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Sample records for superior gluteal nerve

  1. Evaluation of the Superior Gluteal Nerve During Proximal Femoral Nailing

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    Mehmet Sonmez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The superior gluteal nerve may be compromised during hip surgery. We retrospectively evaluated the patients who underwent proximal femoral nailing for unstable trochanteric fractures in order to investigate the presence of superior gluteal nerve injury and its clinical findings. Material and Method: Twenty five patients (14 women, 11 men were included in the study who had femoral nailing between January 2004 and March 2010 at Hamidiye Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital Department of Orthopaedics. Two different types of nails which have similar designs and surgical techniques were used for fracture fixation. Patients who had a history of cerebrovascular disease, electromyography findings of polyneuropathy, or degenerative vertebral disease were excluded from the study. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Findings related to acute denervation in the gluteus medius muscle and motor unit action potential changes were accepted as signs of superior gluteal nerve injury. Results: Eight patients were using support during walking and three of these patients had positive Trendelenburg sign, but only one patient had acute denervation signs of the superior gluteal nerve. Discussion: Based on the present study the incidence of iatrogenic nerve injury is a rare complication of proximal femoral nailing. Elderly patients, regardless of whether they have nerve injury, may limp and need to use a walking support.

  2. Damage to the superior gluteal nerve after the Hardinge approach to the hip.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramesh, M

    2012-02-03

    We studied prospectively 81 consecutive patients undergoing hip surgery using the Hardinge (1982) approach. The abductor muscles of the hip in these patients were assessed electrophysiologically and clinically by the modified Trendelenburg test. Power was measured using a force plate. We performed assessment at two weeks, and at three and nine months after operation. At two weeks we found that 19 patients (23%) showed evidence of damage to the superior gluteal nerve. By three months, five of these had recovered. The nine patients with complete denervation at three months showed no signs of recovery when reassessed at nine months. Persistent damage to the nerve was associated with a positive Trendelenburg test.

  3. The surgical anatomy of the superior gluteal nerve and anatomical radiologic bases of the direct lateral approach to the hip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bos (Jan); R. Stoeckart (Rob); A. Klooswijk (Aij); B. van Linge (Bert); R. Bahadoer (R.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn view of the increasing popularity of the direct lateral approach to the hip joint for hemi- or total hip arthroplasty, the location of the superior gluteal nerve (SGN) was studied. This nerve is in danger when using a transgluteal incision. In 20 embalmed specimens the relation of the

  4. Acute gluteal compartment syndrome: superior gluteal artery rupture following a low energy injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aubrey; Chitre, Vivek; Deo, Hersh

    2012-12-17

    Acute compartment syndrome affecting the gluteal region is rare when compared to the same condition in the forearm or calf. When it does occur, it is usually due to prolonged immobilisation in those with altered consciousness. Gluteal compartment syndrome resulting from injury to the superior gluteal artery is extremely rare and to our knowledge has been described only twice--both after high-energy road traffic accidents (RTA). Other cases have described profound hypotension with superior gluteal artery injury after an RTA and falling off a horse, without acute gluteal compartment syndrome. We present a case of gluteal compartment syndrome due to rupture of the superior gluteal artery following a relatively minor fall. The patient required an emergency fasciotomy, which was performed within 4 h of the injury. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of this rare condition.

  5. Ruptured superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm with hemorrhagic shock: Case report

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    Kerem Seref Corbacioglu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of the superior gluteal artery (SGA is very rare and the most common causes are blunt or penetrating pelvic traumas. Although pseudoaneurysm can be asymptomatic at the time of initial trauma, it can be symptomatic weeks, months, even years after initial trauma. We present a case of a ruptured superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm with hemorrhagic shock twenty days after a bomb injury in the Syria civil war. In addition, we review the anatomy of the SGA, clinical presentation and pitfalls of pseudoaneurysm, and imaging and treatment options. Keywords: Pseudoaneurysm, Superior gluteal artery, Pitfall, Angiography

  6. Duplication of Inferior Gluteal Artery and Course of Superior Gluteal Artery Through the Lumbosacral Trunk

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    Satheesha Nayak B

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Internal iliac artery (IIA shows great deal of variations in its branching pattern. The knowledge of its variant branches is required for successful surgical, orthopedic, plastic surgery and radiological procedures. We observed variations of some of the branches of right IIA in an adult male cadaver. The iliolumbar artery originated from the main trunk of the IIA. After this, IIA divided into anterior and posterior divisions. The posterior division gave lateral sacral and superior gluteal arteries. Superior gluteal artery pierced the lumbosacral trunk before leaving the pelvis. The anterior division further divided into anterior and posterior trunks. Anterior trunk gave rise to superior vesical, inferior vesical, middle rectal and obturator arteries. The posterior trunk gave two inferior gluteal arteries and an internal pudendal artery.

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the superior gluteal artery following polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dennis [Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia and Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Legiehn, Gerald M. [Vancouver General Hospital, Interventional Radiology, University of British Columbia and Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Munk, Peter L. [Vancouver General Hospital, MSK Section, University of British Columbia and Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-09-15

    Gluteal artery aneurysms are rare and often secondary to pelvic fractures, blunt or penetrating trauma. We describe a case of a superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm that presented as back pain with numbness and weakness of the lower extremities. Diagnosis was confirmed by color Doppler sonography and angiography. A proximal and distal control was obtained over the aneurysm neck via coil embolization with excellent hemostasis within the pseudoaneurysm and maintenance of perfusion to the left pelvis. (orig.)

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the superior gluteal artery following polytrauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dennis; Legiehn, Gerald M.; Munk, Peter L.

    2007-01-01

    Gluteal artery aneurysms are rare and often secondary to pelvic fractures, blunt or penetrating trauma. We describe a case of a superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm that presented as back pain with numbness and weakness of the lower extremities. Diagnosis was confirmed by color Doppler sonography and angiography. A proximal and distal control was obtained over the aneurysm neck via coil embolization with excellent hemostasis within the pseudoaneurysm and maintenance of perfusion to the left pelvis. (orig.)

  9. Ruptured superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm with hemorrhagic shock: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbacioglu, Kerem Seref; Aksel, Gokhan; Yildiz, Altan

    2016-03-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the superior gluteal artery (SGA) is very rare and the most common causes are blunt or penetrating pelvic traumas. Although pseudoaneurysm can be asymptomatic at the time of initial trauma, it can be symptomatic weeks, months, even years after initial trauma. We present a case of a ruptured superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm with hemorrhagic shock twenty days after a bomb injury in the Syria civil war. In addition, we review the anatomy of the SGA, clinical presentation and pitfalls of pseudoaneurysm, and imaging and treatment options.

  10. Anatomical relation between S1 sacroiliac screws' entrance points and superior gluteal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; You, Libo; Lian, Wei; Zou, Dexin; Dong, Shengjie; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Shudong; Wang, Dan; Li, Jingning; Li, Wenliang; Zhao, Yuchi

    2018-01-18

    To conduct radiologic anatomical study on the relation between S1 sacroiliac screws' entry points and the route of the pelvic outer superior gluteal artery branches with the aim to provide the anatomical basis and technical reference for the avoidance of damage to the superior gluteal artery during the horizontal sacroiliac screw placement. Superior gluteal artery CTA (CT angiography) vascular imaging of 74 healthy adults (37 women and 37 men) was done with 128-slice spiral CT (computed tomography). The CT attendant-measuring software was used to portray the "safe bony entrance area" (hereinafter referred to as "Safe Area") of the S1 segment in the standard lateral pelvic view of three-dimensional reconstruction. The anatomical relation between S1 sacroiliac screws' Safe Area and the pelvic outer superior gluteal artery branches was observed and recorded. The number of cases in which artery branches intersected the Safe Area was counted. The cases in which superior gluteal artery branches disjointed from the Safe Area were identified, and the shortest distance between the Safe Area and the superior gluteal artery branch closest to the Safe Area was measured. Three cases out of the 74 sample cases were excluded from this study as they were found to have no bony space for horizontal screw placement in S1 segment. Among the remaining 71 sample cases, there are 32 cases (45.1%) where the deep superior branch of superior gluteal artery passes through the Safe Area of S1 entrance point. There was no distinguishing feature and rule on how the deep superior branches and the Safe Area overlapped. In the 39 cases in which superior gluteal artery branches disjointed from the Safe Area, the deep superior branches of superior gluteal artery were the branches closest to the Safe Area and the part of the branch closest to the Safe Area was located in front of the widest part of the Safe Area. The shortest distance between the deep superior branch and the Safe Area is 0.86

  11. Muscle-splitting approach to superior and inferior gluteal vessels: versatile source of recipient vessels for free-tissue transfer to sacral, gluteal, and ischial regions.

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    Park, S

    2000-07-01

    The superior gluteal vessel has been reported as a recipient in free-tissue transfer for the coverage of complex soft-tissue defects in the lumbosacral region, where a suitable recipient vessel is difficult to find. The characteristics of proximity, vessel caliber, and constancy make the superior gluteal vessel preferable to previously reported recipient vessels. However, there are technical difficulties in microsurgery (e.g., short pedicle length and deep location) and muscle injury (transection of the muscle) associated with use of the superior gluteal vessel. The purpose of this article is to present a modification of an approach to the gluteal vessel to alleviate technical difficulties and minimize muscle injury. From August of 1997 to January of 1999, six patients received microvascular transfer of the latissimus dorsi muscle or myocutaneous flap to the sacral (4) and ischial (2) regions. The causes of defects were tumor (1), trauma (1), and pressure sores (4). A muscle-splitting approach was used on the superior gluteal vessel and was later applied to the inferior gluteal vessel. The gluteus maximus muscle was split as needed in the direction of its fibers, and the perforators were dissected down to the superior or inferior gluteal artery and vein deep into the muscle. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 22 months, and all of the flaps survived with complete recovery of the lesion. The major drawbacks of using the superior and inferior gluteal vessels can be overcome with the muscle-splitting approach, which provides increased accessibility and additional length to the vascular pedicle while causing minimal injury to the muscle itself. It also proves to be an easy, safe, and reliable method of dissection. When free-tissue transfer to sacral, gluteal, and ischial regions is indicated, the muscle-splitting approach to the superior and inferior gluteal vessels is a recommended option in the selection of a recipient vessel.

  12. Endoscopic treatment of sciatic nerve entrapment in deep gluteal syndrome: Clinical results.

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    Aguilera-Bohorquez, B; Cardozo, O; Brugiatti, M; Cantor, E; Valdivia, N

    2018-05-25

    Deep gluteal syndrome (DGS) is characterized by compression, at extra-pelvic level, of the sciatic nerve within any structure of the deep gluteal space. The objective was to evaluate the clinical results in patients with DGS treated with endoscopic technique. Retrospective study of patients with DGS treated with an endoscopic technique between 2012 and 2016 with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. The patients were evaluated before the procedure and during the first year of follow-up with the WOMAC and VAIL scale. Forty-four operations on 41 patients (36 women and 5 men) were included with an average age of 48.4±14.5. The most common cause of nerve compression was fibrovascular bands. There were two cases of anatomic variant at the exit of the nerve; compression of the sciatic nerve was associated with the use of biopolymers in the gluteal region in an isolated case. The results showed an improvement of functionality and pain measured with the WOMAC scale with a mean of 63 to 26 points after the procedure (Pnerve. Four cases required revision at 6 months following the procedure due to compression of the scarred tissue surrounding the sciatic nerve. Endoscopic release of the sciatic nerve offers an alternative in the management of DGS by improving functionality and reducing pain levels in appropriately selected patients. Copyright © 2018 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps for repair of large sacrococcygeal pressure sores].

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    Hai, Henglin; Li, Huatao; Chen, Yang; Li, Qiang; Wu, Shenggang; Lili, Wang; Yan, Lei; Xiaoying, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps for repairing large sacrococcygeal pressure sores. Between June 2003 and August 2011, 6 paraplegia patients with large sacrococcygeal pressure sores were repaired with the pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps. There were 2 males and 4 females with an average age of 45.6 years (range, 37-62 years). The mean disease duration was 8.4 months (range, 3-26 months). According to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) standard, 6 cases rated as degree IV. The size of pressure sores ranged from 15 cm x 13 cm to 18 cm x 16 cm. The size of flaps ranged from 18 cm x 14 cm to 21 cm x 15 cm. After operation, all flaps survived successfully. The wounds healed by first intention in 5 cases; partial dehiscence of incision occurred in 1 case, which was cured after dressing change for 26 days. Six patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 12.5 months). The appearance and texture of the flaps were smooth and soft with good elasticity and no ulceration. Pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps can repair large sacrococcygeal pressure sores. The appearance of flaps is smooth and has good compression-resistance effect.

  14. Arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery as a complication of posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting: 3D-CT angiography and arterial embolization

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Park, Jong-Beom; Won, Yoo-Dong; Riew, K. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Superior gluteal artery injuries are rare, but potentially serious complications that occur during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting. The authors reported an arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery, which occurred as a complication during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting and was diagnosed with 3D-CT angiography, then treated with arterial embolization.

  15. Deep gluteal syndrome: anatomy, imaging, and management of sciatic nerve entrapments in the subgluteal space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernando, Moises Fernandez; Cerezal, Luis; Perez-Carro, Luis; Abascal, Faustino; Canga, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Deep gluteal syndrome (DGS) is an underdiagnosed entity characterized by pain and/or dysesthesias in the buttock area, hip or posterior thigh and/or radicular pain due to a non-discogenic sciatic nerve entrapment in the subgluteal space. Multiple pathologies have been incorporated in this all-included ''piriformis syndrome,'' a term that has nothing to do with the presence of fibrous bands, obturator internus/gemellus syndrome, quadratus femoris/ischiofemoral pathology, hamstring conditions, gluteal disorders and orthopedic causes. The concept of fibrous bands playing a role in causing symptoms related to sciatic nerve mobility and entrapment represents a radical change in the current diagnosis of and therapeutic approach to DGS. The development of periarticular hip endoscopy has led to an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying piriformis syndrome, which has supported its further classification. A broad spectrum of known pathologies may be located nonspecifically in the subgluteal space and can therefore also trigger DGS. These can be classified as traumatic, iatrogenic, inflammatory/infectious, vascular, gynecologic and tumors/pseudo-tumors. Because of the ever-increasing use of advanced magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) techniques and the excellent outcomes of the new endoscopic treatment, radiologists must be aware of the anatomy and pathologic conditions of this space. MR imaging is the diagnostic procedure of choice for assessing DGS and may substantially influence the management of these patients. The infiltration test not only has a high diagnostic but also a therapeutic value. This article describes the subgluteal space anatomy, reviews known and new etiologies of DGS, and assesses the role of the radiologist in the diagnosis, treatment and postoperative evaluation of sciatic nerve entrapments, with emphasis on MR imaging and endoscopic correlation. (orig.)

  16. Deep gluteal syndrome: anatomy, imaging, and management of sciatic nerve entrapments in the subgluteal space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernando, Moises Fernandez; Cerezal, Luis; Perez-Carro, Luis; Abascal, Faustino; Canga, Ana [Diagnostico Medico Cantabria (DMC), Department of Radiology, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Valdecilla University Hospital, Orthopedic Surgery Department Clinica Mompia (L.P.C.), Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Valdecilla University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2015-03-05

    Deep gluteal syndrome (DGS) is an underdiagnosed entity characterized by pain and/or dysesthesias in the buttock area, hip or posterior thigh and/or radicular pain due to a non-discogenic sciatic nerve entrapment in the subgluteal space. Multiple pathologies have been incorporated in this all-included ''piriformis syndrome,'' a term that has nothing to do with the presence of fibrous bands, obturator internus/gemellus syndrome, quadratus femoris/ischiofemoral pathology, hamstring conditions, gluteal disorders and orthopedic causes. The concept of fibrous bands playing a role in causing symptoms related to sciatic nerve mobility and entrapment represents a radical change in the current diagnosis of and therapeutic approach to DGS. The development of periarticular hip endoscopy has led to an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying piriformis syndrome, which has supported its further classification. A broad spectrum of known pathologies may be located nonspecifically in the subgluteal space and can therefore also trigger DGS. These can be classified as traumatic, iatrogenic, inflammatory/infectious, vascular, gynecologic and tumors/pseudo-tumors. Because of the ever-increasing use of advanced magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) techniques and the excellent outcomes of the new endoscopic treatment, radiologists must be aware of the anatomy and pathologic conditions of this space. MR imaging is the diagnostic procedure of choice for assessing DGS and may substantially influence the management of these patients. The infiltration test not only has a high diagnostic but also a therapeutic value. This article describes the subgluteal space anatomy, reviews known and new etiologies of DGS, and assesses the role of the radiologist in the diagnosis, treatment and postoperative evaluation of sciatic nerve entrapments, with emphasis on MR imaging and endoscopic correlation. (orig.)

  17. Intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescent angiography-assisted modified superior gluteal artery perforator flap for reconstruction of sacral pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Kai; Wu, Chien-Ju; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yu; Chu, Tzi-Shiang; Hsu, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Han-Ting; Liu, Hung-Hui; Chou, Chang-Yi; Wang, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Chin-Ta; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Pressure sores are often observed in patients who are bedridden. They can be a severe problem not only for patients and their caregivers but also for plastic surgeons. Here, we describe a new method of superior gluteal artery perforator flap harvesting and anchoring with the assistance of intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescent angiography. In this report, we describe the procedure and outcomes for 19 patients with grades III and IV sacral pressure sores who underwent the operation between September 2015 and November 2016. All flaps survived, and two experienced wound-edge partial dehiscence. With the assistance of this imaging device, we were able to acquire a reliable superior gluteal artery perforator flap and perform modified operations with it that are safe, easy to learn and associated with fewer complications than are traditional. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Anatomical basis of the lateral superior gluteal artery perforator (LSGAP) flap and role in bilateral breast reconstruction.

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    Fade, Geraldine; Gobel, Fabienne; Pele, Eric; Chaput, Benoit; Garrido, Ignacio; Pinsolle, Vincent; Pelissier, Philippe; Sinna, Raphael

    2013-06-01

    Deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap is one of the gold standards in autologous breast reconstruction. When the abdominal tissue is not available, the superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) is often a second option with its drawback, especially the donor-site deformity. Reports have highlighted that a higher and more lateral SGAP flap can be harvested to overcome several drawbacks of the classical SGAP, allowing in the same procedure a body-contouring procedure. In order to set the anatomical basis of this flap, we proposed to study the characteristics of a reliable and easily identifiable superior and lateral perforator of the superior gluteal artery (lateral SGAP (LSGAP)) situated in the region of the lower body-lift resection allowing to perform bilateral breast reconstruction at the same time. The anatomical study of 50 scans (or 100 buttocks) allows us to set forth a diagnostic assumption on the localisation of the perforator with respect to osseous landmarks (coccyx, iliac crest and great trochanter) which will be verified during the dissection of 10 cadavers (or 20 buttocks) and during the 20 colour Doppler examination (or 40 buttocks). In our computed tomography (CT) scan study, in 96% of cases, the perforator was situated in a circle with a radius≤3 cm with a 95% confidence interval and located at the junction of the proximal third-middle third of the distance summit of the posterior iliac crest (point B), most lateral point of the greater trochanter (point C). This assumption was verified by the cadaveric dissection and in vivo studies. Our study sets the anatomical landmarks of the LSGAP flap. This option allows the raising of an SGAP flap avoiding the main drawbacks of this flap and allows harvesting a flap with the tissue that is often discarded during the body-lift procedure. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risks to the Superior Gluteal Neurovascular Bundle During Iliosacral and Transsacral Screw Fixation: A Computed Tomogram Arteriography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Jed; Collinge, Cory A

    2017-12-01

    Iliosacral (IS) and transsacral (TS) screws are popular techniques to repair complicated injuries to the pelvis. The anatomy of the superior gluteal neurovasculature (SG NV bundle) is well described as running along the posterior ilium, providing innervation and perfusion to important abductor muscles. The method of pelvis fixation least likely to injure the SG NV bundle is unknown. Twenty uninjured patients with a contrasted computed tomogram of the pelvis and lower extremities (CTA) were evaluated. Starting points for an S1 IS screw and S1 and S2 TS screws were estimated on the "ghost" lateral CTA image for those pelvi with safe corridors (>9 mm diameter). The distance from the projected screw to the SG artery was measured. A distance of <3.65 mm (half of a 7.3-mm screw's diameter) was considered likely for NV bundle injury. Of 40 pelvi CTAs (single sides), 10 pelvi (25%) were determined to be inappropriate for an S1 TS screw. The average distances from the screw starting point and the artery were 25.3 mm (±9.2) for S1 IS, 12.4 mm (±9.0) for S1 TS, and 23.5 mm (±10.7) for S2 TS screws, respectively. Ten S1 TS screws (25%) and no S1 IS or S2 TS screws were projected to have caused injury to the SG NV bundle (P < 0.001). Inserting S1 IS and S2 TS screws put the SG NV anatomy at significantly less risk than S1 TS screws. This information may aid in choosing the "best" fixation option for patients with pelvic ring trauma requiring surgery.

  20. Bilateral post-traumatic gluteal compartment syndrome: A case report and review of literature

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    Devashis Barick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluteal compartment is a rare site for compartment syndrome. Gluteal compartment syndrome has most commonly been described in the literature as occurring after prolonged immobility associated with substance abuse, improper operative positioning, sickle cell-induced infarct, post-traumatic and spontaneous superior gluteal artery rupture, exercise, and post-arterial embolization of the internal iliac artery prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Trauma is rarely associated with this syndrome. Gluteal compartment syndrome occurs in approximately 0.9% of trauma patients. Posttraumatic gluteal compartment syndrome develops because of edema with traumatic contusions, crush injuries and hematoma formation due to blunt superior or inferior gluteal artery injuries in all compartments of the gluteal region Only 6 previous cases have been reported in the literature. Two previous cases involved positioning for urological procedures, while the other cited causes of bilateral gluteal compartment syndrome include exercise-induced, trauma, and prolonged immobilization from substance abuse. One of the most immediately devastating results of a missed compartment syndrome is the risk of the development of rhabdomyolysis with the resulting squeal of myoglobinuria, hyperkalemia, and acidosis resulting in renal failure, shock, multiple organ failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and possibly death. Here we report a case of posttraumatic bilateral compartment syndrome which developed secondary to pressure due to patient being trapped under a vehicle following a vehicular accident. He was operated upon and a bilateral fasciotomy was done. Although he did not develop any renal complications, the sciatic nerve palsy on the left side did not recover. The patient is still under follow up.

  1. Ten-year experience of superior gluteal artery perforator flap for reconstruction of sacral defects in Tri-Service General Hospital

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    Chin-Ta Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, sacral sores continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP flap is a reliable flap that preserves the entire contralateral side as a future donor site. On the ipsilateral side, the gluteal muscle itself is preserved and all flaps based on the inferior gluteal artery are still possible. However, the dissection of the perforator is tedious and carries a risk of compromising the perforator vessels. Patients and Methods: During the period between April 2003 and March 2013, 30 patients presented to our section with sacral wounds causing by pressure sores or infected pilonidal cysts. Of a total of 30 patients, 13 were female and 17 were male. Their ages ranged from 22 to 92 years old (mean 79.8 years old. Surgical intervention was performed electively with immediate or delayed reconstruction using a SGAP flap. The characteristics of patients′ age, and sex, and cause of sacral defect, co-morbidities, wound culture, flap size, perforator number, hospital stay, and outcome were reviewed. Results: For all operations, the length of the pedicle dissection will not exceed 1 cm because of the vascular anatomy of the SGAP, which lies adjacent to the sacral region. Due to short pedicle dissection, all SGAP flap were elevated around an hour. All flaps survived except two, which had partial flap necrosis and were finally treated by contralateral V-Y advancement flaps coverage. The mean follow-up period was 14.8 months (range 3-24. No flap surgery-related mortality was found. Conclusion: Perforator-based flaps have become popular in modern reconstructive surgery because of low donor site morbidity and good preservation of muscle. Our study shows that deep pedicle dissection is unnecessary when the surgery involves an accurate indicating perforator, adequate flap size design, and correct selection of flap utilization between tunnel and rotation. The

  2. [The first exploration of a minimally invasive lysis subcutaneouly for the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture based on relatively safe region around standard injection point of gluteal muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Tang, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Si-rong; Zou, Guo-yao; Xiao, Rong-chi; Liu, Rui-duan; Hu, Jun-zu

    2011-06-01

    To explore the solution of choosing the minimally invasive incision site for gluteal muscle contracture patient based on standard injection point of gluteal muscle. from September 2008 to August 2010, 25 patients (14 males and 11 females with an average of 16.5 years, ranging from 12 to 26 years) with injected gluteal muscle contracture were prospectively studied. The course of disease was from 6 to 12 years. Firstly, the connective skin Surface line from anterior superior iliac spine to coccyx (line AD) was delineated and the point (point O) was marked out as the standard gluteal muscle injection site which was on the one-third of the distance from the anterior superior iliac spine(point A) to the coccyx (point D). Secondly, the anterior and posterior edge lines of surface projection of the gluteal muscle contracture banding (line a, line p) were delineated. Thirdly, the distance from B to O and C to O (B is the point of intersection of line a and line AD,C is the point of intersection of line P and line AD)were measured which was the intersection of line a,p and line AD to point O. Lastly, the minimally invasive surgery was operformed via the skin entry of point C. OB = (0 +/- 0.76) cm, OC = (2.86 +/- 0.78) cm, BC = (2.86 +/- 1.01) cm,the mean postoperative drainage was less than 10 ml,there was no nerve damage,hematoma and other complications. All patients achieved the function of squatting in 4 to 6 days. The solution of choosing the minimally invasive incision site based on standard injection point of gluteal muscle has advantages of positioning precisely,handling easily, recoverying quickly, less trauma and safety, etc.

  3. Traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome: assessment of cranial nerve recovery in 33 cases.

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    Chen, Chien-Tzung; Wang, Theresa Y; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Huang, Faye; Lai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-07-01

    Superior orbital fissure syndrome is a rare complication that occurs in association with craniofacial trauma. The characteristics of superior orbital fissure syndrome are attributable to a constellation of cranial nerve III, IV, and VI palsies. This is the largest series describing traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome that assesses the recovery of individual cranial nerve function after treatment. In a review from 1988 to 2002, 33 patients with superior orbital fissure syndrome were identified from 11,284 patients (0.3 percent) with skull and facial fractures. Severity of cranial nerve injury and functional recovery were evaluated by extraocular muscle movement. Patients were evaluated on average 6 days after initial injury, and average follow-up was 11.8 months. There were 23 male patients. The average age was 31 years. The major mechanism of injury was motorcycle accident (67 percent). Twenty-two received conservative treatment, five were treated with steroids, and six patients underwent surgical decompression of the superior orbital fissure. After initial injury, cranial nerve VI suffered the most damage, whereas cranial nerve IV sustained the least. In the first 3 months, recovery was greatest in cranial nerve VI. At 9 months, function was lowest in cranial nerve VI and highest in cranial nerve IV. Eight patients (24 percent) had complete recovery of all cranial nerves. Functional recovery of all cranial nerves reached a plateau at 6 months after trauma. Cranial nerve IV suffered the least injury, whereas cranial nerve VI experienced the most neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve palsies improved to their final recovery endpoints by 6 months. Surgical decompression is considered when there is evidence of bony compression of the superior orbital fissure.

  4. Changes in the frequency of swallowing during electrical stimulation of superior laryngeal nerve in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kojun; Tsujimura, Takanori; Magara, Jin; Sakai, Shogo; Nakamura, Yuki; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the adaptation of the swallowing reflex in terms of reduced swallowing reflex initiation following continuous superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Forty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized with urethane. To identify swallowing, electromyographic activity of the left mylohyoid and thyrohyoid muscles was recorded. To evoke the swallowing response, the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), recurrent laryngeal nerve, or cortical swallowing area was electrically stimulated. Repetitive swallowing evoked by continuous SLN stimulation was gradually reduced, and this reduction was dependent on the resting time duration between stimulations. Prior SLN stimulation also suppressed subsequent swallowing initiation. The reduction in evoked swallows induced by recurrent laryngeal nerve or cortical swallowing area stimulation was less than that following superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Decerebration had no effect on the reduction in evoked swallows. Prior subthreshold stimulation reduced subsequent initiation of swallowing, suggesting that there was no relationship between swallowing movement evoked by prior stimulation and the subsequent reduction in swallowing initiation. Overall, these data suggest that reduced sensory afferent nerve firing and/or trans-synaptic responses, as well as part of the brainstem central pattern generator, are involved in adaptation of the swallowing reflex following continuous stimulation of swallow-inducing peripheral nerves and cortical areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Frequency of the superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in unilateral fourth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Andrea; Ugrin, Maria Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Superior oblique palsy is accompanied in most cases by overaction of the muscle's ipsilateral antagonist, the inferior oblique muscle. Overaction and contracture of the ipsilateral superior rectus muscle in patients with unilateral fourth (trochlear) nerve palsy is seldom discussed in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency of superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy. The records of 198 patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy examined by the authors between July 1987 and July 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent complete eye examination with measurement of the deviation in the 9 positions of gaze and with the head tilted to both sides in all cooperative patients. Selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in these patients were as follows: vertical deviation of 15(Delta) or larger in primary position, equal or larger hypertropia with the ipsilateral forced tilt test than with the eyes looking straight ahead, more than 5(Delta) hypertropia of the affected eye in horizontal gaze to the same side, hypertropia in all upgazes, and overaction of the contralateral superior oblique muscle. Of 198 patients, 33 (16.6%) met the selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome. Superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome frequently occurs in unilateral superior oblique palsy.

  6. A clear map of the lower cranial nerves at the superior carotid triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Garcia-Gonzalez, Ulises; Agrawal, Abhishek; Tavares, Paulo L M S; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2010-07-01

    The lower cranial nerves must be identified to avoid iatrogenic injury during skull base and high cervical approaches. Prompt recognition of these structures using basic landmarks could reduce surgical time and morbidity. The anterior triangle of the neck was dissected in 30 cadaveric head sides. The most superficial segments of the glossopharyngeal, vagus and its superior laryngeal nerves, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves were exposed and designated into smaller anatomic triangles. The midpoint of each nerve segment inside the triangles was correlated to the angle of the mandible (AM), mastoid tip (MT), and bifurcation of the common carotid artery. A triangle bounded by the styloglossus muscle, external carotid artery, and facial artery housed the glossopharyngeal nerve. This nerve segment was 0.06 ± 0.71 cm posterior to the AM and 2.50 ± 0.59 cm inferior to the MT. The vagus nerve ran inside the carotid sheath posterior to internal carotid artery and common carotid artery bifurcation in 48.3% of specimens. A triangle formed by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, sternocleidomastoid muscle, and internal jugular vein housed the accessory nerve, 1.90 ± 0.60 cm posterior to the AM and 2.30 ± 0.57 cm inferior to the MT. A triangle outlined by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, internal jugular vein, and common facial vein housed the hypoglossal nerve, which was 0.82 ± 0.84 cm posterior to the AM and 3.64 ± 0.70 cm inferior to the MT. Comprehensible landmarks can be defined to help expose the lower cranial nerves to avoid injury to this complex region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Superior Oblique Anterior Transposition with Horizontal Recti Recession-Resection for Total Third-Nerve Palsy

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    Muhsin Eraslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To report the results of lateral rectus muscle recession, medial rectus muscle resection, and superior oblique muscle transposition in the restoration and maintenance of ocular alignment in primary position for patients with total third-nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent surgery between March 2007 and September 2011 for total third-nerve palsy were reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative assessment, including a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Results. A total of 6 patients (age range, 14–45 years were included. The median preoperative horizontal deviation was 67.5 Prism Diopter (PD (interquartile range [IQR] 57.5–70 and vertical deviation was 13.5 PD (IQR 10–20. The median postoperative horizontal residual exodeviation was 8.0 PD (IQR 1–16, and the vertical deviation was 0 PD (IQR 0–4. The median correction of hypotropia following superior oblique transposition was 13.5 ± 2.9 PD (range, 10–16. All cases were vertically aligned within 5 PD. Four of the six cases were aligned within 10 PD of the horizontal deviation. Adduction and head posture were improved in all patients. All patients gained new area of binocular single vision in the primary position after the operation. Conclusion. Lateral rectus recession, medial rectus resection, and superior oblique transposition may be used to achieve satisfactory cosmetic and functional results in total third-nerve palsy.

  8. Monitoring of recurrent and superior laryngeal nerve function using an Airwayscope™ during thyroid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijichi, Kei; Sasano, Hiroshi; Harima, Megumi; Murakami, Shingo

    2017-10-01

    In thyroid surgery, intraoperative identification and preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and superior laryngeal nerve external branch (SLNEB) are crucial. Several reports have proposed that electromyography (EMG) monitoring is an acceptable adjunct for identification and preservation of the RLN. However, a limited number of hospitals have access to an EMG monitoring system. Therefore, the development of another viable monitoring method is required. The aim of the present study was to design a new RLN and SLNEB monitoring method combining an Airwayscope™ (AWS) and a facial nerve stimulator. The facial nerve-stimulating electrode stimulates the RLN or SLNEB, so that the movement of the vocal cord may be observed with an AWS. This monitoring method was performed on 10 patients with a thyroid tumor. In all the cases, RLN and SLNEB were identified and vocal cord function was preserved. All the patients exhibited normal vocal cord function following surgery. Thus, the new RLN and SLNEB monitoring method using an AWS and a facial nerve stimulator is useful in thyroid surgery, and this method may be used as a reliable and available alternative to EMG monitoring to ensure the normal function of the vocal cord.

  9. Are nursing students safe when choosing gluteal intramuscular injection locations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, J

    2011-01-01

    Nurses are required to perform gluteal intramuscular (IM) injections in practice. There are dangers associated with erroneous performance of this task, particularly with dorsogluteal injections. Knowledge regarding safe injection practice is therefore vital for nursing students. Fifty-eight second year students at a New Zealand Nursing School were given schematic drawings of the posterior and lateral aspects of the gluteal region. They were asked to mark and justify the safest location for gluteal IM injections. Fifty-seven students marked the dorsal schematic and one the lateral, with 38 (66.7%) marking in the upper outer quadrant (UOQ). Twenty indicating the UOQ (52.6%) wrote 'sciatic' or 'nerve' in justifying their location. Nineteen (33.3%) marked a location outside the UOQ; nine (47.4%) of these mentioned 'sciatic' or 'nerve' as reasons for injection safety. Overall, 50% of students mentioned 'sciatic' or 'nerve' in justifying the safety of their chosen injection location. Results suggest some second year nursing students do not understand safe gluteal IM injection locations and rationale. Current teaching practices and IM injection techniques could be revisited to prepare students more effectively; this may help prevent pathologies arising from this procedure.

  10. Prospective Evaluation of Electromyography-Guided Phrenic Nerve Monitoring During Superior Vena Cava Isolation to Anticipate Phrenic Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Ichihara, Noboru; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Araki, Makoto; Takagi, Takamitsu; Iwasawa, Jin; Kuroi, Akio; Hirao, Kenzo; Iesaka, Yoshito

    2016-04-01

    Right phrenic nerve injury (PNI) is a major concern during superior vena cava (SVC) isolation due to the anatomical close proximity. The functional and histological severity of PNI parallels the degree of the reduction in the compound motor action potential (CMAP) amplitude. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring CMAPs during SVC isolation to anticipate PNI during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Thirty-nine paroxysmal AF patients were prospectively enrolled. Radiofrequency energy was delivered point-by-point for 30 seconds with 20 W until eliminating all SVC potentials after the pulmonary vein isolation. Right diaphragmatic CMAPs were obtained from modified surface electrodes by pacing from the right subclavian vein. Radiofrequency applications were applied without fluoroscopy under CMAP monitoring at sites with phrenic nerve capture by high output pacing. Electrical SVC isolation was successfully achieved with a mean of 9.4 ± 3.3 applications in all patients. In 3 (7.5%) patients, the SVC was isolated without radiofrequency delivery at phrenic nerve capture sites. Among a total of 346 applications in the remaining 36 patients, 71 (20.5%) were delivered while monitoring CMAPs. In 1 (1.4%) application, the RF application was interrupted due to a decrease in the CMAP amplitude. However, no PNI was detected on fluoroscopy, and the decreased amplitude recovered spontaneously. The remaining 70 (98.6%) applications exhibited no significant changes in the CMAP amplitude throughout the applications (from 1.01 ± 0.47 to 0.98 ± 0.45 mV, P = 0.383). Stable right diaphragmatic CMAPs could be obtained, and monitoring CMAPs might be useful for anticipating right PNI during SVC isolation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Anterior and middle superior alveolar nerve block for anesthesia of maxillary teeth using conventional syringe

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    Ignacio Velasco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental procedures in the maxilla typically require multiple injections and may inadvertently anesthetize facial structures and affect the smile line. To minimize these inconveniences and reduce the number of total injections, a relatively new injection technique has been proposed for maxillary procedures, the anterior and middle superior alveolar (AMSA nerve block, which achieves pulpal anesthesia from the central incisor to second premolar through palatal approach with a single injection. The purpose of this article is to provide background information on the anterior and middle superior alveolar nerve block and demonstrate its success rates of pulpal anesthesia using the conventional syringe. Materials and Methods: Thirty Caucasian patients (16 men and 14 women with an average age of 22 years-old, belonging to the School of Dentistry of Los Andes University, were selected. All the patients received an AMSA nerve block on one side of the maxilla using the conventional syringe, 1 ml of lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:100.000 was injected to all the patients. Results: The AMSA nerve block obtained a 66% anesthetic success in the second premolar, 40% in the first premolar, 60% in the canine, 23.3% in the lateral incisor, and 16.7% in the central incisor. Conclusions: Because of the unpredictable anesthetic success of the experimental teeth and variable anesthesia duration, the technique is disadvantageous for clinical application as the first choice, counting with other techniques that have greater efficacy in the maxilla. Although, anesthetizing the teeth without numbing the facial muscles may be useful in restorative dentistry.

  12. Anatomical etiology of “pseudo-sciatica” from superior cluneal nerve entrapment: a laboratory investigation

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    Konno T

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Konno,1 Yoichi Aota,2 Hiroshi Kuniya,1 Tomoyuki Saito,1 Ning Qu,3 Shogo Hayashi,3 Shinichi Kawata,3 Masahiro Itoh3 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Department of Spine & Spinal Cord Surgery, Yokohama Brain and Spine Center, Yokohama, 3Department of Anatomy, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Objective: The superior cluneal nerve (SCN may become entrapped where it pierces the thoracolumbar fascia over the iliac crest; this can cause low back pain (LBP and referred pain radiating into the posterior thigh, calf, and occasionally the foot, producing the condition known as “pseudo-sciatica.” Because the SCN was thought to be a cutaneous branch of the lumbar dorsal rami, originating from the dorsal roots of L1–L3, previous anatomical studies failed to explain why SCN causes “pseudo-sciatica”. The purpose of the present anatomical study was to better elucidate the anatomy and improve the understanding of “pseudo-sciatica” from SCN entrapment. Materials and methods: SCN branches were dissected from their origin to termination in subcutaneous tissue in 16 cadavers (5 male and 11 female with a mean death age of 88 years (range 81–101 years. Special attention was paid to identify SCNs from their emergence from nerve roots and passage through the fascial attachment to the iliac crest. Results: Eighty-one SCN branches were identified originating from T12 to L5 nerve roots with 13 branches passing through the osteofibrous tunnel. These 13 branches originated from L3 (two sides, L4 (six sides, and L5 (five sides. Ten of the 13 branches showed macroscopic entrapment in the tunnel. Conclusion: The majority of SCNs at risk of nerve entrapment originated from the lower lumbar nerve. These anatomical results may explain why patients with SCN entrapment often evince leg pain or tingling that mimics sciatica. Keywords: superior cluneal nerve, entrapment neuropathy, dorsal rami

  13. Morphological and radiological study of ossified superior transverse scapular ligament as potential risk factor of suprascapular nerve entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polguj, Michał; Sibiński, Marcin; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej; Waszczykowski, Michał; Majos, Agata; Topol, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    The suprascapular notch is covered superiorly by the superior transverse scapular ligament. This region is the most common place of suprascapular nerve entrapment formation. The study was performed on 812 specimens: 86 dry scapulae, 104 formalin-fixed cadaveric shoulders, and 622 computer topography scans of scapulae. In the cases with completely ossified superior transverse scapular ligament, the following measurements were performed: proximal and distal width of the bony bridge, middle transverse and vertical diameter of the suprascapular foramen, and area of the suprascapular foramen. An ossified superior transverse scapular ligament was observed more often in men and in the right scapula. The mean age of the subjects with a completely ossified superior transverse scapular ligament was found to be similar than in those without ossification. The ossified band-shaped type of superior transverse scapular ligament was more common than the fan-shaped type and reduced the space below the ligament to a significantly greater degree. The ossified band-shaped type should be taken into consideration as a potential risk factor in the formation of suprascapular nerve entrapment. It could explain the comparable frequency of neuropathy in various populations throughout the world despite the significant differences between them in occurrence of ossified superior transverse scapular ligament.

  14. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the cricothyroid muscle in patients with suspected superior laryngeal nerve weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Marco; Rubin, Adam; Cox, Paul; Landini, Fernando; Jackson-Menaldi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    In this retrospective case study, we report the apparent clinical effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in combination with voice therapy (VT) for rehabilitating dysphonia secondary to suspected superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) weakness in two female patients. Both patients failed or plateaued with traditional VT but had significant improvement with the addition of NMES of the cricothyroid muscle and SLN using a VitalStim unit. Stimulation was provided simultaneously with voice exercises based on musical phonatory tasks. Both acoustic analysis and endoscopic evaluation demonstrated important improvements after treatment. In the first patient, the major change was obtained within the primo passaggio region; specifically, a decrease in voice breaks was demonstrated. In the second patient, an improvement in voice quality (less breathiness) and vocal range were the most important findings. Additionally, each patient reported a significant improvement in their voice complaints. Neuromuscular laryngeal electrical stimulation in combination with vocal exercises might be a useful tool to improve voice quality in patients with SLN injury. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Multicenter Review of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Injury Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel; Kanter, Adam S

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective multicenter case-series study; case report and review of the literature. The anatomy and function of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) are well described; however, the consequences of SLN injury remain variable and poorly defined. The prevalence of SLN injury as a consequence of cervical spine surgery is difficult to discern as its clinical manifestations are often inconstant and frequently of a subclinical degree. A multicenter study was performed to better delineate the risk factors, prevalence, and outcomes of SLN injury. A retrospective multicenter case-series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AO Spine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received subaxial cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed to identify occurrence of 21 predefined treatment complications. Descriptive statistics were provided for baseline patient characteristics. A retrospective review of the neurosurgical literature on SLN injury was also performed. A total of 8887 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery at the participating institutions were screened, and 1 case of SLN palsy was identified. The prevalence ranged from 0% to 1.25% across all centers. The patient identified underwent a C4 corpectomy. The SLN injury was identified after the patient demonstrated difficulty swallowing postoperatively. He underwent placement of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube and his SLN palsy resolved by 6 weeks. This multicenter study demonstrates that identification of SLN injury occurs very infrequently. Symptomatic SLN injury is an exceedingly rare complication of anterior cervical spine surgery. The SLN is particularly vulnerable when exposing the more rostral levels of the cervical spine. Careful dissection and retraction of the longus coli may decrease the risk of SLN injury during anterior cervical surgery.

  16. Cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafeezur, Rahman Md; Zakir, Hossain Md; Takatsuji, Hanako; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Kensuke; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been reported to be involved in affecting various biological functions through binding with cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2). The present study was designed to investigate whether swallowing, an essential component of feeding behavior, is modulated after the administration of cannabinoid. The swallowing reflex evoked by the repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve in rats was recorded before and after the administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55-212-2 (WIN), with or without CB1 or CB2 antagonist. The onset latency of the first swallow and the time intervals between swallows were analyzed. The onset latency and the intervals between swallows were shorter after the intravenous administration of WIN, and the strength of effect of WIN was dose-dependent. Although the intravenous administration of CB1 antagonist prior to intravenous administration of WIN blocked the effect of WIN, the administration of CB2 antagonist did not block the effect of WIN. The microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist directly into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) prior to intravenous administration of WIN also blocked the effect of WIN. Immunofluorescence histochemistry was conducted to assess the co-localization of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) or glutamate in the NTS. CB1 receptor was co-localized more with GAD67 than glutamate in the NTS. These findings suggest that cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex via CB1 receptors. Cannabinoids may attenuate the tonic inhibitory effect of GABA (gamma-aminobuteric acid) neurons in the central pattern generator for swallowing.

  17. Cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Md Mostafeezur

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids have been reported to be involved in affecting various biological functions through binding with cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1 and 2 (CB2. The present study was designed to investigate whether swallowing, an essential component of feeding behavior, is modulated after the administration of cannabinoid. The swallowing reflex evoked by the repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve in rats was recorded before and after the administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55-212-2 (WIN, with or without CB1 or CB2 antagonist. The onset latency of the first swallow and the time intervals between swallows were analyzed. The onset latency and the intervals between swallows were shorter after the intravenous administration of WIN, and the strength of effect of WIN was dose-dependent. Although the intravenous administration of CB1 antagonist prior to intravenous administration of WIN blocked the effect of WIN, the administration of CB2 antagonist did not block the effect of WIN. The microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist directly into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS prior to intravenous administration of WIN also blocked the effect of WIN. Immunofluorescence histochemistry was conducted to assess the co-localization of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67 or glutamate in the NTS. CB1 receptor was co-localized more with GAD67 than glutamate in the NTS. These findings suggest that cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex via CB1 receptors. Cannabinoids may attenuate the tonic inhibitory effect of GABA (gamma-aminobuteric acid neurons in the central pattern generator for swallowing.

  18. Patterns of lipofuscin accumulation in ganglionic nerve cells of superior cervical ganglion in humans

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    Živković Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Considering available literature lipofuscin is a classical age pigment of postmitotic cells, and a consistently recognized phenomenon in humans and animals. Lipofuscin accumulation is characteristic for nerve cells that are postmitotic. This research was focused on lipofuscin accumulation in ganglionic cells (GC (postganglionic sympathetic cell bodies of superior cervical ganglion in humans during ageing. Methods. We analysed 30 ganglions from cadavers ranging from 20 to over 80 years of age. As material the tissue samples were used from the middle portion of the ganglion, which was separated from the surrounding tissue by the method of macrodissection. The tissue samples were routinely fixed in 10% neutral formalin and embedded in paraffin for classical histological analysis, then three consecutive (successive sections 5 μm thick were made and stained with hematoxylin and eosin method (HE, silver impregnation technique by Masson Fontana and trichrome stain by Florantin. Results. Immersion microscopy was used to analyse patterns of lipofuscin accumulation during ageing making possible to distinguish diffuse type (lipofuscin granules were irregularly distributed and non-confluent, unipolar type (lipofuscin granules were grouped at the end of the cell, bipolar type (lipofuscin granules were concentrated at the two opposite ends of a cell with the nucleus in between at the center of a cell, annular type (lipofuscin granules were in the shape of a complete or incomplete ring around the nucleus and a cell completely filled with lipofuscin (two subtypes distinguishing, one with visible a nucleus, and the other with invisible one. Even at the age of 20 there were cells with lipofuscin granules accumulated in diffuse way, but in smaller numbers; the GC without lipofuscin were dominant. Growing older, especially above 60 years, all of the above mentioned patterns of lipofuscin accumulation were present with the evident increase in cells

  19. Clinical anatomy of the superior cluneal nerve in relation to easily ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnostic criteria for SCN entrapment include anaesthesia of the area supplied by the SCN ... (PSIS) to the SCN and from the midline lumbar spinous processes to the nerve. ... The most widely accepted and first-line treatment for SCN.

  20. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following bariatric surgery: A rare but important complication

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    Bernadette Pereira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gluteal Compartment Syndrome is a rare condition caused by excessive pressure within the gluteal compartments which leads to a number of potentially serious sequelae including rhabdomyolysis, nerve damage, renal failure and death. As bariatric patients are heavy and during prolonged bariatric procedures lie in one position for extended periods of time, they are especially susceptible to developing this complication. It is therefore essential that bariatric surgeons are aware of this complication and how to minimise the chances of it occurring and how to diagnose it. We describe a case of Gluteal Compartment Syndrome in a patient following a gastric bypass and review the aetiology, pathophysiology, treatment and prevention of this complication.

  1. Computed tomographic measurement of gluteal subcutaneous fat thickness in reference to failure of gluteal intramuscular injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbridge, B.E. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Royal Univ. Hospital, Academic Dept. of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)]. E-mail: brent.burbridge@usask.ca

    2007-04-15

    Casual observation of gluteal region fat thickness on computed tomography (CT) of the pelvis leads to the hypothesis that, in some individuals intended intramuscular injections are not properly deposited in the gluteal muscle. We gathered and analyzed data to determine whether this hypothesis was true. CT scans of the pelvis were analyzed over an 18-day period in the tall of 2005. The thickness of gluteal region subcutaneous fat was measured in a standardized manner. Measurement of gluteal region subcutaneous fat thickness was performed for 298 pelvic CT scans. There were 150 male subjects and 148 female subjects. The average gluteal fat thickness for female subjects was 33.2 mm, whereas the average for male subjects was 23.1 mm. Analysis revealed a significant difference in gluteal region fat thickness between male and female subjects. A 37-mm needle, allowing for 6-mm penetration of the gluteal muscle, would not have entered the gluteal muscle fibres in 81 of 148 female subjects (54.7%), in 21 of 150 male subjects (14%), and in 102 of the 298 total sample (34.2%). Analysis revealed a significant difference between male and female subjects with regard to gluteal muscle needle penetration. An overall predicted failure rate of 34% was identified for intended gluteal intramuscular injections when the standard technique was used. This is important information for care providers who inject medications in the gluteal region. In a significant number of patients, the medications will be injected subcutaneously and not into the gluteal musculature, possibly altering the pharmacokinetics of the administered medication. An alternative injection site should probably be chosen to increase the success rate of intramuscular deposition of medications and vaccines in unselected adults. (author)

  2. Gluteal muscle contracture: diagnosis and management options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Saroj; Meng, Chunqing; Wang, Xiaohong; Chaudhary, Nabin; Jin, Shengyang; Yang, Shuhua; Wang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), a debilitating disease, exists all over the globe but it is much more prevalent in China. Patients typically present with abduction and external rotation of the hip and are unable to bring both the knees together while squatting. Multiple etiologies have been postulated, the commonest being repeated intramuscular injection into the buttocks. The disease is diagnosed primarily by clinical features but radiological features are necessary for the exclusion of other pathological conditions. Non-operative treatment with physiotherapy can be tried before surgery is considered but it usually fails. Different surgical techniques have been described and claimed to have a better outcome of one over another but controversy still exists. Based on published literatures, the clinical outcome is exceptionally good in all established methods of surgery. However, endoscopic surgery is superior to conventional open surgery in terms of cosmetic outcome with fewer complications. Nevertheless, its use has been limited by lack of adequate knowledge, instrumentations, and some inherent limitations. Above all, post-operative rehabilitation plays a key role in better outcome, which however should be started gradually. PMID:28059055

  3. Effects of Voice Therapy on Laryngeal Motor Units During Phonation in Chronic Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paresis Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mami; Hitomi, Takefumi; Takekawa, Takashi; Tsuji, Takuya; Kishimoto, Yo; Hirano, Shigeru

    2017-09-26

    Injury to the superior laryngeal nerve can result in dysphonia, and in particular, loss of vocal range. It can be an especially difficult problem to address with either voice therapy or surgical intervention. Some clinicians and scientists suggest that combining vocal exercises with adjunctive neuromuscular electrical stimulation may enhance the positive effects of voice therapy for superior laryngeal nerve paresis (SLNP). However, the effects of voice therapy without neuromuscular electrical stimulation are unknown. The purpose of this retrospective study was to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of voice therapy for rehabilitating chronic SLNP dysphonia in two subjects, using interspike interval (ISI) variability of laryngeal motor units by laryngeal electromyography (LEMG). Both patients underwent LEMG and were diagnosed with having 70% recruitment of the cricothyroid muscle, and 70% recruitment of the cricothyroid and thyroarytenoid muscles, respectively. Both patients received voice therapy for 3 months. Grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, stroboscopic examination, aerodynamic assessment, acoustic analysis, and Voice Handicap Index-10 were performed before and after voice therapy. Mean ISI variability during steady phonation was also assessed. After voice therapy, both patients showed improvement in vocal assessments by acoustic, aerodynamic, GRBAS, and Voice Handicap Index-10 analysis. LEMG indicated shortened ISIs in both cases. This study suggests that voice therapy for chronic SLNP dysphonia can be useful for improving SLNP and voice quality. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anterior superior alveolar nerve injury after extended endoscopic medial maxillectomy: a preclinical study to predict neurological morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Alberto; Mattavelli, Davide; Ferrari, Marco; Rampinelli, Vittorio; Lancini, Davide; Ravanelli, Marco; Bertazzoni, Giacomo; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Buffoli, Barbara; Doglietto, Francesco; Nicolai, Piero

    2017-10-01

    Endoscopic medial maxillectomies (EMMs) are used to optimize exposure of the maxillary sinus and retromaxillary areas. Although in type D EMM (Sturmann-Canfield procedure) the anterior superior alveolar nerve (ASAN) is always at risk of injury, only 29% of patients complained of alveolar process and dental anesthesia. The purpose of this anatomical study is to assess the neural anastomotic network of the ASAN (ASAN-NAN) and describe different extensions of type D EMMs in a preclinical setting. The ASAN and its medial anastomotic branches (MABs) and lateral anastomotic branches (LABs) were evaluated by cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Five different extensions of type D (D1 to D5) EMMs were identified and nerves at risk of injury in each type were assessed by CBCT. Moreover, quantification of surgical corridors was performed on cadaver heads with a neuronavigation system. Fifty-seven CBCT scans were analyzed. The ASAN would be spared in 16.3% of cases with a type D1 EMM, while it would be injured in the majority of type D2 to D5 resections. At least 1 nerve of the ASAN-NAN was spared in 96.6%, 93%, 74.6%, 0%, and 65.8% of type D1 to D5 EMMs, respectively. Two cadaver heads were dissected and the incremental volume and number of maxillary subsites exposed was assessed in type D1 to D5 EMMs. ASAN function impairment is probably compensated by LABs and MABs. If this hypothesis will be validated in a prospective study on patients, preoperative CBCT evaluation could predict neurological morbidity after type D EMM, and allow tailoring the procedure to minimize impairment of the ASAN-NAN. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  5. High-Frequency Electrical Modulation of the Superior Ovarian Nerve as a Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikov, Victor; Sridhar, Arun; Lara, Hernan E

    2018-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent ovarian pathology in women, with excessive sympathetic activity in the superior ovarian nerve (SON) playing an important role in inducing the PCOS symptoms in the rats and humans. Our previous studies have shown that surgical transection of the SON can reverse the disease progression, prompting us to explore the effect of the kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) modulation as a method of reversible non-surgical suppression of the nerve activity in the rodent model of PCOS. 56 animals were randomly allocated to three groups: the Control group ( n = 18), the PCOS group ( n = 15), and the PCOS + KHFAC group ( n = 23). The physiological, anatomical, and biochemical parameters of ovarian function were evaluated during the progression of the experimentally-induced PCOS and during long-term KHFAC modulation applied for 2-3 weeks. The KHFAC modulation has been able to reverse the pathological changes in assessed PCOS parameters, namely the irregular or absent estrous cycling, formation of ovarian cysts, reduction in the number of corpora lutea, and ovarian norepinephrine concentration. The fertility capacity was similar in the PCOS and the PCOS + KHFAC groups, indicating the safety of KHFAC modulation approach. In summary, these results suggest that the KHFAC modulation approach of suppressing the SON activity could become a useful treatment modality for PCOS and potentially other pathological ovarian conditions.

  6. High-Frequency Electrical Modulation of the Superior Ovarian Nerve as a Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Pikov

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most prevalent ovarian pathology in women, with excessive sympathetic activity in the superior ovarian nerve (SON playing an important role in inducing the PCOS symptoms in the rats and humans. Our previous studies have shown that surgical transection of the SON can reverse the disease progression, prompting us to explore the effect of the kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC modulation as a method of reversible non-surgical suppression of the nerve activity in the rodent model of PCOS. 56 animals were randomly allocated to three groups: the Control group (n = 18, the PCOS group (n = 15, and the PCOS + KHFAC group (n = 23. The physiological, anatomical, and biochemical parameters of ovarian function were evaluated during the progression of the experimentally-induced PCOS and during long-term KHFAC modulation applied for 2–3 weeks. The KHFAC modulation has been able to reverse the pathological changes in assessed PCOS parameters, namely the irregular or absent estrous cycling, formation of ovarian cysts, reduction in the number of corpora lutea, and ovarian norepinephrine concentration. The fertility capacity was similar in the PCOS and the PCOS + KHFAC groups, indicating the safety of KHFAC modulation approach. In summary, these results suggest that the KHFAC modulation approach of suppressing the SON activity could become a useful treatment modality for PCOS and potentially other pathological ovarian conditions.

  7. Organization of the auditory brainstem in a lizard, Gekko gecko. I. Auditory nerve, cochlear nuclei, and superior olivary nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yezhong; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine E

    2012-06-01

    We used tract tracing to reveal the connections of the auditory brainstem in the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). The auditory nerve has two divisions, a rostroventrally directed projection of mid- to high best-frequency fibers to the nucleus angularis (NA) and a more dorsal and caudal projection of low to middle best-frequency fibers that bifurcate to project to both the NA and the nucleus magnocellularis (NM). The projection to NM formed large somatic terminals and bouton terminals. NM projected bilaterally to the second-order nucleus laminaris (NL), such that the ipsilateral projection innervated the dorsal NL neuropil, whereas the contralateral projection crossed the midline and innervated the ventral dendrites of NL neurons. Neurons in NL were generally bitufted, with dorsoventrally oriented dendrites. NL projected to the contralateral torus semicircularis and to the contralateral ventral superior olive (SOv). NA projected to ipsilateral dorsal superior olive (SOd), sent a major projection to the contralateral SOv, and projected to torus semicircularis. The SOd projected to the contralateral SOv, which projected back to the ipsilateral NM, NL, and NA. These results suggest homologous patterns of auditory connections in lizards and archosaurs but also different processing of low- and high-frequency information in the brainstem. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Planning a Pedicled Perforator Flap for Pressure Sores in the Gluteal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-June; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Jeon, Byung-Joon; Woo, Kyong-Je

    2018-04-01

    Pedicled perforator flaps (PPFs) have been widely used to treat pressure sores in the gluteal region. Selection of a reliable perforator is crucial for successful surgical treatment of pressure sores using PPFs. In this study, we evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in planning PPF reconstruction of pressure sores in the gluteal region. A retrospective chart review was performed in patients who had undergone these PPF reconstructions and who had received preoperative MRI. Preoperatively, the extent of infection and necrotic tissue was evaluated using MRI, and a reliable perforator was identified, considering the perforator location in relation to the defect, perforator size, and perforator courses. Intraoperatively, the targeted perforator was marked on the skin at the locations measured on the MRI images, and the marked location was confirmed using intraoperative handheld Doppler. Superior gluteal artery, inferior gluteal artery, or parasacral perforators were used for the PPFs. Surgical outcomes were evaluated. A total of 12 PPFs were performed in 12 patients. Superior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 7 patients, inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 3 patients, and parasacral perforator flaps were performed in 2 patients. We could identify a reliable perforator on MRI, and it was found at the predicted locations in all cases. There was only one case of partial flap necrosis. There was no recurrence of the pressure sores during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months (range = 3-15 months). In selected patients with gluteal pressure sores, MRI is a suitable means for not only providing information about disease extent and comorbidities but also for evaluating perforators for PPF reconstructions.

  9. Fatal Complications of Aesthetic Techniques: The Gluteal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkiewicz, Amy V; Kenerson, Katherine; Hutchins, Kenneth D; Garavan, Fintan; Lew, Emma O; Shuman, Mark J

    2018-02-21

    Cosmetic procedures are common and utilize many techniques to obtain aesthetically good outcomes for patient satisfaction with acceptable safety standards. Cosmetic procedures that involve the gluteal region are becoming increasingly popular as various procedures can target the gluteal region such as liposuction, tumescent liposuction, cosmetic filler injections, autologous fat transfer, depot drug delivery, and implants. Complications of cosmetic gluteal procedures can be localized or systemic with systemic complications being responsible for most deaths. These reported systemic complications include sepsis, thromboembolism, fat embolism with or without fat embolism syndrome, macroscopic fat embolism, anesthesia-related and blood volume abnormalities. We herein report 10 deaths due to elective gluteal cosmetic procedures. Autologous fat transfer (fat grafting, lipoinjection) following liposuction resulted in 8 of 10 fatal outcomes of the gluteal aesthetic procedures. A comprehensive discussion of gluteal anatomy, gluteal contouring procedures, and the approach to such cases is presented along with the autopsy findings of the reported cases. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Bilateral gluteal abscesses and myofibrosis complicating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: There is paucity of reports on the musculoskeletal complications of pentazocine abuse in Nigeria.The aim was to report a case of bilateral gluteal abscesses and myofibrosis as a consequence of parenteral pentazocine abuse. CASE SUMMARY: We report a case of a 39 year old housewife who presented ...

  11. Bowel function and quality of life after superior mesenteric nerve plexus transection in right colectomy with D3 extended mesenterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Y; Stimec, B; Andersen, S N; Lindstrom, J C; Pfeffer, F; Oresland, T; Ignjatovic, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the impact of injury to the superior mesenteric nerve plexus caused by right colectomy with D3 extended mesenterectomy as performed in the prospective multicenter trial: "Safe Radical D3 Right Hemicolectomy for Cancer through Preoperative Biphasic Multi-detector Computed Tomography" in which all soft tissue surrounding the superior mesenteric vessels from the level of the middle colic artery to that of the ileocolic artery was removed. Bowel function and gastrointestinal quality of life in two consecutive cohorts that underwent right colectomy with and without D3 extended mesenterectomy were compared. Main outcome measures were the Diarrhea Assessment Scale (DAS) and Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI). The data were collected prospectively through telephone interviews. Forty-nine patients per group, comparable for age, sex, length of bowel resected but with significantly shorter follow-up time in the experimental group, were included. There was no difference in total DAS scores, subscores or additional questions except for higher bowel frequency scores in the D3 group (p = 0.02). Comparison of total GIQLI scores and subscales showed no difference between groups. Regression analysis with correction for confounding factors showed 0.48 lower bowel frequency scores in the D2 group (p = 0.022). Within the D3 group presence of jejunal arteries cranial to the D3 dissection area showed 1.78 lower DAS scores and 0.7 lower bowel frequency scores. Small bowel denervation after right colectomy with D3 extended mesenterectomy leads to increased bowel frequency but does not impact gastrointestinal quality of life. Individual anatomical variants can affect postoperative bowel function differently despite standardized surgery.

  12. Unilateral sectioning of the superior ovarian nerve of rats with polycystic ovarian syndrome restores ovulation in the innervated ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Ledesma Leticia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study tested the hypothesis that if polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS results from activating the noradrenergic outflow to the ovary, unilaterally sectioning the superior ovarian nerve (SON will result in ovulation by the denervated ovary, and the restoration of progesterone (P4, testosterone (T and estradiol (E2 normal serum level. A single 2 mg dose of estradiol valerate (EV to adult rats results in the development of a syndrome similar to the human PCOS. Ten-day old rats were injected with EV or vehicle solution (Vh and were submitted to sham surgery, unilateral or bilateral sectioning of the SON at 24-days of age. The animals were sacrificed at 90 to 92 days of age, when they presented vaginal estrus preceded by a pro-estrus smear. In EV-treated animals, unilateral sectioning of the SON restored ovulation by the innervated ovary and unilateral or bilateral sectioning of the SON normalized testosterone and estradiol levels. These results suggest that aside from an increase in ovarian noradrenergic tone in the ovaries, in the pathogenesis of the PCOS participate other neural influences arriving to the ovaries via the SON, regulating spontaneous ovulation. Changes in P4, T and E2 serum levels induced by EV treatment seem to be controlled by neural signals arising from the abdominal wall and other signals arriving to the ovaries through the SON, and presents asymmetry.

  13. Sacral pressure sore reconstruction – the pedicled superior gluteal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pressure sore reconstruction has always been challenging. Immobile patients are prone to develop pressure sores from unre- lieved pressure on tissue over the sacral area, with shear, friction, moisture and malnutrition as contributing factors. Up to one-third of immobilised patients in long-term care facilities will develop.

  14. Delayed Presentation of Gluteal Compartment Syndrome: The Argument for Fasciotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A male patient in his fifties presented to his local hospital with numbness and weakness of the right leg which left him unable to mobilise. He reported injecting heroin the previous morning. Following an initial diagnosis of acute limb ischaemia the patient was transferred to a tertiary centre where Computed Tomography Angiography was reported as normal. Detailed neurological examination revealed weakness in hip flexion and extension (1/5 on the Medical Research Council scale with complete paralysis of muscle groups distal to this. Sensation to pinprick and light touch was globally reduced. Blood tests revealed acute kidney injury with raised creatinine kinase and the patient was treated for rhabdomyolysis. Orthopaedic referral was made the following day and a diagnosis of gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS was made. Emergency fasciotomy was performed 56 hours after the onset of symptoms. There was immediate neurological improvement following decompression and the patient was rehabilitated with complete nerve recovery and function at eight-week follow-up. This is the first documented case of full functional recovery following a delayed presentation of GCS with sciatic nerve palsy. We discuss the arguments for and against fasciotomy in cases of compartment syndrome with significant delay in presentation or diagnosis.

  15. Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion in an Animal Model of Dysphagia and Its Effect on Sucking and Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Malone, Regina; Holman, Shaina D.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; Fukuhara, Takako; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Thexton, Allan J.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses relating to the sensory deficit that follows a unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion in an infant animal model. We hypothesized that it would result in (1) a higher incidence of aspiration and (2) temporal changes in sucking and swallowing. We ligated the right-side SLN in six 2–3-week-old female pigs. Using videofluoroscopy, we recorded swallows in the same pre- and post-lesion infant pigs. We analyzed the incidence of aspiration and the duration and latency of suck and swallow cycles. After unilateral SLN lesioning, the incidence of silent aspiration during swallowing increased from 0.7 to 41.5 %. The durations of the suck containing the swallow, the suck immediately following the swallow, and the swallow itself were significantly longer in the post-lesion swallows, although the suck prior to the swallow was not different. The interval between the start of the suck containing a swallow and the subsequent epiglottal movement was longer in the post-lesion swallows. The number of sucks between swallows was significantly greater in post-lesion swallows compared to pre-lesion swallows. Unilateral SLN lesion increased the incidence of aspiration and changed the temporal relationships between sucking and swallowing. The longer transit time and the temporal coordinative dysfunction between suck and swallow cycles may contribute to aspiration. These results suggest that swallow dysfunction and silent aspiration are common and potentially overlooked sequelae of unilateral SLN injury. This validated animal model of aspiration has the potential for further dysphagia studies. PMID:23417250

  16. Superiority of resection over enucleation for schwannomas of the cervical vagus nerve: A retrospective cohort study of 22 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pizzardi, Giulia; Minni, Antonio; Masci, Federica; Ciamberlano, Bernardo; Pasqua, Rocco; Calio, Francesco G; Vietri, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Schwannoma of the cervical vagus nerve is rare. Treatment options include intracapsular enucleation and en bloc resection. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of enucleation and resection in terms of postoperative mortality and morbidity, freedom from vocal cord palsy, freedom from local recurrence, quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) and vocal handicap index (VHI). Twentytwo consecutive patients were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 9) underwent intracapsular enucleation, whereas patients in Group B (n = 13) underwent en bloc resection. Main endpoints of the study were postoperative mortality and morbidity, freedom from vocal cord palsy, freedom from local recurrence and quality of life. The quality of life after surgery was assessed according to the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) EQ-5D-5L methodology, and calculation of the voice handicap index (VHI). Postoperative mortality was nil. Morbidity included 1 wound dehiscence in group A and 2 transitory dysphagias in group B. Freedom from vocal cord palsy was 22% in group A and zero in group B (p = 0.15). Operation-specific local recurrence rate was 33% (3/9 patients) in group A and nil in group B (0/23 patients) (p = 0.05). QALYs was 0.55 in group A and 0.54 in group B (p = 1.0). VHI was 23.77 in group A and 26.15 in group B (p = 1.00). Resection is superior to enucleation in terms of freedom from local recurrence. Functional results are comparable for both techniques. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of the Internal Superior Laryngeal Nerve in the Motor Responses of Vocal Cords and the Related Voice Acoustic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifpanahi, Sadegh; Izadi, Farzad; Jamshidi, Ali-Ashraf; Torabinezhad, Farhad; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Mohammadi, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repeated efforts by researchers to impose voice changes by laryngeal surface electrical stimulation (SES) have come to no avail. This present pre-experimental study employed a novel method for SES application so as to evoke the motor potential of the internal superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) and create voice changes. Methods: Thirty-two normal individuals (22 females and 10 males) participated in this study. The subjects were selected from the students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Two monopolar active electrodes were placed on the thyrohyoid space at the location of the ISLN entrance to the larynx and 1 dispersive electrode was positioned on the back of the neck. A current with special programmed parameters was applied to stimulate the ISLN via the active electrodes and simultaneously the resultant acoustic changes were evaluated. All the means of the acoustic parameters during SES and rest periods were compared using the paired t-test. Results: The findings indicated significant changes (P=0.00) in most of the acoustic parameters during SES presentation compared to them at rest. The mean of fundamental frequency standard deviation (SD F0) at rest was 1.54 (SD=0.55) versus 4.15 (SD=3.00) for the SES period. The other investigated parameters comprised fundamental frequency (F0), minimum F0, jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR), mean intensity, and minimum intensity. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated significant changes in most of the important acoustic features, suggesting that the stimulation of the ISLN via SES could induce motor changes in the vocal folds. The clinical applicability of the method utilized in the current study in patients with vocal fold paralysis requires further research. PMID:27582586

  18. Role of the Internal Superior Laryngeal Nerve in the Motor Responses of Vocal Cords and the Related Voice Acoustic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Seifpanahi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Repeated efforts by researchers to impose voice changes by laryngeal surface electrical stimulation (SES have come to no avail. This present pre-experimental study employed a novel method for SES application so as to evoke the motor potential of the internal superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN and create voice changes. Methods: Thirty-two normal individuals (22 females and 10 males participated in this study. The subjects were selected from the students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Two monopolar active electrodes were placed on the thyrohyoid space at the location of the ISLN entrance to the larynx and 1 dispersive electrode was positioned on the back of the neck. A current with special programmed parameters was applied to stimulate the ISLN via the active electrodes and simultaneously the resultant acoustic changes were evaluated. All the means of the acoustic parameters during SES and rest periods were compared using the paired t-test. Results: The findings indicated significant changes (P=0.00 in most of the acoustic parameters during SES presentation compared to them at rest. The mean of fundamental frequency standard deviation (SD F0 at rest was 1.54 (SD=0.55 versus 4.15 (SD=3.00 for the SES period. The other investigated parameters comprised fundamental frequency (F0, minimum F0, jitter, shimmer, harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR, mean intensity, and minimum intensity. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated significant changes in most of the important acoustic features, suggesting that the stimulation of the ISLN via SES could induce motor changes in the vocal folds. The clinical applicability of the method utilized in the current study in patients with vocal fold paralysis requires further research.

  19. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Hirzel, Florian C.; Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L.; Hess, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h

  20. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: christoph.binkert@ksw.ch [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hirzel, Florian C. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland); Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hess, Thomas [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  1. Superior perioperative analgesia with combined femoral-obturator-sciatic nerve block in comparison with posterior lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block for ACL reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareka, Metaxia; Hantes, Michael; Arnaoutoglou, Eleni; Vretzakis, George

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to compare and evaluate the intraoperative and post-operative outcome of PLPS nerve block and that of femoral, obturator and sciatic (FOS) nerve block as a method of anaesthesia, in performing ACL reconstruction. Patients referred for elective arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using hamstring autograft were divided in two groups. The first group received combined femoral-obturator-sciatic nerve block (FOS Group) under dual guidance, whereas the second group received posterior lumbar plexus block under neurostimulation and sciatic nerve block (PLPS Group) under dual guidance. The two groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, BMI and athletic activity. The time needed to perform the nerve blocks was significantly shorter for the FOS group (p block under dual guidance for arthroscopic ACL reconstructive surgery is a safe and tempting anaesthetic choice. The success rate of this technique is higher in comparison with PLPS and results in less peri- and post-operative pain with less opioid consumption. This study provides support for the use of peripheral nerve blocks as an exclusive method for ACL reconstructive surgery in an ambulatory setting with almost no complications. I.

  2. Comparison of gluteal perforator flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flaps for reconstruction of sacral pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chou; Huang, Eng-Yen; Lin, Pao-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    The gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap was considered the workhorse that reconstructed sacral pressure sores, but was gradually replaced by fasciocutaneous flap because of several disadvantages. With the advent of the perforator flap technique, gluteal perforator (GP) flap has gained popularity nowadays. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and outcomes between GP flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation (FR) flaps in the treatment of sacral pressure sores. Between April 2007 and June 2012, 63 patients underwent sacral pressure sore reconstructions, with a GP flap used in 31 cases and an FR flap used in 32 cases. Data collected on the patients included patient age, gender, co-morbidity for being bedridden and follow-up time. Surgical details collected included the defect size, operative time and estimated blood loss. Complications recorded included re-operation, dehiscence, flap necrosis, wound infection, sinus formation, donor-site morbidity and recurrence. The complications and clinical outcomes were compared between these two groups. We found that there was no significant difference in patient demographics, surgical complications and recurrence between these two groups. In gluteal FR flap group, all recurrent cases (five) were treated by reuse of previous flaps. Both methods are comparable, good and safe in treating sacral pressure sores. Gluteal FR flap can be performed without microsurgical dissection, and re-rotation is feasible in recurrent cases. The authors suggest using gluteal FR flaps in patients with a high risk of sore recurrence. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Acetabular anteversion is associated with gluteal tendinopathy at MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, Kyle M. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Royal University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Aly, Abdel-Rahman [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rajasekaran, Sathish [Health Pointe - Pain, Spine and Sport Medicine, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Shepel, Michael; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Gluteal tendinopathy and greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) remain incompletely understood despite their pervasiveness in clinical practice. To date, no study has analyzed the morphometric characteristics of the hip on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predispose to gluteal tendinopathy. This study aimed to evaluate whether acetabular anteversion (AA), femoral neck anteversion (FNA), and femoral neck-shaft angle (FNSA) are associated with MRI features of gluteal tendinopathy. A total of 203 MRI examinations of the hip met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. A single blinded investigator measured AA, FNA, and FNSA according to validated MRI techniques. Two blinded subspecialty-trained musculoskeletal radiologists then independently evaluated the presence of gluteal tendinosis, trochanteric bursitis, and subgluteal bursitis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; post-hoc Tukey's range test). At MRI, 57 patients had gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis, 26 had isolated trochanteric bursitis, and 11 had isolated subgluteal bursitis. AA was significantly (p = 0.01) increased in patients with MRI evidence of gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis [mean: 18.4 , 95 % confidence interval (CI): 17.2 -19.6 ] compared with normal controls (mean: 15.7 , 95 % CI: 14.7 -16.8 ). Similarly, AA was significantly (p = 0.04) increased in patients with isolated trochanteric bursitis (mean: 18.8 , 95 % CI: 16.2 -21.6 ). No association was found between FNA or FNSA and the presence of gluteal tendinopathy. Interobserver agreement for the presence and categorization of gluteal tendinopathy was very good (kappa = 0.859, 95 % CI: 0.815-0.903). Our MRI study suggests that there is an association between increased AA and gluteal tendinopathy, which supports a growing body of evidence implicating abnormal biomechanics in the development of this condition. (orig.)

  4. Acetabular anteversion is associated with gluteal tendinopathy at MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, Kyle M.; Aly, Abdel-Rahman; Rajasekaran, Sathish; Shepel, Michael; Obaid, Haron

    2015-01-01

    Gluteal tendinopathy and greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) remain incompletely understood despite their pervasiveness in clinical practice. To date, no study has analyzed the morphometric characteristics of the hip on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predispose to gluteal tendinopathy. This study aimed to evaluate whether acetabular anteversion (AA), femoral neck anteversion (FNA), and femoral neck-shaft angle (FNSA) are associated with MRI features of gluteal tendinopathy. A total of 203 MRI examinations of the hip met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. A single blinded investigator measured AA, FNA, and FNSA according to validated MRI techniques. Two blinded subspecialty-trained musculoskeletal radiologists then independently evaluated the presence of gluteal tendinosis, trochanteric bursitis, and subgluteal bursitis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; post-hoc Tukey's range test). At MRI, 57 patients had gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis, 26 had isolated trochanteric bursitis, and 11 had isolated subgluteal bursitis. AA was significantly (p = 0.01) increased in patients with MRI evidence of gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis [mean: 18.4 , 95 % confidence interval (CI): 17.2 -19.6 ] compared with normal controls (mean: 15.7 , 95 % CI: 14.7 -16.8 ). Similarly, AA was significantly (p = 0.04) increased in patients with isolated trochanteric bursitis (mean: 18.8 , 95 % CI: 16.2 -21.6 ). No association was found between FNA or FNSA and the presence of gluteal tendinopathy. Interobserver agreement for the presence and categorization of gluteal tendinopathy was very good (kappa = 0.859, 95 % CI: 0.815-0.903). Our MRI study suggests that there is an association between increased AA and gluteal tendinopathy, which supports a growing body of evidence implicating abnormal biomechanics in the development of this condition. (orig.)

  5. [Gluteal muscle contracture release for the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture induced knee osteoarthritis: a report of 52 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-xiang; Gong, Yu-suo; Li, Sheng-hua; Liu, Hai-ping; Chai, Xi-ping

    2011-07-01

    To investigate clinical efficacy and significance of gluteal muscle contracture release for the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture induced knee osteoarthritis. From January 2008 to June 2010,52 patients with gluteal muscle contracture induced knee osteoarthritis were reviewed. Among the patients,15 patients were male and 37 patients were female, ranging in age from 15 to 45 years, with an average of 35 years. Eighteen patients had left knee osteoarthritis, 30 patients had right osteoarthritis, and 4 patients had double knee osteoarthritis. All the patients were treated with gluteal muscle contracture release. Lysholm knee score was used to evaluate therapeutic effects before and after operation. All the patients were followed up,and the duration ranged from 12 to 37 years,with a mean of 15 months. The Lysholm knee score improved from preoperative (68.12 +/- 0.78) points to postoperative (91.23 +/- 0.47) points at the last follow-up, the difference had statistical difference (t=31.269, Pmuscle contracture release is effective to relieve symptoms of gluteal muscles contracture and knee osteoarthritis. The patients with gluteal muscle contracture should be treated early so as to prevent effects of gluteal muscle contracture on knee joint, slow down degeneration of knee joint at early stage, and prevent occurrence of knee osteoarthritis.

  6. Organization of the auditory brainstem in a lizard, Gekko gecko. I. Auditory nerve, cochlear nuclei, and superior olivary nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Y. Z.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Carr, C. E.

    2012-01-01

    We used tract tracing to reveal the connections of the auditory brainstem in the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). The auditory nerve has two divisions, a rostroventrally directed projection of mid- to high best-frequency fibers to the nucleus angularis (NA) and a more dorsal and caudal projection of lo...... of auditory connections in lizards and archosaurs but also different processing of low- and high-frequency information in the brainstem. J. Comp. Neurol. 520:17841799, 2012. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc...

  7. Gluteal fat thickness in pelvic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Jung, Se Young; Lee, Jae Mun; Park, Seog Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1986-01-01

    Many calcifications due to fat necrosis in the buttocks detected on the pelvis roentgenograms suggest that the majority of injections intended to be intramuscular actually are delivered into fat. We measured thickness of adult gluteal fat to decide whether the injection using needle of usual length is done into fat or muscle. We measured the vertical thickness of the subcutaneous fat at a point of 2-3cm above the femoral head cut slice with randomly collected 116 cases of adults in the department of Radiology, St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Medical College. We found that 32% female cases might actually receive on intra adipose injection when a needle of maximum 3.8cm length is inserted into the buttock. If deposition into muscle is desirable, we need to choose needle whose length is appropriate for the site of injection and the patient's deposits of fat.

  8. Levels of Bifurcation of the Sciatic Nerve among Ugandans at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sciatic nerve is derived from the lumbo-sacral plexus, It is the thickest nerve in the whole body, it exits the gluteal region through the lower part of the greater sciatic foramen, it is the main innervator of the posterior thigh, the leg and foot, it usually ends halfway down the back of the thigh by dividing into the ...

  9. Gluteal muscle fibrosis with abduction contracture of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bayati, Mohammed Ali; Kraidy, Bakir Kadhum

    2016-03-01

    Gluteal muscle fibrosis with hip contracture is a rare condition and causes major disability; literature reports are sparse. The aim of this study is to present, for the first time in Iraq and the region, a case series of gluteal fibrosis and the results of surgical treatment. Seven children--six boys and one girl--diagnosed as having gluteal muscle fibrosis with hip contracture, were investigated and treated by open surgical release of fibrotic bands and physiotherapy. All patients improved dramatically over the subsequent weeks, and were able to sit and squat in the normal position. Gluteal muscle fibrosis with hip contracture is present in Iraq and more awareness is needed for early diagnosis. Surgical treatment provided excellent results. More studies are needed to delineate the aetiology of the condition.

  10. CT diagnosis of gluteal muscle contracture in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Longsheng; Bao Jiaqi; Pan Zhili; Hu Kefei; Jiang Jiatan; Zhang Hongliang; Sun Jun; Yuan Yi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT manifestations of gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) in children. Methods: Sixty-one cases of GMC diagnosed by CT and proved by surgery and pathology were studied with 20 cases of non-GMC as the control group. Results: 57 cases (93.4%) were bilateral contracture and 4 cases (6.6%) were unilateral contracture in 61 cases of GMC; The main CT manifestations were as follows: (1) gluteal muscle volume shrunk. There were 118 (100.0%) sides of gluteus maximus contracture , 16 ( 13.6 %) sides of gluteus medius contracture , 12 ( 10.2 %) sides of piriformis contracture, 4 (3.4%) sides of gluteus minimus contracture, 4 (3.4%) sides of capsula articularis contracture; (2) calcification and necrosis in injection zones. There were 95 (80.5%) sides of gluteal calcification and 24 (20.3%) sides of gluteal necrosis; (3) stripe crispation fascia. There were 81 stripes crispation fascia located outboard laterals of gluteus maximus, 36 located inboard laterals of the latter; (4) gluteal muscle clearance widened. There were 38 (32.2%) sides of light degree gluteal muscle contracture, 53 (44.9%) sides of middle degree, and 27 (22.9%) sides of heavy degree. Conclusion: CT can accurately diagnose GMC and it plays an important role in the evaluation of pathological extent and degree of GMC

  11. Anatomical variations between the sciatic nerve and the piriformis muscle: a contribution to surgical anatomy in piriformis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Totlis, Trifon; Konstantinidis, George A; Paraskevas, George; Piagkou, Maria; Koebke, Juergen

    2014-04-01

    To detect the variable relationship between sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle and make surgeons aware of certain anatomical features of each variation that may be useful for the surgical treatment of the piriformis syndrome. The gluteal region of 147 Caucasian cadavers (294 limbs) was dissected. The anatomical relationship between the sciatic nerve and the piriformis muscle was recorded and classified according to the Beaton and Anson classification. The literature was reviewed to summarize the incidence of each variation. The sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle relationship followed the typical anatomical pattern in 275 limbs (93.6 %). In 12 limbs (4.1 %) the common peroneal nerve passed through and the tibial nerve below a double piriformis. In one limb (0.3 %) the common peroneal nerve coursed superior and the tibial nerve below the piriformis. In one limb (0.3 %) both nerves penetrated the piriformis. In one limb (0.3 %) both nerves passed above the piriformis. Four limbs (1.4 %) presented non-classified anatomical variations. When a double piriformis muscle was present, two different arrangements of the two heads were observed. Anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve around the piriformis muscle were present in 6.4 % of the limbs examined. When dissection of the entire piriformis is necessary for adequate sciatic nerve decompression, the surgeon should explore for the possible existence of a second tendon, which may be found either inferior or deep to the first one. Some rare, unclassified variations of the sciatic nerve should be expected during surgical intervention of the region.

  12. Asymmetry of Peak Thicknesses between the Superior and Inferior Retinal Nerve Fiber Layers for Early Glaucoma Detection: A Simple Screening Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyoung Won; Lee, Sang Yeop; Kim, Sangah; Park, Chan Keum; Lee, Kwanghyun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether the asymmetry in the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) thickness between superior and inferior hemispheres on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is useful for early detection of glaucoma. The patient population consisted of Training set (a total of 60 subjects with early glaucoma and 59 normal subjects) and Validation set (30 subjects with early glaucoma and 30 normal subjects). Two kinds of ratios were employed to measure the asymmetry between the superior and inferior pRNFL thickness using OCT. One was the ratio of the superior to inferior peak thicknesses (peak pRNFL thickness ratio; PTR), and the other was the ratio of the superior to inferior average thickness (average pRNFL thickness ratio; ATR). The diagnostic abilities of the PTR and ATR were compared to the color code classification in OCT. Using the optimal cut-off values of the PTR and ATR obtained from the Training set, the two ratios were independently validated for diagnostic capability. For the Training set, the sensitivities/specificities of the PTR, ATR, quadrants color code classification, and clock-hour color code classification were 81.7%/93.2%, 71.7%/74.6%, 75.0%/93.2%, and 75.0%/79.7%, respectively. The PTR showed a better diagnostic performance for early glaucoma detection than the ATR and the clock-hour color code classification in terms of areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) (0.898, 0.765, and 0.773, respectively). For the Validation set, the PTR also showed the best sensitivity and AUC. The PTR is a simple method with considerable diagnostic ability for early glaucoma detection. It can, therefore, be widely used as a new screening method for early glaucoma. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of unilateral gluteal muscle contracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoliang; Tang, Xueyang; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Daoxi; Peng, Mingxing; Liu, Lijun

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of unilateral gluteal muscle contracture. Between January 1990 and September 2009, 41 patients with unilateral gluteal muscle contracture were treated and the clinical data were retrospectively analysed. Among them, 24 were male and 17 were female with an age range from 6 to 29 years (mean, 12 years). Thirty-nine patients had a definite history of repeat intragluteal injection. The locations were the left side in 9 cases and the right side in 32 cases. The main clinical manifestations included lameness and abnormal gait. The medical examination showed pelvic oblique and relative inequality of lower limbs with a mean difference of 2.1 cm (range, 1.2-3.8 cm) in the distance form navel to malleolus medials. The X-ray films of pelvis showed outpouching trochanter of femur and pelvic oblique. The CT scans showed no abnormal finding except pelvic oblique and gluteal muscle contracture. The arc longitudinal incision was made into the posterolateral area nearby the greater trochanter and then lysis of the gluteal muscles was performed, followed by the skin traction of both legs and rehabilitation exercise. All incisions healed by first intention. Forty-one patients were followed up 1-20 years (mean, 5 years), and the signs of gluteal muscle contracture disappeared. After 1 year of operation, 34 patients had equal leg length, 5 patients had mild pelvic oblique, and 2 patients had obvious pelvic oblique. According to LIU Guohui et al. evaluation standard, the results were excellent in 33 cases, good in 6 cases, and poor in 2 cases with an excellent and good rate of 95.12% at 1 year after operation. Unilateral gluteal muscle contracture leads to pelvic oblique and inequality of lower limbs, and it can be cured with the surgical release of the gluteal muscle contracture by the arc longitudinal incision into the posterolateral area nearby the greater trochanter, combined with postoperative skin traction and

  14. Superior and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries and their relationship with cerebello-pontine angle cranial nerves revisited in the light of cranial cephalometric indexes: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Zohreh; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Maleki, Farid; Tabatabai, Seyed

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to clarify the anatomical features of the superior and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries in relation to the trigeminal nerve and acoustic-facial complex and to the bony structures of the skull in a sample of male Iranian cadavers. Bilateral dissections, calvariectomy, and brain evacuation were performed on 31 adult human fresh brains and skull bases to assess the neurovascular associations, and skull base morphometry. Equations were defined to estimate posterior fossa volume and the relationships between bony and neurovascular elements. Eight SCAs were duplicated from origin. There were 9 cases of SCA-trigeminal contacts, which were at the root entry zone in 7. Mean distance from the origin of AICA to the vertebrobasilar junction was 11.80 mm, while 79% of AICAs originated from the lower half of the BA. This was significantly associated with "posterior fossa funneling" and "basilar narrowing" indexes. In most cases AICA crossed the acoustic-facial complex and coursed between neural bundles (48.3%). The AICA reached or entered the internal acoustic canal in 22.6% of cases and was medial to porous in 77.4%. We documented anatomical variations of the superior and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries along with some cephalometric equations with relevant neurovascular anatomy in Iranian cadavers.

  15. The application of MRI in gluteal muscle contracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Tao; You Yuhua; Sun Jing; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei; Qu Hui

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MRI findings and its diagnostic value in gluteal muscle contracture (GMC). Methods: Eleven clinic or operation confirmed GMC patients were examined by plain X-ray and MRI. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI MR imaging were performed and FFE-T 2 WI (fast field echo-T 2 WI) was also scanned. CT scan was conducted in 5 cases. Results: 11 GMC patients were all diagnosed by MRI. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI could only show the atrophy of gluteal muscles, while FFE-T 2 WI could directly show the fibrous band of gluteal muscle and its fascia, and the fibrous band appeared as low signal intensity on FFE-T 2 WI sequence. Conclusions: MRI is the efficient modality in imaging the fibrous band for GMC patients, and FFE-T 2 WI is the most valuable sequence. MRI is very helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of GMC

  16. Fluoroscopic position of the second-generation cryoballoon during ablation in the right superior pulmonary vein as a predictor of phrenic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yukio; Ströker, Erwin; Irfan, Ghazala; Mugnai, Giacomo; Ciconte, Giuseppe; Hünük, Burak; Velagić, Vedran; Overeinder, Ingrid; Tanaka, Kaoru; Brugada, Pedro; de Asmundis, Carlo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista

    2016-08-01

    Phrenic nerve injury (PNI) is the most frequently observed complication during pulmonary vein isolation procedure using the second-generation cryoballoon (CB). Our objective was to analyse the correlation between the fluoroscopic position of the 28 mm CB during ablation in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV) and the occurrence of PNI. A total of 165 patients having undergone the large 28 mm CB ablation were retrospectively reviewed. Positioning of the CB relative to the cardiac silhouette was classified under fluoroscopic guidance in antero-posterior projection during RSPV ablation. Regarding the lower half of the balloon, CB positioning was defined as follows: (A) completely inside the cardiac shadow; (B1) Phrenic nerve injury occurred in 9.7% (16/165) during ablation in the RSPV. The occurrence of PNI was 0.9, 10.6, and 90.1% in positions A, B1, and B2, respectively (A vs. B1, P = 0.01; B1 vs. B2, P < 0.0001). Among other pre-procedural and procedural variables, the B2 position was the strongest independent determinant for predicting PNI at RSPV (P = 0.001, odds ratio: 119.9; 95% confidence interval: 11.6-1234.7) after multivariable analysis. The incidence of PNI at the RSPV significantly increased in case of more distal positioning of the CB relative to the cardiac shadow. This simple and straightforward intra-procedural indicator might prone the operators to attempt occluding the RPSV more proximally in order to avoid PNI. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Effects on steroid hormones secretion resulting from the acute stimulation of sectioning the superior ovarian nerve to pre-pubertal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Ledesma Leticia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the adult rat, neural signals arriving to the ovary via the superior ovarian nerve (SON modulate progesterone (P4, testosterone (T and estradiol (E2 secretion. The aims of the present study were to analyze if the SON in the pre-pubertal rat also modulates ovarian hormone secretion and the release of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing (LH hormone. P4, T, E2, FSH and LH serum levels were measured 30 or 60 minutes after sectioning the SON of pre-pubertal female rats. Our results indicate that the effects on hormone levels resulting from unilaterally or bilaterally sectioning the SON depends on the analyzed hormone, and the time lapse between surgery and autopsy, and that the treatment yielded asymmetric results. The results also suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat the neural signals arriving to the ovaries via the SON regulate the enzymes participating in P4, T and E2 synthesis in a non-parallel way, indicating that the mechanisms regulating the synthesis of each hormone are not regulated by the same signals. Also, that the changes in the steroids hormones are not explained exclusively by the modifications in gonadotropins secretion. The observed differences in hormone levels between rats sacrificed 30 and 60 min after surgery reflect the onset of the compensatory systems regulating hormones secretion.

  18. Digital subtraction angiography of inferior gluteal artery through the infusion catheter of chemotherapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Satoru; Noguchi, Ryosuke; Kanoh, Shori; Shimazui, Toru; Uchida, Katsunori; Nemoto, Ryosuke; Koiso, Kenkichi

    1987-01-01

    More than fifty patients of invasive bladder cancer had been treated by selective intra-arterial chemotherapy through the inferior or superior gluteal arteries. The distribution of infused drugs had been evaluated by RI-angiography through a thin arterial infusion catheter. This time we performed digital subtraction angiography (DSA) through an infusion catheter in order to know the precise distribution of infused materials in seven patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. Pharmaco-DSA with norepinephrine was also done in four patients. Satisfactory spatial and contrast resolution were gained in four patients and pharmaco-DSA showed better quality. In our experience DSA through intra-arterial infusion catheter was a useful procedure in the evaluation of distribution of infused drugs. (author)

  19. Sciatic nerve palsy associated with intramuscular quinine injections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sct?ior ikfeclical O[ficcr. Department of Orthopaeclics, Mulago Hospital, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. Key Words: Sciatic nerve palsy, intramuscular injections, children, quinine dil~ydrochloride. The purpose of this paper is to show that, in children, gluteal injection of quinine dihydrochloride (QDH) may result in ...

  20. Sedentary lifestyle related exosomal release of Hotair from gluteal-femoral fat promotes intestinal cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaozhao Lu; Danna Bai; Xiangwei Liu; Chen Zhou; Guodong Yang

    2017-01-01

    Pioneering epidemiological work has established strong association of sedentary lifestyle and obesity with the risk of colorectal cancer, while the detailed underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that Hotair (HOX transcript antisense RNA) is a pro-adipogenic long non-coding RNA highly expressed in gluteal-femoral fat over other fat depots. Hotair knockout in adipose tissue results in gluteal-femoral fat defect. Squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces intestinal proliferation in...

  1. Z-plasty for severe gluteal muscle contracture in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Kun; Liu, GuoHui; Yang, Shuhua; Cao, Faqi

    2016-12-01

    To review the records of 363 patients with severe gluteal muscle contracture to determine its mechanism, underlying pathology, and treatment outcome. Records of 136 males and 227 females aged 5 to 18 (mean, 12.2) years who underwent Z-plasty for bilateral (n=347) or unilateral (n=16) severe gluteal muscle contracture were reviewed. Severe gluteal muscle contracture was classified as typical (n=52) or special (n=311). The typical type is associated with symptoms of positive out-toe gait, Ober sign, back-extending test, cross-leg test, squatting with knee side-by-side test, and hip dysfunction. It is further subdivided into mild (n=0), moderate (n=40), or severe (n=12). The special type is associated with additional symptoms of pelvic tilt and leg length discrepancy (4 cm in 48 hips). 311 hips had pelvic tilt and 47 hips had lumbar compensatory scoliosis. Treatment outcome was assessed at 6 months. Hip functional score was assessed at the final follow-up. The mean hospitalisation period was 11 days. After a mean follow-up of 1.5 years, the mean hip functional score improved from 8.03 to 11.69; improvement was higher in children (age 5-13 years) than in adolescents (age 14-18 years) [3.7 vs. 2.9, p4 cm, and intra-operatively the contracture band severely affected the joint capsule. The third patient did not comply with postoperative exercises. Surgical treatment for severe gluteal muscle contracture achieved good outcome.

  2. MRI and US of gluteal tendinopathy in greater trochanteric pain syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Andrew; Van der Vliet, Andrew [Regional Imaging Border, Albury, NSW (Australia); Zadow, Steven [Dr Jones and Partners Medical Imaging, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2007-07-15

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is commonly due to gluteus minimus or medius injury rather than trochanteric bursitis. Gluteal tendinopathy most frequently occurs in late-middle aged females. In this pictorial review the pertinent MRI and US anatomy of the gluteal tendon insertions on the greater trochanter and the adjacent bursae are reviewed. The direct (peritendinitis, tendinosis, partial and complete tear) and indirect (bursal fluid, bony changes and fatty atrophy) MRI signs of gluteal tendon injury are illustrated. The key sonographic findings of gluteal tendinopathy are also discussed. (orig.)

  3. The vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Toulgoat, F; Sarrazin, J-L

    2013-10-01

    The vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve) is a sensory nerve. It is made up of two nerves, the cochlear, which transmits sound and the vestibular which controls balance. It is an intracranial nerve which runs from the sensory receptors in the internal ear to the brain stem nuclei and finally to the auditory areas: the post-central gyrus and superior temporal auditory cortex. The most common lesions responsible for damage to VIII are vestibular Schwannomas. This report reviews the anatomy and various investigations of the nerve. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. The superiority of 3D-CISS sequence in displaying the cisternal segment of facial, vestibulocochlear nerves and their abnormal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Changhu, E-mail: tigerlch@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang Bin, E-mail: liangchangbo.student@sina.co [Liao Cheng City People' s Hospital, Dongchang Road, Liaocheng, Shandong (China); Wu Lebin, E-mail: Lebinwu518@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Du Yinglin, E-mail: duyinglinzhuo@sohu.co [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, 72, Jingshi Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Ximing, E-mail: wxminmg369@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Cheng, E-mail: cacab2a@126.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yu Fuhua, E-mail: changhu1970@163.co [Weifang Medical College, 7166, West Road Baotong Weifang, Shandong (China)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: To select the best imaging method for clinical otologic patients through evaluating 3D constructive interference of steady state (CISS) image quality in visualizing the facial, vestibulocochlear nerves (CN:VII-VIII) and their abnormal changes. Methods: The CN:VII-VIII as well as inner ear structures in 48 volunteers were examined using 3D-CISS and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences respectively, and displayed to the full at the reformatted and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the CN:VII-VIII as well as inner ear structures. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxin test, p < 0.05 was considered significant. In addition, 8 patients with abnormality in facial or vestibulocochlear nerves were also examined using 3D-CISS sequence. Results: The identification rates for the cisternal segment of facial, vestibulocochlear nerves and corresponding membranous labyrinth were 100%. Abnormal changes of the facial or vestibulocochlear nerves were clearly shown in 8 patients, among them 1 was caused by bilateral acoustic neurinoma, 1 by cholesteatoma at cerebellopontine angle, 1 by arachnoid cyst, 1 by neurovascular adhesion, 4 by neurovascular compression. Conclusion: With 3D-CISS sequence the fine structure of the CN:VII-VIII and corresponding membranous labyrinth can be clearly demonstrated; lesions at the site of cerebellopontine angle can also be found easily.

  5. The role of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Lingyan, Zhang; Yan, Luo; Yulan, Peng

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the use of ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) by analysis of its imaging characteristics. Thirty-nine patients suspected of having GMC due to abnormal gait underwent pre-operative US. The diagnosis of GMC was confirmed by surgery in 27 patients. Six patients were diagnosed with congenital hip dysplasia, and the remaining six patients were diagnosed with sciatic nerve damage, post-poliomyelitis sequelae, and myasthenia gravis. For the patients with GMC, US showed muscle thinning and hyperechoic strips (specific for muscular contracture) in the muscles involved. In three patients with GMC, the strips were integrated into muscle bundles, demonstrating both strong and weak sonographic echoes. The sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of GMC using the presence of strips were 88.9% and 83.3%, respectively, and using muscle thinning, the sensitivity and specificity were 92.6% and 50%, respectively. The contracture strips, as measured by US, were significantly smaller than the actual measurements at the time of surgery, but there was a significant correlation between the two measurements (r = 0.814, P muscle (91.8%), and the lowest rate was found in the piriformis muscle (52.9%). Ultrasonography is a valuable tool for the diagnosis of GMC, especially for the detection of specific contracture strips in involved muscles. Its role in the pre-operative diagnosis of GMC also provides surgical planning that can guide subsequent treatment.

  6. Congenital heart disease in adolescents with gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-02-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings.

  7. Multisite Infection with Mycobacterium abscessus after Replacement of Breast Implants and Gluteal Lipofilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüegg, Eva; Cheretakis, Alexandre; Modarressi, Ali; Harbarth, Stephan; Pittet-Cuénod, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Medical tourism for aesthetic surgery is popular. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) occasionally cause surgical-site infections. As NTM grow in biofilms, implantations of foreign bodies are at risk. Due to late manifestation, infections occur when patients are back home, where they must be managed properly. Case Report. A 39-year-old healthy female was referred for acute infection of the right gluteal area. Five months before, she had breast implants replacement, abdominal liposuction, and gluteal lipofilling in Mexico. Three months postoperatively, implants were removed for NTM-infection in Switzerland. Adequate antibiotic treatment was stopped after seven days for drug-related hepatitis. At entrance, gluteal puncture for bacterial analysis was performed. MRI showed large subcutaneous collection. Debridement under general anaesthesia was followed by open wound management. Total antibiotic treatment was 20 weeks. Methods. Bacterial analysis of periprosthetic and gluteal liquids included Gram-stain plus acid-fast stain, and aerobic, anaerobic and mycobacterial cultures.  Results. In periprosthetic fluid, Mycobacterium abscessus, Propionibacterium, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were identified. The same M. abscessus strain was found gluteally. The gluteal wound healed within six weeks. At ten months' follow-up, gluteal asymmetry persists for deep scarring. Conclusion. This case presents major complications of multisite aesthetic surgery. Surgical-site infections in context of medical tourism need appropriate bacteriological investigations, considering potential NTM-infections.

  8. Gluteal Hydatid Cyst: Report of a Case from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad NEMATI HONA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst involves both hard and soft tissues even without the evidence of the disease in liver or lungs; however, this manifestation is very rare, particularly in musculoskeletal regions. The current report describes a case with primary diagnose of cystic gluteal swelling leading to diagnose of hydatid cyst after surgical exploration in an 80-yr-old woman the Surgical Outpatient Department, Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. During surgery, the cavity was washed by silver nitrate and the cyst content was appropriately evacuated. The patient had completed a   short course of albendazole postoperatively. Early postoperative complications were not appeared. The patient was followed for 6 months with no evidence of recurrence or complications. 

  9. Patient-Reported Assessment of Functional Gait Outcomes following Superior Gluteal Artery Perforator Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Hur, BA

    2013-08-01

    Conclusions: SGAP flap surgery causes no statistically significant differences in overall LEFS. However, SGAP patients did report donor-site morbidity with decreased ability to perform certain activities and increased fatigue and pain in the longer follow-up period. We feel that patients should be educated regarding gait issues and undergo physical therapy during the early postoperative period.

  10. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  11. [Characteristics and role of the gluteal herpes in a female population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Saavedra, T; Briones, H

    1989-01-01

    Based on the fact that the gluteal herpes may constitute the clinical expression of the reactivation of a Herpes simplex virus latent at the sacral lymph node, we investigated a group of women who were carriers of gluteal herpetic infection, the characteristics of the infection, the virus type principally associated to it, and its possible relation with the genital herpes. Forty one women with gluteal herpes verified by virologic laboratory were studied. 75.7% of these women had had in addition to this herpetic infection in other places, mainly genital, with an average of 7.2 of recurrent episodes per year, (range: 1 to 18 episodes yearly). 78% of the isolated virus was typified as HSV-2 by the use of monoclonal antibodies. It is stand out the importance of considering the background of gluteal herpes as causative of classification of herpetic high risk.

  12. Which level is responsible for gluteal pain in lumbar disc hernia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guofang; Zhou, Jianhe; Liu, Yutan; Sang, Hongxun; Xu, Xiangyang; Ding, Zihai

    2016-08-22

    There are many different reasons why patients could be experiencing pain in the gluteal area. Previous studies have shown an association between radicular low back pain (LBP) and gluteal pain (GP). Studies locating the specific level responsible for gluteal pain in lumbar disc hernias have rarely been reported. All patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in the Kanghua hospital from 2010 to 2014 were recruited. All patients underwent a lumbar spine MRI to clarify their LDH diagnosis, and patients were allocated to a GP group and a non-GP group. To determine the cause and effect relationship between LDH and GP, all of the patients were subjected to percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD). A total of 286 cases were included according to the inclusive criteria, with 168 cases in the GP group and 118 cases in the non-GP group. Of these, in the GP group, 159 cases involved the L4/5 level and 9 cases involved the L5/S1 level, while in the non-GP group, 43 cases involved the L4/5 level and 48 cases involved the L5/S1 level. PELD was performed in both groups. Gluteal pain gradually disappeared after surgery in all of the patients. Gluteal pain recrudesced in a patient with recurrent disc herniation (L4/5). As a clinical finding, gluteal pain is related to low lumbar disc hernia. The L4/5 level is the main level responsible for gluteal pain in lumbar disc hernia. No patients with gluteal pain exhibited involvement at the L3/4 level.

  13. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability.

  14. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years parti...

  15. An Interesting Fistula Tract Presenting with Recurrent Gluteal Abscess: Instructive Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsum Iclal Bayhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A fistula extending from the gluteus to penis is an extremely rare entity. In this paper, we have highlighted novel variant of congenital penile to gluteal fistula complicated with gluteal and penoscrotal abscess in a previously healthy boy. A fistulous tract extending from the gluteus to penis has been shown by fistulogram. Bleomycin has been used in fistula tract with successful results in our patient.

  16. Effects of electrical stimulation-induced gluteal versus gluteal and hamstring muscles activation on sitting pressure distribution in persons with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A. J.; Haverkamp, G. L. G.; de Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W. J.

    Study design: Ten participants underwent two electrical stimulation (ES) protocols applied using a custom-made electrode garment with built-in electrodes. Interface pressure was measured using a force-sensitive area. In one protocol, both the gluteal and hamstring (g+h) muscles were activated, in

  17. GIANT GLUTEAL LIPOMA: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRASHANT HOMBAL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Lipoma is one of the most common benign mesenchymal tumor which can occur in almost in all organs of the body where fat normally exists, so called as universal tumor or ubiquitous tumor. Lipomas are slow growing that rarely reach a size more than 2-3cms. Lesions larger than 5cms, so called giant lipomas are seldom found inside the muscle compressing nervous-vascular structures. The large and deep seated lipomas represent a real diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Case report: We report a case of 48 year old man with a giant lipoma involving his left gluteal and thigh region. The patient was managed by wide local excision of the lesion. The key issues surrounding the intramuscular lipoma with literature review is discussed. Conclusion: Intramuscular Giant lipomas are rare and even though they are typical in their presentation, especially when they are large and show findings that can be confused with a well-differentiated low grade liposarcoma, but when they occur an appropriate workup must be done. This should be followed by adequate open surgical excision and repeat examination over time to monitor for recurrence.

  18. Aberrant femoral torsion presenting with frog-leg squatting mimicking gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Meng-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Ning; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang

    2012-04-01

    Patients with frog-leg squatting have restricted internal rotation and adduction of the affected hips during sitting or squatting. In the surgical literature, the cause generally has been presumed to arise from and be pathognomonic for gluteal muscle contracture. However, we have encountered patients with frog-leg squatting but without gluteal muscle contracture. We therefore raised the following questions: What are the imaging features of patients with frog-leg squatting? Do conditions other than gluteal muscle contracture manifest frog-leg squatting? We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 67 patients presenting with frog-leg squatting from April 1998 to July 2010. There were four females and 63 males; their mean age was 22.2 years (range, 4-50 years). During MRI readout, we observed aberrant axes of some femoral necks and obtained additional CT to measure femoral torsion angles in 59 of the 67 patients. MR images of 27 (40%) patients had signs of gluteal muscle contracture. Twenty-two (33%) patients (40 femora) had aberrant femoral torsion, including diminished anteversion (range, 6°-0°; average, 3.9°) in 11 femora of eight patients and femoral retroversion (range, muscle contracture or aberrant femoral torsion. The observation of aberrant femoral torsion was not anticipated before imaging studies. In addition to gluteal muscle contracture, aberrant femoral torsion can be a cause of frog-leg squatting. Level II, diagnostic study. See the guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  19. Sedentary lifestyle related exosomal release of Hotair from gluteal-femoral fat promotes intestinal cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaozhao; Bai, Danna; Liu, Xiangwei; Zhou, Chen; Yang, Guodong

    2017-03-31

    Pioneering epidemiological work has established strong association of sedentary lifestyle and obesity with the risk of colorectal cancer, while the detailed underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that Hotair (HOX transcript antisense RNA) is a pro-adipogenic long non-coding RNA highly expressed in gluteal-femoral fat over other fat depots. Hotair knockout in adipose tissue results in gluteal-femoral fat defect. Squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces intestinal proliferation in wildtype mice, while not in Hotair knockout mice. Mechanistically, squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces exosomal Hotair secretion mainly by transcriptional upregulation of Hotair via NFκB. And increased exosomal Hotair in turn circulates in the blood and is partially endocytosed by the intestine, finally promoting the stemness and proliferation of intestinal stem/progenitor cells via Wnt activation. Clinically, obese subjects with sedentary lifestyle have much higher exosomal HOTAIR expression in the serum. These findings establish that sedentary lifestyle promotes exosomal Hotair release from the gluteal-femoral fat, which in turn facilitates intestinal stem and/or progenitor proliferation, raising a possible link between sedentary lifestyle with colorectal tumorigenesis.

  20. Comparison of gluteal and hamstring activation during five commonly used plyometric exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struminger, Aaron H; Lewek, Michael D; Goto, Shiho; Hibberd, Elizabeth; Blackburn, J Troy

    2013-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur frequently in athletics, and anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs may decrease injury risk. However, previous prevention programs that include plyometrics use a variety of exercises with little justification of exercise inclusion. Because gluteal and hamstring activation is thought to be important for preventing knee injuries, the purpose of this study was to determine which commonly used plyometric exercises produce the greatest activation of the gluteals and hamstrings. EMG (Electromyography) amplitudes of the hamstring and gluteal muscles during preparatory and loading phases of landing were recorded in 41 subjects during 5 commonly used plyometric exercises. Repeated measures ANOVAs (Analysis of Variance) were used on 36 subjects to examine differences in muscle activation. Differences in hamstring (Pplyometric exercises, their removal from injury prevention programs may be warranted without affecting program efficacy. © 2013.

  1. Gluteal tendinopathy and hip osteoarthritis: Different pathologies, different hip biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kim; Hall, Michelle; Hodges, Paul W; Wrigley, Tim V; Vicenzino, Bill; Pua, Yong-Hao; Metcalf, Ben; Grimaldi, Alison; Bennell, Kim L

    2018-03-01

    Gluteal tendinopathy (GT) and hip osteoarthritis (OA) are the most common causes of hip pain and associated disability in older adults. Pain and altered walking biomechanics are common to both conditions. This study aimed to compare three-dimensional walking biomechanics between individuals with unilateral, symptomatic GT and HOA. Sixty individuals with symptomatic unilateral GT confirmed by magnetic-resonance-imaging and 73 individuals with symptomatic unilateral HOA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grade ≥ 2) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Maximum and minimum values of the external sagittal hip moment, the first peak, second peak and mid-stance minimum of the hip adduction moment (HAM), sagittal plane hip excursion and hip joint angles, pelvic obliquity and trunk lean, at the three HAM time points during stance phase of walking were compared between groups. Compared to individuals with HOA, those with GT exhibited a greater hip peak extension moment (P < 0.001) and greater HAM throughout the stance phase of walking (P = 0.01-P < 0.001), greater hip adduction (P < 0.001) and internal rotation (P < 0.01-P < 0.001) angles and lower hip flexion angles and excursion (P = 0.02 - P < 0.001). Individuals with HOA exhibited a greater forward trunk lean (P ≤ 0.001) throughout stance, and greater ipsilateral trunk lean in the frontal plane (P < 0.001) than those with GT. Despite presence of pain in both conditions, hip kinematics and kinetics differ between individuals with symptomatic unilateral GT and those with symptomatic unilateral HOA. These condition-specific impairments may be targets for optimization of management of HOA and GT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Roles of TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway in pathogenesis and development of gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintao; Ma, Yukun; You, Tian; Tian, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Qi; Zhang, Wentao

    2015-02-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) is a chronic fibrotic disease of gluteal muscles which is characterized by excessive deposition of collagen in the extracellular matrix. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-βs have been shown to play an important role in the progression of GMC. However, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. We sought to explore the expression of TGF-β/Smad pathway proteins and their downstream targets in gluteal muscle contracture disease. The expression levels of collagens type I/III, TGF-β1, Smad2/3/4/7 and PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) in gluteal muscle contraction (GMC) patients were measured using immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot assays. The expressions of collagens type I/III and TGF-β1 were significantly increased in the contraction band compared with unaffected muscle. In addition, R-Smad phosphorylation and Smad4 protein expression in the contraction band were also elevated, while the expression of Smad7 was significantly decreased in the fibrotic muscle of the GMC patients compared to the unaffected adjacent muscle. The protein and mRNA levels of PAI-1 were also remarkably increased in the contraction band compared with adjacent muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated that the expression levels of TGF-β1 and PAI-1 were higher in contraction band than those in the adjacent muscle. Our data confirm the stimulating effects of the TGF-β/Smad pathway in gluteal muscle contracture disease and reveal the internal changes of TGF-β/Smad pathway proteins and their corresponding targets in gluteal muscle contracture patients.

  3. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  4. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  5. The relationship between gluteal muscle activation and throwing kinematics in baseball and softball catchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Hillary A; Oliver, Gretchen D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between gluteal muscle activation and pelvis and trunk kinematics when catchers throw to second base. Forty-two baseball and softball catchers (14.74 ± 4.07 years; 161.85 ± 15.24 cm; 63.38 ± 19.98 kg) participated in this study. Muscle activity of the bilateral gluteus maximus and medius as well as pelvis and trunk kinematics throughout the throwing motion were analyzed. It was discovered that at foot contact, there were 2 significant inverse relationships between stride leg gluteus maximus activity and pelvis axial rotation (r = -0.31, r2 = 0.10, p = 0.05), and between trunk axial rotation and pelvis lateral flexion (r = -0.34, r2= 0.12, p = 0.03). In addition, at foot contact, a significant positive relationship between the drive leg (throwing arm side) and trunk flexion (r = 0.33, r2 = 0.11, p = 0.04) was present. The results of this study provide evidence of gluteal activation both concentrically and eccentrically, in attempt to control the pelvis and trunk during the throwing motion of catchers. The gluteal muscles play a direct role in maintaining the stability of the pelvis, and catchers should incorporate strengthening of the entire lumbopelvic-hip complex into their training regimen. Incorporating concentric and eccentric gluteal exercises will help to improve musculoskeletal core stability, thereby assisting in upper extremity injury prevention.

  6. [Etiological analysis and significance of anterior knee pain induced by gluteal muscles contracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Yu-jie; Wang, Jun-liang; Qi, Wei; Qu, Feng; Yuan, Bang-tuo; Wang, Jiang-tao; Shen, Xue-zhen; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Juan-li

    2014-12-01

    To explore causes of gluteal muscle contracture induced anterior knee pain and curative effect of arthroscopic release. From March 2002 to August 2013,36 patients with gluteal muscle contracture induced anterior knee pain were treated, including 15 males, 21 females, aged from 9 to 40 years old with an average (18.7±7.2) years old; the courses of diseases ranged from 4 to 30 years. The clinical manifestations involved limited to symmelia, positive Ober sign, buttocks touch contracture belts, knee and patella slide to lateral when doing squat activities. All patients were performed gluteal muscle contracture release under arthroscopic. Postoperative complications were observed, Kujala scoring before and after operation was used for compare curative effect. All patients were followed up with an average of 29 months. The incision were healed well, and no complications were occurred. Postoperative Kujala score were improved more than preoperative. Gluteal muscle contracture release could alleviate hypertension of lateral patella, and palys an important role in preventing patellofemoral arthritis.

  7. New minimally invasive option for the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bin; Zhou, Panyu; Xia, Yan; Chen, Youyan; Yu, Jun; Xu, Shuogui

    2012-12-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture is a clinical syndrome that involves contracture and distortion of the gluteal muscles and fascia fibers due to multiple causes. Physical examination demonstrates a characteristic gait due to hip adduction and internal thigh rotation. This study introduces a new minimally invasive method for surgical release of gluteal muscle contracture. Patients with gluteal muscle contracture were assigned to 4 categories: type A, contracture occurred mainly in the iliotibial tract; type B, contracture occurred in the Iliotibial tract and gluteus maximus; type C1, movement of the contraction band was palpable and a snapping sound was audible during squatting; and type C2, movement of the contraction band was not palpable or almost absent and a snapping sound was audible during squatting. This classification method allowed prediction of the anatomic location of these pathological contractures and determination of the type of surgery required. Four critical points were used to define the operative field and served as points to mark a surgical incision smaller than 4 mm. The contracture was easily released in this carefully marked operative field without causing significant neurovascular damage. Over a period of 5 years, between March 2003 and June 2008, the authors treated 1059 patients with this method and achieved excellent outcomes. Most patients were fully active within 12 weeks, with the assistance of an early postoperative rehabilitation program. The most significant complication was a postoperative periarticular hematoma, which occurred in 3 patients within 10 days postoperatively and required surgical ligation of the bleeding vessel. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Performance Effects of Repetition Specific Gluteal Activation Protocols on Acceleration in Male Rugby Union Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Lorna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Warm-up protocols have the potential to cause an acute enhancement of dynamic sprinting performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three repetition specific gluteal activation warm-up protocols on acceleration performance in male rugby union players. Forty male academy rugby union players were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups (control, 5, 10 or 15 repetition gluteal activation group and performed 10 m sprints at baseline and 30 s, 2, 4, 6 and 8 min after their specific intervention protocol. Five and ten meter sprint times were the dependent variable and dual-beam timing gates were used to record all sprint times. Repeated measures analysis of variance found no significant improvement in 5 and 10 m sprint times between baseline and post warm-up scores (p ≥ 0.05 for all groups. There were no reported significant differences between groups at any of the rest interval time points (p ≥ 0.05. However, when individual responses to the warm-up protocols were analyzed, the 15 repetition gluteal activation group had faster 10 m times post-intervention and this improvement was significant (p = 0.021. These results would indicate that there is no specific rest interval for any of the gluteal interventions that results in a potentiation effect on acceleration performance. However, the individual response analysis would seem to indicate that a 15 repetition gluteal activation warm-up protocol has a potentiating effect on acceleration performance provided that the rest interval is adequately and individually determined.

  9. External laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery: is the nerve stimulator necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, E N; Hisham, A N

    2001-09-01

    To find out the incidence and type of external laryngeal nerves during operations on the thyroid, and to assess the role of a nerve stimulator in detecting them. Prospective, non-randomised study. Teaching hospital, Malaysia. 317 patients who had 447 dissections between early January 1998 and late November 1999. Number and type of nerves crossing the cricothyroid space, and the usefulness of the nerve stimulator in finding them. The nerve stimulator was used in 206/447 dissections (46%). 392 external laryngeal nerves were seen (88%), of which 196/206 (95%) were detected with the stimulator. However, without the stimulator 196 nerves were detected out of 241 dissections (81%). The stimulator detected 47 (23%) Type I nerves (nerve > 1 cm from the upper edge of superior pole); 86 (42%) Type IIa nerves (nerve edge of superior pole); and 63 (31%) Type IIb nerves (nerve below upper edge of superior pole). 10 nerves were not detected. When the stimulator was not used the corresponding figures were 32 (13%), 113 (47%), and 51 (21%), and 45 nerves were not seen. If the nerve cannot be found we recommend dissection of capsule close to the medial border of the upper pole of the thyroid to avoid injury to the nerve. Although the use of the nerve stimulator seems desirable, it confers no added advantage in finding the nerve. In the event of uncertainty about whether a structure is the nerve, the stimulator may help to confirm it. However, exposure of the cricothyroid space is most important for good exposure in searching for the external laryngeal nerve.

  10. Anthropometric Study of the Piriformis Muscle and Sciatic Nerve: A Morphological Analysis in a Polish Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haładaj, Robert; Pingot, Mariusz; Polguj, Michał; Wysiadecki, Grzegorz; Topol, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine relationships between piriformis muscle (PM) and sciatic nerve (SN) with reference to sex and anatomical variations. Material/Methods Deep dissection of the gluteal region was performed on 30 randomized, formalin-fixed human lower limbs of adults of both sexes of the Polish population. Anthropometric measurements were taken and then statistically analyzed. Results The conducted research revealed that, apart from the typical structure of the piriformis muscle, the most common variation was division of the piriformis muscle into two heads, with the common peroneal nerve running between them (20%). The group with anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve course displayed greater diversity of morphometric measurement results. There was a statistically significant correlation between the lower limb length and the distance from the sciatic nerve to the greater trochanter in the male specimens. On the other hand, in the female specimens, a statistically significant correlation was observed between the lower limb length and the distance from the sciatic nerve to the ischial tuberosity. The shortest distance from the sciatic nerve to the greater trochanter measured at the level of the inferior edge of the piriformis was 21 mm, while the shortest distance to the ischial tuberosity was 63 mm. Such correlations should be taken into account during invasive medical procedures performed in the gluteal region. Conclusions It is possible to distinguish several anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve course within the deep gluteal region. The statistically significant correlations between some anthropometric measurements were only present within particular groups of male and female limbs. PMID:26629744

  11. Assessment of nerve regeneration across nerve allografts treated with tacrolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisheng, Han; Songjie, Zuo; Xin, Li

    2008-01-01

    Although regeneration of nerve allotransplant is a major concern in the clinic, there have been few papers quantitatively assessing functional recovery of animals' nerve allografts in the long term. In this study, functional recovery, histopathological study, and immunohistochemistry changes of rat nerve allograft with FK506 were investigated up to 12 weeks without slaughtering. C57 and SD rats were used for transplantation. The donor's nerve was sliced and transplanted into the recipient. The sciatic nerve was epineurally sutured with 10-0 nylon. In total, 30 models of transplantation were performed and divided into 3 groups that were either treated with FK506 or not. Functional recovery of the grafted nerve was serially assessed by the pin click test, walking track analysis and electrophysiological evaluations. A histopathological study and immunohistochemistry study were done in the all of the models. Nerve allografts treated with FK506 have no immune rejection through 12 weeks. Sensibility had similarly improved in both isografts and allografts. There has been no difference in each graft. Walk track analysis demonstrates significant recovery of motor function of the nerve graft. No histological results of difference were found up to 12 weeks in each graft. In the rodent nerve graft model, FK506 prevented nerve allograft rejection across a major histocompatibility barrier. Sensory recovery seems to be superior to motor function. Nerve isograft and allograft treated with FK506 have no significant difference in function recovery, histopathological result, and immunohistochemistry changes.

  12. Gluteal Augmentation With Intramuscular Implants in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus With Lipoatrophy Related to the Use of Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Guilherme Augusto; Coltro, Pedro Soler; Barros, Mário Eduardo; Müller Neto, Bruno Francisco; Lima, Renan Victor; Farina, Jayme Adriano

    2017-11-01

    Lipodystrophy syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may lead to low self-esteem and poor compliance with the drug treatment on patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is a matter of concern for the health system. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with HIV submitted to gluteal augmentation with intramuscular silicone implants to correct gluteal lipoatrophy related to the use of HAART. This is a retrospective evaluation of 10 patients submitted to gluteal augmentation with intramuscular silicone implant for correction of gluteal lipoatrophy related to the use of HAART, operated between 2012 and 2015. Postoperative complications and the degree of patient's satisfaction were analyzed. There were 3 postoperative complications including 1 case of surgical wound dehiscence and 2 cases of seroma. Six months after surgery, 8 patients had an excellent degree of satisfaction, and 2 patients had a good degree of satisfaction related to the procedure. Although this intervention does not offer functional advantages, it improves the body contour, increases patients' self-esteem, and helps them to accept their body image. These advantages can lead to higher compliance with prolonged HAART. Gluteal augmentation with intramuscular silicone implant can be a viable option to treat patients with HIV with gluteal lipoatrophy related to the use of HAART. The patients were satisfied with the outcomes of the procedure, and there were only minor self-limited postoperative complications.

  13. A simple and successful sonographic technique to identify the sciatic nerve in the parasacral area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ahmad Muhammad

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe detailed sonographic anatomy of the parasacral area for rapid and successful identification of the sciatic nerve. Fifty patients scheduled for knee surgery were included in this observational study. An ultrasound-guided parasacral sciatic nerve block was performed in all patients. The ultrasound probe was placed on an axial plane 8 cm lateral to the uppermost point of the gluteal cleft. Usually, at this level the posterior border of the ischium (PBI), a characteristically curved hyperechoic line, could be identified. The sciatic nerve appeared as a hyperechoic structure just medial to the PBI. The nerve lies deep to the piriformis muscle lateral to the inferior gluteal vessels, and if followed caudally, it rests directly on the back of the ischium. After confirmation with electrical stimulation, a 20-mL mixture of 1% ropivacaine and 1% lidocaine with epinephrine was injected. The sciatic nerve was identified successfully in 48 patients (96%). In those patients, the median time required for its ultrasonographic identification was ten seconds [interquartile range, 8-13.7 sec], and the block success rate was 100%. The described sonographic details of the parasacral area allowed for rapid and successful identification of the sciatic nerve.

  14. Acquired myospherulosis secondary to gluteal augmentation on fine needle aspiration cytology: A diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperstein, Susan; Dilcher, Thomas; Viswanathan, Kartik; Rao, Rema A; Siddiqui, Momin T; Giorgadze, Tamara

    2018-05-01

    A 30-year-old female presented with a three-month history of a multilocular cystic lesion over the lumbosacral spine. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) of the lesion was performed at an outside institution, and a cytologic diagnosis, suspicious for chordoma, was rendered. The patient presented for surgical consultation at our institution. Repeat FNA demonstrated an unusual fat-like material. Upon further inquiry, the patient provided a recent history of gluteal contour improvement with fibroadipose tissue implants. A diagnosis of myospherulosis was made with a concurrent surgical pathology correlation. No evidence of chordoma was identified. To date, this is the first reported case of acquired myospherulosis in the context of gluteal contour enhancement and represents an important diagnostic pitfall to consider on cytology preparations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Clinical application of modified upper gluteal rhomboid fasciocutaneous flap in repairing sacrococcygeal pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Maohua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Bangmin; Li, Yinghao

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the method and effectiveness of repairing sacrococcygeal pressure sores with modified upper gluteal rhomboid fasciocutaneous flap. Between January 2004 and March 2011, 43 patients with sacrococcygeal pressure sores were treated. There were 25 males and 18 females with an average age of 63 years (range, 38-95 years). The disease duration was 3 months to 2 years and 6 months (mean, 8.5 months). The size of pressure sores ranged from 6 cm x 5 cm to 18 cm x 13 cm. According to the extent and lesion degree of pressure scores, 23 pressure sores were rated as degree III and 20 pressure sores as degree IV. The modified upper gluteal rhomboid flap was designed, one-side upper gluteal fasciocutaneous flaps were transplanted to repair sacrococcygeal pressure sores in 19 cases and two-side flaps in 24 cases. The size of one side flap ranged from 6.5 cm x 4.5 cm to 18.0 cm x 11.5 cm. Fluid under flap occurred in 1 case and edge necrosis of the flaps in 3 cases at 7 days after operation, which were cured after drainage and dressing change; the other flaps survived, and incisions healed by first intention. All patients were followed up 6 months to 3 years with an average of 11 months. Two patients relapsed at 5 months and 8 months, respectively; the other patients had no recurrence. The color of the flaps was normal, and the appearance and elasticity of the flaps were good. The modified upper gluteal rhomboid fasciocutaneous flap has the advantages of simple design and operation, less injury, and reliable effect in repairing sacrococcygeal pressure sores.

  16. Movement anatomy of the gluteal region and thigh of the giant anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla (Myrmecophagidae: Pilosa)

    OpenAIRE

    Priscilla Rosa Queiroz Ribeiro; André Luiz Quagliatto Santos; Lucas de Assis Ribeiro; Tharlianne Alici Martins de Souza; Daniela Cristina Silva Borges; Rogério Rodrigues de Souza; Saulo Gonçalves Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Locomotion reveals the displacement and behavior manner of the species in their daily needs. According to different needs of the several species, different locomotor patterns are adopted. The shapes and attachment points of muscles are important determinants of the movements performed and consequently, the locomotion and motion patterns of living beings. It was aimed to associate anatomical, kinesiology and biomechanics aspects of the gluteal region and thigh of the giant anteater t...

  17. Child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis: a correlative study of CT findings and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Miao; Li Ziping; Meng Quanfei; Guo Yan; Ye Bingbing; Xiao Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT imaging in the diagnosis of child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis. Methods: CT manifestations of child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis were retrospectively analyzed. In total 7 males and 1 female, 2 to 11 years old, were enrolled in study. All cases had been confirmed by surgery and pathology. CT findings were correlatively studied with pathology. Results: Lesions located on the left side were noted in 7 cases, and a lesion located on right side was seen in the rest 1 cam The lesions were elliptical or lobulated on CT images. Three tumors originated from solitary muscle and multiple muscles were involved in other 5 cases. Tumors were well demarcated. Invasion to the adjacent structure was shown in 7 cases. All tumors were homogeneous in density in non-enhanced scan. Compared to the muscles in the same section, 5 tumors were iso -density and 3 tumors were hypo-density. Inside the lesions no hemorrhage, necrosis, cystic degeneration and calcification was revealed. After contrast medium was administrated, iso-dense and homogeneous enhancement as the adjacent muscles was seen in 1 tumor and apparent enhancement were demonstrated in 7 tumors. Seven tumors tended to grow along the longitudinal axis of muscles and infiltrated into fascial space. Atrophy resulting from compression was shown in the adjacent muscles in 6 cases. The major clinical manifestation was limp. Gluteal aggressive fibromatosis was confirmed by pathology in all cases. Conclusion: There are characteristics of child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis in age of onset, gender of the patients, site of the lesion and CT findings as well. CT manifestations were consistent with pathology. CT imaging is helpful in initial diagnosis and differential diagnosis, as well as in assessing the expansion of the tumor and involvement of the adjacent structures. (authors)

  18. Movement anatomy of the gluteal region and thigh of the giant anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla (Myrmecophagidae: Pilosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Rosa Queiroz Ribeiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Locomotion reveals the displacement and behavior manner of the species in their daily needs. According to different needs of the several species, different locomotor patterns are adopted. The shapes and attachment points of muscles are important determinants of the movements performed and consequently, the locomotion and motion patterns of living beings. It was aimed to associate anatomical, kinesiology and biomechanics aspects of the gluteal region and thigh of the giant anteater to its moving characteristics and locomotor habits. It was used three specimens of Myrmecophaga tridactyla, settled in formaldehyde aqueous solution at 10% and subsequently, dissected using usual techniques in gross anatomy. The morphological characteristics of the gluteal region and thigh that influence the patterns of movement and locomotion of animals, were analyzed and discussed in light of literature. All muscles of the gluteal region and thigh of giant anteater show parallel arrangement of the muscular fibers, being flat or fusiform. These muscles are formed in the joint which the interpotent type biolever act. These morphological characteristics indicate a greater predominance of amplitude and movement speed at the expense of strength. On the other hand, features such as osteometric index and the observation of giant anteater motion indicate the opposite, what reflects this animal lack of expertise in locomotor habits and shows the need of future realization of more detailed studies in this subject.

  19. Gluteal Black Market Silicone-induced Renal Failure: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Andrea; Faibisoff, Burt

    2017-11-01

    Very few cases of successful surgical treatment for renal failure due to gluteal silicone injections have been reported in the literature. The silicone toxicity and subsequent renal failure seem to follow repetitive silicone injections and silicone injections in large quantities. This is a case of a 31-year-old woman who developed renal failure after 6 years of gluteal silicone injections who underwent radical resection of bilateral gluteal regions in an attempt to mitigate her impending complete renal failure. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed database and with assistance from medical library staff to conduct keyword searches for "Silicone," "Renal failure," "Silicone emboli syndrome," "Silicone granuloma," and "Silicone end organ toxicity." The search results were reviewed by the authors and selected based on the relevance to the case report presented. Extensive literature relating to silicone granulomas and their systemic effects supports the use of steroids for immediate treatment and eventual surgical resection for cure of the various silicone-related end-organ toxicities including renal failure.

  20. Successful Treatment of Gluteal Pain from Obturator Internus Tendinitis and Bursitis with Ultrasound-Guided Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Boqing; Rispoli, Leia; Stitik, Todd; Leong, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    This case report describes what the authors believe is the first case of a patient with obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis successfully treated with a corticosteroid injection using a trans-tendinous lateral to medial approach. The patient presented with right gluteal pain not relieved by physical therapy or right hip and ischial bursa corticosteroid injections. Pelvic and lumbar spine MRIs and EMG/NCS findings were unremarkable. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness to palpation at the right middle lower gluteal region. Ultrasound imaging with sonopalpation identified the maximal local tender point as the right obturator internus muscle and/or its underlying bursa. A 22-gauge 3.5-inch needle was inserted in-plane to the transducer and longitudinal to the obturator internus from a lateral to medial direction, an approach previously described in cadavers. The obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa were injected with 2.5 ml of 0.5% lidocaine combined with 10 mg of triamcinolone. The patient reported immediate complete relief of pain with continued relief at 2 and 6 months post-injection. This case report demonstrates an injection of the obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa using a trans-tendinous approach, which may be successful for treatment of patients presenting with persistent gluteal pain from obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis.

  1. Gluteal Black Market Silicone–induced Renal Failure: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Matson, DO, PGY-2

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Very few cases of successful surgical treatment for renal failure due to gluteal silicone injections have been reported in the literature. The silicone toxicity and subsequent renal failure seem to follow repetitive silicone injections and silicone injections in large quantities. This is a case of a 31-year-old woman who developed renal failure after 6 years of gluteal silicone injections who underwent radical resection of bilateral gluteal regions in an attempt to mitigate her impending complete renal failure. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed database and with assistance from medical library staff to conduct keyword searches for “Silicone,” “Renal failure,” “Silicone emboli syndrome,” “Silicone granuloma,” and “Silicone end organ toxicity.” The search results were reviewed by the authors and selected based on the relevance to the case report presented. Extensive literature relating to silicone granulomas and their systemic effects supports the use of steroids for immediate treatment and eventual surgical resection for cure of the various silicone-related end-organ toxicities including renal failure.

  2. Targeted Ultrasound-Guided Perineural Hydrodissection of the Sciatic Nerve for the Treatment of Piriformis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S

    2018-05-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a common cause of lumbar, gluteal, and thigh pain, frequently associated with sciatic nerve symptoms. Potential etiologies include muscle injury or chronic muscle stretching associated with gait disturbances. There is a common pathological end pathway involving hypertrophy, spasm, contracture, inflammation, and scarring of the piriformis muscle, leading to impingement of the sciatic nerve. Ultrasound-guided piriformis injections are frequently used in the treatment of these pain syndromes, with most of the published literature describing injection of the muscle. We describe a safe, effective ultrasound-guided injection technique for the treatment of piriformis syndrome using targeted sciatic perineural hydrodissection followed by therapeutic corticosteroid injection.

  3. Anatomical basis for sciatic nerve block at the knee level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Tatiana Rosa Bezerra Wanderley; da Cunha, Rafael Martins; Rodrigues, Amanda Karine Barros; Ramos, Fernando Wagner da Silva; de Sousa-Rodrigues, Célio Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Recently, administration of sciatic nerve block has been revised due to the potential benefit for postoperative analgesia and patient satisfaction after the advent of ultrasound. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomical relations of the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa to determine the optimal distance the needle must be positioned in order to realize the sciatic nerve block anterior to its bifurcation into the tibial and common fibular nerve. The study was conducted by dissection of human cadavers' popliteal fossa, fixed in 10% formalin, from the Laboratory of Human Anatomy and Morphology Departments of the Universidade Federal de Alagoas and Universidade de Ciências da Saúde de Alagoas. Access to the sciatic nerve was obtained. 44 popliteal fossa were analyzed. The bifurcation of the sciatic nerve in relation to the apex of the fossa was observed. There was bifurcation in: 67.96% below the apex, 15.90% above the apex, 11.36% near the apex, and 4.78% in the gluteal region. The sciatic nerve bifurcation to its branches occurs at various levels, and the chance to succeed when the needle is placed between 5 and 7 cm above the popliteal is 95.22%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. [Anatomical basis for sciatic nerve block at the knee level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Tatiana Rosa Bezerra Wanderley; Cunha, Rafael Martins da; Rodrigues, Amanda Karine Barros; Ramos, Fernando Wagner da Silva; Sousa-Rodrigues, Célio Fernando de

    2015-01-01

    Recently, administration of sciatic nerve block has been revised due to the potential benefit for postoperative analgesia and patient satisfaction after the advent of ultrasound. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomical relations of the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa to determine the optimal distance the needle must be positioned in order to realize the sciatic nerve block anterior to its bifurcation into the tibial and common fibular nerve. The study was conducted by dissection of human cadavers' popliteal fossa, fixed in 10% formalin, from the Laboratory of Human Anatomy and Morphology Departments of the Universidade Federal de Alagoas and Universidade de Ciências da Saúde de Alagoas. Access to the sciatic nerve was obtained. 44 popliteal fossa were analyzed. The bifurcation of the sciatic nerve in relation to the apex of the fossa was observed. There was bifurcation in: 67.96% below the apex, 15.90% above the apex, 11.36% near the apex, and 4.78% in the gluteal region. The sciatic nerve bifurcation to its branches occurs at various levels, and the chance to succeed when the needle is placed between 5 and 7 cm above the popliteal is 95.22%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  6. Effects of electrical stimulation-induced gluteal versus gluteal and hamstring muscles activation on sitting pressure distribution in persons with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, C A J; Haverkamp, G L G; de Groot, S; Stolwijk-Swuste, J M; Janssen, T W J

    2012-08-01

    Ten participants underwent two electrical stimulation (ES) protocols applied using a custom-made electrode garment with built-in electrodes. Interface pressure was measured using a force-sensitive area. In one protocol, both the gluteal and hamstring (g+h) muscles were activated, in the other gluteal (g) muscles only. To study and compare the effects of electrically induced activation of g+h muscles versus g muscles only on sitting pressure distribution in individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Ischial tuberosities interface pressure (ITs pressure) and pressure gradient. In all participants, both protocols of g and g+h ES-induced activation caused a significant decrease in IT pressure. IT pressure after g+h muscles activation was reduced significantly by 34.5% compared with rest pressure, whereas a significant reduction of 10.2% after activation of g muscles only was found. Pressure gradient reduced significantly only after stimulation of g+h muscles (49.3%). g+h muscles activation showed a decrease in pressure relief (Δ IT) over time compared with g muscles only. Both protocols of surface ES-induced of g and g+h activation gave pressure relief from the ITs. Activation of both g+h muscles in SCI resulted in better IT pressure reduction in sitting individuals with a SCI than activation of g muscles only. ES might be a promising method in preventing pressure ulcers (PUs) on the ITs in people with SCI. Further research needs to show which pressure reduction is sufficient in preventing PUs.

  7. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehecka, B J; Edwards, Michael; Haverkamp, Ryan; Martin, Lani; Porter, Kambry; Thach, Kailey; Sack, Richard J; Hakansson, Nils A

    2017-08-01

    Gluteal strength plays a role in injury prevention, normal gait patterns, eliminating pain, and enhancing athletic performance. Research shows high gluteal muscle activity during a single-leg bridge compared to other gluteal strengthening exercises; however, prior studies have primarily measured muscle activity with the active lower extremity starting in 90 ° of knee flexion with an extended contralateral knee. This standard position has caused reports of hamstring cramping, which may impede optimal gluteal strengthening. The purpose of this study was to determine which modified position for the single-leg bridge is best for preferentially activating the gluteus maximus and medius. Cross-Sectional. Twenty-eight healthy males and females aged 18-30 years were tested in five different, randomized single-leg bridge positions. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on subjects' gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris of their bridge leg (i.e., dominant or kicking leg), as well as the rectus femoris of their contralateral leg. Subjects performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for each tested muscle prior to performing five different bridge positions in randomized order. All bridge EMG data were normalized to the corresponding muscle MVIC data. A modified bridge position with the knee of the bridge leg flexed to 135 ° versus the traditional 90 ° of knee flexion demonstrated preferential activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius compared to the traditional single-leg bridge. Hamstring activation significantly decreased (p bridge by flexing the active knee to 135 ° instead of 90 ° minimizes hamstring activity while maintaining high levels of gluteal activation, effectively building a bridge better suited for preferential gluteal activation. 3.

  8. Non-small-cell lung cancer: unusual presentation in the gluteal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Alao, Bassel Suffian

    2011-05-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in both men and women worldwide. It is also one of the most common forms of cancer in Ireland, accounting for about 20% of all deaths from cancer each year. Early detection of lung cancer is infrequent, and most cases are not diagnosed and treated until they are at an advanced stage. Distant metastases in lung cancer commonly involve the adrenal glands, liver, bones, and central nervous system; they are only rarely seen in the skeletal system. We report a rare case of metastasis to the gluteal muscle as the initial presentation of lung cancer.

  9. Gluteal mass in a bodybuilder: radiological depiction of a complication of anabolic steroid use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ismail, Khalid; Torreggiani, William C; Munk, Peter L; Nicolaou, Savvas [Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2002-06-01

    The use of anabolic steroids by bodybuilders is relatively common and associated with many side effects. Local side effects include tissue necrosis and soft tissue infection at the injection site. Systemic effects may be early epiphyseal closure in the immature skeleton, testicular atrophy, sterility, acne, gynaecomastia and liver disorders such as hepatitis. We report an unusual case of a bodybuilder who developed a large painful inflammatory soft tissue mass in his gluteal area. Multi-modality imaging showed direct evidence revealing the underlying cause of the mass being depot steroid injections. (orig.)

  10. Gluteal mass in a bodybuilder: radiological depiction of a complication of anabolic steroid use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ismail, Khalid; Torreggiani, William C.; Munk, Peter L.; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2002-01-01

    The use of anabolic steroids by bodybuilders is relatively common and associated with many side effects. Local side effects include tissue necrosis and soft tissue infection at the injection site. Systemic effects may be early epiphyseal closure in the immature skeleton, testicular atrophy, sterility, acne, gynaecomastia and liver disorders such as hepatitis. We report an unusual case of a bodybuilder who developed a large painful inflammatory soft tissue mass in his gluteal area. Multi-modality imaging showed direct evidence revealing the underlying cause of the mass being depot steroid injections. (orig.)

  11. Iliopsoas and Gluteal Muscles Are Asymmetric in Tennis Players but Not in Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, Jose A. L.; Dorado, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of iliopsoas (IL) and gluteal muscles (GL) in tennis and soccer players. Methods IL and GL volumes were determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in male professional tennis (TP) and soccer players (SP), and in non-active control subjects (CG) (n = 8, 15 and 6, respectively). Results The dominant and non-dominant IL were hypertrophied in TP (24 and 36%, respectively, Psoccer players had similar volumes in both sides (P = 0.87). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry decreased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis in TP (r = −0.97, PSoccer and CG had similar GL volumes in both sides (P = 0.11 and P = 0.19, for the dominant and contralateral GL, respectively). GL was asymmetrically hypertrophied in TP. The non-dominant GL volume was 20% greater in TP than in CG (Psoccer is associated to a symmetric hypertrophy of IL. Gluteal muscles are asymmetrically hypertrophied in TP, while SP display a similar size to that observed in controls. It remains to be determined whether the different patterns of IL and GL hypertrophy may influence the risk of injury. PMID:21829539

  12. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  13. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  14. Electrical stimulation-induced Gluteal and Hamstring muscle activation can reduce sitting pressure in individuals with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T. W J; De Koning, A.; Legemate, K. J A; Smit, C. A J

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at high risk of developing pressure sores, in part due to high sitting pressures under the buttocks. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of ES-induced activation of the gluteal and hamstring muscles on the sitting pressure in individuals with SCI. METHODS:

  15. [Insertion of gluteus maximus tendo-chilles lengthening with Z-shaped for the treatment of severe gluteal muscle contracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan-shi; Yang, Xiao-long

    2015-06-01

    To investigate clinical curative effects of gluteal muscle contracture release combined with insertion of gluteus maximus tendo-chilles lengthening with Z-shaped in treating severe gluteal muscles contracture. From 2006 May to 2011 May, 20 patients (35 sides) with severe gluteal muscle contracture were collected, including 12 males and 8 females, aged from 8 to 34 years old with an average of 13 years old; the courses of disease ranged from 3 to 21 years. All patients manifested abnormal gait at different degree, knees close together cannot squat,positive syndrome of Ober, positive test of alice leg. Gluteus contracture fascia release were performed firstly in operation, then insertion of tendo-chilles lengthening with Z-shaped were carried out. Preoperative and postoperative gait, and knee flexion hip extensor squat test, cross leg test, adduction and internal rotary activity of hip joint, stretch strength and motor ability after hip abduction were observed and compared. Twenty patients were followed up for 1 to 5 years. Gluteus maximus were released thoroughly, and snapping hip was disappeared, Ober syndrome were negative. There was significant differences in knee flexion hip extensor squat test, adduction and internal rotary activity of hip joint,stretch before and after operation (Pmuscle strength was protected,stretch strength and motor ability of hip joint were recovered well. Among them,31 cases got excellent results and 4 good. For severe gluteal muscles contracture,insertion of gluteus maximus tendo-chilles lengthening with Z-shaped performed after gluteus contracture fascia release could release gluteal muscle contracture to the greatest extent and obtain postoperative curative effect without resection of normal hip muscle fibers and destroy joint capsule.

  16. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain intensity during application of carboxytherapy in patients with cellulite: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadala, Adria Y; Machado, Aline F P; Liebano, Richard E

    2018-01-16

    Carboxytherapy may generate local pain that is considered the main limiting factor in clinical practice. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used in the control of acute pain; however, the effect of TENS on pain relief during carboxytherapy has not been studied to date. To assess the effect of TENS on pain intensity during carboxytherapy in patients with cellulite in the gluteal region. This randomized clinical trial was conducted with 84 patients, 18-44 years of age, who had moderate cellulite in the gluteal region, according to Cellulite Severity Scale, but never received carboxytherapy. Patients were randomized into 3 groups: active TENS, placebo TENS, and control group. For the intervention, skin depressions with cellulite were outlined, and the gluteal area to be treated was defined. The subcutaneous injection of CO 2 was performed using 0.30 × 13 mm-needles at a 45° angle, with a controlled flow rate of 100 mL/min maintained for 1 minute at each puncture site. The parameters for TENS were as follows: frequency of 100 Hz and pulse duration of 200 μs; TENS intensity was adjusted until the patient reported strong paresthesia. The visual numeric pain rating scale was used to assess pain intensity after each puncture. The active TENS group reported lower pain intensity compared to the placebo TENS (P TENS) was effective in reducing pain intensity during carboxytherapy in patients with cellulite in the gluteal region. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Rhoton, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate and review the detailed microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve and surrounding structures along its entire course and to provide its topographic measurements. Ten cadaveric heads were examined using ×3 to ×40 magnification after the arteries and veins were injected with colored silicone. Both sides of each cadaveric head were dissected using different skull base approaches to demonstrate the entire course of the abducens nerve from the pontomedullary sulcus to the lateral rectus muscle. The anatomy of the petroclival area and the cavernous sinus through which the abducens nerve passes are complex due to the high density of critically important neural and vascular structures. The abducens nerve has angulations and fixation points along its course that put the nerve at risk in many clinical situations. From a surgical viewpoint, the petrous tubercle of the petrous apex is an intraoperative landmark to avoid damage to the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is quite different from the other nerves. No other cranial nerve has a long intradural path with angulations and fixations such as the abducens nerve in petroclival venous confluence. A precise knowledge of the relationship between the abducens nerve and surrounding structures has allowed neurosurgeon to approach the clivus, petroclival area, cavernous sinus, and superior orbital fissure without surgical complications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Surgical approach to extensive hidradenitis suppurativa in the perineal/perianal and gluteal regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Emre; Eren, Tunc; Bulut, Türker; Büyükuncu, Yilmaz; Bugra, Dursun; Yamaner, Sümer

    2009-03-01

    Verneuil's disease, or hidradenitis suppurativa, is a chronic suppurative disease with a tendency to sinus formation, fibrosis, and sclerosis. It is a disease of the apocrine sweat glands and may arise from each of the localizations where apocrine glands are prominent: axilla, nipples, umbilicus, perineum, groin, and buttocks. Extensive hidradenitis suppurativa of the perineal/perianal and the gluteal regions constitute a serious social problem. In this study, we present our experience with stage III extensive hidradenitis suppurativa cases, including our treatment methods and patient outcomes. A retrospective review of the medical records from January 1990 to July 2003 of 15 patients was performed. Fifteen patients underwent treatment for extensive hidradenitis suppurativa in the gluteal, perineal/perianal, and inguinal areas with total surgical excision. All patients were men (100%) and their mean age was 42.5 (range, 23-66) years. The patients underwent a total number of 21 operations. In 11 patients wounds were left open for secondary healing, and the mean time for complete wound healing in this group was 12.2 (range, 9.5-22) weeks. Two patients underwent primary wound closure by the application of rotation flaps, and their complete healing times were observed to be approximately 2 weeks. Delayed skin grafting was used for the remaining two patients in whom the wounds had been left open after the initial operation. In this group, complete wound healing took a total of 8 weeks. Only one diverting colostomy was needed in a patient in the delayed skin-grafting group. Squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed in the specimens of one patient treated with total excision followed by the application of a rotation flap. This patient had had complaints of gluteal discharge for approximately 30 years. The cancer recurred after 6 months in the perianal region and immediate abdominoperineal resection was performed. He died during the second postoperative month due to systemic

  19. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1: tumour-to-liver ratio is superior to an SUV{sub max} cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Johannes [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Centre Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Apostolova, Ivayla [Otto-von-Guericke University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Bannas, Peter; Yamamura, Jin; Herrmann, Jochen; Adam, Gerhard; Derlin, Thorsten [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Friedrich, Reinhard E. [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Mautner, Victor F. [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of normalising intra-tumour tracer accumulation on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to reference tissue uptake for characterisation of peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) compared with the established maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) cut-off of >3.5. Forty-nine patients underwent FDG PET/CT. Intra-tumour tracer uptake (SUVmax) was normalised to three different reference tissues (tumour-to-liver, tumour-to-muscle and tumour-to-fat ratios). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were used out to assess the diagnostic performance. Histopathology and follow-up served as the reference standard. Intra-tumour tracer uptake correlated significantly with liver uptake (r{sub s} = 0.58, P = 0.016). On ROC analysis, the optimum threshold for tumour-to-liver ratio was >2.6 (AUC = 0.9735). Both the SUVmax cut-off value of >3.5 and a tumour-to-liver ratio >2.6 provided a sensitivity of 100 %, but specificity was significantly higher for the latter (90.3 % vs 79.8 %; P = 0.013). In patients with NF1, quantitative {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging may identify malignant change in neurofibromas with high accuracy. Specificity could be significantly increased by using the tumour-to-liver ratio. The authors recommend further evaluation of a tumour-to-liver ratio cut-off value of >2.6 for diagnostic intervention planning. (orig.)

  20. Percutaneous Fascia Release for Treating Chronic Recurrent Gluteal Myofascial Pain—A Pilot Study of a New Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Shui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of percutaneous fascia release to treat chronic recurrent gluteal myofascial pain related to recurrent tendonitis or bursitis at the attachment sites. Methods Five patients (three males, two females; aged 48.6 ± 8.9 years with myofascial trigger points in the gluteus medius muscle were treated. Outcome measures, including pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, and the relative strength of hip abduction, were assessed before, immediately after, and six months after the treatment. The data measured before and after treatment (different times on visual analog scale, pressure pain threshold, and relative hip abduction strength were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed-rank test and paired t -test, respectively, for the comparisons between time points. Results Reduction in pain intensity and increase in the pressure pain threshold and the relative hip abduction strength were found in all five patients after treatment when compared with those of before treatment ( P 0.05. Conclusions Percutaneous fascia release of gluteal muscle insertion sites can be used to treat chronic gluteal pain related to subtrochanteric bursitis to avoid recurrence, if other treatment cannot control the recurrence, although this was demonstrated only on a small sample size without control and blind assessment in the pilot study.

  1. Iliac hyperdense line: a new radiographic sign of gluteal muscle contracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jin-Hua; Gan, Lan-Feng; Zheng, He-Lin; Li, Hao [Chongqing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Chongqing (China)

    2005-10-01

    A hyperdense line on the ilium that runs roughly parallel to the sacroiliac joint (we called it ''iliac hyperdense line sign'') was frequently observed on pelvic radiographs of patients with gluteal muscle contracture (GMC). A literature search revealed no description of this sign. To determine the relationship between the iliac hyperdense line sign and GMC and to explore how this sign is formed. Pelvic plain films of 103 cases of GMC and those of 200 control individuals were reviewed for the presence or absence of the iliac hyperdense line sign. Pelvic CT scans in 8 of 103 cases and 13 of 200 controls were analyzed with relation to the plain films. The iliac hyperdense line sign was visualized in 85 of 103 (82.5%) cases of GMC and none of the 200 controls. In the GMC group, pelvic CT scans showed a deformity of the posterior ilium. The lateral cortex of the posterior ilium took on a partly or completely anteroposterior course, while in the control group the course appeared as an oblique orientation from posteromedial to anterolateral. The iliac hyperdense line on pelvic plain film can be used as a radiographic sign to suggest a diagnosis of GMC. This sign might be a result of the long and persistent pulling effect of the contracted gluteus maximus muscle, which deforms the lateral cortex of the posterior ilium from an oblique course to an anteroposterior course tangential to the X-ray beam. (orig.)

  2. Iliac hyperdense line: a new radiographic sign of gluteal muscle contracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jin-Hua; Gan, Lan-Feng; Zheng, He-Lin; Li, Hao

    2005-01-01

    A hyperdense line on the ilium that runs roughly parallel to the sacroiliac joint (we called it ''iliac hyperdense line sign'') was frequently observed on pelvic radiographs of patients with gluteal muscle contracture (GMC). A literature search revealed no description of this sign. To determine the relationship between the iliac hyperdense line sign and GMC and to explore how this sign is formed. Pelvic plain films of 103 cases of GMC and those of 200 control individuals were reviewed for the presence or absence of the iliac hyperdense line sign. Pelvic CT scans in 8 of 103 cases and 13 of 200 controls were analyzed with relation to the plain films. The iliac hyperdense line sign was visualized in 85 of 103 (82.5%) cases of GMC and none of the 200 controls. In the GMC group, pelvic CT scans showed a deformity of the posterior ilium. The lateral cortex of the posterior ilium took on a partly or completely anteroposterior course, while in the control group the course appeared as an oblique orientation from posteromedial to anterolateral. The iliac hyperdense line on pelvic plain film can be used as a radiographic sign to suggest a diagnosis of GMC. This sign might be a result of the long and persistent pulling effect of the contracted gluteus maximus muscle, which deforms the lateral cortex of the posterior ilium from an oblique course to an anteroposterior course tangential to the X-ray beam. (orig.)

  3. Effect of controlled exercise on middle gluteal muscle fibre composition in Thoroughbred foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, D; Yamano, S; Kasashima, Y; Sugiura, T; Nasu, T; Tokuriki, M; Miyata, H

    2003-11-01

    Most racehorses are trained regularly from about age 18 months; therefore, little information is available on the effect of training in Thoroughbred foals. Well-controlled exercise could improve muscle potential ability for endurance running. Thoroughbred foals at age 2 months were separated into control and training (treadmill exercise) groups and samples obtained from the middle gluteal muscle at 2 and 12 months post partum. Muscle fibre compositions were determined by histochemical and electrophoretical techniques and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity was analysed in each fibre type. All fibre types were hypertrophied with growth and type I and IIA fibres were significantly larger in the training than the control group at age 12 months. A significant increase of SDH activity was found in type IIX muscle fibres in the training group. Training in young Thoroughbred horses can facilitate muscle fibre hypertrophy and increase the oxidative capacity of type IIX fibres, which could potentially enhance stamina at high speeds. To apply this result to practical training, further studies are needed to determine more effective and safe intensities of controlled exercise.

  4. Iliac hyperdense line: a new X-ray sign of gluteal muscle contracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jinhua; Gan Lanfeng; Zheng Helin; He Ling; Yu Guorong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the relationship between gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) and the iliac hyperdense line on pelvic plain film, and to explore how the iliac hyperdense line is formed. Methods: The pelvic plain films of 103 cases with GMC confirmed by operation and those of 200 individuals as control were analyzed. Pelvic CT scanning was performed in 8 cases GMC and 13 cases of normal controls. Results: The iliac hyperdense line at the side of sacroiliac joint was found on the pelvic plain film in 85 of 103 cases with GMC and 5 of 200 in control group. In 103 cases of GMC, the iliac hyperdense line was detected in 81 of 88 patients beyond 5 years, and 83 of 94 was mostly the gluteus maximus contracture. In control group, pelvic CT showed that the outer cortex of posterior ilium at the level of sacroiliac joint appeared as an oblique plane, oriented from posteromedial side to anterolateral side, while in GMC group, the oblique plane became steeper and almost oriented posteroanteriorly. In addition, the posterior part of the ilium which gave the attachment of contracted gluteus maximus muscle deformed and widened. Conclusion: The iliac hyperdense line on the pelvic plain film is resulted from the long and persistent pulling effect of contracted gluteus maximus muscle, which causes the change the oblique plane of posterior ilium into a posteroanterior course parallel to the X-ray beam

  5. Changes in gluteal muscle forces with alteration of footstrike pattern during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, Charles Nathan; Kernozek, Thomas W; Gheidi, Naghmeh

    2017-10-01

    Gait retraining is a common form of treatment for running related injuries. Proximal factors at the hip have been postulated as having a role in the development of running related injuries. How altering footstrike affects hip muscles forces and kinematics has not been described. Thus, we aimed to quantify differences in hip muscle forces and hip kinematics that may occur when healthy runners are instructed to alter their foot strike pattern from their habitual rear-foot strike to a forefoot strike. This may gain insight on the potential etiology and treatment methods of running related lower extremity injury. Twenty-five healthy female runners completed a minimum of 10 running trials in a controlled laboratory setting under rear-foot strike and instructed forefoot strike conditions. Kinetic and kinematic data were used in an inverse dynamic based static optimization to estimate individual muscle forces during running. Within subject differences were investigated using a repeated measures multi-variate analysis of variance. Peak gluteus medius and minimus and hamstring forces were reduced while peak gluteus maximus force was increased when running with an instructed forefoot strike pattern. Peak hip adduction, hip internal rotation, and heel-COM distance were also reduced. Therefore, instructing habitual rearfoot strike runners to run with a forefoot strike pattern resulted in changes in peak gluteal and hamstring muscle forces and hip kinematics. These changes may be beneficial to the development and treatment of running related lower extremity injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship between gluteal muscle activation and upper extremity kinematics and kinetics in softball position players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Gretchen D

    2014-03-01

    As the biomechanical literature concerning softball pitching is evolving, there are no data to support the mechanics of softball position players. Pitching literature supports the whole kinetic chain approach including the lower extremity in proper throwing mechanics. The purpose of this project was to examine the gluteal muscle group activation patterns and their relationship with shoulder and elbow kinematics and kinetics during the overhead throwing motion of softball position players. Eighteen Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association softball players (19.2 ± 1.0 years; 68.9 ± 8.7 kg; 168.6 ± 6.6 cm) who were listed on the active playing roster volunteered. Electromyographic, kinematic, and kinetic data were collected while players caught a simulated hit or pitched ball and perform their position throw. Pearson correlation revealed a significant negative correlation between non-throwing gluteus maximus during the phase of maximum external rotation to maximum internal rotation (MIR) and elbow moments at ball release (r = -0.52). While at ball release, trunk flexion and rotation both had a positive relationship with shoulder moments at MIR (r = 0.69, r = 0.82, respectively) suggesting that the kinematic actions of the pelvis and trunk are strongly related to the actions of the shoulder during throwing.

  7. Non-formation of the main trunk of the sciatic nerve and unusual relationships to the piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stoyanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sciatic nerve is the largest branch of the sacral plexus. Variations of its origin, exit from the pelvis, emergence and branching in the posterior region of the thigh, especially in regards to the piriformis muscle, are an object of interest due to the possibility to be involved in the pathogenensis of clinically significant non-discogenic sciatica or piriformis syndrome. Case report: We present a case of variant anatomy of the sciatic nerve, discovered during routine dissection of the left gluteal region of an adult female cadaver. We observed a non-formation of the main trunk of the nerve; rather, the tibial nerve passed inferiorly to the piriformis muscle, while the common peroneal nerve went through the body of the bifid piriformis muscle, immediately next to its tendon. The two branches continued their course in the thigh without joining and forming a proper sciatic nerve. The medical records of the body donor did not reveal any neurological impairment which could be linked to this anatomical peculiarity. Conclusion: The anatomy of the sciatic nerve could be considered to be a factor of clinical significance. The high prevalence of similar anatomical variations should be kept in mind during the diagnostic process of clinical entities involving the sciatic nerve.

  8. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  9. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  10. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  11. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  12. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  13. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF DEEP GLUTEAL PAIN IN A FEMALE RUNNER WITH PELVIC INVOLVEMENT: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, Laura; Kolber, Morey J.; Garcia, Ashley; Rothschild, Carey E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gluteal injuries, proximal hamstring injuries, and pelvic floor disorders have been reported in the literature among runners. Some suggest that hip, pelvis, and/or groin injuries occur in 3.3% to 11.5% of long distance runners. The purpose of this case report is to describe the differential diagnosis and treatment approach for a patient presenting with combined hip and pelvic pain. Case description: A 45-year-old female distance runner was referred to physical therapy for proximal hamstring pain that had been present for several months. This pain limited her ability to tolerate sitting and caused her to cease running. Examination of the patient's lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremity led to the initial differential diagnosis of hamstring syndrome and ischiogluteal bursitis. The patient's primary symptoms improved during the initial four visits, which focused on education, pain management, trunk stabilization and gluteus maximus strengthening, however pelvic pain persisted. Further examination led to a secondary diagnosis of pelvic floor hypertonic disorder. Interventions to address the pelvic floor led to resolution of symptoms and return to running. Outcomes: Pain level on the Visual Analog Scale decreased from 7/10 to 1/10 over the course of treatment. The patient was able to return to full sport activity and improved sitting tolerance to greater then two hours without significant discomfort. Discussion: This case suggests the interdependence of lumbopelvic and lower extremity kinematics in complaints of hamstring, posterior thigh and pelvic floor disorders. This case highlights the importance of a thorough examination as well as the need to consider a regional interdependence of the pelvic floor and lower quarter when treating individuals with proximal hamstring pain. Level of Evidence: Level 4 PMID:24175132

  14. 臀下动脉穿支蒂复合组织瓣修复骶尾部巨大褥疮的解剖与临床应用%Anatomy study and clinical applications of complex tissue flap pedicled with inferior gluteal artery perforator for repairing giant sacrococcygeal pressure sore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢昀; 林建华; 叶君健; 郑和平

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of using complex tissue flap pedicled with inferior gluteal artery perforator for repair giant sacrococcygeal pressure sore.Methods Thirty embalmed lower limbs of adult cadavers perfused with red latex were used for anatomical study,and the followings were observed:①The course,branche and distribution of gluteal artery.②The course and distribution of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve.③Anastomosis between the posterior cutaneous branch of gluteal artery and nutrient vessels of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve.8 cases aging from 17 years to 56 years were completed during May 2007 to July 2013,6 cases were males and 2 cases were females.The sizes of pressure sore with the depth to Ⅳ degree were ranged from 16 cm × 9 cm to 22 cm × 10 cm.The sizes of flaps were harvested from 32 cm × 10 cm to 25 cm × 9 cm.Results The gluteal artery crossed the edge of the piriformis,the main stem was (3.1 ± 0.4) mm in diameter and gave out 2-5 muscular branches to supply the gluteus maximus.The posterior femoral cutaneous nerve crossed the edge of gluteus maximus and descended between biceps femoris and semitendinosus.Perforating deep fascia point located was (5.9 ± 0.8) cm above the line between medial and lateral femoral epicondyle.The constant anastomosis were formed by the posterior cutaneous branch of gluteal artery,the obturator artery perforator and the direct popliteal artery perforator around the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve.The complex flap survived successfully in all patients.Sutures were removed at 14 days postoperatively and the wounds healed well.All supplied areas were closed by directly suturing.Recurrent sacrococcygeal pressure sore was not observed in all cases with satisfied appearance and normal color during the outpatient follow-up period from 5 months to 5 years.Conclusion The united flap of gluteal myocutaneous flap and the posterior femoral cutaneous

  15. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Bryant; Khan, Zubair; Switaj, Paul J; Ochenjele, George; Fuchs, Daniel; Dahl, William; Cederna, Paul; Kung, Theodore A; Kadakia, Anish R

    2014-08-06

    Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone.

  16. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  17. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: Percutaneous Tendon Fenestration Versus Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection for Treatment of Gluteal Tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jon A; Yablon, Corrie M; Henning, P Troy; Kazmers, Irene S; Urquhart, Andrew; Hallstrom, Brian; Bedi, Asheesh; Parameswaran, Aishwarya

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare ultrasound-guided percutaneous tendon fenestration to platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome. After Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, patients with symptoms of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and ultrasound findings of gluteal tendinosis or a partial tear (Pain scores were recorded at baseline, week 1, and week 2 after treatment. Retrospective clinic record review assessed patient symptoms. The study group consisted of 30 patients (24 female), of whom 50% were treated with fenestration and 50% were treated with PRP. The gluteus medius was treated in 73% and 67% in the fenestration and PRP groups, respectively. Tendinosis was present in all patients. In the fenestration group, mean pain scores were 32.4 at baseline, 16.8 at time point 1, and 15.2 at time point 2. In the PRP group, mean pain scores were 31.4 at baseline, 25.5 at time point 1, and 19.4 at time point 2. Retrospective follow-up showed significant pain score improvement from baseline to time points 1 and 2 (P.99). Our study shows that both ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration and PRP injection are effective for treatment of gluteal tendinosis, showing symptom improvement in both treatment groups. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell′s phenomenon, superior oblique (SO overaction, and lateral rectus (LR contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%, trauma (20%, inflammation (13%, aneurysm (7%, and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles.

  19. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupam; Bahuguna, Chirag; Nagpal, Ritu; Kumar, Barun

    2016-01-01

    Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell's phenomenon, superior oblique (SO) overaction, and lateral rectus (LR) contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%), trauma (20%), inflammation (13%), aneurysm (7%), and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension), aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles. PMID:27433033

  20. Inferior gluteal artery perforator flap: a viable alternative for ischial pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Seok; Lew, Dae Hyun; Roh, Tai Suk; Yoo, Won Min; Lee, Won Jai; Tark, Kwan Chul

    2009-10-01

    The ischial area is by far the most common site for pressure sores in wheelchair-bound paraplegic patients, because most of the pressure of the body is exerted on this area in the seated position. Even after a series of successful pressure sore treatments, the site is very prone to relapse from the simplest everyday tasks. Therefore, it is crucial to preserve the main pedicle during primary surgery. Several surgical procedures, such as myocutaneous flap and perforator flap, have been introduced for the treatment of pressure sores. During a 4-year time period at our institute, we found favourable clinical results using the inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) procedure for ischial sore treatment. A total of 23 patients (20 males and three females) received IGAP flap surgery in our hospital from January 2003 to January 2007. Surgery was performed on the same site again in 10 (43%) patients who had originally relapsed after undergoing the conventional method of pressure sore surgery. The average age of patients was 47.4 years (range 26-71 years). Most of the patients were paraplegic (16 cases, 70%) and others were either quadriplegic (four cases, 17%) or ambulatory (three cases, 13%). Based on hospital records and clinical photographs, we attempted to assess the feasibility and practicability of the IGAP flap procedure through comparative analysis of several parameters including the size of the defective area, treatment modalities, relapses, complications, and postoperative treatments. The average follow-up duration for 23 subjects was 25.4 months (range 5-42 months). All flaps survived without major complications. Partial flap necrosis developed in one case but secondary healing was achieved and the final outcome was not impaired. Most of the cases healed well during the follow-up period. Postoperative complications such as wound dehiscence and fistula developed in some subjects, but all healed well with a secondary treatment. A total of five cases relapsed

  1. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury: Effect of duty cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MSc Karin J.A. Legemate; MD Christof A. J. Smit; MSc Anja de Koning; PhD Sonja de Groot; MD, PhD Janneke M. Stolwijk-Swuste; PhD Thomas W.H. Janssen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation

  2. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury : Effect of duty cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Christof A. J.; Legemate, Karin J. A.; de Koning, Anja; de Groot, Sonja; Stolwijk-Swuste, Janneke M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation on

  3. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A. J.; Zwinkels, M.; van Dijk, T.; de Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W. J.

    Background: Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle

  4. An update-tissue engineered nerve grafts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitesh P; Lyon, Kristopher A; Huang, Jason H

    2018-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNI) are caused by a range of etiologies and result in a broad spectrum of disability. While nerve autografts are the current gold standard for the reconstruction of extensive nerve damage, the limited supply of autologous nerve and complications associated with harvesting nerve from a second surgical site has driven groups from multiple disciplines, including biomedical engineering, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, and orthopedic surgery, to develop a suitable or superior alternative to autografting. Over the last couple of decades, various types of scaffolds, such as acellular nerve grafts (ANGs), nerve guidance conduits, and non-nervous tissues, have been filled with Schwann cells, stem cells, and/or neurotrophic factors to develop tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs). Although these have shown promising effects on peripheral nerve regeneration in experimental models, the autograft has remained the gold standard for large nerve gaps. This review provides a discussion of recent advances in the development of TENGs and their efficacy in experimental models. Specifically, TENGs have been enhanced via incorporation of genetically engineered cells, methods to improve stem cell survival and differentiation, optimized delivery of neurotrophic factors via drug delivery systems (DDS), co-administration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and pretreatment with chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC). Other notable advancements include conduits that have been bioengineered to mimic native nerve structure via cell-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and the development of transplantable living nervous tissue constructs from rat and human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Grafts composed of non-nervous tissues, such as vein, artery, and muscle, will be briefly discussed.

  5. Experimental study of vascularized nerve graft: evaluation of nerve regeneration using choline acetyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, M; Tamai, S; Yajima, H; Kawanishi, K

    2001-01-01

    A comparative study of nerve regeneration was performed on vascularized nerve graft (VNG) and free nerve graft (FNG) in Fischer strain rats. A segment of the sciatic nerve with vascular pedicle of the femoral artery and vein was harvested from syngeneic donor rat for the VNG group and the sciatic nerve in the same length without vascular pedicle was harvested for the FNG group. They were transplanted to a nerve defect in the sciatic nerve of syngeneic recipient rats. At 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks after operation, the sciatic nerves were biopsied and processed for evaluation of choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity, histological studies, and measurement of wet weight of the muscle innervated by the sciatic nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation of the grafted nerve was also performed before sacrifice. The average CAT activity in the distal to the distal suture site was 383 cpm in VNG and 361 cpm in FNG at 2 weeks; 6,189 cpm in VNG and 2,264 cpm in FNG at 4 weeks; and 11,299 cpm in VNG and 9,424 cpm in FNG at 6 weeks postoperatively. The value of the VNG group was statistically higher than that of the FNG group at 4 weeks postoperatively. Electrophysiological and histological findings also suggested that nerve regeneration in the VNG group was superior to that in the FNG group during the same period. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups after 6 weeks postoperatively in any of the evaluations. The CAT measurement was useful in the experiments, because it was highly sensitive and reproducible. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. An artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (arteria comitans nervi ischiadici) and the position of the hip joint: a comparative histological study using chick, mouse, and human foetal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, A; Hayashi, S; Nasu, H; Abe, H; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Murakami, G

    2013-02-01

    Birds and reptiles always carry a long and thick artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (i.e., the sciatic artery), whereas mammals do not. We attempted to demonstrate a difference in courses of the nerve and artery in fetuses in relation with the hip joint posture. Eight mid-term human fetuses (15-18 weeks), five mouse fetuses (E18) and five chick embryos (11 days after incubation) were examined histologically. Thin feeding arteries in the sciatic nerve were consistently observed in human fetuses in spite of the long, inferiorly curved course of the nerve around the ischium. The tissue around the human sciatic nerve was not so tight because of the medial and inferior shift of the nerve away from the hip joint. The fetal hip joint position differed among the species, being highly flexed in humans and almost at right angle flexion in mice and chicks. Because of deep adduction of the hip joint in the mouse, the knee was located near the midline of the body. The mouse sciatic nerve ran through the tight tissue along the head of the femur, whereas the chick nerve ran through the loose space even in the gluteal region. In birds, evolution of the pelvis including the hip joint without adduction seemed to make the arterial development possible. In mammals, highly flexed or adducted hip joint seemed to be one of the disturbing factors against development of the long and thick artery. A slight change in posture may cause significant arterial variation.

  7. Estrogen receptor protein content is different in abdominal than gluteal subcutaneous adipose tissue of overweight-to-obese premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Cooper, Elizabeth E; Hickner, Robert C

    2013-08-01

    Premenopausal women demonstrate a distinctive gynoid body fat distribution and circulating estrogen status is associated with the maintenance of this adiposity patterning. Estrogen's role in modulation of regional adiposity may occur through estrogen receptors (ERs), which are present in human adipose tissue. The purpose of this study was to determine regional differences in the protein content of ERα, ERβ, and the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) between the abdominal (AB) and gluteal (GL) subcutaneous adipose tissue of overweight-to-obese premenopausal women. Biopsies of the subcutaneous AB and GL adipose tissue were performed in 15 premenopausal women (7 Caucasian/8 African American, 25.1 ± 1.8 years, BMI 29.5 ± 0.5kg/m(2)). Adipose tissue protein content was measured by western blot analysis and correlation analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between ER protein content and anthropometric indices/body composition measurements. We found that ERα protein was higher in AB than GL (AB 1.0 ± 0.2 vs GL 0.67 ± 0.1 arbitrary units [AU], P=0.02), ERβ protein was higher in GL than AB (AB 0.78 ± 0.12 vs GL 1.3 ± 0.2 AU, P=0.002), ERα/ERβ ratio was higher in AB than GL (AB 1.9 ± 0.4 vs GL 0.58 ± 0.08 AU, P=0.007), and GPER protein content was similar in AB and GL (P=0.80) subcutaneous adipose tissue. Waist-to-hip ratio was inversely related to gluteal ERβ (r(2)=0.315, P=0.03) and positively related to gluteal ERα/ERβ ratio (r(2)=0.406, P=0.01). These results indicate that depot specific ER content may be an important underlying determinant of regional effects of estrogen in upper and lower body adipose tissue of overweight-to-obese premenopausal women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bathymetry of Lake Superior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Superior has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  9. Superior Hiking Trail Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Superior Hiking Trail main trail, spurs, and camp spurs for completed trail throughout Cook, Lake, St. Louis and Carlton counties. These data were collected with...

  10. Superior Hiking Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Superior Hiking Trail main trail, spurs, and camp spurs for completed trail throughout Cook, Lake, St. Louis and Carlton counties. These data were collected with...

  11. Alternate superior Julia sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Anju; Rani, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Alternate Julia sets have been studied in Picard iterative procedures. The purpose of this paper is to study the quadratic and cubic maps using superior iterates to obtain Julia sets with different alternate structures. Analytically, graphically and computationally it has been shown that alternate superior Julia sets can be connected, disconnected and totally disconnected, and also fattier than the corresponding alternate Julia sets. A few examples have been studied by applying different type of alternate structures

  12. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  13. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  14. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  15. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later on. Inflammation of the tendons ( tendonitis ) or joints ( arthritis ) can also put pressure on the nerve. ... how fast electrical signals move through a nerve Neuromuscular ultrasound to view problems with the muscles and ...

  16. A novel conduit-based coaptation device for primary nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Riley, D Colton; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Cardwell, Nancy; Pollins, Alonda C; Afshari, Ashkan; Nguyen, Lyly; Dortch, Richard D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2018-06-01

    Conduit-based nerve repairs are commonly used for small nerve gaps, whereas primary repair may be performed if there is no tension on nerve endings. We hypothesize that a conduit-based nerve coaptation device will improve nerve repair outcomes by avoiding sutures at the nerve repair site and utilizing the advantages of a conduit-based repair. The left sciatic nerves of female Sprague-Dawley rats were transected and repaired using a novel conduit-based device. The conduit-based device group was compared to a control group of rats that underwent a standard end-to-end microsurgical repair of the sciatic nerve. Animals underwent behavioral assessments at weekly intervals post-operatively using the sciatic functional index (SFI) test. Animals were sacrificed at four weeks to obtain motor axon counts from immunohistochemistry. A sub-group of animals were sacrificed immediately post repair to obtain MRI images. SFI scores were superior in rats which received conduit-based repairs compared to the control group. Motor axon counts distal to the injury in the device group at four weeks were statistically superior to the control group. MRI tractography was used to demonstrate repair of two nerves using the novel conduit device. A conduit-based nerve coaptation device avoids sutures at the nerve repair site and leads to improved outcomes in a rat model. Conduit-based nerve repair devices have the potential to standardize nerve repairs while improving outcomes.

  17. Elastofibroma of the gluteal region with a concomitant contralateral lesion: case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevolani, Luca; Casadei, R.; Donati, D. [Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, III Orthopaedic and Traumatology Clinic, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D.; Gambarotti, M. [Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bone Tumor Center, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    A 51-year-old man presented with elastofibroma (EF) of the gluteal region with a concomitant contralateral lesion. The patient presented with a slow growing mass of the proximal third of the right buttock and had swelling, discomfort in sitting, and right-hip pain during walking for 2 months. On MRI, a soft-tissue mass was noted between the gluteus maximus and the gluteus medius muscle. The mass showed similar signal intensity to the surrounding tissue on T1- and T2-weighted images and with linear hyperintense areas in its internal structure. At surgery, a soft, non-encapsulated, irregular, and rubber-like mass was found attached to the gluteus medius muscles. It was pathologically confirmed to be an EF. This unusual manifestation of an EF is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Coexpression network analysis in abdominal and gluteal adipose tissue reveals regulatory genetic loci for metabolic syndrome and related phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Halgrimsdottir, Ingileif

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD) and gluteal (GLU) adipose tissue...... and 51 (0.6%) in GLU only. Differential eigengene network analysis of 8,256 shared probesets detected 22 shared modules with high preservation across adipose depots (D(ABD-GLU) = 0.89), seven of which were associated with MetS (FDR P100,000 individuals; rs10282458, affecting expression of RARRES2...... and their interactions influence complex traits such as MetS, integrated analysis of genotypes and coexpression networks across multiple tissues relevant to clinical traits is an efficient strategy to identify novel associations....

  19. Parkinson disease affects peripheral sensory nerves in the pharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Nyirenda, Themba; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Sue, Lucia I; Beach, Thomas G

    2013-07-01

    Dysphagia is very common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and often leads to aspiration pneumonia, the most common cause of death in PD. Current therapies are largely ineffective for dysphagia. Because pharyngeal sensation normally triggers the swallowing reflex, we examined pharyngeal sensory nerves in PD patients for Lewy pathology.Sensory nerves supplying the pharynx were excised from autopsied pharynges obtained from patients with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD (n = 10) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 4). We examined the glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve IX), the pharyngeal sensory branch of the vagus nerve (PSB-X), and the internal superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) innervating the laryngopharynx. Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated α-synuclein was used to detect Lewy pathology. Axonal α-synuclein aggregates in the pharyngeal sensory nerves were identified in all of the PD subjects but not in the controls. The density of α-synuclein-positive lesions was greater in PD patients with dysphagia versus those without dysphagia. In addition, α-synuclein-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the ISLN were much more abundant than those in cranial nerve IX and PSB-X. These findings suggest that pharyngeal sensory nerves are directly affected by pathologic processes in PD. These abnormalities may decrease pharyngeal sensation, thereby impairing swallowing and airway protective reflexes and contributing to dysphagia and aspiration.

  20. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  1. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, T.; Grimm, A.; Schelle, T.

    2017-01-01

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [de

  2. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  3. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  4. After facial nerve damage, regenerating axons become aberrant throughout the length of the nerve and not only at the site of the lesion: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D; Raisman, G

    2004-02-01

    After facial nerve trauma, aberrant regeneration is associated with synkinesis. Animal models of mechanical nerve guides or reparative cell transplants at the site of a lesion have not been shown to improve disorganized regeneration. We examined whether this is because regenerating axons become disorganized throughout the length of the nerve and not only at the site of the lesion. In rats (n = 12), retrograde fluorescent tracer techniques were used to establish that most of the temporal branch fibres were carried in the superior half of the facial nerve trunk. In two further groups of rats (n = 24) a complete proximal facial nerve lesion was made, and the nerve immediately repaired by suture. After 4 weeks, at a second operation, the superior half of the facial nerve trunk was cut, either proximal or distal to the original lesion, and retrograde tracers were applied to distal branches of the nerve. It was possible to localize the points at which regenerating fibres became aberrant in their course by studying the number of labelled motoneurons in the facial nucleus after application of the tracer to the temporal branch of the nerve: this was similar in the distal and proximal hemisection groups, suggesting that aberrant axonal development occurred throughout the length of the nerve. Future strategies aimed at improving the organization of regeneration need to provide guidance cues not only at the site of the lesion as previously thought, but also throughout the length of the nerve.

  5. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  6. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  7. Hydrogel derived from porcine decellularized nerve tissue as a promising biomaterial for repairing peripheral nerve defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Shihao; Qiu, Shuai; Rao, Zilong; Liu, Jianghui; Zhu, Shuang; Yan, Liwei; Mao, Haiquan; Zhu, Qingtang; Quan, Daping; Liu, Xiaolin

    2018-06-01

    Decellularized matrix hydrogels derived from tissues or organs have been used for tissue repair due to their biocompatibility, tunability, and tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components. However, the preparation of decellularized peripheral nerve matrix hydrogels and their use to repair nerve defects have not been reported. Here, we developed a hydrogel from porcine decellularized nerve matrix (pDNM-G), which was confirmed to have minimal DNA content and retain collagen and glycosaminoglycans content, thereby allowing gelatinization. The pDNM-G exhibited a nanofibrous structure similar to that of natural ECM, and a ∼280-Pa storage modulus at 10 mg/mL similar to that of native neural tissues. Western blot and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the pDNM-G consisted mostly of ECM proteins and contained primary ECM-related proteins, including fibronectin and collagen I and IV). In vitro experiments showed that pDNM-G supported Schwann cell proliferation and preserved cell morphology. Additionally, in a 15-mm rat sciatic nerve defect model, pDNM-G was combined with electrospun poly(lactic-acid)-co-poly(trimethylene-carbonate)conduits to bridge the defect, which did not elicit an adverse immune response and promoted the activation of M2 macrophages associated with a constructive remodeling response. Morphological analyses and electrophysiological and functional examinations revealed that the regenerative outcomes achieved by pDNM-G were superior to those by empty conduits and closed to those using rat decellularized nerve matrix allograft scaffolds. These findings indicated that pDNM-G, with its preserved ECM composition and nanofibrous structure, represents a promising biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration. Decellularized nerve allografts have been widely used to treat peripheral nerve injury. However, given their limited availability and lack of bioactive factors, efforts have been made to improve the efficacy

  8. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury: Effect of duty cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Christof A. J. Smit, MD; Karin J. A. Legemate, MSc; Anja de Koning, MSc; Sonja de Groot, PhD; Janneke M. Stolwijk-Swuste, MD, PhD; Thomas W. J. Janssen, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation on interface pressure distribution in sitting individuals with SCI and study the usability of a newly developed electrode garment (ES shorts). Ten individuals with SCI participated in this study, in which t...

  9. Adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells: correlation in rat thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Daniela

    2002-10-21

    The interactions between adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells (MCs) were studied in the thymus of adult and old rats by morphological methods and by quantitative analysis of images (QAIs). The whole thymus was drawn in adult (12 months old) rats: normal, sympathectomized or electrostimulated. Thymuses from the above-mentioned animals were weighed, measured and dissected. Thymic slices were stained with eosin orange for detection of microanatomical details and with Bodian's method for identification of the whole nerve fibres. Thymic MCs were stained with Astrablau. Histofluorescence microscopy was used for staining of adrenergic nerve fibres. Finally, all morphological results were submitted to the QAIs and statistical analysis of data. Our results suggest that after surgical sympathectomy, the greater part of adrenergic nerve fibres disappear while related MCs appear to show less evident fluorescence and few granules. On the contrary, electrostimulation of the cervical superior ganglion induced an increase in the fluorescence of adrenergic nerve fibres and of related MCs.

  10. MR imaging of nerve root impingement in the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresi, L.M.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Bloze, A.E.; Davis, S.J.; Amster, J.; Berger, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the relationship between MR imaging findings of nerve root impingement, presenting symptoms, and physical examination findings, and physiologic data (DSEP and EMG) in a population of patients presented with classic radicular symptoms. Fifty-eight patients presenting with classic radicular pain were studied with MR imaging, DSER, and EMG, MR imaging was performed with a GE Signa imaging system with use of T1- and T2-weighted sequences and 5-mm-thick sections. Nerve root impingement in the subarticular recess (the root exiting the next lowest level) was distinguished from nerve root impingement in the superior intervertebral foramen (the root exiting the same level)

  11. Vascularized nerve grafts: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Renato; Capone, Crescenzo; Sgulò, Francesco Giovanni; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to define an experimental model in order to promote the functional recovery of the nerves using grafts with vascular support (Vascular Nerve Grafts - VNG). The aim of this study is to define, on an experimental model in normal recipient bed, whether the functional recovery with VNG is superior to that obtained non-vascularized graft (NNG). Twenty male rabbits, which underwent dissection of sciatic nerve, were later treated by reinnervation through an autograft. In 10 animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with VNG; in 10 control animals the reconstruction of sciatic nerve was realized with NNG. The VNG group showed a better axonal organization and a significantly higher number of regenerated axons in the early phases (after 30 days) than the NNG group, whereas the difference in the axonal number at day 90 was less significant; besides, the axon diameter and the myelin thickness were not significantly improved by VNG group. Our data suggests that the use of VNG leads to a faster regeneration process and a better functional recovery, although the final results are comparable to those of the NNG. VNG improve the quality of the axonal regeneration (axonal diameter and Schwann cells), although the increase in the axonal number is not significant and does not improve the long-term functional outcome.

  12. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  13. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Self and Superior Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    model of the self-evaluation process as it differs from the evaluation process used by superiors. Symbolic Interactionism One view of self assessment is...supplied by the symbolic interactionists (Cooley, 1902; Head, 1934), who state that self perceptions are generated largely from individuals...disagreements remained even immediately after an appraisal interview in which a great deal of feedback was given. Research on the symbolic interactionist

  15. Correlation among ultrasound, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the sciatic nerve: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Nizar; van Geffen, Geert J; Bruhn, Jörgen; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2010-01-01

    Efficient identification of the sciatic nerve (SN) requires a thorough knowledge of its topography in relation to the surrounding structures. Anatomic cross sections in similar oblique planes as observed during SN ultrasonography are lacking. A survey of sonoanatomy matched with ultrasound views of the major SN block sites will be helpful in pattern recognition, especially when combined with images that show the internal architecture of the nerve. From 1 cadaver, consecutive parts of the upper leg corresponding to the 4 major blocks sites were sectioned and deeply frozen. Using cryomicrotomy, consecutive transverse sections were acquired and photographed at 78-microm intervals, along with histologic sections at 5-mm intervals. Multiplanar reformatting was done to reconstruct the optimal planes for an accurate comparison of ultrasonography and gross anatomy. The anatomic and histologic images were matched with ultrasound images that were obtained from 2 healthy volunteers. By simulating the exact position and angulation as in the ultrasonographic images, detailed anatomic overviews of SN and adjacent structures were reconstructed in the gluteal, subgluteal, midfemoral, and popliteal regions. Throughout its trajectory, SN contains numerous fascicles with connective and adipose tissues. In this study, we provide an optimal matching between histology, anatomic cross sections, and short-axis ultrasound images of SN. Reconstructing ultrasonographic planes with this high-resolution digitized anatomy not only enables an overview but also shows detailed views of the architecture of internal SN. The undulating course of the nerve fascicles within SN may explain its varying echogenic appearance during probe manipulation.

  16. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  17. Superior facet syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Igarashi, Seishi; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1985-01-01

    Sciatica caused by root entrapment in the lateral recess was named superior facet syndrome by Epstein in 1972. Few reports on this subject based on large numbers of cases have been documented to date. Of the patients with sciatica, 32 patients were diagnosed to have root entrapment at the lateral recess L 5 or/and S 1 lumbar spine. Out of 32 patients, 20 patients were operated on and the lateral entrapment was recognized in all of surgical cases. Neuroradiological findings, especially of metrizamide CT (met. CT), were documented in detail. Thirty two patients were classified in three types according to radiological findings. They were congenital or developmental, degenerative, and combined type, respectively, Fourteen cases belonged to the congenital type, 13 to the degenerative and 5 to the combined type. Each group had the mean ages of 23.4, 53.8, and 36.8 years old, respectively. Of 32 cases the entrapment occured in 47 L 5 roots and 11 S 1 roots. There was no remarkable laterality. In operation the unroofing of the lateral recess were done and the sciatica subsided postoperatively in all of surgical cases. Met. CT revealed extreme medial protrusion of the superior articular joint in 18 of 24 cases(75%) and none filling of the root in the lateral recess in 21 of 24 cases (87.5%). In the degenerative type, met. CT showed some degenerative changes that were hypertrophy or deformity of the articular joints and spur formation of the vertebral body. In contrast to met. CT, metrizamide myelography revealed only slight changes, which were poor filling of the root before it turned out the pedicle of lateral compression of the root. In plain films or lumbar spine articular joints at Lsub(4/5) were formed in coronal plane in 69% of cases of the L 5 root entrapment. Met. CT using ReView technique was of great diagnostic value in superior facet syndrome. (author)

  18. The superiority of 3D-CISS sequence in displaying the cisternal segment of posterior nerves and their pathological changes%3D-CISS MRI序列对脑池段后组脑神经及其病变显示的优势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁长虎; 柳澄; 李坤成; 武乐斌; 庞琦; 乌大尉; 王海燕; 于富华

    2009-01-01

    目的 通过脑池段后组脑神经3D-CISS序列与3D-TSE序列成像质量的比较,评估3D-CISS序列对脑池段后组脑神经及其病变显示的作用.方法 对45例正常体检者和12例患有各种后组脑神经异常症状的病人进行3D-CISS序列、3D-TSE序列扫描,对后组腑神经成像进行评分.结果 舌咽、迷走、副神经及舌下神经在3D-CISS、3D-TSE序列的显示率依次为:100%、57.1%;100%、52.3%;100%、41.1%;91.0%、59.3%.应用3D-CISS序列:对8例血管性神经痛病人显示了责任血管压迫点,对3例后组脑神经微小肿瘤进行了显示,对1例蛛网膜囊肿病人显示了压迫点.结论 对于被脑脊液围绕的后组脑神经显示成像,3D-CISS序列是较好的选择.%Objective To evaluate the efficacy of 3D-CISS on image quality of posterior nerves surrounded by CSF when compared with that of 3D-TSE. Method A total of 45 volunteers and 12 patients with abnormality of posterior cranial nerves were examined using 3D-CISS and 3D-TSE sequences respectively. The image quality were graded for glossopharyngeal nerve、vagus nerve、accessory nerve、 hypoglossal nerves (CN Ⅸ、Ⅹ、Ⅺ、Ⅻ) and their related arteries. Results The identification rates for cisternal segment of posterior nerves were as follows: glossopharyngeal nerve (100% in 3D-CISS and 57.1% in 31)-TSE)、vagus nerve(100% in 3D-CISS and 52.3% in 3I)-TSE)、accessory nerve(100% in 3D-CISS and 41.1% in 3D-TSE)、hypoglossal nerves(91.0% in 3D-CISS and 59.3% in 3D-TSE);12 patients with pathological changes in posterior nerves were all displayed well, among them 8 were pressed by artery, 1 by arachnoid cyst,3 caused by tumors. Conclusions 3D-CISS sequence is preferable when imaging posterior cranial nerves surrounded by CSF.

  19. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes in sensation or movement No history of injury to the area No signs of nerve damage These medicines reduce swelling and pressure on the nerve. They may be injected directly into the area or taken by mouth. Other medicines include: Over-the-counter pain ...

  1. Tibial nerve (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve is commonly injured by fractures or other injury to the back of the knee or the lower leg. It may be affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. The nerve can also be damaged by pressure from a tumor, abscess, or bleeding into the ...

  2. Information Superiority through Data Warehousing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warner, Neil

    2001-01-01

    .... A precursor to a knowledge edge is Information Superiority. Within most current Command Support Systems minimal integration and fusion of data is undertaken to provide the basis of information superiority...

  3. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  4. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  5. Schwannoma of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve : A Rare Entity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, Linda M; Teding van Berkhout, F; Priesterbach, Loudy; Buijsrogge, Marc P

    Neurogenic tumors are the most common posterior mediastinal tumors in adults. Schwannomas originating from the recurrent laryngeal nerve are rare. The present study describes a 46-year-old man with a tumor in the left superior mediastinum. Because of the narrow relationship with the aorta and the

  6. Congenital pits of the optic nerve head and retinochoroidal colobomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C; Augsburger, J J

    1980-07-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with bilateral retinochoroidal colobomas associated with an inferonasal congenital pit of the optic nerve head in each eye. Different theories on the origin of such pits are discussed. This case supports the theory that some congenital optic pits occur as a result of failure of closure of the superior end of the embryonic fissure.

  7. Schwann cell seeded guidance tubes restore erectile function after ablation of cavernous nerves in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, F; Weidner, N; Matiasek, K; Caspers, C; Mrva, T; Vroemen, M; Henke, J; Lehmer, A; Schwaibold, H; Erhardt, W; Gänsbacher, B; Hartung, R

    2004-07-01

    Dissection of the cavernous nerves eliminates spontaneous erections. We evaluated the ability of Schwann cell seeded nerve guidance tubes to restore erections after bilateral cavernous nerve resection in rats. Sections (5 mm) of the cavernous nerve were excised bilaterally, followed by immediate bilateral microsurgical reconstruction. In 10 animals per group (20 study nerves) reconstruction was performed by genitofemoral nerve interposition, interposition of silicone tubes or interposition of silicone tubes seeded with homologous Schwann cells. As the control 10 animals (20 study nerves) underwent sham operation (positive control) and bilateral nerve ablation (without reconstruction) was performed in a further 10 (negative control). Erectile function was evaluated 3 months postoperatively by relaparotomy, electrical nerve stimulation and intracavernous pressure recording. After 3 months neurostimulation resulted in an intact erectile response in 90% (18 of 20) of Schwann cell grafts, while treatment with autologous nerves (30% or 6 of 20) or tubes only (50% or 10 of 20) was less successful (p Schwann cell grafts compared to results in the other treatment groups (p Schwann cell grafts. Schwann cell seeded guidance tubes restore erectile function after the ablation of cavernous nerves in rats and they are superior to autologous nerve grafts.

  8. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0047 TITLE: Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ahmet Höke...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0047 Nanofiber nerve guide for peripheral nerve repair and regeneration 5b. GRANT NUMBER...goal of this collaborative research project was to develop next generation engineered nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with aligned nanofibers and

  9. Detailed anatomy of the abducens nerve in the lateral rectus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yong Seok; Kim, In-Beom; Shin, Sun Young

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to elucidate the detailed anatomy of the abducens nerve in the lateral rectus muscle (LRM) and the intramuscular innervation pattern using Sihler staining. In this cohort study, 32 eyes of 16 cadavers were assessed. Dissection was performed from the LRM origin to its insertion. The following distances were measured: from LRM insertion to the bifurcation point of the abducens nerve, from LRM insertion to the entry site of the superior branch or inferior branch, from the upper border of the LRM to the entry site of the superior branch, from the lower border of LRM to the entry site of inferior branch, and the widths of the main trunk and superior and inferior branches. The single trunk of the abducens nerve divided into two branches 37 mm from insertion of the LRM, and 22 of 32 (68.8%) orbits showed only two superior and inferior branches with no subdivision. The superior branch entered the LRM more anteriorly (P = 0.037) and the superior branch was thinner than the inferior branch (P = 0.040). The most distally located intramuscular nerve ending was observed at 52.9 ± 3.5% of the length of each muscle. Non-overlap between the superior and inferior intramuscular arborization of the nerve was detected in 27 of 32 cases (84.4%). Five cases (15.6%) showed definite overlap of the superior and inferior zones. This study revealed the detailed anatomy of the abducens nerve in the LRM and provides helpful information to understand abducens nerve palsy. Clin. Anat. 30:873-877, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Simultaneous occurrence of a severe Morel-Lavallée lesion and gluteal muscle necrosis as a sequela of transcatheter angiographic embolization following pelvic fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takayoshi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Sakuragi, Atsushi; Tsukie, Tomio; Kawanabe, Keiichi

    2015-03-26

    Morel-Lavallée lesions are posttraumatic hemolymphatic collections caused by disruption of the interfascial planes between the subcutaneous soft tissue and muscle. Severe peripelvic Morel-Lavallée lesions have rarely been reported in the literature. By contrast, a number of cases of gluteal muscle necrosis following transcatheter angiographic embolization for pelvic fracture have been reported. Each entity can result in severe infection and sepsis, and the mortality rate in such cases is quite high. However, to date, no previous reports have described a case in which these life-threatening entities occurred simultaneously. A 32-year-old Asian man simultaneously developed severe peripelvic Morel-Lavallée lesions and gluteal muscle necrosis with sepsis following transcatheter angiographic embolization after an unstable pelvic fracture. Extremely large skin and soft tissue defects, which were untreatable with any commonly used flaps, were generated after repeated debridement. In addition, a deep-bone infection was suspected in his left fractured iliac bone, while motor function was almost completely lost in his left leg, possibly as a sequela of transcatheter angiographic embolization. As a result of his condition, a left hemipelvectomy was unavoidable. A pedicled fillet flap from his sacrificed left limb was used for the treatment of the defects and to provide a durable base for a prosthesis. Our patient survived and returned to his previous job 24 months after the surgery wearing a prosthetic left leg. As illustrated by the present case, severe peripelvic Morel-Lavallée lesions and gluteal muscle necrosis following transcatheter angiographic embolization can occur simultaneously after unstable pelvic fractures. Physicians should recognize that these entities can result in life-threatening sepsis and, therefore, should attempt to detect them as early as possible. When hemipelvectomy is unavoidable, a pedicled upper and lower leg in-continuity fillet flap may

  11. Acute Bilateral Superior Branch Vestibular Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario A. Yacovino

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid onset of a bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH is often attributed to vestibular ototoxicity. However, without any prior exposure to ototoxins, the idiopathic form of BVH is most common. Although sequential bilateral vestibular neuritis (VN is described as a cause of BVH, clinical evidence for simultaneous and acute onset bilateral VN is unknown. We describe a patient with an acute onset of severe gait ataxia and oscillopsia with features compatible with acute BVH putatively due to a bilateral VN, which we serially evaluated with clinical and laboratory vestibular function testing over the course of 1 year. Initially, bilateral superior and horizontal semicircular canals and bilateral utricles were impaired, consistent with damage to both superior branches of each vestibular nerve. Hearing was spared. Only modest results were obtained following 6 months of vestibular rehabilitation. At a 1-year follow-up, only the utricular function of one side recovered. This case is the first evidence supporting an acute presentation of bilateral VN as a cause for BVH, which would not have been observed without critical assessment of each of the 10 vestibular end organs.

  12. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  13. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  14. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  15. Anatomical basis for sciatic nerve block at the knee level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Recently, administration of sciatic nerve block has been revised due to the potential benefit for postoperative analgesia and patient satisfaction after the advent of ultrasound. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomical relations of the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa to determine the optimal distance the needle must be positioned in order to realize the sciatic nerve block anterior to its bifurcation into the tibial and common fibular nerve. Method: The study was conducted by dissection of human cadavers’ popliteal fossa, fixed in 10% formalin, from the Laboratory of Human Anatomy and Morphology Departments of the Universidade Federal de Alagoas and Universidade de Ciências da Saúde de Alagoas. Access to the sciatic nerve was obtained. Results: 44 popliteal fossa were analyzed. The bifurcation of the sciatic nerve in relation to the apex of the fossa was observed. There was bifurcation in: 67.96% below the apex, 15.90% above the apex, 11.36% near the apex, and 4.78% in the gluteal region. Conclusions: The sciatic nerve bifurcation to its branches occurs at various levels, and the chance to succeed when the needle is placed between 5 and 7 cm above the popliteal is 95.22%. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: Recentemente a feitura de bloqueio do nervo isquiático tem sido revista devido ao potencial benéfico para analgesia pós-operatória e satisfação dos pacientes após o advento da ultrassonografia. O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever as relações anatômicas do nervo isquiático na fossa poplítea para determinar a distância ideal em que a agulha deve ser posicionada para a feitura do bloqueio anestésico do nervo isquiático anterior a sua bifurcação em nervo tibial e fibular comum. Método: O trabalho foi feito por meio de dissecção de fossa poplítea de cadáveres humanos, fixados em formol a 10%, provenientes do Laboratório de Anatomia Humana dos departamentos de Morfologia da

  16. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  17. Sobredentadura total superior implantosoportada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlando Rodríguez García

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de un paciente desdentado total superior, rehabilitado en la consulta de implantología de la Clínica "Pedro Ortiz" del municipio Habana del Este en Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba, en el año 2009, mediante prótesis sobre implantes osteointegrados, técnica que se ha incorporado a la práctica estomatológica en Cuba como alternativa al tratamiento convencional en los pacientes desdentados totales. Se siguió un protocolo que comprendió una fase quirúrgica, procedimiento con o sin realización de colgajo y carga precoz o inmediata. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 56 años de edad, que acudió a la consulta multidisciplinaria, preocupado, porque se le habían elaborado tres prótesis en los últimos dos años y ninguna reunía los requisitos de retención que él necesitaba para sentirse seguro y cómodo con las mismas. El resultado final fue la satisfacción total del paciente, con el mejoramiento de la calidad estética y funcional.

  18. Histopathology of cryoballoon ablation-induced phrenic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Ferreira, Jose; Guerra, Peter G; Landry, Evelyn; Coulombe, Nicolas; Rivard, Lena; Macle, Laurent; Thibault, Bernard; Talajic, Mario; Roy, Denis; Khairy, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Hemi-diaphragmatic paralysis is the most common complication associated with cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation, yet the histopathology of phrenic nerve injury has not been well described. A preclinical randomized study was conducted to characterize the histopathology of phrenic nerve injury induced by cryoballoon ablation and assess the potential for electromyographic (EMG) monitoring to limit phrenic nerve damage. Thirty-two dogs underwent cryoballoon ablation of the right superior pulmonary vein with the objective of inducing phrenic nerve injury. Animals were randomized 1:1 to standard monitoring (i.e., interruption of ablation upon reduction in diaphragmatic motion) versus EMG guidance (i.e., cessation of ablation upon a 30% reduction in the diaphragmatic compound motor action potential [CMAP] amplitude). The acute procedural endpoint was achieved in all dogs. Phrenic nerve injury was characterized by Wallerian degeneration, with subperineural injury to large myelinated axons and evidence of axonal regeneration. The degree of phrenic nerve injury paralleled the reduction in CMAP amplitude (P = 0.007). Animals randomized to EMG guidance had a lower incidence of acute hemi-diaphragmatic paralysis (50% vs 100%; P = 0.001), persistent paralysis at 30 days (21% vs 75%; multivariate odds ratio 0.12, 95% confidence interval [0.02, 0.69], P = 0.017), and a lesser severity of histologic injury (P = 0.001). Mature pulmonary vein ablation lesion characteristics, including circumferentiality and transmurality, were similar in both groups. Phrenic nerve injury induced by cryoballoon ablation is axonal in nature and characterized by Wallerian degeneration, with potential for recovery. An EMG-guided approach is superior to standard monitoring in limiting phrenic nerve damage. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Surgical Anatomy of the Cervical Part of the Hypoglossal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Brian Ngure; Butt, Fawzia; Mandela, Pamela; Odula, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Iatrogenic injuries to cranial nerves, half of which affect the hypoglossal nerve, occur in up to 20% of surgical procedures involving the neck. The risk of injury could be minimized by in-depth knowledge of its positional and relational anatomy. Forty-one hypoglossal nerves were dissected from cadaveric specimens and positions described in relation to the internal carotid artery (ICA), external carotid artery (ECA), carotid bifurcation, mandible, hyoid bone, mastoid process, and the digastric tendon. The distance of the nerve from where it crossed the ICA and ECA to the carotid bifurcation was 29.93 (±5.99) mm and 15.19 (±6.68) mm, respectively. The point where it crossed the ICA was 12.24 (±3.71) mm superior to the greater horn of hyoid, 17.16 (±4.40) mm inferior to the angle of the mandible, and 39.08 (±5.69) mm from tip of the mastoid. The hypoglossal nerve loop was inferior to the digastric tendon in 73% of the cases. The hypoglossal nerves formed high loops in this study population. Caution should be exercised during surgical procedures in the neck. The study also revealed that the mastoid process is a reliable fixed landmark to locate the hypoglossal nerve.

  20. Point-of-care Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of a Gluteal Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Roy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 57-year-old male with a history of intravenous drug use presented to the emergency department with four days of progressively worsening pain and swelling to his left buttock after injecting heroin subcutaneously (i.e., “skin popping”. Labs were significant for a white blood cell count (WBC of 26,700/mm3. Using the high frequency, linear probe, a point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS was performed and revealed a large soft tissue abscess. Significant findings: POCUS reveals a large, hypoechoic soft tissue abscess with debris and tracks extending to the bottom of the image. Furthermore, when compressed, movement of the abscess contents is appreciated. There is also superficial cobble-stoning consistent with overlying cellulitis and soft tissue edema. Discussion: In the United States, there are over 14 million outpatient visits per year related to soft tissue infections, with nearly one-third being seen in the emergency department.1,2 22%-65% of intravenous drug users experience abscesses and cellulitis.3 Soft tissue abscesses are commonly encountered in the emergency department and the diagnosis is often made by history and physical exam.5 However, imaging modalities are more accurate than physical exam alone. When comparing ultrasound to physical exam in the diagnosis of soft tissue abscesses, one study suggests that ultrasound has a sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 87%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the physical exam is 84% and 60%, respectively.4 Another study comparing computed tomography (CT to ultrasound in the diagnosis of abscesses found ultrasound to have a sensitivity and specificity of 96.7% and 85.7%, respectively, while the overall sensitivity and specificity of CT was 76.7% and 91.4%, respectively. Ultrasound was superior in overall image detail ratings and demonstrated more visible detail within the abscess cavity. 5 When utilizing POCUS to evaluate for an abscess, look for an

  1. Diagnostic capability of optic nerve head rim width and retinal nerve fiber thickness in open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Staso, Silvio; Agnifili, Luca; Di Staso, Federico; Climastone, Hilary; Ciancaglini, Marco; Scuderi, Gian Luca

    2018-03-01

    This study was performed to test the diagnostic capability of the minimum rim width compared to peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with glaucoma. A case control, observer masked study, was conducted. Minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were assessed using the patient-specific axis traced between fovea-to-Bruch's membrane opening center axis. For both minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, the regionalization in six sectors (nasal, superior-nasal, superior-temporal, temporal, inferior-temporal, and inferior-nasal) was analyzed. Eyes with at least one sector with value below the 5% or 1% normative limit of the optical coherence tomography normative database were classified as glaucomatous. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive positive and negative values were calculated for both minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. A total of 118 eyes of 118 Caucasian subjects (80 eyes with open-angle glaucoma and 38 control eyes) were enrolled in the study. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 79.7%, 77.5%, and 84.2%, respectively, for minimum rim width and 84.7%, 82.5%, and 89.5% for retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. The positive predictive values were 0.91% and 0.94% for minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, respectively, whereas the negative predictive values were 0.64% and 0.70%. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.892 for minimum rim width and 0.938 for retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Our results indicated that the sector analysis based on Bruch's membrane opening and fovea to disk alignment is able to detect glaucomatous defects, and that Bruch's membrane opening minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness showed equivalent diagnostic ability.

  2. End-to-side neurorrhaphy repairs peripheral nerve injury: sensory nerve induces motor nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Zhang, She-Hong; Wang, Tao; Peng, Feng; Han, Dong; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy is an option in the treatment of the long segment defects of a nerve. It involves suturing the distal stump of the disconnected nerve (recipient nerve) to the side of the intimate adjacent nerve (donor nerve). However, the motor-sensory specificity after end-to-side neurorrhaphy remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate whether cutaneous sensory nerve regeneration induces motor nerves after end-to-side neurorrhaphy. Thirty rats were randomized into three groups: (1) end-to-side neurorrhaphy using the ulnar nerve (mixed sensory and motor) as the donor nerve and the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve as the recipient nerve; (2) the sham group: ulnar nerve and cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve were just exposed; and (3) the transected nerve group: cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve was transected and the stumps were turned over and tied. At 5 months, acetylcholinesterase staining results showed that 34% ± 16% of the myelinated axons were stained in the end-to-side group, and none of the myelinated axons were stained in either the sham or transected nerve groups. Retrograde fluorescent tracing of spinal motor neurons and dorsal root ganglion showed the proportion of motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the end-to-side group was 21% ± 5%. In contrast, no motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the sham group and transected nerve group were found in the spinal cord segment. These results confirmed that motor neuron regeneration occurred after cutaneous nerve end-to-side neurorrhaphy.

  3. Morphometric study of the upper intercostal nerves: practical application for neurotizations in traumatic brachial plexus palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfazadourian, H; Tramond, B; Dauge, M C; Oberlin, C

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was a morphometric evaluation of the intercostal nerves at different levels along their course in order to determine their adequacy in neurotizing the recipient nerves. The intercostal nerves were harvested from 5 cadavers. A biopsy of the nerve was obtained at 2 levels for each nerve in the parasternal region and at the level of the mid-axillary line. The musculocutaneous nerve was isolated at its origin from the lateral cord. Each harvested specimen was embedded in paraffin and sections were made using a microtome. These sections were then stained histochemically using HPS (Hematein, Phloxine, Safran). Real-time digitalisation of the video image under the microscope was performed. The sum of the different fascicular zones is the effective sensorimotor surface of the nerve at the level being studied. Direct suture of the upper three intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve is always possible upto the axillary fossa. The sixth intercostal nerve can be delivered upto this level in only 50% of cases without dissection of the musculocutaneous nerve upto its entry into the coracobrachialis. The musculocutaneous nerve presents a mean surface area of 2.64 mm2 while the nerve to the biceps has a mean surface area of 0.34 mm2 i.e. a ration of 1/8. The mean surface area of the intercostal nerves at the parasternal level is 0.23 mm2 while that at the axillary level is 0.34 mm2. Thus a loss of 33% in surface area occurs between the axillary and the parasternal levels. Our study confirms the insufficiency between the surface area of the intercostal nerves and the different nerve trunks to be neurotized. The relationship between the surface area of the musculocutaneous nerve and the three intercostal nerves is 26.72% with a minimum of 17.2%. If a fourth intercostal nerve is added, this ratio nerves appears to be a superior technique. We were able to deliver the sixth intercostal nerve for a direct suture to the musculocutaneous nerve in only half

  4. MR imaging of the cranial nerves and the intracranial vessels using 3D-SPGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Sato, Nami; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Sugai, Yukio; Ogushi, Masatoshi; Kubota, Hisashi

    1992-01-01

    MR angiography (MRA) has developed rapidly, but it is still insufficient to demonstrate the detail of the intracranial vascular anatomy. We found that original images of MRA render more information than MRA images about not only intracranial vessels but also cranial nerves. We have tried to demonstrate cranial nerves and intracranial vessels on 26 patients and evaluated using real time reformation of original images of MRA. MR images were obtained by SPGR (3DFT) after injection of Gd-DTPA. The optic nerve, the oculomotor nerve, the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve were visualized clearly on almost patients and detectabilities of these nerves were 100%, 98%, 100%, 94% and 100%, respectively. The abducent nerve was also detectable in 76%. The trochlear nerve, which could not be observed by any modality, was detected at prepontine cistern in 10%. Arteries around brain stem such as the superior cerebellar artery (SCA), the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and the posterior communicating artery (PcomA) were clearly visible, and branching of these arteries and anatomical detail were completely coincide with angiogram on 12 patients. The basal vein of Rosenthal and the petrosal vein were confirmed in 100% and their anastomose were demonstrated obviously. We concluded that this method was extremely useful to observe cranial nerves and intracranial small vessels. (author)

  5. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  6. Optic Nerve Injury in a Patient with Chronic Allergic Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribhi Hazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of the optic nerve can lead to irreversible vision changes. We present a patient with a past medical history of skin allergy and allergic conjunctivitis (AC who presented with insidious unexplained unilateral vision loss. Physical exam revealed significant blepharospasm, mild lid edema, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, afferent pupillary defect, and slight papillary hypertrophy. Slit lamp examination demonstrated superior and inferior conjunctival scarring as well as superior corneal scarring but no signs of external trauma or neurological damage were noted. Conjunctival cultures and cytologic evaluation demonstrated significant eosinophilic infiltration. Subsequent ophthalmoscopic examination revealed optic nerve atrophy. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to vigorous itching of the affected eye for many months. Given the presenting symptoms, history, and negative ophthalmological workup, it was determined that the optic nerve atrophy was likely secondary to digital pressure from vigorous itching. Although AC can be a significant source of decreased vision via corneal ulceration, no reported cases have ever described AC-induced vision loss of this degree from vigorous itching and chronic pressure leading to optic nerve damage. Despite being self-limiting in nature, allergic conjunctivitis should be properly managed as extreme cases can result in mechanical compression of the optic nerve and compromise vision.

  7. Brodie’s Abscess of Posterior Ilium with Gluteal Syndrome, an Unusual Cause of Paediatric Low Back Pain: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behera G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Brodie’s abscess is a variety of subacute osteomyelitis with a long duration of presentation and intermittent pain. It usually involves the metaphyseal region of long bones of the lower limbs. Brodie’s abscess of pelvic bone is very rare. Involvement of posterior ilium with gluteal syndrome is extremely unusual and can be easily missed or misdiagnosed. We present a 9-year old boy who reported to us with intermittent low back pain of three months duration without any other constitutional symptoms. Clinically, there was mild tenderness over the posterior ilium. Computed tomography showed a lytic lesion in the posterior ilium with a breach in the outer cortex. MRI and bone scan were suggestive of inflammatory pathology. Keeping infective, tubercular and benign bone tumors as differential diagnoses, open biopsy and curettage were done. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured and histopathology was suggestive of osteomyelitis. The patient received appropriate antibiotics for six weeks. He was asymptomatic till 18 months of follow up without any recurrence. We present this case because of its rarity and unusual presentation as gluteal syndrome and low back pain, and its resemblance to other pelvic and sacroiliac joint pathologies which are often missed or misdiagnosed in paediatric patients.

  8. Use of inferior gluteal artery and posterior thigh perforators in management of ischial pressure sores with limited donor sites for flap coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Cigdem; Ozdemir, Jale; Yirmibesoglu, Oktay; Yucel, Ergin; Agir, Hakan

    2012-07-01

    Reconstructive surgery for ischial pressure sore defects presents a challenge because of high rates of recurrence. The aim of this study was to describe the use of inferior gluteal artery (IGA) and posterior thigh perforators in management of ischial pressure sores with limited donor sites. Between September 2005 and 2009, 11 patients (9 male, 2 female) with ischial sores were operated by using IGA and posterior thigh perforator flaps. The data of patients included age, sex, cause of paraplegia, flap size, perforator of flap, previous surgeries, recurrences, complications, and postoperative follow-up. Nine IGA and 5 posterior thigh perforator flaps were used. Six patients presented with recurrent lesions, 5 patients were operated for sacral and contralateral ischial pressure sores previously. In 2 patients, IGA and posterior thigh perforator flaps were used in combination. Patients were followed for an average of 34.3 months. In 2 recurrent cases, readvancement of IGA perforator flap and gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap were treatment of choice. Treatment of patients with recurrent lesions or multiple pressure sores is challenging because of limited available flap donor sites. In this study, posterior thigh perforator flaps were preferred in patients in whom the previous donor site was the gluteal region. IGA perforator flaps were the treatment of choice in patients for whom posterior thigh region was previously used. Alternately, preserved perforators of previous conventional myocutaneous flaps enabled us to use these perforators in recurrences.

  9. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  10. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Ultrasound-guided block of the suprascapular nerve - a volunteer study of a new proximal approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C; Lund, J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The standard approach for the suprascapular nerve block is deep in the supraspinous fossa. However, with this approach, the suprascapular nerve is difficult to visualize by ultrasound. The aim of this study was to describe a new method to visualize and selectively block the suprascapu......BACKGROUND: The standard approach for the suprascapular nerve block is deep in the supraspinous fossa. However, with this approach, the suprascapular nerve is difficult to visualize by ultrasound. The aim of this study was to describe a new method to visualize and selectively block...... the suprascapular nerve in a more superficial and proximal location. METHODS: Twelve healthy volunteers were included. We located the brachial plexus in transverse section with ultrasound, and by longitudinal slide, we identified the departure of the suprascapular nerve from the superior trunk. The suprascapular...

  12. 142 Key words: Brachialis, radial nerve, musculocutaneous nerve.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AWORI KIRSTEEN

    The innervation of brachialis muscle by the musculocutaneous nerve has been described as either type I or type II and the main trunk to this muscle is rarely absent. The contribution .... brachialis muscle by fiber analysis of supply nerves].

  13. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    counterparts in the peripheral nervous system, in some instances without peripheral nervous system symptoms. Both hereditary and acquired demyelinating neuropathies have been studied and the effects on nerve pathophysiology have been compared with degeneration and regeneration of axons. SUMMARY: Excitability......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve...... excitability studies are relatively novel but are acquiring an increasingly important role in the study of peripheral nerves. RECENT FINDINGS: By measuring responses in nerve that are related to nodal function (strength-duration time constant, rheobase and recovery cycle) and internodal function (threshold...

  14. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  15. Ultrasound of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve in asymptomatic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jiaan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To define the sites where the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN is more easily visualized and to describe the anatomical variations of the LFCN. Methods A total of 240 LFCNs in 120 volunteers were evaluated with 18 MHz ultrasound; the intermuscular space between the tensor fasciae latae muscle and the sartorius was used as an initial sonographic landmark. The time taken to identify the nerve was recorded. The number of nerve branches at the level of the inguinal ligament (IL and the relationship between the LFCN and the IL was assessed. The nerve cross-sectional area (CSA of the LFCN and the distance between the LFCN and the anterior superior iliac spine was measured. Results Each nerve was identified using ultrasound in all participants. The mean time for identifying the nerve was 7s for unilateral LFCNs. The nerve passed under the IL in 198 cases, whereas in 44 cases, it passed through to the IL. The LFCN consisted of 1–4 branches just after its passage under or through the IL. The CSA of the LFCN was 1.04±0.44 mm2, and the mean distance between the LFCN and the anterior superior iliac spine was 15.6 ± 4.2 mm. Conclusions It is easier to identify the LFCN if the intermuscular space between the tensor fasciae latae muscle and the sartorius is used as an initial sonographic landmark. The anatomical variation of the LFCN can be viewed with high-frequency ultrasound.

  16. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  18. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul

    2001-01-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  19. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul [Sungkyunkwan Univ., School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  20. Neurological complications in thyroid surgery: a surgical point of view on laryngeal nerves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMANUELA eVARALDO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified,the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a

  1. Effect of nerve activity on transport of nerve growth factor and dopamine β-hydroxylase antibodies in sympathetic neurones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, G.; Chubb, I.; Freeman, C.; Geffen, L.; Rush, R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of nerve activity on the uptake and retrograde transport of nerve growth factor (NGF) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) antibodies was studied by injecting 125 I-labelled NGF and anti-DBH into the anterior eye chamber of guinea-pigs. Decentralization of the ipsilateral superior cervical ganglion (SCG) had no significant effect on the retrograde transport of either NGF or anti-DBH. Phenoxybenzamine produced a 50% increase in anti-DBH but not NGF accumulation and this effect was prevented by prior decentralization. This demonstrates that NGF is taken up independently of the retrieval of synaptic vesicle components. (Auth.)

  2. Relationship between the Ulnar Nerve and the Branches of the Radial Nerve to the Medial Head of the Triceps Brachii Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sh, Cho; Ih, Chung; Uy, Lee

    2018-05-17

    One branch of the radial nerve to the medial head of the triceps brachii muscle (MHN) has been described as accompanying or joining the ulnar nerve. Mostly two MHN branches have been reported, with some reports of one; however, the topographical anatomy is not well documented. We dissected 52 upper limbs from adult cadavers and found one, two, and three MHN branches in 9.6%, 80.8%, and 9.6% of cases, respectively. The MHN accompanying the ulnar nerve was always the superior MHN. The relationship between the ulnar nerve and the MHN was classified into four types according to whether the MHN was enveloped along with the ulnar nerve in the connective tissue sheath and whether it was in contact with the ulnar nerve. It contacted the ulnar nerve in 75.0% of cases and accompanied it over a mean distance of 73.6 mm (range 36-116 mm). In all cases in which the connective tissue sheath enveloped the branch of the MHN and the ulnar nerve, removing the sheath confirmed that the MHN branch originated from the radial nerve. The detailed findings and anatomical measurements of the MHN in this study will help in identifying its branches during surgical procedures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  4. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  5. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  6. The intracranial facial nerve as seen through different surgical windows: an extensive anatomosurgical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Antonio; Evins, Alexander I; Visca, Anna; Stieg, Phillip E

    2013-06-01

    The facial nerve has a short intracranial course but crosses critical and frequently accessed surgical structures during cranial base surgery. When performing approaches to complex intracranial regions, it is essential to understand the nerve's conventional and topographic anatomy from different surgical perspectives as well as its relationship with surrounding structures. To describe the entire intracranial course of the facial nerve as observed via different neurosurgical approaches and to provide an analytical evaluation of the degree of nerve exposure achieved with each approach. Anterior petrosectomies (middle fossa, extended middle fossa), posterior petrosectomies (translabyrinthine, retrolabyrinthine, transcochlear), a retrosigmoid, a far lateral, and anterior transfacial (extended maxillectomy, mandibular swing) approaches were performed on 10 adult cadaveric heads (20 sides). The degree of facial nerve exposure achieved per segment for each approach was assessed and graded independently by 3 surgeons. The anterior petrosal approaches offered good visualization of the nerve in the cerebellopontine angle and intracanalicular portion superiorly, whereas the posterior petrosectomies provided more direct visualization without the need for cerebellar retraction. The far lateral approach exposed part of the posterior and the entire inferior quadrants, whereas the retrosigmoid approach exposed parts of the superior and inferior quadrants and the entire posterior quadrant. Anterior and anteroinferior exposure of the facial nerve was achieved via the transfacial approaches. The surgical route used must rely on the size, nature, and general location of the lesion, as well as on the capability of the particular approach to better expose the appropriate segment of the facial nerve.

  7. Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Differences Between Caribbean Black and African American Patients as Measured by Spectral Domain OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rohini; Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Al-Aswad, Lama; Ciarleglio, Adam; Cioffi, George A; Blumberg, Dana M

    2015-01-01

    There are well-established differences in optic nerve morphology between patients of African and European descent. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning has demonstrated these differences with respect to optic disc area (DA), average cup-disc ratio, cup volume, and nerve fiber layer thickness. However, the term "African descent" describes a heterogenous group with considerable variability. This study evaluates differences in optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) parameters as measured by Cirrus HD-OCT between Caribbean black and African American patients. A total of 25 African American subjects and 25 Caribbean black subjects with normal ocular examinations were consecutively recruited to this study. All patients received imaging of the optic nerve and nerve fiber layer with Cirrus HD-OCT. Optic nerve and RNFL parameters were evaluated for statistically significant differences using a t test. A mixed effect model for correlated data was then created to adjust outcome variables for (1) repeated measures and (2) optic nerve size. Two one-sided t tests were then utilized to determine equivalence. After adjustment for DA, RNFL thickness, cup volume, DA, inferior nerve fiber layer, and vertical cup-disc ratio demonstrated statistically significant equivalence between the 2 groups (P value fiber layer quadrant was significantly different between the 2 groups and may merit further investigation. Findings of this study suggest that optic nerve and RNFL morphology is markedly similar between Caribbean blacks and African Americans once adjusted for optic nerve size but cannot be considered equivalent in all measures, particularly in the superior nerve fiber layer.

  8. Biocompatibility of Different Nerve Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Felix; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Fansa, Hisham

    2009-01-01

    Bridging nerve gaps with suitable grafts is a major clinical problem. The autologous nerve graft is considered to be the gold standard, providing the best functional results; however, donor site morbidity is still a major disadvantage. Various attempts have been made to overcome the problems of autologous nerve grafts with artificial nerve tubes, which are “ready-to-use” in almost every situation. A wide range of materials have been used in animal models but only few have been applied to date clinically, where biocompatibility is an inevitable prerequisite. This review gives an idea about artificial nerve tubes with special focus on their biocompatibility in animals and humans.

  9. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  10. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  11. Early corneal nerve damage and recovery following small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Riau, Andri K; Lwin, Nyein C; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Tan, Donald T; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2014-03-25

    We compared early corneal nerve changes after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). A total of 12 rabbits underwent LASIK in one eye and SMILE in the fellow eye. Baseline and follow-up evaluations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks postoperatively were performed with in vivo confocal microscopy to evaluate 5 different areas within the treated zone: center, superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal. Cryosections of the corneas and whole mount of the extracted SMILE lenticules were analyzed with immunostaining of βIII-tubulin. One week after SMILE and LASIK, a decrease in nerve length and density was observed in all evaluated areas. A trend toward greater subbasal nerve length and density (SLD), more eyes with subbasal nerves (ESN), more eyes with subbasal nerves longer than 200 μm (SNL), and higher mean number of subbasal nerves by frame (NSN) in SMILE than in LASIK groups was observed at subsequent follow-up time points. Only the SMILE group showed a recovery of SLD, ESN, and NSN by week 4 (P > 0.05). A trend toward more eyes with sprouting subbasal nerves and greater mean number of sprouting nerves was observed in LASIK than in SMILE, indicating that more subbasal nerves were disrupted and undergoing regeneration after LASIK. Immunostaining at postoperative week 4 revealed a faster stromal nerve recovery in post-SMILE eyes compared to post-LASIK eyes. Our findings suggest that SMILE results in less nerve damage and faster nerve recovery than LASIK.

  12. Tullio phenomenon in superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Cronin, Scott J; Heidenreich, Katherine D

    2014-03-18

    Tullio phenomenon refers to eye movements induced by sound.(1) This unusual examination finding may be seen in superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD) syndrome.(2) This disorder is due to absent bone over the superior semicircular canal (figure). Patients complain of dizziness triggered by loud sound, aural fullness, autophony, and pulsatile tinnitus. When Tullio phenomenon exists in SSCD syndrome, the patient develops a mixed vertical-torsional nystagmus in which the slow phase rotates up and away from the affected ear (video on the Neurology® Web site at Neurology.org). This pattern of nystagmus aligns in the plane of the dehiscent semicircular canal and is due to excitation of its afferent nerves.

  13. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  14. Proposing the Use of Partial AUC as an Adjunctive Measure in Establishing Bioequivalence Between Deltoid and Gluteal Administration of Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lik Hang N; Choi, Charles; Gershkovich, Pavel; Barr, Alasdair M; Honer, William G; Procyshyn, Ric M

    2016-12-01

    The maximum plasma concentration (C max ) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) are commonly used to establish bioequivalence between two formulations of the same oral medication. Similarly, these pharmacokinetic parameters have also been used to establish bioequivalence between two sites of administration for the same injectable formulation. However, these conventional methods of establishing bioequivalence are of limited use when comparing modified-release formulations of a drug, particularly those with rates of absorption that are amenable to change with the site of injection. Inherent differences in the rate of absorption can result in clinically significant differences in early exposure and drug response. Here, we propose the use of the partial AUC (pAUC) as a measure of early exposure to aid in the assessment of bioequivalence between the gluteal and the deltoid site of administration for long-acting injectable antipsychotics.

  15. Estudo das relações anatômicas e suas variações entre o nervo ciático e o músculo piriforme Study on anatomical relationships and variations between the sciatic nerve and piriform muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EJD Vicente

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A síndrome do músculo piriforme pode ter como causa a passagem anormal do nervo ciático ou de uma de suas partes pelo ventre do músculo piriforme. OBJETIVO: Analisar as relações anatômicas e métricas entre o músculo piriforme e o nervo ciático, contribuindo com o conhecimento anátomo-clínico da região glútea. MÉTODO: Foram utilizados 20 cadáveres adultos de ambos os sexos. O nervo ciático e o músculo piriforme foram dissecados, medidos e fotodocumentados. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que 85% das 40 regiões glúteas apresentaram o nervo como tronco único, passando pela borda inferior do músculo piriforme, e 15% mostraram uma variação bilateral, caracterizada pela passagem do nervo fibular comum através do músculo piriforme. Os dados obtidos não revelaram diferenças estatisticamente significantes.CONTEXT: Piriform muscle syndrome can be caused by abnormal passage of the sciatic nerve or one of its parts through the belly of the piriform muscle. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the anatomical and measurement relationships between the piriform muscle and the sciatic nerve in order to contribute towards better anatomoclinical understanding of the gluteal region. METHOD: Twenty adult cadavers of both sexes were used. The sciatic nerve and piriform muscle were dissected, measured and photodocumented. RESULTS: The sciatic nerve was seen to be a single trunk passing through the lower margin of the piriform muscle in 85% of the 40 gluteal regions, and 15% showed bilateral variation characterized by the passage of the common fibular nerve through the piriform muscle. The data obtained did not show any statistically significant differences.

  16. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  17. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... function after nerve regeneration. Methods: Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2...

  18. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  19. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  20. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  1. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  2. Myelography for nerve root avulsion in birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Mitomo, Masanori; Hirabuki, Norio; Miura, Takashi; Kawai, Ryuji; Imakita, Satoshi; Harada, Koshi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    Myelography and CT myelography (CMT) were reviewed in 18 cases of birth palsy with clinically suspected avulsion injury. Root-somatosensory evoked potential (root-SEP) was also reviewed for myelographic evaluation of the nerve root avolusion in birth palsy. Root-SEP is not induced in case of avulsed nerve roots, but is induced in case of both normal and incompletely avulsed roots. Myelography demonstrated 58 abnormal nerve roots in 18 cases (19 limbs); 45 (78%) complete and 13 (22%) incomplete nerve root avulsions. Each of complete and incomplete avulsions was defined as total absence and partial presence of rootlets on myelography, respectively. Traumatic meningoceles were detected at 46 roots (79%) on myelography and/or CTM; 35 roots on myelography and 45 roots on CTM. CTM could not detect only a very small meningocele at one root. At 11 roots CTM was superior to myelography in delineating a meningocele because CTM is sensitive to a poorly enhanced meningocele. CTM, however, could not diagnose nerve root avulsions so accurately as myelography, since myelography detected 12 (7 completely and 5 incompletely) avulsed roots without meningocele, whereas CTM could not delineate the nerve roots clearly. Thus, myelography is indispensable to evaluate nerve root avulsions without meningocele. Root-SEP was examined in 9 patients who underwent branchial plexus exploration. SEP was negative at 22/25 roots with complete avulsion and was positive at 7/7 roots with myelographically incomplete avulsion, regardless of presence or absence of any traumatic meningocele. Myelography and root-SEP correlated well at 29 (92%) out of 32 roots in evaluating complete and incomplete avulsion injuries. Myelography and root-SEP were not considered in 3 roots. Though myelography demonstrated complete avulsions with traumatic meningocele, SEP was positive in these three roots, which were interpreted as partially avulsed roots. (J.P.N.).

  3. Myelography for nerve root avulsion in birth palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Mitomo, Masanori; Hirabuki, Norio; Miura, Takashi; Kawai, Ryuji; Imakita, Satoshi; Harada, Koshi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1990-01-01

    Myelography and CT myelography (CMT) were reviewed in 18 cases of birth palsy with clinically suspected avulsion injury. Root-somatosensory evoked potential (root-SEP) was also reviewed for myelographic evaluation of the nerve root avolusion in birth palsy. Root-SEP is not induced in case of avulsed nerve roots, but is induced in case of both normal and incompletely avulsed roots. Myelography demonstrated 58 abnormal nerve roots in 18 cases (19 limbs); 45 (78%) complete and 13 (22%) incomplete nerve root avulsions. Each of complete and incomplete avulsions was defined as total absence and partial presence of rootlets on myelography, respectively. Traumatic meningoceles were detected at 46 roots (79%) on myelography and/or CTM; 35 roots on myelography and 45 roots on CTM. CTM could not detect only a very small meningocele at one root. At 11 roots CTM was superior to myelography in delineating a meningocele because CTM is sensitive to a poorly enhanced meningocele. CTM, however, could not diagnose nerve root avulsions so accurately as myelography, since myelography detected 12 (7 completely and 5 incompletely) avulsed roots without meningocele, whereas CTM could not delineate the nerve roots clearly. Thus, myelography is indispensable to evaluate nerve root avulsions without meningocele. Root-SEP was examined in 9 patients who underwent branchial plexus exploration. SEP was negative at 22/25 roots with complete avulsion and was positive at 7/7 roots with myelographically incomplete avulsion, regardless of presence or absence of any traumatic meningocele. Myelography and root-SEP correlated well at 29 (92%) out of 32 roots in evaluating complete and incomplete avulsion injuries. Myelography and root-SEP were not considered in 3 roots. Though myelography demonstrated complete avulsions with traumatic meningocele, SEP was positive in these three roots, which were interpreted as partially avulsed roots. (J.P.N.)

  4. Surgical anatomy of the styloid muscles and the extracranial glossopharyngeal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, J M; Gavid, M; Asanau, A; Timoshenko, A P; Richard, C; Martin, C H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationships between the extracranial glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve and the muscles of the styloid diaphragm. In humans, the IX nerve is a hidden retrostyloid nerve which plays a critical role notably in swallowing and has to be preserved during infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal spaces surgical procedures. In ten adult heads from cadavers (20 sides) fixed in formalin, dissection of the extracranial IX nerve was performed under operating microscope with special attention given to the relationships between this nerve and the styloid muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The three styloid muscles delimit three triangular intermuscular intervals which were each thoroughly explored. Different osseous landmarks were investigated for easy nerve location. The styloid process (SP) is the main superior osseous landmark for the three muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The stylohyoid muscle (SHM) is anteromedially located to the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. The styloglossus muscle (SGM) is medial and anterior to the SHM. The stylopharyngeal muscle (SPM) is the most vertical and medial of the three styloid muscles. It courses from the medial surface of the SP in a deep plane hidden between the SHM and the SGM. The extracranial IX nerve turns around the SPM superiorly with a vertical segment posterior to the SPM and inferiorly with a horizontal segment lateral to the SPM. The meeting point of the two segments of the IX nerve is about 10 mm anteriorly located from the transverse process of the atlas. The external carotid artery and some of its branches lie in contact with the lateral side of the IX nerve. Such relationships between the extracranial IX nerve, the styloid muscles and the transverse process of the atlas should be appreciated by clinician who treats patients with stylohyoid complex syndromes and by the surgeon for the parapharyngeal spaces approach.

  5. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation inhibits induced spinal cord seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Rollins, Dennis L; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that left-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. To test our hypothesis that right-sided vagus nerve stimulation will also abort seizure activity, we have initiated seizures in the spinal cord and then performed right-sided vagus nerve stimulation in an animal model. Four pigs were anesthetized and placed in the lateral position and a small laminectomy performed in the lumbar region. Topical penicillin, a known epileptogenic drug to the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, was next applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed cord. With the exception of the control animal, once seizure activity was discernible via motor convulsion or increased electrical activity, the right vagus nerve previously isolated in the neck was stimulated. Following multiple stimulations of the vagus nerve and with seizure activity confirmed, the cord was transected in the midthoracic region and vagus nerve stimulation performed. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation resulted in cessation of spinal cord seizure activity in all animals. Transection of the spinal cord superior to the site of seizure induction resulted in the ineffectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation in causing cessation of seizure activity in all study animals. As with left-sided vagus nerve stimulation, right-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. Additionally, the effects of right-sided vagus nerve stimulation on induced spinal cord seizures involve descending spinal pathways. These data may aid in the development of alternative mechanisms for electrical stimulation for patients with medically intractable seizures and add to our knowledge regarding the mechanism for seizure cessation following peripheral nerve stimulation.

  6. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facia...

  7. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  8. Effect of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in femoral nerve block for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing total knee replacement arthroplasty: A dose–response study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil K Packiasabapathy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine at 2 μg/kg dose in femoral nerve block is superior to 1 μg/kg for providing analgesia after TKA, although its role in facilitating early ambulation needs further evaluation.

  9. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  10. Combined Ipsilateral Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Contralateral Downbeat Nystagmus in a Case of Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Matsuzono

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy.

  11. Reflex vocal fold adduction in the porcine model: the effects of stimuli delivered to various sensory nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jeong-Soo; Hundal, Jagdeep S; Sasaki, Clarence T; Abdelmessih, Mikhail W; Kelleher, Stephen P

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a panel of sensory nerves capable of eliciting an evoked glottic closure reflex (GCR) and to quantify the glottic closing force (GCF) of these responses in a porcine model. In 5 pigs, the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (iSLN) and the trigeminal, pharyngeal plexus, glossopharyngeal, radial, and intercostal nerves were surgically isolated and electrically stimulated. During stimulation of each nerve, the GCR was detected by laryngeal electromyography and the GCF was measured with a pressure transducer. The only nerve that elicited the GCR in the 5 pigs was the iSLN. The average GCF was 288.9 mm Hg. This study demonstrates that the only afferent nerve that elicits the GCR in pigs is the iSLN, and that it should remain the focus of research for the rehabilitation of patients with absent or defective reflex vocal fold adduction.

  12. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  13. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  14. Rabdomiólise por síndrome compartimental glútea após cirurgia bariátrica: relato de caso Rabdomiolisis por síndrome compartimental glúteo después de cirugía bariátrica: relato de caso Rhabdomyolysis secondary to gluteal compartment syndrome after bariatric surgery: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luiz Benevides

    2006-08-01

    a cirugía bariátrica tipo duodenal switch, bajo anestesia general asociada a la anestesia peridural. El procedimiento se dio sin incidencias. El tiempo anestésico quirúrgico fue de 3 horas y 30 minutos. El primer día del postoperatorio el paciente presentó dolor en la región lombosacral y en las nalgas, además de parestesia en los miembros inferiores en la distribución del nervio ciático. Durante el examen, las nalgas presentaban una discreta palidez, tensas, con edemas, dolían cuando eran tocadas y cuando se movían. Fue diagnosticado el síndrome compartimental glúteo que evolucionó con rabdomiolisis e insuficiencia renal aguda. Hubo una recuperación de la función renal y ninguna secuela motora o sensitiva se detectó. CONCLUSIONES: Los pacientes obesos mórbidos sometidos a la cirugía bariátrica pueden presentar síndrome compartimental glúteo. Cuando no se diagnostica y se trata precozmente, puede evolucionar con rabdomiolisis e insuficiencia renal aguda representando una seria amenaza para la vida.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bariatric surgery has become a common procedure and several complications have been reported. The objective of this report is to present a case of gluteal compartment syndrome that evolved to acute renal failure after bariatric surgery and to discuss the diagnosis, and the prophylactic and therapeutic measures. CASE REPORT: A 42 years old male patient, white, with a body mass index (BMI of 43, physical status ASA II, who underwent bariatric surgery of the duodenal switch type, under general anesthesia associated with epidural anesthesia. There were no complications during the procedure. The anesthetic-surgical procedure lasted 3 hours and 30 minutes. On postoperative day one the patient developed lumbosacral and gluteal pain, besides paresthesia in the lower limbs in the distribution of the sciatic nerve. On physical exam, the buttocks were slightly pale, tight, swollen, and painful to palpation and to movement. A diagnosis

  15. Phrenic Nerve Injury After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Clementy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI has been well studied by cardiac surgeons. More recently it has been recognized as a potential complication of catheter ablation with a prevalence of 0.11 to 0.48 % after atrial fibrillation (AF ablation. This review will focus on PNI after AF ablation. Anatomical studies have shown a close relationship between the right phrenic nerve and it's proximity to the superior vena cava (SVC, and the antero-inferior part of the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV. In addition, the proximity of the left phrenic nerve to the left atrial appendage has been well established. Independent of the type of ablation catheter (4mm, 8 mm, irrigated tip, balloon or energy source used (radiofrequency (RF, ultrasound, cryothermia, and laser; the risk of PNI exists during ablation at the critical areas listed above. Although up to thirty-one percent of patients with PNI after AF ablation remain asymptomatic, dyspnea remain the cardinal symptom and is present in all symptomatic patients. Despite the theoretical risk for significant adverse effect on functional status and quality of life, short-term outcomes from published studies appear favorable with 81% of patients with PNI having a complete recovery after 7 ± 7 months.Conclusion: Existing studies have described PNI as an uncommon but avoidable complication in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for AF. Prior to ablation at the SVC, antero-inferior RSPV ostium or the left atrial appendage, pacing should be performed before energy delivery. If phrenic nerve capture is documented, energy delivery should be avoided at this site. Electrophysiologist's vigilance as well as pacing prior to ablation at high risk sites in close proximity to the phrenic nerve are the currently available tools to avoid the complication of PNI.

  16. Subclavian vein pacing and venous pressure waveform measurement for phrenic nerve monitoring during cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Justin; Singarayar, Suresh; Kabunga, Peter; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    The phrenic nerves may be damaged during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. Phrenic nerve function is routinely monitored during ablation by stimulating the right phrenic nerve from a site in the superior vena cava (SVC) and manually assessing the strength of diaphragmatic contraction. However the optimal stimulation site, method of assessing diaphragmatic contraction, and techniques for monitoring the left phrenic nerve have not been established. We assessed novel techniques to monitor phrenic nerve function during cryoablation procedures. Pacing threshold and stability of phrenic nerve capture were assessed when pacing from the SVC, left and right subclavian veins. Femoral venous pressure waveforms were used to monitor the strength of diaphragmatic contraction. Stable capture of the left phrenic nerve by stimulation in the left subclavian vein was achieved in 96 of 100 patients, with a median capture threshold of 2.5 mA [inter-quartile range (IQR) 1.4-5.0 mA]. Stimulation of the right phrenic nerve from the subclavian vein was superior to stimulation from the SVC with lower pacing thresholds (1.8 mA IQR 1.4-3.3 vs. 6.0 mA IQR 3.4-8.0, P phrenic nerve palsy. The left phrenic nerve can be stimulated from the left subclavian vein. The subclavian veins are the optimal sites for phrenic nerve stimulation. Monitoring the femoral venous pressure waveform is a novel technique for detecting impending phrenic nerve damage. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Writing superiority in cued recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina eFueller

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In list learning paradigms with free recall, written recall has been found to be less susceptible to intrusions of related concepts than spoken recall when the list items had been visually presented. This effect has been ascribed to the use of stored orthographic representations from the study phase during written recall (Kellogg, 2001. In other memory retrieval paradigms, either better recall for modality-congruent items or an input-independent writing superiority effect have been found (Grabowski, 2005. In a series of four experiments using a paired associate (PA learning paradigm we tested (a whether output modality effects on verbal recall can be replicated in a paradigm that does not involve the rejection of semantically related intrusion words, (b whether a possible superiority for written recall was due to a slower response onset for writing as compared to speaking in immediate recall, and (c whether the performance in PA word recall was correlated with performance in an additional episodic memory task. We found better written recall in the first half of the recall phase, irrespective of the modality in which the material was presented upon encoding. An explanation based on longer response latencies for writing and hence more time for retrieval could be ruled out by showing that the effect persisted in delayed response versions of the task. Although there was some evidence that stored additional episodic information may contribute to the successful retrieval of associate words, this evidence was only found in the immediate response experiments and hence is most likely independent from the observed output modality effect. In sum, our results from a PA learning paradigm suggest that superior performance for written versus spoken recall cannot be (solely explained in terms of additional access to stored orthographic representations from the encoding phase. Our findings rather suggest a general writing-superiority effect at the time of memory

  18. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  19. Influence of neural monitoring during thyroid surgery on nerve integrity and postoperative vocal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsman, A F; Warhurst, S; Fraser, S; Novakovic, D; Sidhu, S B

    2018-06-01

    Integrity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) can be checked by intraoperative nerve monitoring (IONM) after visualization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and nature of voice dysfunction following thyroid surgery with routine IONM. Thyroidectomies were performed with routine division of strap muscles and nerve monitoring to confirm integrity of the RLN and EBSLN following dissection. Patients were assessed for vocal function before surgery and at 1 and 3 months after operation. Assessment included use of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) 10, maximum phonation time, fundamental frequency, pitch range, harmonic to noise ratio, cepstral peak prominence and smoothed cepstral peak prominence. A total of 172 nerves at risk were analysed in 102 consecutive patients undergoing elective thyroid surgery. In 23·3 per cent of EBSLNs and 0·6 per cent of RLNs nerve identification required the assistance of IONM in addition to visualization. Nerve integrity was confirmed during surgery for 98·8 per cent of EBSLNs and 98·3 per cent of RLNs. There were no differences between preoperative and postoperative VHI-10 scores. Acoustic voice assessment showed small changes in maximum phonation time at 1 and 3 months after surgery. Where there is routine division of strap muscles, thyroidectomy using nerve monitoring confirmation of RLN and EBSLN function following dissection results in no clinically significant voice change.

  20. Prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior had the form of beakers varying in outline but similar in size. They were wheel-thrown, mould-made or manufactured by using a combination of wheel-throwing and mould-made appliqués. Given that face vessels are considerably scarcer than other kinds of pottery, more than fifty finds from Moesia Superior make an enviable collection. In this and other provinces face vessels have been recovered from military camps, civilian settlements and necropolises, which suggests that they served more than one purpose. It is generally accepted that the faces-masks gave a protective role to the vessels, be it to protect the deceased or the family, their house and possessions. More than forty of all known finds from Moesia Superior come from Viminacium, a half of that number from necropolises. Although tangible evidence is lacking, there must have been several local workshops producing face vessels. The number and technological characteristics of the discovered vessels suggest that one of the workshops is likely to have been at Viminacium, an important pottery-making centre in the second and third centuries.

  1. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  2. Origem e distribuição do nervo isquiático no veado-catingueiro (Mazama gouazoubira Origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve in catingueiro-deer (Mazama gouazoubira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Martina M. Martins

    2013-02-01

    úteo superficial, gluteobíceps, bíceps da coxa, semitendinoso, semimembranoso, adutor e gastrocnêmio. Distalmente o nervo isquiático bifurca-se Em nervo tibial e fibular comum, os quais inervam a porção distal do membro pélvico.This study aimed to describe the origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve in catingueiro-deer (Mazama gouazoubira. Two animals of the species, obtained post mortem by trampling on the highway, were used for the study meeting the requirements of the Governing Law (1.153/95. By dissection the skin was completely removed and the animals were fixed in aqueous 10% formaldehyde solution. Through dorsolateral access, superficial gluteal muscle, biceps femoris muscle and gluteus medius muscle were cut at their insertion and folded, to view the origin and distribution of the sciatic nerve on both sides of the animals. Images were recorded with a digital camera (Sony a200 Camera, 10.2mpx and results were described based on Veterinary Anatomical Nomina. The source data of the sciatic nerve in both specimens showed that the nerve originates from the ventral branches of S1 and L6, and could have contribution from S2. After its emergence through the greater sciatic foramen on both the sides, the sciatic nerve supplies branches to gluteus medius muscle, gluteus deep muscle, superficial gluteal muscle, gluteobiceps muscle, biceps femoris muscle, semimembranosus muscle, semitendinosus muscle and gastrocnemius muscle. Near the mid-thigh the sciatic nerve divides into the tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve which innervate the muscles of the distal hind limb. Moreover, the cutaneous nerve flow can cause the common peroneal nerve or tibial nerve. In conclusion, in Mazama gouazoubira specimens studied, the sciatic nerve originated from the ventral branch of spinal L6 and S1, which may or may not have the contribution from S2. In its distribution stem originate the gluteal nerve, the caudal femoral cutaneous nerve and muscular branches, which together innervate the

  3. Microvascular Decompression for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia in Patient with Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, John P; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Link, Michael J; Carlson, Matthew L

    2018-05-01

    Secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is uncommon. When a space-occupying lesion with mass effect is identified, the associated TN is often exclusively attributed to the tumor. This report illustrates the importance of considering coexistent actionable pathology when surgically treating secondary TN. A 51-year-old woman presented with abrupt-onset TN of the V2 and V3 nerve divisions with hypesthesia. She denied changes in hearing, balance, or facial nerve dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 1.6-cm contrast-enhancing cerebellopontine angle tumor that effaced the trigeminal nerve, consistent with a vestibular schwannoma. In addition, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery abutted the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve on T2-weighted thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the tumor elicited a response from the facial nerve at low threshold over the entire accessible tumor surface, indicating that the tumor was a facial nerve schwannoma. Considering the patient's lack of facial nerve deficit and that the tumor exhibited no safe entry point for intracapsular debulking, tumor resection was not performed. Working between the tumor and tentorium, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery was identified and decompressed with a Teflon pad. At last follow-up, the patient exhibited resolution of her TN. Her hearing and facial nerve function remained intact. Despite obstruction from a medium-sized tumor, it is still possible to achieve microvascular decompression of the fifth cranial nerve. This emphasizes the importance of considering other actionable pathology during surgical management of presumed tumor-induced TN. Further, TN is relatively uncommon with medium-sized vestibular schwannomas and coexistent causes should be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fibrin matrices with affinity-based delivery systems and neurotrophic factors promote functional nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Matthew D; MacEwan, Matthew R; French, Alexander R; Moore, Amy M; Hunter, Daniel A; Mackinnon, Susan E; Moran, Daniel W; Borschel, Gregory H; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E

    2010-08-15

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been shown to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration following injury and target different neuronal populations. The delivery of either growth factor at the site of injury may, therefore, result in quantitative differences in motor nerve regeneration and functional recovery. In this study we evaluated the effect of affinity-based delivery of GDNF or NGF from fibrin-filled nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) on motor nerve regeneration and functional recovery in a 13 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Seven experimental groups were evaluated consisting of GDNF or NGF and the affinity-based delivery system (DS) within NGCs, control groups excluding the DS and/or growth factor, and nerve isografts. Groups with growth factor in the conduit demonstrated equivalent or superior performance in behavioral tests and relative muscle mass measurements compared to isografts at 12 weeks. Additionally, groups with GDNF demonstrated greater specific twitch and tetanic force production in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle than the isograft control, while groups with NGF produced demonstrated similar force production compared to the isograft control. Assessment of motor axon regeneration by retrograde labeling further revealed that the number of ventral horn neurons regenerating across NGCs containing GDNF and NGF DS was similar to the isograft group and these counts were greater than the groups without growth factor. Overall, the GDNF DS group demonstrated superior functional recovery and equivalent motor nerve regeneration compared to the isograft control, suggesting it has potential as a treatment for motor nerve injury.

  5. Double elevator weakening for unilateral congenital superior oblique palsy with ipsilateral superior rectus contracture and lax superior oblique tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O

    2012-06-01

    In unilateral congenital superior oblique palsy, a large hypertropia is sometimes associated with ipsilateral contracture of the superior rectus muscle and apparent overaction of the contralateral superior oblique. Ipsilateral double elevator weakening is one surgical approach; however, this procedure could compromise supraduction. We report a series of three consecutive patients who underwent ipsilateral superior rectus and inferior oblique recessions for unilateral superior oblique palsy. Intraoperatively, all three patients were found to have a lax ipsilateral superior oblique tendon. Postoperatively, all three patients had satisfactory correction of the hypertropia and abnormal head position with minimal supraduction defect. This procedure seems to be an acceptable initial surgical option for treating congenital superior oblique muscle palsy with ipsilateral contracture of the superior rectus muscle, even when the ipsilateral superior oblique tendon is lax. Copyright © 2012 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The gross anatomy of the renal sympathetic nerves revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompeo, Blanca; Maranillo, Eva; Garcia-Touchard, Arturo; Larkin, Theresa; Sanudo, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Catheter-based renal denervation techniques focus on reducing blood pressure in resistant hypertension. This procedure requires exact knowledge of the anatomical interrelation between the renal arteries and the targeted renal nervous plexus. The aim of this work was to build on classical anatomical studies and describe the gross anatomy and anatomical relationships of the renal arteries and nerve supply to the kidneys in a sample of human cadavers. Twelve human cadavers (six males and six females), age range 73 to 94 years, were dissected. The nervous fibers and renal arteries were dissected using a surgical microscope. The renal plexus along the hilar renal artery comprised a fiber-ganglionic ring surrounding the proximal third of the renal artery, a neural network along the middle and distal thirds, and smaller accessory ganglia along the course of the nerve fibers. The fibers of the neural network were mainly located on the superior (95.83%) and inferior (91.66%) surfaces of the renal artery and they were sparsely interconnected by diagonal fibers. Polar arteries were present in 33.33% of cases and the renal nerve pattern for these was similar to that of the hilar arteries. Effective renal denervation needs to target the superior and inferior surfaces of the hilar and polar arteries, where the fibers of the neural network are present. Clin. Anat. 29:660-664, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Sensory nerve function and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various gap lengths with nerve guides and autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensory nerve recovery and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various lengths of nerve gaps in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using different techniques. Group 4, in which the longest nerve gap (15 mm) was reconstructed with a thin-walled

  8. Contorno de la región glútea: Conceptos actuales y propuesta de clasificación Contouring of gluteal region: Current concepts and proposal for classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Avendaño-Valenzuela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La mejora del contorno glúteo y de las regiones paraglúteas es un requerimiento frecuente por parte de las pacientes. Algunos autores han hecho contribuciones múltiples a este tema: cruroplastias, levantamiento glúteo, implantes de glúteo, flancoplastias, liposucción y lipoinyección, técnicas que logran mejoría del contorno glúteo, pero que generalmente requieren una combinación de procedimientos. Sugerimos una clasificación para facilitar la elección del tratamiento quirúrgico más adecuado para la remodelación de la región glútea. Esta clasificación se basa principalmente en la anatomía músculo-esquelética de la región glútea, la cadera y las zonas de deformidad o lipodistrofia. Analizamos un total de 800 mujeres entre 16 y 54 años de edad, a lo largo de un período de 7 años. A todas se les realizó estudio anatómico y fotográfico de la cadera. Analizamos las estructuras músculo-esqueléticas y las zonas con lipodistrofia o deformidad; éstas últimas fueron clasificadas según su frecuencia como zona I, II, III, IV y V. Las deformidades aparecieron con la frecuencia siguiente: tipo I: 5%. Tipo II: 30%. Tipo III: 40%. Tipo IV: 20%. Tipo V: 5%. El propósito de esta nueva clasificación de deformidades de la cadera y su tratamiento es actualizar los conceptos y evolucionar en el tratamiento estético de la cadera con un concepto global. Permite también obtener resultados estéticos más relevantes. La clasificación, aplicable a las mujeres latinas y anglosajonas, ofrece una guía para el estudio preoperatorio de los glúteos y evitar así secuelas tras la cirugía.An improvement in the contouring of gluteal and paragluteal regions has been frequently required by the patients. Some authors have made multiple contributions like cruroplasty, gluteal lift, gluteal implants, flancoplasty, liposuction and lipoinjection, because the improvement of the gluteal contouring requires a combination of procedures. We are

  9. Brief reports: ultrasound-guided obturator nerve block: a proximal interfascial technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ahmad Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    In this report, I describe and evaluate a proximal ultrasound (US)-guided obturator nerve block technique using an interfascial local anesthetic (LA) injection deep to the pectineus muscle. The pectineus muscle was identified and followed, while the US probe was tilted cranially until the superior pubic ramus was visualized. In this plane, LA was injected interfascially between the pectineus and obturator externus. The median time required to identify the injection site was 4 seconds (95% confidence interval, 3-5 seconds). The median motor block onset was 4 minutes (95% confidence interval, 3-5 minutes). Both obturator nerve branches were blocked successfully in all patients (100%). The US-guided obturator nerve block using interfascial LA injection inferior to the superior pubic ramus, between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles, was shown to be a simple and successful technique.

  10. Microsurgical reconstruction of large nerve defects using autologous nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoutis, N K; Gerostathopoulos, N E; Efstathopoulos, D G; Misitizis, D P; Bouchlis, G N; Anagnostou, S K

    1994-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1993, 643 patients with peripheral nerve trauma were treated in our clinic. Primary neurorraphy was performed in 431 of these patients and nerve grafting in 212 patients. We present the functional results after nerve grafting in 93 patients with large nerve defects who were followed for more than 2 years. Evaluation of function was based on the Medical Research Council (MRC) classification for motor and sensory recovery. Factors affecting functional outcome, such as age of the patient, denervation time, length of the defect, and level of the injury were noted. Good results according to the MRC classification were obtained in the majority of cases, although function remained less than that of the uninjured side.

  11. Electrophysiology of Extraocular Cranial Nerves: Oculomotor, Trochlear, and Abducens Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Praveen; Balzer, Jeffery R; Anetakis, Katherine; Crammond, Donald J; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2018-01-01

    The utility of extraocular cranial nerve electrophysiologic recordings lies primarily in the operating room during skull base surgeries. Surgical manipulation during skull base surgeries poses a risk of injury to multiple cranial nerves, including those innervating extraocular muscles. Because tumors distort normal anatomic relationships, it becomes particularly challenging to identify cranial nerve structures. Studies have reported the benefits of using intraoperative spontaneous electromyographic recordings and compound muscle action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation in preventing postoperative neurologic deficits. Apart from surgical applications, electromyography of extraocular muscles has also been used to guide botulinum toxin injections in patients with strabismus and as an adjuvant diagnostic test in myasthenia gravis. In this article, we briefly review the rationale, current available techniques to monitor extraocular cranial nerves, technical difficulties, clinical and surgical applications, as well as future directions for research.

  12. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  13. Assessment of fatty degeneration of the gluteal muscles in patients with THA using MRI: reliability and accuracy of the Goutallier and quartile classification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelken, Florian; Wassilew, Georgi I; Köhlitz, Torsten; Brockhaus, Sebastian; Hamm, Bernd; Perka, Carsten; Diederichs, und Gerd

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the performance of the Goutallier classification for assessing fatty degeneration of the gluteus muscles from magnetic resonance (MR) images and to compare its performance to a newly proposed system. Eighty-four hips with clinical signs of gluteal insufficiency and 50 hips from asymptomatic controls were analyzed using a standard classification system (Goutallier) and a new scoring system (Quartile). Interobserver reliability and intraobserver repeatability were determined, and accuracy was assessed by comparing readers' scores with quantitative estimates of the proportion of intramuscular fat based on MR signal intensities (gold standard). The existing Goutallier classification system and the new Quartile system performed equally well in assessing fatty degeneration of the gluteus muscles, both showing excellent levels of interrater and intrarater agreement. While the Goutallier classification system has the advantage of being widely known, the benefit of the Quartile system is that it is based on more clearly defined grades of fatty degeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. POROSITY OF THE WALL OF A NEUROLAC (R) NERVE CONDUIT HAMPERS NERVE REGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, Marcel F.; Den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2009-01-01

    One way to improve nerve regeneration and bridge longer nerve gaps may be the use of semipermeable/porous conduits. With porosity less biomaterial is used for the nerve conduit. We evaluated the short-term effects of porous Neurolac (R) nerve conduits for in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration. In 10

  15. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  16. Scaffoldless tissue-engineered nerve conduit promotes peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after tibial nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron M. Adams; Keith W. VanDusen; Tatiana Y. Kostrominova; Jacob P. Mertens; Lisa M. Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerve tissue may cause loss of function in both the nerve and the targeted muscles it innervates. This study compared the repair capability of engineered nerve conduit (ENC), engineered fibroblast conduit (EFC), and autograft in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap. ENCs were fabricated utilizing primary fibroblasts and the nerve cells of rats on embryonic day 15 (E15). EFCs were fabricated utilizing primary fi-broblasts only. Following a 12-week recovery, nerve repair was assessed by measuring contractile properties in the medial gastrocnemius muscle, distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, and histology of muscle and nerve. The autografts, ENCs and EFCs reestablished 96%, 87% and 84% of native distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, 100%, 44% and 44% of native specific force of medical gastrocnemius, and 63%, 61% and 67% of native medial gastrocnemius mass, re-spectively. Histology of the repaired nerve revealed large axons in the autograft, larger but fewer axons in the ENC repair, and many smaller axons in the EFC repair. Muscle histology revealed similar muscle fiber cross-sectional areas among autograft, ENC and EFC repairs. In conclusion, both ENCs and EFCs promot-ed nerve regeneration in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap repair, suggesting that the E15 rat nerve cells may not be necessary for nerve regeneration, and EFC alone can suffice for peripheral nerve injury repair.

  17. Bilateral absence of musculocutaneous nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathada V Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus is an important group of spinal nerve plexus that supplies the muscles of the upper limb via the ventral rami of the Cervical 5 - Thoracic 1 fibers of the spinal nerves. It is not uncommon to notice the variations during cadaveric dissections in many regions of the body, at different levels, such as, roots, trunks, division, cords, communications, and branches as reported in the literature. Although the nerve supply of the body musculature takes place in the fetal life itself, its course, branching pattern, innervations, and communication can show variable patterns as the fetal development progresses. One such anomaly was noticed during our routine cadaveric dissection in the Department of Anatomy, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum, showing bilateral absence of the musculocutaneous nerve, which obviously drew the attention of the students of medicine, physiotherapy, and learning clinicians as well.

  18. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  19. Coordinated Respiratory Motor Activity in Nerves Innervating the Upper Airway Muscles in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tachikawa

    Full Text Available Maintaining the patency of the upper airway during breathing is of vital importance. The activity of various muscles is related to the patency of the upper airway. In the present study, we examined the respiratory motor activity in the efferent nerves innervating the upper airway muscles to determine the movements of the upper airway during respiration under normocapnic conditions (pH = 7.4 and in hypercapnic acidosis (pH = 7.2. Experiments were performed on arterially perfused decerebrate rats aged between postnatal days 21-35. We recorded the efferent nerve activity in a branch of the cervical spinal nerve innervating the infrahyoid muscles (CN, the hypoglossal nerve (HGN, the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN with the phrenic nerve (PN. Inspiratory nerve discharges were observed in all these nerves under normocapnic conditions. The onset of inspiratory discharges in the CN and HGN was slightly prior to those in the SLN and RLN. When the CO2 concentration in the perfusate was increased from 5% to 8% to prepare for hypercapnic acidosis, the peak amplitudes of the inspiratory discharges in all the recorded nerves were increased. Moreover, hypercapnic acidosis induced pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, SLN, and RLN. The onset of pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, and SLN was prior to that of discharges in the RLN. These results suggest that the securing of the airway that occurs a certain time before dilation of the glottis may facilitate ventilation and improve hypercapnic acidosis.

  20. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    These antimicrobial peptides are implicated in the resistance of epithelial surfaces to microbial colonisation and have been shown to be upregulated...be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. Outcomes have now been validated in a large animal (swine) model with 5 cm ulnar nerve...Goals of the Project Task 1– Determine mechanical properties, seal strength and resistance to biodegradation of candidate photochemical nerve wrap

  1. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by...

  2. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves......, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological...

  3. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve...... juxtapapillary tumors invading the optic nerve because of simple proximity to the nerve. A neurotropic subtype invades the optic nerve and retina in a diffuse fashion unrelated to tumor size or location. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jan...

  4. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  5. Effect of neurotrophic factor, MDP, on rats’ nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Fornazari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine the immune-modulating effects of the neurotrophic factor N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP on median nerve regeneration in rats. We used male Wistar rats (120-140 days of age, weighing 250-332 g and compared the results of three different techniques of nerve repair: 1 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures alone (group S - 10 rats, 2 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures plus fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA; group SF - 20 rats, and 3 sutures plus FTA, with MDP added to the FTA (group SFM - 20 rats. Functional assessments using the grasp test were performed weekly for 12 weeks to identify recovery of flexor muscle function in the fingers secondary to median nerve regeneration. Histological analysis was also utilized. The total number and diameter of myelinated fibers were determined in each proximal and distal nerve segment. Two indices, reported as percentage, were calculated from these parameters, namely, the regeneration index and the diameter change index. By the 8th week, superiority of group SFM over group S became apparent in the grasping test (P = 0.005. By the 12th week, rats that had received MDP were superior in the grasping test compared to both group S (P < 0.001 and group SF (P = 0.001. Moreover, group SF was better in the grasping test than group S (P = 0.014. However, no significant differences between groups were identified by histological analysis. In the present study, rats that had received MDP obtained better function, in the absence of any significant histological differences.

  6. The auriculotemporal nerve in etiology of migraine headaches: compression points and anatomical variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Harvey; Okada, Haruko C; Brown, Matthew S; Alleyne, Brendan; Liu, Mengyuan T; Zwiebel, Samantha; Guyuron, Bahman

    2012-08-01

    The auriculotemporal nerve has been identified as one of the peripheral trigger sites for migraine headaches. However, its distal course is poorly mapped following emergence from the parotid gland. In addition, a reliable anatomical landmark for locating the potential compression points along the course of the nerve during surgery has not been sufficiently described. Twenty hemifaces on 10 fresh cadavers were dissected to trace the course of the auriculotemporal nerve from the inferior border of the zygomatic arch to its termination in the temporal scalp. The compression points were mapped and the distances were measured from the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus, which was used as a fixed anatomical landmark. Three potential compression points along the course of the auriculotemporal nerve were identified. Compression points 1 and 2 corresponded to preauricular fascial bands. Compression point 1 was centered 13.1±5.9 mm anterior and 5.0±7.0 mm superior to the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus, whereas compression point 2 was centered at 11.9±6.0 mm anterior and 17.2±10.4 mm superior to the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus. A significant relationship was found between the auriculotemporal nerve and superficial temporal artery (compression point 3) in 80 percent of hemifaces, with three patterns of interaction: a single site of artery crossing over the nerve (62.5 percent), a helical intertwining relationship (18.8 percent), and nerve crossing over the artery (18.8 percent). Findings from this cadaver study provide information relevant to the operative localization of potential compression points along the auriculotemporal nerve.

  7. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  8. Visualization of the lower cranial nerves by 3D-FIESTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takemura, Akihiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Takada, Tadanori

    2005-01-01

    MR cisternography has been introduced for use in neuroradiology. This method is capable of visualizing tiny structures such as blood vessels and cranial nerves in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space because of its superior contrast resolution. The cranial nerves and small vessels are shown as structures of low intensity surrounded by marked hyperintensity of the CSF. In the present study, we evaluated visualization of the lower cranial nerves (glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory) by the three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) sequence and multiplanar reformation (MPR) technique. The subjects were 8 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 21 to 76 years (average, 54 yeas). We examined the visualization of a total of 66 nerves in 11 subjects by 3D-FIESTA. The results were classified into four categories ranging from good visualization to non-visualization. In all cases, all glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were identified to some extent, while accessory nerves were visualized either partially or entirely in only 16 cases. The total visualization rate was about 91%. In conclusion, 3D-FIESTA may be a useful method for visualization of the lower cranial nerves. (author)

  9. Histological methods for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in human nerve trunks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, T L; Gschmeissner, S E

    1994-03-01

    Although there are many histological techniques for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in paraffin embedded or frozen sections of the peripheral nervous system, modern approaches usually use plastic embedded material. Although plastic embedding is superior for small cutaneous branches, this method has limited value for histological assessment of nerve trunks. We report three methods which together yield a comprehensive approach for thorough and detailed investigation of human nerve trunks. The rapid osmication method permitted assessment of myelinated nerve fibers from frozen sections at operation, thus providing the surgeon with guidance on the extent of nerve resection. The modification presented here resulted in permanent slides, allowing comparison of results with those of the other two procedures. The new osmium-hematoxylin technique could be performed on paraffin embedded nerves. Paraffin, unlike plastic, permitted the study of the whole cross sectional area of the nerve in single sections. Moreover, the sharp image of the myelin permitted computerized morphometry. The significantly modified axonal silver impregnation technique was performed on frozen sections mounted on glass slides, as opposed to the time-consuming impregnation of free-floating sections. The latter technique had a high success rate and permitted semiquantitative assessment of axons in nerve trunks. These methods can be performed in any routine histology laboratory and resulted in greater accuracy compared to conventional methods.

  10. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  11. The First Experience of Triple Nerve Transfer in Proximal Radial Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Andalib, Sasan

    2018-01-01

    Injury to distal portion of posterior cord of brachial plexus leads to palsy of radial and axillary nerves. Symptoms are usually motor deficits of the deltoid muscle; triceps brachii muscle; and extensor muscles of the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Tendon transfers, nerve grafts, and nerve transfers are options for surgical treatment of proximal radial nerve palsy to restore some motor functions. Tendon transfer is painful, requires a long immobilization, and decreases donor muscle strength; nevertheless, nerve transfer produces promising outcomes. We present a patient with proximal radial nerve palsy following a blunt injury undergoing triple nerve transfer. The patient was involved in a motorcycle accident with complete palsy of the radial and axillary nerves. After 6 months, on admission, he showed spontaneous recovery of axillary nerve palsy, but radial nerve palsy remained. We performed triple nerve transfer, fascicle of ulnar nerve to long head of the triceps branch of radial nerve, flexor digitorum superficialis branch of median nerve to extensor carpi radialis brevis branch of radial nerve, and flexor carpi radialis branch of median nerve to posterior interosseous nerve, for restoration of elbow, wrist, and finger extensions, respectively. Our experience confirmed functional elbow, wrist, and finger extensions in the patient. Triple nerve transfer restores functions of the upper limb in patients with debilitating radial nerve palsy after blunt injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  13. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ?cross-bridging? to promote nerve regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour per...

  14. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Objectives  Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method  A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV-VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results  In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion  The pattern of cranial nerves IV-VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV-VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV-VI intraoperatively.

  15. Optical coherence tomography of the prostate nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitchian, Shahab

    Preservation of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. These microscopic nerves course along the surface of the prostate within a few millimeters of the prostate capsule, and they vary in size and location from one patient to another, making preservation of the nerves difficult during dissection and removal of a cancerous prostate gland. These observations may explain in part the wide variability in reported sexual potency rates (9--86%) following prostate cancer surgery. Any technology capable of providing improved identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery would be of great assistance in improving sexual function after surgery, and result in direct patient benefit. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique capable of performing high-resolution cross-sectional in vivo and in situ imaging of microstructures in biological tissues. OCT imaging of the cavernous nerves in the rat and human prostate has recently been demonstrated. However, improvements in the OCT system and the quality of the images for identification of the cavernous nerves is necessary before clinical use. The following chapters describe complementary approaches to improving identification and imaging of the cavernous nerves during OCT of the prostate gland. After the introduction to OCT imaging of the prostate gland, the optimal wavelength for deep imaging of the prostate is studied in Chapter 2. An oblique-incidence single point measurement technique using a normal-detector scanning system was implemented to determine the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, mua and m's , of fresh canine prostate tissue, ex vivo, from the diffuse reflectance profile of near-IR light as a function of source-detector distance. The effective attenuation coefficient, mueff, and the Optical Penetration Depth (OPD) were

  16. Sex differences in the branching position of the nerve to the abductor digiti minimi muscle: an anatomical study of cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Daisuke; Naito, Munekazu; Hayashi, Shogo; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Ohmichi, Mika; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The nerve to the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMM nerve) is the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve or originates directly from the posterior tibial nerve. Damage to the ADMM nerve is a cause of heel pain and eventually results in ADMM atrophy. It is known that ADMM atrophy occurs more often in females than in males, and the reason remains unclear. This study aimed to explore sex differences in the branching pattern, position, and angle of the ADMM nerve. Forty-two cadavers (20 males, 22 females) were dissected at Aichi Medical University between 2011 and 2015. Cases of foot deformity or atrophy were excluded and 67 ft (30 male, 37 female) were examined to assess the branching pattern, position, and angle of the ADMM nerve. The branching positions of the ADMM nerve were superior to the malleolar-calcaneal axis (MCA) in 37 ft (55 %), on the MCA in 10 ft (15 %), and inferior to the MCA in 20 ft (30 %). There was no case among male feet in which the ADMM nerve branched inferior to the MCA, whereas this pattern was observed in 19 of 37 female feet (51 %). The branching position of the ADMM nerve was significantly closer to the MCA in female feet than in male feet. There were no significant sex differences in the branching pattern and angle of the ADMM nerve. The ADMM nerve sometimes branches off inferior to the MCA in females, but not in males. This difference may be the reason for the more frequent occurrence of ADMM atrophy in females than in males.

  17. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  18. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering 'excellent' and 'good' muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  19. Escuela Superior de Palos Verdes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neutra, Richard J.

    1965-02-01

    Full Text Available Before initiating the building operations for the «Palos Verdes» School, the site was divided into two large horizontal surfaces, at different levels. The lower one served to accommodate the playing fields, a car park, the physical training building, and shop and ancillary buildings. On the higher of these two surfaces, and to the West of the access road, there is a car park and also the building and plot of ground devoted to agricultural technology, as well as the literary studies and general purpose buildings. As a complement to these, there is a series of blocks, arranged in parallel rows, which house the administrative offices, the art school, the craft's school, the general classrooms, and those devoted to higher education. The fascinating aspect of this school is the outstanding penetration of the architect's mind into the essential function of the project. Its most evident merit is the sense of comradeship and harmony that permeates the whole architectural manifold.Antes de construir el complejo escolar «Palos Verdes» se comenzó por crear, en el terreno, dos grandes mesetas a niveles diferentes. Sobre el inferior se organizaron: los campos de juegos, de deportes, un aparcamiento, el edificio para educación física y los destinados a tiendas y servicios. Sobre la meseta superior, al oeste de la vía de acceso, se dispuso un aparcamiento y el edificio y campo para adiestramiento agrícola; al este, otro aparcamiento, el edificio dedicado a materias literarias, y el destinado a usos múltiples. Completan las instalaciones de la escuela una serie de bloques paralelos: la administración, la escuela de arte, las clases de trabajos manuales, las aulas de enseñanzas generales, y las de los cursos superiores. Lo fascinante de este complejo escolar es la perfecta y magistral compenetración del arquitecto con el tema proyectado, y su mayor mérito, la sensación de cordialidad y armonía con el ambiente.

  20. The clinico-anatomic explanation for tibial intraneural ganglion cysts arising from the superior tibiofibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Anatomy, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mokhtarzadeh, Ali; Schiefer, Terry K. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Krishnan, Kartik G. [Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Department of Neurological Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Kliot, Michel [University of Washington, Department of Neurosurgery, Seattle, Washington (United States); Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2007-04-15

    To demonstrate that tibial intraneural ganglia in the popliteal fossa are derived from the posterior portion of the superior tibiofibular joint, in a mechanism similar to that of peroneal intraneural ganglia, which have recently been shown to arise from the anterior portion of the same joint. Retrospective clinical study and prospective anatomic study. The clinical records and MRI findings of three patients with tibial intraneural ganglion cysts were analyzed and compared with those of one patient with a tibial extraneural ganglion cyst and one volunteer. Seven cadaveric limbs were dissected to define the articular anatomy of the posterior aspect of the superior tibiofibular joint. The condition of the three patients with intraneural ganglia recurred because their joint connections were not identified initially. In two patients there was no cyst recurrence when the joint connection was treated at revision surgery; the third patient did not wish to undergo additional surgery. The one patient with an extraneural ganglion had the joint connection identified at initial assessment and had successful surgery addressing the cyst and the joint connection. Retrospective evaluation of the tibial intraneural ganglion cysts revealed stereotypic features, which allowed their accurate diagnosis and distinction from extraneural cases. The intraneural cysts had tubular (rather than globular) appearances. They derived from the postero-inferior portion of the superior tibiofibular joint and followed the expected course of the articular branch on the posterior surface of the popliteus muscle. The cysts then extended intra-epineurially into the parent tibial nerves, where they contained displaced nerve fascicles. The extraneural cyst extrinsically compressed the tibial nerve but did not directly involve it. All cadaveric specimens demonstrated a small single articular branch, which derived from the tibial nerve to the popliteus. The branch coursed obliquely across the posterior

  1. Characteristics of vertigo and the affected vestibular nerve systems in idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Chisato; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kamogashira, Teru; Egami, Naoya; Sugasawa, Keiko; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo attacks in IBV patients involving both the superior and inferior vestibular nerve systems were significantly more severe than vertigo attacks in patients with selective involvement of the inferior vestibular nerve system alone. To investigate the relationship between the frequency and duration of vertigo and the affected vestibular nerve system in idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy (IBV). This study categorized 44 IBV patients into the following three sub-groups according to the affected vestibular nerve system: superior, inferior, and mixed type. These patients were also categorized into the following three sub-groups according to their clinical time course: progressive type showing no episodes of vertigo, sequential type showing recurrent vertigo attacks and single-attack type showing a single episode of vertigo. Ten, 11 and 23 patients were classified as the superior, the inferior, and the mixed type, respectively. Seventeen, 23, and four patients were classified as the progressive, the sequential, and the single-attack type, respectively. For the patients having one or more vertigo attacks, the duration of the vertigo attack was longer than 24 h in 69% of the mixed type, and the duration of vertigo in the mixed type was significantly longer than that in the inferior type (p < 0.05).

  2. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  3. Electrodiagnosis and nerve conduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posuniak, E A

    1984-08-01

    The use of electrodiagnostic techniques in evaluation of complaints in the lower extremities provides an objective method of assessment. A basic understanding of principles of neurophysiology, EMG and NCV methodology, and neuropathology of peripheral nerves greatly enhances physical diagnosis and improves the state of the art in treatment of the lower extremity, especially foot and ankle injuries. Familiarity with the method of reporting electrodiagnostic studies and appreciation of the electromyographer's interpretation of the EMG/NCV studies also reflects an enhanced fund of knowledge, skills, and attitudes as pertains to one's level of professional expertise. Information regarding the etiology of positive sharp waves, fibrillation potentials, fasciculation, and normal motor action potentials and conduction studies serves as a sound basis for the appreciation of the categories of nerve injury. Competence in understanding the degree of axonal or myelin function or dysfunction in a nerve improve one's effectiveness not only in medical/surgical treatment but in prognostication of recovery of function. A review of the entrapment syndromes in the lower extremity with emphasis on tarsal tunnel syndrome summarizes the most common nerve entrapments germane to the practice of podiatry. With regard to tarsal tunnel syndrome, the earliest electrodiagnostic study to suggest compression was reported to be the EMG of the foot and leg muscles, even before prolonged nerve latency was noted.

  4. Intraoperative Ultrasound for Peripheral Nerve Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsey, Matthew; Wilson, Thomas J; Henning, Phillip Troy; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2017-10-01

    Offering real-time, high-resolution images via intraoperative ultrasound is advantageous for a variety of peripheral nerve applications. To highlight the advantages of ultrasound, its extraoperative uses are reviewed. The current intraoperative uses, including nerve localization, real-time evaluation of peripheral nerve tumors, and implantation of leads for peripheral nerve stimulation, are reviewed. Although intraoperative peripheral nerve localization has been performed previously using guide wires and surgical dyes, the authors' approach using ultrasound-guided instrument clamps helps guide surgical dissection to the target nerve, which could lead to more timely operations and shorter incisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  6. Morphological pattern of intrinsic nerve plexus distributed on the rabbit heart and interatrial septum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saburkina, Inga; Gukauskiene, Ligita; Rysevaite, Kristina; Brack, Kieran E; Pauza, Audrys G; Pauziene, Neringa; Pauza, Dainius H

    2014-01-01

    Although the rabbit is routinely used as the animal model of choice to investigate cardiac electrophysiology, the neuroanatomy of the rabbit heart is not well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the topography of the intrinsic nerve plexus located on the rabbit heart surface and interatrial septum stained histochemically for acetylcholinesterase using pressure-distended whole hearts and whole-mount preparations from 33 Californian rabbits. Mediastinal cardiac nerves entered the venous part of the heart along the root of the right cranial vein (superior caval vein) and at the bifurcation of the pulmonary trunk. The accessing nerves of the venous part of the heart passed into the nerve plexus of heart hilum at the heart base. Nerves approaching the heart extended epicardially and innervated the atria, interatrial septum and ventricles by five nerve subplexuses, i.e. left and middle dorsal, dorsal right atrial, ventral right and left atrial subplexuses. Numerous nerves accessed the arterial part of the arterial part of the heart hilum between the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and distributed onto ventricles by the left and right coronary subplexuses. Clusters of intrinsic cardiac neurons were concentrated at the heart base at the roots of pulmonary veins with some positioned on the infundibulum. The mean number of intrinsic neurons in the rabbit heart is not significantly affected by aging: 2200 ± 262 (range 1517–2788; aged) vs. 2118 ± 108 (range 1513–2822; juvenile). In conclusion, despite anatomic differences in the distribution of intrinsic cardiac neurons and the presence of well-developed nerve plexus within the heart hilum, the topography of all seven subplexuses of the intrinsic nerve plexus in rabbit heart corresponds rather well to other mammalian species, including humans. PMID:24527844

  7. Selective reinnervation: a comparison of recovery following microsuture and conduit nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, P J; Bain, J R; Mackinnon, S E; Makino, A P; Hunter, D A

    1991-09-20

    Selective reinnervation was studied by comparing the regeneration across a conventional neurorraphy versus a conduit nerve repair. Lewis rats underwent right sciatic nerve transection followed by one of four different nerve repairs (n = 8/group). In groups I and II a conventional neurorraphy was performed and in groups III and IV the proximal and distal stumps were coapted by use of a silicone conduit with an interstump gap of 5 mm. The proximal and distal stumps in groups I and III were aligned anatomically correct and the proximal stump was rotated 180 degrees in groups II and IV (i.e. proximal peroneal nerve opposite the distal tibial nerve and the proximal tibial nerve opposite the distal peroneal nerve). By 14 weeks, there was an equivalent, but incomplete return in sciatic function index (SFI) in groups I, III, and IV as measured by walking track analysis. However, the SFI became unmeasurable by 6 weeks in all group II animals. At 14 weeks, the percent innervation of the tibialis anterior and medial gastronemius muscles by the peroneal and tibial nerves respectively was estimated by selective compound muscle action potential amplitude recordings. When fascicular alignment was reversed, there was greater tibial (P = 0.02) and lesser peroneal (P = 0.005) innervation of the gastrocnemius muscle in the conduit (group IV) versus the neurorraphy (group II) group. This suggests that the gastrocnemius muscle may be selectively reinnervated by the tibial nerve. However, there was no evidence of selective reinnervation of the tibialis anterior muscle. Despite these differences, the functional recovery in both conduit repair groups (III and IV) was equivalent to a correctly aligned microsuture repair (group I) and superior to that in the incorrectly aligned microsuture repair (group II).

  8. Nerve ultrasound shows subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleman, Johan A; Stellingwerff, Menno D; Brekelmans, Geert J; Visser, Leo H

    2018-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is mainly associated with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Peripheral nerve involvement is described in symptomatic patients, but evidence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement is scarce. We conducted a cross-sectional pilot study in 2 asymptomatic and 3 minimally symptomatic patients with NF2 to detect subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. Patients underwent clinical examination, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS). A total of 30 schwannomas were found, divided over 20 nerve segments (33.9% of all investigated nerve segments). All patients had at least 1 schwannoma. Schwannomas were identified with HRUS in 37% of clinically unaffected nerve segments and 50% of nerve segments with normal NCS findings. HRUS shows frequent subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in NF2. Clinicians should consider peripheral nerve involvement as a cause of weakness and sensory loss in the extremities in patients with this disease. Muscle Nerve 57: 312-316, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Use of Degradable Nerve Conduits for Human Nerve Repair: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Meek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major clinical challenge. The most widely used technique for bridging defects in peripheral nerves is the use of autologous nerve grafts. This technique, however, has some disadvantages. Many alternative experimental techniques have thus been developed, such as degradable nerve conduits. Degradable nerve guides have been extensively studied in animal experimental studies. However, the repair of human nerves by degradable nerve conduits has been limited to only a few clinical studies. In this paper, an overview of the available international published literature on degradable nerve conduits for bridging human peripheral nerve defects is presented for literature available until 2004. Also, the philosophy on the use of nerve guides and nerve grafts is given.

  10. Sobredentadura total superior implantosoportada Superior total overdenture on implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlando Rodríguez García

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de un paciente desdentado total superior, rehabilitado en la consulta de implantología de la Clínica "Pedro Ortiz" del municipio Habana del Este en Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba, en el año 2009, mediante prótesis sobre implantes osteointegrados, técnica que se ha incorporado a la práctica estomatológica en Cuba como alternativa al tratamiento convencional en los pacientes desdentados totales. Se siguió un protocolo que comprendió una fase quirúrgica, procedimiento con o sin realización de colgajo y carga precoz o inmediata. Se presenta un paciente masculino de 56 años de edad, que acudió a la consulta multidisciplinaria, preocupado, porque se le habían elaborado tres prótesis en los últimos dos años y ninguna reunía los requisitos de retención que él necesitaba para sentirse seguro y cómodo con las mismas. El resultado final fue la satisfacción total del paciente, con el mejoramiento de la calidad estética y funcional.This is the case of a total maxilla edentulous patient seen in consultation of the "Pedro Ortíz" Clinic Implant of Habana del Este municipality in 2009 and con rehabilitation by prosthesis over osteointegration implants added to stomatology practice in Cuba as an alternative to conventional treatment in patients totally edentulous. We follow a protocol including a surgery or surgical phase, technique without or with flap creation and early or immediate load. This is a male patient aged 56 came to our multidisciplinary consultation worried because he had three prostheses in last two years and any fulfilled the requirements of retention to feel safe and comfortable with prostheses. The final result was the total satisfaction of rehabilitated patient improving its aesthetic and functional quality.

  11. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  12. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  13. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  14. Techniques for Preservation of the Frontotemporal Branch of Facial Nerve during Orbitozygomatic Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiriev, Toma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kaare

    2015-01-01

    Background During orbitozygomatic (OZ) approaches, the frontotemporal branch (FTB) of the facial nerve is exposed to injury if proper measures are not taken. This article describes in detail the nuances of the two most common techniques (interfascial and subfascial dissection). Design The FTB...... of the facial nerve was dissected and followed in its tissue planes on fresh-frozen cadaver heads. The interfascial and subfascial dissections were performed, and every step was photographed and examined. Results The interfascial dissection is safe to be started from the most anterior part of the superior...

  15. Enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration through asymmetrically porous nerve guide conduit with nerve growth factor gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Tae Ho; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with nerve growth factor (NGF) gradient along the longitudinal direction by rolling a porous polycaprolactone membrane with NGF concentration gradient. The NGF immobilized on the membrane was continuously released for up to 35 days, and the released amount of the NGF from the membrane gradually increased from the proximal to distal NGF ends, which may allow a neurotrophic factor gradient in the tubular NGC for a sufficient period. From the in vitro cell culture experiment, it was observed that the PC12 cells sense the NGF concentration gradient on the membrane for the cell proliferation and differentiation. From the in vivo animal experiment using a long gap (20 mm) sciatic nerve defect model of rats, the NGC with NGF concentration gradient allowed more rapid nerve regeneration through the NGC than the NGC itself and NGC immobilized with uniformly distributed NGF. The NGC with NGF concentration gradient seems to be a promising strategy for the peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 52-64, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  17. Imaging of the optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Masterson, Karen; Delavelle, Jacqueline; Viallon, Magalie; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Becker, Christoph D.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  18. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Following Ilioinguinal Nerve Block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-20

    Apr 20, 2018 ... a 3‑year period under ilioinguinal nerve block only were assessed for evidence of TFNP. All patients ... loss over the anterior aspect of the thigh, weakness of extension at the knee joint, .... and may result in falls with fractures which carry severe ... recovery of the palsy and subsequently discharged same.

  19. Functional nerve recovery after bridging a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve with a biodegradable nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Klok, F; Robinson, PH; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of nerve function was evaluated after bridging a 15 mm sciatic nerve gap in 51 rats with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide. Recovery of function was investigated by analysing the footprints, by analysing video recordings of gait, by electrically eliciting the

  20. Nerve supply to the pelvis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nerves that branch off the central nervous system (CNS) provide messages to the muscles and organs for normal ... be compromised. In multiple sclerosis, the demyelinization of nerve cells may lead to bowel incontinence, bladder problems ...

  1. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP Ajay Jawahar MD ... spinal cord is the thick, whitish bundle of nerve tissue that extends from the lowest part of ...

  2. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make ...

  3. Reconstruction of facial nerve injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Adel; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ron M

    2011-05-01

    Facial nerve trauma is uncommon in children, and many spontaneously recover some function; nonetheless, loss of facial nerve activity leads to functional impairment of ocular and oral sphincters and nasal orifice. In many cases, the impediment posed by facial asymmetry and reduced mimetic function more significantly affects the child's psychosocial interactions. As such, reconstruction of the facial nerve affords great benefits in quality of life. The therapeutic strategy is dependent on numerous factors, including the cause of facial nerve injury, the deficit, the prognosis for recovery, and the time elapsed since the injury. The options for treatment include a diverse range of surgical techniques including static lifts and slings, nerve repairs, nerve grafts and nerve transfers, regional, and microvascular free muscle transfer. We review our strategies for addressing facial nerve injuries in children.

  4. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Introduction. Cranial nerve palsy is a common clinical problem ... Methodology ... The two cases with three-nerve involvement were re- lated to viral encephalitis and cerebral contusion from ... RTA = road traffic accident.

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  6. a technique to repair peripheral nerve injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    attached nerve does occi.rr, and functional recovery (sensory and motor) has been demonstrated. ..... Brachial plexus. Upper trunk to lower. 19 Nov 1998 ... Fractured. 13 Mar 1998 Mid shaft hiunerus Radial nerve to. 14 Mar 1999 humerus cut.

  7. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully

  8. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully.

  9. Secondary digital nerve repair in the foot with resorbable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve conduits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Robinson, PH

    Nerve guides are increasingly being used in peripheral nerve repair. In the last decade, Much preclinical research has been undertaken into a resorbable nerve guide composed of p(DLLA-epsilon-CL). This report describes the results of secondary digital nerve reconstruction in the foot in a patient

  10. Peripheral nerve regeneration through P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Schakernraad, JM

    1998-01-01

    P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides can be used perfectly for short nerve gaps in rats, and are even better than short autologous nerve grafts. The tube dimensions, such as the internal diameter and wall thickness, are very important for the final outcome of peripheral nerve regeneration, as well as the

  11. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  12. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  13. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  14. INTERPRETATION OF NERVE CONDUCTION STUDY IN POLYNEUROPATHY WITH MULTIBACILLARY LEPROSY TYPE 2 REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Tantia Sari

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy reaction contributes to disability due to peripheral nerve damage. Nerve conduction study (NCS provides a profound physiological description of peripheral nerves. This study aims to report a case of polyneuropathy in leprosy with type 2 reactions (T2R which is evaluated using NCS. A 33-year-old woman complain of painful bumps in her arms and legs, fever, swollen feet since 2 days ago, and history of leprosy. Dermatologic examination on the right superior palpebra, right and left arms and legs revealed multiple tenderness erythematous nodules; right claw hand; and both legs oedema. Slit skin smear revealed positive result. Histopathologic examination supported T2R description. The NCS examination concluded severe axonal demyelinating motoric sensoric polyneurophaty, with left worse. She was treated with MDT-MB, bed rest, orally methylprednisolone, vitamin B, paracetamol, ferrous sulfas, and topical olive oil. Clinical improvement was achieved after 2 weeks. The NCS is used to assess the nerve impuls conduction along the peripheral nerves. In this case, it was found that NCS could showed early neuropathy in nerves that were clinically undetectable. It can be concluded that the NCS examination is an important diagnostic modalities for early detection of neuropathy and confirmed the diagnosis of clinical neuropathy in leprosy.

  15. IGF-1 and Chondroitinase ABC Augment Nerve Regeneration after Vascularized Composite Limb Allotransplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya V Kostereva

    Full Text Available Impaired nerve regeneration and inadequate recovery of motor and sensory function following peripheral nerve repair remain the most significant hurdles to optimal functional and quality of life outcomes in vascularized tissue allotransplantation (VCA. Neurotherapeutics such as Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1 and chondroitinase ABC (CH have shown promise in augmenting or accelerating nerve regeneration in experimental models and may have potential in VCA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of low dose IGF-1, CH or their combination (IGF-1+CH on nerve regeneration following VCA. We used an allogeneic rat hind limb VCA model maintained on low-dose FK506 (tacrolimus therapy to prevent rejection. Experimental animals received neurotherapeutics administered intra-operatively as multiple intraneural injections. The IGF-1 and IGF-1+CH groups received daily IGF-1 (intramuscular and intraneural injections. Histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate outcomes at five weeks. Overall, compared to controls, all experimental groups showed improvements in nerve and muscle (gastrocnemius histomorphometry. The IGF-1 group demonstrated superior distal regeneration as confirmed by Schwann cell (SC immunohistochemistry as well as some degree of extrafascicular regeneration. IGF-1 and CH effectively promote nerve regeneration after VCA as confirmed by histomorphometric and immunohistochemical outcomes.

  16. Anatomical study of phrenic nerve course in relation to neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tomohiro; Usami, Akinobu; Kishi, Asuka; Kon, Hideki; Takada, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The present study sought to clarify the course of the phrenic nerve and its correlation with anatomical landmarks in the neck region. We examined 17 cadavers (30 sides). In each, the phrenic nerves was dissected from the lateral side of the neck, and its position within the triangle formed by the mastoid process and sternal and acromial ends of the clavicle was determined. The point where the phrenic nerve arises in the posterior triangle was found to be similar to the point where the cutaneous blanches of the cervical plexus emerge at the middle of the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. In the supraclavian triangle, the phrenic nerve crosses the anterior border of the anterior scalene muscle near Erb's point where the superficial point is 2-3 cm superior from the clavicle and posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The phrenic nerve arises in the posterior triangle near the nerve point, then descends to the anterior surface of the anterior scalene muscle in the supraclavian triangle. It is necessary to be aware of the supraclavian triangle below Erb's point during neck dissection procedures.

  17. Acute optic nerve sheath fenestration with the free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Casagrande, Vivien A.; Joos, Karen M.; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Head, William S.; Mavity-Hudson, Julia A.; Nunnally, Amy H.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the free electron laser (FEL) energy can be delivered to a small space to perform optic nerve sheath fenestration with minimal acute nerve damage. Methods: A 530 mm hollow waveguide probe was designed. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (1.0 mm diameter) was performed in 8 rabbits using either the FEL (4 eyes, 6.45mm, 10 Hz, 2 mJ) or a knife (4 eyes). Within 2 hours following surgery, the animals were perfused with aldehyde fixative. The integrity of the optic nerve and glial response at the site of fenestration were evaluated on tissue selections with H&E, and antibodies to S100β or GFAP. Results: Surgery using the FEL probe was found to be technically superior to the knife. The glial reaction was limited to a zone adjacent to the fenestration and was similar in both the FEL and knife incisions. Conclusions: The FEL appears capable of efficiently performing an optic nerve sheath fenestration in a small space with minimal acute damage. Both the FEL and knife incisions result in a rapid glial response at the site of fenestration even when optic nerve integrity is not compromised.

  18. Mechanism to preserve phrenic nerve function during photosensitization reaction: drug uptake and photosensitization reaction effect on electric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruka; Hamada, Risa; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2018-02-01

    To study a mechanism of phrenic nerve preservation phenomena during a photosensitization reaction, we investigated an uptake of talaporfin sodium and photosensitization reaction effect on an electric propagation. Right phrenic nerve was completely preserved after superior vena cava isolations using the photosensitization reaction in canine animal experiments, in spite of adjacent myocardium was electrically blocked. We predicted that low drug uptake and/or low photosensitization reaction effect on the nerve might be a mechanism of that phenomena. To investigate uptake to various nerve tissue, a healthy extracted crayfish ventral nerve cord and an extracted porcine phrenic nerve were immersed in 20 μg/ml talaporfin sodium solution for 0-240 min. The mean talaporfin sodium fluorescence brightness increased depending on the immersion time. This brightness saturated around the immersion time of 120 min. We found that talaporfin sodium uptake inside the perineurium which directly related to the electric propagation function was lower than that of outside in the porcine phrenic nerve. To investigate photosensitization reaction effect on electric propagation, the crayfish nerve was immersed into the same solution for 15 min and irradiated by a 663 nm laser light with 120 mW/cm2. Since we found the action potential disappeared when the irradiation time was 25-65 s, we consider that the crayfish nerve does not tolerant to the photosensitization reaction on electric propagation function at atmospheric pressure. From these results, we think that the low uptake of talaporfin sodium inside the perineurium and low oxygen partial pressure of nerve might be the possible mechanism to preserve phrenic nerve in vivo.

  19. Ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athale, S.; Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroradiology Section, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 F. Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284-7800 (United States); Hallet, K.K. [Neuropathology Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglioglioma of the cranial nerves is extremely rare; only a few cases involving the optic nerves have been reported. We present a case of ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve, which was isointense with the brain stem on all MRI sequences and showed no contrast enhancement. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  20. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  1. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used...

  2. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurt, E.; Eijk, T. van; Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Arnts, I.; Steegers, M.A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP

  3. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  4. Paso superior en una ladera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bender, O.

    1965-07-01

    Full Text Available The Redwood highway, through the Californian forest, runs on a viaduct, as it crosses a mountain slope of about 45° inclination. The firm ground is fairly deep, and as an additional constructional difficulty, it was necessary to respect the natural beauty of the countryside. A structure of portal frames were built, forming a number of short spans. These spans were bridged with metal girders, on which a 19 m wide deck was placed. The columns are hollow and have a transversal cross beam, to join each pair. There was difficulty in excavating the foundations for the columns, as it was necessary to dig through the soft top soil, and also prevent this soil from hurting the trunks of the forest trees. Another significant difficulty in the construction of this viaduct was the access to the working site, since there were no suitable platforms from which to operate the appropriate machinery. This made it necessary to do a lot of the work by manual operation. As one of the edges of the deck is very close to the mountain side, a supporting beam was erected on this side. It was made of concrete, on metal piles. The formwork for the deck structure was placed on the concrete stems of the supporting piles.La autopista denominada Redwood (California salva, con un paso superior, la ladera de un bosque cuya pendiente es del 1/1. El terreno firme se halla a bastante profundidad, añadiéndose, a los naturales problemas de la construcción, el imperativo de respetar la belleza agreste del paraje. La solución adoptada consiste en una estructura porticada, con varios tramos de pequeñas luces, salvados con vigas metálicas, sobre los que se coloca la losa del tablero, de 19 m de anchura total. Los soportes están constituidos por pórticos de dos montantes huecos (con bases de hormigón en masa por debajo del suelo, hasta el firme coronados por un cabezal. La perforación de pozos para el hormigonado de los montantes presentaba la dificultad de atravesar el terreno

  5. Nerve growth factor receptor immunostaining suggests an extrinsic origin for hypertrophic nerves in Hirschsprung's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, H; O'Briain, D S; Puri, P

    1994-01-01

    The expression of nerve growth factor receptor in colon from 20 patients with Hirshsprung's disease and 10 controls was studied immunohistochemically. The myenteric and submucous plexuses in the ganglionic bowel and hypertrophic nerve trunks in the aganglionic bowel displayed strong expression of nerve growth factor receptor. The most important finding was the identical localisation of nerve growth factor receptor immunoreactivity on the perineurium of both hypertrophic nerve trunks in Hirshs...

  6. MRI appearance of the superior transverse scapular ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Huang, Ambrose J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The superior transverse scapular ligament (STSL) forms the roof of the suprascapular notch, which is the most common location of entrapment of the suprascapular nerve, a cause of shoulder pain and weakness. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of visualization of the STSL on routine shoulder MRIs, to identify the sequences and imaging planes on which it is visualized most frequently, and to describe its typical MRI appearance, none of which have been previously addressed in the radiologic literature. One hundred twenty-one consecutive shoulder MRIs were reviewed for the presence or absence of the STSL, including the imaging plane and sequence that best depicted the ligament. Dimensions of the ligament were recorded. Fifty four of 121 shoulder MRIs were technically adequate for visualization of the STSL, and it was identified on 51 of these studies (94 %). There was no statistically significant difference between 1.5-T and 3-T systems. The best individual sequence for visualizing the STSL was the sagittal T1-weighted sequence, in which the STSL was visible on 75/80 technically adequate sequences (94 %). The sagittal plane was the best plane for visualizing the STSL, in which it was visible on 65/69 technically adequate studies (94 %). The STSL on average measured 12.8 ± 1.5 mm in transverse dimension. The STSL can be visualized on the majority of shoulder MRIs and is best seen on sagittal T1-weighted images on our imaging protocol. Evaluation of the STSL can potentially help in identifying pathologic conditions affecting the suprascapular nerve. (orig.)

  7. 75 FR 28542 - Superior Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to orient the new Superior Resource Advisory Committee members on their roles... following business will be conducted: Overview of the roles and responsibilities of the Superior Resource...

  8. Arthroscopic release using F and C method versus conventional open release method in the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Saroj; Jin, Shengyang; Meng, Chunqing; Chaudhary, Nabin; Tamang, Nira; Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Xianzhe; Wang, Hong; Yang, Shuhua

    2017-03-16

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), a debilitating disease, usually starts in early childhood after variable dose of injections around the buttock, if left untreated it worsens gradually and persists throughout the life. Because the disease mostly affects adolescents and adults, there is always an aesthetic concerns. Purposeof the study was to introduce the arthroscopic F and C method of GMC release, and to compare its clinical efficiency with conventional open surgery in terms of clinical outcome, rate of complications, patient's satisfactions, and recurrence. Between Jan 2013 and July 2015, 75 patients received an arthroscopic release with F and C release method and 71 patients received conventional open release of GMC. Primary surgeries in 16 years or older patients were included in the study. Two groups were compared clinically using Hip Outcome Scores - Activities of Daily Living Subscale (HOS-ADL), Hip Outcome Scores - Sports Subscale (HOS-Sports), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and Ye et al. evaluation criteria. No statistically significant differences were observed in Hip Outcome Scores - Activities of Daily Living Subscale (HOS-ADL) (P = 0.078), Hip Outcome Scores - Sports Subscale (HOS-Sports) (P = 0.340), and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) (P = 0.524) between the two groups. 74 (98.7%) patients in the arthroscopic surgery group had good to excellent results, whereas 69 (97.1%) patients in the conventional open surgery group had good to excellent results (P = 0.727). No statistically significant difference was observed in recurrence rate (P = 0.612). Statistically significant differences were observed in incision length, use of post-operative analgesia, post-operative off-bed activity, and hospital stay. Complications were significantly higher in the conventional open surgery group (n = 21) than in the arthroscopic surgery group (n = 10) (P = 0.016). More importantly, cosmetic satisfaction was 100% in arthroscopic release group

  9. Intra-articular versus intravenous magnesium-sulfate as adjuvant to femoral nerve block in arthroscopic knee sur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdulatif

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: The combined use of femoral nerve block with IA or IV MgSO4 is associated with significant reduction of the intensity and duration of postoperative pain and postoperative analgesic requirements in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery with the IA MgSO4 being superior to IV route of administration.

  10. Allotransplanted neurons used to repair peripheral nerve injury do not elicit overt immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Liu

    Full Text Available A major problem hindering the development of autograft alternatives for repairing peripheral nerve injuries is immunogenicity. We have previously shown successful regeneration in transected rat sciatic nerves using conduits filled with allogeneic dorsal root ganglion (DRG cells without any immunosuppression. In this study, we re-examined the immunogenicity of our DRG neuron implanted conduits as a potential strategy to overcome transplant rejection. A biodegradable NeuraGen® tube was infused with pure DRG neurons or Schwann cells cultured from a rat strain differing from the host rats and used to repair 8 mm gaps in the sciatic nerve. We observed enhanced regeneration with allogeneic cells compared to empty conduits 16 weeks post-surgery, but morphological analyses suggest recovery comparable to the healthy nerves was not achieved. The degree of regeneration was indistinguishable between DRG and Schwann cell allografts although immunogenicity assessments revealed substantially increased presence of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ in Schwann cell allografts compared to the DRG allografts by two weeks post-surgery. Macrophage infiltration of the regenerated nerve graft in the DRG group 16 weeks post-surgery was below the level of the empty conduit (0.56 fold change from NG; p<0.05 while the Schwann cell group revealed significantly higher counts (1.29 fold change from NG; p<0.001. Major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I molecules were present in significantly increased levels in the DRG and Schwann cell allograft groups compared to the hollow NG conduit and the Sham healthy nerve. Our results confirmed previous studies that have reported Schwann cells as being immunogenic, likely due to MHC I expression. Nerve gap injuries are difficult to repair; our data suggest that DRG neurons are superior medium to implant inside conduit tubes due to reduced immunogenicity and represent a potential treatment strategy that could be preferable to the current gold

  11. Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve is most commonly due to its damage by trauma. A ten-month old child presented with the history of a fall from a four-storey building. She developed traumatic third nerve palsy and eventually the clinical features of aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. The adduction of the eye improved over time. She was advised for patching for the strabismic amblyopia as well. Traumatic third nerve palsy may result in aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. In younger patients, motility of the eye in different gazes may improve over time. © NEPjOPH.

  12. [Morphologic changes during neuroplastic nerve restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalski, E P; Rozhkov, E N

    1976-06-01

    The dynamics of ultrastructural changes in plastic recovery of the function of the additional nerve by the anterior branch of the second cervical nerve was studied. The nerve cells at the level of the donor-nerve were found to be highly reactive and plastic. It was established that in the process of heterogenic regeneration of the nerve the most substantial changes in neuronal structures were observed during the first two months. The cysterns of the endoplasmic network remained dilated for a long time after platic operation with might be related with the increased protein metabolism in the neuron.

  13. Survey of Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Anisometropic and Strabismic Amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Soltani Moghaddam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available . To investigate the effect of anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia on the nerve fiber layer thickness. This cross-sectional study was done on 54 amblyopic subjects, equally in both strabismic and anisometropic groups. The thickness otonerve fiber layer measured in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole in both eyes of both groups. The means of thickness were compared in amblyopic and sound eyes. In strabismus group, the average nerve fiber layer thickness of the sound eye , in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole were 113.23±14, 117.37±25, 68.96±6, 69.55±14 and 93.40±8 microns respectively. In amblyopic eyes of the same group, these measurements were 103.11±18, 67.74±11, and 69.59±16 and 89.59±12 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as whole respectively. In anisometropic groups, the sound eye measurements were as 130.96±22, 129.07±29, 80.62±12, and 83.88±20 and 107.7±13 microns in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole orderly. In amblyopic eyes of this group the mean thicknesses were 115.63±29, 133.15±25, 78.8±15, 80.2±16 and 109.17±21 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole respectively. Statistically, there were no significant differences between amblyopic and sound eyes (P>0.5. Our study did not support any significant change in a nerve fiber layer thickness of amblyopic patients; however, decreased thickness in superior and nasal quadrants of strabismic amblyopia and except inferior quadrant and as a whole. These measurements may be a clue for management and prognosis of amblyopia in old age.

  14. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  15. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne; Duhamel, Alain; Bera-Louville, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  16. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...... to earliest muscle reinnervation) on the final recovery of the outcome measures. Nerve gap distance and the repair type, individually and concertedly, strongly influenced the time to earliest muscle reinnervation, and only time to reinnervation was significant when all three variables were included as outcome...

  17. Suprascapular nerve entrapment in newsreel cameramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Gülçin Kaymak; Göğüş, Feride

    2003-03-01

    To determine presence of suprascapular nerve entrapment in a group of newsreel cameramen. Thirty-six men working as newsreel cameramen participated in the study. In addition to musculoskeletal and neurologic examinations, bilateral suprascapular nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography were performed. A group of 19 healthy, male volunteers were included in the study as normal controls for suprascapular nerve conduction studies. In newsreel cameramen, mean suprascapular nerve latency was 3.20 +/- 0.56 msec and 2.84 +/- 0.36 msec for right and left shoulders, respectively (P = 0.001). The mean latency difference between right and left suprascapular nerves was -0.05 +/- 0.19 msec in the control group and 0.36 +/- 0.58 msec in the cameramen group (P mobile camera on the shoulder might cause suprascapular nerve entrapment in newsreel cameramen. This could be considered an occupational disorder of the suprascapular nerve, like meat-packer's neuropathy.

  18. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  19. Anatomical study of middle cluneal nerve entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konno T

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Konno,1 Yoichi Aota,2 Tomoyuki Saito,1 Ning Qu,3 Shogo Hayashi,3 Shinichi Kawata,3 Masahiro Itoh3 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yokohama City University, 2Department of Spine and Spinal Cord, Yokohama Brain and Spine Center, Yokohama City, 3Department of Anatomy, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Object: Entrapment of the middle cluneal nerve (MCN under the long posterior sacroiliac ligament (LPSL is a possible, and underdiagnosed, cause of low-back and/or leg symptoms. To date, detailed anatomical studies of MCN entrapment are few. The purpose of this study was to ascertain, using cadavers, the relationship between the MCN and LPSL and to investigate MCN entrapment. Methods: A total of 30 hemipelves from 20 cadaveric donors (15 female, 5 male designated for education or research, were studied by gross anatomical dissection. The age range of the donors at death was 71–101 years with a mean of 88 years. Branches of the MCN were identified under or over the gluteus maximus fascia caudal to the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS and traced laterally as far as their finest ramification. Special attention was paid to the relationship between the MCN and LPSL. The distance from the branch of the MCN to the PSIS and to the midline and the diameter of the MCN were measured. Results: A total of 64 MCN branches were identified in the 30 hemipelves. Of 64 branches, 10 (16% penetrated the LPSL. The average cephalocaudal distance from the PSIS to where the MCN penetrated the LPSL was 28.5±11.2 mm (9.1–53.7 mm. The distance from the midline was 36.0±6.4 mm (23.5–45.2 mm. The diameter of the MCN branch traversing the LPSL averaged 1.6±0.5 mm (0.5–3.1 mm. Four of the 10 branches penetrating the LPSL had obvious constriction under the ligament. Conclusion: This is the first anatomical study illustrating MCN entrapment. It is likely that MCN entrapment is not a rare clinical entity. Keywords: middle cluneal nerve, sacroiliac joint

  20. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical 'cross-bridging' to promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-10-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges) into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to 'protect' chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  1. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  2. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  3. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  4. Future Perspectives in the Management of Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-04-01

     The author presents a solicited "white paper" outlining her perspective on the role of nerve transfers in the management of nerve injuries.  PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were evaluated to compare nerve graft and nerve transfer. An evaluation of the scientific literature by review of index articles was also performed to compare the number of overall clinical publications of nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfer. Finally, a survey regarding the prevalence of nerve transfer surgery was administrated to the World Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery (WSRM) results.  Both nerve graft and transfer can generate functional results and the relative success of graft versus transfer depended on the function to be restored and the specific transfers used. Beginning in the early 1990s, there has been a rapid increase from baseline of nerve transfer publications such that clinical nerve transfer publication now exceeds those of nerve repair or nerve graft. Sixty-two responses were received from WSRM membership. These surgeons reported their frequency of "usually or always using nerve transfers for repairing brachial plexus injuries as 68%, radial nerves as 27%, median as 25%, and ulnar as 33%. They reported using nerve transfers" sometimes for brachial plexus 18%, radial nerve 30%, median nerve 34%, ulnar nerve 35%.  Taken together this evidence suggests that nerve transfers do offer an alternative technique along with tendon transfers, nerve repair, and nerve grafts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Superiority in value and the repugnant conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2007-01-01

    superiority does not amount to a radical value difference at all. I then spell out the consequences of these results for different interpretations of Griffin's suggestion regarding population ethics. None of them comes out very successful, but perhaps they nevertheless retain some interest.......James Griffin has considered a weak form of superiority in value a possible remedy to the Repugnant Conclusion. In this paper, I demonstrate that, in a context where value is additive, this weaker form collapses into a stronger form of superiority. And in a context where value is non-additive, weak...

  6. Estudio anatómico de la transferencia de los nervios accesorio y toracodorsal al nervio cubital en el gato Anatomic study of spinal accesory and thoracodorsal nerves transfer to ulnar nerve in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Martínez-Méndez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones del plexo braquial son una de las patologías más graves y con mayor número de secuelas del miembro superior. En el momento actual las transferencias nerviosas se encuentran en primera línea del armamento terapéutico para reconstruir funciones proximales del miembro superior. En el estudio que presentamos se realizaron 20 transferencias nerviosas al nervio cubital del gato común, tomando bien el nervio accesorio del espinal (10 casos o bien el nervio toracodorsal (10 casos. Como grupo control se utilizó el lado contralateral al intervenido. Durante el año siguiente, se evaluó la reinervación mediante estudios electromiográficos, histológicos de nervio y músculo, así como histoquímicos de médula espinal. Tras el análisis de los resultados encontramos que las motoneuronas de ambos nervios donantes son capaces de conseguir reinervaciones parciales del territorio cubital.A brachial plexus injury is one of the most severe pathologies of the upper limb, and also has severe sequels. In the actual state of the art, nerve transfers are being used as first line of therapeutic approach in the reconstruction of proximal functions of the upper limb. In this study 20 nerve transfers were made to the ulnar nerve of the cat, using the spinal accessory nerve (10 cases or the thoracodorsal nerve (10 cases. The opposite side was used as control. During next year, reinnervation was assessed by electromyography, nerve and muscle histology and histochemical evaluation of the spinal cord. We found that motoneurons of both donor nerves are able to make partial reinervation of the ulnar nerve territory.

  7. The nerves around the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Alain; Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan

  8. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  9. Schwann cell-mediated delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor restores erectile function after cavernous nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Florian; Buchner, Alexander; Schlenker, Boris; Gratzke, Christian; Arndt, Christian; Stief, Christian; Weidner, Norbert; Matiasek, Kaspar

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the time-course of functional recovery after cavernous nerve injury using glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced Schwann cell-seeded silicon tubes. Sections of the cavernous nerves were excised bilaterally (5 mm), followed by immediate bilateral surgical repair. A total of 20 study nerves per group were reconstructed by interposition of empty silicon tubes and silicon tubes seeded with either glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-overexpressing or green fluorescent protein-expressing Schwann cells. Control groups were either sham-operated or received bilateral nerve transection without nerve reconstruction. Erectile function was evaluated by relaparotomy, electrical nerve stimulation and intracavernous pressure recording after 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks. The animals underwent re-exploration only once, and were killed afterwards. The nerve grafts were investigated for the maturation state of regenerating nerve fibers and the fascular composition. Recovery of erectile function took at least 4 weeks in the current model. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced Schwann cell grafts restored erectile function better than green fluorescent protein-transduced controls and unseeded conduits. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced grafts promoted an intact erectile response (4/4) at 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks that was overall significantly superior to negative controls (P cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced grafts compared with negative controls (P = 0.018) and unseeded tubes (P = 0.034). Return of function was associated with the electron microscopic evidence of preganglionic myelinated nerve fibers and postganglionic unmyelinated axons. Schwann cell-mediated delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor presents a viable approach for the treatment of erectile dysfunction after cavernous nerve injury. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Nerve supply to the internal anal sphincter differs from that to the distal rectum: an immunohistochemical study of cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugasa, Yusuke; Arakawa, Takashi; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2014-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common problem after anal sphincter-preserving operations. The intersphincteric autonomic nerves supplying the internal anal sphincter (IAS) are formed by the union of: (1) nerve fibers from Auerbach's nerve plexus of the most distal part of the rectum and (2) the inferior rectal branches of the pelvic plexus (IRB-PX) running along the conjoint longitudinal muscle coat. The aim of the present study is to identify the detailed morphology of nerves to the IAS. The study comprised histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of paraffin-embedded sections from a large block of anal canal from the preserved 10 cadavers. The IRB-PX came from the superior aspect of the levator ani and ran into the anal canal on the anterolateral side. These nerves contained both sympathetic and parasympathetic fibers, but the sympathetic content was much higher than in nerves from the distal rectum. All intramural ganglion cells in the distal rectum were neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive and tyrosine hydroxylase-negative and were restricted to above the squamous-columnar epithelial junction. Parasympathetic nerves formed a lattice-like plexus in the circular smooth muscles of the distal rectum, whereas the IAS contained short, longitudinally running sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves, although sympathetic nerves were dominant. The major autonomic nerve input to the IAS seemed not to originate from the distal rectum but from the IRB-PX. Injury to the IRB-PX during surgery seemed to result in loss of innervation to the major part of the IAS.

  11. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    LM, de Crombrugghe B. Some recent advances in the chemistry and biology of trans- forming growth factor-beta. J Cell Biol 1987;105:1039e45. 12. Hao Y...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In current war trauma, 20-30% of all extremity injuries and >80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve...through both axonal advance and in revascularization of the graft following placement. We are confident that this technology may allow us to

  12. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    this (Figure 14). Task 2g . Decision on wrap/fixation method for AvanceΤΜ nerve graft studies in rodent model. (Month 16, All PI’s) This decision...completed 3g . Preparation of manuscript based on Task 3 studies and evaluation for recommendation for human studies. This final task will be...significantly reduced mean hospital stay, dressings changes, mean time to epithelialisation, reduced pain, increased mobility . Patient and surgeon 666 N

  13. The relationship between the fistula tract and the facial nerve in type II first branchial cleft anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Burak; Gunaydin, Rıza Onder; Unal, Omer Faruk

    2015-04-01

    To share our experience involving seven patients with type II first branchial cleft anomalies (hereafter, type II anomalies), to determine whether the location of the external fistula openings of the anomalies are associated with the location of the facial nerve tract, and elucidate the relationship between the location of the fistula opening and the facial nerve. The medical records of seven patients who underwent surgery from 2005 to 2013 for type II anomalies were retrospectively examined. The relationship between the fistula opening and the facial nerve was evaluated in each patient with respect to whether the fistula opening was superior or inferior to the mandibular angle. All patients underwent partial parotidectomy, facial nerve exposure, and total excision of the mass together with connection of a small cuff of the external auditory canal skin to the fistula tract. The fistula tracts were located medially to the facial nerve in two patients, and both fistulae had openings inferior to the mandibular angle. The fistula tracts were located laterally to the facial nerve in the remaining five patients: one patient had no external opening, one had an opening inferior to the mandibular angle, and the remaining three had openings superior to the mandibular angle. Because type II anomalies are rare, their diagnosis is difficult. Surgery of such lesions is challenging and associated with a high risk due to their proximity to the facial nerve. We believe that the location of the fistula opening may help to identify the relationship between the anomalous lesion and facial nerve. Studies involving larger series of cases are needed to confirm our hypothesis; however, because of the rarity of this specific anomaly, it will not be easy to compile a large number of cases. We believe that our study will encourage further investigation on this subject. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  15. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  16. Axillary nerve injury associated with sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkook; Saetia, Kriangsak; Saha, Suparna; Kline, David G; Kim, Daniel H

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to present and investigate axillary nerve injuries associated with sports. This study retrospectively reviewed 26 axillary nerve injuries associated with sports between the years 1985 and 2010. Preoperative status of the axillary nerve was evaluated by using the Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSUHSC) grading system published by the senior authors. Intraoperative nerve action potential recordings were performed to check nerve conduction and assess the possibility of resection. Neurolysis, suture, and nerve grafts were used for the surgical repair of the injured nerves. In 9 patients with partial loss of function and 3 with complete loss, neurolysis based on nerve action potential recordings was the primary treatment. Two patients with complete loss of function were treated with resection and suturing and 12 with resection and nerve grafting. The minimum follow-up period was 16 months (mean 20 months). The injuries were associated with the following sports: skiing (12 cases), football (5), rugby (2), baseball (2), ice hockey (2), soccer (1), weightlifting (1), and wrestling (1). Functional recovery was excellent. Neurolysis was performed in 9 cases, resulting in an average functional recovery of LSUHSC Grade 4.2. Recovery with graft repairs averaged LSUHSC Grade 3 or better in 11 of 12 cases Surgical repair can restore useful deltoid function in patients with sports-associated axillary nerve injuries, even in cases of severe stretch-contusion injury.

  17. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavelu, K; Kannan, R; Kumar, N Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages.

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  19. Outer Electrospun Polycaprolactone Shell Induces Massive Foreign Body Reaction and Impairs Axonal Regeneration through 3D Multichannel Chitosan Nerve Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Duda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the performance of composite nerve grafts with an inner 3D multichannel porous chitosan core and an outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell. The inner chitosan core provided multiple guidance channels for regrowing axons. To analyze the in vivo properties of the bare chitosan cores, we separately implanted them into an epineural sheath. The effects of both graft types on structural and functional regeneration across a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap were compared to autologous nerve transplantation (ANT. The mechanical biomaterial properties and the immunological impact of the grafts were assessed with histological techniques before and after transplantation in vivo. Furthermore during a 13-week examination period functional tests and electrophysiological recordings were performed and supplemented by nerve morphometry. The sheathing of the chitosan core with a polycaprolactone shell induced massive foreign body reaction and impairment of nerve regeneration. Although the isolated novel chitosan core did allow regeneration of axons in a similar size distribution as the ANT, the ANT was superior in terms of functional regeneration. We conclude that an outer polycaprolactone shell should not be used for the purpose of bioartificial nerve grafting, while 3D multichannel porous chitosan cores could be candidate scaffolds for structured nerve grafts.

  20. Outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell induces massive foreign body reaction and impairs axonal regeneration through 3D multichannel chitosan nerve guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Sven; Dreyer, Lutz; Behrens, Peter; Wienecke, Soenke; Chakradeo, Tanmay; Glasmacher, Birgit; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    We report on the performance of composite nerve grafts with an inner 3D multichannel porous chitosan core and an outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell. The inner chitosan core provided multiple guidance channels for regrowing axons. To analyze the in vivo properties of the bare chitosan cores, we separately implanted them into an epineural sheath. The effects of both graft types on structural and functional regeneration across a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap were compared to autologous nerve transplantation (ANT). The mechanical biomaterial properties and the immunological impact of the grafts were assessed with histological techniques before and after transplantation in vivo. Furthermore during a 13-week examination period functional tests and electrophysiological recordings were performed and supplemented by nerve morphometry. The sheathing of the chitosan core with a polycaprolactone shell induced massive foreign body reaction and impairment of nerve regeneration. Although the isolated novel chitosan core did allow regeneration of axons in a similar size distribution as the ANT, the ANT was superior in terms of functional regeneration. We conclude that an outer polycaprolactone shell should not be used for the purpose of bioartificial nerve grafting, while 3D multichannel porous chitosan cores could be candidate scaffolds for structured nerve grafts.

  1. Evidence Suggesting that the Buccal and Zygomatic Branches of the Facial Nerve May Contain Parasympathetic Secretomotor Fibers to the Parotid Gland by Means of Communications from the Auriculotemporal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn

    2015-12-01

    The auriculotemporal nerve is one of the peripheral nerves that communicates with the facial nerve. However, the function of these communications is poorly understood. Details of how these communications form and connect with each other are still unclear. In addition, a reliable anatomical landmark for locating these communications during surgery has not been sufficiently described. Microdissection was performed on 20 lateral hemifaces of 10 soft-embalmed cadavers to investigate facial-auriculotemporal nerve communications with emphasis on determining their function. The auriculotemporal nerve was identified in the retromandibular space and traced towards its terminations. The communicating branches were followed and the anatomical relationships to surrounding structures observed. The auriculotemporal nerve is suspended above the maxillary artery in the dense retromandibular fascia behind the mandibular ramus. It forms a knot and fans out, providing multiple branches in all directions in the sagittal plane. Inferiorly, it connects the maxillary periarterial plexus, while minute branches supply the temporomandibular joint anteriorly. The larger branches mainly communicate with the branches of the temporofacial division of the facial nerve, and the auricular branches enter the fascia of the auricular cartilage posteriorly. The temporal branches and occasionally the zygomatic branches arise superiorly to distribute within the temporoparietal fascia. The auriculotemporal nerve forms the parotid retromandibular plexus through two types of communication. It sends one to three branches to join the zygomatic and buccal branches of the facial nerve at the branching area of the temporofacial division. It also communicates with the periarterial plexus of the superficial temporal and maxillary arteries. This plexus continues anteriorly along the branches of the facial nerve and the periarterial plexus of the transverse facial artery as the parotid periductal autonomic plexus

  2. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome causing growth retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil İbrahim Taşcı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare and lifethreateningclinical condition caused by the compressionof the third portion of the duodenum between the aortaand the superior mesenteric artery’s proximal part. Thiscompression may lead to chronic intermittent, acute totalor partial obstruction. Sudden weight-loss and the relateddecrease in the fat tissue are considered to be the etiologicalreason of acute stenosis. Weight-loss accompaniedby nausea, vomiting, anorexia, epigastric pain, andbloating are the leading complaints. Barium radiographs,computerized tomography, conventional angiography,tomographic and magnetic resonance angiography areused in the diagnosis. There are medical and surgical approachesto treatment. We hereby present the case ofa patient with superior mesenteric artery syndrome withdelayed diagnosis.Key words: superior mesenteric artery syndrome, nausea-vomiting, anorexia

  3. Atitudes de anestesiologistas e médicos em especialização em anestesiologia dos CET/SBA em relação aos bloqueios nervosos dos membros superior e inferior Actitudes de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización en anestesiología de los CET/SBA con relación a los bloqueos nerviosos de los miembros superior e inferior The attitude of anesthesiologists and anesthesiology residents of the CET/SBA regarding upper and lower limb nerve blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Escovedo Helayel

    2009-06-01

    aumentado en la práctica anestesiológica, debido a una menor necesidad de instrumentación de las vías aéreas, a un menor coste y a una excelente analgesia postoperatoria. Sin embargo, su utilización sufre restricciones causadas por la falta de entrenamiento, un mayor tiempo de realización, el temor de las complicaciones neurológicas y la toxicidad sistémica. El objetivo de este estudio, fue medir las actitudes de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización en los Centros de Enseñanza y Entrenamiento (CET/SBA con relación a los BNP. MÉTODO: Se constituyó un cuestionario con 25 ítems, quedando a disposición electrónicamente y por correo, para los responsables de 80 CET, sus instructores y médicos en especialización. RESULTADOS: Cuarenta y dos CET (52,5% devolvieron 188 cuestionarios, siendo 62 (32% médicos en especialización (ME y 126 (68% anestesiólogos. El coeficiente de confiabilidad de Cronbach del cuestionario fue de 0,79. El análisis factorial reveló seis factores que explicaron un 53% de la variancia de los puntajes: factor 1 - actitudes positivas, responsables de un 18,34 % de la variancia; factor 2 - entrenamiento/aplicación, responsable de un 11,73 % de la variancia; factor 3 - aspectos negativos, responsable de un 7,11 % de la variancia; factor 4 - factores limitantes, responsable de un 6,39 % de la variancia; factor 5 - anestesia regional como diferencial de competencia, responsable de un 5,79 % de la variancia; y factor 6 - respecto del paciente, responsable de un 5,4 % de la variancia. CONCLUSIONES: El cuestionario pareció ser una herramienta fidedigna para mensurar las actitudes con relación a la anestesia regional. Los anestesiólogos demostraron un mayor interés en los aspectos relacionados con los pacientes, mientras los ME tuvieron como foco principal la adquisición de habilidades técnicas.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of regional blocks especially peripheral nerve blocks (PNB has been increasing in anesthesiology due to

  4. Combined use of decellularized allogeneic artery conduits with autologous transdifferentiated adipose-derived stem cells for facial nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Ke; Mi, Wen-juan; Qiu, Jian-hua

    2011-11-01

    Natural biological conduits containing seed cells have been widely used as an alternative strategy for nerve gap reconstruction to replace traditional nerve autograft techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a decellularized allogeneic artery conduit containing autologous transdifferentiated adipose-derived stem cells (dADSCs) on an 8-mm facial nerve branch lesion in a rat model. After 8 weeks, functional evaluation of vibrissae movements and electrophysiological assessment, retrograde labeling of facial motoneurons and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. The transected nerves reconstructed with dADSC-seeded artery conduits achieved satisfying regenerative outcomes associated with morphological and functional improvements which approached those achieved with Schwann cell (SC)-seeded artery conduits, and superior to those achieved with artery conduits alone or ADSC-seeded artery conduits, but inferior to those achieved with nerve autografts. Besides, numerous transplanted PKH26-labeled dADSCs maintained their acquired SC-phenotype and myelin sheath-forming capacity inside decellularized artery conduits and were involved in the process of axonal regeneration and remyelination. Collectively, our combined use of decellularized allogeneic artery conduits with autologous dADSCs certainly showed beneficial effects on nerve regeneration and functional restoration, and thus represents an alternative approach for the reconstruction of peripheral facial nerve defects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Polymeric Nerve Conduits with Contact Guidance Cues Used in Nerve Repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G DAI; X NIU; J YIN

    2016-01-01

    In the modern life, the nerve injury frequently happens due to mechanical, chemical or thermal accidents. In the trivial injuries, the peripheral nerves can regenerate on their own; however, in most of the cases the clinical treatments are required, where relatively large nerve injury gaps are formed. Currently, the nerve repair can be accomplished by direct suture when the injury gap is not too large;while the autologous nerve graft working as the gold standard of peripheral nerve injury treatment for nerve injuries with larger gaps. However, the direct suture is limited by heavy tension at the suture sites, and the autologous nerve graft also has the drawbacks of donor site morbidity and insufifcient donor tissue. Recently, artiifcial nerve conduits have been developed as an alternative for clinical nerve repair to overcome the limitations associated with the above treatments. In order to further improve the efifciency of nerve conduits, various guidance cues are incorporated, including physical cues, biochemical signals, as well as support cells. First, this paper reviewed the contact guidance cues applied in nerve conduits, such as lumen ifllers, multi-channels and micro-patterns on the inner surface. Then, the paper focused on the polymeric nerve conduits with micro inner grooves. The polymeric nerve conduits were fabricated using the phase inversion-based ifber spinning techniques. The smart spinneret with grooved die was designed in the spinning platform, while different spinning conditions, including flow rates, air-gap distances, and polymer concentrations, were adjusted to investigate the inlfuence of fabrication conditions on the geometry of nerve conduits. The inner groove size in the nerve conduits can be precisely controlled in our hollow ifber spinning process, which can work as the efifcient contact guidance cue for nerve regeneration.

  6. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  7. Anatomical Variations in Formation of Sural Nerve in Adult Indian Cadavers

    OpenAIRE

    A.N., Kavyashree; Subhash, Lakshmi Prabha; K.R., Asha; M.K., Bindu Rani

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sural nerve is formed by communication of medial sural cutaneous nerve, that arise from tibial nerve in popliteal fossa and peroneal communicating nerve, a branch directly from common peroneal nerve or from lateral sural cutaneous nerve. The sural nerve is universally recognized by surgeons as a site for harvesting an autologous nerve graft and for nerve biopsies in case of neuropathies.

  8. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Roehm, P.C.; Mends, F.; Hagiwara, M.; Fatterpekar, G.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell’s palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers

  9. Cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezyar, E.; Atahan, I.L.; Akyol, F.H.; Guerkaynak, M.; Zorlu, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1989, 23 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients presenting with cranial nerve involvement (CNI) of one or more nerves at the time of diagnosis were treated and followed-up in our department. All patients were irradiated with curative intent, and total doses of 50 to 70 Gy (median 65 Gy) were delivered to the nasopharynx. Cranial nerves VI, III, V, IV, IX, and XII were the most commonly involved nerves. The total response rate of cranial nerves was 74% in a median follow-up time of 2 years, with the highest rate observed in the third and sixth cranial nerves. All complete responses except two were observed in the first month after radiotherapy. (author)

  10. The nerve endings of the acetabular labrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y T; Azuma, H

    1995-11-01

    The nerve endings of the human acetabular labrum were investigated. Twenty-three acetabular labra were obtained from 24 fresh human cadavers, stained with Suzuki's silver impregnation and an immunohistochemical technique for neurogenic specific protein S-100, and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ramified free nerve endings were seen in all specimens by silver staining, and also were observed by the immunohistochemical technique for S-100 protein. Sensory nerve end organs, such as a Vater-Pacini corpuscle, Golgi-Mazzoni corpuscle, Ruffini corpuscle, and articular corpuscle (Krause corpuscle), were observed by silver staining. Collagen fibers were scattered sparsely in the superficial layer of the labrum, and nerve endings were observed mostly in this region. Collagen fibers were sparse, and nerve endings also were observed in some regions among the collagen fiber bundles in the inner layer. Innervation of the acetabular labrum was confirmed in this study, suggesting that nerve endings in the labrum may be involved in nociceptive and proprioceptive mechanisms.

  11. Superior versus inferior Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakravan, Mohammad; Yazdani, Shahin; Shahabi, Camelia; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2009-02-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) (New World Medical Inc., Rancho Cucamonga, CA) implantation in the superior versus inferior quadrants. Prospective parallel cohort study. A total of 106 eyes of 106 patients with refractory glaucoma. Consecutive patients with refractory glaucoma underwent AGV implantation in the superior or inferior quadrants. Main outcome measures included intraocular pressure (IOP) and rate of complications. Other outcome measures included best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), number of glaucoma medications, and success rate (defined as at least 30% IOP reduction and 5glaucoma surgery, phthisis bulbi, or loss of light perception. Of a total of 106 eyes, 58 and 48 eyes underwent AGV implantation in the superior and inferior quadrants, respectively. Baseline characteristics were comparable in the study groups, except for preoperative IOP, which was higher in the superior group (P = 0.01). Patients were followed for a mean period of 10.6+/-8.49 months and 10.58+/-6.75 months in the superior and inferior groups, respectively (P = 0.477). BCVA was comparable between the groups at all postoperative visits (P>0.122). After 1 year, statistically significant but comparable IOP reduction from baseline (Pglaucoma medications was comparable after 1 year (1.3+/-1.2 vs. 1.9+/-0.8 for superior and inferior implants, respectively, P = 0.256). Success rates were also similar at 1 year: 27 eyes (81.8%) versus 20 eyes (95.2%) for superior and inferior implants, respectively (P = 0.227). However, the overall rate of complications, such as implant exposure necessitating removal, cosmetically unappealing appearance, and endophthalmitis, was higher in the inferior group: 12 eyes (25%) versus 3 eyes (5.2%) for superior and inferior groups, respectively, (P = 0.004). Superior and inferior AGV implants have similar intermediate efficacy in terms of IOP reduction, decrease in number of glaucoma medications, and preservation of vision. However

  12. Miconazole enhances nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Qiu, Shuai; Yan, Liwei; Zhu, Shuang; Zheng, Canbin; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin

    2018-05-01

    Improving axonal outgrowth and remyelination is crucial for peripheral nerve regeneration. Miconazole appears to enhance remyelination in the central nervous system. In this study we assess the effect of miconazole on axonal regeneration using a sciatic nerve crush injury model in rats. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and miconazole groups. Nerve regeneration and myelination were determined using histological and electrophysiological assessment. Evaluation of sensory and motor recovery was performed using the pinprick assay and sciatic functional index. The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and Western blotting were used to assess the proliferation and neurotrophic expression of RSC 96 Schwann cells. Miconazole promoted axonal regrowth, increased myelinated nerve fibers, improved sensory recovery and walking behavior, enhanced stimulated amplitude and nerve conduction velocity, and elevated proliferation and neurotrophic expression of RSC 96 Schwann cells. Miconazole was beneficial for nerve regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Muscle Nerve 57: 821-828, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nerve Biopsy In The Diagnosis Of Leporsy

    OpenAIRE

    Hazra B; Banerjee P P; Bhattacharyya N K; Gupta P N; Barbhunia J N; Sanyal S

    1997-01-01

    Skin and nerve biopsies were done in 33 cases of different clinical types of leprosy selected from Dermatology OPD of Medical College and Hospitals, Calcutta during 1994-95. Histopathological results were compared with emphasis on the role of nerve biopsies in detection of patients with multibacillary leprosy. The evident possibility of having patients with multibacillary leprosy in peripheral leprosy with multiple drugs. It is found that skin and nerve biopsy are equally informative in borde...

  14. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ames, Christopher P.; Clark, Aaron J.; Kanter, Adam S.; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Multi-institutional retrospective study. Objective: The goal of the current study is to quantify the incidence of 2 extremely rare complications of cervical spine surgery; hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerve palsies. Methods: A total of 8887 patients who underwent cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were included in the study from 21 institutions. Results: No glossopharyngeal nerve injuries were reported. One hypoglossal nerve injury was reported after a C3-7 laminectomy...

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    OpenAIRE

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple techni...

  16. [Acute palsy of twelfth cranial nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz del Castillo, F; Molina Nieto, T; De la Riva Aguilar, A; Triviño Tarradas, F; Bravo-Rodríguez, F; Ramos Jurado, A

    2005-01-01

    The hypoglossal nerve or Twelfth-nerve palsy is a rare damage with different causes: tumors or metastases in skull base, cervicals tumors, schwannoma, dissection or aneurysm carotid arteries, stroke, trauma, idiopathic cause, radiation, infections (mononucleosis) or multiple cranial neuropathy. Tumors were responsible for nearly half of the cases in different studies. We studied a female with hypoglossal nerve acute palsy. We made a differential diagnostic with others causes and a review of the literature.

  17. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S.K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  18. An audit of traumatic nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2009-07-01

    The impact of trauma in the Irish healthcare setting is considerable. We present the results of a retrospective assessment of referrals to a Neurophysiology department for suspected traumatic nerve injury. A broad range of traumatic neuropathies was demonstrated on testing, from numerous causes. We demonstrate an increased liklihood of traumatic nerve injury after fracture \\/ dislocation (p = 0.007). Our series demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the possibility of nerve injury post trauma, especially after bony injury.

  19. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... are the body’s “telephone wiring” system that carries messages between the brain and the rest of the body. Some nerves carry messages from the brain to muscles to make the body move. Other nerves carry ...

  20. Progress of nerve bridges in the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Ao,Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Qiang Ao Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Fundamental Science, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, Peoples’ Republic of China Abstract: Clinical repair of a nerve defect is one of the most challenging surgical problems. Autologous nerve grafting remains the gold standard treatment in addressing peripheral nerve injuries that cannot be bridged by direct epineural suturing. However, the autologous nerve graft is not readily available, and the process of harvesting...

  1. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  2. Adult Stem Cell Based Enhancement of Nerve Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    accompanied by injuries to peripheral nerves; if not repaired, the trauma can lead to significant dysfunction and disability . While nerves have the ability to...recovery, minimized disability , and increased quality of life for our wounded warriors. 2. KEYWORDS: Stem Cell, Nerve Conduit, Peripheral Nerve...would be a paradigm shift away from ordering X-rays at 10-12 weeks and only ordering a CT scan. It has the potential to change the standard of care

  3. Nerve Biopsy In The Diagnosis Of Leporsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazra B

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin and nerve biopsies were done in 33 cases of different clinical types of leprosy selected from Dermatology OPD of Medical College and Hospitals, Calcutta during 1994-95. Histopathological results were compared with emphasis on the role of nerve biopsies in detection of patients with multibacillary leprosy. The evident possibility of having patients with multibacillary leprosy in peripheral leprosy with multiple drugs. It is found that skin and nerve biopsy are equally informative in borderline and lepromatour leprosy and is the only means to diagnose polyneuritic leprosy. Nerve biopsy appears to be more informative in the diagnosis of all clinical types of leprosy.

  4. Scaffolds for peripheral nerve repair and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Xu, Lai; Gu, Xiaosong

    2018-06-02

    Trauma-associated peripheral nerve defect is a widespread clinical problem. Autologous nerve grafting, the current gold standard technique for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, has many internal disadvantages. Emerging studies showed that tissue engineered nerve graft is an effective substitute to autologous nerves. Tissue engineered nerve graft is generally composed of neural scaffolds and incorporating cells and molecules. A variety of biomaterials have been used to construct neural scaffolds, the main component of tissue engineered nerve graft. Synthetic polymers (e.g. silicone, polyglycolic acid, and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)) and natural materials (e.g. chitosan, silk fibroin, and extracellular matrix components) are commonly used along or together to build neural scaffolds. Many other materials, including the extracellular matrix, glass fabrics, ceramics, and metallic materials, have also been used to construct neural scaffolds. These biomaterials are fabricated to create specific structures and surface features. Seeding supporting cells and/or incorporating neurotrophic factors to neural scaffolds further improve restoration effects. Preliminary studies demonstrate that clinical applications of these neural scaffolds achieve satisfactory functional recovery. Therefore, tissue engineered nerve graft provides a good alternative to autologous nerve graft and represents a promising frontier in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Schwannoma Originating From the Periphereral Intercostal Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Aksoy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are usually solitary, encapsulated, and asymptomatic, benign neurogenic tumors originating from the nerve sheath. Schwannomas rarely show malignant transformation, however, require close monitoring. They are primarily located in the thorax in the costovertebral sulcus, may rarely originate from peripheral intercostal nerves. Less than 10% of primary thoracic neurogenic tumors originate from the peripheral intercostal nerves. The main treatment and diagnosis of schwannomas are complete surgical resection. We report a rare case of a 40-year-old male with asymptomatic schwannoma originating from an intercostal nerve which was found incidentally on his chest X-ray and was treated with surgery.

  6. Major Peripheral Nerve Injuries After Elbow Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir J; Mithani, Suhail K; Lodha, Sameer J; Richard, Marc J; Leversedge, Fraser J; Ruch, David S

    2016-06-01

    To survey the American Society for Surgery of the Hand membership to determine the nature and distribution of nerve injuries treated after elbow arthroscopy. An online survey was sent to all members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Collected data included the number of nerve injuries observed over a 5-year period, the nature of treatment required for the injuries, and the outcomes observed after any intervention. Responses were anonymous, and results were securely compiled. We obtained 372 responses. A total of 222 nerve injuries were reported. The most injured nerves reported were ulnar, radial, and posterior interosseous (38%, 22%, and 19%, respectively). Nearly half of all patients with injuries required operative intervention, including nerve graft, tendon transfer, nerve repair, or nerve transfer. Of the patients who sustained major injuries, those requiring intervention, 77% had partial or no motor recovery. All minor injuries resolved completely. Our results suggest that major nerve injuries after elbow arthroscopy are not rare occurrences and the risk of these injuries is likely under-reported in the literature. Furthermore, patients should be counseled on this risk because most nerve injuries show only partial or no functional recovery. With the more widespread practice of elbow arthroscopy, understanding the nature and sequelae of significant complications is critically important in ensuring patient safety and improving outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Natsis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An unusual combination of median nerve’s variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve’s medial root. The latter (fourth root was united with the lateral (fifth root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications.

  8. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve function in alcoholic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Andersen, K; Smith, T

    1984-01-01

    (18% and 48% decrease respectively). However, in three patients with moderate neuropathy, and in one patient with no signs of neuropathy, this veno-arteriolar reflex was absent, indicating dysfunction of the peripheral sympathetic adrenergic nerve fibres. The three patients also showed a lesser degree......The peripheral sympathetic vasomotor nerve function was investigated in 18 male chronic alcoholics admitted for intellectual impairment or polyneuropathy. By means of the local 133Xenon washout technique, the sympathetic veno-arteriolar axon-reflex was studied. This normally is responsible for a 50...... comprise not only the peripheral sensory and motor nerve fibres, but also the thin pseudomotor and vasomotor nerves....

  9. Pseudotumoural hypertrophic neuritis of the facial nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Zanoletti, E; Mazzoni, A; Barbò, R

    2008-01-01

    In a retrospective study of our cases of recurrent paralysis of the facial nerve of tumoural and non-tumoural origin, a tumour-like lesion of the intra-temporal course of the facial nerve, mimicking facial nerve schwannoma, was found and investigated in 4 cases. This was defined as, pseudotumoral hypertrophic neuritis of the facial nerve. The picture was one of recurrent acute facial palsy with incomplete recovery and imaging of a benign tumour. It was different from the well-known recurrent ...

  10. [Surgical treatment in otogenic facial nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-Dong; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Zhai, Meng-Yao; Lü, Wei; Qi, Fang; Jiang, Hong; Zha, Yang; Shen, Peng

    2008-06-01

    To study the character of facial nerve palsy due to four different auris diseases including chronic otitis media, Hunt syndrome, tumor and physical or chemical factors, and to discuss the principles of the surgical management of otogenic facial nerve palsy. The clinical characters of 24 patients with otogenic facial nerve palsy because of the four different auris diseases were retrospectively analyzed, all the cases were performed surgical management from October 1991 to March 2007. Facial nerve function was evaluated with House-Brackmann (HB) grading system. The 24 patients including 10 males and 14 females were analysis, of whom 12 cases due to cholesteatoma, 3 cases due to chronic otitis media, 3 cases due to Hunt syndrome, 2 cases resulted from acute otitis media, 2 cases due to physical or chemical factors and 2 cases due to tumor. All cases were treated with operations included facial nerve decompression, lesion resection with facial nerve decompression and lesion resection without facial nerve decompression, 1 patient's facial nerve was resected because of the tumor. According to HB grade system, I degree recovery was attained in 4 cases, while II degree in 10 cases, III degree in 6 cases, IV degree in 2 cases, V degree in 2 cases and VI degree in 1 case. Removing the lesions completely was the basic factor to the surgery of otogenic facial palsy, moreover, it was important to have facial nerve decompression soon after lesion removal.

  11. Possibilities of pfysiotherapy in facial nerve paresis

    OpenAIRE

    ZIFČÁKOVÁ, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor thesis addresses paresis of the facial nerve. The facial nerve paresis is a rather common illness, which cannot be often cured without consequences despite all the modern treatments. The paresis of the facial nerve occurs in two forms, central and peripheral. A central paresis is a result of a lesion located above the motor nucleus of the facial nerve. A peripheral paresis is caused by a lesion located either in the location of the motor nucleus or in the course of the facial ner...

  12. A prospective clinical evaluation of biodegradable neurolac nerve guides for sensory nerve repair in the hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertleff, MJOE; Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA

    Purpose: Our purpose was to study the recovery of sensory nerve function, after treatment of traumatic peripheral nerve lesions with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) Neurolac nerve guide (Polyganics B.V., Groningen, the Netherlands) versus the current standard reconstruction

  13. Biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts : Electromyographic and video analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of bridging a gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat with either a biodegradable copolymer of (DL)-lactide and epsilon -caprolactone [p(DLLA-epsilon -CL)] nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the gastrocnemius

  14. End-to-side nerve suture – a technique to repair peripheral nerve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lateral sprouting from an intact nerve into an attached nerve does occur, and functional recovery (sensory and motor) has been demonstrated. We have demonstrated conclusively that ETSNS in the human is a viable option in treating peripheral nerve injuries, including injuries to the brachial plexus. Among the many ...

  15. Comparison of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and ultrasound imaging for nerve localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegener, J. T.; Boender, Z. J.; Preckel, B.; Hollmann, M. W.; Stevens, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Percutaneous nerve stimulation (PNS) is a non-invasive technique to localize superficial nerves before performing peripheral nerve blocks, but its precision has never been evaluated by high-resolution ultrasound. This study compared stimulating points at the skin with the position of

  16. One-stage human acellular nerve allograft reconstruction for digital nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human acellular nerve allografts have a wide range of donor origin and can effectively avoid nerve injury in the donor area. Very little is known about one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defects. The present study observed the feasibility and effectiveness of human acellular nerve allograft in the reconstruction of < 5-cm digital nerve defects within 6 hours after injury. A total of 15 cases of nerve injury, combined with nerve defects in 18 digits from the Department of Emergency were enrolled in this study. After debridement, digital nerves were reconstructed using human acellular nerve allografts. The patients were followed up for 6-24 months after reconstruction. Mackinnon-Dellon static two-point discrimination results showed excellent and good rates of 89%. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test demonstrated that light touch was normal, with an obvious improvement rate of 78%. These findings confirmed that human acellular nerve allograft for one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defect after hand injury is feasible, which provides a novel trend for peripheral nerve reconstruction.

  17. Genetic modification of human sural nerve segments by a lentiviral vector encoding nerve growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tannemaat, Martijn R; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, J.; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autologous nerve grafts are used to treat severe peripheral nerve injury, but recovery of nerve function after grafting is rarely complete. Exogenous application of neurotrophic factors may enhance regeneration, but thus far the application of neurotrophic factors has been hampered by

  18. Neural stem cells enhance nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Zhou, Shuai; Feng, Guo-Ying; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Sun, Yi; Liu, Qian; Huang, Fei

    2012-10-01

    With the development of tissue engineering and the shortage of autologous nerve grafts in nerve reconstruction, cell transplantation in a conduit is an alternative strategy to improve nerve regeneration. The present study evaluated the effects and mechanism of brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) on sciatic nerve injury in rats. At the transection of the sciatic nerve, a 10-mm gap between the nerve stumps was bridged with a silicon conduit filled with 5 × 10(5) NSCs. In control experiments, the conduit was filled with nerve growth factor (NGF) or normal saline (NS). The functional and morphological properties of regenerated nerves were investigated, and expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and NGF was measured. One week later, there was no connection through the conduit. Four or eight weeks later, fibrous connections were evident between the proximal and distal segments. Motor function was revealed by measurement of the sciatic functional index (SFI) and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). Functional recovery in the NSC and NGF groups was significantly more advanced than that in the NS group. NSCs showed significant improvement in axon myelination of the regenerated nerves. Expression of NGF and HGF in the injured sciatic nerve was significantly lower in the NS group than in the NSCs and NGF groups. These results and other advantages of NSCs, such as ease of harvest and relative abundance, suggest that NSCs could be used clinically to enhance peripheral nerve repair.

  19. Comparison of Nerve Excitability Testing, Nerve Conduction Velocity, and Behavioral Observations for Acrylamide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve excitability (NE) testing is a sensitive method to test for peripheral neurotoxicity in humans,and may be more sensitive than compound nerve action potential (CNAP) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV).We used acrylamide to compare the NE and CNAP/NCV methods. Behavioral test...

  20. Muscle potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, I.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Van Ham, L. M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve and subsequent recording of the muscle-evoked potential (MEP) was performed in eight dogs and three cats with unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction. Localisation of the lesion in the sciatic nerve was based on the history, clinical neurological examination

  1. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  2. MRI of enlarged dorsal ganglia, lumbar nerve roots, and cranial nerves in polyradiculoneuropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, M.; Mukherji, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the MRI findings in four patients with a clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic polyradiculoneuropathies. In two examination of the lumbar spine showed enlarged nerve roots and dorsal ganglia, and similar findings were present in the cervical spine in a third. The cisternal portions of the cranial nerves were enlarged in another patient. MRI allows identification of enlarged nerves in hypertrophic polyradiculopathies. (orig.)

  3. The usefulness of MR myelography for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Yasumasa; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Miyauchi, Yukio; Niitsu, Mamoru

    2002-01-01

    diagnosed as postganglionic lesion (Zone 2) intraoperatively. In the latter all roots except two roots were diagnosed as preganglionic lesion intraoperatively. ESCPs of low amplitude were recorded in the two roots. The sensitivity and the specificity of MR myelography were 100% and 97.1% respectively. MR myelography has several advantages compared with conventional myelography. It is non-invasive and quick. It provides imaging of full column in multiple projections. It delineates the deformity of a nerve sleeve and/or the defect of nerve rootlets. Therefore, MR myelography is now superior to conventional myelography for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury. (author)

  4. Persistent left superior vena cava with absent right superior vena cava: image findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Junior, Cyrillo Rodrigues de; Carvalho, Tarcisio Nunes; Fraguas Filho, Sergio Roberto; Costa, Marlos Augusto Bitencourt; Jacob, Beatriz Mahmud; Machado, Marcio Martins; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos; Ximenes, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava absent right superior vena cava is a rare anomaly, with less than 150 cases reported in the literature. Congenitally persistent left superior vena cava is the most common variant of systemic venous return to the heart, resulting embryologically from failure of the left anterior cardinal vein to become obliterated. Its incidence varies from 0.3% in patients with otherwise normal heart to 4.3% in patients with congenital heart disease. In the majority of the patients, a right superior vena cava is present as well, but rarely the right anterior cardinal vein degenerates resulting in the absence of the normal right superior vena cava. The blood from the right side is carried by the persistent left superior vena cava to the right atrium through the coronary sinus. We report the case of a patient with a persistent left superior vena cava and absence of right superior vena cava identified by chance during a chest radiograph and computed tomography examination for investigation of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease. The patient had no congenital heart disease and the blood from the right side was drained by the persistent left superior vena cava into the right atrium through the coronary sinus. (author)

  5. Prevalence of Split Nerve Fiber Layer Bundles in Healthy People Imaged with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirel Gür Güngör

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The presence of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL split bundles was recently described in normal eyes scanned using scanning laser polarimetry and by histologic studies. Split bundles may resemble RNFL loss in healthy eyes. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of nerve fiber layer split bundles in healthy people. Materials and Methods: We imaged 718 eyes of 359 healthy persons with the spectral domain optical coherence tomography in this cross-sectional study. All eyes had intraocular pressure of 21 mmHg or less, normal appearance of the optic nerve head, and normal visual fields (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2 full threshold program. In our study, a bundle was defined as ‘split’ when there is localized defect not resembling a wedge defect in the RNFL deviation map with a symmetrically divided RNFL appearance on the RNFL thickness map. The classification was performed by two independent observers who used an identical set of reference examples to standardize the classification. Results: Inter-observer consensus was reached in all cases. Bilateral superior split bundles were seen in 19 cases (5.29% and unilateral superior split was observed in 15 cases (4.16%. In 325 cases (90.52% there was no split bundle. Conclusion: Split nerve fiber layer bundles, in contrast to single nerve fiber layer bundles, are not common findings in healthy eyes. In eyes with normal optic disc appearance, especially when a superior RNFL defect is observed in RNFL deviation map, the RNLF thickness map and graphs should also be examined for split nerve fiber layer bundles.

  6. Evaluation of Morphological and Functional Nerve Recovery of Rat Sciatic Nerve with a Hyaff11-Based Nerve Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jansen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of a Hyaff11-based nerve guide was studied in rats. Functional tests were performed to study motor nerve recovery. A withdrawal reflex test was performed to test sensory recovery. Morphology was studied by means of histology on explanted tissue samples. Motor nerve recovery was established within 7 weeks. Hereafter, some behavioral parameters like alternating steps showed an increase in occurence, while others remained stable. Sensory function was observed within the 7 weeks time frame. Nerve tissue had bridged the 10-mm gap within 7 weeks. The average nerve fiber surface area increased significantly in time. In situ degradation of the nerve conduit was fully going on at week 7 and tubes had collapsed by then. At weeks 15 and 21, the knitted tube wall structure was completely surrounded by macrophages and giant cells, and matrix was penetrating the tube wall. We conclude that a Hyaff11-based nerve guide can be used to bridge short peripheral nerve defects in rat. However, adaptations need to be made.

  7. The picture superiority effect in associative recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, William E

    2008-10-01

    The picture superiority effect has been well documented in tests of item recognition and recall. The present study shows that the picture superiority effect extends to associative recognition. In three experiments, students studied lists consisting of random pairs of concrete words and pairs of line drawings; then they discriminated between intact (old) and rearranged (new) pairs of words and pictures at test. The discrimination advantage for pictures over words was seen in a greater hit rate for intact picture pairs, but there was no difference in the false alarm rates for the two types of stimuli. That is, there was no mirror effect. The same pattern of results was found when the test pairs consisted of the verbal labels of the pictures shown at study (Experiment 4), indicating that the hit rate advantage for picture pairs represents an encoding benefit. The results have implications for theories of the picture superiority effect and models of associative recognition.

  8. Tissue-engineered spiral nerve guidance conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; Shah, Munish B; Lee, Paul; Yu, Xiaojun

    2018-06-01

    Recently in peripheral nerve regeneration, preclinical studies have shown that the use of nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) with multiple longitudinally channels and intra-luminal topography enhance the functional outcomes when bridging a nerve gap caused by traumatic injury. These features not only provide guidance cues for regenerating nerve, but also become the essential approaches for developing a novel NGC. In this study, a novel spiral NGC with aligned nanofibers and wrapped with an outer nanofibrous tube was first developed and investigated. Using the common rat sciatic 10-mm nerve defect model, the in vivo study showed that a novel spiral NGC (with and without inner nanofibers) increased the successful rate of nerve regeneration after 6 weeks recovery. Substantial improvements in nerve regeneration were achieved by combining the spiral NGC with inner nanofibers and outer nanofibrous tube, based on the results of walking track analysis, electrophysiology, nerve histological assessment, and gastrocnemius muscle measurement. This demonstrated that the novel spiral NGC with inner aligned nanofibers and wrapped with an outer nanofibrous tube provided a better environment for peripheral nerve regeneration than standard tubular NGCs. Results from this study will benefit for future NGC design to optimize tissue-engineering strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration. We developed a novel spiral nerve guidance conduit (NGC) with coated aligned nanofibers. The spiral structure increases surface area by 4.5 fold relative to a tubular NGC. Furthermore, the aligned nanofibers was coated on the spiral walls, providing cues for guiding neurite extension. Finally, the outside of spiral NGC was wrapped with randomly nanofibers to enhance mechanical strength that can stabilize the spiral NGC. Our nerve histological data have shown that the spiral NGC had 50% more myelinated axons than a tubular structure for nerve regeneration across a 10 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve

  9. Ultrasonographic demonstration of intraneural neovascularization after penetrating nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Csillik, Anita; Dévay, Katalin; Rosero, Maja

    2018-06-01

    Hypervascularization of nerves has been shown to be a pathological sign in some peripheral nerve disorders, but has not been investigated in nerve trauma. An observational cohort study was performed of the intraneural blood flow of 30 patients (34 nerves) with penetrating nerve injuries, before or after nerve reconstruction. All patients underwent electrophysiological assessment, and B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography. Intraneural hypervascularization proximal to the site of injury was found in all nerves, which was typically marked and had a longitudinal extension of several centimeters. In 6 nerves, some blood flow was also present within the injury site or immediately distal to the injury. No correlation was found between the degree of vascularization and age, size of the scar / neuroma, or degree of reinnervation. Neovascularization of nerves proximal to injury sites appears to be an essential element of nerve regeneration after penetrating nerve injuries. Muscle Nerve 57: 994-999, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Median Nerve Conduction in Healthy Nigerians: Normative Data

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of median nerve disease using multiple studies, and rendering ... Aim: To develop normative values for motor and sensory median nerve ..... Table 5: Comparison of median motor nerve conduction study parameters to studies elsewhere. Study.

  11. Infraorbital nerve transposition to expand the endoscopic transnasal maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, Giovanni; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Karligkiotis, Apostolos; Zocchi, Jacopo; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni; Califano, Luigi; Battaglia, Paolo; Castelnuovo, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    The infraorbital nerve (ION) is a terminal branch of the maxillary nerve (V2) providing sensory innervation to the malar skin. It is sometimes necessary to sacrifice the ION and its branches to obtain adequate maxillary sinus exposure for radical resection of sinonasal tumors. Consequently, patients suffer temporary or permanent paresthesia, hypoestesthia, and neuralgia of the face. We describe an innovative technique used for preservation of the ION while removing the anterior, superior, and lateral walls of the maxillary sinus through a medial endoscopic transnasal maxillectomy. All patients who underwent transnasal endoscopic maxillectomy with ION transposition in our institute were retrospectively reviewed. Two patients were identified who had been treated for sinonasal cancers using this approach. No major complications were observed. Transient loss of ION function was observed with complete recovery of skin sensory perception within 6 months of surgery. One patient referred to a mild permanent anesthesia of the upper incisors. No diplopia or enophthalmos were encountered in any of the patients. The ION transposition is useful for selected cases of benign and malignant sinonasal tumors that do not infiltrate the ION itself but involve the surrounding portion of the maxillary sinus. Anatomic preservation of the ION seems to be beneficial to the postoperative quality of life of such patients. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  12. Vena cava superior syndrome associated with sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, K.; Walz, M.; Reidemeister, J.C.; Donhuijsen, K.

    1988-01-01

    We report the first observation of clinical manifestations of vena cava superior syndrome (VCSS) associated with sarcoidosis. Twenty-four years after the first signs of the disease had been noted, mediastinal lymphomas penetrating the wall of the vena cava superior caused complete obstruction. It is most unusual for the vessel wall to be destroyed in this way, which explains why VCSS is often missed in sarcoidosis. The obstructed vessel was resected and successfully replaced by a Gore-Tex prosthesis. The importance of VCSS for the differential diagnosis is pointed out. Two further peculiarities are the simultaneous occurrence of elevated intraocular pressure and VCSS, and the familial incidence. (orig.) [de

  13. Clinical experience with a novel electromyographic approach to preventing phrenic nerve injury during cryoballoon ablation in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondésert, Blandine; Andrade, Jason G; Khairy, Paul; Guerra, Peter G; Dyrda, Katia; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Léna; Thibault, Bernard; Talajic, Mario; Roy, Denis; Dubuc, Marc; Shohoudi, Azadeh

    2014-08-01

    Phrenic nerve palsy remains the most frequent complication associated with cryoballoon-based pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. We sought to characterize our experience using a novel monitoring technique for the prevention of phrenic nerve palsy. Two hundred consecutive cryoballoon-based PV isolation procedures between October 2010 and October 2013 were studied. In addition to standard abdominal palpation during right phrenic nerve pacing from the superior vena cava, all patients underwent diaphragmatic electromyographic monitoring using surface electrodes. Cryoablation was terminated on any perceived reduction in diaphragmatic motion or a 30% decrease in the compound motor action potential (CMAP). During right-sided ablation, a ≥30% reduction in CMAP amplitude occurred in 49 patients (24.5%). Diaphragmatic motion decreased in 30 of 49 patients and was preceded by a 30% reduction in CMAP amplitude in all. In 82% of cases, this reduction in CMAP amplitude occurred during right superior PV isolation. The baseline CMAP amplitude was 946.5±609.2 mV and decreased by 13.8±13.8% at the end of application. This decrease was more marked in the 33 PVs with a reduction in diaphragmatic motion than in those without (40.9±15.3% versus 11.3±10.5%; Pphrenic nerve palsy persisted beyond the end of the procedure, with all cases recovering within 6 months. Despite the shortened application all veins were isolated. At repeat procedure the right-sided PVs reconnected less frequently than the left-sided PVs in those with phrenic nerve palsy. Electromyographic phrenic nerve monitoring using the surface CMAP is reliable, easy to perform, and offers an early warning to impending phrenic nerve injury. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Effect of duration and severity of migraine on retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, and choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Mona K; Fouad, Mohamed M

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the factors in migraine that have the highest significance on retinal and choroidal layers' thickness. Ninety patients with migraine and 40 age-matched healthy participants were enrolled in this observational, cross-sectional study. After full ophthalmological examination, spectral domain-optical coherence tomography was done for all patients measuring the thickness of ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer. Enhanced depth imaging technique was used to measure the choroidal thickness. There was significant thinning in the superior and inferior ganglion cell layers, all retinal nerve fiber layer quadrants, and all choroidal quadrants (except for the central subfield) in migraineurs compared to controls. The duration of migraine was significantly correlated with ganglion cell layer, retinal nerve fiber layer, and all choroidal quadrants, while the severity of migraine was significantly correlated with ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer only. Multiregression analysis showed that the duration of migraine is the most important determinant factor of the superior retinal nerve fiber layer quadrant (β = -0.375, p = 0.001) and in all the choroidal quadrants (β = -0.531, -0.692, -0.503, -0.461, -0.564, respectively, p  layer quadrants (β = -0.256, -0.335, -0.308; p  = 0.036, 0.005, 0.009, respectively) and the inferior ganglion cell layer hemisphere (β = -0.377 and p = 0.001). Ganglion cell layer, retinal nerve fiber layer, and choroidal thickness are significantly thinner in patients with migraine. The severity of migraine has more significant influence in the thinning of ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer, while the duration of the disease affected the choroidal thickness more.

  15. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the mastoid facial nerve canal mimicking a facial nerve schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew L; Bharatha, Aditya; Aviv, Richard I; Nedzelski, Julian; Chen, Joseph; Bilbao, Juan M; Wong, John; Saad, Reda; Symons, Sean P

    2009-07-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma of the skull base is a rare entity. Involvement of the temporal bone is particularly rare. We present an unusual case of progressive facial nerve paralysis with imaging and clinical findings most suggestive of a facial nerve schwannoma. The lesion was tubular in appearance, expanded the mastoid facial nerve canal, protruded out of the stylomastoid foramen, and enhanced homogeneously. The only unusual imaging feature was minor calcification within the tumor. Surgery revealed an irregular, cystic lesion. Pathology diagnosed a chondromyxoid fibroma involving the mastoid portion of the facial nerve canal, destroying the facial nerve.

  16. Nerve Transfers for Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury: Advantages and Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Hems, Tim

    2011-01-01

    In recent years nerve transfers have been increasingly used to broaden reconstructive options for brachial plexus reconstruction. Nerve transfer is a procedure where an expendable nerve is connected to a more important nerve in order to reinnervate that nerve. This article outlines the experience of the Scottish National Brachial Plexus Injury Service as our use of nerve transfers has increased. Outcomes have improved for reconstruction of the paralysed shoulder using transfer of the accessor...

  17. Prognostic factors in sensory recovery after digital nerve repair

    OpenAIRE

    Bulut, Tugrul; Akgun, Ulas; Citlak, Atilla; Aslan, Cihan; Sener, Ufuk; Sener, Muhittin

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The prognostic factors that affect sensory nerve recovery after digital nerve repair are variable because of nonhomogeneous data, subjective tests, and different assessment/scoring methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of sensory nerve recovery after digital nerve repair and to investigate the prognostic factors in sensorial healing.Methods: Ninety-six digital nerve repairs of 63 patients were retrospectively evaluated. All nerves were repaired with end-to-end ...

  18. Superior oblique luxation and trochlear luxation as new concepts in superior oblique muscle weakening surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mombaerts, I.; Koornneef, L.; Everhard-Halm, Y. S.; Hughes, D. S.; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    We used superior oblique luxation and trochlear luxation as new surgical procedures to treat acquired Brown's syndrome and superior oblique muscle overaction. We studied nine patients (11 eyes) who underwent trochlear surgery between 1988 and 1993. Four patients had acquired Brown's syndrome and

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of meniscoid superior labrum: normal variant or superior labral tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Novelino Simão

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of a "meniscoid" superior labrum. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 582 magnetic resonance imaging examinations of shoulders. Of those 582 examinations, 110 were excluded, for a variety of reasons, and the final analysis therefore included 472 cases. Consensus readings were performed by three musculoskeletal radiologists using specific criteria to diagnose meniscoid labra. Results: A meniscoid superior labrum was identified in 48 (10.2% of the 472 cases evaluated. Arthroscopic proof was available in 21 cases (43.8%. In 10 (47.6% of those 21 cases, the operative report did not include the mention a superior labral tear, thus suggesting the presence of a meniscoid labrum. In only one of those cases were there specific comments about a mobile superior labrum (i.e., meniscoid labrum. In the remaining 11 (52.4%, surgical correlation demonstrated superior labral tears. Conclusion: A meniscoid superior labrum is not an infrequent finding. Depending upon assumptions and the requirement of surgical proof, the prevalence of a meniscoid superior labrum in this study was between 2.1% (surgically proven and 4.8% (projected. However, superior labral tears are just as common and are often confused with meniscoid labra.

  20. Nerve injuries do occur in elbow arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgersom, Nick F J; van Deurzen, Derek F P; Gerritsma, Carina L E; van der Heide, Huub J L; Malessy, Martijn J A; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2018-01-01

    The purpose is to create more awareness as well as emphasize the risk of permanent nerve injury as a complication of elbow arthroscopy. Patients who underwent elbow arthroscopy complicated by permanent nerve injury were retrospectively collected. Patients were collected using two strategies: (1) by word-of-mouth throughout the Dutch Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, and the Leiden University Nerve Centre, and (2) approaching two medical liability insurance companies. Medical records were reviewed to determine patient characteristics, disease history and postoperative course. Surgical records were reviewed to determine surgical details. A total of eight patients were collected, four men and four women, ageing 21-54 years. In five out of eight patients (62.5%), the ulnar nerve was affected; in the remaining three patients (37.5%), the radial nerve was involved. Possible causes for nerve injury varied among patients, such as portal placement and the use of motorized instruments. A case series on permanent nerve injury as a complication of elbow arthroscopy is presented. Reporting on this sequel in the literature is little, however, its risk is not to be underestimated. This study emphasizes that permanent nerve injury is a complication of elbow arthroscopy, concurrently increasing awareness and thereby possibly aiding to prevention. IV, case series.

  1. Magnetoneurographic evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D.L. Kuypers (Paul)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWhen a peripheral nerve is reconstructed after it has been damaged. it is important to assess, in an early stage, whether the nerve is regenerating across the lesion. However, at present for this purpose an adequate method is not available. In this study short term changes in the

  2. Multiple cranial nerve palsies complicating tympanomastoiditis: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media either acute or chronic, is not uncommon in childhood. Multiple cranial nerve palsies occuring as a complication of either form of otitis media is unusual. A case of a nine year old boy with chronic suppurative otitis media with associated mastoiditis complicated with ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve palsies is ...

  3. Nerve injuries do occur in elbow arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgersom, Nick F. J.; van Deurzen, Derek F. P.; Gerritsma, Carina L. E.; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose is to create more awareness as well as emphasize the risk of permanent nerve injury as a complication of elbow arthroscopy. Patients who underwent elbow arthroscopy complicated by permanent nerve injury were retrospectively collected. Patients were collected using two strategies: (1) by

  4. Symptoms of Nerve Dysfunction After Hip Arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dippmann, Christian; Thorborg, Kristian; Kraemer, Otto

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this study was to analyze the rate, pattern, and severity of symptoms of nerve dysfunction after hip arthroscopy (HA) by reviewing prospectively collected data. The secondary purpose was to study whether symptoms of nerve dysfunction were related to traction time...

  5. Diagnostic value of the near-nerve needle sensory nerve conduction in sensory inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Zeki; Oh, Shin J

    2018-03-01

    In this study we report the diagnostic value of the near-nerve needle sensory nerve conduction study (NNN-SNCS) in sensory inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (IDP) in which the routine nerve conduction study was normal or non-diagnostic. The NNN-SNCS was performed to identify demyelination in the plantar nerves in 14 patients and in the median or ulnar nerve in 2 patients with sensory IDP. In 16 patients with sensory IDP, routine NCSs were either normal or non-diagnostic for demyelination. Demyelination was identified by NNN-SNCS by dispersion and/or slow nerve conduction velocity (NCV) below the demyelination marker. Immunotherapy was initiated in 11 patients, 10 of whom improved or remained stable. NNN-SNCS played an essential role in identifying demyelinaton in 16 patients with sensory IDP, leading to proper treatment. Muscle Nerve 57: 414-418, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Matching of motor-sensory modality in the rodent femoral nerve model shows no enhanced effect on peripheral nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, David H.; Johnson, Philip J.; Moore, Amy M.; Magill, Christina K.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Tung, Thomas HH.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries with nerve gaps largely consists of autologous nerve grafting utilizing sensory nerve donors. Underlying this clinical practice is the assumption that sensory autografts provide a suitable substrate for motoneuron regeneration, thereby facilitating motor endplate reinnervation and functional recovery. This study examined the role of nerve graft modality on axonal regeneration, comparing motor nerve regeneration through motor, sensory, and mixed nerve isografts in the Lewis rat. A total of 100 rats underwent grafting of the motor or sensory branch of the femoral nerve with histomorphometric analysis performed after 5, 6, or 7 weeks. Analysis demonstrated similar nerve regeneration in motor, sensory, and mixed nerve grafts at all three time points. These data indicate that matching of motor-sensory modality in the rat femoral nerve does not confer improved axonal regeneration through nerve isografts. PMID:20122927

  7. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve head characteristics in eyes with situs inversus of the optic disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sunah; Jin, Sunyoung; Roh, Kyu Hwa; Hwang, Young Hoon

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and optic nerve head (ONH) characteristics, as determined using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), in eyes with situs inversus of the optic disc. The peripapillary RNFL and the ONH were assessed in 12 eyes belonging to 6 subjects with situs inversus of the optic disc (situs inversus group) and 24 eyes in 12 age-matched, sex-matched, and refractive error-matched healthy subjects (control group) by using OCT. The average, quadrant, and clock-hour RNFL thicknesses (clock-hour 9 on the scan represented the temporal side of the optic disc in both eyes), the superior/inferior RNFL peak locations, and ONH characteristics such as disc area, rim area, cup-to-disc ratio, vertical cup-to-disc ratio, and cup volume were obtained. The differences in RNFL and ONH characteristics between the 2 groups were analyzed. The situs inversus group had a thicker RNFL in the clock-hour sectors 3 and 4, a thinner RNFL in the clock-hour sectors 7, 8, and 11, and more nasally located superior and inferior RNFL peak locations than the control group (P≤0.001). The situs inversus group had a smaller cup-to-disc area ratio, smaller vertical cup-to-disc ratio, and a lesser cup volume than the control group (Poptic disc showed different peripapillary RNFL and ONH characteristics from those without this abnormality. These findings should be considered when assessing eyes with situs inversus of the optic disc.

  8. Fluoroscopy of spontaneous breathing is more sensitive than phrenic nerve stimulation for detection of right phrenic nerve injury during cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Markus; Nielson, Annika; Andrié, René P; Mittmann-Braun, Erica L; Stöckigt, Florian; Kreuz, Jens; Nickenig, Georg; Schrickel, Jan W; Lickfett, Lars M

    2014-08-01

    Right phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) is a typical complication of cryoballoon ablation of the right-sided pulmonary veins (PVs). Phrenic nerve function can be monitored by palpating the abdomen during phrenic nerve pacing from the superior vena cava (SVC pacing) or by fluoroscopy of spontaneous breathing. We sought to compare the sensitivity of these 2 techniques during cryoballoon ablation for detection of PNP. A total of 133 patients undergoing cryoballoon ablation were monitored with both SVC pacing and fluoroscopy of spontaneous breathing during ablation of the right superior PV. PNP occurred in 27/133 patients (20.0%). Most patients (89%) had spontaneous recovery of phrenic nerve function at the end of the procedure or on the following day. Three patients were discharged with persistent PNP. All PNP were detected first by fluoroscopic observation of diaphragm movement during spontaneous breathing, while diaphragm could still be stimulated by SVC pacing. In patients with no recovery until discharge, PNP occurred at a significantly earlier time (86 ± 34 seconds vs. 296 ± 159 seconds, P < 0.001). No recovery occurred in 2/4 patients who were ablated with a 23 mm cryoballoon as opposed to 1/23 patients with a 28 mm cryoballoon (P = 0.049). Fluoroscopic assessment of diaphragm movement during spontaneous breathing is more sensitive for detection PNP as compared to SVC pacing. PNP as assessed by fluoroscopy is frequent (20.0%) and carries a high rate of recovery (89%) until discharge. Early onset of PNP and use of 23 mm cryoballoon are associated with PNP persisting beyond hospital discharge. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Christopher P; Clark, Aaron J; Kanter, Adam S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multi-institutional retrospective study. The goal of the current study is to quantify the incidence of 2 extremely rare complications of cervical spine surgery; hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerve palsies. A total of 8887 patients who underwent cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were included in the study from 21 institutions. No glossopharyngeal nerve injuries were reported. One hypoglossal nerve injury was reported after a C3-7 laminectomy (0.01%). This deficit resolved with conservative management. The rate by institution ranged from 0% to 1.28%. Although not directly injured by the surgical procedure, the transient nerve injury might have been related to patient positioning as has been described previously in the literature. Hypoglossal nerve injury during cervical spine surgery is an extremely rare complication. Institutional rates may vary. Care should be taken during posterior cervical surgery to avoid hyperflexion of the neck and endotracheal tube malposition.

  10. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-four injection injuries in 52 patients were caused by mandibular block analgesia affecting the lingual nerve (n=42) and/or the inferior alveolar nerve (n=12). All patients were examined with a standardized test of neurosensory functions. The perception of the following stimuli was assessed......: feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...... inferior alveolar nerve injury. All grades of loss of neurosensory and gustatory functions were found, and a range of persisting neurogenic malfunctions was reported. Subjective complaints and neurosensory function tests indicate that lingual nerve lesions are more incapacitating than inferior alveolar...

  11. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  12. MR imaging of the intraparotid facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Masaki

    1996-01-01

    Using a 1.5T MR imaging system, seven normal volunteers and 6 patients with parotid tumors were studied and their intraparotid facial nerves were directly imaged. The findings were evaluated by T1-weighted axial, sagittal and oblique images. The facial nerve appeared to be relatively hypointensive within the highsignal parotid parenchyma, and the main trunks of the facial nerves were observed directly in all the cases examined. Their main divisions were detected in all the volunteers and 5 of 6 patients were imaged obliquely. The facial nerves run in various fashions and so the oblique scan planes were determined individually to detect this running figure directly. To verify our observations, surgical findings of the facial nerve were compared with the MR images or results. (author)

  13. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; O'Meara, Caitlin C; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Poss, Kenneth D; Lee, Richard T

    2015-08-24

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte proliferation following injury. Specifically, pharmacological inhibition of cholinergic nerve function reduces cardiomyocyte proliferation in the injured hearts of both zebrafish and neonatal mice. Direct mechanical denervation impairs heart regeneration in neonatal mice, which was rescued by the administration of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) recombinant proteins. Transcriptional analysis of mechanically denervated hearts revealed a blunted inflammatory and immune response following injury. These findings demonstrate that nerve function is required for both zebrafish and mouse heart regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, I.J.; Smoker, W.R.; Kuta, A.J.; Felton, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  15. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(6.000: 491-500

  16. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(6: 491-500

  17. Ulnar nerve injury associated with trampoline injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclin, Melvin M; Novak, Christine B; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2004-08-01

    This study reports three cases of ulnar neuropathy after trampoline injuries in children. A chart review was performed on children who sustained an ulnar nerve injury from a trampoline accident. In all cases, surgical intervention was required. Injuries included upper-extremity fractures in two cases and an upper-extremity laceration in one case. All cases required surgical exploration with internal neurolysis and ulnar nerve transposition. Nerve grafts were used in two cases and an additional nerve transfer was used in one case. All patients had return of intrinsic hand function and sensation after surgery. Children should be followed for evolution of ulnar nerve neuropathy after upper-extremity injury with consideration for electrical studies and surgical exploration if there is no improvement after 3 months.

  18. Ulnar nerve sonography in leprosy neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Liu, Da-Yue; Lei, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a half-year history of right forearm sensory and motor dysfunction. Ultrasound imaging revealed definite thickening of the right ulnar nerve trunk and inner epineurium, along with heterogeneous hypoechogenicity and unclear nerve fiber bundle. Color Doppler exhibited a rich blood supply, which was clearly different from the normal ulnar nerve presentation with a scarce blood supply. The patient subsequently underwent needle aspiration of the right ulnar nerve, and histopathological examination confirmed that granulomatous nodules had formed with a large number of infiltrating lymphocytes and a plurality of epithelioid cells in the fibrous connective tissues, with visible atypical foam cells and proliferous vascularization, consistent with leprosy. Our report will familiarize readers with the characteristic sonographic features of the ulnar nerve in leprosy, particularly because of the decreasing incidence of leprosy in recent years.

  19. Superior intellectual ability in schizophrenia: neuropsychological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCabe, James H; Brébion, Gildas; Reichenberg, Abraham; Ganguly, Taposhri; McKenna, Peter J; Murray, Robin M; David, Anthony S

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that neurocognitive impairment is a core deficit in schizophrenia. However, it appears that some patients with schizophrenia have intelligence quotients (IQs) in the superior range. In this study, we sought out schizophrenia patients with an estimated premorbid Intelligence Quotient (IQ) of at least 115 and studied their neuropsychological profile. Thirty-four patients meeting diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV), with mean estimated premorbid IQ of 120, were recruited and divided into two subgroups, according to whether or not their IQ had declined by at least 10 points from their premorbid estimate. Their performance on an extensive neuropsychological battery was compared with that of 19 IQ-matched healthy controls and a group of 16 "typical" schizophrenia patients with estimated premorbid IQ Schizophrenia patients whose estimated premorbid and current IQ both lay in the superior range were statistically indistinguishable from IQ-matched healthy controls on all neurocognitive tests. However, their profile of relative performance in subtests was similar to that of typical schizophrenia patients. Patients with superior premorbid IQ and evidence of intellectual deterioration had intermediate scores. Our results confirm the existence of patients meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia who have markedly superior premorbid intellectual level and appear to be free of gross neuropsychological deficits. We discuss the implications of these findings for the primacy of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  20. The Picture Superiority Effect and Biological Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses learning behaviors where the "picture superiority effect" (PSE) seems to be most effective in biology education. Also considers research methodology and suggests a new research model which allows a more direct examination of the strategies learners use when matching up picture and text in efforts to "understand"…

  1. Mammographic varicosities indicative of a superior mediastinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, an abnormal calibre of the superficial veins can reflect not only underrying breast pathology, but a collateral venous return resulting from an upper mediastinal obstruction. A case mammographically demonstrating mammary varicosities resulting from a superior mediastinal syndrome is described. S. Afr. Med.

  2. COSEE Superior Creates Passion for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    COSEE was a transformative educational experience that has changed the way I teach. In July, I participated in the COSEE Lake Superior Shipboard and Shoreline Science program. I spent a week on the US EPA’s R/V Lake Guardian with 14 other teachers and a crew of sailors and scient...

  3. Perturbation resilience and superiorization of iterative algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Censor, Y; Davidi, R; Herman, G T

    2010-01-01

    Iterative algorithms aimed at solving some problems are discussed. For certain problems, such as finding a common point in the intersection of a finite number of convex sets, there often exist iterative algorithms that impose very little demand on computer resources. For other problems, such as finding that point in the intersection at which the value of a given function is optimal, algorithms tend to need more computer memory and longer execution time. A methodology is presented whose aim is to produce automatically for an iterative algorithm of the first kind a 'superiorized version' of it that retains its computational efficiency but nevertheless goes a long way toward solving an optimization problem. This is possible to do if the original algorithm is 'perturbation resilient', which is shown to be the case for various projection algorithms for solving the consistent convex feasibility problem. The superiorized versions of such algorithms use perturbations that steer the process in the direction of a superior feasible point, which is not necessarily optimal, with respect to the given function. After presenting these intuitive ideas in a precise mathematical form, they are illustrated in image reconstruction from projections for two different projection algorithms superiorized for the function whose value is the total variation of the image

  4. [Imaging anatomy of the cranial nerves using 3.0 Tesla MRI: a practical review for clinicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Barba, Oscar; Martínez-Martínez, Lidieth; Cazares-Arellano, José Luis; Martínez-López, Manuel; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the method of choice to evaluate the cranial nerves (CN). These nerves constitute a group of structures that have acquired during their phylogenetic development a high degree of specialization. There are 12 pairs of CN to which we use their specific name or number. The olfactory (I) and optic (II) pairs are not real nerves but tracts from the encephalon. The spinal nerve (XI) derives from superior cervical segment of the spine. The other 9 pairs of CN are related with the brain stem. Although the skull base foramina can be seen on computed tomography, the nerves themselves can only be visualized in detail on MR. That means, in order to see the different segments of nerves I to XII, the right sequences must be used. It is important to provide detailed clinical information to the radiologist so that a tailored MR study can be performed. In this review, the basic imaging anatomy of the 12 CN is discussed and illustrated briefly with an emphasis on more advanced extra-axial anatomy, illustrated with high-resolution MR images. Clinicians looking for complete anatomic descriptions and/or MR illustrations are advised to consult specialized textbooks considering it is not possible to describe all of the anatomy in one article. This manuscript is intended to be a practical review for clinicians.

  5. Liposomal bupivacaine versus interscalene nerve block for pain control after shoulder arthroplasty: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zeng; Chen, Zong; Ma, Chuangen

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative pain control after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) can be challenging. Liposomal bupivacaine and interscalene nerve block are 2 common pain control protocol for TSA patients. However, whether liposomal bupivacaine was superior than interscalene nerve block was unknown. This meta-analysis aimed to illustrate the efficacy liposomal bupivacaine versus interscalene nerve block for pain control in patients undergoing TSA. In May 2017, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google database. Data on patients prepared for TSA in studies that compared liposomal bupivacaine versus interscalene nerve block were retrieved. The endpoints were the visual analogue scale (VAS) at 4 hours, 8 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 2 weeks, total morphine consumption at 24 hours, and the length of hospital stay. Software of Stata 12.0 was used for pooling the final outcomes. Five clinical studies with 573 patients (liposomal bupivacaine group = 239, interscalene nerve block group = 334) were ultimately included in the meta-analysis. There was no significant difference between the VAS at 4 hours, 8 hours, and 2 weeks between liposomal bupivacaine group and interscalene nerve block group (P > .05). Compared with interscalene nerve block group, liposomal bupivacaine was associated with a reduction of VAS score at 12 hours, 24 hours by appropriately 3.31 points and 6.42 points respectively on a 100-point VAS. Furthermore, liposomal bupivacaine was associated with a significantly reduction of the length of hospital stay by appropriately by 0.16 days compared with interscalene nerve block group. Current meta-analysis indicates that compared with interscalene nerve block, liposomal bupivacaine had comparative effectiveness on reducing both pain scores and the length of hospital stay. However, studies with more patients and better-designed methods are needed to

  6. Retrobulbar diameter of optic nerve in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The ultrasound diagnostics of the optic nerve includes the analysis of the optic nerve disc (PNO and measuring of its retrobulbar diameter. With B-scan, by Schraeder's method, it is possible to measure very precisely the optic nerve, the pial diameter, the normal values for the pial diameter being 2.8-4.1 mm. In glaucoma, the disease that is most frequently associated with higher intraocular pressure, there comes the destruction of nerve fibres, which can be visualized as the excavation of the optic nerve disc. Objective. In this paper, we were interested in finding whether in glaucoma, and in what phase of the disease, the optic nerve starts growing thinner. Aware of many forms of this very complex disease, we were interested in knowing if the visualization of excavation on the optic nerve disc is related to diminishing of the pial diameter of the retrobulbar nerve part. Methods. There were treated the patients who had already had the diagnosis of glaucoma and the visualized excavation of the optic disc of various dimensions. Echographically, there was measured the thickness of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve and the finding compared in relation to the excavation of the optic disc. Results. In all eyes with glaucoma, a normal size of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve was measured, ranging from 3.01 to 3.91 mm with the median of 3.36 mm. Also, by testing the correlation between the thickness of the optic nerve and the excavation of the PNO, by Pearson test, we found that there was no correlation between these two parameters (r=0.109; p>0.05. Conclusion. In the patients with glaucoma, the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve is not thinner (it has normal values, even not in the cases with a totally excavated optic disc. There is no connection between the size of the PNO excavation and the thickness of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve.

  7. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of Spontaneous and Nerve-Evoked Calcium Transients in Intact Extraocular Muscles in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Hennig, Grant W.; Corrigan, Robert D.; Smith, Terence K.; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) have unique calcium handling properties, yet little is known about the dynamics of calcium events underlying ultrafast and tonic contractions in myofibers of intact EOMs. Superior oblique EOMs of juvenile chickens were dissected with their nerve attached, maintained in oxygenated Krebs buffer, and loaded with fluo-4. Spontaneous and nerve stimulation-evoked calcium transients were recorded and, following calcium imaging, some EOMs were double-labeled with rhodamine-conjugated alpha-bungarotoxin (rhBTX) to identify EOM myofiber types. EOMs showed two main types of spontaneous calcium transients, one slow type (calcium waves with 1/2max duration of 2–12 s, velocity of 25–50 μm/s) and two fast “flash-like” types (Type 1, 30–90 ms; Type 2, 90–150 ms 1/2max duration). Single pulse nerve stimulation evoked fast calcium transients identical to the fast (Type 1) calcium transients. Calcium waves were accompanied by a local myofiber contraction that followed the calcium transient wavefront. The magnitude of calcium-wave induced myofiber contraction far exceeded those of movement induced by nerve stimulation and associated fast calcium transients. Tetrodotoxin eliminated nerve-evoked transients, but not spontaneous transients. Alpha-bungarotoxin eliminated both spontaneous and nerve-evoked fast calcium transients, but not calcium waves, and caffeine increased wave activity. Calcium waves were observed in myofibers lacking spontaneous or evoked fast transients, suggestive of multiply-innervated myofibers, and this was confirmed by double-labeling with rhBTX. We propose that the abundant spontaneous calcium transients and calcium waves with localized contractions that do not depend on innervation may contribute to intrinsic generation of tonic functions of EOMs. PMID:22579493

  9. Longterm effects of cardiac mediastinal nerve cryoablation on neural inducibility of atrial fibrillation in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Glavinovic, Tamara; Armour, J Andrew; Cardinal, René; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Kus, Teresa

    2011-04-26

    In canines, excessive activation of select mediastinal nerve inputs to the intrinsic cardiac nervous system induces atrial fibrillation (AF). Since ablation of neural elements is proposed as an adjunct to circumferential pulmonary vein ablation for AF, we investigated the short and long-term effects of mediastinal nerve ablation on AF inducibility. Under general anesthesia, in 11 dogs several mediastinal nerve sites were identified on the superior vena cava that, when stimulated electrically during the atrial refractory period, reproducibly initiated AF. Cryoablation of one nerve site was then performed and inducibility retested early (1-2 months post Cryo; n=7) or late (4 months post Cryo; n=4). Four additional dogs that underwent a sham procedure were retested 1 to 2 months post-surgery. Stimulation induced AF at 91% of nerve sites tested in control versus 21% nerve sites early and 54% late post-ablation (both P<0.05). Fewer stimuli were required to induce AF in controls versus the Early Cryo group; this capacity returned to normal values in the Late Cryo group. AF episodes were longer in control versus the Early or Late Cryo groups. Heart rate responses to vagal or stellate ganglion stimulation, as well as to local nicotine infusion into the right coronary artery, were similar in all groups. In conclusion, focal damage to intrinsic cardiac neuronal inputs causes short-term stunning of neuronal inducibility of AF without major loss of overall adrenergic or cholinergic efferent neuronal control. That recovery of AF inducibility occurs rapidly post-surgery indicates the plasticity of intrathoracic neuronal elements to focal injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. MR imaging of spondylolytic spondylolisthesis: changes of intervertebral foramen and nerve root compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hyung [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate the factors affecting intervertebral foramen stenosis and nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. We investigated 120 intervertebral foramina of 60 patients with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis who had undergone lumbar MRI. A retrospective review of their MR images revealed the degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression. The relationship between disk height diminution following spondylolysis and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis was also evaluated. Forty eight of 60 patients showed a similar degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis, and in 12 patients the degree of stenosis was different. In 110 intervertebral foramina, stenosis of both the superior and inferior compartments of intervertebral foramina was demonstrated. In 37 of 120 cases (30.8%), stenosis was mild ; in 44 of 120 (36.7%) it was modcrate, and in 29 of 120 (24.2%) it was severe. Stenosis of the inferior compartment was demonstrated in ten of 120 intervertebral foramina (8.3%). Nerve root compression was caused by posterior bulging of the intervertebral disk (65/120), descent of the pedicle (51/120), an isthmic bony segment above the site of spondylolytic (44/120), a bony spur formed at a spondylolytic site (11/120), and fibrocartilaginous callus at a spondylolytic site (5/48). In all cases there was degenerative change of the intervertebral disk at the affected level. There was no relationship between degree of disk height diminution and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis (p > 0.05). The degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis are variable, and MRI demonstrates them precisely. There was no positive relationship between degree of nerve root compression at an intervertebral foramen and degree of spondylolysis and degeneration of an intervertebral foramen. The degree of nerve root compression is believed to be another criterion for describing

  11. Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Sreenath, Satyan B; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Farzal, Zainab; Zanation, Adam M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the extent of carotid artery exposure attained, including the identification of the external carotid branches and lower cranial nerves in five sequential external approaches to the parapharyngeal space, and to provide an anatomical algorithm. Anatomical study. Six latex-injected adult cadaver heads were dissected in five consecutive approaches: transcervical approach with submandibular gland removal, posterior extension of the transcervical approach, transcervical approach with parotidectomy, parotidectomy with lateral mandibulotomy, and parotidectomy with mandibulectomy. The degree of carotid artery exposure attained, external carotid branches, and lower cranial nerves visualized was documented. The transcervical approach exposed 1.5 cm (Standard Deviation (SD) 0.5) of internal carotid artery (ICA) and 1.25 cm (SD 0.25) of external carotid artery (ECA). The superior thyroid and facial arteries and cranial nerve XII and XI were identified. The posterior extension exposed 2.9 cm (SD 0.7) of ICA and 2.7 cm (SD 1.0) of ECA. Occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries were visualized. The transparotid approach exposed 4.0 cm (SD 1.1) of ICA and 3.98 cm (SD 1.8) of ECA. Lateral mandibulotomy exposed the internal maxillary artery, cranial nerve X, the sympathetic trunk, and 4.6 cm (SD 2.4) of ICA. Mandibulectomy allowed for complete ECA exposure, cranial nerve IX, lingual nerve, and 6.9 cm (SD 1.3) of ICA. Approaches for the parapharyngeal space must be based on anatomic and biological patient factors. This study provides a guide for the skull base surgeon for an extended approach based on the desired anatomic exposure. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:585-591, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. MR imaging of spondylolytic spondylolisthesis: changes of intervertebral foramen and nerve root compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the factors affecting intervertebral foramen stenosis and nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. We investigated 120 intervertebral foramina of 60 patients with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis who had undergone lumbar MRI. A retrospective review of their MR images revealed the degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression. The relationship between disk height diminution following spondylolysis and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis was also evaluated. Forty eight of 60 patients showed a similar degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis, and in 12 patients the degree of stenosis was different. In 110 intervertebral foramina, stenosis of both the superior and inferior compartments of intervertebral foramina was demonstrated. In 37 of 120 cases (30.8%), stenosis was mild ; in 44 of 120 (36.7%) it was modcrate, and in 29 of 120 (24.2%) it was severe. Stenosis of the inferior compartment was demonstrated in ten of 120 intervertebral foramina (8.3%). Nerve root compression was caused by posterior bulging of the intervertebral disk (65/120), descent of the pedicle (51/120), an isthmic bony segment above the site of spondylolytic (44/120), a bony spur formed at a spondylolytic site (11/120), and fibrocartilaginous callus at a spondylolytic site (5/48). In all cases there was degenerative change of the intervertebral disk at the affected level. There was no relationship between degree of disk height diminution and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis (p > 0.05). The degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis are variable, and MRI demonstrates them precisely. There was no positive relationship between degree of nerve root compression at an intervertebral foramen and degree of spondylolysis and degeneration of an intervertebral foramen. The degree of nerve root compression is believed to be another criterion for describing

  13. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI for evaluation of peripheral nerve neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Suzuki, Katsuji; Yamada, Mitsuko; Kojima, Motohiro.

    1995-01-01

    We carried out enhanced MRI for the carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve palsy that is entrapment neuropathy. The affected nerve was enhanced in entrapment point. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 41 of 52 cases (79%). Cubital tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 4 of 5 cases (80%). Tarsal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 1 of 1 case. Anterior interosseous nerve palsy: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 3 of 4 cases (75%). The affected nerve was strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA, indicating the blood-nerve barrier in the affected nerve to be broken and intraneural edema to be produced, e.i., the ability of Gd-DTPA to selectively contrast-enhance a pathologic focus within the peripheral nerve is perhaps its most important clinical applications. (author)

  14. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI for evaluation of peripheral nerve neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsuhiko [Aikoh Orthopaedic Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kobayashi, Shigeru; Suzuki, Katsuji; Yamada, Mitsuko; Kojima, Motohiro

    1995-11-01

    We carried out enhanced MRI for the carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve palsy that is entrapment neuropathy. The affected nerve was enhanced in entrapment point. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 41 of 52 cases (79%). Cubital tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 4 of 5 cases (80%). Tarsal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 1 of 1 case. Anterior interosseous nerve palsy: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 3 of 4 cases (75%). The affected nerve was strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA, indicating the blood-nerve barrier in the affected nerve to be broken and intraneural edema to be produced, e.i., the ability of Gd-DTPA to selectively contrast-enhance a pathologic focus within the peripheral nerve is perhaps its most important clinical applications. (author).

  15. Transfer of obturator nerve for femoral nerve injury: an experiment study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Depeng; Zhou, Jun; Lin, Yaofa; Xie, Zheng; Chen, Huihao; Yu, Ronghua; Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin

    2018-07-01

    Quadriceps palsy is mainly caused by proximal lesions in the femoral nerve. The obturator nerve has been previously used to repair the femoral nerve, although only a few reports have described the procedure, and the outcomes have varied. In the present study, we aimed to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness of this treatment in a rodent model using the randomized control method. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups: the experimental group, wherein rats underwent femoral neurectomy and obturator nerve transfer to the femoral nerve motor branch; and the control group, wherein rats underwent femoral neurectomy without nerve transfer. Functional outcomes were measured using the BBB score, muscle mass, and histological assessment. At 12 and 16 weeks postoperatively, the rats in the experimental group exhibited recovery to a stronger stretch force of the knee and higher BBB score, as compared to the control group (p nerve with myelinated and unmyelinated fibers was observed in the experimental group. No significant differences were observed between groups at 8 weeks postoperatively (p > 0.05). Obturator nerve transfer for repairing femoral nerve injury was feasible and effective in a rat model, and can hence be considered as an option for the treatment of femoral nerve injury.

  16. Ultrasound-guided approach for axillary brachial plexus, femoral nerve, and sciatic nerve blocks in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoy, Luis; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J; Gleed, Robin D; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Raw, Robert M; Santare, Carrie L; Jay, Ariane R; Wang, Annie L

    2010-03-01

    To describe an ultrasound-guided technique and the anatomical basis for three clinically useful nerve blocks in dogs. Prospective experimental trial. Four hound-cross dogs aged 2 +/- 0 years (mean +/- SD) weighing 30 +/- 5 kg and four Beagles aged 2 +/- 0 years and weighing 8.5 +/- 0.5 kg. Axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic combined ultrasound/electrolocation-guided nerve blocks were performed sequentially and bilaterally using a lidocaine solution mixed with methylene blue. Sciatic nerve blocks were not performed in the hounds. After the blocks, the dogs were euthanatized and each relevant site dissected. Axillary brachial plexus block Landmark blood vessels and the roots of the brachial plexus were identified by ultrasound in all eight dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the four ventral nerve roots (C6, C7, C8, and T1) and the axillary vessels. Three roots (C7, C8, and T1) were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Femoral nerve block Landmark blood vessels (femoral artery and femoral vein), the femoral and saphenous nerves and the medial portion of the rectus femoris muscle were identified by ultrasound in all dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the femoral vessels, femoral nerve, and the rectus femoris muscle. The femoral nerves were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Sciatic nerve block. Ultrasound landmarks (semimembranosus muscle, the fascia of the biceps femoris muscle and the sciatic nerve) could be identified in all of the dogs. In the four Beagles, anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the biceps femoris muscle, the semimembranosus muscle, and the sciatic nerve. In the Beagles, all but one of the sciatic nerves were stained adequately. Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is an accurate method for depositing local anesthetic for axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic nerve blocks.

  17. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. METHODS: This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. RESULTS: The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  18. The Ultrasonographic Findings of Bifid Median Nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Noh Hyuck; Joh, Joon Hee; Lee, Sung Moon

    2009-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of bifid median nerve and its clinical significance. We retrospectively reviewed five cases (three men and two women, mean age: 54 years) of incidentally found bifid median nerve from 264 cases of clinically suspected carpal-tunnel syndrome that were seen at our hospital during last 6 years. Doppler sonography was performed in all five cases and MR angiography was done in one case for detecting a persistent median artery. The difference (ΔCSA) between the sum of the cross-sectional areas of the bifid median nerve at the pisiform level (CSA2) and the cross-sectional area proximal to the bifurcation(CSA1) was calculated. The incidence of a bifid median nerve was 1.9%. All the patients presented with a tingling sensation on a hand and two patients had nocturnal pain. All the cases showed bifurcation of the nerve bundle proximal to the carpal tunnel. The margins appeared relatively smooth and each bundle showed a characteristic fascicular pattern. A persistent median artery was noted between the bundles in four cases. ΔCSA was more than 2 mm 2 in four cases. Bifid median nerve with a persistent median artery is a relatively rare normal variance and these are very important findings before performing surgical intervention to avoid potential nerve injury and massive bleeding. We highly suggest that radiologists should understand the anatomical characteristics of this anomaly and make efforts to detect it

  19. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, P.S.; Bataini, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with 35 cranial nerve palsies were seen at the Fondation Curie during follow-up after radical radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. The twelfth nerve was involved in 19 cases, the tenth in nine, and the eleventh in five; the fifth and second nerves were involved once each and in the same patient. The twelfth nerve was involved alone in 16 patients and the tenth nerve alone in three, with multiple nerves involved in the remaining six patients. The palsy was noted from 12 to 145 months after diagnosis of the tumor. The latency period could be correlated with dose so that the least square fit equation representing NSD vs delay is NSD = 2598--Delay (in months) x 4.6, with a correlation coefficient of -0.58. The distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation-induced nerve palsy is critical. It can often be inferred from the latency period but must be confirmed by observation over a period of time

  20. Quantitative assessment of integrated phrenic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2016-06-01

    Integrated electrical activity in the phrenic nerve is commonly used to assess within-animal changes in phrenic motor output. Because of concerns regarding the consistency of nerve recordings, activity is most often expressed as a percent change from baseline values. However, absolute values of nerve activity are necessary to assess the impact of neural injury or disease on phrenic motor output. To date, no systematic evaluations of the repeatability/reliability have been made among animals when phrenic recordings are performed by an experienced investigator using standardized methods. We performed a meta-analysis of studies reporting integrated phrenic nerve activity in many rat groups by the same experienced investigator; comparisons were made during baseline and maximal chemoreceptor stimulation in 14 wild-type Harlan and 14 Taconic Sprague Dawley groups, and in 3 pre-symptomatic and 11 end-stage SOD1(G93A) Taconic rat groups (an ALS model). Meta-analysis results indicate: (1) consistent measurements of integrated phrenic activity in each sub-strain of wild-type rats; (2) with bilateral nerve recordings, left-to-right integrated phrenic activity ratios are ∼1.0; and (3) consistently reduced activity in end-stage SOD1(G93A) rats. Thus, with appropriate precautions, integrated phrenic nerve activity enables robust, quantitative comparisons among nerves or experimental groups, including differences caused by neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.