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Sample records for superior nc fluency

  1. Challenging the Superiority of Phonological Fluency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erz, Antonia; Christensen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The results of three laboratory experiments contribute to our understanding of effects of phonological fluency on correct recognition and recall of novel brand names, being relevant to the areas of information processing, memory, and branding. Employing the full range of fluency, the results offer...

  2. Rethinking spoken fluency

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article re-examines the notion of spoken fluency. Fluent and fluency are terms commonly used in everyday, lay language, and fluency, or lack of it, has social consequences. The article reviews the main approaches to understanding and measuring spoken fluency and suggest that spoken fluency is best understood as an interactive achievement, and offers the metaphor of ‘confluence’ to replace the term fluency. Many measures of spoken fluency are internal and monologue-based, whereas evidence...

  3. Putting the Fun Back into Fluency Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Mary Ann; Gregory, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    Based on recent research in fluency instruction, the authors present a scenario in which a teacher focuses her fluency instruction on authentic fluency tasks based in performance. Beginning with establishing a student-friendly definition of fluency and culminating with student engagement in fun fluency activities, this article explores the…

  4. Brain bases of reading fluency in typical reading and impaired fluency in dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna A Christodoulou

    Full Text Available Although the neural systems supporting single word reading are well studied, there are limited direct comparisons between typical and dyslexic readers of the neural correlates of reading fluency. Reading fluency deficits are a persistent behavioral marker of dyslexia into adulthood. The current study identified the neural correlates of fluent reading in typical and dyslexic adult readers, using sentences presented in a word-by-word format in which single words were presented sequentially at fixed rates. Sentences were presented at slow, medium, and fast rates, and participants were asked to decide whether each sentence did or did not make sense semantically. As presentation rates increased, participants became less accurate and slower at making judgments, with comprehension accuracy decreasing disproportionately for dyslexic readers. In-scanner performance on the sentence task correlated significantly with standardized clinical measures of both reading fluency and phonological awareness. Both typical readers and readers with dyslexia exhibited widespread, bilateral increases in activation that corresponded to increases in presentation rate. Typical readers exhibited significantly larger gains in activation as a function of faster presentation rates than readers with dyslexia in several areas, including left prefrontal and left superior temporal regions associated with semantic retrieval and semantic and phonological representations. Group differences were more extensive when behavioral differences between conditions were equated across groups. These findings suggest a brain basis for impaired reading fluency in dyslexia, specifically a failure of brain regions involved in semantic retrieval and semantic and phonological representations to become fully engaged for comprehension at rapid reading rates.

  5. Exploring EFL fluency in Asia

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, T; Brown, P; Herder, S

    2014-01-01

    In EFL contexts, an absence of chances to develop fluency in the language classroom can lead to marked limitations in English proficiency. This volume explores fluency development from a number of different perspectives, investigating measurements and classroom strategies for promoting its development.

  6. Image Ambiguity and Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakesch, Martina; Leder, Helmut; Forster, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ambiguity is often associated with negative affective responses, and enjoying ambiguity seems restricted to only a few situations, such as experiencing art. Nevertheless, theories of judgment formation, especially the “processing fluency account”, suggest that easy-to-process (non-ambiguous) stimuli are processed faster and are therefore preferred to (ambiguous) stimuli, which are hard to process. In a series of six experiments, we investigated these contrasting approaches by manipulating fluency (presentation duration: 10ms, 50ms, 100ms, 500ms, 1000ms) and testing effects of ambiguity (ambiguous versus non-ambiguous pictures of paintings) on classification performance (Part A; speed and accuracy) and aesthetic appreciation (Part B; liking and interest). As indicated by signal detection analyses, classification accuracy increased with presentation duration (Exp. 1a), but we found no effects of ambiguity on classification speed (Exp. 1b). Fifty percent of the participants were able to successfully classify ambiguous content at a presentation duration of 100 ms, and at 500ms even 75% performed above chance level. Ambiguous artworks were found more interesting (in conditions 50ms to 1000ms) and were preferred over non-ambiguous stimuli at 500ms and 1000ms (Exp. 2a - 2c, 3). Importantly, ambiguous images were nonetheless rated significantly harder to process as non-ambiguous images. These results suggest that ambiguity is an essential ingredient in art appreciation even though or maybe because it is harder to process. PMID:24040172

  7. Fluency Effects in Recognition Memory: Are Perceptual Fluency and Conceptual Fluency Interchangeable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Meredith; Olds, Justin M.; Westerman, Deanne L.

    2014-01-01

    On a recognition memory test, both perceptual and conceptual fluency can engender a sense of familiarity and elicit recognition memory illusions. To date, perceptual and conceptual fluency have been studied separately but are they interchangeable in terms of their influence on recognition judgments? Five experiments compared the effect of…

  8. Specialty Board on Fluency Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or large groups of speech-language pathologists. Speech-language pathologists who are Board Certified Specialists in Fluency may be found on this website by searching name, city(location) or zip code. ...

  9. Lexical factors and cerebral regions influencing verbal fluency performance in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D G; Wadley, V G; Kapur, P; DeRamus, T P; Singletary, B; Nicholas, A P; Blanton, P D; Lokken, K; Deshpande, H; Marson, D; Deutsch, G

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate assumptions regarding semantic (noun), verb, and letter fluency in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) using novel techniques for measuring word similarity in fluency lists and a region of interest (ROI) analysis of gray matter correlates. Fifty-eight individuals with normal cognition (NC, n=25), MCI (n=23), or AD (n=10) underwent neuropsychological tests, including 10 verbal fluency tasks (three letter tasks [F, A, S], six noun categories [animals, water creatures, fruits and vegetables, tools, vehicles, boats], and verbs). All pairs of words generated by each participant on each task were compared in terms of semantic (meaning), orthographic (spelling), and phonemic (pronunciation) similarity. We used mixed-effects logistic regression to determine which lexical factors were predictive of word adjacency within the lists. Associations between each fluency raw score and gray matter volumes in sixteen ROIs were identified by means of multiple linear regression. We evaluated causal models for both types of analyses to specify the contributions of diagnosis and various mediator variables to the outcomes of word adjacency and fluency raw score. Semantic similarity between words emerged as the strongest predictor of word adjacency for all fluency tasks, including the letter fluency tasks. Semantic similarity mediated the effect of cognitive impairment on word adjacency only for three fluency tasks employing a biological cue. Orthographic similarity was predictive of word adjacency for the A and S tasks, while phonemic similarity was predictive only for the S task and one semantic task (vehicles). The ROI analysis revealed different patterns of correlations among the various fluency tasks, with the most common associations in the right lower temporal and bilateral dorsal frontal regions. Following correction with gray matter volumes from the opposite hemisphere, significant associations persisted for animals, vehicles, and a composite

  10. Oral Reading Fluency as a Predictor of Silent Reading Fluency at Secondary and Postsecondary Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Soonhwa; DaCosta, Boaventura

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated oral reading fluency as a predictor of silent reading fluency at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Several measures were used, including the Gray Oral Reading Test, the Test of Silent Word Reading Fluency, the Test of Silent Contextual Reading Fluency, and the Reading Observation Scale. A total of 223 students…

  11. Neural correlates of rhyming vs. lexical and semantic fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Tilo; Nagels, Arne; Kirner-Veselinovic, André; Krach, Sören

    2011-05-19

    Rhyming words, as in songs or poems, is a universal feature of human language across all ages. In the present fMRI study a novel overt rhyming task was applied to determine the neural correlates of rhyme production. Fifteen right-handed healthy male volunteers participated in this verbal fluency study. Participants were instructed to overtly articulate as many words as possible either to a given initial letter (LVF) or to a semantic category (SVF). During the rhyming verbal fluency task (RVF), participants had to generate words that rhymed with pseudoword stimuli. On-line overt verbal responses were audiotaped in order to correct the imaging results for the number of generated words. Fewer words were generated in the rhyming compared to both the lexical and the semantic condition. On a neural level, all language tasks activated a language network encompassing the left inferior frontal gyrus, the middle and superior temporal gyri as well as the contralateral right cerebellum. Rhyming verbal fluency compared to both lexical and semantic verbal fluency demonstrated significantly stronger activation of left inferior parietal region. Generating novel rhyme words seems to be mainly mediated by the left inferior parietal lobe, a region previously found to be associated with meta-phonological as well as sub-lexical linguistic processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Developmental, Component-Based Model of Reading Fluency: An Investigation of Predictors of Word-Reading Fluency, Text-Reading Fluency, and Reading Comprehension

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young-Suk Grace

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal was to expand our understanding of text reading fluency (efficiency or automaticity)—how its relation to other constructs (e.g., word reading fluency and reading comprehension) changes over time and how it is different from word reading fluency and reading comprehension. We examined (1) developmentally changing relations among word reading fluency, listening comprehension, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension; (2) the relation of reading comprehension to text readi...

  13. Does Emotional Arousal Influence Swearing Fluency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Richard; Zile, Amy

    2017-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of experimentally manipulated emotional arousal on swearing fluency. We hypothesised that swear word generation would be increased with raised emotional arousal. The emotional arousal of 60 participants was manipulated by having them play a first-person shooter video game or, as a control, a golf video game, in a randomised order. A behavioural measure of swearing fluency based on the Controlled Oral Word Association Test was employed. Successful experimental manipulation was indicated by raised State Hostility Questionnaire scores after playing the shooter game. Swearing fluency was significantly greater after playing the shooter game compared with the golf game. Validity of the swearing fluency task was demonstrated via positive correlations with self-reported swearing fluency and daily swearing frequency. In certain instances swearing may represent a form of emotional expression. This finding will inform debates around the acceptability of using taboo language.

  14. Developmental, Component-Based Model of Reading Fluency: An Investigation of Predictors of Word-Reading Fluency, Text-Reading Fluency, and Reading Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Suk Grace

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal was to expand our understanding of text reading fluency (efficiency or automaticity)-how its relation to other constructs (e.g., word reading fluency and reading comprehension) changes over time and how it is different from word reading fluency and reading comprehension. We examined (1) developmentally changing relations among word reading fluency, listening comprehension, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension; (2) the relation of reading comprehension to text reading fluency; (3) unique emergent literacy predictors (i.e., phonological awareness, orthographic awareness, morphological awareness, letter name knowledge, vocabulary) of text reading fluency vs. word reading fluency; and (4) unique language and cognitive predictors (e.g., vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, theory of mind) of text reading fluency vs. reading comprehension. These questions were addressed using longitudinal data (two timepoints; Mean age = 5;24 & 6;08) from Korean-speaking children ( N = 143). Results showed that listening comprehension was related to text reading fluency at time 2, but not at time 1. At both times text reading fluency was related to reading comprehension, and reading comprehension was related to text reading fluency over and above word reading fluency and listening comprehension. Orthographic awareness was related to text reading fluency over and above other emergent literacy skills and word reading fluency. Vocabulary and grammatical knowledge were independently related to text reading fluency and reading comprehension whereas theory of mind was related to reading comprehension, but not text reading fluency. These results reveal developmental nature of relations and mechanism of text reading fluency in reading development.

  15. On Which Abilities Are Category Fluency and Letter Fluency Grounded A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of 53 Alzheimer's Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Bizzozero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In Alzheimer's dementia (AD, letter fluency is less impaired than category fluency. To check whether category fluency and letter fluency depend differently on semantics and attention, 53 mild AD patients were given animal and letter fluency tasks, two semantic tests (the Verbal Semantic Questionnaire and the BORB Association Match test, and two attentional tests (the Stroop Colour-Word Interference test and the Digit Cancellation test. Methods: We conducted a LISREL confirmatory factor analysis to check the extent to which category fluency and letter fluency tasks were related to semantics and attention, viewed as latent variables. Results: Both types of fluency tasks were related to the latent variable Semantics but not to the latent variable Attention. Conclusions: Our findings warn against interpreting the disproportionate impairment of AD patients on category and letter fluency as a contrast between semantics and attention.

  16. Fluency-dependent cortical activation associated with speech production and comprehension in second language learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K; Hirotani, M; Yokokawa, H; Yoshida, H; Makita, K; Yamazaki-Murase, M; Tanabe, H C; Sadato, N

    2015-08-06

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated the brain regions underlying language task performance in adult second language (L2) learners. Specifically, we identified brain regions where the level of activation was associated with L2 fluency levels. Thirty Japanese-speaking adults participated in the study. All participants were L2 learners of English and had achieved varying levels of fluency, as determined by a standardized L2 English proficiency test, the Versant English Test (Pearson Education Inc., 2011). When participants performed the oral sentence building task from the production tasks administered, the dorsal part of the left inferior frontal gyrus (dIFG) showed activation patterns that differed depending on the L2 fluency levels: The more fluent the participants were, the more dIFG activation decreased. This decreased activation of the dIFG might reflect the increased automaticity of a syntactic building process. In contrast, when participants performed an oral story comprehension task, the left posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) showed increased activation with higher fluency levels. This suggests that the learners with higher L2 fluency were actively engaged in post-syntactic integration processing supported by the left pSTG. These data imply that L2 fluency predicts neural resource allocation during language comprehension tasks as well as in production tasks. This study sheds light on the neural underpinnings of L2 learning by identifying the brain regions recruited during different language tasks across different modalities (production vs. comprehension). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of Working Memory in Individuals With Stuttering in Comparison With Individuals With Normal Fluency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiswarya Liz Varghese

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available It is common in literature to relate stuttering with some other deficit that interferes with communicative functions. Working memory comprises the system of human memory dedicated to both temporary storages of phonological detail and allocation of cognitive resources necessary for forming lasting memories. In this study we have analyzed the performance of individuals with stuttering on various working memory tasks. The aim of study is to compare the working memory abilities in individuals with stuttering and individuals with normal fluency on various working memory tasks. A total of 30 individuals with stuttering and 30 individuals with normal fluency in the age range of 18 – 40 years participated in the study. The Working Memory domain will be assessed using The Manipal Manual for Cognitive Linguistic Abilities (MMCLA which consists of auditory word retrieval, auditory letter and number recall, auditory word list recall, auditory delayed sentence recall, visual practice recall, visual letter and number recall, visual word list recall and visual delayed sentence recall. Results revealed that the individuals with normal fluency had superior performance compared to the individuals with stuttering. Hence, it’s helpful to understand the involvement of working memory in stuttering and incorporate working memory training along with the conventional fluency therapy.

  18. Oral Reading Fluency with iPods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Karla; Gove, Mary K.; Abate, Ron

    2018-01-01

    Research suggests that oral reading fluency frees up working memory so readers can focus on the meaning of a text, but traditional instruction in oral reading can be problematic in classrooms with students at different reading levels. Differentiating instruction, providing motivation to practice, as well as timely corrective feedback are practical…

  19. Episodic Memory, Semantic Memory, and Fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Carl F.

    1980-01-01

    Suggests that creating a second-language semantic network can be conceived as developing a plan for retrieving second-language word forms. Characteristics of linguistic performance which will promote fluency are discussed in light of the distinction between episodic and semantic memory. (AMH)

  20. Analysis of Speech Fluency in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia Freitas; Sampaio, Adriana; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Giacheti, Celia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, often referred as being characterized by dissociation between verbal and non-verbal abilities, although the number of studies disputing this proposal is emerging. Indeed, although they have been traditionally reported as displaying increased speech fluency, this topic has not been…

  1. Affect intensity and processing fluency of deterrents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    The theory of emotional intensity (Brehm, 1999) suggests that the intensity of affective states depends on the magnitude of their current deterrents. Our study investigated the role that fluency--the subjective experience of ease of information processing--plays in the emotional intensity modulations as reactions to deterrents. Following an induction phase of good mood, we manipulated both the magnitude of deterrents (using sets of photographs with pre-tested potential to instigate an emotion incompatible with the pre-existent affective state--pity) and their processing fluency (normal vs. enhanced through subliminal priming). Current affective state and perception of deterrents were then measured. In the normal processing conditions, the results revealed the cubic effect predicted by the emotional intensity theory, with the initial affective state being replaced by the one appropriate to the deterrent only in participants exposed to the high magnitude deterrence. In the enhanced fluency conditions the emotional intensity pattern was drastically altered; also, the replacement of the initial affective state occurred at a lower level of deterrence magnitude (moderate instead of high), suggesting the strengthening of deterrence emotional impact by enhanced fluency.

  2. Verbal fluency in idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thut, G.; Antonini, A.; Roelcke, U.; Missimer, J.; Maguire, R.P.; Leenders, K.L.; Regard, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the relationship between resting metabolism and verbal fluency, a correlate of frontal lobe cognition, was examined in 33 PD patients. We aimed to determine brain structures involved in frontal lobe cognitive impairment with special emphasis on differences between demented and non-demented PD patients. (author) 3 figs., 2 refs

  3. Possible origin of superior corrosion resistance for electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, I.; Yang, H.W.; Dinh, L.; Lund, I.; Earthman, J.C.; Mohamed, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present here for the first time observations that grain boundaries in electrodeposited (ED) nanocrystalline (nc) Ni are predominantly of Σ3 character. The results presented are based on orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) performed to produce electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps. This large volume fraction of coherent low sigma coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries appears to be consistent with the superior corrosion resistance of ED nc-Ni in comparison with its coarse-grained counterpart

  4. MOF derived Ni/Co/NC catalysts with enhanced properties for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiapeng; Chen, Juan; Lin, Hao; Liu, Ruilai; Yang, Xiaobing

    2018-03-01

    Designing efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is very important for renewable energy storage and conversion devices. In this paper, we introduced a new strategy to synthesize Ni doped Co/NC catalysts (NC is the abbreviation of nitrogen-doped graphitic carbon), which were derived from ZIF-67. All catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The results show that Ni was well doped in the Ni/Co/NC catalysts and the doping of Ni has great influence on the OER activity of Ni/Co/NC catalysts. Among these catalysts, 0.50Ni/Co/NC exhibits the highest OER activity. The onset potential of 0.50Ni/Co/NC is 1.47 V, which is superior than the onset potential of Co/NC (1.54 V), 0.25Ni/Co/NC (1.48 V), 1.00Ni/Co/NC (1.53 V). The excellent OER activity of 0.50Ni/Co/NC catalyst makes its potential to be used on renewable energy storage.

  5. Implicit Recognition Based on Lateralized Perceptual Fluency

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Iliana M.; Voss, Joel L.; Paller, Ken A.

    2012-01-01

    In some circumstances, accurate recognition of repeated images in an explicit memory test is driven by implicit memory. We propose that this “implicit recognition” results from perceptual fluency that influences responding without awareness of memory retrieval. Here we examined whether recognition would vary if images appeared in the same or different visual hemifield during learning and testing. Kaleidoscope images were briefly presented left or right of fixation during divided-attention enc...

  6. Behavioral fluency: Evolution of a new paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Binder, Carl

    1996-01-01

    Behavioral fluency is that combination of accuracy plus speed of responding that enables competent individuals to function efficiently and effectively in their natural environments. Evolving from the methodology of free-operant conditioning, the practice of precision teaching set the stage for discoveries about relations between behavior frequency and specific outcomes, notably retention and maintenance of performance, endurance or resistance to distraction, and application or transfer of tra...

  7. The Relationship between Temporal Measures of Oral Fluency and Ratings of Fluency: A Case of Iranian Advanced EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Farahani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective fluency judgment has always been a formidable task in language testing. Nonetheless, temporal fluency is the type of fluency which can be measured and quantified. Given that, temporal fluency is also known as temporal measures of fluency (Luoma, 2004. Furthermore, it has aroused considerable interest in analyzing speech of language learners in terms of quantitative measures (Kormos & Denes, 2004; Freed, 1995; Riggenbach, 1991; Lennon, 1990. They suggested that certain measures of fluency can more objectively specify fluency level and that perceptual understanding of fluency to a high extent correlate with these measures. Following these studies, the present study was an endeavor to relate quantitative measures of fluency and assessment of fluency in oral speech of L2 learners. To do so 30 advanced EFL learners whose speaking score on TOEFL iBT scale was between 19 to 22, i.e. B2 on CEFR scale, were selected. Then, they were given a picture strip as the elicitation task and asked to make up a story based on that. Their voice was recorded, transcribed and further analyzed by voice analysis software called PRAAT to calculate seven measures of fluency. Meanwhile, two trained listeners were required to rate the recordings, scoring them from 1 to 9. Finally, the relationship between these variables was calculated. The results showed that judge listeners’ ratings of fluency were highly correlated with speech rate, phonation time ratio, and mean length of runs. Moreover, among the measures of temporal fluency speech rate proved significantly correlated with articulation rate, phonation time ratio, and mean length of runs.

  8. Sexual-orientation-related differences in verbal fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Qazi; Abrahams, Sharon; Wilson, Glenn D

    2003-04-01

    This study examined the performance of 60 heterosexual men, 60 gay men, 60 heterosexual women, and 60 lesbians on 3 tests of verbal fluency known to show gender differences: letter, category, and synonym fluency. Gay men and lesbians showed opposite-sex shifts in their profile of scores. For letter fluency, gay men outperformed all other groups; lesbians showed the lowest scores. For category fluency, gay men and heterosexual women jointly outperformed lesbians and heterosexual men. Finally, gay men outperformed all other groups on synonym fluency, whereas lesbians and heterosexual men performed similarly. A difference between heterosexual men and women was demonstrated on category and synonym fluency only. The findings implicate within-sex differences in the functioning of the prefrontal and temporal cortices.

  9. Visiting digital fluency for pre-service teachers in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Demir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital literacy is to know how to use digital tools, however digital fluency is a new concept. Beyond the digital literacy, digital fluency requires skills to know when to use the technology and even why to use the technology. The technology advances rapidly; as a result, education and instruction are getting digitalized. So it could be estimated that; pre-service teachers who are future teachers, should have digital skills. This is the main point of this study which aims to visit pre-service teachers in Turkey from the perspective of digital fluency, give insights about digital fluency, scrutinize its difference from digital literacy and provide literature review on the previous studies about digital fluency. Accordingly; a through literature review was performed. At first, the connection between digital fluency and the 21st century analyzed, then the differences between digital literacy and digital fluency are described. Worldwide and specifically Turkish literature review revealed that, certain studies foresaw the increasing importance of digital fluency based on development of digital devices, and Turkish literature was limited to some scale development and descriptive studies solely determining the digital literacy level of the participants. Thus, it could be stated that further and up-to-date studies are required, which would be conducted with pre-service teachers and current assessment instruments should be developed to determine digital fluency level, considering the rapid advances in technology.

  10. Perceptual Fluency, Auditory Generation, and Metamemory: Analyzing the Perceptual Fluency Hypothesis in the Auditory Modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besken, Miri; Mulligan, Neil W.

    2014-01-01

    Judgments of learning (JOLs) are sometimes influenced by factors that do not impact actual memory performance. One recent proposal is that perceptual fluency during encoding affects metamemory and is a basis of metacognitive illusions. In the present experiments, participants identified aurally presented words that contained inter-spliced silences…

  11. Fluency Training in the ESL Classroom: An Experimental Study of Fluency Development and Proceduralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, N. de; Perfetti, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the role of speech repetition in oral fluency development. Twenty-four students enrolled in English-as-a-second-language classes performed three training sessions in which they recorded three speeches, of 4, 3, and 2 min, respectively. Some students spoke about the

  12. Linguistic Skills and Speaking Fluency in a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Nivja H.; Steinel, Margarita P.; Florijn, Arjen; Schoonen, Rob; Hulstijn, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how individual differences in linguistic knowledge and processing skills relate to individual differences in speaking fluency. Speakers of Dutch as a second language ("N" = 179) performed eight speaking tasks, from which several measures of fluency were derived such as measures for pausing, repairing, and speed…

  13. A Strategic Necessity: Building Senior Leadership's Fluency in Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomitz, Kara; Cabellon, Edmund T.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the opportunity for senior student affairs officers (SSAOs) to develop an increased digital fluency to meet the needs of various constituencies in the digital age. The authors explore what a digital fluency is, how it might impact SSAOs' leadership potential, and the benefits for their respective divisions.

  14. What oral text reading fluency can reveal about reading comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenendaal, N.J.; Groen, M.A.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Text reading fluency – the ability to read quickly, accurately and with a natural intonation – has been proposed as a predictor of reading comprehension. In the current study, we examined the role of oral text reading fluency, defined as text reading rate and text reading prosody, as a contributor

  15. Developing Mathematical Fluency: Comparing Exercises and Rich Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2018-01-01

    Achieving fluency in important mathematical procedures is fundamental to students' mathematical development. The usual way to develop procedural fluency is to practise repetitive exercises, but is this the only effective way? This paper reports three quasi-experimental studies carried out in a total of 11 secondary schools involving altogether 528…

  16. Comparison of Animal, Action and Phonemic Fluency in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Milman, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Background: The ability to generate words that follow certain constraints, or verbal fluency, is a sensitive indicator of neurocognitive impairment, and is impacted by a variety of variables. Aims: To investigate the effect of post-stroke aphasia, elicitation category and linguistic variables on verbal fluency performance. Methods &…

  17. Evaluating lexical characteristics of verbal fluency output in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Barbara J; Chambers, Destinee; Shesler, Leah W; Haber, Alix; Kurtz, Matthew M

    2012-12-30

    Standardized lexical analysis of verbal output has not been applied to verbal fluency tasks in schizophrenia. Performance of individuals with schizophrenia on both a letter (n=139) and semantic (n=137) fluency task was investigated. The lexical characteristics (word frequency, age-of-acquisition, word length, and semantic typicality) of words produced were evaluated and compared to those produced by a healthy control group matched on age, gender, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) vocabulary scores (n=20). Overall, individuals with schizophrenia produced fewer words than healthy controls, replicating past research (see Bokat and Goldberg, 2003). Words produced in the semantic fluency task by individuals with schizophrenia were, on average, earlier acquired and more typical of the category. In contrast, no differences in lexical characteristics emerged in the letter fluency task. The results are informative regarding how individuals with schizophrenia access their mental lexicons during the verbal fluency task. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Personality traits prospectively predict verbal fluency in a lifespan sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R; Terracciano, Antonio; Kitner-Triolo, Melissa H; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Zonderman, Alan B

    2011-12-01

    In a community-dwelling sample (N = 4,790; age range 14-94), we examined whether personality traits prospectively predicted performance on a verbal fluency task. Open, extraverted, and emotionally stable participants had better verbal fluency. At the facet level, dispositionally happy and self-disciplined participants retrieved more words; those prone to anxiety and depression and those who were deliberative retrieved fewer words. Education moderated the association between conscientiousness and fluency such that participants with lower education performed better on the fluency task if they were also conscientious. Age was not a moderator at the domain level, indicating that the personality-fluency associations were consistent across the life span. A disposition toward emotional vulnerability and being less open, less happy, and undisciplined may be detrimental to cognitive performance.

  19. Perceptual fluency and judgments of vocal aesthetics and stereotypicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Molly; McGuire, Grant

    2015-05-01

    Research has shown that processing dynamics on the perceiver's end determine aesthetic pleasure. Specifically, typical objects, which are processed more fluently, are perceived as more attractive. We extend this notion of perceptual fluency to judgments of vocal aesthetics. Vocal attractiveness has traditionally been examined with respect to sexual dimorphism and the apparent size of a talker, as reconstructed from the acoustic signal, despite evidence that gender-specific speech patterns are learned social behaviors. In this study, we report on a series of three experiments using 60 voices (30 females) to compare the relationship between judgments of vocal attractiveness, stereotypicality, and gender categorization fluency. Our results indicate that attractiveness and stereotypicality are highly correlated for female and male voices. Stereotypicality and categorization fluency were also correlated for male voices, but not female voices. Crucially, stereotypicality and categorization fluency interacted to predict attractiveness, suggesting the role of perceptual fluency is present, but nuanced, in judgments of human voices. © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Processing fluency and impressions of joy and pride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchenko Yu.E.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The mere exposure effect consists in the increasing of affective preference (sympathy/ liking for a previously encountered stimulus. Many researches connect it with processing fluency and effort savings (hedonic marking hypothesis [17]. The present study investigates, whether processing fluency connects with other positive emotions. We supposed higher processing fluency correlates with grater intensity of pride and joy. In 1 Experiment participants (n = 98 recognize 10 well-known proverbs in guessing game. Then they marked proverbs about that they would brag to their friends and ranked all proverbs from the most to the lest pleasant. In 2 Experiment 4 groups each of that concluded 24 different complicated joy statements were pairwise compared. Participants (n = 55 chosen most funny and marked unfunny statements. Results shows most sympathy is connect with higher processing fluency, but pride and joy appear more often in connection with more complicated stimuli required lower processing fluency.

  1. Implicit Recognition Based on Lateralized Perceptual Fluency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana M. Vargas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In some circumstances, accurate recognition of repeated images in an explicit memory test is driven by implicit memory. We propose that this “implicit recognition” results from perceptual fluency that influences responding without awareness of memory retrieval. Here we examined whether recognition would vary if images appeared in the same or different visual hemifield during learning and testing. Kaleidoscope images were briefly presented left or right of fixation during divided-attention encoding. Presentation in the same visual hemifield at test produced higher recognition accuracy than presentation in the opposite visual hemifield, but only for guess responses. These correct guesses likely reflect a contribution from implicit recognition, given that when the stimulated visual hemifield was the same at study and test, recognition accuracy was higher for guess responses than for responses with any level of confidence. The dramatic difference in guessing accuracy as a function of lateralized perceptual overlap between study and test suggests that implicit recognition arises from memory storage in visual cortical networks that mediate repetition-induced fluency increments.

  2. Implicit recognition based on lateralized perceptual fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Iliana M; Voss, Joel L; Paller, Ken A

    2012-02-06

    In some circumstances, accurate recognition of repeated images in an explicit memory test is driven by implicit memory. We propose that this "implicit recognition" results from perceptual fluency that influences responding without awareness of memory retrieval. Here we examined whether recognition would vary if images appeared in the same or different visual hemifield during learning and testing. Kaleidoscope images were briefly presented left or right of fixation during divided-attention encoding. Presentation in the same visual hemifield at test produced higher recognition accuracy than presentation in the opposite visual hemifield, but only for guess responses. These correct guesses likely reflect a contribution from implicit recognition, given that when the stimulated visual hemifield was the same at study and test, recognition accuracy was higher for guess responses than for responses with any level of confidence. The dramatic difference in guessing accuracy as a function of lateralized perceptual overlap between study and test suggests that implicit recognition arises from memory storage in visual cortical networks that mediate repetition-induced fluency increments.

  3. Semantic, phonologic, and verb fluency in Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Jardim Azambuja

    Full Text Available Abstract Verbal fluency tasks have been identified as important indicators of executive functioning impairment in patients with frontal lobe dysfunction. Although the usual evaluation of this ability considers phonologic and semantic criteria, there is some evidence that fluency of verbs would be more sensitive in disclosing frontostriatal physiopathology since frontal regions primarily mediate retrieval of verbs. Huntington's disease usually affects these circuitries. Objective: To compare three types of verbal fluency task in the assessment of frontal-striatal dysfunction in HD subjects. Methods: We studied 26 Huntington's disease subjects, divided into two subgroups: mild (11 and moderate (15 along with 26 normal volunteers matched for age, gender and schooling, for three types of verbal fluency: phonologic fluency (F-A-S, semantic fluency and fluency of verbs. Results: Huntington's disease subjects showed a significant reduction in the number of words correctly generated in the three tasks when compared to the normal group. Both controls and Huntington's disease subjects showed a similar pattern of decreasing task performance with the greatest number of words being generated by semantic elicitation followed by verbs and lastly phonologic criteria. We did not find greater production of verbs compared with F-A-S and semantic conditions. Moreover, the fluency of verbs distinguished only the moderate group from controls. Conclusion: Our results indicated that phonologic and semantic fluency can be used to evaluate executive functioning, proving more sensitive than verb fluency. However, it is important to point out that the diverse presentations of Huntington's disease means that an extended sample is necessary for more consistent analysis of this issue.

  4. It felt fluent, and I liked it: subjective feeling of fluency rather than objective fluency determines liking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Michael; Leder, Helmut; Ansorge, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    According to the processing-fluency explanation of aesthetics, more fluently processed stimuli are preferred (R. Reber, N. Schwarz, & P. Winkielman, 2004, Processing fluency and aesthetic pleasure: Is beauty in the perceiver's processing experience? Personality and Social Psychology Review, Vol. 8, pp. 364-382.). In this view, the subjective feeling of ease of processing is considered important, but this has not been directly tested in perceptual processing. In two experiments, we therefore objectively manipulated fluency (ease of processing) with subliminal perceptual priming (Study 1) and variations in presentation durations (Study 2). We assessed the impact of objective fluency on feelings of fluency and liking, as well as their interdependence. In line with the processing-fluency account, we found that objectively more fluent images were indeed judged as more fluent and were also liked more. Moreover, differences in liking were even stronger when data were analyzed according to felt fluency. These findings demonstrate that perceptual fluency is not only explicitly felt, it can also be reported and is an important determinant of liking. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Lexical-Semantic Search Under Different Covert Verbal Fluency Tasks: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqing Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Verbal fluency is a measure of cognitive flexibility and word search strategies that is widely used to characterize impaired cognitive function. Despite the wealth of research on identifying and characterizing distinct aspects of verbal fluency, the anatomic and functional substrates of retrieval-related search and post-retrieval control processes still have not been fully elucidated.Methods: Twenty-one native English-speaking, healthy, right-handed, adult volunteers (mean age = 31 years; range = 21–45 years; 9 F took part in a block-design functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI study of free recall, covert word generation tasks when guided by phonemic (P, semantic-category (C, and context-based fill-in–the-blank sentence completion (S cues. General linear model (GLM, Independent Component Analysis (ICA, and psychophysiological interaction (PPI were used to further characterize the neural substrate of verbal fluency as a function of retrieval cue type.Results: Common localized activations across P, C, and S tasks occurred in the bilateral superior and left inferior frontal gyrus, left anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area (SMA, and left insula. Differential task activations were centered in the occipital, temporal and parietal regions as well as the thalamus and cerebellum. The context-based fluency task, i.e., the S task, elicited higher differential brain activity in a lateralized frontal-temporal network typically engaged in complex language processing. P and C tasks elicited activation in limited pathways mainly within the left frontal regions. ICA and PPI results of the S task suggested that brain regions distributed across both hemispheres, extending beyond classical language areas, are recruited for lexical-semantic access and retrieval during sentence completion.Conclusion: Study results support the hypothesis of overlapping, as well as distinct, neural networks for covert word generation when

  6. Performances on five verbal fluency tests in a healthy, elderly Danish sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jette; Jørgensen, Kasper; Vogel, Asmus

    2013-01-01

    Verbal fluency tests are widely used as measures of language and executive functions. This study presents data for five tests; semantic fluency (animals, supermarket items and alternating between cities and professions), lexical fluency (s-words), and action fluency (verbs) based on a sample of 100...

  7. Reading Fluency in the Middle and Secondary Grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. PAIGE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we discuss the specifics of reading fluency and provide suggestions for identifying when reading is fluent and when it is not. We then discuss the important role that reading fluency plays in the attainment of literacy achievement and briefly review research results that highlight the relationship between fluency and comprehension. This is followed by a discussion of reading fluency and comprehension data gathered by one of the authors in India that highlight the possibilities for the acquisition of fluent reading in those learning English as a second language. Following a review of strategies to assist middle and secondary teachers with the development of fluent reading in their students, we conclude with a discussion of word study strategies that promote syllabic and morphemic analysis. Such strategies aid readers in the development of word automaticity and encourage the development of fluent reading.

  8. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  9. Action verbal fluency in Parkinson’s patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Tello Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We compared the performance of 31 non-demented Parkinson´s disease (PD patients to 61 healthy controls in an action verbal fluency task. Semantic and phonemic fluencies, cognitive impairment and behavioural dysfunction were also assessed. The mean disease duration of PD was 9.8 years (standard deviation (SD = 6.13. There were no age (U = 899.5, p = 0.616, gender(chi-square = 0.00, p = 1.00 or literacy (U = 956, p = 0.96 differences between the two groups. A significant difference was observed between the two groups in the action verbal fluency task (U = 406.5, p < 0.01 that was not found in the other fluency tasks. The education level was the only biographical variable that influenced the action (verb fluency outcomes, irrespective of disease duration. Our findings suggest a correlation between the disease mechanisms in PD and a specific verb deficit, support the validity of the action (verb fluency as an executive function measure and suggest that this task provides unique information not captured with traditional executive function tasks.

  10. Exploring "fringe" consciousness: the subjective experience of perceptual fluency and its objective bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Rolf; Wurtz, Pascal; Zimmermann, Thomas D

    2004-03-01

    Perceptual fluency is the subjective experience of ease with which an incoming stimulus is processed. Although perceptual fluency is assessed by speed of processing, it remains unclear how objective speed is related to subjective experiences of fluency. We present evidence that speed at different stages of the perceptual process contributes to perceptual fluency. In an experiment, figure-ground contrast influenced detection of briefly presented words, but not their identification at longer exposure durations. Conversely, font in which the word was written influenced identification, but not detection. Both contrast and font influenced subjective fluency. These findings suggest that speed of processing at different stages condensed into a unified subjective experience of perceptual fluency.

  11. The frontal-anatomic specificity of design fluency repetitions and their diagnostic relevance for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possin, Katherine L; Chester, Serana K; Laluz, Victor; Bostrom, Alan; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2012-09-01

    On tests of design fluency, an examinee draws as many different designs as possible in a specified time limit while avoiding repetition. The neuroanatomical substrates and diagnostic group differences of design fluency repetition errors and total correct scores were examined in 110 individuals diagnosed with dementia, 53 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 37 neurologically healthy controls. The errors correlated significantly with volumes in the right and left orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the right and left superior frontal gyrus, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the right striatum, but did not correlate with volumes in any parietal or temporal lobe regions. Regression analyses indicated that the lateral OFC may be particularly crucial for preventing these errors, even after excluding patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from the analysis. Total correct correlated more diffusely with volumes in the right and left frontal and parietal cortex, the right temporal cortex, and the right striatum and thalamus. Patients diagnosed with bvFTD made significantly more repetition errors than patients diagnosed with MCI, Alzheimer's disease, semantic dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, or corticobasal syndrome. In contrast, total correct design scores did not differentiate the dementia patients. These results highlight the frontal-anatomic specificity of design fluency repetitions. In addition, the results indicate that the propensity to make these errors supports the diagnosis of bvFTD. (JINS, 2012, 18, 1-11).

  12. The relationship between different measures of oral reading fluency and reading comprehension in second-grade students who evidence different oral reading fluency difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Justin C; Sevcik, Rose A; Morris, Robin D; Lovett, Maureen W; Wolf, Maryanne; Kuhn, Melanie; Meisinger, Beth; Schwanenflugel, Paula

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether different measures of oral reading fluency relate differentially to reading comprehension performance in two samples of second-grade students: (a) students who evidenced difficulties with nonsense-word oral reading fluency, real-word oral reading fluency, and oral reading fluency of connected text (ORFD), and (b) students who evidenced difficulties only with oral reading fluency of connected text (CTD). Participants (ORFD, n = 146 and CTD, n = 949) were second-grade students who were recruited for participation in different reading intervention studies. Data analyzed were from measures of nonsense-word oral reading fluency, real-word oral reading fluency, oral reading fluency of connected text, and reading comprehension that were collected at the pre-intervention time point. Correlational and path analyses indicated that real-word oral reading fluency was the strongest predictor of reading comprehension performance in both samples and across average and poor reading comprehension abilities. Results of this study indicate that real-word oral reading fluency was the strongest predictor of reading comprehension and suggest that real-word oral reading fluency may be an efficient method for identifying potential reading comprehension difficulties.

  13. Neurophysiological evidence that perceptions of fluency produce mere exposure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leynes, P Andrew; Addante, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    Recent exposure to people or objects increases liking ratings, the "mere exposure effect" (Zajonc in American Psychologist, 35, 117-123, 1968), and an increase in processing fluency has been identified as a potential mechanism for producing this effect. This fluency hypothesis was directly tested by altering the trial-by-trial image clarity (i.e., fluency) while Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded. In Experiment 1, clarity was altered across two trial blocks that each had homogenous trial-by-trial clarity, whereas clarity varied randomly across trials in Experiment 2. Blocking or randomizing image clarity across trials was expected to produce different levels of relative fluency and alter mere exposure effects. The mere exposure effect (i.e., old products liked more than new products) was observed when stimulus clarity remained constant across trials, and clear image ERPs were more positive than blurry image ERPs. Importantly, these patterns were reversed when clarity varied randomly across test trials, such that participants liked clear images more than blurry (i.e., no mere exposure effect) and clear image ERPs were more negative than blurry image ERPs. The findings provide direct experimental support from both behavioral and electrophysiological measures that, in some contexts, mere exposure is the product of top-down interpretations of fluency.

  14. Auditory hindsight bias: Fluency misattribution versus memory reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Philip A; Neil, Greg J; Bernstein, Daniel M

    2017-06-01

    We report 4 experiments investigating auditory hindsight bias-the tendency to overestimate the intelligibility of distorted auditory stimuli after learning their identity. An associative priming manipulation was used to vary the amount of processing fluency independently of prior target knowledge. For hypothetical designs, in which hindsight judgments are made for peers in foresight, we predicted that judgments would be based on processing fluency and that hindsight bias would be greater in the unrelated- compared to related-prime context (differential-fluency hypothesis). Conversely, for memory designs, in which foresight judgments are remembered in hindsight, we predicted that judgments would be based on memory reconstruction and that there would be independent effects of prime relatedness and prior target knowledge (recollection hypothesis). These predictions were confirmed. Specifically, we found support for the differential-fluency hypothesis when a hypothetical design was used in Experiments 1 and 2 (hypothetical group). Conversely, when a memory design was used in Experiments 2 (memory group), 3A, and 3B, we found support for the recollection hypothesis. Together, the results suggest that qualitatively different mechanisms create hindsight bias in the 2 designs. The results are discussed in terms of fluency misattributions, memory reconstruction, anchoring-and-adjustment, sense making, and a multicomponent model of hindsight bias. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Tuning by means of laser annealing of electronic and structural properties of nc-Si/a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliani, E.; Somaschini, C.; Sanguinetti, S.; Grilli, E.; Guzzi, M.; Le Donne, A.; Binetti, S.; Pizzini, S.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report the effect of laser annealing on the structural and electronic properties of nc-Si/a-Si:H samples grown close to the amorphous to nanocrystalline transition. The nc-Si/a-Si:H thin films were produced by low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition through a gas discharge containing SiH 4 . The samples were subjected to different laser fluencies and were characterized for changes in their structural and electronic properties via Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements. The laser annealing effects are twofold: i) the nanocrystalline phase grows, during the laser treatment, respect to the amorphous phase; ii) the photoluminescence spectra show the suppression, after laser annealing, of the frequencies above the crystalline Si band-gap.

  16. Verbal fluency in bilingual Spanish/English Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatierra, Judy; Rosselli, Monica; Acevedo, Amarilis; Duara, Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that in verbal fluency tests, monolinguals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show greater difficulties retrieving words based on semantic rather than phonemic rules. The present study aimed to determine whether this difficulty was reproduced in both languages of Spanish/English bilinguals with mild to moderate AD whose primary language was Spanish. Performance on semantic and phonemic verbal fluency of 11 bilingual AD patients was compared to the performance of 11 cognitively normal, elderly bilingual individuals matched for gender, age, level of education, and degree of bilingualism. Cognitively normal subjects retrieved significantly more items under the semantic condition compared to the phonemic, whereas the performance of AD patients was similar under both conditions, suggesting greater decline in semantic verbal fluency tests. This pattern was produced in both languages, implying a related semantic decline in both languages. Results from this study should be considered preliminary because of the small sample size.

  17. Mere exposure effect: A consequence of direct and indirect fluency-preference links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Sylvie; Van der Linden, Martial

    2006-06-01

    In three experiments, picture quality between test items was manipulated to examine whether subjects' expectations about the fluency normally associated with these different stimuli might influence the effects of fluency on preference or familiarity-based recognition responses. The results showed that fluency due to pre-exposure influenced responses less when objects were presented with high picture quality, suggesting that attributions of fluency to preference and familiarity are adjusted according to expectations about the different test pictures. However, this expectations influence depended on subjects' awareness of these different quality levels. Indeed, imperceptible differences seemed not to induce expectations about the test item fluency. In this context, fluency due to both picture quality and pre-exposure influenced direct responses. Conversely, obvious, and noticed, differences in test picture quality did no affect responses, suggesting that expectations moderated attributions of fluency only when fluency normally associated with these different stimuli was perceptible but difficult to assess.

  18. Working memory influences processing speed and reading fluency in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lisa A; Ryan, Matthew; Martin, Rebecca B; Ewen, Joshua; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Denckla, Martha B; Mahone, E Mark

    2011-01-01

    Processing-speed deficits affect reading efficiency, even among individuals who recognize and decode words accurately. Children with ADHD who decode words accurately can still have inefficient reading fluency, leading to a bottleneck in other cognitive processes. This "slowing" in ADHD is associated with deficits in fundamental components of executive function underlying processing speed, including response selection. The purpose of the present study was to deconstruct processing speed in order to determine which components of executive control best explain the "processing" speed deficits related to reading fluency in ADHD. Participants (41 ADHD, 21 controls), ages 9-14 years, screened for language disorders, word reading deficits, and psychiatric disorders, were administered measures of copying speed, processing speed, reading fluency, working memory, reaction time, inhibition, and auditory attention span. Compared to controls, children with ADHD showed reduced oral and silent reading fluency and reduced processing speed-driven primarily by deficits on WISC-IV Coding. In contrast, groups did not differ on copying speed. After controlling for copying speed, sex, severity of ADHD-related symptomatology, and GAI, slowed "processing" speed (i.e., Coding) was significantly associated with verbal span and measures of working memory but not with measures of response control/inhibition, lexical retrieval speed, reaction time, or intrasubject variability. Further, "processing" speed (i.e., Coding, residualized for copying speed) and working memory were significant predictors of oral reading fluency. Abnormalities in working memory and response selection (which are frontally mediated and enter into the output side of processing speed) may play an important role in deficits in reading fluency in ADHD, potentially more than posteriorally mediated problems with orienting of attention or perceiving the stimulus.

  19. Linguistic Phenomena in Men and Women - TOT, FOK, Verbal Fluency

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Szepietowska; Barbara Gawda; Agnieszka Gawda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the differences between women and men in the phenomena of feeling of knowing/know (FOK), tip of the tongue (TOT), and verbal fluency. Two studies are presented. The first included a group of 60 participants and focused on the analysis of FOK and TOT in men and women. The second study described the performance of 302 participants in verbal fluency tasks. Both studies showed that sex is not a significant predictor of linguistic abilities. Rather, the main fa...

  20. Visiting digital fluency for pre-service teachers in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Kadir Demir; Betül Aydın; Nazife Şen Ersoy; Aydın Kelek; İsmail Tatar; Abdullah Kuzu; Hatice Ferhan Odabaşı

    2015-01-01

    Digital literacy is to know how to use digital tools, however digital fluency is a new concept. Beyond the digital literacy, digital fluency requires skills to know when to use the technology and even why to use the technology. The technology advances rapidly; as a result, education and instruction are getting digitalized. So it could be estimated that; pre-service teachers who are future teachers, should have digital skills. This is the main point of this study which aims to visit pre-ser...

  1. Correlation between the physical parameters of the i-nc-Si absorber layer grown by 27.12 MHz plasma with the nc-Si solar cell parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debajyoti; Mondal, Praloy

    2017-09-01

    Growth of highly conducting nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) thin films of optimum crystalline volume fraction, involving dominant crystallographic preferred orientation with simultaneous low fraction of microstructures at a low substrate temperature and high growth rate, is a challenging task for its promising utilization in nc-Si solar cells. Utilizing enhanced electron density and superior ion flux densities of the high frequency (∼27.12 MHz) SiH4 plasma, improved nc-Si films have been produced by simple optimization of H2-dilution, controlling the ion damage and enhancing supply of atomic-hydrogen onto the growing surface. Single junction nc-Si p-i-n solar cells have been prepared with i-nc-Si absorber layer and optimized. The physical parameters of the absorber layer have been systematically correlated to variations of the solar cell parameters. The preferred alignment of crystallites, its contribution to the low recombination losses for conduction of charge carriers along the vertical direction, its spectroscopic correlation with the dominant growth of ultra-nanocrystalline silicon (unc-Si) component and corresponding longer wavelength absorption, especially in the neighborhood of i/n-interface region recognize scientific and technological key issues that pave the ground for imminent advancement of multi-junction silicon solar cells.

  2. Facilitating English-Language Learners' Oral Reading Fluency with Digital Pen Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Tan, Chia-Chen; Lo, Bey-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Oral reading fluency is an indicator of overall reading competence. Many studies have claimed that repeated reading can promote oral reading fluency. Currently, novel Web- or computer-based reading technologies offer interactive digital materials that promote English oral reading fluency using the repeated reading strategy; however, paper-based…

  3. Mirror Asymmetry of Category and Letter Fluency in Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer's Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Erminio; Rosci, Chiara; Saetti, Maria Cristina; Laiacona, Marcella

    2009-01-01

    In this study we contrasted the Category fluency and Letter fluency performance of 198 normal subjects, 57 Alzheimer's patients and 57 patients affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim was to check whether, besides the prevalence of Category fluency deficit often reported among Alzheimer's patients, the TBI group presented the opposite…

  4. Understanding Oral Reading Fluency among Adults with Low Literacy: Dominance Analysis of Contributing Component Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellard, Daryl F.; Anthony, Jason L.; Woods, Kari L.

    2012-01-01

    This study extends the literature on the component skills involved in oral reading fluency. Dominance analysis was applied to assess the relative importance of seven reading-related component skills in the prediction of the oral reading fluency of 272 adult literacy learners. The best predictors of oral reading fluency when text difficulty was…

  5. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear... southeast side of the Inlet. (g) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape Fear...

  6. A cognitive assessment of highly superior autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePort, Aurora K R; Stark, Shauna M; McGaugh, James L; Stark, Craig E L

    2017-02-01

    Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory (HSAM) is characterised as the ability to accurately recall an exceptional number of experiences and their associated dates from events occurring throughout much of one's lifetime. The source of this ability has only begun to be explored. The present study explores whether other enhanced cognitive processes may be critical influences underlying HSAM abilities. We investigated whether enhanced abilities in the domains of verbal fluency, attention/inhibition, executive functioning, mnemonic discrimination, perception, visual working memory, or the processing of and memory for emotional details might contribute critically to HSAM. The results suggest that superior cognitive functioning is an unlikely basis of HSAM, as only modest advantages were found in only a few tests. In addition, we examined HSAM subjects' memory of the testing episodes. Interestingly, HSAM participants recalled details of their own experiences far better than those experiences that the experimenter shared with them. These findings provide additional evidence that HSAM involves, relatively selectively, recollection of personal, autobiographical material.

  7. Bathymetry of Lake Superior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Superior has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  8. Superior Hiking Trail Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Superior Hiking Trail main trail, spurs, and camp spurs for completed trail throughout Cook, Lake, St. Louis and Carlton counties. These data were collected with...

  9. Superior Hiking Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Superior Hiking Trail main trail, spurs, and camp spurs for completed trail throughout Cook, Lake, St. Louis and Carlton counties. These data were collected with...

  10. Alternate superior Julia sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Anju; Rani, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Alternate Julia sets have been studied in Picard iterative procedures. The purpose of this paper is to study the quadratic and cubic maps using superior iterates to obtain Julia sets with different alternate structures. Analytically, graphically and computationally it has been shown that alternate superior Julia sets can be connected, disconnected and totally disconnected, and also fattier than the corresponding alternate Julia sets. A few examples have been studied by applying different type of alternate structures

  11. The Relationship between Reading Fluency and Lexile Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Joshua Steve

    2017-01-01

    With increasing emphasis being placed on teachers to show an improvement in student achievement, schools are relying on indicators such as reading fluency and reading comprehension to gauge student progress throughout the year. Since the growth on these assessments are used in calculating teachers and administrators' yearly job evaluations, the…

  12. Fluency: an aim in teaching and a criterion in assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aud Marit Simensen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the concept ‘fluency’ from different perspectives. When fluency is an aim in teaching, a thorough comprehension of the concept among teachers is a prerequisite for appropriate planning of instruction, including the choice of appropriate classroom activities. When fluency is an assessment criterion, it is even more important that examiners have a shared perception of the concept. The present article starts by presenting common perceptions of the concept and goes on to explore some of the current research. Next, it provides a historical overview of the place of fluency in teaching theory and explains some of the preconditions for the inclusion of this concept among teaching objectives and assessment criteria. It will also, as an illustration, give an outline of the position of the concept over time in the Norwegian school system on the basis of an analysis of the relevant syllabuses. Finally, the article explicates the notion of language use as a complex cognitive skill and explores current method¬ological ideas about teaching towards fluency.

  13. Boosting Reading Fluency: An Intervention Case Study at Subword Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairaluoma, Leila; Ahonen, Timo; Aro, Mikko; Holopainen, Leena

    2007-01-01

    This study is an intervention case study of fluency in Finnish-speaking children with dyslexia. Two 7-year-old children, a girl and a boy, were selected from the Jyvaskyla Longitudinal Study of Dyslexia. The intervention emphasised syllables as reading units, and proceeded from reading syllables to reading words and text. Letter knowledge, reading…

  14. Specificity and Overlap in Skills Underpinning Reading and Arithmetical Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Daal, Victor; van der Leij, Aryan; Ader, Herman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine unique and common causes of problems in reading and arithmetic fluency. 13- to 14-year-old students were placed into one of five groups: reading disabled (RD, n = 16), arithmetic disabled (AD, n = 34), reading and arithmetic disabled (RAD, n = 17), reading, arithmetic, and listening comprehension disabled…

  15. Is Earlier Better? Mastery of Reading Fluency in Early Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yonghan; Chaparro, Erin A.; Preciado, Jorge; Cummings, Kelli D.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The goal of the present study was to provide empirical evidence for the importance of mastering reading fluency in early schooling. Study participants were 1,322 students in 3rd grade in 42 schools in a northwestern state. These students were assessed using a battery of reading skill tests as well as comprehensive tests of more…

  16. Two Mechanisms of Constructive Recollection: Perceptual Recombination and Conceptual Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Manoj K.; Bluestone, Maximilian R.; Gallo, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Recollection is constructive and prone to distortion, but the mechanisms through which recollections can become embellished with rich yet illusory details are still debated. According to the conceptual fluency hypothesis, abstract semantic or conceptual activation increases the familiarity of a nonstudied event, causing one to falsely attribute…

  17. Remediation of fluency: Word specific or generalised training effects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, I.E.; Reitsma, P.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines whether reading fluency benefits more from repeated reading of a limited set of words or from practicing reading with many different words. A group of 37 reading delayed Dutch children repeatedly read the same 20 words with limited exposure duration, whereas another group

  18. Teachers Engaging Parents as Tutors to Improve Oral Reading Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupzyk, Sara S.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the application of evidence-based tutoring for oral reading fluency (ORF) to a natural setting, using teachers as parent trainers. Measures used to determine the impact of parent tutoring included treatment integrity, student reading outcomes, attitudes towards involvement and reading, and social validity. Six teachers…

  19. Reading Fluency Instruction for Students at Risk for Reading Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Jeremiah J.; Barefoot, Lexie C.; Avrit, Karen J.; Brown, Sasha A.; Black, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The important role of reading fluency in the comprehension and motivation of readers is well documented. Two reading rate intervention programs were compared in a cluster-randomized clinical trial of students who were considered at-risk for reading failure. One program focused instruction at the word level; the second program focused instruction…

  20. Scrutinizing the Factors Affecting Fluency of English among Arab Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghazali, Fawzi

    2017-01-01

    This research study investigates the cognitive, psychological and personal factors affecting the accuracy and fluency of English language usage among Arab learners. Early research led by Chomsky (1965) and Krashen (1981) suggested that an individual's Language Acquisition Device once triggered at the appropriate time and supported with adequate…

  1. Influences of early English language teaching on oral fluency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wolf, Stephana; Smit, Nienke; Lowie, Wander

    2017-01-01

    Elementary-level foreign language education is currently receiving a lot of attention in the literature on second language learning, and has emerged as an important educational policy issue. The present study aims to contribute to this discussion by focusing on the fluency benefits gained from early

  2. Influences of Early English Language Teaching on Oral Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Stephana; Smit, Nienke; Lowie, Wander

    2017-01-01

    Elementary-level foreign language education is currently receiving a lot of attention in the literature on second language learning, and has emerged as an important educational policy issue. The present study aims to contribute to this discussion by focusing on the fluency benefits gained from early foreign language teaching. The participants were…

  3. Oral Reading Fluency Testing: Pitfalls for Children with Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Karole; Scaler Scott, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    As school districts nationwide have moved toward data driven intervention, oral reading fluency measures have become a prevalent means to monitor progress by assessing the degree to which a child is becoming a fast (and therefore fluent) reader. This article reviews results of a survey of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working with children…

  4. Improving English Speaking Fluency: The Role of Six Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Shahini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study, using an open interview, set out to investigate the roles six factors, including age, university education, teachers of English Language institutes, teaching English, dictionary, and note-taking, played in improving English speaking fluency of seventeen fluent Iranian EFL speakers. The participants were chosen purposefully based on the speaking scale of Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL. The findings indicated that early age had a great impact on the participants’ speaking fluency. They mentioned that they could not pick up fluency if they had started learning English at older ages. Moreover, university education had no effect on enhancing their fluency. They stated that not having enough opportunities to speak English in classrooms, being exposed to wrong amounts of input from their classmates or even from some university instructors, having no access to English native speakers in English Language Departments, professors’ talking in native language out of classes, in their offices or even sometimes in classes all led to their losing motivation after entering the university. In contrast, teachers in English language institutes had a supportive role in increasing the participants’ English learning. Although two participants quit teaching English since it had a negative influence on their speaking, it had a positive impact on improving speaking ability of the rest. And finally, fruitful strategies were suggested on how to use dictionaries and note-takings.

  5. Specificity and overlap in skills underpinning reading and arithmetical fluency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daal, V.; van der Leij, A.; Adèr, H.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine unique and common causes of problems in reading and arithmetic fluency. 13- to 14-year-old students were placed into one of five groups: reading disabled (RD, n = 16), arithmetic disabled (AD, n = 34), reading and arithmetic disabled (RAD, n = 17), reading,

  6. Investigating Patterns of Errors for Specific Comprehension and Fluency Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriakin, Taylor A.; Kaufman, Alan S.

    2017-01-01

    Although word reading has traditionally been viewed as a foundational skill for development of reading fluency and comprehension, some children demonstrate "specific" reading comprehension problems, in the context of intact word reading. The purpose of this study was to identify specific patterns of errors associated with reading…

  7. Stuttering, induced fluency, and natural fluency: a hierarchical series of activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Kristin S; Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T

    2014-12-01

    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder most likely due to a heritable form of developmental dysmyelination impairing the function of the speech-motor system. Speech-induced brain-activation patterns in persons who stutter (PWS) are anomalous in various ways; the consistency of these aberrant patterns is a matter of ongoing debate. Here, we present a hierarchical series of coordinate-based meta-analyses addressing this issue. Two tiers of meta-analyses were performed on a 17-paper dataset (202 PWS; 167 fluent controls). Four large-scale (top-tier) meta-analyses were performed, two for each subject group (PWS and controls). These analyses robustly confirmed the regional effects previously postulated as "neural signatures of stuttering" (Brown, Ingham, Ingham, Laird, & Fox, 2005) and extended this designation to additional regions. Two smaller-scale (lower-tier) meta-analyses refined the interpretation of the large-scale analyses: (1) a between-group contrast targeting differences between PWS and controls (stuttering trait); and (2) a within-group contrast (PWS only) of stuttering with induced fluency (stuttering state). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measuring autobiographical fluency in the self-memory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbone, Clare J; Moulin, Chris J A

    2014-01-01

    Autobiographical memory is widely considered to be fundamentally related to concepts of self and identity. However, few studies have sought to test models of self and memory directly using experimental designs. Using a novel autobiographical fluency paradigm, the present study investigated memory accessibility for different levels of self-related knowledge. Forty participants generated 20 "I am" statements about themselves, from which the 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th, and 20th were used as cues in a two-minute autobiographical fluency task. The most salient aspects of the self, measured by both serial position and ratings of personal significance, were associated with more accessible sets of autobiographical memories. This finding supports theories that view the self as a powerful organizational structure in memory. Results are discussed with reference to models of self and memory.

  9. How Reading Volume Affects both Reading Fluency and Reading Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. ALLINGTON

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Long overlooked, reading volume is actually central to the development of reading proficiencies, especially in the development of fluent reading proficiency. Generally no one in schools monitors the actual volume of reading that children engage in. We know that the commonly used commercial core reading programs provide only material that requires about 15 minutes of reading activity daily. The remaining 75 minute of reading lessons is filled with many other activities such as completing workbook pages or responding to low-level literal questions about what has been read. Studies designed to enhance the volume of reading that children do during their reading lessons demonstrate one way to enhance reading development. Repeated readings have been widely used in fostering reading fluency but wide reading options seem to work faster and more broadly in developing reading proficiencies, including oral reading fluency.

  10. Maintaining students’ Speaking Fluency through Exhibition Examination in Sociolinguistic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khusnul Qhotimah Yuliatuty

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Using exhibition for the final project in Sociolinguistic study is really interesting for Universitas Siswa Bangsa Internasional students, especially for 2011 English Department students. Exhibition becomes interesting because this is the new thing to conduct the final project for English Department students’ cohort 2011 at Universitas Siswa Bangsa Internasional. The lecturer divides the students into pairs and each pairs should master one content or topic in Sociolinguistic study.  The students will do the exhibition about the topic that they get in a pairs. The lecturer also gives the students rubric sheet to fill by the visitors. The exhibition will make the students prepare themselves well because they will face many questions about the content which will be delivered by them. Beside, this exhibition also maintains students’ fluency in speaking English because they will explain and answer the questions from visitors with English. This paper tries to focus on how exhibition examination can maintain students’ fluency in speaking English.

  11. Memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition in normal aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Thapliyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concepts of aging-related cognitive changes have appeared to be a major challenge in the society. In this context, the present study was planned to find out the functioning of aging population on different neurocognitive measures. Aims: The aim of the study was to find out the neurocognitive functioning, namely memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition of normal aging population. Materials and Methods: Following purposive sampling technique, a total of 50 healthy subjects (30 males and 20 females in the age range of 60-70 years were recruited from Jaipur city of Rajasthan. Mini-mental state Examination, PGI memory scale, animal names test, and Stroop test were administered. Results: The findings reveal dysfunction in almost all the domains of memory, namely mental balance, attention and concentration, delayed recall, verbal retention for dissimilar pairs, visual retention and recognition, immediate recall, verbal retention for similar pairs, and visual retention. In domain of verbal fluency, all subjects gave low responses on the animal names test. In domain of response inhibition, all the subjects took less time in color test as compared to color word test on the Stroop task. Conclusions: Findings suggest that there are dysfunction in the area of memory, verbal fluency, and response inhibition in persons aged 60-70 years. However, recent and remote memory were found to be intact.

  12. Fluency profile: comparison between Brazilian and European Portuguese speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Blenda Stephanie Alves e; Martins-Reis, Vanessa de Oliveira; Baptista, Ana Catarina; Celeste, Letícia Correa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the speech fluency of Brazilian Portuguese speakers with that of European Portuguese speakers. The study participants were 76 individuals of any ethnicity or skin color aged 18-29 years. Of the participants, 38 lived in Brazil and 38 in Portugal. Speech samples from all participants were obtained and analyzed according to the variables of typology and frequency of speech disruptions and speech rate. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed to assess the association between the fluency profile and linguistic variant variables. We found that the speech rate of European Portuguese speakers was higher than the speech rate of Brazilian Portuguese speakers in words per minute (p=0.004). The qualitative distribution of the typology of common dysfluencies (pPortuguese speakers is not available, speech therapists in Portugal can use the same speech fluency assessment as has been used in Brazil to establish a diagnosis of stuttering, especially in regard to typical and stuttering dysfluencies, with care taken when evaluating the speech rate.

  13. Impairments of speech fluency in Lewy body spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Sharon; McMillan, Corey; Gross, Rachel G; Cook, Philip; Gunawardena, Delani; Morgan, Brianna; Boller, Ashley; Siderowf, Andrew; Grossman, Murray

    2012-03-01

    Few studies have examined connected speech in demented and non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed the speech production of 35 patients with Lewy body spectrum disorder (LBSD), including non-demented PD patients, patients with PD dementia (PDD), and patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), in a semi-structured narrative speech sample in order to characterize impairments of speech fluency and to determine the factors contributing to reduced speech fluency in these patients. Both demented and non-demented PD patients exhibited reduced speech fluency, characterized by reduced overall speech rate and long pauses between sentences. Reduced speech rate in LBSD correlated with measures of between-utterance pauses, executive functioning, and grammatical comprehension. Regression analyses related non-fluent speech, grammatical difficulty, and executive difficulty to atrophy in frontal brain regions. These findings indicate that multiple factors contribute to slowed speech in LBSD, and this is mediated in part by disease in frontal brain regions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Demo (Parent)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Durham, NC EnviroAtlas Area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  15. Self and Superior Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    model of the self-evaluation process as it differs from the evaluation process used by superiors. Symbolic Interactionism One view of self assessment is...supplied by the symbolic interactionists (Cooley, 1902; Head, 1934), who state that self perceptions are generated largely from individuals...disagreements remained even immediately after an appraisal interview in which a great deal of feedback was given. Research on the symbolic interactionist

  16. Examining the relationship between rapid automatized naming and arithmetic fluency in Chinese kindergarten children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaxin; Georgiou, George K; Zhang, Yiyun; Li, Yixun; Shu, Hua; Zhou, Xinlin

    2017-02-01

    Rapid automatized naming (RAN) has been found to predict mathematics. However, the nature of their relationship remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to examine how RAN (numeric and non-numeric) predicts a subdomain of mathematics (arithmetic fluency) and (b) to examine what processing skills may account for the RAN-arithmetic fluency relationship. A total of 160 third-year kindergarten Chinese children (83 boys and 77 girls, mean age=5.11years) were assessed on RAN (colors, objects, digits, and dice), nonverbal IQ, visual-verbal paired associate learning, phonological awareness, short-term memory, speed of processing, approximate number system acuity, and arithmetic fluency (addition and subtraction). The results indicated first that RAN was a significant correlate of arithmetic fluency and the correlations did not vary as a function of type of RAN or arithmetic fluency tasks. In addition, RAN continued to predict addition and subtraction fluency even after controlling for all other processing skills. Taken together, these findings challenge the existing theoretical accounts of the RAN-arithmetic fluency relationship and suggest that, similar to reading fluency, multiple processes underlie the RAN-arithmetic fluency relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Superior facet syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Igarashi, Seishi; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1985-01-01

    Sciatica caused by root entrapment in the lateral recess was named superior facet syndrome by Epstein in 1972. Few reports on this subject based on large numbers of cases have been documented to date. Of the patients with sciatica, 32 patients were diagnosed to have root entrapment at the lateral recess L 5 or/and S 1 lumbar spine. Out of 32 patients, 20 patients were operated on and the lateral entrapment was recognized in all of surgical cases. Neuroradiological findings, especially of metrizamide CT (met. CT), were documented in detail. Thirty two patients were classified in three types according to radiological findings. They were congenital or developmental, degenerative, and combined type, respectively, Fourteen cases belonged to the congenital type, 13 to the degenerative and 5 to the combined type. Each group had the mean ages of 23.4, 53.8, and 36.8 years old, respectively. Of 32 cases the entrapment occured in 47 L 5 roots and 11 S 1 roots. There was no remarkable laterality. In operation the unroofing of the lateral recess were done and the sciatica subsided postoperatively in all of surgical cases. Met. CT revealed extreme medial protrusion of the superior articular joint in 18 of 24 cases(75%) and none filling of the root in the lateral recess in 21 of 24 cases (87.5%). In the degenerative type, met. CT showed some degenerative changes that were hypertrophy or deformity of the articular joints and spur formation of the vertebral body. In contrast to met. CT, metrizamide myelography revealed only slight changes, which were poor filling of the root before it turned out the pedicle of lateral compression of the root. In plain films or lumbar spine articular joints at Lsub(4/5) were formed in coronal plane in 69% of cases of the L 5 root entrapment. Met. CT using ReView technique was of great diagnostic value in superior facet syndrome. (author)

  18. The Role of Reading Fluency in Children's Text Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Cañizo, Marta; Suárez-Coalla, Paz; Cuetos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Understanding a written text requires some higher cognitive abilities that not all children have. Some children have these abilities, since they understand oral texts; however, they have difficulties with written texts, probably due to problems in reading fluency. The aim of this study was to determine which aspects of reading fluency are related to reading comprehension. Four expositive texts, two written and two read by the evaluator, were presented to a sample of 103 primary school children (third and sixth grade). Each text was followed by four comprehension questions. From this sample we selected two groups of participants in each grade, 10 with good results in comprehension of oral and written texts, and 10 with good results in oral and poor in written comprehension. These 40 subjects were asked to read aloud a new text while they were recorded. Using Praat software some prosodic parameters were measured, such as pausing and reading rate (number and duration of the pauses and utterances), pitch and intensity changes and duration in declarative, exclamatory, and interrogative sentences and also errors and duration in words by frequency and stress. We compared the results of both groups with ANOVAs. The results showed that children with less reading comprehension made more inappropriate pauses and also intersentential pauses before comma than the other group and made more mistakes in content words; significant differences were also found in the final declination of pitch in declarative sentences and in the F0 range in interrogative ones. These results confirm that reading comprehension problems in children are related to a lack in the development of a good reading fluency.

  19. Predicting short-term stock fluctuations by using processing fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Adam L.; Oppenheimer, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    Three studies investigated the impact of the psychological principle of fluency (that people tend to prefer easily processed information) on short-term share price movements. In both a laboratory study and two analyses of naturalistic real-world stock market data, fluently named stocks robustly outperformed stocks with disfluent names in the short term. For example, in one study, an initial investment of $1,000 yielded a profit of $112 more after 1 day of trading for a basket of fluently named shares than for a basket of disfluently named shares. These results imply that simple, cognitive approaches to modeling human behavior sometimes outperform more typical, complex alternatives. PMID:16754871

  20. Fluency Effects on Brand Name Recognition and Preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erz, Antonia; Christensen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has not provided a clear understanding of processing fluency effects on memory. In a laboratory experiment with novel non-words, we found a recognition advantage of fluent non-words over moderately fluent and disfluent non-words. This advantage diminished when non-words were...... presented as novel brand names in different product contexts. We further tested a preference reversal in favor of disfluency and found that disfluent brand names (non-words) were equally disliked across different products contexts. A preference reversal could be observed when fluent names were preferred...

  1. From fluency to comprehension powerful instruction through authentic reading

    CERN Document Server

    Rasinski, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Helping teachers move beyond fluency as measured by speed alone, this book focuses on building the skills that students need to read accurately, meaningfully, and expressively--the essential components of reading comprehension. Each concise chapter presents a tried-and-true instructional or assessment strategy and shows how K-12 teachers can apply it in their own classrooms, using a wide variety of engaging texts. Special features include classroom examples, ""Your Turn"" activities, and 24 reproducible forms, in a large-size format for easy photocopying. Purchasers also get access to a

  2. Information Superiority through Data Warehousing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warner, Neil

    2001-01-01

    .... A precursor to a knowledge edge is Information Superiority. Within most current Command Support Systems minimal integration and fusion of data is undertaken to provide the basis of information superiority...

  3. Effects of a Mathematics Fluency Program on Mathematics Performance of Students with Challenging Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Todd; Hirn, Regina G.; Lingo, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of a fluency-building mathematics program called Great Leaps Math on fluency of basic addition mathematics facts zero to nine and word problem solving using a multiple probe design across participants. Three elementary students with challenging behaviors and mathematics difficulty participated in the…

  4. A Cross-Sectional Study of Fluency and Reading Comprehension in Spanish Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calet, Nuria; Gutiérrez-Palma, Nicolás; Defior, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The importance of prosodic elements is recognised in most definitions of fluency. Although speed and accuracy have been typically considered the constituents of reading fluency, prosody is emerging as an additional component. The relevance of prosody in comprehension is increasingly recognised in the latest studies. The purpose of this research is…

  5. Considering the Context and Texts for Fluency: Performance, Readers Theater, and Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chase; Nageldinger, James

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the importance of teaching reading fluency and all of its components, including automaticity and prosody. The authors explain how teachers can create a context for reading fluency instruction by engaging students in reading performance activities. To support the instructional contexts, the authors suggest particular…

  6. Voice and Fluency Changes as a Function of Speech Task and Deep Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana; Rogers, Tiffany; Godier, Violette; Tagliati, Michele; Sidtis, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Speaking, which naturally occurs in different modes or "tasks" such as conversation and repetition, relies on intact basal ganglia nuclei. Recent studies suggest that voice and fluency parameters are differentially affected by speech task. In this study, the authors examine the effects of subcortical functionality on voice and fluency,…

  7. So Long, Robot Reader! A Superhero Intervention Plan for Improving Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcell, Barclay; Ferraro, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an engaging means for turning disfluent readers into prosody superstars. Each week students align with Poetry Power Man and his superhero friends to battle the evil Robot Reader and his sidekicks. The Fluency Foursome helps students adhere to the multidimensional aspects of fluency where expression and comprehension are…

  8. Picture-Perfect Is Not Perfect for Metamemory: Testing the Perceptual Fluency Hypothesis with Degraded Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besken, Miri

    2016-01-01

    The perceptual fluency hypothesis claims that items that are easy to perceive at encoding induce an illusion that they will be easier to remember, despite the finding that perception does not generally affect recall. The current set of studies tested the predictions of the perceptual fluency hypothesis with a picture generation manipulation.…

  9. Phonological fluency strategy of switching differentiates relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinis, L; Kosmidis, M H; Vlahou, C; Malegiannaki, A C; Gatzounis, G; Dimisianos, N; Karra, A; Kiosseoglou, G; Gourzis, P; Papathanasopoulos, P

    2013-01-01

    The strategies used to perform a verbal fluency task appear to be reflective of cognitive abilities necessary for successful daily functioning. In the present study, we explored potential differences in verbal fluency strategies (switching and clustering) used to maximize word production by patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) versus patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). We further assessed impairment rates and potential differences in the sensitivity and specificity of phonological versus semantic verbal fluency tasks in discriminating between those with a diagnosis of MS and healthy adults. We found that the overall rate of impaired verbal fluency in our MS sample was consistent with that in other studies. However, we found no differences between types of MS (SPMS, RRMS), on semantic or phonological fluency word production, or the strategies used to maximize semantic fluency. In contrast, we found that the number of switches differed significantly in the phonological fluency task between the SPMS and RRMS subtypes. The clinical utility of semantic versus phonological fluency in discriminating MS patients from healthy controls did not indicate any significant differences. Further, the strategies used to maximize performance did not differentiate MS subgroups or MS patients from healthy controls.

  10. The Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning Activities in Enhancing EFL Learners' Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrayah, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    This research-paper aims at examining the effectiveness of cooperative learning activities in enhancing EFL learners' fluency. The researcher has used the descriptive approach, recorded interviews for testing fluency as tools of data collection and the software program SPSS as a tool for the statistical treatment of data. Research sample consists…

  11. When Does Modality Matter? Perceptual versus Conceptual Fluency-Based Illusions in Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeremy K.; Lloyd, Marianne E.; Westerman, Deanne L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that illusions of recognition memory based on enhanced perceptual fluency are sensitive to the perceptual match between the study and test phases of an experiment. The results of the current study strengthen that conclusion, as they show that participants will not interpret enhanced perceptual fluency as a sign of…

  12. Event-Related Potential (ERP) Evidence for Fluency-Based Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leynes, P. Andrew; Zish, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the influence of perceptual fluency on recognition memory. Words were studied using a shallow encoding task to decrease the contribution of recollection on recognition. Fluency was manipulated by blurring half of the test probes. Clarity varied randomly across trials in one experiment and was grouped into two blocks…

  13. Development of Speech Fluency over a Short Period of Time: Effects of Pedagogic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Parvaneh; Campbell, Colin; McCormack, Joan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of a short-term pedagogic intervention on development of second language (L2) fluency among learners studying English for academic purposes at a UK university. It also examines the interaction between development of fluency and complexity and accuracy. Through a pretest and posttest design, data were collected…

  14. Examining Oral Reading Fluency Trajectories Among English Language Learners and English Speaking Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane R. Jimerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Students’ oral reading fluency growth from first through fourth grade was used to predict their achievement on the Stanford Achievement Test (9th ed.; SAT-9 Reading using a latent growth model. Two conditional variables related to student status were used to determine the effects on reading performance - English language learners (ELLs with low socioeconomic status and low socioeconomic (SES status alone. Results revealed that both types of student status variables reliably predicted low performance on initial first grade oral reading fluency, which later predicted fourth grade performance on the SAT-9. However, the reading fluency trajectories of the ELLs and monolingual English students were not significantly different. In addition, when both student status variables and letter naming fluency were used to predict initial oral reading fluency, letter naming fluency dominated the prediction equation, suggesting that an initial pre-reading skill, letter naming fluency, better explained fourth grade performance on the SAT-9 than either ELL with low SES or low SES alone. The discussion focuses on how to better enable these readers and how oral reading fluency progress monitoring can be used to assist school personnel in determining which students need additional instructional assistance.

  15. Incorporating Vocabulary Instruction in Individual Reading Fluency Interventions with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lauren E.; Mercer, Sterett H.; Geres-Smith, Rhonda

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine whether incorporating vocabulary instruction in individual reading fluency interventions for English Language Learners (ELLs) would improve reading comprehension. Two vocabulary instructional procedures were contrasted with a fluency-building only condition in an alternating-treatments design…

  16. Linguistic and Cultural Factors Associated with Phonemic Fluency Performance in Bilingual Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Verbal fluency tasks are used extensively in clinical settings because of their sensitivity to a wide variety of disorders, including cognitive decline and dementia, and their usefulness in differential diagnoses. However, the effects of bilingualism on neuropsychological assessment, and verbal fluency in particular, are currently not completely…

  17. Using an Intelligent Tutor and Math Fluency Training to Improve Math Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Ivon; Royer, James M.; Woolf, Beverly P.

    2011-01-01

    This article integrates research in intelligent tutors with psychology studies of memory and math fluency (the speed to retrieve or calculate answers to basic math operations). It describes the impact of computer software designed to improve either strategic behavior or math fluency. Both competencies are key to improved performance and both…

  18. Reading Fluency Techniques from the Bottom-up: A Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ali Ostovar-Namaghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In many EFL contexts, including language education milieu in Iran, reading fluency is usually taken for granted since language education in public high schools mainly focuses on reading comprehension. Taking the detrimental effect of fluency deficiency into account, some practitioners foreground reading fluency and try to develop it early on. To give voice to their theories of practice, this qualitative study interviewed teachers who were willing to share their experience with the researchers. In line with grounded theory, the iterative process of data collection and analysis continued until the conceptualization of fluency development techniques was saturated. The techniques emerged are conducive to fluency development and as such the findings have clear implications for practitioners and policy makers nation-wide.

  19. Coping with stress in adults with speech fluency disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Pietraszek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Stuttering is a developmental speech disorder that affects the fluency of speech. Persons who stutter perceive speaking situations and social interactions as threatening. Participants and procedure Nineteen (47.50% adults with speech fluency disorders (SFD and 21 (52.50% without participated in the study. All participants completed the following measures individually: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS, and an informational survey. Results Our study confirmed that persons with SFD experience more stressful situations in life and feel greater anxiety, both as a trait and as a state, which influences their daily life. The negative affect experienced contributed to their preferred use of Emotion-Oriented Coping strategies, at the expense of more proactive Task-Oriented Coping. Experienced stress and anxiety influenced and consolidated their habitual stress coping styles, devoted mainly to dealing with negative emotions. Conclusions Stuttering affects daily activities, interpersonal relationships, and the quality of life. Therefore, professional support should include adaptive, task-oriented coping.

  20. Sobredentadura total superior implantosoportada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlando Rodríguez García

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de un paciente desdentado total superior, rehabilitado en la consulta de implantología de la Clínica "Pedro Ortiz" del municipio Habana del Este en Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba, en el año 2009, mediante prótesis sobre implantes osteointegrados, técnica que se ha incorporado a la práctica estomatológica en Cuba como alternativa al tratamiento convencional en los pacientes desdentados totales. Se siguió un protocolo que comprendió una fase quirúrgica, procedimiento con o sin realización de colgajo y carga precoz o inmediata. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 56 años de edad, que acudió a la consulta multidisciplinaria, preocupado, porque se le habían elaborado tres prótesis en los últimos dos años y ninguna reunía los requisitos de retención que él necesitaba para sentirse seguro y cómodo con las mismas. El resultado final fue la satisfacción total del paciente, con el mejoramiento de la calidad estética y funcional.

  1. ORF Sequence: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002695 gi|15830145 >gi|15830145|ref|NP_308918.1| putative transmembrane subunit...IFVPIGALQAGEALWHWSVIPLGLAVAILSTALPYSLEMIALTRLPTRTFGTLMSMEPALAAVSGMIFLGETLTPIQLLALGAIIAASMGSTLTVRKESKIKELDIN

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23464690 >gi|23464690|ref|NP_695293.1| hypothetical transmembrane pro...LVQLCAMGFIIGYVIRSNNVWMVFSLMAVMLVAAVQIVMSRARGIPKGLAGPIFLSLVITMLLMLALVTELIVRPHPWYAPQLVVPLTGMLLGNTVSALAVGLSRFYESME

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32471017 >gi|32471017|ref|NP_864010.1| hypothetical protein-transmemb...HALISRLRIWGRETLTEMPSWLVSMVVHLTLLLVLALIGRSTSKVGQIELLFRQSSESSSMELAEFTIAAAAPLESFERSMEEERIATTQLVSIDVIDAEAEMFSLVP

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_002942 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002942 gi|52840424 >gi|52840424|ref|YP_094223.1| probable transmembrane protein...EYKRAQKQTFVMFFKGSLKGLVTTAPVTYRGVKIGEVKVIEITENKEHSKVLIPVYVQFFVERTYGFSQDPIHLLIDNGYVANITKPNLLTGVAEIELIKPTPAVKYKQTYYHSYPVFPTHNSAEKYTSME

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32476407 >gi|32476407|ref|NP_869401.1| hypothetical protein-transmemb...IYPDDRPGWIDQPIVNDGKDYSLVVTAGPSGSMEEADELIGVYARGAVQSYVDELVSEQEWATEPEMIPLDIDWIRDELVVRRYEGVVQVGDEQQFEKAILIRIEPEDKKVFETAIADMKLKERLAATGIVILGGFSLLVGGSIVLGGLASRQKQPTAAA

  6. Transcranial direct current stimulation over left inferior frontal cortex improves speech fluency in adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesters, Jennifer; Möttönen, Riikka; Watkins, Kate E

    2018-04-01

    See Crinion (doi:10.1093/brain/awy075) for a scientific commentary on this article.Stuttering is a neurodevelopmental condition affecting 5% of children, and persisting in 1% of adults. Promoting lasting fluency improvement in adults who stutter is a particular challenge. Novel interventions to improve outcomes are of value, therefore. Previous work in patients with acquired motor and language disorders reported enhanced benefits of behavioural therapies when paired with transcranial direct current stimulation. Here, we report the results of the first trial investigating whether transcranial direct current stimulation can improve speech fluency in adults who stutter. We predicted that applying anodal stimulation to the left inferior frontal cortex during speech production with temporary fluency inducers would result in longer-lasting fluency improvements. Thirty male adults who stutter completed a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over left inferior frontal cortex. Fifteen participants received 20 min of 1-mA stimulation on five consecutive days while speech fluency was temporarily induced using choral and metronome-timed speech. The other 15 participants received the same speech fluency intervention with sham stimulation. Speech fluency during reading and conversation was assessed at baseline, before and after the stimulation on each day of the 5-day intervention, and at 1 and 6 weeks after the end of the intervention. Anodal stimulation combined with speech fluency training significantly reduced the percentage of disfluent speech measured 1 week after the intervention compared with fluency intervention alone. At 6 weeks after the intervention, this improvement was maintained during reading but not during conversation. Outcome scores at both post-intervention time points on a clinical assessment tool (the Stuttering Severity Instrument, version 4) also showed significant improvement in the group receiving

  7. 78 FR 24071 - Safety Zone; Pasquotank River; Elizabeth City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Pasquotank River; Elizabeth City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary... Pasquotank River in Elizabeth City, NC in support of the Fireworks display for the Potato Festival. This... Guard is establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Pasquotank River in Elizabeth City, NC...

  8. 78 FR 72009 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ...-0440; Airspace Docket No. 13-ASO-10] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC AGENCY: Federal... at Star, NC, to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Star, NC (78 FR 54413...

  9. Effect of aging, education, reading and writing, semantic processing and depression symptoms on verbal fluency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Moraes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Verbal fluency tasks are widely used in (clinical neuropsychology to evaluate components of executive functioning and lexical-semantic processing (linguistic and semantic memory. Performance in those tasks may be affected by several variables, such as age, education and diseases. This study investigated whether aging, education, reading and writing frequency, performance in semantic judgment tasks and depression symptoms predict the performance in unconstrained, phonemic and semantic fluency tasks. This study sample comprised 260 healthy adults aged 19 to 75 years old. The Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression models were used for data analysis. The variables under analysis were associated in different ways and had different levels of contribution according to the type of verbal fluency task. Education had the greatest effect on verbal fluency tasks. There was a greater effect of age on semantic fluency than on phonemic tasks. The semantic judgment tasks predicted the verbal fluency performance alone or in combination with other variables. These findings corroborate the importance of education in cognition supporting the hypothesis of a cognitive reserve and confirming the contribution of lexical-semantic processing to verbal fluency.

  10. The appropriacy of fluency tests in assessing epileptic seizure lateralization in children with partial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Jasmina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluency tests are frequently used in clinical practice to asses executive functions. The literature data are not unequivocal although in a great number of papers is pointed out the importance of the left hemisphere, specially of the left frontal lobes in the mediation of phonological fluency and the right hemisphere in the mediation of nonverbal fluency. This paper considers the suitability of fluency tests for the detection of left versus right seizure laterality. The sample consisted of thirty-two epilepsy patients divided into two groups: LHF-participants with the seizure focus in the left hemisphere (n=16, and DHF-participants with the seizure focus in the right hemisphere (n=16, and K-the control group of t age-matched healthy children (n=50 aged 7-11 years. The qualitative and quantitative comparison of the phonological and nonverbal fluency performance was carried out in consideration of the seizure laterality as well as compared to the healthy controls. The results of phonological fluency performance revealed that the performance of the LHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both DHF and K group. The analysis of nonverbal fluency performance revealed that the performance of the DHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both LHF and K group The qualitative analysis obtained valuable data, which could additionally contribute to the neuropsychological evaluation of the left versus right seizure laterality.

  11. Apathy and Reduced Speed of Processing Underlie Decline in Verbal Fluency following DBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Limousin, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Reduced verbal fluency is a strikingly uniform finding following deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD). The precise cognitive mechanism underlying this reduction remains unclear, but theories have suggested reduced motivation, linguistic skill, and/or executive function. It is of note, however, that previous reports have failed to consider the potential role of any changes in speed of processing. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine verbal fluency changes with a particular focus on the role of cognitive speed. Method. In this study, 28 patients with PD completed measures of verbal fluency, motivation, language, executive functioning, and speed of processing, before and after DBS. Results. As expected, there was a marked decline in verbal fluency but also in a timed test of executive functions and two measures of speed of processing. Verbal fluency decline was associated with markers of linguistic and executive functioning, but not after speed of processing was statistically controlled for. In contrast, greater decline in verbal fluency was associated with higher levels of apathy at baseline, which was not associated with changes in cognitive speed. Discussion. Reduced generativity and processing speed may account for the marked reduction in verbal fluency commonly observed following DBS. PMID:28408788

  12. Apathy and Reduced Speed of Processing Underlie Decline in Verbal Fluency following DBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Foley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Reduced verbal fluency is a strikingly uniform finding following deep brain stimulation (DBS for Parkinson’s disease (PD. The precise cognitive mechanism underlying this reduction remains unclear, but theories have suggested reduced motivation, linguistic skill, and/or executive function. It is of note, however, that previous reports have failed to consider the potential role of any changes in speed of processing. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine verbal fluency changes with a particular focus on the role of cognitive speed. Method. In this study, 28 patients with PD completed measures of verbal fluency, motivation, language, executive functioning, and speed of processing, before and after DBS. Results. As expected, there was a marked decline in verbal fluency but also in a timed test of executive functions and two measures of speed of processing. Verbal fluency decline was associated with markers of linguistic and executive functioning, but not after speed of processing was statistically controlled for. In contrast, greater decline in verbal fluency was associated with higher levels of apathy at baseline, which was not associated with changes in cognitive speed. Discussion. Reduced generativity and processing speed may account for the marked reduction in verbal fluency commonly observed following DBS.

  13. Update on Didactic and Clinical Education in Fluency Disorders: 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Yaruss, J; Lee, Jieun; Kikani, Kaya B; Leslie, Paula; Herring, Caryn; Ramachandar, Sujini; Tichenor, Seth; Quesal, Robert W; McNeil, Malcolm R

    2017-02-01

    This study surveyed didactic and clinical education in fluency disorders at undergraduate and graduate institutions in the United States that provide education in speech-language pathology to determine whether a previously observed reduction in requirements has continued since prior surveys (Yaruss, 1999; Yaruss & Quesal, 2002). The study involved a detailed questionnaire that was sent to 282 communication science and disorders departments. Questions examined didactic and clinical education, as well as faculty knowledge about fluency disorders. Comparisons with prior surveys revealed several findings, including (a) on average, programs have increased academic coursework and incorporated more practical sessions and competency-based testing in the classroom; (b) the number of faculty who possess extensive clinical experience with fluency disorders has decreased; and (c) although an increase in clinical requirements in fluency disorders was detected, the number of programs providing minimal education about fluency disorders remains high. Given an expanding scope of practice, many programs have continued to try to provide adequate education about fluency disorders. Still, direct clinical experiences are limited, and faculty expertise in this area has continued to decrease. To raise students' confidence and competence in fluency disorders, efforts beyond graduate work-or systemic changes in the profession-may be necessary.

  14. Apathy and Reduced Speed of Processing Underlie Decline in Verbal Fluency following DBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jennifer A; Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hyam, Jonathan A; Limousin, Patricia; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Objective . Reduced verbal fluency is a strikingly uniform finding following deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD). The precise cognitive mechanism underlying this reduction remains unclear, but theories have suggested reduced motivation, linguistic skill, and/or executive function. It is of note, however, that previous reports have failed to consider the potential role of any changes in speed of processing. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine verbal fluency changes with a particular focus on the role of cognitive speed. Method . In this study, 28 patients with PD completed measures of verbal fluency, motivation, language, executive functioning, and speed of processing, before and after DBS. Results . As expected, there was a marked decline in verbal fluency but also in a timed test of executive functions and two measures of speed of processing. Verbal fluency decline was associated with markers of linguistic and executive functioning, but not after speed of processing was statistically controlled for. In contrast, greater decline in verbal fluency was associated with higher levels of apathy at baseline, which was not associated with changes in cognitive speed. Discussion . Reduced generativity and processing speed may account for the marked reduction in verbal fluency commonly observed following DBS.

  15. Google and the mind: predicting fluency with PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Thomas L; Steyvers, Mark; Firl, Alana

    2007-12-01

    Human memory and Internet search engines face a shared computational problem, needing to retrieve stored pieces of information in response to a query. We explored whether they employ similar solutions, testing whether we could predict human performance on a fluency task using PageRank, a component of the Google search engine. In this task, people were shown a letter of the alphabet and asked to name the first word beginning with that letter that came to mind. We show that PageRank, computed on a semantic network constructed from word-association data, outperformed word frequency and the number of words for which a word is named as an associate as a predictor of the words that people produced in this task. We identify two simple process models that could support this apparent correspondence between human memory and Internet search, and relate our results to previous rational models of memory.

  16. Verbal and Non-verbal Fluency in Adults with Developmental Dyslexia: Phonological Processing or Executive Control Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Spark, James H; Henry, Lucy A; Messer, David J; Zięcik, Adam P

    2017-08-01

    The executive function of fluency describes the ability to generate items according to specific rules. Production of words beginning with a certain letter (phonemic fluency) is impaired in dyslexia, while generation of words belonging to a certain semantic category (semantic fluency) is typically unimpaired. However, in dyslexia, verbal fluency has generally been studied only in terms of overall words produced. Furthermore, performance of adults with dyslexia on non-verbal design fluency tasks has not been explored but would indicate whether deficits could be explained by executive control, rather than phonological processing, difficulties. Phonemic, semantic and design fluency tasks were presented to adults with dyslexia and without dyslexia, using fine-grained performance measures and controlling for IQ. Hierarchical regressions indicated that dyslexia predicted lower phonemic fluency, but not semantic or design fluency. At the fine-grained level, dyslexia predicted a smaller number of switches between subcategories on phonemic fluency, while dyslexia did not predict the size of phonemically related clusters of items. Overall, the results suggested that phonological processing problems were at the root of dyslexia-related fluency deficits; however, executive control difficulties could not be completely ruled out as an alternative explanation. Developments in research methodology, equating executive demands across fluency tasks, may resolve this issue. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A Cognitive Assessment of Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePort, Aurora K.R.; Stark, Shauna M.; McGaugh, James L.; Stark, Craig E.L.

    2017-01-01

    Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory (HSAM) is characterized as the ability to accurately recall an exceptional number of experiences and their associated dates from events occurring throughout much of one’s lifetime. The source of this ability has only begun to be explored. The present study explores whether other enhanced cognitive processes may be critical influences underlying HSAM abilities. We investigated whether enhanced abilities in the domains of verbal fluency, attention/inhibition, executive functioning, mnemonic discrimination, perception, visual working memory, or the processing of and memory for emotional details might contribute critically to HSAM. The results suggest that superior cognitive functioning is an unlikely basis of HSAM, as only modest advantages were found in only a few tests. In addition, we examined HSAM subjects’ memory of the testing episodes. Interestingly, HSAM participants recalled details of their own experiences far better than those experiences that the experimenter shared with them. These findings provide additional evidence that HSAM involves, relatively selectively, recollection of personal, autobiographical material. PMID:26982996

  18. Virtual NC machine model with integrated knowledge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, Sofija; Dukovski, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The concept of virtual NC machining was established for providing a virtual product that could be compared with an appropriate designed product, in order to make NC program correctness evaluation, without real experiments. This concept is applied in the intelligent CAD/CAM system named VIRTUAL MANUFACTURE. This paper presents the first intelligent module that enables creation of the virtual models of existed NC machines and virtual creation of new ones, applying modular composition. Creation of a virtual NC machine is carried out via automatic knowledge data saving (features of the created NC machine). (Author)

  19. NC10 bacteria in marine oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padilla, Cory C; Bristow, Laura A; Sarode, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the NC10 phylum link anaerobic methane oxidation to nitrite denitrification through a unique O2-producing intra-aerobic methanotrophy pathway. A niche for NC10 in the pelagic ocean has not been confirmed. We show that NC10 bacteria are present and transcriptionally active in oceanic....... rRNA and mRNA transcripts assignable to NC10 peaked within the OMZ and included genes of the putative nitrite-dependent intra-aerobic pathway, with high representation of transcripts containing the unique motif structure of the nitric oxide (NO) reductase of NC10 bacteria, hypothesized...

  20. Emotion Decoding and Incidental Processing Fluency as Antecedents of Attitude Certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrocelli, John V; Whitmire, Melanie B

    2017-07-01

    Previous research demonstrates that attitude certainty influences the degree to which an attitude changes in response to persuasive appeals. In the current research, decoding emotions from facial expressions and incidental processing fluency, during attitude formation, are examined as antecedents of both attitude certainty and attitude change. In Experiment 1, participants who decoded anger or happiness during attitude formation expressed their greater attitude certainty, and showed more resistance to persuasion than participants who decoded sadness. By manipulating the emotion decoded, the diagnosticity of processing fluency experienced during emotion decoding, and the gaze direction of the social targets, Experiment 2 suggests that the link between emotion decoding and attitude certainty results from incidental processing fluency. Experiment 3 demonstrated that fluency in processing irrelevant stimuli influences attitude certainty, which in turn influences resistance to persuasion. Implications for appraisal-based accounts of attitude formation and attitude change are discussed.

  1. Phonological Fluency Strategy of Switching Differentiates Relapsing-Remitting and Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Messinis, L.; Kosmidis, M. H.; Vlahou, C.; Malegiannaki, A. C.; Gatzounis, G.; Dimisianos, N.; Karra, A.; Kiosseoglou, G.; Gourzis, P.; Papathanasopoulos, P.

    2013-01-01

    The strategies used to perform a verbal fluency task appear to be reflective of cognitive abilities necessary for successful daily functioning. In the present study, we explored potential differences in verbal fluency strategies (switching and clustering) used to maximize word production by patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) versus patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). We further assessed impairment rates and potential differences in the sensi...

  2. Spanish normative studies in young adults (NEURONORMA young adults project): norms for verbal fluency tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals-Coll, M; Sánchez-Benavides, G; Quintana, M; Manero, R M; Rognoni, T; Calvo, L; Palomo, R; Aranciva, F; Tamayo, F; Peña-Casanova, J

    2013-01-01

    Lexical fluency tests are frequently used in clinical practice to assess language and executive function. As part of the Spanish normative studies project in young adults (NEURONORMA young adults project), we provide age- and education-adjusted normative data for 3 semantic fluency tasks (animals, fruits and vegetables, and kitchen tools), three formal lexical fluency tasks (words beginning with P, M and R), three excluded-letter fluency tasks (words excluding A, E and S) and a verb fluency task. The sample consisted of 179 participants who are cognitively normal and range in age from 18 to 49 years. Tables are provided to convert raw scores to scaled scores. Age- and education-adjusted scores are provided by applying linear regression techniques. The results show that education impacted most of the verbal fluency test scores, with no effects related to age and only minimal effects related to sex. The norms obtained will be extremely useful in the clinical evaluation of young Spanish adults. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-leptonic kaon decays at large Nc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Andrea; Hernández, Pilar; Pena, Carlos; Romero-López, Fernando

    2018-03-01

    We study the scaling with the number of colors Nc of the weak amplitudes mediating kaon mixing and decay, in the limit of light charm masses (mu = md = ms = mc). The amplitudes are extracted directly on the lattice for Nc = 3 - 7 (with preliminar results for Nc = 8 and 17) using twisted mass QCD. It is shown that the (sub-leading) 1 /Nc corrections to B\\hatk are small and that the naive Nc → ∞ limit, B\\hatk = 3/4, seems to be recovered. On the other hand, the O (1/Nc) corrections in K → ππ amplitudes (derived from K → π matrix elements) are large and fully anti-correlated in the I = 0 and I = 2 channels. This may have some implications for the understanding of the ΔI = 1/2 rule.

  4. Semantic verbal fluency in elderly Mexican adults: Reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Oliveros, M; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Y; Acosta-Castillo, I; García-Ramírez, N; Rojas de la Torre, G; Sosa-Ortiz, A L

    2015-05-01

    The semantic verbal fluency test (SVF) is sensitive to detecting cognitive decline. It is fast and easy to use in any cultural context; therefore, it is included in most of the neuropsychological assessment protocols. To estimate normative values for the SVF test (animals), in an elderly population aged 65 years and over. 1233 subjects who were healthy, cognitively preserved, residents of two areas (rural and urban) of Mexico were assessed. A neurological and neuropsychological exploration battery was applied, including SVF. The age average was 73+6 and schooling was 4.0+3.9 years, with 59% women. The average of the words generated in the SVF test was 14+5, and a correlation of 0.16 of these scores with age, education, and gender was found (pimportant contribution provided by this study was that the data analysis enabled normative values to be obtained for an elderly Mexican population aged 65 years and over. It was also confirmed, as other neuropsychological assessment studies have done, that the SVF test is influenced by socio-demographic variables, such as age and education, aspects to be considered at the time of obtaining normative values. Finally, it was noted that the average scores obtained were lower than other published reference values, due to the low educational level of our sample. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing reading fluency in Kenya: Oral or silent assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Benjamin; Zuilkowski, Stephanie Simmons

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the Education for All movement has focused more intensely on the quality of education, rather than simply provision. Many recent and current education quality interventions focus on literacy, which is the core skill required for further academic success. Despite this focus on the quality of literacy instruction in developing countries, little rigorous research has been conducted on critical issues of assessment. This analysis, which uses data from the Primary Math and Reading Initiative (PRIMR) in Kenya, aims to begin filling this gap by addressing a key assessment issue - should literacy assessments in Kenya be administered orally or silently? The authors compared second-grade students' scores on oral and silent reading tasks of the Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) in Kiswahili and English, and found no statistically significant differences in either language. They did, however, find oral reading rates to be more strongly related to reading comprehension scores. Oral assessment has another benefit for programme evaluators - it allows for the collection of data on student errors, and therefore the calculation of words read correctly per minute, as opposed to simply words read per minute. The authors therefore recommend that, in Kenya and in similar contexts, student reading fluency be assessed via oral rather than silent assessment.

  6. Speech rate and fluency in children with phonological disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Priscila Maronezi; Nicolielo-Carrilho, Ana Paola; Lopes-Herrera, Simone Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    To identify and describe the speech rate and fluency of children with phonological disorder (PD) with and without speech-language therapy. Thirty children, aged 5-8 years old, both genders, were divided into three groups: experimental group 1 (G1) — 10 children with PD in intervention; experimental group 2 (G2) — 10 children with PD without intervention; and control group (CG) — 10 children with typical development. Speech samples were collected and analyzed according to parameters of specific protocol. The children in CG had higher number of words per minute compared to those in G1, which, in turn, performed better in this aspect compared to children in G2. Regarding the number of syllables per minute, the CG showed the best result. In this aspect, the children in G1 showed better results than those in G2. Comparing children's performance in the assessed groups regarding the tests, those with PD in intervention had higher time of speech sample and adequate speech rate, which may be indicative of greater auditory monitoring of their own speech as a result of the intervention.

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_003909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003909 gi|42782207 >gi|42782207|ref|NP_979454.1| BclA protein [Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987] MANRLNFTGP...LGCCGISGKTGPTGPTGPTGVTGSTGPTGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGPTGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGP...TGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGFTGPTGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGPTGATGSTGP

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42523756 >gi|42523756|ref|NP_969136.1| membrane protein necessary for nodulation/competitivene...ss [Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100] MKSLMLILFVSLLSVVAKADCTTAITINEAISASTSDYLERAEKR

  9. ORF Sequence: NC_003078 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etitiveness [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MQLSACARRREAVRYRRRMARILILLFSLLSAFAFPVTPVP... NC_003078 gi|16264863 >gi|16264863|ref|NP_437655.1| probable membrane protein necessary for nodulation comp

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13471138 >gi|13471138|ref|NP_102707.1| transcriptional regulatory protein, nodulation competit...iveness determinant [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] MTNESDTRSAELAELTADIVSAYVSNNPLPV

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39933242 >gi|39933242|ref|NP_945518.1| possible nicotinate-nucleotide adn...WWLVSPGNPLKDISSLREIDARVAAAQAIADDPRIQVSRLEAVIGTRYTADTLRYLRRHCPGARFVWIMGADNLAQFHRWQQWQQIAAEIPIAVIDRPPTSFRALAAPAAQRLMRMRIPNNKAATLADREPPAWVYLTGLKSLVSSTALRNPDGSWKT

  12. ORF Sequence: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15964332 >gi|15964332|ref|NP_384685.1| PROBABLE PYRAZINAMIDASE/NICOTINAMIDAS...E (INCLUDES: PYRAZINAMIDASE, NICOTINAMIDASE) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MADAARPDLREAMADEAL

  13. ORF Sequence: NC_006155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein (involved in environmental [Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP 32953] MTKTDYLMRLRKCTTIDTLERVIEKNKYELSDDELELFYSAADHRLAELTMNKLYDKIPPTVWQHVK ... NC_006155 gi|51595328 >gi|51595328|ref|YP_069519.1| hemolysin expression modulatin

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_003279 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003279 gi|17507795 >gi|17507795|ref|NP_493043.1| putative protein, with at least 2 transme...YLNIQIADETTDLPVSIDRANVDMRIYRAFEMSMEKDIISLSTSNTSHAEISTPKSRKKKSRKLGLKNLEEVINSKYNSCQKQDNSMSIQ

  15. ORF Sequence: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32475512 >gi|32475512|ref|NP_868506.1| hypothetical protein-signal peptide and transme...VLVGLLLPAVQAAREAARRMSCSNNIAQLTLATHNYEFSMEHLPPGTTNPTGPIVNTPNGEHISFLVRLLPYIEQQGTADDFDLTASVYAPANAKVRAYQISAFLCPS

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|18407972 >gi|18407972|ref|NP_564823.1| no apical meristem (NAM) famil...y protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] MQAEEIICRVSDEEIIENYLRPKINGETSSIPRYVVELAEELYTVEPWLLPRQTAPILNPGEWFYFGKRNRKYSN

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|17533935 >gi|17533935|ref|NP_496777.1| ZYXin (zyx-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MNQIFHVDC...FAPRCALCSKPIVPQDGEKESVRVVAMDKSFHVDCYKCEDCGMQLSSKLEGQGCYPIDNHLLCKTCNGNRLRVVSST

  18. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358092 >gi|13358092|ref|NP_078366.1| cytosine-specific methyltransferase [Ureap...RILFDLQKLNQLPQFLLLENVNNMLSKQHKLDYDMWTKSLKQLGYSTCTFQLNALDYGSAQRRKRVYAISILNYDGLIDSNGNILDLEAPIFDGKQKQLKDVLKTNYK

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358063 >gi|13358063|ref|NP_078337.1| hypothetical protein UU500 [Ureap...MGNHTWDHPDIFEILTTKTNIIRPYNIINTHQYHLVGSGSRVFYCNKKMIRVTNLLGNSIDMKGLQTNPFESLDKIIAFNEAPIHIVDFHAETTSEKNALFLDFKSKL

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13358146 >gi|13358146|ref|NP_078420.1| transcription antitermination factor [Ureap...lasma parvum serovar 3 str. ATCC 700970] MAYKIKDLDSKLLSDLKIDFNHRHQWYIVTVVSGNEQKVIENIKDKLNGYGYGDKLSDLKIIKEKIKEVKIYEPSEAP

  1. The effect of topic selection on writing fluency among Japanese high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lin Lubold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Written fluency and fluency building activities have been shown to promote linguistic choice and student voice development, increased ability to express ideas using complex grammatical structures and greater intrinsic motivation in English language learners. Since the 1970’s, process-oriented writing has been emphasized, yielding an amplified focus on meaning of student content over linguistic form precision. Current research of writing fluency must delve deeper into questions of student ownership of topic and the outcomes for low-risk activities that support fluency practice and encourage confidence building in students. The purpose of this replication study is to further explore previous findings on the effects of topic selection on writing fluency for high school English as foreign language learners. Building off of the work of Bonzo (2008, this study focused on a timed, non-graded writing activity administered to groups of Japanese engineering students in three departments: mechanical, electrical, and global engineering. The six subsequent samples for each participating student were analyzed using online text-analysis for total and unique word counts, providing data used to perform a t-test. Responses to bi-lingual student questionnaires, with prompts on self-perceived written English ability, self-efficacy and strategies for success while writing, provided additional insight into the facets of fluency. The results of these writing sessions offer both confirmation of and contrast to Bonzo’s original work, demonstrate increased student meaning making, and support the use of free writing activities in English language classrooms as a means by which student written fluency may be improved.

  2. Text-fading based training leads to transfer effects on children’s sentence reading fluency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telse eNagler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies used a text-fading procedure as a training tool with the goal to increase silent reading fluency (i.e., proficient reading rate and comprehension. In recently published studies, this procedure resulted in lasting reading enhancements for adult and adolescent research samples. However, studies working with children reported mixed results. While reading rate improvements were observable for Dutch reading children in a text-fading training study, reading fluency improvements in standardized reading tests post-training attributable to the fading manipulation were not detectable. These results raise the question of whether text-fading training is not effective for children or whether research design issues have concealed possible transfer effects. Hence, the present study sought to investigate possible transfer effects resulting from a text-fading based reading training program, using a modified research design. Over a period of three weeks, two groups of German third-graders read sentences either with an adaptive text-fading procedure or at their self-paced reading rate. A standardized test measuring reading fluency at the word, sentence, and text level was conducted pre- and post-training. Text level reading fluency improved for both groups equally. Post-training gains at the word level were found for the text-fading group, however, no significant interaction between groups was revealed for word reading fluency. Sentence level reading fluency gains were found for the text-fading group, which significantly differed from the group of children reading at their self-paced reading routine. These findings provide evidence for the efficacy of text-fading as a training method for sentence reading fluency improvement also for children.

  3. Parallel effects of processing fluency and positive affect on familiarity-based recognition decisions for faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin eDuke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available According to attribution models of familiarity assessment, people can use a heuristic in recognition-memory decisions, in which they attribute the subjective ease of processing of a memory probe to a prior encounter with the stimulus in question. Research in social cognition suggests that experienced positive affect may be the proximal cue that signals fluency in various experimental contexts. In the present study, we compared the effects of positive affect and fluency on recognition-memory judgments for faces with neutral emotional expression. We predicted that if positive affect is indeed the critical cue that signals processing fluency at retrieval, then its manipulation should produce effects that closely mirror those produced by manipulations of processing fluency. In two experiments, we employed a masked-priming procedure in combination with a Remember-Know paradigm that aimed to separate familiarity- from recollection-based memory decisions. In addition, participants performed a prime-discrimination task that allowed us to take inter-individual differences in prime awareness into account. We found highly similar effects of our priming manipulations of processing fluency and of positive affect. In both cases, the critical effect was specific to familiarity-based recognition responses. Moreover, in both experiments it was reflected in a shift towards a more liberal response bias, rather than in changed discrimination. Finally, in both experiments, the effect was found to be related to prime awareness; it was present only in participants who reported a lack of such awareness on the prime-discrimination task. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that points not only to a role of fluency, but also of positive affect in familiarity assessment. As such they are consistent with the idea that fluency itself may be hedonically marked.

  4. Parallel effects of processing fluency and positive affect on familiarity-based recognition decisions for faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Devin; Fiacconi, Chris M; Köhler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    According to attribution models of familiarity assessment, people can use a heuristic in recognition-memory decisions, in which they attribute the subjective ease of processing of a memory probe to a prior encounter with the stimulus in question. Research in social cognition suggests that experienced positive affect may be the proximal cue that signals fluency in various experimental contexts. In the present study, we compared the effects of positive affect and fluency on recognition-memory judgments for faces with neutral emotional expression. We predicted that if positive affect is indeed the critical cue that signals processing fluency at retrieval, then its manipulation should produce effects that closely mirror those produced by manipulations of processing fluency. In two experiments, we employed a masked-priming procedure in combination with a Remember-Know (RK) paradigm that aimed to separate familiarity- from recollection-based memory decisions. In addition, participants performed a prime-discrimination task that allowed us to take inter-individual differences in prime awareness into account. We found highly similar effects of our priming manipulations of processing fluency and of positive affect. In both cases, the critical effect was specific to familiarity-based recognition responses. Moreover, in both experiments it was reflected in a shift toward a more liberal response bias, rather than in changed discrimination. Finally, in both experiments, the effect was found to be related to prime awareness; it was present only in participants who reported a lack of such awareness on the prime-discrimination task. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that points not only to a role of fluency, but also of positive affect in familiarity assessment. As such they are consistent with the idea that fluency itself may be hedonically marked.

  5. Semantic Verbal Fluency test in dementia: Preliminary retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Lopes

    Full Text Available Abstract The Semantic Verbal Fluency (SVF test entails the generation of words from a given category within a pre-set time of 60 seconds. Objectives: To verify whether socio-demographic and clinical data of individuals with dementia correlate with the performance on the SVF test and to ascertain whether differences among the criteria of number of answers, clusters and data spread over the intervals, predict clinical results. Methods: This was a retrospective study of 49 charts of demented patients classified according to the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR scale. We correlated education, age and gender, as well as CDR and Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE scores with the number of answers, clustering and switching distributed over four 15-second intervals on the SVF test. Results: The correlation between number of answers and quartiles was weak (r=0.407, p=0.004; r=0.484, p<0.001 but correlation between the number of clusters and responses was strong (r=0.883, p<0.001. The number of items on the SVF was statistically significant with MMSE score (p=0.01 and there was a tendency for significance on the CDR (p=0.06. The results indicated little activity regarding what we propose to call cluster recalling in the two groups. Discussion: The SVF test, using number of items generated, was found to be more effective than classic screening tests in terms of speed and ease of application in patients with CDR 2 and 3.

  6. Shall we use non-verbal fluency in schizophrenia? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Romina; Trappeniers, Julie; Lefebvre, Laurent

    2014-05-30

    Over the last few years, numerous studies have attempted to explain fluency impairments in people with schizophrenia, leading to heterogeneous results. This could notably be due to the fact that fluency is often used in its verbal form where semantic dimensions are implied. In order to gain an in-depth understanding of fluency deficits, a non-verbal fluency task - the Five-Point Test (5PT) - was proposed to 24 patients with schizophrenia and to 24 healthy subjects categorized in terms of age, gender and schooling. The 5PT involves producing as many abstract figures as possible within 1min by connecting points with straight lines. All subjects also completed the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) while those with schizophrenia were further assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results show that the 5PT evaluation differentiates patients from healthy subjects with regard to the number of figures produced. Patients׳ results also suggest that the number of figures produced is linked to the "overall executive functioning" and to some inhibition components. Although this study is a first step in the non-verbal efficiency research field, we believe that experimental psychopathology could benefit from the investigations on non-verbal fluency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emotional verbal fluency: a new task on emotion and executive function interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Katharina; Fetz, Karolina; Oetken, Sarah; Habel, Ute; Heim, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The present study introduces "Emotional Verbal Fluency" as a novel (partially computerized) task, which is aimed to investigate the interaction between emotionally loaded words and executive functions. Verbal fluency tasks are thought to measure executive functions but the interaction with emotional aspects is hardly investigated. In the current study, a group of healthy subjects (n = 21, mean age 25 years, 76% females) were asked to generate items that are either part of a semantic category (e.g., plants, toys, vehicles; standard semantic verbal fluency) or can trigger the emotions joy, anger, sadness, fear and disgust. The results of the task revealed no differences between performance on semantic and emotional categories, suggesting a comparable task difficulty for healthy subjects. Hence, these first results on the comparison between semantic and emotional verbal fluency seem to highlight that both might be suitable for examining executive functioning. However, an interaction was found between the category type and repetition (first vs. second sequence of the same category) with larger performance decrease for semantic in comparison to emotional categories. Best performance overall was found for the emotional category "joy" suggesting a positivity bias in healthy subjects. To conclude, emotional verbal fluency is a promising approach to investigate emotional components in an executive task, which may stimulate further research, especially in psychiatric patients who suffer from emotional as well as cognitive deficits.

  8. Alternative Text Types to Improve Reading Fluency for Competent to Struggling Readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy V. Rasinski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article offers instructional suggestions and strategies based on research and theoretical literature for developing reading fluency through the use of rhyming poetry and other texts beyond the narrative and informational texts that have been traditionally used for reading instruction. Readers’ lack of fluency in reading can be a monumental impediment to proficiency in good comprehension and overall reading competency. For all readers it is well established that as they progress in reading competence their reading ability grows (Stanovich, 1993/1994. This continued reading success begets continued reading growth; however, many struggling readers have difficulty in moving to a level of automaticity and fluency in their reading that enables them to engage in a successful practice. Lack of practice inhibits their reading comprehension. Readers’ abilities to effectively comprehend texts are significantly affected by their proficiency in accurate and automatic word recognition and prosody (May, 1998; Stanovich, 1993/1994; LaBerge & Samuels, 1974; Schreiber, 1991. Repeated reading practice has been shown to be a powerful way to improve these important fluency competencies. Certain texts are particularly well suited for repeated reading that improves both aspects of fluency

  9. Is semantic verbal fluency impairment explained by executive function deficits in schizophrenia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A. Berberian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate if verbal fluency impairment in schizophrenia reflects executive function deficits or results from degraded semantic store or inefficient search and retrieval strategies. Method: Two groups were compared: 141 individuals with schizophrenia and 119 healthy age and education-matched controls. Both groups performed semantic and phonetic verbal fluency tasks. Performance was evaluated using three scores, based on 1 number of words generated; 2 number of clustered/related words; and 3 switching score. A fourth performance score based on the number of clusters was also measured. Results: SZ individuals produced fewer words than controls. After controlling for the total number of words produced, a difference was observed between the groups in the number of cluster-related words generated in the semantic task. In both groups, the number of words generated in the semantic task was higher than that generated in the phonemic task, although a significant group vs. fluency type interaction showed that subjects with schizophrenia had disproportionate semantic fluency impairment. Working memory was positively associated with increased production of words within clusters and inversely correlated with switching. Conclusion: Semantic fluency impairment may be attributed to an inability (resulting from reduced cognitive control to distinguish target signal from competing noise and to maintain cues for production of memory probes.

  10. 76 FR 29645 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC. This safety... Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, North Carolina in the Federal Register (33 FR 165). We received no...

  11. 76 FR 18669 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... River under the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC... Newport River at Morehead City, North Carolina. The contract provides for cleaning, painting, and steel...

  12. 76 FR 38018 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... the main span US 70/Morehead City-Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC. This safety...) entitled Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, North Carolina in the Federal Register (33 FR 165). We...

  13. 76 FR 23227 - Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone, Newport River; Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... River under the main span US 70/Morehead City--Newport River high rise bridge in Carteret County, NC... Newport River at Morehead City, North Carolina. The contract provides for cleaning, painting, and steel...

  14. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  15. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuto Kobayashi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those strains in vivo. NC mice again showed comparable airway reactivity to that seen in A/J mice and a significantly greater reactivity than that seen in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. To investigate the effects of airway inflammation on airway reactivity to acetylcholine in vivo, NC and BALB/c mice were sensitized to and challenged with antigen. Sensitization to and challenge with antigen induced accumulation of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, in lung and increased airway reactivity in NC and BALB/c mice. These results indicate that NC mice exhibit inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Therefore, NC mice are a suitable strain to use in investigating the mechanisms underlying airway hyperreactivity and such studies will provide beneficial information for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma.

  16. On pseudorandom generators in NC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cryan, Mary; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we consider the question of whether NC 0 circuits can generate pseudorandom distributions. While we leave the general question unanswered, we show – • Generators computed by NC 0 circuits where each output bit depends on at most 3 input bits (i.e, DNC 3 0 circuits) and with stretch ...

  17. Effects of literacy on semantic verbal fluency in an immigrant population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T. Rune; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A significant impact of limited schooling and illiteracy has been found on numerous neuropsychological tests, which may partly be due to the ecological relevance of the tests in the context of illiteracy. The aims of this study were to compare the performance of illiterate and literate...... and acculturation score did not affect this interaction effect. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our results are in line with previous studies comparing semantic fluency in illiterate and literate individuals. The results lend further support to the strong associations between literacy, semantic verbal fluency performance...... immigrants on two semantic criteria for the verbal fluency test, and examine the influence of acculturation on test performances. METHOD: Performances of 20 cognitively unimpaired illiterate and 21 literate Turkish immigrants aged ≥50 years were compared on an animal and supermarket criterion...

  18. Using video self- and peer modeling to facilitate reading fluency in children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Martha M; Buggey, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The authors compared the effects of video self-modeling and video peer modeling on oral reading fluency of elementary students with learning disabilities. A control group was also included to gauge general improvement due to reading instruction and familiarity with researchers. The results indicated that both interventions resulted in improved fluency. Students in both experimental groups improved their reading fluency. Two students in the self-modeling group made substantial and immediate gains beyond any of the other students. Discussion is included that focuses on the importance that positive imagery can have on student performance and the possible applications of both forms of video modeling with students who have had negative experiences in reading.

  19. SEMANTIC VERBAL FLUENCY OF THE BILINGUAL CHILDREN WITH MILD INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad GLUMBIKJ

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Semantic verbal fluency test is reliable instrument for detection of various kinds of neuropsychological deficits. Participants’ attainments in this test are influenced by array of socio-cultural factors. The occurrence of “twofold semilingualism” belongs to these cultural factors.The objective of this research is to determine differences between monolingual and bilingual children with mild mental retardation in semantic verbal fluency test.The sample consisted of 90 participants with mild mental retardation, of both sexes, aged from 12 to 15. The whole sample was divided into three subsets: 30 monolingual children (M1, who speak only Serbian, 30 monolingual Roma children who do not speak Romany (M2 and 30 bilingual Roma children who speak both, Romany and Serbian language (B.It was found that both groups of monolingual children have better performances in semantic fluency tasks than bilingual children.

  20. Reading fluency: implications for the assessment of children with reading disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Elizabeth B; Bloom, Juliana S; Hynd, George W

    2010-06-01

    The current investigation explored the diagnostic utility of reading fluency measures in the identification of children with reading disabilities. Participants were 50 children referred to a university-based clinic because of suspected reading problems and/or a prior diagnosis of dyslexia, where children completed a battery of standardized intellectual, reading achievement, and processing measures. Within this clinical sample, a group of children were identified that exhibited specific deficits in their reading fluency skills with concurrent deficits in rapid naming speed and reading comprehension. This group of children would not have been identified as having a reading disability according to assessment of single word reading skills alone, suggesting that it is essential to assess reading fluency in addition to word reading because failure to do so may result in the under-identification of children with reading disabilities.

  1. On the (elusive) role of oral motor-movements in fluency-based memory illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Deanne L; Klin, Celia M; Lanska, Meredith

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that the ease with which a stimulus is processed affects many different types of evaluative judgments. Recently, it has been proposed that for verbal stimuli the effect of fluency on such judgments is mediated by the muscles that are involved in speech (Topolinski & Strack, 2009, 2010). Evidence for this claim can be found in studies that have shown that fluency effects are eliminated if such judgments are made while these muscles are otherwise engaged (such as while chewing gum or eating). Additional research has found that oral-motor tasks block familiarity-based responding on recognition memory tasks (Topolinski, 2012). The current study investigated the effect of an oral-motor task on recognition memory. Of particular interest was whether the fluency-blocking effects of an oral-motor task would extend to fluency-based illusions of recognition memory. Although we found robust fluency-based illusions of familiarity, we did not find that the effects were modulated by the nature of the concurrent task (gum-chewing vs. a manual-motor task). Moreover, we found no evidence that oral-motor tasks affected recognition more generally, nor did we find that an oral-motor task modulated affective ratings to repeated stimuli. We were also unable to replicate the finding that an oral-motor task blocks the false fame effect (Topolinski & Strack, 2010). These results call into question the assertion that oral-motor movements mediate fluency effects in recognition memory and other evaluative judgments. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Auditory Masking Effects on Speech Fluency in Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia: Comparison to Altered Auditory Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacks, Adam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of masked auditory feedback (MAF) on speech fluency in adults with aphasia and/or apraxia of speech (APH/AOS). We hypothesized that adults with AOS would increase speech fluency when speaking with noise. Altered auditory feedback (AAF; i.e., delayed/frequency-shifted feedback) was included as a control condition not…

  3. Verbal Fluency and Verbal Short-Term Memory in Adults with Down Syndrome and Unspecified Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavroussi, Panayiota; Andreou, Georgia; Karagiannopoulou, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine verbal fluency and verbal short-term memory in 12 adults with Down syndrome (DS) and 12 adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) of unspecified origin, matched for receptive vocabulary and chronological age. Participants' performance was assessed on two conditions of a verbal fluency test, namely, semantic…

  4. An Exploration of the Relationships among Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) Theory-Aligned Cognitive Abilities and Math Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piselli, Katherine D.

    2017-01-01

    Math fluency, which refers to the ability to solve single digit arithmetic problems quickly and accurately, is a foundational mathematical skill. Recent research has examined the role of phonological processing, executive control, and number sense in explaining differences in math fluency performance in school-aged children. Identifying the links…

  5. Using an iPad® App to Improve Sight Word Reading Fluency for At-Risk First Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musti-Rao, Shobana; Lo, Ya-yu; Plati, Erin

    2015-01-01

    We used a multiple baseline across word lists design nested within a multiple baseline across participants design to examine the effects of instruction delivered using an iPad® app on sight word fluency and oral reading fluency of six first graders identified as at risk for reading failure. In Study 1, three students participated in…

  6. Using a Technology-Supported Approach to Preservice Teachers' Multirepresentational Fluency: Unifying Mathematical Concepts and Their Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Daniel; Moore-Russo, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A test project at the University of Puerto Rico in Mayagüez used GeoGebra applets to promote the concept of multirepresentational fluency among high school mathematics preservice teachers. For this study, this fluency was defined as simultaneous awareness of all representations associated with a mathematical concept, as measured by the ability to…

  7. Verbal fluency as a prefrontal activation probe: a validation study using 99mTc-ECD brain SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audenaert, K.; Brans, B.; Laere, K. van; Versijpt, J.; Dierckx, R.; Lahorte, P.; Heeringen, K. van

    2000-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) in the letter and category fluency paradigm of the Controlled Oral Word Association (COWA) test in healthy volunteers. Two groups each comprising ten right-handed healthy volunteers were injected twice with 370 MBq technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer following a split-dose paradigm (resting and activation condition). Statistical parametric mapping (SPM96) was used to determine voxelwise significant changes. The letter fluency and the category fluency activation paradigm had a differential brain activation pattern. The posterior part of the left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) was activated in both paradigms, with the category fluency task having an extra activation in the anterior LIPC. In the category fluency task, but not the letter fluency task, an activation in the right inferior prefrontal cortex was found. These findings confirm to a large extent the results of previous functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography studies in semantic and phonological activation paradigms. The choice and validity of various methodological characteristics of the experimental design leading to these results are critically discussed. It is concluded that brain SPET activation with the letter fluency and category fluency paradigm under standard neuropsychological conditions in healthy volunteers is both technically and practically feasible. (orig.)

  8. Fluent, Fast, and Frugal? A Formal Model Evaluation of the Interplay between Memory, Fluency, and Comparative Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Benjamin E.; Erdfelder, Edgar; Pohl, Rudiger F.

    2011-01-01

    A new process model of the interplay between memory and judgment processes was recently suggested, assuming that retrieval fluency--that is, the speed with which objects are recognized--will determine inferences concerning such objects in a single-cue fashion. This aspect of the fluency heuristic, an extension of the recognition heuristic, has…

  9. Verbal fluency as a prefrontal activation probe: a validation study using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audenaert, K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Ghent University Hospital and Ghent University (Belgium); Brans, B.; Laere, K. van; Versijpt, J.; Dierckx, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Lahorte, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Laboratory of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); Heeringen, K. van [Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Ghent University Hospital and Ghent University (Belgium)

    2000-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) in the letter and category fluency paradigm of the Controlled Oral Word Association (COWA) test in healthy volunteers. Two groups each comprising ten right-handed healthy volunteers were injected twice with 370 MBq technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer following a split-dose paradigm (resting and activation condition). Statistical parametric mapping (SPM96) was used to determine voxelwise significant changes. The letter fluency and the category fluency activation paradigm had a differential brain activation pattern. The posterior part of the left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) was activated in both paradigms, with the category fluency task having an extra activation in the anterior LIPC. In the category fluency task, but not the letter fluency task, an activation in the right inferior prefrontal cortex was found. These findings confirm to a large extent the results of previous functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography studies in semantic and phonological activation paradigms. The choice and validity of various methodological characteristics of the experimental design leading to these results are critically discussed. It is concluded that brain SPET activation with the letter fluency and category fluency paradigm under standard neuropsychological conditions in healthy volunteers is both technically and practically feasible. (orig.)

  10. NC CATCH: Advancing Public Health Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, James; Fisher, John W; Eichelberger, Christopher; Bridger, Colleen; Angelon-Gaetz, Kim; Nelson, Debi

    2010-01-01

    The North Carolina Comprehensive Assessment for Tracking Community Health (NC CATCH) is a Web-based analytical system deployed to local public health units and their community partners. The system has the following characteristics: flexible, powerful online analytic processing (OLAP) interface; multiple sources of multidimensional, event-level data fully conformed to common definitions in a data warehouse structure; enabled utilization of available decision support software tools; analytic capabilities distributed and optimized locally with centralized technical infrastructure; two levels of access differentiated by the user (anonymous versus registered) and by the analytical flexibility (Community Profile versus Design Phase); and, an emphasis on user training and feedback. The ability of local public health units to engage in outcomes-based performance measurement will be influenced by continuing access to event-level data, developments in evidence-based practice for improving population health, and the application of information technology-based analytic tools and methods.

  11. VBOT: Motivating computational and complex systems fluencies with constructionist virtual/physical robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Matthew W.

    As scientists use the tools of computational and complex systems theory to broaden science perspectives (e.g., Bar-Yam, 1997; Holland, 1995; Wolfram, 2002), so can middle-school students broaden their perspectives using appropriate tools. The goals of this dissertation project are to build, study, evaluate, and compare activities designed to foster both computational and complex systems fluencies through collaborative constructionist virtual and physical robotics. In these activities, each student builds an agent (e.g., a robot-bird) that must interact with fellow students' agents to generate a complex aggregate (e.g., a flock of robot-birds) in a participatory simulation environment (Wilensky & Stroup, 1999a). In a participatory simulation, students collaborate by acting in a common space, teaching each other, and discussing content with one another. As a result, the students improve both their computational fluency and their complex systems fluency, where fluency is defined as the ability to both consume and produce relevant content (DiSessa, 2000). To date, several systems have been designed to foster computational and complex systems fluencies through computer programming and collaborative play (e.g., Hancock, 2003; Wilensky & Stroup, 1999b); this study suggests that, by supporting the relevant fluencies through collaborative play, they become mutually reinforcing. In this work, I will present both the design of the VBOT virtual/physical constructionist robotics learning environment and a comparative study of student interaction with the virtual and physical environments across four middle-school classrooms, focusing on the contrast in systems perspectives differently afforded by the two environments. In particular, I found that while performance gains were similar overall, the physical environment supported agent perspectives on aggregate behavior, and the virtual environment supported aggregate perspectives on agent behavior. The primary research questions

  12. Writing superiority in cued recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina eFueller

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In list learning paradigms with free recall, written recall has been found to be less susceptible to intrusions of related concepts than spoken recall when the list items had been visually presented. This effect has been ascribed to the use of stored orthographic representations from the study phase during written recall (Kellogg, 2001. In other memory retrieval paradigms, either better recall for modality-congruent items or an input-independent writing superiority effect have been found (Grabowski, 2005. In a series of four experiments using a paired associate (PA learning paradigm we tested (a whether output modality effects on verbal recall can be replicated in a paradigm that does not involve the rejection of semantically related intrusion words, (b whether a possible superiority for written recall was due to a slower response onset for writing as compared to speaking in immediate recall, and (c whether the performance in PA word recall was correlated with performance in an additional episodic memory task. We found better written recall in the first half of the recall phase, irrespective of the modality in which the material was presented upon encoding. An explanation based on longer response latencies for writing and hence more time for retrieval could be ruled out by showing that the effect persisted in delayed response versions of the task. Although there was some evidence that stored additional episodic information may contribute to the successful retrieval of associate words, this evidence was only found in the immediate response experiments and hence is most likely independent from the observed output modality effect. In sum, our results from a PA learning paradigm suggest that superior performance for written versus spoken recall cannot be (solely explained in terms of additional access to stored orthographic representations from the encoding phase. Our findings rather suggest a general writing-superiority effect at the time of memory

  13. Impact of Cover, Copy, and Compare on Fluency Outcomes for Students with Disabilities and Math Deficits: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, James D., Jr.; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Fluency, a combination of response accuracy and speed, enables students to work efficiently through academic tasks. Students with disabilities and math deficits often struggle to learn math facts fluently. Although issues with fluency frequently coexist with a disability, problems gaining fluency also stem from a lack of practice and appropriate…

  14. Prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior had the form of beakers varying in outline but similar in size. They were wheel-thrown, mould-made or manufactured by using a combination of wheel-throwing and mould-made appliqués. Given that face vessels are considerably scarcer than other kinds of pottery, more than fifty finds from Moesia Superior make an enviable collection. In this and other provinces face vessels have been recovered from military camps, civilian settlements and necropolises, which suggests that they served more than one purpose. It is generally accepted that the faces-masks gave a protective role to the vessels, be it to protect the deceased or the family, their house and possessions. More than forty of all known finds from Moesia Superior come from Viminacium, a half of that number from necropolises. Although tangible evidence is lacking, there must have been several local workshops producing face vessels. The number and technological characteristics of the discovered vessels suggest that one of the workshops is likely to have been at Viminacium, an important pottery-making centre in the second and third centuries.

  15. Double elevator weakening for unilateral congenital superior oblique palsy with ipsilateral superior rectus contracture and lax superior oblique tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O

    2012-06-01

    In unilateral congenital superior oblique palsy, a large hypertropia is sometimes associated with ipsilateral contracture of the superior rectus muscle and apparent overaction of the contralateral superior oblique. Ipsilateral double elevator weakening is one surgical approach; however, this procedure could compromise supraduction. We report a series of three consecutive patients who underwent ipsilateral superior rectus and inferior oblique recessions for unilateral superior oblique palsy. Intraoperatively, all three patients were found to have a lax ipsilateral superior oblique tendon. Postoperatively, all three patients had satisfactory correction of the hypertropia and abnormal head position with minimal supraduction defect. This procedure seems to be an acceptable initial surgical option for treating congenital superior oblique muscle palsy with ipsilateral contracture of the superior rectus muscle, even when the ipsilateral superior oblique tendon is lax. Copyright © 2012 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuto Kobayashi; Toru Miura; Tomoko Haba; Miyuki Sato; Masao Takei; Isao Serizawa

    1999-01-01

    In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those st...

  17. Science As A Second Language: Acquiring Fluency through Science Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, R.; EcoVoices Expedition Team

    2013-05-01

    exploring, solving problems, seeking answers to questions, playing, reading for pleasure, conversing, discussing, where the focus is not specifically on language development, but on the activity, which is of interest to the participant. Language Learning is a formal education process, the language arts aspect of the school day: the direct teaching of reading, writing, grammar, spelling, and speaking. Fluency results primarily from language acquisition and secondarily from language learning. We can view the problem of science education and communication as similar to language acquisition. Science Learning is a formal education process, the school science aspect of the school day: the direct teaching of standards-aligned science content. Science Acquisition is an informal process that occurs in the midst of exploring, solving problems, seeking answers to questions, playing, experimenting for pleasure, conversing, discussing, where the focus is not specifically on science content development, but on the inquiry activity, driven by the curiosity of the participant. Treating Science as a Second Language shifts the evaluation of science learning to include gauging the extent to which students choose to deepen their pursuit of science learning.

  18. Typography and color: effects of salience and fluency on conscious recollective experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, Thomas; Wippich, Werner

    2004-12-01

    Within one experiment the central assumptions of the distinctiveness/fluency account of recollective experience were tested and contrasted with predictions of processing theory. To manipulate perceptual salience, the typography of words was varied. Effects of conceptual salience were induced by a variation of word color. In the study phase participants generated different word or object images according to presented words. To manipulate perceptual and conceptual fluency one test group underwent a priming procedure in the test phase, consisting of a recognition test, whereby some primes were identical to the target words typographically or by color and others were not. Additionally, all participants were asked to make judgments of recollective experience (remember, know, guess) after the old/new decisions. The results of the data analyses confirm the distinctiveness/fluency account. Words written in an unusual typography or color were judged significantly more often as "remembered" than normal words. The priming procedure uncovered some effects of fluency on reaction times: old/new decisions took less time if prime and target words were perceptually or conceptually identical.

  19. General Chemistry Students' Conceptual Understanding and Language Fluency: Acid-Base Neutralization and Conductometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyachwaya, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine college general chemistry students' conceptual understanding and language fluency in the context of the topic of acids and bases. 115 students worked in groups of 2-4 to complete an activity on conductometry, where they were given a scenario in which a titration of sodium hydroxide solution and dilute…

  20. Conceptual fluency at test shifts recognition response bias in Alzheimer's disease: implications for increased false recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Carl A; Marchant, Natalie L; Koutstaal, Wilma; Schacter, Daniel L; Budson, Andrew E

    2007-09-20

    The presence or absence of conceptual information in pictorial stimuli may explain the mixed findings of previous studies of false recognition in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test this hypothesis, 48 patients with AD were compared to 48 healthy older adults on a recognition task first described by Koutstaal et al. [Koutstaal, W., Reddy, C., Jackson, E. M., Prince, S., Cendan, D. L., & Schacter D. L. (2003). False recognition of abstract versus common objects in older and younger adults: Testing the semantic categorization account. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 29, 499-510]. Participants studied and were tested on their memory for categorized ambiguous pictures of common objects. The presence of conceptual information at study and/or test was manipulated by providing or withholding disambiguating semantic labels. Analyses focused on testing two competing theories. The semantic encoding hypothesis, which posits that the inter-item perceptual details are not encoded by AD patients when conceptual information is present in the stimuli, was not supported by the findings. In contrast, the conceptual fluency hypothesis was supported. Enhanced conceptual fluency at test dramatically shifted AD patients to a more liberal response bias, raising their false recognition. These results suggest that patients with AD rely on the fluency of test items in making recognition memory decisions. We speculate that AD patients' over reliance upon fluency may be attributable to (1) dysfunction of the hippocampus, disrupting recollection, and/or (2) dysfunction of prefrontal cortex, disrupting post-retrieval processes.

  1. ADHD and Adolescent EFL Learners' Speaking Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashi, Hamid; Dolatdoost, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This study was an attempt to investigate the relationships among Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and speaking complexity, accuracy, and fluency (CAF) among Iranian EFL learners. To fulfill the purpose of this study, the teachers and parents of 593 male students were given the Farsi version of the CSI-4 ADHD diagnostic…

  2. Corrective Feedback, Spoken Accuracy and Fluency, and the Trade-Off Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehr Azad, Mohammad Hassan; Farrokhi, Farahman; Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    The current study was an attempt to investigate the effects of different corrective feedback (CF) conditions on Iranian EFL learners' spoken accuracy and fluency (AF) and the trade-off between them. Consequently, four pre-intermediate intact classes were randomly selected as the control, delayed explicit metalinguistic CF, extensive recast, and…

  3. Distinguishing familiarity from fluency for the compound word pair effect in associative recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Fahad N; Hockley, William E

    2017-09-01

    We examined whether processing fluency contributes to associative recognition of unitized pre-experimental associations. In Experiments 1A and 1B, we minimized perceptual fluency by presenting each word of pairs on separate screens at both study and test, yet the compound word (CW) effect (i.e., hit and false-alarm rates greater for CW pairs with no difference in discrimination) did not reduce. In Experiments 2A and 2B, conceptual fluency was examined by comparing transparent (e.g., hand bag) and opaque (e.g., rag time) CW pairs in lexical decision and associative recognition tasks. Lexical decision was faster for transparent CWs (Experiment 2A) but in associative recognition, the CW effect did not differ by CW pair type (Experiment 2B). In Experiments 3A and 3B, we examined whether priming that increases processing fluency would influence the CW effect. In Experiment 3A, CW and non-compound word pairs were preceded with matched and mismatched primes at test in an associative recognition task. In Experiment 3B, only transparent and opaque CW pairs were presented. Results showed that presenting matched versus mismatched primes at test did not influence the CW effect. The CW effect in yes-no associative recognition is due to reliance on enhanced familiarity of unitized CW pairs.

  4. A normative study of lexical verbal fluency in an educationally-diverse elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Jo; Lee, Cheol Soon; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Hong, Chang Hyung; Lee, Kang Soo; Son, Sang Joon; Han, Changsu; Park, Moon Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Ghang; Kim, Tae Hui; Park, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Ki Woong

    2013-12-01

    Lexical fluency tests are frequently used to assess language and executive function in clinical practice. We investigated the influences of age, gender, and education on lexical verbal fluency in an educationally-diverse, elderly Korean population and provided its' normative information. We administered the lexical verbal fluency test (LVFT) to 1676 community-dwelling, cognitively normal subjects aged 60 years or over. In a stepwise linear regression analysis, education (B=0.40, SE=0.02, standardized B=0.506) and age (B=-0.10, SE=0.01, standardized B=-0.15) had significant effects on LVFT scores (p0.05). Education explained 28.5% of the total variance in LVFT scores, which was much larger than the variance explained by age (5.42%). Accordingly, we presented normative data of the LVFT stratified by age (60-69, 70-74, 75-79, and ≥80 years) and education (0-3, 4-6, 7-9, 10-12, and ≥13 years). The LVFT norms should provide clinically useful data for evaluating elderly people and help improve the interpretation of verbal fluency tasks and allow for greater diagnostic accuracy.

  5. The Effects of Divided Attention on Speech Motor, Verbal Fluency, and Manual Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromey, Christopher; Shim, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate aspects of the "functional distance hypothesis," which predicts that tasks regulated by brain networks in closer anatomic proximity will interfere more with each other than tasks controlled by spatially distant regions. Speech, verbal fluency, and manual motor tasks were examined to ascertain whether…

  6. The impact of language co-activation on L1 and L2 speech fluency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, Christopher; Sprenger, Simone A.; Schmid, Monika S.

    2015-01-01

    Fluent speech depends on the availability of well-established linguistic knowledge and routines for speech planning and articulation. A lack of speech fluency in late second-language (12) learners may point to a deficiency of these representations, due to incomplete acquisition. Experiments on

  7. Characteristics of Fluency and Speech in Two Families with High Incidences of Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stager, Sheila V.; Freeman, Frances J.; Braun, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents data from 2 families with high incidence of stuttering, comparing methods of phenotype assignment and exploring the presence of other fluency disorders and corresponding speech characteristics. Method: Three methods for assigning phenotype of stuttering were used: self-identification, family identification, and expert…

  8. Phonemic verbal fluency and severity of anxiety disorders in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudineia Toazza

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Previous studies have implicated impaired verbal fluency as being associated with anxiety disorders in adolescents. Objectives: To replicate and extend previously reported evidence by investigating whether performance in phonemic verbal fluency tasks is related to severity of anxiety symptoms in young children with anxiety disorders. We also aim to investigate whether putative associations are independent from co-occurring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD symptoms. Methods: Sixty children (6-12 years old with primary diagnoses of anxiety disorders participated in this study. Severity of symptoms was measured using clinician-based, parent-rated and self-rated validated scales. Verbal fluency was assessed using a simple task that measures the number of words evoked in 1-minute with the letter F, from which we quantified the number of isolated words, number of clusters (groups of similar words and number of switches (transitions between clusters and/or between isolated words. Results: There was a significant association between the number of clusters and anxiety scores. Further analysis revealed associations were independent from co-occurring ADHD symptoms. Conclusion: We replicate and extend previous findings showing that verbal fluency is consistently associated with severity in anxiety disorders in children. Further studies should explore the potential effect of cognitive training on symptoms of anxiety disorders.

  9. Role of route previewing strategies on climbing fluency and exploratory movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Ludovic; Cordier, Romain; Orth, Dominic; Courtine, Yoan; Croft, James L.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the role of route previewing strategies on climbing fluency and on exploratory movements of the limbs, in order to understand whether previewing helps people to perceive and to realize affordances. Eight inexperienced and ten experienced climbers previewed a 10 m high route of 5b

  10. Reading with Ease: The Impact of an Oral Reading Fluency Intervention with Adolescent Struggling Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wig, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, quasi-experimental study was to investigate the impact of a repeated reading fluency intervention focused on prosody, counterbalanced with an intervention focused on reading strategies. Both of these interventions were designed to promote feelings of achievement through participation in activities intended to…

  11. Reading Fluency and Students with Reading Disabilities: How Fast Is Fast Enough to Promote Reading Comprehension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Rollanda E.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of improving reading rate and fluency is to positively impact reading comprehension; however, it is unclear how fast students with learning disabilities (LD) need to read to reap this benefit. The purpose of this research was to identify the point of diminishing return for students who were dysfluent readers. Participants included 337…

  12. Investigating the Representational Fluency of Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers in a Modelling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delice, Ali; Kertil, Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study that investigated pre-service mathematics teachers' modelling processes in terms of representational fluency in a modelling activity related to a cassette player. A qualitative approach was used in the data collection process. Students' individual and group written responses to the mathematical modelling…

  13. Medio-lateral knee fluency in anterior cruciate ligament-injured athletes during dynamic movement trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panos, Joseph A; Hoffman, Joshua T; Wordeman, Samuel C; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-03-01

    Correction of neuromuscular impairments after anterior cruciate ligament injury is vital to successful return to sport. Frontal plane knee control during landing is a common measure of lower-extremity neuromuscular control and asymmetries in neuromuscular control of the knee can predispose injured athletes to additional injury and associated morbidities. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of anterior cruciate ligament injury on knee biomechanics during landing. Two-dimensional frontal plane video of single leg drop, cross over drop, and drop vertical jump dynamic movement trials was analyzed for twenty injured and reconstructed athletes. The position of the knee joint center was tracked in ImageJ software for 500 milliseconds after landing to calculate medio-lateral knee motion velocities and determine normal fluency, the number of times per second knee velocity changed direction. The inverse of this calculation, analytical fluency, was used to associate larger numerical values with fluent movement. Analytical fluency was decreased in involved limbs for single leg drop trials (P=0.0018). Importantly, analytical fluency for single leg drop differed compared to cross over drop trials for involved (Pinjury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Emotional Verbal Fluency: A New Task on Emotion and Executive Function Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Oetken

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study introduces “Emotional Verbal Fluency” as a novel (partially computerized task, which is aimed to investigate the interaction between emotionally loaded words and executive functions. Verbal fluency tasks are thought to measure executive functions but the interaction with emotional aspects is hardly investigated. In the current study, a group of healthy subjects (n = 21, mean age 25 years, 76% females were asked to generate items that are either part of a semantic category (e.g., plants, toys, vehicles; standard semantic verbal fluency or can trigger the emotions joy, anger, sadness, fear and disgust. The results of the task revealed no differences between performance on semantic and emotional categories, suggesting a comparable task difficulty for healthy subjects. Hence, these first results on the comparison between semantic and emotional verbal fluency seem to highlight that both might be suitable for examining executive functioning. However, an interaction was found between the category type and repetition (first vs. second sequence of the same category with larger performance decrease for semantic in comparison to emotional categories. Best performance overall was found for the emotional category “joy” suggesting a positivity bias in healthy subjects. To conclude, emotional verbal fluency is a promising approach to investigate emotional components in an executive task, which may stimulate further research, especially in psychiatric patients who suffer from emotional as well as cognitive deficits.

  15. Motor skills and verbal fluency in HIV positive older adults in Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Finger Tapping Test of the Developmental Neuropsychological Test Battery was also used. Results: Tests of motor skill were less sensitive to HIV infection (F (1, 48) = 1.134, p= .292) than verbal fluency tests-Hopkins Verbal Learning (F (1, 48) = 42.994, p=.000, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test- delay (F (1, 48) = 45.886, ...

  16. Using a Multimedia-Based Program for Developing Student Teachers' EFL Speaking Fluency Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diyyab, Eman Aly; Abdel-Haq, Eman Muhamad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdel-Sadeq

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of using a multimedia-based program for developing EFL speaking fluency skills among second year, English section student teachers. The sample of the present study consisted of thirty students at Sadat Faculty of Education, Minufiya University, Egypt. The study sample was…

  17. The Impact of Pushed Output on Accuracy and Fluency of Iranian EFL Learners' Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Beniss, Aram Reza; Edalati Bazzaz, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    The current study attempted to establish baseline quantitative data on the impacts of pushed output on two components of speaking (i.e., accuracy and fluency). To achieve this purpose, 30 female EFL learners were selected from a whole population pool of 50 based on the standard test of IELTS interview and were randomly assigned into an…

  18. Measurement Properties of DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency in Grade 2: Implications for Equating Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoolmiller, Michael; Biancarosa, Gina; Fien, Hank

    2013-01-01

    Lack of psychometric equivalence of oral reading fluency (ORF) passages used within a grade for screening and progress monitoring has recently become an issue with calls for the use of equating methods to ensure equivalence. To investigate the nature of the nonequivalence and to guide the choice of equating method to correct for nonequivalence,…

  19. Biological Dialogues: How to Teach Your Students to Learn Fluency in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, S. Randolph; Cook, David L.; May, Marilyn K.

    2013-01-01

    Biology courses have thousands of words to learn in order to intelligently discuss the subject and take tests over the material. Biological fluency is an important goal for students, and practical methods based on constructivist pedagogies can be employed to promote it. We present a method in which pairs of students write dialogues from…

  20. Effect of Music-Integrated Instruction on First Graders' Reading Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Kerry G.

    2012-01-01

    The study examined music-integrated (MI) instruction, framed by automatic information processing theory and elements of prosody. A quasi-experimental, pre- and posttest design was utilized to ascertain the effect of MI instruction on reading fluency among first grade students. Subjects were students in two public elementary schools in Georgia. To…

  1. Developing L2 Listening Fluency through Extended Listening-Focused Activities in an Extensive Listening Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna C-S.; Millett, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects on developing L2 listening fluency through doing extended listening-focused activities after reading and listening to audio graded readers. Seventy-six EFL university students read and listened to a total of 15 graded readers in a 15-week extensive listening programme. They were divided into three groups (Group…

  2. The Use of Profanity During Letter Fluency Tasks in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringman, John M.; Kwon, Eunice; Flores, Deborah L.; Rotko, Carol; Mendez, Mario F.; Lu, Po

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the production of profanity during letter fluency testing distinguishes frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Background Alterations in language and social behavior typify FTD spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, in can be difficult to distinguish pathologically-defined frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) from AD clinically. Assessing verbal fluency by having patients generate as many words as they can beginning with specific letters in a given period of time can yield diverse information of diagnostic utility. Method Words produced during FAS letter fluency testing were reviewed and instances of the use of "f*ck", "*ss", and "sh*t" and other words felt to be inappropriate were sought. The frequency of these words was compared between clinically diagnosed FTD and AD patients using chi-square tests. Results We found that 6/32 (18.8%) patients with FTD generated the word "f*ck" during the "F" trial as opposed to none of 38 patients with AD (p = 0.007). Patients who said "f*ck" had diagnoses of either behavioral variant FTD (3/15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (2/8), or semantic dementia (1/3). Conclusions Though the specific neuropathology in these cases is uncertain, generation of "f*ck" during letter fluency testing appears to have utility in differentiating FTD from AD. PMID:20829665

  3. Predictors of Response to Intervention of Word Reading Fluency in Dutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltinga, Femke; van der Leij, Aryan; Struiksma, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of rapid digit naming, phonological memory, letter sound naming, and orthographic knowledge to the prediction of responsiveness to a school-based, individual intervention of word reading fluency problems of 122 Dutch second and third graders whose reading scores were below the 10th…

  4. Do Dispositional Characteristics Influence Reading? Examining the Impact of Personality on Reading Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krach, S. Kathleen; McCreery, Michael P.; Loe, Scott A.; Jones, W. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates specific relationships between personality traits and general academic performance. In addition, research studies have demonstrated relationships among personality and variables related to reading fluency (i.e. speed, accuracy, automaticity, and prosody). However, little investigation has examined specific links…

  5. Event-related potentials indicate that fluency can be interpreted as familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruett, Heather; Leynes, P Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that fluency may be capable of supporting recognition independently of familiarity. This hypothesis was further tested in the present study. 29 participants encoded name-brand and off-brand products in an incidental task. Participants then judged whether the product was old or new during two tests with products from one category (i.e., only name-brand or only off-brand products) and a mixed test (where both name-brand and off-brand products were shown). The ERP data elicited by off-brand products varied as a function of test format. During the mixed test, off-brand products were correlated with a FN400 effect, whereas a fluency ERP (old ERPs were more negative than new at parietal electrodes 225-400ms) was observed during the other test. Importantly, no FN400 was detected during this test. The ERP results suggest that viewing the off-brand products during the mixed test produced a familiarity experience; however, fluency supported recognition when viewing off-brand products on the other test. The results are strong evidence that top-down processing of visual features during recognition interprets the information relative to the context. This process results in either fluency or, in other contexts, it is interpreted as familiarity as the Discrepancy-Attribution Hypothesis (Whittlesea and Williams, 2001a, 2001b) contends. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reading Fluency as a Predictor of Reading Proficiency in Low-Performing, High-Poverty Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Scott K.; Smolkowski, Keith; Katz, Rachell; Fien, Hank; Seeley, John R.; Kame'enui, Edward J.; Beck, Carrie Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine oral reading fluency (ORF) in the context of a large-scale federal reading initiative conducted in low performing, high poverty schools. The objectives were to (a) investigate the relation between ORF and comprehensive reading tests, (b) examine whether slope of performance over time on ORF predicted…

  7. Modeling Oral Reading Fluency Development in Latino Students: A Longitudinal Study across Second and Third Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Petscher, Yaacov; Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Williams, Rihana S.; Dyrlund, Allison K.; Connor, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This study examines growth in oral reading fluency across 2nd and 3rd grade for Latino students grouped in 3 English proficiency levels: students receiving English as a second language (ESL) services (n = 2,182), students exited from ESL services (n = 965), and students never designated as needing services (n = 1,857). An important focus was to…

  8. Can a "Shouting" Digital Game Help Learners Develop Oral Fluency in a Second Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Jennica; Cardoso, Walcir; Waddington, David

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the development of oral fluency in a Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) environment that uses a "shouting" digital game as a pedagogical tool: Spaceteam ESL4. Spaceteam ESL is a game for mobile devices that involves time-sensitive aural exchanges among players (English learners), with great potential to promote…

  9. Influence of Verbal Working Memory Depends on Vocabulary: Oral Reading Fluency in Adolescents with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, L. Todd; Rouhani, Parisa

    2012-01-01

    Most research on dyslexia to date has focused on early childhood, while comparatively little is known about the nature of dyslexia in adolescence. The current study had two objectives. The first was to investigate the relative contributions of several cognitive and linguistic factors to connected-text oral reading fluency in a sample of…

  10. Using Supplementary Readings (Short Stories) in Increasing the Conceptual Fluency, the Case of Idioms in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Elahe; Talebinezhad, Mohammed Reza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to probed whether using supplementary readings (short stories containing idioms) increase conceptual fluency of L2 learners. In line with the goal of the study, first, the researcher selected a sample of 30 female lower-intermediate L2 learners from Sadr Private Language Centre in Isfahan. She selected them based on…

  11. Direct and Indirect Effects of Print Exposure on Silent Reading Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Quintino R.; Guerin, Julia M.

    2018-01-01

    Print exposure is an important causal factor in reading development. Little is known, however, of the mechanisms through which print exposure exerts an effect onto reading. To address this gap, we examined the direct and indirect effects of print exposure on silent reading fluency among college students (n = 52). More specifically, we focused on…

  12. Progress Monitoring Instrument Development: Silent Reading Fluency, Vocabulary, and Reading Comprehension. Technical Report #1110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nese, Joseph F. T.; Anderson, Daniel; Hoelscher, Kyle; Tindal, Gerald; Alonzo, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement (CBM) is designed to measure students' academic status and growth so the effectiveness of instruction may be evaluated. In the most popular forms of reading CBM, the student's oral reading fluency is assessed. This behavior is difficult to sample in a computer-based format, a limitation that may be a function of the…

  13. The Quality of Evidence in Reading Fluency Intervention for Korean Readers with Reading Difficulties and Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yujeong; Kim, Min Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to provide information about the quality of the evidence on reading fluency instruction for at-risk students and students with reading/learning disabilities as a way to evaluate whether an instructional strategy is evidence-based and has potential for classroom use. An extensive search process with inclusion and exclusion criteria…

  14. Predictive Validity and Accuracy of Oral Reading Fluency for English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwood, Michael L.; Tung, Catherine Y.; Checca, C. Jason

    2014-01-01

    The predictive validity and accuracy of an oral reading fluency (ORF) measure for a statewide assessment in English language arts was examined for second-grade native English speakers (NESs) and English learners (ELs) with varying levels of English proficiency. In addition to comparing ELs with native English speakers, the impact of English…

  15. The Development of L2 Fluency during Study Abroad: A Cross-Language Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvio, Francesca; Diao, Wenhao; Donovan, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Examining speech samples from 75 American university students learning 1 of 3 languages (Mandarin, Russian, and Spanish), this article reports on a study of second language (L2) learners' oral fluency development and its relationship with their gains in holistic proficiency ratings during a semester abroad. In study abroad research, there is a…

  16. The limited use of the fluency heuristic: Converging evidence across different procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Rüdiger F; Erdfelder, Edgar; Michalkiewicz, Martha; Castela, Marta; Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2016-10-01

    In paired comparisons based on which of two objects has the larger criterion value, decision makers could use the subjectively experienced difference in retrieval fluency of the objects as a cue. According to the fluency heuristic (FH) theory, decision makers use fluency-as indexed by recognition speed-as the only cue for pairs of recognized objects, and infer that the object retrieved more speedily has the larger criterion value (ignoring all other cues and information). Model-based analyses, however, have previously revealed that only a small portion of such inferences are indeed based on fluency alone. In the majority of cases, other information enters the decision process. However, due to the specific experimental procedures, the estimates of FH use are potentially biased: Some procedures may have led to an overestimated and others to an underestimated, or even to actually reduced, FH use. In the present article, we discuss and test the impacts of such procedural variations by reanalyzing 21 data sets. The results show noteworthy consistency across the procedural variations revealing low FH use. We discuss potential explanations and implications of this finding.

  17. The Word Writing CAFE: Assessing Student Writing for Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Dorothy J.

    2005-01-01

    The Word Writing CAFE is a new assessment tool designed for teachers to evaluate objectively students' word-writing ability for fluency, accuracy, and complexity. It is designed to be given to the whole class at one time. This article describes the development of the CAFE and provides directions for administering and scoring it. The author also…

  18. Improving Science Student Teachers' Self-Perceptions of Fluency with Innovative Technologies and Scientific Inquiry Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalik, Muammer; Ebenezer, Jazlin; Özsevgeç, Tuncay; Küçük, Zeynel; Artun, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of "Environmental Chemistry" elective course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry (TESI) model on senior science student teachers' (SSSTs) self-perceptions of fluency with innovative technologies (InT) and scientific inquiry abilities. The study was conducted with 117 SSSTs (68…

  19. The Relationship between Reading Comprehension, Decoding, and Fluency in Greek: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padeliadu, Susana; Antoniou, Faye

    2014-01-01

    Experts widely consider decoding and fluency as the basis of reading comprehension, while at the same time consistently documenting problems in these areas as major characteristics of students with learning disabilities. However, scholars have developed most of the relevant research within phonologically deep languages, wherein decoding problems…

  20. Word Reading Efficiency, Text Reading Fluency, and Reading Comprehension among Chinese Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangying; Sawaki, Yasuyo; Sabatini, John

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among word reading efficiency, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension for adult English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. Data from 185 adult Chinese EFL learners preparing to take the Test-of-English-as-a-Foreign-Language[TM] (TOEFL[R]) were analyzed in this study. The participants completed a…

  1. Why do employees follow their superiors' instructions? Identification of the reasons to comply with superiors' will in a group of Polish employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Aleksandra; Merecz-Kot, Dorota; Andysz, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Managers influence the way organization works as well as the functioning of subordinates - in the context of their work life but non-professional functioning as well e.g., attitude towards work-life balance or taking care of health. We focused on the superior-subordinate relation, referring to social power bases theory by Raven. We identified the reasons why subordinates decide to follow their superiors' orders and determined specific styles of compliance with superiors' will. Understanding why employees listen to their superiors may be valuable in the context of supporting healthy organizational climate and atmosphere of co-operation or communicating values - for example, as regards taking care of own health. We discussed the results referring to the issue of influencing employees in the context of their health behavior. The research involved 100 Polish employees, aged 28 years old on average, who filled in the Interpersonal Power Inventory by Raven et al. for subordinates in a Polish adaptation by Zaleski. The questionnaire includes 11 subscales referring to power bases. Based on the cluster analysis results, we recognized people who complied because of: all kinds of power bases (typical for 46% of the respondents); the respect for superiors' professionalism (34%); and formal/objective reasons (20%). Employees differ in terms of their styles of compliance. Their motives to comply with superiors' instructions constitute compilations of power bases. The superiors' awareness of the reasons why their employees decide to follow orders is necessary for successful management. It may motivate employees to work but also to take care of their own health. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003902 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003902 gi|21232942 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21242877 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004663 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004663 gi|29348666 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_004578 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004578 gi|28867366 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_005139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_005139 gi|37678876 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21241391 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006177 gi|51892124 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_006349 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006349 gi|53716793 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_006840 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006840 gi|59711756 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006370 gi|54310137 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003919 gi|21243399 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003869 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_003869 gi|20807352 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_006351 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006351 gi|53722013 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_004459 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_004459 gi|27363966 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_006834 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ative regulator of cell autolysis [Desulfitobacterium ... hafniense DCB-2] ... Length = 127 ... Q... NC_006834 gi|58583632 >1i58A 23 189 289 415 6e-06 ... ref|ZP_00097900.1| COG3275: Put

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_001139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001139 gi|6321518 >gi|6321518|ref|NP_011595.1| Protein of unknown function; deletion... mutant has synthetic fitness defect with an sgs1 deletion mutant; Slx9p [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MVA

  18. Observations of NC stop nets for bottlenose dolphin takes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To observe the NC stop net fishery to document the entanglement of bottlenose dolphins and movement of dolphins around the nets.

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26988182 >1rwrA 1 265 36 293 1e-50 ... ref|NP_743607.1| surface colonization... ... gb|AAN67071.1| surface colonization protein, putative ... [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] ...

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_003281 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003281 gi|25151987 >gi|25151987|ref|NP_499440.2| TRAnsformer : XX animals trans...formed into males TRA-1, HERmaphrodization of XO animals HER-2, sex determination zinc-finger protein, alter

  1. ORF Sequence: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inization of XX and XO animals FEM-3 (46.2 kD) (fem-3) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MEVDPGSDDVEADRETRAQKLKLKRNVK... NC_003282 gi|17540880 >gi|17540880|ref|NP_501587.1| sex determination protein, FEM

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003282 gi|17540144 >gi|17540144|ref|NP_500824.1| feminization 1 homolog a, FEMinization of XX and XO ani...mals FEM-1 (fem-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MTPNGHHFRTVIYNAAAVGNLQRIKVFTINSRNDRQWII

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31792282 >gi|31792282|ref|NP_854775.1| PROBABLE CELLULASE CELA2A (ENDO-1,4-BETA-GLUCA...NASE) (ENDOGLUCANASE) (CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULASE) [Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97] MNGAAPTNGAPLSYPSICEGVHWGHLVGGHQPAY

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|57116825 >gi|57116825|ref|YP_177638.1| PROBABLE CELLULASE CELA2A (ENDO-1,4-BETA-GLUCA...NASE) (ENDOGLUCANASE) (CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULASE) [Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv] MNGAAPTNGAPLSYPSICEGVHWGHLVGGHQPAY

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16131649 >gi|16131649|ref|NP_418241.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli K12] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIATLTWFEFRRVR

  6. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erobacterial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli K12] MKVLTVFGTRPEAIKMAPLVHALAKD... NC_000913 gi|49176409 >gi|49176409|ref|YP_026253.1| UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine -2-epimerase; synthesis of ent

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erobacterial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MSAKALAAYSKRIDV... NC_002655 gi|15804377 >gi|15804377|ref|NP_290417.1| UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine -2-epimerase; synthesis of ent

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of cations and cationic drugs [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis str. SC-B67] MQQFEWI... NC_006905 gi|62180071 >gi|62180071|ref|YP_216488.1| putative membrane transporter

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_002977 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002977 gi|53804693 >1fgjA 20 492 48 517 e-179 ... gb|AAU92745.1| hydroxylamine oxy...doreductase [Methylococcus capsulatus str. Bath] ... ref|YP_113436.1| hydroxylamine oxydoreductase ...

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_006569 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006569 gi|56708985 >1fgjA 5 498 32 521 0.0 ... ref|YP_165030.1| hydroxylamine oxid...oreductase [Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ... gb|AAV97335.1| hydroxylamine oxidoreductase ... [

  11. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of cations and cationic drugs [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis str. SC-B67] MFYWILL... NC_006905 gi|62180070 >gi|62180070|ref|YP_216487.1| putative membrane transporter

  12. Explorations of the extended ncKP hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Aristophanes; Mueller-Hoissen, Folkert

    2004-01-01

    A recently obtained extension (xncKP) of the Moyal-deformed KP hierarchy (ncKP hierarchy) by a set of evolution equations in the Moyal-deformation parameters is further explored. Formulae are derived to compute these equations efficiently. Reductions of the xncKP hierarchy are treated, in particular to the extended ncKdV and ncBoussinesq hierarchies. Furthermore, a good part of the Sato formalism for the KP hierarchy is carried over to the generalized framework. In particular, the well-known bilinear identity theorem for the KP hierarchy, expressed in terms of the (formal) Baker-Akhiezer function, extends to the xncKP hierarchy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that N-soliton solutions of the ncKP equation are also solutions of the first few deformation equations. This is shown to be related to the existence of certain families of algebraic identities

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003295 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003295 gi|17546028 >1fjgR 2 71 22 91 5e-16 ... emb|CAD15011.1| PROBABLE PRIMOSOMAL REPLICATION... PROTEIN [Ralstonia solanacearum] ... ref|NP_519430.1| PROBABLE PRIMOSOMAL REPLICATION ...

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se/invertase); possible inulinase [Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705] MTDFTPETPVLTPIHDHAAELAKAEAGVAEMAANRNNRWYP... NC_004307 gi|23464731 >gi|23464731|ref|NP_695334.1| beta-fructofuranosidase (sucra

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006371 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006371 gi|54302237 >1r690 2 63 15 79 7e-05 ... ref|YP_132230.1| hypotethical trans...criptional regulator [Photobacterium profundum ... SS9] emb|CAG22430.1| hypotethical transcriptional ...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39936477 >1kmoA 7 661 92 753 2e-72 ... emb|CAE28855.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris... ... putative hydroxamate-type ferrisiderophore receptor ... [Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009] ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006155 gi|51597538 >1kmoA 5 661 59 714 9e-71 ... ref|YP_071729.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...ive ... hydroxamate-type ferrisiderophore receptor. [Yersinia ... pseudotuberculosis IP 32953

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23465117 >1g5aA 80 628 2 589 5e-59 ... gb|AAL05573.1| alpha-glucosidase [Bifidobacterium adolesce...ntis] ... Length = 588 ... Query: 1 ... MTANNLNDDWWKQAVVYQIYPRSFKDVNGDGLGDIAGVTEK

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62181272 >gi|62181272|ref|YP_217689.1| H inversion: regulation of fla...gellar gene expression by site-specific inversion of DNA [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choler

  20. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16128606 >gi|16128606|ref|NP_415156.1| RNA chaperone, transcription antiterm...inator, affects expression of rpoS and uspA [Escherichia coli K12] MSKIKGNVKWFNESKGFGFITPEDGSKDVFVHFSAIQTNGFKTLAEGQRVEFEITNGAKGPSAANVIAL

  1. ORF Sequence: NC_001147 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001147 gi|6324442 >gi|6324442|ref|NP_014511.1| Plasma membrane Mg(2+) transporter, expression and turnov...er are regulated by Mg(2+) concentration; overexpression confers increased toleranc

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein) (involved in swarmer cell regulation) [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD 2210633] MKKAVKKISSKKIITISAIIV... NC_004605 gi|28901366 >gi|28901366|ref|NP_801021.1| ScrC (sensory box/GGDEF family

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein (involved in environmental regulation of virulence factors) [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica s... NC_006905 gi|62179085 >gi|62179085|ref|YP_215502.1| hemolysin expression modulatin

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_003283 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003283 gi|17563066 >gi|17563066|ref|NP_506462.1| putative protein family member, with a transme...mbrane domain (5O433) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MWNLVSPIHISSKFSMEMAEVNVVAVPEENRQTYLETDNDRLVMAIIWLIMPPMAVFFKCRGCTKHVFINFLLYLLLVLPAYKHATWFCFVKGREFEAEDGFVRAR

  5. ORF Sequence: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|17535455 >gi|17535455|ref|NP_495314.1| putative endoplasmic reticulum protein, with a transme...mbrane domain (2G788) [Caenorhabditis elegans] MTDVRFIIWNCIALLVALMMALTSIIILSDAPHNSME

  6. 76 FR 78331 - Environmental Impact Statement: Jackson County, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... following purpose description: ``The purpose of this project is to relieve traffic congestion in the Sylva... that improves the NC 107 north/south vehicular mobility by increasing average speeds for through...

  7. ORF Sequence: NC_001137 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ull mutation has global effects on transcription; Yer064cp [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MIDDTENSKIHLEGSHKTGKYT... NC_001137 gi|6320907 >gi|6320907|ref|NP_010986.1| Non-essential nuclear protein; n

  8. ORF Sequence: NC_001145 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001145 gi|6323710 >gi|6323710|ref|NP_013781.1| Protein required for nuclear mem...brane fusion during karyogamy, localizes to the membrane with a soluble portion in the endoplasmic reticulum

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21219041 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tide synthetase [Actinoplanes teichomyceticus] ... Length = 427 ... Query: 12 ... LSPLQEGMLFHNLFDEEELDAYNVQ... NC_003888 gi|32141196 >1l5aA 1 423 12 438 2e-57 ... emb|CAE53352.1| non-ribosomal pep

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003306 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003306 gi|17938860 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42523916 >1a12A 35 375 64 376 3e-39 ... emb|CAE53335.1| putative RCC1 repeats protein [Actinoplan...es teichomyceticus] ... Length = 313 ... Query: 425 GVGFACALYDNNDLKCFGANDYGQLGD

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003064 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003064 gi|16119505 >1pv1A 14 282 20 256 6e-05 ... emb|CAE53384.1| hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes... teichomyceticus] emb|CAG15045.1| ... hypothetical protein [Actinoplanes teichomyce

  14. ORF Sequence: NC_002162 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002162 gi|13357802 >gi|13357802|ref|NP_078076.1| ribosomal protein L24 [Ureapla...sma parvum serovar 3 str. ATCC 700970] MNRIKKGDTVVVISGKNKNKSGVVIQVNPKEQTALVEGVNKIKRHQKKDQTHEQSGIIEKEAPIRLCKLALVDPKGKDKGKATKVKYLLKDNKKVRVARKSGSELDVNKK

  15. 77 FR 46631 - Television Broadcasting Services; Greenville, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Greenville, NC AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final... acceptance of full power television rulemaking petitions requesting channel substitutions in May 2011, it... Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal Communications Commission. Barbara A. Kreisman, Chief, Video...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_005090 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005090 gi|34558174 >1wcv1 4 239 4 244 2e-25 ... ref|NP_907989.1| SEPTUM SITE-DETERMINING...| SEPTUM ... SITE-DETERMINING PROTEIN MIND CELL DIVISION INHIBITOR ... MIND [Wolinella succino

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_003047 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003047 gi|15965329 >gi|15965329|ref|NP_385682.1| PROBABLE CARBAMOYL-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE LARGE CHAIN (AMMO...NIA CHAIN ARGININE BIOSYNTHESIS) PROTEIN [Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021] MPKRQDIKSILI

  18. ORF Sequence: NC_001134 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ivery of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins to the nucleoplasm, binds rg-nucl... NC_001134 gi|6319491 >gi|6319491|ref|NP_009573.1| Transportin, cytosolic karyopherin beta 2 involved in del

  19. BChPT x 1/Nc: masses and currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goity, Jose L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Fernando, Ishara P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2018-04-01

    A summary of the implementation of the combined BChPT X 1/Nc expansion for three flavors is presented, along with its applications to the octet and decuplet baryon masses, SU(3) charges and axial couplings.

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003919 gi|21242752 >1iwlA 2 180 23 207 3e-47 ... gb|AAM36870.1| outer-membrane lipoproteins... ... outer-membrane lipoproteins carrier protein precursor ... [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citr

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54308356 >1iwlA 4 181 22 199 2e-52 ... ref|YP_129376.1| hypothetical outer membrane lipoproteins... ... hypothetical outer membrane lipoproteins carrier protein ... [Photobacterium profundum] ... L

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15800754 >gi|15800754|ref|NP_286768.1| periplasmic protein effects translocation of lipoprotei...ns from inner membrane to outer [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MMKKIAITCALLSSLVA

  3. ORF Sequence: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|16128858 >gi|16128858|ref|NP_415411.1| periplasmic chaperone effects translocation of lipoprot...eins from inner membrane to outer membrane [Escherichia coli K12] MMKKIAITCALLSSLVA

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62179485 >gi|62179485|ref|YP_215902.1| periplasmic protein effects translocation of lipoprotei...ns from inner membrane to outer membrane [Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serov

  5. Electrophysiological signals associated with fluency of different levels of processing reveal multiple contributions to recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingbing; Taylor, Jason R; Wang, Wei; Gao, Chuanji; Guo, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    Processing fluency appears to influence recognition memory judgements, and the manipulation of fluency, if misattributed to an effect of prior exposure, can result in illusory memory. Although it is well established that fluency induced by masked repetition priming leads to increased familiarity, manipulations of conceptual fluency have produced conflicting results, variously affecting familiarity or recollection. Some recent studies have found that masked conceptual priming increases correct recollection (Taylor & Henson, 2012), and the magnitude of this behavioural effect correlates with analogous fMRI BOLD priming effects in brain regions associated with recollection (Taylor, Buratto, & Henson, 2013). However, the neural correlates and time-courses of masked repetition and conceptual priming were not compared directly in previous studies. The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to identify and compare the electrophysiological correlates of masked repetition and conceptual priming and investigate how they contribute to recognition memory. Behavioural results were consistent with previous studies: Repetition primes increased familiarity, whereas conceptual primes increased correct recollection. Masked repetition and conceptual priming also decreased the latency of late parietal component (LPC). Masked repetition priming was associated with an early P200 effect and a later parietal maximum N400 effect, whereas masked conceptual priming was only associated with a central-parietal maximum N400 effect. In addition, the topographic distributions of the N400 repetition priming and conceptual priming effects were different. These results suggest that fluency at different levels of processing is associated with different ERP components, and contributes differentially to subjective recognition memory experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduced verbal fluency for proper names in nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease: a quantitative and qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Eric M; Delis, Dean C; Paul, Brianna M; Filoteo, J Vincent

    2011-02-01

    There has been an increasing interest within neuropsychology in comparing verbal fluency for different grammatical classes (e.g., verb generation vs. noun generation) in neurological populations, including Parkinson's disease (PD). However, to our knowledge, few studies have compared verbal fluency for common nouns and proper names in PD. Common nouns and proper names differ in terms of their semantic characteristics, as categories of common nouns are organized hierarchically based on semantics, while categories of proper nouns lack a well-defined semantic organization. In addition, there is accumulating evidence that the retrieval of these distinct grammatical classes are subserved by somewhat distinct neural systems. Given that verbal fluency deficits are among the first impairments to emerge in PD, and that such deficits are predictors of future cognitive decline, it is important to examine all aspects of verbal fluency in this population. For the current study, we compared the performance of a group of 32 nondemented PD patients with 32 healthy participants (HP) on verbal fluency tasks for common nouns (animals) and proper names (boys' first names). A significant interaction between verbal fluency task and diagnostic status emerged, as the PD group performed significantly worse on only the proper name fluency task. This finding may reflect the absence of well-defined semantic organization that structures the verbal search for first names, thus placing a greater onus on strategic or "executive" verbal retrieval processes.

  7. precision deburring using NC and robot equipment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-05-01

    Deburring precision miniature components is often time consuming and inconsistent. Although robots are available for deburring parts, they are not precise enough for precision miniature parts. Numerical control (NC) machining can provide edge break consistencies to meet requirements such as 76.2-..mu..m maximum edge break (chamfer). Although NC machining has a number of technical limitations which prohibits its use on many geometries, it can be an effective approach to features that are particularly difficult to deburr.

  8. Structural studies of n-type nc-Si-QD thin films for nc-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debajyoti; Kar, Debjit

    2017-12-01

    A wide optical gap nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) dielectric material is a basic requirement at the n-type window layer of nc-Si solar cells in thin film n-i-p structure on glass substrates. Taking advantage of the high atomic-H density inherent to the planar inductively coupled low-pressure (SiH4 + CH4)-plasma, development of an analogous material in P-doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H network has been tried. Incorporation of C in the Si-network extracted from the CH4 widens the optical band gap; however, at enhanced PH3-dilution of the plasma spontaneous miniaturization of the nc-Si-QDs below the dimension of Bohr radius (∼4.5 nm) further enhances the band gap by virtue of the quantum size effect. At increased flow rate of PH3, dopant induced continuous amorphization of the intrinsic crystalline network is counterbalanced by the further crystallization promoted by the supplementary atomic-H extracted from PH3 (1% in H2) in the plasma, eventually holding a moderately high degree of crystallinity. The n-type wide band gap (∼1.93 eV) window layer with nc-Si-QDs in adequate volume fraction (∼52%) could furthermore be instrumental as an effective seed layer for advancing sequential crystallization in the i-layer of nc-Si solar cells with n-i-p structure in superstrate configuration.

  9. THE CONTRIBUTION OF COMPLEXITY, ACCURACY AND FLUENCY TO LANGUAGE FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Rausch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper will outline an instructional approach that proposes a Complexity, Accuracy, Fluency (CAF paradigm as a means of providing learners with the CAF-based communication consciousness and CAF-oriented manipulative skills that are increasingly important in language use in Language for Specific Purposes. Given the complex combinations of communicative tasks, communicative formats and communicative circumstances that accompany the wide-ranging and various contexts of contemporary professional communication, communicative competence demands a combinative consciousness and informed application of Complexity, Accuracy and Fluency as a communication paradigm. Viewed as a combination of its three components, a CAF paradigm constitutes a fundamental ‘information, language and communication’ triad that can guide professional language use in any communicative circumstance. Viewed as a communicative skill set, the CAF triad implies the capability to adjust specific elements and aspects of information, language and communication as needed for a communicative task, whether in oral or print communication and regardless of task category. Adjusting complexity in this context refers to both content and language complexity. Adjusting accuracy refers to the conventions that dictate appropriate or acceptable language in a given context. Finally, adjusting fluency refers to a sense of communicative fluency, that which yields either smooth and persuasive language as in a native-speaker normative view or explicit and clearly explanatory language as necessary in some communicative encounters. The need to manipulate these three components depends on circumstance variables such as objective, available time, audience characteristics and the degree of detail desired. This paper will outline this combinative CAF notion as background to a materials development project being undertaken in a Japanese university, introducing the specifics of an Extended Reading Aloud

  10. Improving Earth Science Metadata: Modernizing ncISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, K.; Schweitzer, R.; Neufeld, D.; Burger, E. F.; Signell, R. P.; Arms, S. C.; Wilcox, K.

    2016-12-01

    ncISO is a package of tools developed at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI) that facilitates the generation of ISO 19115-2 metadata from NetCDF data sources. The tool currently exists in two iterations: a command line utility and a web-accessible service within the THREDDS Data Server (TDS). Several projects, including NOAA's Unified Access Framework (UAF), depend upon ncISO to generate the ISO-compliant metadata from their data holdings and use the resulting information to populate discovery tools such as NCEI's ESRI Geoportal and NOAA's data.noaa.gov CKAN system. In addition to generating ISO 19115-2 metadata, the tool calculates a rubric score based on how well the dataset follows the Attribute Conventions for Dataset Discovery (ACDD). The result of this rubric calculation, along with information about what has been included and what is missing is displayed in an HTML document generated by the ncISO software package. Recently ncISO has fallen behind in terms of supporting updates to conventions such updates to the ACDD. With the blessing of the original programmer, NOAA's UAF has been working to modernize the ncISO software base. In addition to upgrading ncISO to utilize version1.3 of the ACDD, we have been working with partners at Unidata and IOOS to unify the tool's code base. In essence, we are merging the command line capabilities into the same software that will now be used by the TDS service, allowing easier updates when conventions such as ACDD are updated in the future. In this presentation, we will discuss the work the UAF project has done to support updated conventions within ncISO, as well as describe how the updated tool is helping to improve metadata throughout the earth and ocean sciences.

  11. Escuela Superior de Palos Verdes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neutra, Richard J.

    1965-02-01

    Full Text Available Before initiating the building operations for the «Palos Verdes» School, the site was divided into two large horizontal surfaces, at different levels. The lower one served to accommodate the playing fields, a car park, the physical training building, and shop and ancillary buildings. On the higher of these two surfaces, and to the West of the access road, there is a car park and also the building and plot of ground devoted to agricultural technology, as well as the literary studies and general purpose buildings. As a complement to these, there is a series of blocks, arranged in parallel rows, which house the administrative offices, the art school, the craft's school, the general classrooms, and those devoted to higher education. The fascinating aspect of this school is the outstanding penetration of the architect's mind into the essential function of the project. Its most evident merit is the sense of comradeship and harmony that permeates the whole architectural manifold.Antes de construir el complejo escolar «Palos Verdes» se comenzó por crear, en el terreno, dos grandes mesetas a niveles diferentes. Sobre el inferior se organizaron: los campos de juegos, de deportes, un aparcamiento, el edificio para educación física y los destinados a tiendas y servicios. Sobre la meseta superior, al oeste de la vía de acceso, se dispuso un aparcamiento y el edificio y campo para adiestramiento agrícola; al este, otro aparcamiento, el edificio dedicado a materias literarias, y el destinado a usos múltiples. Completan las instalaciones de la escuela una serie de bloques paralelos: la administración, la escuela de arte, las clases de trabajos manuales, las aulas de enseñanzas generales, y las de los cursos superiores. Lo fascinante de este complejo escolar es la perfecta y magistral compenetración del arquitecto con el tema proyectado, y su mayor mérito, la sensación de cordialidad y armonía con el ambiente.

  12. Bringing the frame into focus: the influence of regulatory fit on processing fluency and persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angela Y; Aaker, Jennifer L

    2004-02-01

    This research demonstrates that people's goals associated with regulatory focus moderate the effect of message framing on persuasion. The results of 6 experiments show that appeals presented in gain frames are more persuasive when the message is promotion focused, whereas loss-framed appeals are more persuasive when the message is prevention focused. These regulatory focus effects suggesting heightened vigilance against negative outcomes and heightened eagerness toward positive outcomes are replicated when perceived risk is manipulated. Enhanced processing fluency leading to more favorable evaluations in conditions of compatibility appears to underlie these effects. The findings underscore the regulatory fit principle that accounts for the persuasiveness of message framing effects and highlight how processing fluency may contribute to the "feeling right" experience when the strategy of goal pursuit matches one's goal.

  13. Effects of Listening While Reading (LWR on Swahili Reading Fluency and Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipo Lubua

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have examined the contribution of technology in teaching such languages as English, French, and Spanish, among many others. Contrarily, most LCTL’s, have received very little attention. This study investigates if listening while reading (LWR may expedite Swahili reading fluency and comprehension. The study employed the iBook Author tool to create weekly mediated and interactive reading texts, with comprehension exercises, which were eventually used to collect descriptive and qualitative data from four Elementary Swahili students. Participants participated in a seven week reading program, which provided them with some kind of directed self-learning, and met with the instructor for at least 30 minutes every week for observation and more reading activities. The teacher recorded their reading scores, and a number of themes on how LWR influenced reading fluency and comprehension are discussed here. It shows that participants have a positive attitude towards LWR and they suggest it for all the reading classes.

  14. [Profile, competencies and digital fluency of nurses in the Professional Improvement Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Lyvia Pini; Kobayashi, Rika Miyahara

    2013-08-01

    A descriptive exploratory study conducted in the city of São Paulo, which aimed to identify the profile, competencies and digital fluency of nurses in the Professional Improvement Program in handling technology at work. The population, composed by 60 nurses in the program, answered a questionnaire with data about profile, digital fluency and professional competencies. The participants were found to be: 95.0% female, 61.7% between 23 and 25 years old, 75.0% from public schools, 58.3% enrolled in cardiovascular nursing, 98.3% had contact with computing resources during graduation, 100.0% had a computer at home, 86.7% accessed the internet daily, 96.7% used Messenger and 58.3% had an intermediate level of knowledge and skill in computing. Professional competencies required for technology management referred to knowing how to be innovative, creative, and updated to identify and manage software and to use technological resources.

  15. The Relationship of Error Rate and Comprehension in Second and Third Grade Oral Reading Fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Mary; Wills, Howard; Miller, Angela; Kaufman, Journ

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the relationships of oral reading speed and error rate on comprehension with second and third grade students with identified reading risk. The study included 920 2nd graders and 974 3rd graders. Participants were assessed using Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) and the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test (WRMT) Passage Comprehension subtest. Results from this study further illuminate the significant relationships between error rate, oral reading fluency, and reading comprehension performance, and grade-specific guidelines for appropriate error rate levels. Low oral reading fluency and high error rates predict the level of passage comprehension performance. For second grade students below benchmark, a fall assessment error rate of 28% predicts that student comprehension performance will be below average. For third grade students below benchmark, the fall assessment cut point is 14%. Instructional implications of the findings are discussed.

  16. An overview on STEP-NC compliant controller development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, M. A.; Minhat, M.; Jamaludin, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The capabilities of conventional Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machine tools as termination organiser to fabricate high-quality parts promptly, economically and precisely are undeniable. To date, most CNCs follow the programming standard of ISO 6983, also called G & M code. However, in fluctuating shop floor environment, flexibility and interoperability of current CNC system to react dynamically and adaptively are believed still limited. This outdated programming language does not explicitly relate to each other to have control of arbitrary locations other than the motion of the block-by-block. To address this limitation, new standard known as STEP-NC was developed in late 1990s and is formalized as an ISO 14649. It adds intelligence to the CNC in term of interoperability, flexibility, adaptability and openness. This paper presents an overview of the research work that have been done in developing a STEP-NC controller standard and the capabilities of STEP-NC to overcome modern manufacturing demands. Reviews stated that most existing STEP-NC controller prototypes are based on type 1 and type 2 implementation levels. There are still lack of effort being done to develop type 3 and type 4 STEP-NC compliant controller.

  17. Behavioural and neural evidence for the impact of fluency context on conscious memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carlos Alexandre; Mecklinger, Axel; Zimmer, Hubert

    2017-07-01

    It has been recently suggested that fluency may impact recognition memory performance when the fluency context varies from trial-to-trial. Surprisingly, such an effect has proved difficult to detect in the masked priming paradigm, one of the most popular means to increase fluency-based memory judgements. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment in which participants encoded words at study and, at test, performed a recognition memory task within a masked priming procedure. In order to optimise the chances of finding priming effects on recognition memory performance, we used low-frequency words, which have been shown to increase hits relative to false alarms and enhance masked priming effects. Fluency context was manipulated by either mixing primed and unprimed trials [Random context (RC) experiment] or blocking primed and unprimed trials [Blocked context (BC) experiment]. Behaviourally, priming affected high-confidence memory performance only in the RC experiment. This behavioural effect correlated positively with neural priming in several recognition memory regions. Moreover, we observed a functional coupling between the left middle temporal gyrus and the left parietal and posterior cingulate cortices that was greater for primed relative to unprimed words. In contrast, in the BC experiment, despite similar activity in recognition-memory-related regions, we did not find any significant correlations between neural and behavioural priming. Finally, we observed striking differences in the neural correlates of masked priming between the RC and BC experiments not only in location but also in direction of the neural response. Possible implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS PSYCHOMETRIC TOOL FOR ENHANCING FUNCTIONAL FLUENCY

    OpenAIRE

    TEMPLE, SUSANNAH FLEUR

    2002-01-01

    Functional Fluency denotes efficacy of interpersonal functioning in terms of flexibility and balance of the behavioural modes a person uses. The aim of this project is to design and create a psychometric tool for mapping the patterns of such functioning. The intention is that feedback on the test results will stimulate the insights and understanding to support and encourage positive behavioural change. This process, involving the development of self-awareness, which is a key as...

  19. Investigating the Prospective Sense of Agency: Effects of Processing Fluency, Stimulus Ambiguity, and Response Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidarus, Nura; Vuorre, Matti; Metcalfe, Janet; Haggard, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    How do we know how much control we have over our environment? The sense of agency refers to the feeling that we are in control of our actions, and that, through them, we can control our external environment. Thus, agency clearly involves matching intentions, actions, and outcomes. The present studies investigated the possibility that processes of action selection, i.e., choosing what action to make, contribute to the sense of agency. Since selection of action necessarily precedes execution of action, such effects must be prospective. In contrast, most literature on sense of agency has focussed on the retrospective computation whether an outcome fits the action performed or intended. This hypothesis was tested in an ecologically rich, dynamic task based on a computer game. Across three experiments, we manipulated three different aspects of action selection processing: visual processing fluency, categorization ambiguity, and response conflict. Additionally, we measured the relative contributions of prospective, action selection-based cues, and retrospective, outcome-based cues to the sense of agency. Manipulations of action selection were orthogonally combined with discrepancy of visual feedback of action. Fluency of action selection had a small but reliable effect on the sense of agency. Additionally, as expected, sense of agency was strongly reduced when visual feedback was discrepant with the action performed. The effects of discrepant feedback were larger than the effects of action selection fluency, and sometimes suppressed them. The sense of agency is highly sensitive to disruptions of action-outcome relations. However, when motor control is successful, and action-outcome relations are as predicted, fluency or dysfluency of action selection provides an important prospective cue to the sense of agency. PMID:28450839

  20. The role of auditory temporal cues in the fluency of stuttering adults

    OpenAIRE

    Furini, Juliana; Picoloto, Luana Altran; Marconato, Eduarda; Bohnen, Anelise Junqueira; Cardoso, Ana Claudia Vieira; Oliveira, Cristiane Moço Canhetti de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: to compare the frequency of disfluencies and speech rate in spontaneous speech and reading in adults with and without stuttering in non-altered and delayed auditory feedback (NAF, DAF). Methods: participants were 30 adults: 15 with Stuttering (Research Group - RG), and 15 without stuttering (Control Group - CG). The procedures were: audiological assessment and speech fluency evaluation in two listening conditions, normal and delayed auditory feedback (100 milliseconds dela...

  1. Modeling Oral Reading Fluency Development in Latino Students: A Longitudinal Study Across Second and Third Grade

    OpenAIRE

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Petscher, Yaacov; Williams, Rihana S.; Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Dyrlund, Allison K.; Connor, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This study examines growth in oral reading fluency across 2nd and 3rd grade for Latino students grouped in 3 English proficiency levels: students receiving English as a second language (ESL) services (n = 2,182), students exited from ESL services (n = 965), and students never designated as needing services (n = 1,857). An important focus was to learn whether, within these 3 groups, proficiency levels and growth were reliably related to special education status. Using hierarchical linear model...

  2. Hearing "Quack" and Remembering a Duck: Evidence for Fluency Attribution in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurten, Marie; Lloyd, Marianne; Willems, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that fluency does not influence memory decisions until ages 7-8. In two experiments (n = 96 and n = 64, respectively), children, aged 4, 6, and 8 years (Experiments 1 and 2), and adults (Experiment 2) studied a list of pictures. Participants completed a recognition test during which each study item was preceded by a…

  3. Second language as a compensatory resource for maintaining verbal fluency in bilingual immigrants with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, D; Walters, J; Fine, J; Muchnik-Rozanov, Y; Paz, M; Lerner, V; Belmaker, R H; Bersudsky, Y

    2015-08-01

    Due to the large migrations over the past three decades, large numbers of individuals with schizophrenia are learning a second language and being seen in clinics in that second language. We conducted within-subject comparisons to clarify the contribution of clinical, linguistic and bilingual features in the first and second languages of bilinguals with schizophrenia. Ten bilingual Russian(L1) and Hebrew(L2) proficient patients, who developed clinical schizophrenia after achieving proficiency in both languages, were selected from 60 candidates referred for the study; they were resident in Israel 7-32 years with 3-10 years from immigration to diagnosis. Clinical, linguistic and fluency markers were coded in transcripts of clinical interviews. There was a trend toward more verbal productivity in the first language (L1) than the second language (L2). Clinical speech markers associated with thought disorder and cognitive impairment (blocking and topic shift) were similar in both languages. Among linguistic markers of schizophrenia, Incomplete syntax and Speech role reference were significantly more frequent in L2 than L1; Lexical repetition and Unclear reference demonstrated a trend in the same direction. For fluency phenomena, Discourse markers were more prevalent in L1 than L2, and Codeswitching was similar across languages, showing that the patients were attuned to the socio-pragmatics of language use. More frequent linguistic markers of schizophrenia in L2 show more impairment in the syntactic/semantic components of language, reflecting greater thought and cognitive dysfunction. Patients are well able to acquire a second language. Nevertheless, schizophrenia finds expression in that language. Finally, more frequent fluency markers in L1 suggests motivation to maintain fluency, evidenced in particular by codeswitched L2 lexical items, a compensatory resource. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lexical Access in Persian Normal Speakers: Picture Naming, Verbal Fluency and Spontaneous Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sadat Ghoreishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lexical access is the process by which the basic conceptual, syntactical and morpho-phonological information of words are activated. Most studies of lexical access have focused on picture naming. There is hardly any previous research on other parameters of lexical access such as verbal fluency and analysis of connected speech in Persian normal participants. This study investigates the lexical access performance in normal speakers in different issues such as age, sex and education. Methods: The performance of 120 adult Persian speakers in three tasks including picture naming, verbal fluency and connected speech, was examined using "Persian Lexical Access Assessment Package”. The performance of participants between two gender groups (male/female, three education groups (below 5 years, above 12 years, between 5 and 12 years and three age groups (18-35 years, 36-55 years, 56-75 years were compared. Results: According to findings, picture naming increased with increasing education and decreased with increasing age. The performance of participants in phonological and semantic verbal fluency showed improvement with age and education. No significant difference was seen between males and females in verbal fluency task. In the analysis of connected speech there were no significant differences between different age and education groups and just mean length of utterance in males was significantly higher than females. Discussion: The findings could be a primitive scale for comparison between normal subjects and patients in lexical access tasks, furthermore it could be a horizon for planning of treatment goals in patients with word finding problem according to age, gender and education.

  5. Pattern of neural responses to verbal fluency shows diagnostic specificity for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walshe Muriel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairments in executive function and language processing are characteristic of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Their functional neuroanatomy demonstrate features that are shared as well as specific to each disorder. Determining the distinct pattern of neural responses in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may provide biomarkers for their diagnoses. Methods 104 participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scans while performing a phonological verbal fluency task. Subjects were 32 patients with schizophrenia in remission, 32 patients with bipolar disorder in an euthymic state, and 40 healthy volunteers. Neural responses to verbal fluency were examined in each group, and the diagnostic potential of the pattern of the neural responses was assessed with machine learning analysis. Results During the verbal fluency task, both patient groups showed increased activation in the anterior cingulate, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right putamen as compared to healthy controls, as well as reduced deactivation of precuneus and posterior cingulate. The magnitude of activation was greatest in patients with schizophrenia, followed by patients with bipolar disorder and then healthy individuals. Additional recruitment in the right inferior frontal and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortices was observed in schizophrenia relative to both bipolar disorder and healthy subjects. The pattern of neural responses correctly identified individual patients with schizophrenia with an accuracy of 92%, and those with bipolar disorder with an accuracy of 79% in which mis-classification was typically of bipolar subjects as healthy controls. Conclusions In summary, both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with altered function in prefrontal, striatal and default mode networks, but the magnitude of this dysfunction is particularly marked in schizophrenia. The pattern of response to verbal fluency is highly

  6. Verbal fluency in children with intellectual disability: Influence of basic executive components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gligorović Milica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phonemic and semantic fluency tasks are frequently used to differentiate executive control roles and the integrity of lexical-semantic representation. The main goal of this study is to determine the influence of basic executive components on phonemic and semantic productivity in children with mild intellectual disability. The sample consisted of 95 children with unspecified mild intellectual disability (MID, ages 10-13.11. Phonemic fluency was assessed by the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT, while semantic fluency was assessed by the Category Naming Test (CNT. Cognitive flexibility was assessed by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST and Trail Making Test (TMT. Number Manipulation Task (NMT was used for the verbal working memory assessment, while Day/Night Stroop Task was used for the assessment of inhibitory control. The results analysis showed that all of the assessed EF components significantly affect phonemic productivity. Semantic productivity significantly depends on WCST and TMT performance. Verbal working memory and inhibitory control do not significantly contribute to semantic productivity. The results of our study indicate that the discrepancy between phonemic and semantic productivity in children with MID could be directly associated with the basic executive functions components.

  7. The effect of Phonological Encoding Complexity on Speech Fluency of Stuttering and Non-Stuttering Children

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    Sara Ramezani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stuttering is a fairly common speech disorder. However, the etiology is poorly understood and is likely to be heterogeneous. The aim of this research is to investigate phonological encoding complexity on speech fluency in 6-9 year old stuttering children in comparison with non-stutterers in Tehran. Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive analytic research was done on 18 stuttering children with profound and severe level and 18 non-stuttering children. The stuttering subjects were selected by convenience and normal subjects were matched to stuttering subjects by gender, age and geographics. A non-word test comprising 87 non-words was used to investigate phonological encoding and phonological complexity effects on speech fluency. Stimuli were presented in random order with approximately 5 seconds between items, using a computer via external Toshiba SOMIC SM-818 headphone and requested subject was asked to repeat them.  Results: The results indicated that speech fluency decreased significantly (P<0.05 by increasing phonological complexity comparing to controls. Conclusion: The findings of the present research seem to suggest that, stuttering children may have deficits in phonological encoding. The deficit has been increased with phonological encoding complexity. Based on covert repair hypothesis, phonological difficulty may cause covert self- repair and leads to different patterns of stuttering.

  8. The role of auditory temporal cues in the fluency of stuttering adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Furini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: to compare the frequency of disfluencies and speech rate in spontaneous speech and reading in adults with and without stuttering in non-altered and delayed auditory feedback (NAF, DAF. Methods: participants were 30 adults: 15 with Stuttering (Research Group - RG, and 15 without stuttering (Control Group - CG. The procedures were: audiological assessment and speech fluency evaluation in two listening conditions, normal and delayed auditory feedback (100 milliseconds delayed by Fono Tools software. Results: the DAF caused a significant improvement in the fluency of spontaneous speech in RG when compared to speech under NAF. The effect of DAF was different in CG, because it increased the common disfluencies and the total of disfluencies in spontaneous speech and reading, besides showing an increase in the frequency of stuttering-like disfluencies in reading. The intergroup analysis showed significant differences in the two speech tasks for the two listening conditions in the frequency of stuttering-like disfluencies and in the total of disfluencies, and in the flows of syllable and word-per-minute in the NAF. Conclusion: the results demonstrated that delayed auditory feedback promoted fluency in spontaneous speech of adults who stutter, without interfering in the speech rate. In non-stuttering adults an increase occurred in the number of common disfluencies and total of disfluencies as well as reduction of speech rate in spontaneous speech and reading.

  9. The visual attention span deficit in Chinese children with reading fluency difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Menglian; Liu, Hanlong; Huang, Chen

    2018-02-01

    With reading development, some children fail to learn to read fluently. However, reading fluency difficulty (RFD) has not been fully investigated. The present study explored the underlying mechanism of RFD from the aspect of visual attention span. Fourteen Chinese children with RFD and fourteen age-matched normal readers participated. The visual 1-back task was adopted to examine visual attention span. Reaction time and accuracy were recorded, and relevant d-prime (d') scores were computed. Results showed that children with RFD exhibited lower accuracy and lower d' values than the controls did in the visual 1-back task, revealing a visual attention span deficit. Further analyses on d' values revealed that the attention distribution seemed to exhibit an inverted U-shaped pattern without lateralization for normal readers, but a W-shaped pattern with a rightward bias for children with RFD, which was discussed based on between-group variation in reading strategies. Results of the correlation analyses showed that visual attention span was associated with reading fluency at the sentence level for normal readers, but was related to reading fluency at the single-character level for children with RFD. The different patterns in correlations between groups revealed that visual attention span might be affected by the variation in reading strategies. The current findings extend previous data from alphabetic languages to Chinese, a logographic language with a particularly deep orthography, and have implications for reading-dysfluency remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of fluency stent-grafts in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jianbo; Li Yanhao; Chen Yong; He Xiaofeng; Zeng Qingle; Mei Quelin; Lu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of Fluency stent-graft (Bard Corp) in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: The clinical data of 21 consecutive patients treated by TIPS using Fluency stent-grafts were retrospectively reviewed. All of them were recurrent variceal bleeding secondary to portal vein hypertension, 1 was bleeding secondary to primary hepatic carcinoma with port vein thrombus, and 1 was Budd-Chiari syndrome. They were followed-up after (10.1±4.6) months (2.0 to 24.0 months). Stent-grafts patancy, portal vein pressure and liver function were recorded and compared. Results: Twenty-five stent-grafts were successfully implanted in 21 patients, 23 stent grafts were 8 mm 2 were 10 mm in diameter. The covered length of the stents varied from 6 to 8 cm. The bleeding was stopped and the portal vein pressure decreased significantly from (25.4±3.5) mm Hg to (15.4±2.8) mm Hg (t= 12.495, P 0.05). Conclusion: The Fluency stent-grafts could increase the patency of the TIPS, but its efficacy on the long-term effect and hepatic encephalopathy need further investigation. (authors)

  11. The impact of language co-activation on L1 and L2 speech fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Christopher; Sprenger, Simone A; Schmid, Monika S

    2015-10-01

    Fluent speech depends on the availability of well-established linguistic knowledge and routines for speech planning and articulation. A lack of speech fluency in late second-language (L2) learners may point to a deficiency of these representations, due to incomplete acquisition. Experiments on bilingual language processing have shown, however, that there are strong reasons to believe that multilingual speakers experience co-activation of the languages they speak. We have studied to what degree language co-activation affects fluency in the speech of bilinguals, comparing a monolingual German control group with two bilingual groups: 1) first-language (L1) attriters, who have fully acquired German before emigrating to an L2 English environment, and 2) immersed L2 learners of German (L1: English). We have analysed the temporal fluency and the incidence of disfluency markers (pauses, repetitions and self-corrections) in spontaneous film retellings. Our findings show that learners to speak more slowly than controls and attriters. Also, on each count, the speech of at least one of the bilingual groups contains more disfluency markers than the retellings of the control group. Generally speaking, both bilingual groups-learners and attriters-are equally (dis)fluent and significantly more disfluent than the monolingual speakers. Given that the L1 attriters are unaffected by incomplete acquisition, we interpret these findings as evidence for language competition during speech production. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The Longitudinal Contribution of Early Morphological Awareness Skills to Reading Fluency and Comprehension in Greek

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    George Manolitsis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the role of three morphological awareness (MA skills (inflection, derivation, and compounding in word reading fluency and reading comprehension in a relatively transparent orthography (Greek. Two hundred and fifteen (104 girls; Mage = 67.40 months, at kindergarten Greek children were followed from kindergarten (K to grade 2 (G2. In K and grade 1 (G1, they were tested on measures of MA (two inflectional, two derivational, and three compounding, letter knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN, and general cognitive ability (vocabulary and non-verbal IQ. At the end of G1 and G2, they were also tested on word reading fluency and reading comprehension. The results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that the inflectional and derivational aspects of MA in K as well as all aspects of MA in G1 accounted for 2–5% of unique variance in reading comprehension. None of the MA skills predicted word reading fluency, after controlling for the effects of vocabulary and RAN. These findings suggest that the MA skills, even when assessed as early as in kindergarten, play a significant role in reading comprehension development.

  13. Imitated prosodic fluency predicts reading comprehension ability in good and poor high school readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Breen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have established a relationship between beginning readers’ silent comprehension ability and their prosodic fluency, such that readers who read aloud with appropriate prosody tend to have higher scores on silent reading comprehension assessments. The current study was designed to investigate this relationship in two groups of high school readers: Specifically Poor Comprehenders (SPCs, who have adequate word level and phonological skills but poor reading comprehension ability, and a group of age- and decoding skill-matched controls. We compared the prosodic fluency of the two groups by determining how effectively they produced prosodic cues to syntactic and semantic structure in imitations of a model speaker’s production of syntactically and semantically varied sentences. Analyses of pitch and duration patterns revealed that speakers in both groups produced the expected prosodic patterns; however, controls provided stronger durational cues to syntactic structure. These results demonstrate that the relationship between prosodic fluency and reading comprehension continues past the stage of early reading instruction. Moreover, they suggest that prosodically fluent speakers may also generate more fluent implicit prosodic representations during silent reading, leading to more effective comprehension.

  14. Subjective memory complaints and their relation with verbal fluency in active older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Flavia Rodrigues; Machado, Camila Kretzer; Souza, Monique Coan; Machado, Marcos José; Belaunde, Aline Megumi Arakawa

    2017-05-22

    To verify subjective memory complaints and their relation to verbal fluency in older people participating in community groups. An epidemiological quantitative study performed in community groups for older people in Florianópolis, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected by structured interview using the Memory Complaint Questionnaire (MAC-Q) and the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT) by semantic categories "animals/minute". For an inferential descriptive analysis, data with p people in question and added to the questionnaire). We found no relation between subjective memory complaints and verbal fluency of active older people. Mnemonic complaints were correlated to the negative perception of memory and to the duration of the complaint. However, subjective memory complaints were an indicator for those individuals with negative perception of memory, being one aspect that must be considered in older people's speech when investigating a possible cognitive deterioration. Such data can assist in formulating public health care policies aimed at older people in the city, which emphasizes the importance of verifying subjective memory complaints in this population.

  15. The impact of pushed output on accuracy and fluency of Iranian EFL learners’ speaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Reza Sadeghi Beniss

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study attempted to establish baseline quantitative data on the impacts of pushed output on two components of speaking (i.e., accuracy and fluency. To achieve this purpose, 30 female EFL learners were selected from a whole population pool of 50 based on the standard test of IELTS interview and were randomly assigned into an experimental group and a control group. The participants in the experimental group received pushed output treatment while the students in the control group received non-pushed output instruction. The data were collected through IELTS interview and then the interview of each participant was separately tape-recorded and later transcribed and coded to measure accuracy and fluency. Then, the independent samples t-test was employed to analyze the collected data. The results revealed that the experimental group outperformed the control group in accuracy. In contrast, findings substantiated that pushed output had no impact on fluency. The positive impact of pushed output demonstrated in this study is consistent with the hypothesized function of Swain’s (1985 pushed output. The results can provide some useful insights into syllabus design and English language teaching.

  16. Speech fluency profile on different tasks for individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Fabiola Staróbole; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2017-07-20

    To characterize the speech fluency profile of patients with Parkinson's disease. Study participants were 40 individuals of both genders aged 40 to 80 years divided into 2 groups: Research Group - RG (20 individuals with diagnosis of Parkinson's disease) and Control Group - CG (20 individuals with no communication or neurological disorders). For all of the participants, three speech samples involving different tasks were collected: monologue, individual reading, and automatic speech. The RG presented a significant larger number of speech disruptions, both stuttering-like and typical dysfluencies, and higher percentage of speech discontinuity in the monologue and individual reading tasks compared with the CG. Both groups presented reduced number of speech disruptions (stuttering-like and typical dysfluencies) in the automatic speech task; the groups presented similar performance in this task. Regarding speech rate, individuals in the RG presented lower number of words and syllables per minute compared with those in the CG in all speech tasks. Participants of the RG presented altered parameters of speech fluency compared with those of the CG; however, this change in fluency cannot be considered a stuttering disorder.

  17. ADHD and adolescent EFL learners’ speaking complexity, accuracy, and fluency in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Marashi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to investigate the relationships among Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and speaking complexity, accuracy, and fluency (CAF among Iranian EFL learners. To fulfill the purpose of this study, the teachers and parents of 593 male students were given the Farsi version of the CSI-4 ADHD diagnostic questionnaire, out of which 61 students scored above the cut-off score of nine in both the teacher and parent questionnaires. These students then sat for a sample speaking section of the Key English Test (KET; the interviews were scored by two raters according to the measures of CAF. The data were thus analyzed and the results revealed a significant positive correlation between ADHD and speaking fluency; in contrast, a significant negative correlation was observed between ADHD and speaking complexity and ADHD and speaking accuracy. The regressions disclosed that ADHD is a significant predictor of complexity, accuracy, and fluency in speaking. The findings of this study have pedagogical implications for both parents and teachers in contact with students with ADHD with respect to the importance of identifying such students and thus planning and monitoring their progress.

  18. Effect of low fluencies of near-ultraviolet radiation on Bacteroides fragilis survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, H.J.K.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a convenient obligate anaerobe for an investigation on the effect of near-UV irradiation since the authors have shown that it can be maintained in aerobic solutions for at least 6 h without loss in viability. Furthermore, they recently demonstrated that B. fragilis differs from other bacteria in that it is more sensitive to far-UV (254 nm) radiation in the presence of oxygen. The role of oxygen on near-UV survival in B. fragilis, was investigated. The effect of chloramphenicol was also studied. Survival curves are presented. B. fragilis Bf-2 cells irradiated with increasing fluencies of near-UV light under anaerobic conditions showed no loss in viability. A 'V'-shaped survival curve was obtained when cells were irradiated aerobically. After the initial reduction in viability with fluencies up to 1.5 kJ/m 2 further irradiation resulted in the recovery of colony-forming ability which was maximal at 2.6 kJ/m 2 and remained at this level up to fluencies of 4 kJ/m 2 . (Auth.)

  19. Connected text reading and differences in text reading fluency in adult readers.

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    Sebastian Wallot

    Full Text Available The process of connected text reading has received very little attention in contemporary cognitive psychology. This lack of attention is in parts due to a research tradition that emphasizes the role of basic lexical constituents, which can be studied in isolated words or sentences. However, this lack of attention is in parts also due to the lack of statistical analysis techniques, which accommodate interdependent time series. In this study, we investigate text reading performance with traditional and nonlinear analysis techniques and show how outcomes from multiple analyses can used to create a more detailed picture of the process of text reading. Specifically, we investigate reading performance of groups of literate adult readers that differ in reading fluency during a self-paced text reading task. Our results indicate that classical metrics of reading (such as word frequency do not capture text reading very well, and that classical measures of reading fluency (such as average reading time distinguish relatively poorly between participant groups. Nonlinear analyses of distribution tails and reading time fluctuations provide more fine-grained information about the reading process and reading fluency.

  20. Prosody as a Tool for Assessing Reading Fluency of Adult ESL Students

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    Seftirina Evina Sinambela

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The prosodic features in reading aloud assignment has been associated with the students’ decoding skill. The goal of the present study is to determine the reliability of prosody for assessing reading fluency of adult ESL students in Indonesia context. The participants were all Indonesian natives, undergraduate students, adult females and males who have learned English in school (at the very least twice a week for more than 12 years. Text reading prosody was assessed by reading aloud task and the students’ speaking manner was taped and measured by using the Multidimensional Fluency Scale, as for text comprehension was assessed with a standardized test. It was discovered by the current study that prosody is a reliable sign to determine reading fluency and also reading comprehension. The student who did not read the text prosodically (with appropriate expression actually showed that he/she failed to comprehend the text. This study also revealed that a struggling reader was also having low comprehension capacity in listening spoken texts. The ESL students’ common problems to acquire prosodic reading skill are low exposure to the target language and do not have a good model to imitate prosodic reading.

  1. Using principal component analysis to capture individual differences within a unified neuropsychological model of chronic post-stroke aphasia: Revealing the unique neural correlates of speech fluency, phonology and semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Ajay D; Woollams, Anna M; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2017-01-01

    Individual differences in the performance profiles of neuropsychologically-impaired patients are pervasive yet there is still no resolution on the best way to model and account for the variation in their behavioural impairments and the associated neural correlates. To date, researchers have generally taken one of three different approaches: a single-case study methodology in which each case is considered separately; a case-series design in which all individual patients from a small coherent group are examined and directly compared; or, group studies, in which a sample of cases are investigated as one group with the assumption that they are drawn from a homogenous category and that performance differences are of no interest. In recent research, we have developed a complementary alternative through the use of principal component analysis (PCA) of individual data from large patient cohorts. This data-driven approach not only generates a single unified model for the group as a whole (expressed in terms of the emergent principal components) but is also able to capture the individual differences between patients (in terms of their relative positions along the principal behavioural axes). We demonstrate the use of this approach by considering speech fluency, phonology and semantics in aphasia diagnosis and classification, as well as their unique neural correlates. PCA of the behavioural data from 31 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia resulted in four statistically-independent behavioural components reflecting phonological, semantic, executive-cognitive and fluency abilities. Even after accounting for lesion volume, entering the four behavioural components simultaneously into a voxel-based correlational methodology (VBCM) analysis revealed that speech fluency (speech quanta) was uniquely correlated with left motor cortex and underlying white matter (including the anterior section of the arcuate fasciculus and the frontal aslant tract), phonological skills with

  2. Sobredentadura total superior implantosoportada Superior total overdenture on implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlando Rodríguez García

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de un paciente desdentado total superior, rehabilitado en la consulta de implantología de la Clínica "Pedro Ortiz" del municipio Habana del Este en Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba, en el año 2009, mediante prótesis sobre implantes osteointegrados, técnica que se ha incorporado a la práctica estomatológica en Cuba como alternativa al tratamiento convencional en los pacientes desdentados totales. Se siguió un protocolo que comprendió una fase quirúrgica, procedimiento con o sin realización de colgajo y carga precoz o inmediata. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 56 años de edad, que acudió a la consulta multidisciplinaria, preocupado, porque se le habían elaborado tres prótesis en los últimos dos años y ninguna reunía los requisitos de retención que él necesitaba para sentirse seguro y cómodo con las mismas. El resultado final fue la satisfacción total del paciente, con el mejoramiento de la calidad estética y funcional.This is the case of a total maxilla edentulous patient seen in consultation of the "Pedro Ortíz" Clinic Implant of Habana del Este municipality in 2009 and con rehabilitation by prosthesis over osteointegration implants added to stomatology practice in Cuba as an alternative to conventional treatment in patients totally edentulous. We follow a protocol including a surgery or surgical phase, technique without or with flap creation and early or immediate load. This is a male patient aged 56 came to our multidisciplinary consultation worried because he had three prostheses in last two years and any fulfilled the requirements of retention to feel safe and comfortable with prostheses. The final result was the total satisfaction of rehabilitated patient improving its aesthetic and functional quality.

  3. Comparison of mechanical behavior of TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC, TiN/TiNC films on 9Cr18 steel by PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingguo; Zhang, Yanshuai; Hu, Hanjun; Zheng, Yugang; Zhang, Kaifeng; Zhou, Hui

    2017-11-01

    TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC and TiN/TiNC films were deposited on 9Cr18 steel using magnetron sputtering technique. The morphology, composition, chemical state and crystalline structure of the films were observed and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hardness and adhesion force were tested by nanoindentation and scratch tester, respectively. The friction and wear behavior of TiN, TiNC, CrN/TiNC and TiN/TiNC films sliding against GCr15 balls were investigated and compared synthetically using ball-on-disk tribometer. It was found that Tisbnd N, Tisbnd C, Tisbnd Nsbnd C and Csbnd C bonds were formed. The TiN/TiNC film was composed of TiN, TiC and TiNC phases. Hardness and adhesion force results indicated that although the TiN film possessed the highest hardness, its adhesion force was lowest among all the films. Tribological test results showed that the friction coefficient of TiN/TiNC was much lower than that of TiN and the wear rate decreases remarkably from 2.3 × 10-15 m3/Nm to 7.1 × 10-16 m3/Nm, which indicated the TiN/TiNC film has better wear resistance.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Ultrafiltration/Microfiltration Membranes for Removal of Nitrocellulose (NC) Fines from Wastewater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Byung

    1997-01-01

    .... In Phase II, a pilot-scale crossflow membrane filtration system was constructed to: (1) investigate the concentration polarization and fouling mechanism caused by NC fines during crossflow filtration of NC wastewater, (2...

  5. Modulating phonemic fluency performance in healthy subjects with transcranial magnetic stimulation over the left or right lateral frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirni, Daniela; Turriziani, Patrizia; Mangano, Giuseppa Renata; Bracco, Martina; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2017-07-28

    A growing body of evidence have suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can improve the performance of aphasic patients in language tasks. For example, application of inhibitory rTMS or tDCs over the right frontal lobe of dysphasic patients resulted in improved naming abilities. Several studies have also reported that in healthy controls (HC) tDCS application over the left prefrontal cortex (PFC) improve performance in naming and semantic fluency tasks. The aim of this study was to investigate in HC, for the first time, the effects of inhibitory repetitive TMS (rTMS) over left and right lateral frontal cortex (BA 47) on two phonemic fluency tasks (FAS or FPL). 44 right-handed HCs were administered rTMS or sham over the left or right lateral frontal cortex in two separate testing sessions, with a 24h interval, followed by the two phonemic fluency tasks. To account for possible practice effects, an additional 22 HCs were tested on only the phonemic fluency task across two sessions with no stimulation. We found that rTMS-inhibition over the left lateral frontal cortex significantly worsened phonemic fluency performance when compared to sham. In contrast, rTMS-inhibition over the right lateral frontal cortex significantly improved phonemic fluency performance when compared to sham. These results were not accounted for practice effects. We speculated that rTMS over the right lateral frontal cortex may induce plastic neural changes to the left lateral frontal cortex by suppressing interhemispheric inhibitory interactions. This resulted in an increased excitability (disinhibition) of the contralateral unstimulated left lateral frontal cortex, consequently enhancing phonemic fluency performance. Conversely, application of rTMS over the left lateral frontal cortex may induce a temporary, virtual lesion, with effects similar to those reported in left frontal

  6. Verbal fluency in male and female schizophrenia patients: Different patterns of association with processing speed, working memory span, and clinical symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brébion, Gildas; Stephan-Otto, Christian; Ochoa, Susana; Nieto, Lourdes; Contel, Montserrat; Usall, Judith

    2018-01-01

    Decreased processing speed in schizophrenia patients has been identified as a major impairment factor in various neuropsychological domains. Working memory span has been found to be involved in several deep or effortful cognitive processes. We investigated the impact that these 2 cognitive functions may have on phonological and semantic fluency in schizophrenia patients and healthy participants. Fifty-five patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy participants were administered a neuropsychological battery including phonological and semantic fluency, working memory, and cognitive and motor speed. Regression analyses revealed that motor speed was related to phonological fluency in female patients, whereas cognitive speed was related to semantic fluency in male patients. In addition, working memory span was related to verbal fluency in women from both the patient and the healthy control groups. Decreased processing speed, but not decreased working memory span, accounted for the verbal fluency deficit in patients. Verbal fluency was inversely related to attention deficit in female patients and to negative symptoms in male patients. Decreased processing speed may be the main factor in verbal fluency impairment of patients. Further, the cognitive and clinical predictors of verbal fluency efficiency are different in men and women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Paso superior en una ladera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bender, O.

    1965-07-01

    Full Text Available The Redwood highway, through the Californian forest, runs on a viaduct, as it crosses a mountain slope of about 45° inclination. The firm ground is fairly deep, and as an additional constructional difficulty, it was necessary to respect the natural beauty of the countryside. A structure of portal frames were built, forming a number of short spans. These spans were bridged with metal girders, on which a 19 m wide deck was placed. The columns are hollow and have a transversal cross beam, to join each pair. There was difficulty in excavating the foundations for the columns, as it was necessary to dig through the soft top soil, and also prevent this soil from hurting the trunks of the forest trees. Another significant difficulty in the construction of this viaduct was the access to the working site, since there were no suitable platforms from which to operate the appropriate machinery. This made it necessary to do a lot of the work by manual operation. As one of the edges of the deck is very close to the mountain side, a supporting beam was erected on this side. It was made of concrete, on metal piles. The formwork for the deck structure was placed on the concrete stems of the supporting piles.La autopista denominada Redwood (California salva, con un paso superior, la ladera de un bosque cuya pendiente es del 1/1. El terreno firme se halla a bastante profundidad, añadiéndose, a los naturales problemas de la construcción, el imperativo de respetar la belleza agreste del paraje. La solución adoptada consiste en una estructura porticada, con varios tramos de pequeñas luces, salvados con vigas metálicas, sobre los que se coloca la losa del tablero, de 19 m de anchura total. Los soportes están constituidos por pórticos de dos montantes huecos (con bases de hormigón en masa por debajo del suelo, hasta el firme coronados por un cabezal. La perforación de pozos para el hormigonado de los montantes presentaba la dificultad de atravesar el terreno

  8. 75 FR 28542 - Superior Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to orient the new Superior Resource Advisory Committee members on their roles... following business will be conducted: Overview of the roles and responsibilities of the Superior Resource...

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13474471 >1gkpA 2 454 5 422 3e-10 ... ref|NP_106039.1| creatinine deamin...ase [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB51825.1| creatinine deaminase [Mesorhizobium loti ...

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_002570 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002570 gi|15612789 >1v7zA 3 254 1 238 1e-53 ... dbj|BAB03945.1| creatinine amidohy...drolase [Bacillus halodurans C-125] ... ref|NP_241092.1| creatinine amidohydrolase [Bacillus ...

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_002952 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002952 gi|49483221 >1pwgA 4 329 74 373 1e-38 ... ref|YP_040445.1| autolysis and me...thicillin resistant-related protein [Staphylococcus ... aureus subsp. aureus MRSA252] emb|CAG40034.1| autolysis

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_004461 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004461 gi|27467672 >1pwgA 4 344 72 389 1e-36 ... ref|NP_764309.1| autolysis and me...thicillin resistant-related protein [Staphylococcus ... epidermidis ATCC 12228] gb|AAO04351.1| autolysis

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003098 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003098 gi|15902282 >1in4A 3 311 20 328 5e-98 ... ref|NP_357832.1| Branch migration of Holliday structures... [Streptococcus pneumoniae ... R6] gb|AAK99042.1| Branch migration of Holliday ... structures... [Streptococcus pneumoniae R6] pir||F97901 ... branch migration of Holliday structures

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005363 gi|42524871 >1tjlA 27 144 16 133 6e-10 ... ref|NP_970251.1| dnaK deletion s...uppressor protein [Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100] ... emb|CAE78310.1| dnaK deletion suppressor pro

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27380945 >1tjlA 26 141 1 116 7e-32 ... ref|NP_772474.1| dnaK deletion su...ppressor protein [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA ... 110] dbj|BAC51099.1| dnaK deletion suppressor pro

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... regulator, internal deletion [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] pir||A87693 transcription regulato... NC_003317 gi|17988031 >1etoB 1 97 211 307 4e-07 ... ref|NP_422373.1| transcriptional regulator, internal delet...r, internal ... deletion [imported] - Caulobacter crescentus ... Len...ion [Caulobacter ... crescentus CB15] gb|AAK25541.1| transcriptional ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... regulator, internal deletion [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] pir||A87693 transcription regulato... NC_002696 gi|16127809 >1etoB 1 97 211 307 4e-07 ... ref|NP_422373.1| transcriptional regulator, internal delet...r, internal ... deletion [imported] - Caulobacter crescentus ... Len...ion [Caulobacter ... crescentus CB15] gb|AAK25541.1| transcriptional ...

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16124962 >1mgtA 4 167 79 239 2e-25 ... ref|NP_419526.1| ada regulatory protein, internal deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] gb|AAK22694.1| ada regulatory protein, internal ... deletio...n [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] pir||B87337 ada ... regulatory protein, internal deletion

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16124962 >1adn0 1 76 1 75 1e-17 ... ref|NP_419526.1| ada regulatory protein, internal deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus ... CB15] gb|AAK22694.1| ada regulatory protein, internal ... deletion... [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] pir||B87337 ada ... regulatory protein, internal deletion

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004431 gi|26247437 >1j9iA 1 68 1 68 7e-21 ... ref|NP_753477.1| Prophage Qin DNA packaging... protein NU1 homolog [Escherichia coli ... CFT073] gb|AAN80037.1| Prophage Qin DNA packaging ... ...teriophage ... 21] pir||A49849 DNA-packaging protein Nu1 - phage 21 ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_006905 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006905 gi|62179784 >1j9iA 1 68 1 68 5e-21 ... ref|YP_216201.1| Gifsy-1 prophage DNA packaging... ... gb|AAX65120.1| Gifsy-1 prophage DNA packaging protein ... [Phage Gifsy-1] ... Length = 68 ... Q

  2. ORF Sequence: NC_001136 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_001136 gi|6320573 >gi|6320573|ref|NP_010653.1| Nucleolar protein involved in pre-rRNA processing; deplet...ion causes severely decreased 18S rRNA levels; Esf1p [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MAG

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_006840 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006840 gi|59712585 >1bxwA 8 170 21 215 9e-07 ... ref|NP_800205.1| accessory colonization... factor AcfA [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD ... 2210633] dbj|BAC62038.1| accessory colonization

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004605 gi|28900550 >1bxwA 8 170 21 215 9e-07 ... ref|NP_800205.1| accessory colonization... factor AcfA [Vibrio parahaemolyticus RIMD ... 2210633] dbj|BAC62038.1| accessory colonization

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002929 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002929 gi|33592330 >1uynX 1 299 352 647 5e-40 ... ref|NP_879974.1| tracheal colonization... factor precursor [Bordetella pertussis Tohama ... I] emb|CAA08832.2| tracheal colonization fac...tor ... [Bordetella pertussis] emb|CAE41497.1| tracheal ... colonization factor precursor [Bor

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|18397761 >1wocC 2 96 2 97 5e-15 ... ref|YP_063428.1| ssb1 [Campylobacter... ... gb|EAL55921.1| single-strand binding protein, putative ... [Campylobacter coli RM2228] gb|AAR29517.1| ssb1

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003075 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003075 gi|30692533 >3ullA 5 115 1 104 8e-18 ... ref|YP_063478.1| ssb1 [Campylobact...er jejuni] gb|AAR29567.1| ssb1 [Campylobacter ... jejuni] ... Length = 104 ... Query: 31 ... GQDSDVS

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003282 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003282 gi|17540144 >1n0rA 2 124 89 212 5e-26 ... gb|AAA96093.1| Feminization of xx and xo animals... ... homolog a, FEMinization of XX and XO animals FEM-1 ... (fem-1) [Caenorhabditis elegans] pir||

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_004605 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004605 gi|28900808 >1l3wA 6 536 1265 1798 3e-11 ... ref|NP_800463.1| putative biofilm...-associated surface protein [Vibrio parahaemolyticus ... RIMD 2210633] dbj|BAC62296.1| putative biofilm

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15804385 >gi|15804385|ref|NP_290425.1| TDP-Fuc4NAc:lipidII transferase; synthesis of enterobac...terial common antigen (ECA) [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] MSLLQFSGLFVVWLLCTLFIA

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003070 gi|15221381 >1bq00 2 77 15 90 4e-20 ... ref|NP_177004.1| gravity-responsive... protein / altered response to gravity protein ... (ARG1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAD13758.1| Altere

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27377041 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1ii8A 3 194 4 202 2e-10 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1gxlA 2 204 475 685 1e-34 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003237 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003237 gi|19075000 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus ... jannaschii DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome ... segreta

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669839 >1xewY 1 130 1026 1153 2e-37 ... ref|NP_248653.1| chromosome segreta...tion protein (smc1) [Methanocaldococcus jannaschii ... DSM 2661] gb|AAB99663.1| chromosome segreta

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1| ... acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ferrulic acid biotransformation ... protein, putative [Pseudomo...ransformation protein, ... putative [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN68958.... NC_002947 gi|26990069 >1u8vA 9 432 4 458 7e-34 ... ref|NP_745494.1| acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ferrulic acid biot

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26990072 >1uzbA 37 513 3 472 6e-68 ... ref|NP_745497.1| vanillin dehydro...genase [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN68961.1| ... vanillin dehydrogenase [Pseudomonas putida KT24

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27381528 >1uzbA 40 515 6 475 3e-74 ... ref|NP_773057.1| vanillin: NAD ox...idoreductase [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... dbj|BAC51682.1| vanillin: NAD oxidoreductase ...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_004463 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004463 gi|27377799 >1uzbA 40 515 5 474 3e-69 ... ref|NP_769328.1| vanillin: NAD ox...idoreductase [Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110] ... dbj|BAC47953.1| vanillin: NAD oxidoreductase ...

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_002696 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002696 gi|16126641 >1uzbA 58 515 12 462 8e-77 ... ref|NP_421205.1| vanillin dehydr...ogenase [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] gb|AAK24373.1| ... vanillin dehydrogenase [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] ... pir||A87547 vanillin dehydrogenase [imported] - ... Caulobacter crescentus ...

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_005090 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005090 gi|34557929 >1kmoA 12 661 39 664 3e-52 ... ref|NP_907744.1| RECEPTOR PRECURSOR-Most...ly Fe transport [Wolinella succinogenes DSM ... 1740] emb|CAE10644.1| RECEPTOR PRECURSOR-Most

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_006085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006085 gi|50842772 >1qr0A 1 205 2 202 3e-27 ... ref|YP_055999.1| biosurfactants pr...oduction protein [Propionibacterium acnes ... KPA171202] gb|AAT83041.1| biosurfactants production ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_000917 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000917 gi|11498546 >1yozA 1 116 1 116 6e-47 ... pdb|1YOZ|B Chain B, Predicted Coding... Region Af0941 From Archaeoglobus Fulgidus ... pdb|1YOZ|A Chain A, Predicted Coding Region Af0941 F

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_003283 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003283 gi|17561408 >1bor0 2 53 282 342 3e-04 ... ref|NP_757385.1| synoviolin 1 iso...form b [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH30530.1| Synoviolin 1, ... isoform b [Homo sapiens] ... Length = 61

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_006841 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006841 gi|59714046 >1gntA 1 552 1 553 0.0 ... ref|YP_206821.1| hydroxylamine reduc...tase [Vibrio fischeri ES114] gb|AAW87933.1| ... hydroxylamine reductase [Vibrio fischeri ES114] ...

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003228 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003228 gi|60681683 >1gntA 1 551 3 543 0.0 ... emb|CAH07898.1| hydroxylamine reduct...ase [Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343] ... ref|YP_211827.1| hydroxylamine reductase [Bacteroides ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_000963 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000963 gi|15604438 >1xvqA 17 163 47 203 4e-07 ... ref|NP_220956.1| SCO2 PROTEIN PRECURSOR (sco2...) [Rickettsia prowazekii str. Madrid E] ... emb|CAA15032.1| SCO2 PROTEIN PRECURSOR (sco2...) ... [Rickettsia prowazekii] pir||F71663 sco2 protein ... precursor (sco2) RP587 - Rickettsia

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_006142 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006142 gi|51473766 >1xvqA 17 163 40 196 7e-07 ... ref|YP_067523.1| Sco2-like prote...in [Rickettsia typhi str. Wilmington] gb|AAU04041.1| ... Sco2-like protein [Rickettsia typhi str. Wil

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003911 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003911 gi|56698151 >1wy2A 3 347 27 396 7e-44 ... gb|AAV96554.1| creatinase [Silici...bacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ref|YP_168523.1| ... creatinase [Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3] ... Length

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_003366 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003366 gi|18309739 >1v7zA 1 255 3 250 3e-61 ... dbj|BAB80463.1| creatinase [Clostr...idium perfringens str. 13] ref|NP_561673.1| ... creatinase [Clostridium perfringens str. 13] ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002947 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002947 gi|26990378 >1wy2A 3 347 23 393 2e-45 ... ref|NP_745803.1| creatinase [Pseu...domonas putida KT2440] gb|AAN69267.1| creatinase ... [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] ... Length = 3

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003030 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003030 gi|15895740 >1w3oA 13 174 5 153 2e-30 ... ref|NP_349089.1| Possible 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics... ... gb|AAK80429.1| Possible 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics ... resistance protein, NimA-family [Clost...ridium ... acetobutylicum ATCC 824] pir||B97205 probable ... 5-Nitroimidazole antibiotics

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_000964 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000964 gi|16078891 >1jmkC 6 230 1056 1270 2e-59 ... ref|NP_389712.1| plipastatin s...ynthetase [Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168] ... emb|CAB13713.1| plipastatin synthetase [B

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003921 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003921 gi|21264213 >1ub4C 1 63 1 63 4e-10 ... gb|AAM39232.1| plasmid stable inheritance... protein I [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ... citri str. 306] ref|NP_644714.1| plasmid stable ... inheritance

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002946 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002946 gi|59800954 >1ub4B 4 109 2 113 3e-22 ... ref|YP_207666.1| putative plasmid stable inheritance... ... gb|AAW89254.1| putative plasmid stable inheritance ... protein putative phage associated prote

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical stbA Plasmid stable inheritance protein ... [Photobacterium profundum] ... Length = ... NC_006370 gi|54307287 >1mwmA 2 317 24 344 3e-96 ... ref|YP_128307.1| Hypothetical stbA Plasmid stable inherita...nce protein ... [Photobacterium profundum SS9] emb|CAG18505.1| ... Hy

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003921 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003921 gi|21264212 >1m1fA 1 109 2 110 1e-34 ... gb|AAM39231.1| plasmid stable inheritance... protein K [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. ... citri str. 306] ref|NP_644713.1| plasmid stable ... inheritance

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_005791 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005791 gi|45358156 >1wcv1 4 241 4 235 5e-21 ... ref|NP_987713.1| walker type ATPas...e [Methanococcus maripaludis S2] emb|CAF30149.1| ... walker type ATPase [Methanococcus maripaludis S2

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_004547 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004547 gi|50121646 >1kmoA 14 661 37 705 8e-56 ... ref|YP_050813.1| exogenous ferri...c siderophore TonB-dependent receptor [Erwinia ... carotovora subsp. atroseptica SCRI1043] emb|CAG75622.1| ... exogenou

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003305 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003305 gi|17937619 >1kmoA 2 661 49 702 6e-54 ... ref|NP_534408.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] gb|AAL44724.1| exogenous ferric sidero...phore ... receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58] ... pir||AF3038 exogenous ferric sider

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003063 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003063 gi|15891046 >1kmoA 2 661 49 702 6e-54 ... ref|NP_534408.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] gb|AAL44724.1| exogenous ferric sidero...phore ... receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58] ... pir||AF3038 exogenous ferric sider

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_002927 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002927 gi|33603734 >1kmoA 3 661 60 754 2e-50 ... ref|NP_891294.1| exogenous ferric... siderophore receptor [Bordetella bronchiseptica ... RB50] gb|AAB51774.1| exogenous ferric siderophor...e ... receptor emb|CAE35124.1| exogenous ferric siderophore ... receptor [Bordetella bronchise

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_005085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005085 gi|34497787 >1f39A 3 98 107 198 1e-23 ... gb|AAQ60004.1| SOS mutagenesis [C...hromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472] ... ref|NP_902002.1| SOS mutagenesis [Chromobacterium ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_005861 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005861 gi|46446610 >1f39A 5 95 55 141 1e-16 ... ref|YP_007975.1| probable SOS mutagenesis... and repair protein UmuD [Parachlamydia sp. ... UWE25] emb|CAF23700.1| probable SOS mutagenesis

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_005070 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005070 gi|33865578 >1f39A 4 97 54 143 4e-22 ... ref|NP_897137.1| putative SOS mutagenesis... protein UmuD [Synechococcus sp. WH 8102] ... emb|CAE07559.1| putative SOS mutagenesis protein

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003233 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003233 gi|19074284 >1ltlE 10 233 29 251 7e-31 ... emb|CAD25394.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM5 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_585790.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1ewiA 5 113 54 161 1e-18 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION F...ACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PROT

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173253 >1a5t0 17 316 29 298 4e-25 ... emb|CAD27104.1| REPLICATION FACT...OR C (ACTIVATOR 1) 37kDa SUBUNIT [Encephalitozoon ... cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597056.1| REPLICATION FA

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173256 >1g8pA 7 311 329 597 1e-04 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31791180 >1ii8A 1 187 1 168 2e-14 ... ref|NP_853673.1| DNA REPLICATION A...D92865.1| ... DNA REPLICATION AND REPAIR PROTEIN RECF (SINGLE-STRAND ... DNA BINDING PROTEIN)

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_003238 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003238 gi|19173256 >1ltlE 44 240 100 302 2e-23 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION... LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003364 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003364 gi|18312259 >1g8pA 7 306 385 684 6e-05 ... emb|CAD25272.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR MCM2 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi ... GB-M1] ref|NP_584768.1| DNA REPLICATION LICENSING

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1jmcA 1 238 213 445 1e-62 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION ...FACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PRO

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_005787 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005787 gi|45198873 >1g8pA 7 311 329 597 1e-04 ... emb|CAD27107.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY MCM7 ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_597059.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002607 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002607 gi|15791012 >1g8pA 7 306 385 684 6e-05 ... emb|CAD25272.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR MCM2 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi ... GB-M1] ref|NP_584768.1| DNA REPLICATION LICENSING

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003317 gi|17987645 >1j1vA 4 94 20 109 8e-10 ... gb|AAL52543.1| CHROMOSOMAL REPLICATION... INITIATOR PROTEIN DNAA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_540279.1| CHROMOSOMAL REPLICATION IN

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003229 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003229 gi|19074034 >1ltlE 2 242 49 290 7e-40 ... emb|CAD25144.1| DNA REPLICATION L...ICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY (MCM4) ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_584640.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_003236 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003236 gi|19074669 >1l1oC 2 175 456 623 1e-43 ... emb|CAD25779.1| DNA REPLICATION ...FACTOR A PROTEIN 1 [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ... ref|NP_586175.1| DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A PRO

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_003229 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003229 gi|19073988 >1a5t0 2 324 6 283 2e-17 ... emb|CAD25098.1| DNA REPLICATION FA...CTOR (ACTIVATOR 1) 36 kDa SUBUNIT ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi GB-M1] ref|NP_584594.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003232 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003232 gi|19173617 >1ltlE 7 224 22 242 3e-38 ... ref|NP_597420.1| DNA REPLICATION ...LICENSING FACTOR OF THE MCM FAMILY (MCM6) ... [Encephalitozoon cuniculi] emb|CAD26597.1| DNA ... REPLICATION

  2. Stepping Motor - Hydraulic Motor Servo Drives for an NC Milling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the retrofit design of the control system of an NC milling machine with a stepping motor and stepping motor - actuated hydraulic motor servo mechanism on the machines X-axis is described. The servo designed in the course of this study was tested practically and shown to be linear - the velocity following errors ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_000117 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000117 gi|15605324 >1jgmA 39 326 7 260 4e-33 ... ref|NP_220110.1| PHP superfamily hydrolase [Chlamydia trachomatis D/UW-3/CX] ... gb|AAC68196.1| PHP... ... trachomatis D/UW-3/CX] pir||G71494 probable php ... hydrolase - Chlamydia trachomatis (sero

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003902 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003902 gi|21229523 >1p6rA 5 81 4 80 4e-10 ... ref|NP_635440.1| methicillin resista...nce protein [Xanthomonas campestris pv. ... campestris str. ATCC 33913] gb|AAM39364.1| methicillin ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_006582 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006582 gi|56962048 >1sd4A 2 99 6 103 1e-24 ... ref|YP_173770.1| methicillin resist...ance regulatory protein MecI [Bacillus clausii ... KSM-K16] dbj|BAD62809.1| methicillin resistance ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_003919 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003919 gi|21240843 >1p6rA 5 81 4 80 8e-10 ... gb|AAM34961.1| methicillin resistanc...e protein [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ... str. 306] ref|NP_640425.1| methicillin resistance ...

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002678 gi|13472874 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_006177 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006177 gi|51893967 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_002967 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002967 gi|42528039 >1b4uB 49 289 86 299 5e-14 ... ref|NP_104441.1| encapsulation p...rotein CapA [Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099] ... dbj|BAB50227.1| encapsulation protein; CapA ...

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31792055 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_002945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002945 gi|31793631 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002755 gi|15841974 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_002755 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002755 gi|15840280 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|15609587 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_003155 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003155 gi|29830077 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_000962 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000962 gi|15608007 >1xsfA 15 102 29 115 2e-23 ... ref|NP_215382.1| POSSIBLE RESUSCITATION...hypothetical protein Rv0867c - Mycobacterium ... tuberculosis (strain H37RV) emb|CAA17673.1| POSSIBLE ... RESUSCITATION

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_004331 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004331 gi|23619306 >1wfiA 3 125 209 328 1e-34 ... ref|NP_705268.1| nuclear movement... protein, putative [Plasmodium falciparum 3D7] ... emb|CAD52505.1| nuclear movement protein, putativ

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_003071 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003071 gi|18403860 >1rl1A 4 90 215 300 7e-09 ... ref|NP_705268.1| nuclear movement... protein, putative [Plasmodium falciparum 3D7] ... emb|CAD52505.1| nuclear movement protein, putative

  19. Large-Nc quantum chromodynamics and harmonic sums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-08

    Jun 8, 2012 ... This has led us to consider a class of analytic number theory .... The self-energy function LR(Q2) in the chiral limit vanishes order by order in QCD ... the 1/Nc expansion, the Goldstone loop corrections are subleading and, ...

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_004310 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004310 gi|23502014 >1y7mA 26 161 48 214 1e-16 ... gb|AAL52029.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE... OPERON OXIDOREDUCTASE CAIA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_539765.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE OPERON

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003317 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003317 gi|17987131 >1y7mA 26 161 48 214 1e-16 ... gb|AAL52029.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE... OPERON OXIDOREDUCTASE CAIA [Brucella melitensis ... 16M] ref|NP_539765.1| PROBABLE CARNITINE OPERON

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_002771 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002771 gi|15829246 >1nm8A 15 579 43 592 3e-82 ... ref|NP_326606.1| CARNITINE O-ACE...TYLTRANSFERASE [Mycoplasma pulmonis UAB CTIP] ... emb|CAC13948.1| CARNITINE O-ACETYLTRANSFERASE ...

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_002655 gi|15803232 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310050 >1r0wC 43 281 30 288 6e-50 ... ref|YP_131070.1| putative ABC-type oligopeptide transport...putative ... ABC-type oligopeptide transportsystem, ATPase component ... [Photobacterium profu

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310056 >1r0wC 45 273 39 283 1e-54 ... ref|YP_131076.1| putative ABC-type metal ion transports...ative ... ABC-type metal ion transportsystem, ATPase component ... [Photobacterium profundum

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_000913 gi|49176263 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f|NP_289264.1| PTS system enzyme II ABC (asc), ... cryptic, transports specific beta-glucosides ... ...ABC (asc), cryptic, transports specific ... beta-glucosides [Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933] ... ... NC_002695 gi|15832825 >1iba0 1 77 8 85 7e-10 ... gb|AAG57822.1| PTS system enzyme II

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_006361 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006361 gi|54022220 >1y7yA 7 68 12 73 3e-05 ... ref|YP_132230.1| hypotethical trans...criptional regulator [Photobacterium profundum ... SS9] emb|CAG22430.1| hypotethical transcriptional ...

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_002758 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002758 gi|15923033 >1sd4A 3 117 7 121 9e-28 ... dbj|BAB56205.1| methicillin resist...ance regulatory protein [Staphylococcus aureus ... subsp. aureus Mu50] sp|Q932L5|MECI_STAAM Methicill...in ... resistance regulatory protein mecI ref|NP_370567.1| ... methicillin resistance regulato

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_002506 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002506 gi|15600953 >1cqxA 1 398 1 388 e-107 ... gb|AAF96096.1| ferrisiderophore re...ductase [Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. ... N16961] ref|NP_232583.1| ferrisiderophore reductase... ... [Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. N16961] ... pir||F82491 ferrisiderophore reductase

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available outer ... membrane receptor for iron transport; outer membrane ... porin protein, putative ferris...porin protein, putative ferrisiderophore receptor ... [Escherichia coli K12] gb|AAC73892.1| putative ... NC_000913 gi|16128773 >1kmoA 12 661 63 760 6e-50 ... ref|NP_415326.1| outer membrane

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002928 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002928 gi|33596933 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 8e-60 ... ref|NP_884576.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella parapertussis 12822] ... emb|CAE37631.1| putative ferrisiderophore rec

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_002929 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002929 gi|33592999 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 1e-60 ... ref|NP_880643.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella pertussis Tohama I] ... emb|CAE42244.1| putative ferrisiderophore rece

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_003143 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003143 gi|16121259 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006677 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006677 gi|58039110 >1kmoA 11 661 79 730 2e-52 ... ref|YP_191074.1| Hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Gluconobacter oxydans ... 621H] gb|AAW60418.1| Hydroxamate-type ferrisid

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_003063 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003063 gi|15890948 >1kmoA 11 661 74 716 3e-76 ... ref|NP_534507.1| hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium ... tumefaciens str. C58] gb|AAL44823.1| hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] pir||AI3050 hydroxamate-type ferris

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_005810 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005810 gi|45443224 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_002927 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002927 gi|33600770 >1kmoA 7 661 65 702 2e-60 ... ref|NP_888330.1| putative ferrisi...derophore receptor [Bordetella bronchiseptica RB50] ... emb|CAE32282.1| putative ferrisiderophore rec

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_004088 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004088 gi|22127219 >1kmoA 5 661 44 699 5e-70 ... emb|CAC89799.1| putative hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia ... pestis CO92] ref|NP_404572.1| putative hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Yersinia pestis CO92] ... pir||AD0117 probable hydroxamate-type ferris

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_006677 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006677 gi|58039006 >1kmoA 12 661 92 773 1e-43 ... ref|YP_190970.1| Hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Gluconobacter oxydans ... 621H] gb|AAW60314.1| Hydroxamate-type ferrisid

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_003305 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003305 gi|17937718 >1kmoA 11 661 74 716 3e-76 ... ref|NP_534507.1| hydroxamate-type ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium ... tumefaciens str. C58] gb|AAL44823.1| hydroxamate-type ... ferris...iderophore receptor [Agrobacterium tumefaciens ... str. C58] pir||AI3050 hydroxamate-type ferris

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21225320 >1k12A 3 151 580 722 8e-15 ... dbj|BAC69434.1| putative mycodextrana...se [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... ref|NP_822899.1| putative mycodextranase [Streptomyces

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_003888 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003888 gi|21225300 >1k12A 3 151 580 722 8e-15 ... dbj|BAC69434.1| putative mycodextrana...se [Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680] ... ref|NP_822899.1| putative mycodextranase [Streptomyces

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_003284 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003284 gi|17551448 >1rw3A 32 443 156 555 3e-25 ... gb|AAF64414.1| Pol [equine foam...y virus] ref|NP_054716.1| Pol [equine foamy virus] ... Length = 400 ... Query: 980 ... KLRIVLD--ASSPPGPEPSL

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_002655 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002655 gi|15800390 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004741 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004741 gi|30062138 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_004431 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004431 gi|26246664 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_002695 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002695 gi|15829972 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|56479698 >1j3eA 1 115 2 116 2e-47 ... pdb|1IU3|F Chain F, Crystal Structure Of The E.Coli... ... Structure Of The E.Coli Seqa Protein Complexed With ... Hemimethylated Dna ... Length = ... Seqa Protein Complexed ... With Hemimethylated Dna pdb|1IU3|C Chain C, Crystal ...

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|24115225 >1e94E 1 443 7 449 e-162 ... pdb|1E94|F Chain F, Hslv-Hslu From E.Coli... pdb|1E94|E Chain E, Hslv-Hslu From ... E.Coli pdb|1HQY|F Chain F, Nucleotide-Dependent ...

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_004337 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004337 gi|56480239 >1us0A 2 305 26 295 5e-61 ... pdb|1MZR|B Chain B, Structure Of Dkga From E.Coli...re ... Of Dkga From E.Coli At 2.13 A Resolution Solved By ... Molecular Replacement ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_000913 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000913 gi|49176300 >1us0A 2 305 26 295 5e-61 ... pdb|1MZR|B Chain B, Structure Of Dkga From E.Coli...re ... Of Dkga From E.Coli At 2.13 A Resolution Solved By ... Molecular Replacement ...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_005085 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005085 gi|34495619 >1t06A 1 193 1 205 2e-24 ... gb|AAQ57843.1| DNA alkylation repa...ir enzyme [Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472] ... ref|NP_899834.1| DNA alkylation repair enzyme ...

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_004307 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004307 gi|23466169 >1u94A 19 326 67 387 5e-28 ... ref|NP_696772.1| alkylation dama...ge repair protein [Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705] ... gb|AAN25408.1| alkylation damage repair protei

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_006087 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006087 gi|50955643 >1u94A 24 325 68 337 3e-32 ... ref|YP_062931.1| alkylation dama...ge DNA repair protein [Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli ... str. CTCB07] gb|AAT89826.1| alkylation damage D

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_005027 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005027 gi|32477023 >1t06A 1 191 9 220 1e-24 ... ref|NP_870017.1| probable DNA alkylation... repair enzyme [Rhodopirellula baltica SH 1] ... emb|CAD79170.1| probable DNA alkylation repair

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_004350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004350 gi|24378587 >1t06A 1 191 11 210 3e-32 ... gb|AAN57848.1| DNA alkylation rep...air enzyme [Streptococcus mutans UA159] ... ref|NP_720542.1| DNA alkylation repair enzyme ...

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_006348 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006348 gi|53726196 >1umqA 5 59 22 76 8e-06 ... ref|ZP_00216666.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion...ef|ZP_00221526.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ...

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_000907 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000907 gi|16272918 >1etoB 1 97 1 98 9e-28 ... ref|ZP_00320663.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion... ... ref|ZP_00156839.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator [Hae

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_002528 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002528 gi|15617004 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 1e-23 ... ref|NP_240217.1| factor-for-inversion... ... DNA-binding protein fis dbj|BAB13103.1| ... factor-for-inversion stimulation protein [Buchnera ... ... aphidicola str. APS (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] pir||G84976 ... factor-for-inversion

  1. ORF Alignment: NC_004459 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004459 gi|27364633 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  2. ORF Alignment: NC_004603 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004603 gi|28899659 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  3. ORF Alignment: NC_004061 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004061 gi|21672661 >1etoB 1 98 1 99 3e-23 ... ref|NP_660728.1| factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Buchnera aphidicola ... str. Sg (Schizaphis graminum)] gb|AAM67939.1| ... factor-for-inversion

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_006512 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006512 gi|56461389 >1etoB 1 98 1 97 7e-25 ... ref|YP_156670.1| Factor for inversion... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ... [Idiomarina loihiensis L2TR] gb|AAV83121.1| Factor for ... inversion

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_006350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006350 gi|53720503 >1umqA 5 59 22 76 8e-06 ... ref|ZP_00216666.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion...ef|ZP_00221526.1| COG2901: Factor for inversion ... stimulation Fis, transcriptional activator ...

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_005139 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005139 gi|37681323 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_006370 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006370 gi|54310477 >1etoB 1 98 1 98 7e-29 ... ref|YP_131497.1| putative factor-for-inversion... stimulation protein [Photobacterium ... profundum SS9] emb|CAG21695.1| putative ... factor-for-inversion

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_006511 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006511 gi|56414667 >1hcrA 1 48 25 72 5e-05 ... ref|YP_151742.1| inversion of adjac... ... 9150] gb|AAV78430.1| inversion of adjacent DNA; at ... locus of e14 element [Salmonella ent

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|25149956 >1qauA 5 99 56 151 2e-04 ... gb|AAN38752.1| axon identity speci...rm b ... [Caenorhabditis elegans] ref|NP_495592.2| SYnapse ... Defective SYD-1, axon identity

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_003280 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003280 gi|25149956 >1tx4A 1 170 679 853 1e-24 ... gb|AAN38752.1| axon identity spe...form b ... [Caenorhabditis elegans] ref|NP_495592.2| SYnapse ... Defective SYD-1, axon identity

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_004722 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_004722 gi|30021592 >1vkpA 12 368 2 333 2e-83 ... ref|NP_833223.1| Agmatine deimina...se [Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579] gb|AAP10424.1| ... Agmatine deiminase [Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579] ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_002607 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002607 gi|15790649 >1b22A 10 70 5 63 2e-10 ... pdb|1XU4|A Chain A, Atpase In Compl...ex With Amp-Pnp, Magnesium And Potassium ... Co-F pdb|1T4G|A Chain A, Atpase In Complex With Amp-Pnp ...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_003551 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003551 gi|20094872 >1b22A 10 70 5 63 2e-10 ... pdb|1XU4|A Chain A, Atpase In Compl...ex With Amp-Pnp, Magnesium And Potassium ... Co-F pdb|1T4G|A Chain A, Atpase In Complex With Amp-Pnp

  14. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669589 >1vhtA 3 200 2 186 2e-14 ... ref|NP_248402.1| alignment in /usr/local/projects...408.1| ... alignment in ... /usr/local/projects/ARG/Intergenic/ARG_R584_orf2.nr ... [Me

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_005791 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005791 gi|45359158 >1q7hA 13 141 446 567 8e-09 ... ref|NP_248016.1| alignment in /usr/local/projects...B99026.1| ... alignment in ... /usr/local/projects/ARG/Intergenic/ARG_R428_orf1.nr ...

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_000909 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000909 gi|15669211 >1q7hA 13 141 446 567 8e-09 ... ref|NP_248016.1| alignment in /usr/local/projects...B99026.1| ... alignment in ... /usr/local/projects/ARG/Intergenic/ARG_R428_orf1.nr ...

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_000918 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_000918 gi|15606868 >1tg6E 33 200 25 196 8e-08 ... ref|NP_214248.1| nodulation competitiveness... protein NfeD [Aquifex aeolicus VF5] ... gb|AAC07639.1| nodulation competitiveness protein... NfeD ... [Aquifex aeolicus VF5] pir||H70456 nodulation ... competitiveness protein NfeD - Aqu

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_005296 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005296 gi|39936538 >1u07A 13 88 186 259 1e-09 ... emb|CAE28917.1| possible energy ...transducer TonB [Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009] ... ref|NP_948814.1| possible energy transducer T

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_002745 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_002745 gi|15925955 >1n8kA 34 374 26 339 4e-06 ... dbj|BAB56414.1| similar to xylitol... ... SA0242 [Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus N315] ... ref|NP_370776.1| similar to xylitol

  20. ORF Alignment: NC_006351 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006351 gi|53722258 >1kolA 2 388 1 341 4e-33 ... ref|YP_111243.1| putative zinc-binding xylitol... ... zinc-binding xylitol/sorbitol dehydrogenase ... [Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243] ... .../sorbitol dehydrogenase [Burkholderia ... pseudomallei K96243] emb|CAH38702.1| putative ...