electrons in each emission region to emit several wavelengths simultaneously. At high current densities, the light-emitting diode spectra broadened into a continuous, broadband spectrum that covered the entire mid-infrared band. When cooled to 77 K, radiances of over 1 W/cm2 sr were achieved, demonstrating apparent temperatures above 1000 K over the 3-5 μm band. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices are capable of emitting from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the device design can be expanded to include longer emission wavelengths.

  2. Dimensional control of cobalt spin state in oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Woon; Choi, W. S.; Okamoto, S.; Sohn, C. H.; Park, H. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Lee, H. N.; Kim, K. W.; Moon, S. J.; Noh, T. W.

    2013-03-01

    Perovskite cobalt oxide is a very intriguing system with various spin states owing to the delicate balance between crystal field splitting and Hund exchange energy. In this talk, we show that its spin state can be altered through dimensional control, enabled by digital synthesis of perovskite cobalt oxide superlattices. We employed a few unit cells of LaCoO3 as an active magnetic layer, separated by LaAlO3 spacer layer. High quality [(LaCoO3) n (LaAlO3) n ]8 (n = 2, 6, and 10) superlattices were fabricated using pulsed laser epitaxy. Spectroscopic tools including x-ray absorption spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy revealed clear evolution of the electronic structure and resultant spin state by changing dimensionality. Specifically, the spin state changed from a high to a low spin state with a larger optical band gap, as the dimension reduced from 3D to 2D. Dynamic mean field calculation supported the critical role of dimensionality on the spin state and electronic structure of LaCoO3.

  3. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q L; Zhang, X M; Miyazaki, T; Mizukami, S

    2015-01-19

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rare-earth system were rarely developed. Here, we develop a new type of ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting PMA based on abundant Heusler alloy families. The superlattice is formed by [MnGa/Co2FeAl] unit with their magnetizations antiparallel aligned. The effective anisotropy (K(u)(eff)) over 6 Merg/cm(3) is obtained, and the SL can be easily built on various substrates with flexible lattice constants. The coercive force, saturation magnetization and K(u)(eff) of SLs are highly controllable by varying the thickness of MnGa and Co2FeAl layers. The SLs will supply a new choice for magnetic recording and spintronics memory application such as magnetic random access memory.

  4. Nanowire-based gas sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Yuan, C.A.; Zhang, G.

    2013-01-01

    Gas sensors fabricated with nanowires as the detecting elements are powerful due to their many improved characteristics such as high surface-to-volume ratios, ultrasensitivity, higher selectivity, low power consumption, and fast response. This paper gives an overview on the recent process of the dev

  5. Surface physics of semiconducting nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michele; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires (NWs) are firm candidates for novel nanoelectronic devices and a fruitful playground for fundamental physics. Ultra-thin nanowires, with diameters below 10 nm, present exotic quantum effects due to the confinement of the wave functions, e.g. widening of the electronic band-gap, deepening of the dopant states. However, although several reports of sub-10 nm wires exist to date, the most common NWs have diameters that range from 20 to 200 nm, where these quantum effects are absent or play a very minor role. Yet, the research activity on this field is very intense and these materials still promise to provide an important paradigm shift for the design of emerging electronic devices and different kinds of applications. A legitimate question is then: what makes a nanowire different from bulk systems? The answer is certainly the large surface-to-volume ratio. In this article we discuss the most salient features of surface physics and chemistry in group-IV semiconducting nanowires, focusing mostly on Si NWs. First we review the state-of-the-art of NW growth to achieve a smooth and controlled surface morphology. Next we discuss the importance of a proper surface passivation and its role on the NW electronic properties. Finally, stressing the importance of a large surface-to-volume ratio and emphasizing the fact that in a NW the surface is where most of the action takes place, we discuss molecular sensing and molecular doping.

  6. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  7. Nanowire-based Quantum Photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulgarini, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis work, I studied individual quantum dots embedded in one-dimensional nanostructures called nanowires. Amongst the effects given by the nanometric dimensions, quantum dots enable the generation of single light particles: photons. Single photon emitters and detectors are central building

  8. Optical properties of semiconducting nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, L.K. van

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires of high purity and crystallinity hold promise as building blocks for opto-electronical devices at the nanoscale.. They are commonly grown via a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism in which metal (nano) droplets collect the semiconductor precursors to form a solution which, whe

  9. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  10. Writing and functionalisation of suspended DNA nanowires on superhydrophobic pillar arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Miele, Ermanno

    2014-08-08

    Nanowire arrays and networks with precisely controlled patterns are very interesting for innovative device concepts in mesoscopic physics. In particular, DNA templates have proven to be versatile for the fabrication of complex structures that obtained functionality via combinations with other materials, for example by functionalisation with molecules or nanoparticles, or by coating with metals. Here, the controlled motion of the a three-phase contact line (TCL) of DNA-loaded drops on superhydrophobic substrates is used to fabricate suspended nanowire arrays. In particular, the deposition of DNA wires is imaged in situ, and different patterns are obtained on hexagonal pillar arrays by controlling the TCL velocity and direction. Robust conductive wires and networks are achieved by coating the wires with a thin layer of gold, and as proof of concept conductivity measurements are performed on single suspended wires. The plastic material of the superhydrophobic pillars ensures electrical isolation from the substrate. The more general versatility of these suspended nanowire networks as functional templates is outlined by fabricating hybrid organic-metal-semiconductor nanowires by growing ZnO nanocrystals onto the metal-coated nanowires.

  11. Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) for Electronic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karina

    In recent years nanowires have gained a generous amount of interest because of the possible application of nanowires within electronic devices. A nanowire is a one dimensional semiconductor nanostructure with a diameter less than 100 nm. Nanowires have the potential to be a replacement for the present day complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology; it is believed by 2020, a 5--6 nm gate length within field effect transistors (FET) would be realized and cease further miniaturization of electronic devices. SiC processes several unique chemical and physical properties that make it an attractive alternative to Si as a semiconductor material. Silicon carbide's properties make it a perfect candidate for applications such as high temperature sensors, x-ray emitters and high radiation sensors. The main objective of this thesis is to successfully grow silicon carbide nanowires on silicon substrates with the assistance of a metal catalyst, by the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The contributions made by the work carried out in this thesis are broad. This is the first study that has carried out a comprehensive investigation into a wide range of metal catalyst for the growth of SiC nanowires by the process of chemical vapor deposition. The study proved that the surface tension interactions between the silicon substrate and the metal catalyst are the controlling factor in the determination of the diameter of the nanowires grown. This study also proved that the silicon substrate orientation has no impact on the growth of the nanowires, similar growth patterns occurred on both Si and Si substrates. The nanowires grown were characterized by a variety of different methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperature, growth temperature, growth time and the catalyst type used are investigated to determine the most suitable conditions necessary for SiC nanowire

  12. Controlling Nanocrystal Superlattice Symmetry and Shape-Anisotropic Interactions through Variable Ligand Surface Coverage

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2011-03-09

    The assembly of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) into superstructures with long-range translational and orientational order is sensitive to the molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface. We illustrate how ligand coverage on colloidal PbS NCs can be exploited as a tunable parameter to direct the self-assembly of superlattices with predefined symmetry. We show that PbS NCs with dense ligand coverage assemble into face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattices whereas NCs with sparse ligand coverage assemble into body-centered cubic (bcc) superlattices which also exhibit orientational ordering of NCs in their lattice sites. Surface chemistry characterization combined with density functional theory calculations suggest that the loss of ligands occurs preferentially on {100} than on reconstructed {111} NC facets. The resulting anisotropic ligand distribution amplifies the role of NC shape in the assembly and leads to the formation of superlattices with translational and orientational order. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Simple theoretical analysis of the Einstein’s photoemission from quantum confined superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Roy, S.; Saha, A.; De, D.; Ghatak, K. P.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we study the Einstein's photoemission from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI and HgTe/CdTe quantum well superlattices (QWSLs) with graded interfaces and quantum well effective mass superlattices in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated dispersion relations in the respective cases. Besides, the same has been studied from the afore-mentioned quantum dot superlattices and it appears that the photoemission oscillates with increasing carrier degeneracy and quantizing magnetic field in different manners. In addition, the photoemission oscillates with film thickness and increasing photon energy in quantum steps together with the fact that the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation will introduce new physical ideas and new experimental findings under different external conditions. The influence of band structure is apparent from all the figures and we have suggested three applications of the analyses of this paper in the fields of superlattices and microstructures.

  14. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz;

    2013-01-01

    with one monolayer of InN and 40 monolayers of GaN. The results are compared with calculations performed for different types of superlattices: InN/GaN, InGaN/GaN, and InN/InGaN/GaN with single monolayers of InN and/or InGaN. The superlattices are simulated by band structure calculations based on the local......Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...

  15. High-Detectivity Type-II Superlattice Detectors for 6-14 um Infrared Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  16. High Electric Field Quantum Transport: Submillimeter Wave AC Stark Localization in Vertical and Lateral Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    superlattices. These experiments have opened the arena of photon assisted transport to semiconductor devices and paved the way for future teraherz: electronics based on quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures.

  17. Engineering the electronic structure of graphene superlattices via Fermi velocity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene superlattices have attracted much research interest in the last years, since it is possible to manipulate the electronic properties of graphene in these structures. It has been verified that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic structure of the system. The electronic structure in the vicinity of these points has been studied for a gapless and gapped graphene superlattice and for a graphene superlattice with a spatially modulated energy gap. In each case a different behavior was obtained. In this work we show that via Fermi velocity engineering it is possible to tune the electronic properties of a graphene superlattice to match all the previous cases studied. We also obtained new features of the system never observed before, reveling that the electronic structure of graphene is very sensitive to the modulation of the Fermi velocity. The results obtained here are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  18. Huge spin-transfer torque in a magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H.; Tseng, P.; Ko, C. W.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2017-09-01

    Huge spin-transfer torque (STT) in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) achieved by superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The magnitude of the STT depends on the number of cells in the superlattice barrier and the nonmagnetic metal layer's thickness. The result shows that the STT of the novel superlattice-barrier MTJ can reach values up to four orders of magnitude greater than those of traditional single-barrier stacks based on three cells superlattice by designing the nonmagnetic metal layer's thickness. In addition, the spin-transfer torque of the proposed MTJ can also be thousands of magnitude greater than those of traditional double-barrier MTJs.

  19. Influence of Fermi velocity engineering on electronic and optical properties of graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aram, Tahereh Nemati [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Neel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Asgari, Asghar, E-mail: asgari@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, using Kronig–Penney model, the electronic states in graphene-based superlattices with various substrates and considering exact electron Fermi velocity values are investigated. The analysis of our results clearly indicates that the difference between Fermi velocity values of gaped and gapless graphene regions determines the patency rate of band gap. Also, using transfer matrix method (TMM) the absorbance spectrum of mentioned structures is calculated. The more important result is that the absorbance of these structures is significantly near zero. - Highlights: • The electronic states in graphene superlattices with various substrates are investigated. • The exact electron Fermi velocity values are considered. • Using TMM the absorbance spectrum of two graphene-based superlattices is calculated. • The widest (narrowest) energy band gap belong to quartz–SiC (quartz–h-BN) superlattice.

  20. Interwell and intrawell magnetoexcitons in GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timofeev, V. B.; Filin, A. I.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect (interwell) excitons in superlattices (SLs) with different barrier widths (different tunneling coupling) is experimentally investigated in a strong enough magnetic field with the use of photoluminescence (PL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE), reflectance spec...

  1. Thermal conductivity measurement of InGaAs/InGaAsP superlattice thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen; YANG Juekuan; ZHUANG Ping; CHEN Minhua; ZHU Jian; CHEN Yunfei

    2006-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of InGaAs/InGaAsP superlattices with different period lengths were measured from 100 to 320 K using 3ω method.In this temperature range, the thermal conductivities were found to decrease with an increase in temperature. For the period length-dependant thermal conductivity, the minimum value does exist at a certain period length, which demonstrates that at a short period length, superlattice thermal conductivity increases with a decrease in the period length. When the period is longer than a certain period length, the interface thermal resistance dominates in phonon transport. The experimental and theoretical results confirmed the previous predictions from the lattice dynamics analysis, i.e. with the increase in period length, the dominant mechanisms of phonon transport in superlattices will shift from wave mode to particle mode. This is crucial for the cutoff of the phonons and lays a sound foundation for the design of superlattice structures.

  2. Structural and magnetic properties of holmium-scandium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of Ho-Sc alloys and superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy have been investigated using x-ray and neutron-diffraction techniques. Structural studies reveal that the alloy samples have different a lattice parameters for the Sc-seed layer and the Ho:Sc alloy grown on top...... of the seed layer; while the superlattices have different a lattice parameters for the Sc seed, and for both the Ho and Sc in the superlattice layers. The structural characteristics are related to the large lattice mismatches (of the order 7%) between the constituent elements. The magnetic moments....... It is found that a good description of the dependence of T-N upon concentration is given by a virtual-crystal model where the peak in the conduction-electron susceptibility varies linearly between that of the pure constituents. In the superlattices, the moments also form a basal-plane helix at T...

  3. Improving Thermoelectric Properties of Nanowires Through Inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. Eduardo; Sánchez, Vicenta; Wang, Chumin

    2017-05-01

    Inhomogeneity in nanowires can be present in the cross-section and/or by breaking the translational symmetry along the nanowire. In particular, the quasiperiodicity introduces an unusual class of electronic and phononic transport with a singular continuous eigenvalue spectrum and critically localized wave functions. In this work, the thermoelectricity in periodic and quasiperiodically segmented nanobelts and nanowires is addressed within the Boltzmann formalism by using a real-space renormalization plus convolution method developed for the Kubo-Greenwood formula, in which tight-binding and Born models are, respectively, used for the calculation of electric and lattice thermal conductivities. For periodic nanowires, we observe a maximum of the thermoelectric figure-of-merit ( ZT) in the temperature space, as occurred in the carrier concentration space. This maximum ZT can be improved by introducing into nanowires periodically arranged segments and an inhomogeneous cross-section. Finally, the quasiperiodically segmented nanowires reveal an even larger ZT in comparison with the periodic ones.

  4. Structure property relationships of nitride superlattice hard coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitin

    Today, more than 40% of all cutting tools used in machining applications are covered with coatings. Coatings improve wear resistance, increase tool life, enable use at higher speed, and broaden the application range. Superlattices, where thin layers (typically deposited in an alternating fashion, are widely used commercially. Importantly, the hardness value of a superlattice (e.g. TiN/AlN) can significantly exceed the rule of mixture value. Superlattice coatings built from crystallographically dissimilar materials are not widely studied but hold promise for improvements in performance by allowing for both hardness and toughness to be simultaneously optimized. This is what this thesis is concerned with: a structure-property comparison of isostructural superlattices with corresponding non-isostructural superlattices. In order to grow both isostructural and non-isostructural superlattices from the same set of materials, it is necessary to grow monolithic films in different phases. Towards this end, the synthesis of different phases of AlN, (Ti,Al)N, TaN, and TiN was investigated. Films were grown by pulsed laser deposition in two different chambers that had different base pressures to study the effect of background gases on the phases and orientations of the films. Growth of AlN and (Ti,Al)N films is strongly affected in a chamber that had a base pressure of 10-6 Torr, but the films adopt their stable nitride structures in a chamber with the lower base pressure of 10-8 Torr. TaN adopts either the cubic rock salt structure or its stable hexagonal structure, depending on the growth temperature, while TiN grows as rock salt in all conditions. Single crystal epitaxial superlattices were then grown with different compositions, periodicities, and crystallographic orientations to compare the effect of chemistry, nanostructure, and crystallographic texture on hardness. Finally, the structure-property relationships of non-isostructural (cubic/hexagonal) superlattices are

  5. Magnetic crossover effect in Nickel nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaddar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France); Gloaguen, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie, Electrochimie Moleculaire et Chimie Analytique, CNRS-UMR 6521, C. S. 93837 Brest Cedex 3 (France); Gieraltowski, J. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France); Tannous, C., E-mail: tannous@univ-brest.f [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France)

    2011-05-01

    A crossover effect in the magnetic reversal mechanism within arrays of Nickel nanowires whose diameter varies from 15 to 100 nm is observed around 50 nm. Hysteresis loops and FMR measurements confirm that nanowire diameter controls effectively the nanowire easy axis as well as the magnetization reversal mechanism. This might be very interesting for spintronic devices based on current-induced domain motion such as non-volatile magnetic memory elements (MRAM) and low Ohmic loss devices.

  6. Electrothermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Francesco; Najafi, Faraz; Herder, Charles; Berggren, Karl K.

    2011-02-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Transport in weakly-coupled superlattices: A quantitative approach for photon-assisted tunneling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1997-01-01

    Photon-assisted tunneling is studied in weakly-coupled semiconductor superlattices under THz irradiation. Using a microscopic transport model we find excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data for two different samples without using any fitting parameters.......Photon-assisted tunneling is studied in weakly-coupled semiconductor superlattices under THz irradiation. Using a microscopic transport model we find excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data for two different samples without using any fitting parameters....

  8. Electron transport across a quantum wire embedding a saw-tooth superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yuan-Ping; Yan Xiao-Hong; Lu Mao-Wang; Deng Yu-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By developing the recursive Green function method, the transport properties through a quantum wire embedding a finite-length saw-tooth superlattice are studied in the presence of magnetic field. The effects of magnetic modulation and the geometric structures of the superlattice on transmission coefficient are discussed. It is shown that resonant electron gas. The transmission spectrum can be tailored to match requirements through adjusting the size of saw-tooth quantum dot and field strength.

  9. Photonic band structure of one-dimensional aperiodic superlattices composed of negative refraction metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Michał H.; Salejda, Włodzimierz; Klauzer-Kruszyna, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Karol

    2007-05-01

    The dispersion relation for polarized light transmitting through a one-dimensional superlattice composed of aperiodically arranged layers made of ordinary dielectric and negative refraction metamaterials is calculated with finite element method. Generalized Fibonacci, generalized Thue-Morse, double-periodic and Rudin-Shapiro superlattices are investigated, using their periodic approximants. Strong dispersion of metamaterials is taken into account. Group velocities and effective refraction indices in the structures are calculated. The self-similar structure of the transmission spectra is observed.

  10. Tunable Negative Differential Resistance in Planer Graphene Superlattice Resonant Tunneling Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Sattari-Esfahlan, S. M.; Fouladi-Oskuei, J.; S. Shojaei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the controllable negative differential resistance (NDR) in a proposed planar graphene superlattice structure. High value of peak to valley ratio (PVR) is predicted. This is significant because of appearance of NDR with high PVR at low biases. Our finding is important since beside the other potential applications of the graphene, proposes implementation of the graphene based superlattice in electronic devices such as resonant tunneling diode and filters.

  11. Moire superlattice effects in graphene/boron-nitride van der Waals heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallbank, John R.; Chen, Xi; Fal' ko, Vladimir I. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Mucha-Kruczynski, Marcin [Department of Physics, University of Bath (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Van der Waals heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride feature a moire superlattice for graphene's Dirac electrons. Here, we review the effects generated by this superlattice, including a specific miniband structure featuring gaps and secondary Dirac points, and a fractal spectrum of magnetic minibands known as Hofstadter's butterfly. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Supersolid Phase in One-Dimensional Hard-Core Boson Hubbard Model with a Superlattice Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Huai-Ming; LIANG Ying

    2008-01-01

    The ground state of the one-dimensional hard-core boson Hubbard model with a superlattice potential is studied by quantum Monte Carlo methods. We demonstrate that besides the CDW phase and the Mort insulator phase, the supersolid phase emerges due to the presence of the superlattice potential, which reflects the competition with the hopping term. We also study the densities of sublattices and have a clear idea about the distribution of the bosons on the lattice.

  13. Self-Organization of PbS into Quantum Dots Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Self-organization of PbS into quantum dots superlattices is demonstrated for the first time, and hexaplanar colloidal crystals 1-10m m in size made from PbS quantum dots 4nm in diameter are shown in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) micrograph, and the inner structures of the superlattices can be seen from the High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM).

  14. Controlling Chaos Probability of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a Weak Optical Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; LUO Xiao-Bing

    2009-01-01

    @@ The spatial chaos probability of a Bose-Einstein condensate perturbed by a weak optical superlattice is studied. It is demonstrated that the spatial chaotic solution appears with a certain probability in a given parameter region under a random boundary condition. The effects of the lattice depths and wave vectors on the chaos probability are illustrated, and different regions associated with different chaos probabilities are found. This suggests a feasible scheme for suppressing and strengthening chaos by adjusting the optical superlattice experimentally.

  15. Study on band gap structure of Fibonacci quantum superlattices by using the transfer matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, V.; Castro-Palacio, J. C.; Marí, B.; Monsoriu, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    The scattering properties of particles in a one-dimensional Fibonacci sequence based potential have been analyzed by means of the Transfer Matrix Method. The electronic band gaps are examined comparatively with those obtained using the corresponding periodic potentials. The reflection coefficient shows self-similar properties for the Fibonacci superlattices. Moreover, by using the generalized Bragg's condition, the band gaps positions are derived from the golden mean involved in the design of the superlattice structure.

  16. Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium-Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained Layer Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Minority carrier lifetimes in undoped and Beryllium -doped Type-2 Ga-free, InAs/InAsSb strained layer superlattices (SLS) with...is unlimited. Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium -Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained Layer Superlattices The views, opinions and/or findings contained in...Brook University W-5510 Melville Library West Sayville, NY 11796 -3362 1 ABSTRACT Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium -Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained

  17. Crystallization of spin superlattices with pressure and field in the layered magnet SrCu2(BO3)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haravifard, S.; Graf, D.; Feiguin, A. E.; Batista, C. D.; Lang, J. C.; Silevitch, D. M.; Srajer, G.; Gaulin, B. D.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    An exact mapping between quantum spins and boson gases provides fresh approaches to the creation of quantum condensates and crystals. Here we report on magnetization measurements on the dimerized quantum magnet SrCu2(BO3)2 at cryogenic temperatures and through a quantum-phase transition that demonstrate the emergence of fractionally filled bosonic crystals in mesoscopic patterns, specified by a sequence of magnetization plateaus. We apply tens of Teslas of magnetic field to tune the density of bosons and gigapascals of hydrostatic pressure to regulate the underlying interactions. Simulations help parse the balance between energy and geometry in the emergent spin superlattices. The magnetic crystallites are the end result of a progression from a direct product of singlet states in each short dimer at zero field to preferred filling fractions of spin-triplet bosons in each dimer at large magnetic field, enriching the known possibilities for collective states in both quantum spin and atomic systems. PMID:27320787

  18. Land/groove optical recording with GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattice-like structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Qiang(墙威); Luping Shi; Towchong Chong; Yang Cao(曹阳)

    2004-01-01

    A superlattice-like (SLL) structure was applied to phase-change optical recording. The recording layer consisting of alternating thin layers of two different phase-change materials, GeTe and Sb2Tes, were grown by magnetron sputtering on polycarbonate substrates. Land/groove optical recording was adopted to suppress crosstalk and obtain a large track density. Dynamic properties of the SLL disc were investigated with the shortest 1T pulse duration of 8 ns. Clear eye pattern was observed after 10000 direct overwrite cycles. Erasability above 20 dB was achieved at a constant linear velocity of 19 m/s. Carrier-noise ratio (CNR) kept above 46 dB when the recording frequency reaches 21 MHz. The SLL phase change optical disc demonstrates a better recording performance than the Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge1Sb4Te7 discs in terms of CNR, erasability, and overwrite jitter.

  19. Preparation and characterization of haematite nanowire arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, D S; Liu, Q F; Zhang, L Y

    2003-01-01

    Arrays of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowires embedded in anodic alumina membranes were obtained after heat-treating beta-FeOOH nanowire arrays fabricated by electrochemical deposition. Haematite polycrystalline nanowires with maximum length of about 7 mu m and average diameter of about 120 nm were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The Morin temperature below 80 K and Neel temperature of about 350 K for the alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowire arrays, far lower than those of bulk material, were measured by Moessbauer spectroscopy and using a Magnetic Property Measurement System.

  20. Rational defect introduction in silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Naechul; Chi, Miaofang; Howe, Jane Y; Filler, Michael A

    2013-05-08

    The controlled introduction of planar defects, particularly twin boundaries and stacking faults, in group IV nanowires remains challenging despite the prevalence of these structural features in other nanowire systems (e.g., II-VI and III-V). Here we demonstrate how user-programmable changes to precursor pressure and growth temperature can rationally generate both transverse twin boundaries and angled stacking faults during the growth of oriented Si nanowires. We leverage this new capability to demonstrate prototype defect superstructures. These findings yield important insight into the mechanism of defect generation in semiconductor nanowires and suggest new routes to engineer the properties of this ubiquitous semiconductor.

  1. Electrochemical Preparation of WO_3 Nanowire Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Ordered WO3 nanowires arrays have been fabricated by electrochemical deposition with anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates and annealing the W nanowire arrays in air at 400 ℃. The morphology and the chemical composition of WO3 nanowires arrays were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM),Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the diameters of the WO3 nanowires are about 90 nm, which is in go...

  2. Metal nanowire-graphene composite transparent electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowski, Trent; Zhu, Zhaozhao; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Shikoh, Ali Sehpar; Touati, Farid; Benammar, Mohieddine; Mansuripur, Masud; Falco, Charlies M.

    2014-10-01

    Silver nanowires with 40 nm diameter and copper nanowires with 150 nm diameter were synthesized using low-temperature routes, and deposited in combination with ultrathin graphene sheets for use as transparent conductors. A systematic and detailed analysis involving nature of capping agent for the metal nanowires, annealing of deposited films, and pre-treatment of substrates revealed critical conditions necessary for preparing high performance transparent conducting electrodes. The best electrodes show ~90% optical transmissivity and sheet resistance of ~10 Ω/□, already comparable to the best available transparent electrodes. The metal nanowire-graphene composite electrodes are therefore well suited for fabrication of opto-electronic and electronic devices.

  3. Optically controllable nanobreaking of metallic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lina; Lu, Jinsheng; Yang, Hangbo; Luo, Si; Wang, Wei; Lv, Jun; Qiu, Min; Li, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Nanobreaking of nanowires has shown its necessity for manufacturing integrated nanodevices as nanojoining does. In this letter, we develop a method for breaking gold pentagonal nanowires by taking advantage of the photothermal effect with a 532 nm continuous-wave (CW) laser. The critical power required for nanobreaking is much lower for perpendicular polarization than that for parallel polarization. By controlling the polarization and the power of the irradiation light for nanobreaking, the nanowires can be cut into segments with gap widths ranging from dozens of nanometers to several micrometers. This CW light-induced single point nanobreaking of metallic nanowires provides a highly useful and promising method in constructing nanosystems.

  4. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Christoph

    The Type II InAs/GaInSb and InAs/InAsSb superlattices are material systems for implementation as photodetector absorbers in infrared imaging applications. In addition to cutoff wavelengths spanning the infrared spectrum, they offer degrees of freedom in their materials design (e.g. layer thicknesses, alloy compositions, number of layers in one superlattice period) that permit the optimization of an infrared photon detector's figures of merit such as detectivity through the tuning of material properties like generation/recombination lifetimes and optical absorption. We describe efforts to obtain accurate electronic band structures of superlattice semiconductors with infrared energy gaps, and employing them to evaluate nonradiative minority carrier lifetimes. Simple device models are utilized to suggest potential performance enhancements that arise from employing superlattices as infrared absorber. We also discuss current efforts to simulate the molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs/InAsSb superlattices to predict dominant native point defects and other growth nonidealities. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors.

  5. High-temperature crystallization of nanocrystals into three-dimensional superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liheng; Willis, Joshua J.; McKay, Ian Salmon; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Qin, Jian; Cargnello, Matteo; Tassone, Christopher J.

    2017-08-01

    Crystallization of colloidal nanocrystals into superlattices represents a practical bottom-up process with which to create ordered metamaterials with emergent functionalities. With precise control over the size, shape and composition of individual nanocrystals, various single- and multi-component nanocrystal superlattices have been produced, the lattice structures and chemical compositions of which can be accurately engineered. Nanocrystal superlattices are typically prepared by carefully controlling the assembly process through solvent evaporation or destabilization or through DNA-guided crystallization. Slow solvent evaporation or cooling of nanocrystal solutions (over hours or days) is the key element for successful crystallization processes. Here we report the rapid growth (seconds) of micrometre-sized, face-centred-cubic, three-dimensional nanocrystal superlattices during colloidal synthesis at high temperatures (more than 230 degrees Celsius). Using in situ small-angle X-ray scattering, we observe continuous growth of individual nanocrystals within the lattices, which results in simultaneous lattice expansion and fine nanocrystal size control due to the superlattice templates. Thermodynamic models demonstrate that balanced attractive and repulsive interparticle interactions dictated by the ligand coverage on nanocrystal surfaces and nanocrystal core size are responsible for the crystallization process. The interparticle interactions can also be controlled to form different superlattice structures, such as hexagonal close-packed lattices. The rational assembly of various nanocrystal systems into novel materials is thus facilitated for both fundamental research and for practical applications in the fields of magnetics, electronics and catalysis.

  6. Evolving random fractal Cantor superlattices for the infrared using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, Jeremy A; Lin, Lan; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Ordered and chaotic superlattices have been identified in Nature that give rise to a variety of colours reflected by the skin of various organisms. In particular, organisms such as silvery fish possess superlattices that reflect a broad range of light from the visible to the UV. Such superlattices have previously been identified as 'chaotic', but we propose that apparent 'chaotic' natural structures, which have been previously modelled as completely random structures, should have an underlying fractal geometry. Fractal geometry, often described as the geometry of Nature, can be used to mimic structures found in Nature, but deterministic fractals produce structures that are too 'perfect' to appear natural. Introducing variability into fractals produces structures that appear more natural. We suggest that the 'chaotic' (purely random) superlattices identified in Nature are more accurately modelled by multi-generator fractals. Furthermore, we introduce fractal random Cantor bars as a candidate for generating both ordered and 'chaotic' superlattices, such as the ones found in silvery fish. A genetic algorithm is used to evolve optimal fractal random Cantor bars with multiple generators targeting several desired optical functions in the mid-infrared and the near-infrared. We present optimized superlattices demonstrating broadband reflection as well as single and multiple pass bands in the near-infrared regime.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, P.D., E-mail: pabloborges@ufv.br [Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tec., Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Petersen, J.E.; Scolfaro, L. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Leite Alves, H.W. [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João Del Rei, Caixa Postal 110, São João Del Rei 36300-000, MG (Brazil); Myers, T.H. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Doping in a manner that introduces anisotropy in order to reduce thermal conductivity is a significant focus in thermoelectric research today. By solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in the constant scattering time (τ) approximation, in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory, we compare the Seebeck coefficient (S) and figure of merit (ZT) of bulk PbTe to PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures and PbTe doping superlattices (SLs) with periodically doped planes. Bismuth and Thallium were used as the n- and p-type impurities, respectively. The effects of carrier concentration are considered via chemical potential variation in a rigid band approximation. The impurity bands near the Fermi level in the electronic structure of PbTe SLs are of Tl s- and Bi p-character, and this feature is independent of the doping concentration or the distance between impurity planes. We observe the impurity bands to have a metallic nature in the directions perpendicular to the doping planes, yet no improvement on the values of ZT is found when compared to bulk PbTe. For the PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures, the calculated S presents good agreement with recent experimental data, and an anisotropic behavior is observed for low carrier concentrations (n<10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}). A large value of ZT{sub ||} (parallel to the growth direction) of 3.0 is predicted for n=4.7×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and T=700 K, whereas ZT{sub p} (perpendicular to the growth direction) is found to peak at 1.5 for n=1.7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Both electrical conductivity enhancement and thermal conductivity reduction are analyzed. - Graphical abstract: Figure of merit for PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructure along the [0 0 1] direction, P.D. Borges, J.E. Petersen, L. Scolfaro, H.W. Leite Alves, T.H. Myers, Improved thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices. - Highlights: • Thermoelectric properties of IV

  8. Two-dimensional Confinement of Heavy Fermions in Artificial Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Hiroaki

    2011-03-01

    Low dimensionality and strong electron-electron Coulomb interactions are both key parameters for novel quantum states of condensed matter. A metallic system with the strongest electron correlations is reported in rare-earth and actinide compounds with f electrons, known as heavy-fermion compounds, where the effective mass of the conduction electrons are strikingly enhanced by the electron correlations up to some hundreds times the free electron mass. To date the electronic structure of all heavy-fermion compounds is essentially three-dimensional. We realized experimentally a two-dimensional heavy fermion system, adjusting the dimensionality in a controllable fashion. We grew artificial superlattices of CeIn 3 (m)/ LaIn 3 (n), in which m -layers of heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeIn 3 and n -layers of a non-magnetic isostructual compound LaIn 3 are stacked alternately, by a molecular beam epitaxy. By reducing the thickness of the CeIn 3 layers, the magnetic order was suppressed and the effective electron mass was further enhanced. The Néel temperature becomes zero at around m = 2 , concomitant with striking deviations from the standard Fermi liquid low-temperature electronic properties. Standard Fermi liquid behaviors are, however, recovered under high magnetic field. These behaviors imply new ``dimensional tuning'' towards a quantum critical point. We also succeeded to fabricate artificial superlattices of a heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn 5 and non-magnetic divalent Yb-compound YbCoIn 5 . Superconductivity survives even in CeCoIn 5 (3)/ YbCoIn 5 (5) films, while the thickness of CeCoIn 5 layer, 2.3 nm, is comparable to the c -axis coherence length ξc ~ 2 nm. This work has been done in collaboration with Y. Mizukami, S. Yasumoto, M. Shimozawa, H. Kontani, T. Shibauchi, T. Terashima and Y. Matsuda.superconductivity is realized in the artificial superlattices. This work has been done in collaboration with Y. Mizukami, S. Yasumoto, M. Shimozawa, H. Kontani, T

  9. Structural and electronic properties of germanene/MoS2 monolayer and silicene/MoS2 monolayer superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodan; Wu, Shunqing; Zhou, Sen; Zhu, Zizhong

    2014-01-01

    Superlattice provides a new approach to enrich the class of materials with novel properties. Here, we report the structural and electronic properties of superlattices made with alternate stacking of two-dimensional hexagonal germanene (or silicene) and a MoS2 monolayer using the first principles approach. The results are compared with those of graphene/MoS2 superlattice. The distortions of the geometry of germanene, silicene, and MoS2 layers due to the formation of the superlattices are all r...

  10. Oxide-assisted Synthesis and Properties of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee S. T.

    2001-01-01

    @@ We introduce a new synthetic approach, called oxide-assisted growth method, which can produce bulk-quantity synthesis of high-purity (no metal contamination) onedimensional semiconductor nanomaterials. In contrast to the conventional metalcatalyst VLS approach, the oxide-assisted growth method uses oxides instead of metal catalysis in a laser ablation, thermal evaporation or CVD process. Using this new approach, we have synthesized various high-purity, one-dimensional semiconductor nanomaterials, including nanowires of Si, Ge, C, SiC, Si3N4, GaN, GaAs, GaP and CdS. Notably, silicon nanomaterials of controlled diameter, desired orientation or pattern, and morphologies (wire, chain, ribbons, cable) are attainable. We have characterized the morphology, microstructure, and optical and field-emission properties of silicon nanowires. The atomic structure and electronic properties of Si nanowires have been measured by STM and STS, which are correlated to the transport measurements. The effect of quantum confinement has been manifested. The results are important for developing nanoelectronic devices and offer exciting opportunities for research and applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  11. Oxide-assisted Synthesis and Properties of Semiconductor Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee; S.; T.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a new synthetic approach, called oxide-assisted growth method, which can produce bulk-quantity synthesis of high-purity (no metal contamination) onedimensional semiconductor nanomaterials. In contrast to the conventional metalcatalyst VLS approach, the oxide-assisted growth method uses oxides instead of metal catalysis in a laser ablation, thermal evaporation or CVD process. Using this new approach, we have synthesized various high-purity, one-dimensional semiconductor nanomaterials, including nanowires of Si, Ge, C, SiC, Si3N4, GaN, GaAs, GaP and CdS. Notably, silicon nanomaterials of controlled diameter, desired orientation or pattern, and morphologies (wire, chain, ribbons, cable) are attainable. We have characterized the morphology, microstructure, and optical and field-emission properties of silicon nanowires. The atomic structure and electronic properties of Si nanowires have been measured by STM and STS, which are correlated to the transport measurements. The effect of quantum confinement has been manifested. The results are important for developing nanoelectronic devices and offer exciting opportunities for research and applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.  ……

  12. Geometrical and physical conditions for skyrmion stability in a nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Chui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Skyrmions are promising information carriers in the next-generation storage and transmission devices. Appropriate design of the nanowire that permits the flow of skyrmions is, however, seldom studied. In this work, the geometrical and material parameters have been varied to investigate the favorable conditions for skyrmion formation and stability in a nanowire through micromagnetic simulations. It is found that the minimum planar dimensions have to be satisfied in order to stabilize a skyrmion. Furthermore, the nanowire thickness is also important for establishing a skyrmion. The temperature effect in the competition between the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI limits the skyrmion formation in a well-defined phase. On the other hand, fine tuning of the exchange stiffness and the Gilbert damping constant sustain a specified portion of the phase diagram that allows for skyrmion formation. Our study also indicates that the stabilized magnetization pattern is dependent on the initial skyrmion state. These results shed light on the possible configurations that are suitable for the design of skyrmionic devices.

  13. Indium Tin Oxide@Carbon Core–Shell Nanowire and Jagged Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper reports two new indium tin oxide (ITO-based nanostructures, namely ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire. The ITO@carbon core–shell nanowires (~50 nm in diameter, 1–5 μm in length, were prepared by a chemical vapor deposition process from commercial ITO nanoparticles. A carbon overlayer (~5–10 in thickness was observed around ITO nanowire core, which was in situ formed by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene gas. This carbon overlayer could be easily removed after calcination in air at an elevated temperature of 700°C, thus forming jagged ITO nanowires (~40–45 nm in diameter. The growth mechanisms of ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire were also suggested.

  14. Quasiballistic quantum transport through Ge/Si core/shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotekar-Patil, D; Nguyen, B-M; Yoo, J; Dayeh, S A; Frolov, S M

    2017-09-20

    We study signatures of ballistic quantum transport of holes through Ge/Si core/shell nanowires at low temperatures. We observe Fabry-Pérot interference patterns as well as conductance plateaus at integer multiples of 2e (2)/h at zero magnetic field. Magnetic field evolution of these plateaus reveals relatively large effective Landé g-factors. Ballistic effects are observed in nanowires with silicon shell thickness of 1-3 nm, but not in bare germanium wires. These findings inform the future development of spin and topological quantum devices which rely on ballistic sub-band-resolved transport.

  15. Effective negative refractive index in ferromagnet-semiconductor superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkanyan, Roland H; Niarchos, Dimitris G

    2006-06-12

    Problem of anomalous refraction of electromagnetic waves is analyzed in a superlattice which consists of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and nonmagnetic semiconductor. Effective permittivity and permeability tensors are derived in the presence of an external magnetic field parallel to the plane of the layers. It is shown that in the case of the Voigt configuration, the structure behaves as a left-handed medium with respect to TE-type polarized wave, in the low-frequency region of propagation. The relative orientation of the Poynting vector and the refractive wave vector is examined in different frequency ranges. It is shown that the frequency region of existence for the backward mode can be changed using external magnetic field as tuning parameter.

  16. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks--cubes and octahedrons--when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block's facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. The presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.

  17. Dynamical Axion Field in a Magnetic Topological Insulator Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    We propose that the dynamical axion field can be realized in a magnetic topological insulator superlattice or a topological paramagnetic insulator. The magnetic fluctuations of these systems produce a pseudoscalar field which has an axionic coupling to the electromagnetic field, and thus it gives a condensed-matter realization of the axion electrodynamics. Compared to the previously proposed dynamical axion materials where a long range antiferromagnetic order is required, the systems proposed here have the advantage that only an uniform magnetization or a paramagnetic state is needed for the dynamic axion. We further propose several experiments to detect such a dynamical axion field. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  18. Kinetics of electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozik, A.J.; Turner, J.A.; Peterson, M.W.

    1988-05-05

    A kinetic model has been developed that quantitatively describes electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes into liquid solutions. The model permits electron transfer from all quantum levels as well as from surface states; it also takes into account recombination in the bulk, space charge layer, and surfaces states, and band-edge movement. The model calculations define the values of the rate constants for heterogeneous electron transfer and hot electron thermalization among the various energy levels in the supperlattice quantum wells that are necessary to achieve hot electron transfer from excited quantum states. The question of whether hot electron transfer is manifested by a dependence of the photocurrent action spectra on acceptor redox potential is examined in detail.

  19. Plasmon modes of a massive Dirac plasma, and their superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rashi; Thakur, Anmol; Vignale, Giovanni; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-05-01

    We explore the collective density oscillations of a collection of charged massive Dirac particles, in one, two, and three dimensions, and their one-dimensional (1D) superlattice. We calculate the long-wavelength limit of the dynamical polarization function analytically, and use the random phase approximation to obtain the plasmon dispersion. The density dependence of the long-wavelength plasmon frequency in massive Dirac systems is found to be different compared to systems with parabolic and gapless Dirac dispersion. We also calculate the long-wavelength plasmon dispersion of a 1D metamaterial made from 1D and 2D massive Dirac plasma. Our analytical results will be useful for exploring the use of massive Dirac materials as electrostatically tunable plasmonic metamaterials and can be experimentally verified by infrared spectroscopy, as in the case of graphene [L. Ju et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 6, 630 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.146].

  20. Electronic and magnetic properties of zincblende half-metal superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C Y; Qian, M C; Pask, J; Yang, L H; Dag, S

    2003-11-05

    Zincblende half-metallic compounds such as CrAs, with large magnetic moments and high Curie temperatures, are promising materials for spintronic applications. They explore layered materials, consisting of alternating layers of zincblende half-metals, by first principles calculations, and find that superlattices of (CrAs){sub 1}(MnAs){sub 1} and (CrAs){sub 2}(MnAs){sub 2} are half-metallic with magnetic moments of 7.0{mu}{sub B} and 14.0{mu}{sub B} per unit cell, respectively. They discuss the nature of the bonding and half-metallicity in these materials and, based on the understanding acquired, develop a simple expression for the magnetic moment in such materials. They explore the range of lattice constants over which half-metallicity is manifested, and suggest corresponding substrates for growth in thin film form.