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Sample records for superheated drops progress

  1. Superheated drop neutron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Roy, B; Roy, S C; Das, Mala

    2000-01-01

    Superheated drops are known to detect neutrons through the nucleation caused by the recoil nuclei produced by the interactions of neutrons with the atoms constituting the superheated liquid molecule. A novel method of finding the neutron energy from the temperature dependence response of SDD has been developed. From the equivalence between the dependence of threshold energy for nucleation on temperature of SDD and the dependence of dE/dx of the recoil ions with the energy of the neutron, a new method of finding the neutron energy spectrum of a polychromatic as well as monochromatic neutron source has been developed.

  2. Standardisation of superheated drop and bubble detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhavere, F.; D' Errico, F

    2002-07-01

    This study presents an analysis of the commercially available superheated drop detectors and bubble detectors, performed in substantial accordance with the guidelines developed by the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO). The analysis was performed in terms of linearity, reproducibility, ageing, minimum detection thresholds, energy and angular dependence of the response and the influence of various climatic conditions. (author)

  3. Advances in superheated drop (bubble) detector techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d`Errico, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari; Alberts, W.G.; Matzke, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    State-of-the-art neutron dosemeters based on superheated drop (bubble) detectors are described. These are either active systems for area monitoring, which rely on the acoustical recording of drop vaporisations, or passive pen size ones for personal dosimetry, based on optical bubble counting. The technological solutions developed for the construction of robust devices for health physics applications are described with special emphasis on methods adopted to reduce mechanical shock and temperature sensitivity of the detectors. Finally, a review is given of some current research activities. In particular, a new approach to neutron spectrometry is presented which relies on the thermal effects for the definition of the response matrix of the system. (author).

  4. Research progress of the Superheated Steam Drying Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yongchun; Li, Jie; Li, Xuanyou; Zhao, Gaiju; Wu, Maogang

    2012-01-01

    The superheated steam drying technology has lots of advantages such as safe, energy-saving, pollution-free and so on, so it causes more and more extensive concern. The superheated steam drying technology is introduced and its merits and faults are analyzed. The theoretical research progress of the superheated steam drying is summarized and the recent application of the materials including the food, wood, paper, sludge and lignite is stated. In brief, the superheated steam drying technol...

  5. Applicability of superheated drop (bubble) detectors to reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d`Errico, F.; Curzio, G. [Univ. degli Studi di Pisa (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari; Alberts, W.G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Apfel, R.E.; Guldbakke, S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The characteristics of superheated drop (bubble) detectors (SDD`s) have been reviewed with respect to the possible application of these devices in reactor dosimetry. In particular, their ability to measure neutrons in the presence of a high noise level, elevated temperatures and intense {gamma} background has been investigated. Based on these studies, the use of SDD`s is proposed for the monitoring and analysis of neutron emission from spent fuel assemblies. Finally, the possibility to employ these detectors in radiation protection dosimetry around power plants is discussed.

  6. Thermal activation of superheated lipid-coated perfluorocarbon drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, Paul A; Thomas, Alec N; Borden, Mark A

    2015-04-28

    This study explored the thermal conditions necessary for the vaporization of superheated perfluorocarbon nanodrops. Droplets C3F8 and C4F10 coated with a homologous series of saturated diacylphosphatidylcholines were formed by condensation of 4 μm diameter microbubbles. These drops were stable at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, but they vaporized back into microbubbles at higher temperatures. The vaporization transition was measured as a function of temperature by laser light extinction. We found that C3F8 and C4F10 drops experienced 90% vaporization at 40 and 75 °C, respectively, near the theoretical superheat limits (80-90% of the critical temperature). We therefore conclude that the metastabilty of these phase-change agents arises not from the droplet Laplace pressure altering the boiling point, as previously reported, but from the metastability of the pure superheated fluid to homogeneous nucleation. The rate of C4F10 drop vaporization was quantified at temperatures ranging from 55 to 75 °C, and an apparent activation energy barrier was calculated from an Arrhenius plot. Interestingly, the activation energy increased linearly with acyl chain length from C14 to C20, indicating that lipid interchain cohesion plays an important role in suppressing the vaporization rate. The vaporized drops (microbubbles) were found to be unstable to dissolution at high temperatures, particularly for C14 and C16. However, proper choice of the fluorocarbon and lipid species provided a nanoemulsion that could undergo at least ten reversible condensation/vaporization cycles. The vaporization properties presented in this study may facilitate the engineering of tunable phase-shift particles for diagnostic imaging, targeted drug delivery, tissue ablation, and other applications.

  7. Neutron-gamma discrimination by pulse analysis with superheated drop detector

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Mala; Saha, S; Bhattacharya, S; Bhattacharjee, P

    2010-01-01

    Superheated drop detector (SDD) consisting of drops of superheated liquid of halocarbon is irradiated to neutrons and gamma-rays from 252Cf fission neutron source and 137Cs gamma source separately. The analysis of pulse height of the signals in the neutron and gamma-ray sensitive temperature provides strong information on the identification of neutron and gamma-ray induced events.

  8. Fundamental Properties of Superheated Drop (Bubble) Detectors (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F

    1999-07-01

    Superheated drop detectors and bubble damage detectors find increasing applications in ionising radiation dosimetry and spectrometry. These emulsions of overexpanded halocarbon droplets can be manufactured to respond selectively to densely ionising particles, such as neutron recoils, or to all directly and indirectly ionising radiations. It is shown here that the fundamental properties of the detectors can be predicted by semi-empirical expressions based on the thermal spike theory. A new non-dimensional quantity, defined as 'reduced superheat', is introduced and shown to permit a unified parametrisation of the properties of superheated emulsions. In particular, utilising the reduced superheat concept, it is possible to predict the neutron detection thresholds of the emulsions, their sensitisation to thermal neutrons and to photons, and their ultimate thermodynamic instability. This unified characterisation finds immediate application in the selection of the halocarbons and of the operating conditions most suitable for specific radiation detection problems. Finally, some data are presented which question a direct proportionality between the particle track length contributing to the vaporisation and a critical bubble diameter derived from spontaneous nucleation models. An effective track length based on experimental observations is introduced to derive the minimum track-averaged LET for bubble nucleation expressed as a function of reduced superheat. (author)

  9. Neutron ambient dosimetry with superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d`Errico, F.; Noccioni, P. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari; Alberts, W.G.; Dietz, E.; Siebert, B.R.L. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Gualdrini, G. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Kurkdjian, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    A prototype neutron area monitor was developed which improves the performance of superheated drop detectors based on halocarbon-12. The detectors are thermally controlled: this removes external temperature effects while ensuring a dose equivalent response optimised with respect to its energy dependence. The system was first characterised through calibrations with monoenergetic neutron beams. In the intermediate energy range, where experimental investigations were not possible, Monte Carlo response calculations were carried out. The prototype was then extensively tested by means of simulated and in-field irradiations with broad neutron spectra. All these tests indicated a remarkably constant dose equivalent response regardless of the neutron energy distributions. The current device is a fairly delicate system which can be operated reliably when environmental conditions are not extreme. Nevertheless, when it was possible to employ it, this monitor demonstrated an accuracy far superior to that of conventional meters used in routine surveillance. (author).

  10. Electronic neutron personal dosimetry with superheated drop detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Apfel, R.E.; Curzio, G.; Nath, R

    2001-07-01

    The prototype of an electronic personal neutron dosemeter based on superheated drop detectors is presented. This battery operated device comprises a neutron sensor, bubble-counting electronics and a temperature controller ensuring an optimal dose equivalent response. The neutron sensor is a 12 ml detector vial containing an emulsion of about 50,000 halocarbon-12 droplets of 100 {mu}m diameter. The temperature controller is a low-power, solid-state device stabilising the emulsion at 31.5 deg. C by means of an etched foil heater. The microprocessor-controlled counting electronics relies on a double piezo-electric transducer configuration to record bubble formation acoustically via a comparative pulse-shape analysis of ambient noise and detector signals. The performance of the dosemeter was analysed in terms of the requirements presently developed for neutron personal dosemeters. The detection threshold is about 1 {mu}Sv, while the personal dose equivalent response to neutrons in the thermal to 62 MeV range falls within a factor 1.6 of 13 bubbles per {mu}Sv. (author)

  11. High-energy neutron dosimetry with superheated drop detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Agosteo, S.; Sannikov, A.V.; Silari, M

    2002-07-01

    A systematic analysis of the response of dichlorodifluoromethane superheated drop detectors was performed in the 46-133 MeV energy range. Experiments with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were performed at the Universite Catholique de Leuvain-la-Neuve, Belgium and the Svedberg Laboratory, Sweden, while tests in a broad field were performed at CERN. To determine the response of the detectors to the high-energy beams, the spectra of incident neutrons were folded over functions modelled after the cross sections for the production of heavy ions from the detector elements. The cross sections for fluorine and chlorine were produced in this work by means of the Monte Carlo high-energy transport code HADRON based on the cascade exciton model of nuclear interactions. The new response data permit the interpretation of measurements at high-energy accelerators and on high-altitude commercial flights, where a 30-50% under-response had been consistently recorded with respect to neutron dose equivalent. The introduction of a 1 cm lead shell around the detectors effectively compensates most of the response defect. (author)

  12. Active neutron spectrometry with superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d`Errico, F.; Curzio, G. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Alberts, W.G.; Guldbakke, S.; Kluge, H.; Matzke, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    A new approach to neutron spectrometry has been developed in a joint project by DCMN Pisa and PTB Braunschweig. The system relies on the use of superheated drop (bubble) detectors and the thermodynamic control of their detection thresholds. This is the result of investigations into the physics of these detectors combined with extensive experimental work on their response to neutrons. These studies indicate that the higher the degree of superheat of a detector, the lower the minimum energy that secondary charged particles, and therefore primary neutrons, must impart to the droplets in order to nucleate their evaporation. Therefore, by controlling the temperature of the detectors, accurately defined detection thresholds, virtually any desired one, can be generated in the 0.01-10 MeV neutron energy range. An active prototype instrument has been developed: bubbles are counted acoustically and temperature regulation is achieved by means of thin heating strips. Tests with reference neutron spectra show that the system is suitable for few-channel spectrometry and may be useful for radiation protection dosimetry. Appropriate unfolding algorithms are currently investigated, to be ultimately implemented in an automatic device. (author).

  13. Nucleation efficiency of R134a as a sensitive liquid for superheated drop emulsion detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mala Das; R Sarkar; P K Mondal; S Saha; B K Chatterjee; S C Roy

    2010-10-01

    Superheated emulsion detector is known to detect neutrons, γ-rays and other charged particles. The present work includes the study of nucleation efficiency of super-heated drops of one of the CFC-free liquids, R134a (C2H2F4), to fast neutrons, its response to -rays from 241Am and 137Cs and compare its nucleation efficiency with that of R12. The observation indicates that because of the presence of hydrogen, the nucleation efficiency is less in R134a than in R12 in the present neutron energy range of considera-tion. R134a is one of the most environment-friendly, commercially available liquid that is suitable for superheated drop detector, specially in neutron dosimetry and one needs to investigate it in detail.

  14. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector by the pressure sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MALA DAS; NILANJAN BISWAS

    2017-01-01

    Superheated drop detector consisting of drops of superheated liquid suspended in polymer or gel matrix is of great demand, mainly because of its insensitivity to β-particles and γ -rays and also because of the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released duringthe nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by using the pressure sensor. The associated circuits for the measurement are described in this article. The detection of events is verified by measuring the events with the acoustic sensor. The measurement was done using drops of various sizes to study the effect of the size of the drop on the pressure recovery time. Probability of detection of events has increased for larger size of the superheated drops and lesser volume of air in contact with the gel matrix. The exponential decay fitting to the pressure sensor signals shows the dead time for pressure recovery of such a drop detector to be a few microseconds.

  15. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector by the pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mala; Biswas, Nilanjan

    2017-01-01

    Superheated drop detector consisting of drops of superheated liquid suspended in polymer or gel matrix is of great demand, mainly because of its insensitivity to ß-particles and ?-rays and also because of the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released during the nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by using the pressure sensor. The associated circuits for the measurement are described in this article. The detection of events is verified by measuring the events with the acoustic sensor. The measurement was done using drops of various sizes to study the effect of the size of the drop on the pressure recovery time. Probability of detection of events has increased for larger size of the superheated drops and lesser volume of air in contact with the gel matrix. The exponential decay fitting to the pressure sensor signals shows the dead time for pressure recovery of such a drop detector to be a few microseconds.

  16. Neutron spectrometry in mixed fields: superheated drop (bubble) detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Errico, F; Matzke, M

    2003-01-01

    The BINS neutron threshold spectrometer permits the analysis of the main features of a neutron field for radiation protection purposes. The system offers a virtually complete photon discrimination and nested threshold responses to neutrons, which allow the use of very effective 'few-channel' unfolding procedures. To date, the practical operating energy range of a BINS is 0.1-10 MeV, over which a resolving power of 20-30% can be expected when the deconvolution is performed without explicit pre-information. Spectrum unfolding results in relatively high uncertainties on the differential fluence distributions, but due to negative correlations in adjacent energy groups the uncertainties on integral quantities such as dose equivalent are small and of the order of 5% to 10%, similar to the results of other active spectrometers. In comparison with most radiation detectors, the BINS is an extremely slow system due to the intrinsic duration of a bubble pulse and to the time associated with pulse analysis. For example, the maximum sustainable fluence rate of 1 MeV neutrons is about 10(4) cm(-2) s(-1), which is low for many neutron physics experiments. However, this rate corresponds to an ambient dose equivalent rate of about 1 mSv h(-1), making the active device adequate for radiation protection applications in the workplaces described in Section 1. There are ample margins for improvement of the spectrometer. In particular, in the low-energy region a thermal-epithermal neutron group may be added by using chlorine-bearing emulsions stabilised at suitable temperatures. In fact, the latest version of the system achieves this goal by using a single superheated emulsion of dichlorotetrafluoroethane (R-114) operated at temperatures up to 55 degrees C. This extends the range of the spectrometer and at the same time removes the undue enhancement of the UNFANA output in the low energy region. Above 10 MeV, the resolution can be improved by adding more thresholds, e.g. by starting from

  17. A new method for neutron depth dosimetry with the superheated drop detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Apfel, R.E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Chemical composition and energy response of the Superheated Drop Detector (SDD) suggested to us a new technique for the direct measurement of dose equivalent depth distributions in tissue-equivalent phantoms, independently of impinging neutron spectra and energy degradation with depth. The SDD performance has been tested against the depth-dose curves published in NCRP Report 38. The experimental results, in agreement with the expected values, confirm the applicability of this method. (author).

  18. Development of device for trapping a superheated liquid drop and life-time measurements of the drop by radiation-induced evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Teruko; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Homma, Akira; Narita, Masakuni [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-08-01

    In this study a detection sensitivity evaluation was made by measuring the life time of a single liquid drop. A device trapping a superheated drop was developed, where a single drop of test liquid was trapped at a specified position and then irradiated. Therefore, the volume of the drop can be measured before the irradiation. Wakeshima originally developed the device, in which a test liquid drop was injected and superheated in a supporting liquid, to measure the limit of superheat of the liquid. Apfel modified Wakeshima's device by applying an acoustic field to be able to trap and decompress a superheated liquid drop. The device in the present study is similar to Apfel's. But the inlet part is cooled because the boiling point of the test liquid is lower than room temperature. In this device the superheated drop of trans-2-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, boiling point=0.8degC) was exposed to Am-Be neutrons and {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and its life time was measured. (author)

  19. A neutron spectrometer based on temperature variations in superheated drop compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Apfel, R E

    2002-01-01

    The response of superheated drop detectors (SDDs) to neutron radiation varies in a self-consistent manner with variations in temperature and pressure, making such compositions suitable for neutron spectrometry. The advantage of this approach is that the response functions of candidate materials versus energy as the temperature or pressure is varied are nested and have distinct thresholds, with no thermal neutron response. These characteristics permit unfolding without the uncertainties associated with other spectrometry techniques, where multiple solutions are possible, thus requiring an initial guess of the spectrum. A spectrometer was developed based on the well-established technology for acoustic sensing of bubble events interfaced with a proportional-integral-derivative temperature controller. The active monitor for neutrons, called REMbrandt sup T sup M , was used as the platform for controlling temperature on a SDD probe and for data acquisition, thereby automating the process of measuring the neutron e...

  20. Superheated-drop (bubble) neutron detectors and their compliance with ICRP-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Errico, F. (Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Alberts, W.G. (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany))

    1994-01-01

    Several devices based on superheated-drop detector technology have become available almost simultaneously with the release of new ICRP and ICRU publications. Given this circumstance, a study of the characteristics of the system has been undertaken by the authors considering the revised recommendations for neutron dosimetry. The dose equivalent response in free air has been examined experimentally as a function of energy from thermal up to 70 MeV neutrons, and its dependence on the angle of incidence has been tested on a phantom at 0.57 MeV. Some results are discussed with respect to lower limit of detection, temperature sensitivity, [gamma] discrimination, batch-to-batch uniformity, and reproducibility. Some conclusions in terms of advantages, limitations and possible applications of the system are presented. (author).

  1. A neutron spectrometer based on temperature variations in superheated drop compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfel, Robert E. E-mail: robert.apfel@yale.edu; D' Errico, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    The response of superheated drop detectors (SDDs) to neutron radiation varies in a self-consistent manner with variations in temperature and pressure, making such compositions suitable for neutron spectrometry. The advantage of this approach is that the response functions of candidate materials versus energy as the temperature or pressure is varied are nested and have distinct thresholds, with no thermal neutron response. These characteristics permit unfolding without the uncertainties associated with other spectrometry techniques, where multiple solutions are possible, thus requiring an initial guess of the spectrum. A spectrometer was developed based on the well-established technology for acoustic sensing of bubble events interfaced with a proportional-integral-derivative temperature controller. The active monitor for neutrons, called REMbrandt{sup TM}, was used as the platform for controlling temperature on a SDD probe and for data acquisition, thereby automating the process of measuring the neutron energy spectrum. The new instrument, called REM-SPEC{sup TM}, implements and automates the original BINS approach: it adjusts the temperature of the SDD vial in increasing steps and measures the bubble event rate at each step. By using two distinct SDD materials with overlapping responses, the 0.1-20 MeV range of energies relevant to practical spectrometry is readily covered. Initial experiments with an Am-Be source validate the operational protocols of this device.

  2. Monte Carlo evaluation of the neutron detection efficiency of a superheated drop detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualdrini, G.F. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; D`Errico, F.; Noccioni, P. [Pisa, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari

    1997-03-01

    Neuron dosimetry has recently gained renewed attention, following concerns on the exposure of crew members on board aircraft, and of workers around the increasing number of high energy accelerators for medical and research purpose. At the same time the new operational qualities for radiation dosimetry introduced by ICRU and the ICRP, aiming at a unified metrological system applicable to all types of radiation exposure, involved the need to update current devices in order to meet new requirements. Superheated Drop (Bubble) Detectors (SDD) offer an alternative approach to neutron radiation protection dosimetry. The SDDs are currently studied within a large collaborative effort involving Yale University. New Haven CT, Pisa (IT) University, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig D, and ENEA (Italian National Agency for new Technologies Energy and the Environment) Centre of Bologna. The detectors were characterised through calibrations with monoenergetic neutron beams and where experimental investigations were inadequate or impossible, such as in the intermediate energy range , parametric Monte Carlo calculations of the response were carried out. This report describes the general characteristic of the SDDs along with the Monte Carlo computations of the energy response and a comparison with the experimental results.

  3. Monte Carlo evaluation of the neutron detection efficiency of a superheated drop detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualdrini, G. F. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; D`Errico, F.; Noccioni, P. [Pisa, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari

    1997-06-01

    Neutron dosimetry has recently gained renewed attention, following concerns on the exposure of crew members on board aircraft, and of workers around the increasing number of high energy accelerators for medical and research purposes. At the same time the new operational quantities for radiation dosimetry introduced by ICRU and the ICRP, aiming at a unified metrological system applicable to all types of radiation exposure, involved the need to update current devices in order to meet new requirements. Superheated Drop (Bubble) Detectors (SDD) offer an alternative approach to neutron radiation protection dosimetry. The SDDs are currently studied within a large collaborative effort involving Yale University, New Haven CT, the `Universita` degli Studi di Pisa`, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig D. and ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment)-C.R., Bologna. The detectors were characterised through calibrations with monoenergetic neutron beams and where experimental investigations were inadequate or impossible, such as in the intermediate energy range, parametric Monte Carlo calculations of the response were carried out. This report describes the general characteristics of the SDDs along with the Monte Carlo computations of the energy response and a comparison with the experimental results.

  4. A Study on the Violent Interactions of an Immiscible Drop impacting on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, Mohamad

    2014-05-01

    ABSTRACT A Study on the Violent Interactions of an Immiscible Drop Impacting on a Superheated Pool Mohamad Alchalabi The interactions between two immiscible liquids of different temperatures can be violent to the extent of causing harm to individuals, or damage to equipment, especially when used in the industry. Only a few studies investigated these interactions but they could not produce the violent interactions often reported by the industry, and therefore their results did not help much to develop clear understanding of the dynamics of these interactions. In this work, a high speed imaging system operated at 100,000 frames per second was utilized to record the events and phenomena taking place upon the impact of Perfluorohexane droplet at room temperature onto a hot soybean oil pool at temperatures as high as 300 ºC. The impact velocity was varied by varying the height of the droplet before it pinches off under its own weight. The recorded events identified the occurrence of vortex ring vapor explosions, weak and strong nucleate boiling, and film boiling. An impact velocity vs. oil temperature diagram identifying the regions in which each of these phenomena takes place was generated, and the dynamics driving their occurrences were explored. The vortex ring vapor explosions were found to become less violent as the impact velocity was increased, which was attributed to the existence of a smaller amount of liquid Perfluorohexane within the rings at high speed impacts, which does evaporate but does not expand violently. Weak nucleate boiling occurred at very high impact velocities relatively. As the temperature is increased, however, they start 5 turning into strong nucleate boiling. The strong nucleate boiling usually starts right upon impact, and when the temperature of the oil at one impact velocity is increased, it starts turning into film boiling, in which the liquid Perfluorohexane is covered by a vapor layer of its own vapor.

  5. Superheated emulsions: neutronics and thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d`Errico, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari]|[Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine; Curzio, G. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari; Nath, R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine; Apfel, R.E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Dietz, E.; Guldbakke, S.; Siebert, B.R.L. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Egger, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Gualdrini, G.F. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    The results of some recent theoretical and experimental investigations on the physics of superheated emulsions are presented. Computational fluid thermodynamics allowed for a detailed description of the temporal and spatial history of the energy deposition process by a charged particle in a superheated liquid. Despite the assumptions it is based upon, this model gives information in agreement with experimental data on bubble nucleation. The experimental findings concern the role of interfacial reactions between drops and emulsifier, the existence of inhibition temperatures for the detector`s response, and the progressive sensitisation to protons. (author).

  6. A position-sensitive neutron spectrometer/dosimeter based on pressurized superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Holland, S. K.; Lamba, M.; Patz, S.; Rivard, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    A position-sensitive, superheated emulsion chamber (SEC) is introduced for three-dimensional (3D) spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons. The detector is based on a fine suspension of octafluorocyclobutane droplets emulsified in a tissue-equivalent gel. This gel is highly viscous and immobilizes the bubbles at the location of their formation. At an operating temperature of 35°C, the droplets are moderately superheated and their evaporation is nucleated by the densely ionizing products of fast neutron interactions, with no response to sparsely ionizing radiations. Thus, when a neutron emitter such as a 252Cf brachytherapy source is inserted in the SEC, a bubble distribution forms around the source and makes the neutron field visible. The SEC is operated at different externally applied pressures that correspond to different response thresholds. These responses form a virtually orthogonal matrix which is suitable for spectrometry and allows the use of effective few channel unfolding procedures, yielding the spatial dependence of absorbed dose and neutron energy spectra in-tissue. Bubble spatial distributions in the chamber can be determined through optical tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 3D, steady-state MRI method has proven particularly effective for this purpose. After the imaging, the SEC can be pressurized above the halocarbon vapor tension in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. Within a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the bubble counting statistics.

  7. A position-sensitive neutron spectrometer/dosimeter based on pressurized superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F. E-mail: francesco.derrico@yale.edu; Nath, R.; Holland, S.K.; Lamba, M.; Patz, S.; Rivard, M.J

    2002-01-01

    A position-sensitive, superheated emulsion chamber (SEC) is introduced for three-dimensional (3D) spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons. The detector is based on a fine suspension of octafluorocyclobutane droplets emulsified in a tissue-equivalent gel. This gel is highly viscous and immobilizes the bubbles at the location of their formation. At an operating temperature of 35 deg.C, the droplets are moderately superheated and their evaporation is nucleated by the densely ionizing products of fast neutron interactions, with no response to sparsely ionizing radiations. Thus, when a neutron emitter such as a {sup 252}Cf brachytherapy source is inserted in the SEC, a bubble distribution forms around the source and makes the neutron field visible. The SEC is operated at different externally applied pressures that correspond to different response thresholds. These responses form a virtually orthogonal matrix which is suitable for spectrometry and allows the use of effective few channel unfolding procedures, yielding the spatial dependence of absorbed dose and neutron energy spectra in-tissue. Bubble spatial distributions in the chamber can be determined through optical tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 3D, steady-state MRI method has proven particularly effective for this purpose. After the imaging, the SEC can be pressurized above the halocarbon vapor tension in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. Within a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the bubble counting statistics.

  8. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.

    2017-04-18

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  9. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D' Errico, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bedogni, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2013-07-18

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  10. Drop impact on superheated surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, Tuan; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    At impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid's boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surfaces (``contact boiling''), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back (``gentle film boiling''), or both forms the Leidenfrost layer and ejects tiny droplets upward (``spraying film boiling''). We experimentally determine conditions under which impact behaviors in each regime can be realized. We show that the dimensionless maximum spreading $\\gamma$ of impacting droplets on the heated surfaces in both gentle and spraying film boiling regimes shows a universal scaling with the Weber number $\\We$ ($\\gamma\\sim\\We^{2/5}$) -- regardless of surface temperature and of liquid properties -- which is much steeper than for the impact on non-heated (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) surfaces ($\\gamma\\sim\\We^{1/4}$). We also intereferometrically measure the vapor thickness under the droplet.

  11. Drop Impact on Superheated Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, A.T.; Staat, H.J.J.; Prosperetti, A.; Sun, C.; Lohse, D.

    2012-01-01

    At the impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid’s boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surface (“contact boiling”), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back (“gentle film

  12. Drop impact on superheated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan; Staat, Hendrik J J; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-20

    At the impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid's boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surface ("contact boiling"), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back ("gentle film boiling"), or both forms the Leidenfrost layer and ejects tiny droplets upward ("spraying film boiling"). We experimentally determine conditions under which impact behaviors in each regime can be realized. We show that the dimensionless maximum spreading γ of impacting droplets on the heated surfaces in both gentle and spraying film boiling regimes shows a universal scaling with the Weber number We (γ~We(2/5)), which is much steeper than for the impact on nonheated (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) surfaces (γ~We(1/4)). We also interferometrically measure the vapor thickness under the droplet.

  13. Progress on Concepts for Next-Generation Drop Tower Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; Eigenbrod, Christian; Von Kampen, Peter; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) founded by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans J. Rath in 1985 is part of the Department of Production Engineering at the University of Bremen, Germany. ZARM is mainly concentrated on fundamental investigations of gravitational and space-related phenomenas under conditions of weightlessness as well as questions and developments related to technologies for space. At ZARM about 100 scientists, engineers, and administrative staff as well as many students from different departments are employed. Today, ZARM is still one of the largest and most important research center for space sciences and technologies in Europe. With a height of 146 m the Bremen Drop Tower is the predominant facility of ZARM and also the only drop tower of its class in Europe. ZARM's ground-based laboratory offers the opportunity for daily short-term experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness at a level of 10-6 g (microgravity), which is one of the best achievable for ground-based flight opportunities. Scientists may choose up to three times a day between a single drop experiment with 4.74 s in simple free fall and an experiment in ZARM's worldwide unique catapult system with 9.3 s in weightlessness. Since the start of operation of the facility in 1990, over 7500 drops or catapult launches of more than 160 different experiment types from various scientific fields like fundamental physics, combustion, fluid dynamics, planetary formation / astrophysics, biology and materials sciences have been accomplished so far. In addition, more and more technology tests have been conducted under microgravity conditions at the Bremen Drop Tower in order to effectively prepare appropriate space missions in advance. In this paper we report on the progress on concepts for next-generation drop tower systems based on the GraviTower idea utilizing a guided electro-magnetic linear drive. Alternative concepts motivated by the scientific demand for higher

  14. Melting of superheated molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-07-01

    Melting dynamics of micrometer scale, polycrystalline samples of isobutane, dimethyl ether, methyl benzene, and 2-propanol were investigated by fast scanning calorimetry. When films are superheated with rates in excess of 105 K s-1, the melting process follows zero-order, Arrhenius-like kinetics until approximately half of the sample has transformed. Such kinetics strongly imply that melting progresses into the bulk via a rapidly moving solid-liquid interface that is likely to originate at the sample's surface. Remarkably, the apparent activation energies for the phase transformation are large; all exceed the enthalpy of vaporization of each compound and some exceed it by an order of magnitude. In fact, we find that the crystalline melting kinetics are comparable to the kinetics of dielectric α-relaxation in deeply supercooled liquids. Based on these observations, we conclude that the rate of non-isothermal melting for superheated, low-molecular-weight crystals is limited by constituent diffusion into an abnormally dense, glass-like, non-crystalline phase.

  15. BOILER-SUPERHEATED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, T.P.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear power reactor of the type in which a liquid moderator-coolant is transformed by nuclear heating into a vapor that may be used to drive a turbo- generator is described. The core of this reactor comprises a plurality of freely suspended tubular fuel elements, called fuel element trains, within which nonboiling pressurized liquid moderator-coolant is preheated and sprayed through orifices in the walls of the trains against the outer walls thereof to be converted into vapor. Passage of the vapor ovcr other unwetted portions of the outside of the fuel elements causes the steam to be superheated. The moderatorcoolant within the fuel elements remains in the liqUid state, and that between the fuel elements remains substantiaily in the vapor state. A unique liquid neutron-absorber control system is used. Advantages expected from the reactor design include reduced fuel element failure, increased stability of operation, direct response to power demand, and circulation of a minimum amount of liquid moderatorcoolant. (A.G.W.)

  16. Detection in superheated water chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chienthavorn, O

    1999-11-01

    Superheated water has been used successfully as an eluent in liquid chromatography and has been coupled to various modes of detection, ultraviolet (UV), fluorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). A number of compounds were examined on poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB), polybutadiene (PBD), and octadecylsilyl bonded silica (ODS) column with isothermal and temperature programmes. The PS-DVB column was mostly used throughout the project as it was the most stable. Not only pure water could serve as superheated water mobile phase; inorganic buffered water and ion-pairing reagent with a concentration of 1-3 mM of the buffer and reagent were also exploited. It was shown that the pH could be controlled during the separation without salt precipitation and the separations followed a conventional reversed-phase HPLC method. Results from fluorescence detection showed good separation of a series of vitamins, such as pyridoxine, riboflavin, thiamine, and some analgesics. The relationship of riboflavin using the detection was linear and the detection limit was seven times higher than that of a conventional method. Simultaneous separation and identification using superheated water chromatography-NMR was demonstrated. With using a stop flow method, NMR spectra of model drugs, namely barbiturates, paracetamol, caffeine and phenacetin were obtained and the results agreed with reference spectra, confirming a perfect separation. A demonstration to obtain COSY spectrum of salicylamide was also performed. The method was expanded to the coupling of superheated water LC to NMR-MS. Results from the hyphenated detection method showed that deuteration and degradation happened in the superheated water conditions. The methyl group hydrogens of pyrimidine ring of sulfonamide and thiamine were exchanged with deuterium. Thiamine was decomposed to 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol and both were deuterated under the conditions. (author)

  17. Surface boiling of superheated liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-01-01

    A basic vaporization mechanism that possibly affects the qualitative and quantitative prediction of the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous superheated liquids was experimentally and analytically investigated. The studies are of relevance for the instantaneous failure of a containment vessel filled with liquefied gas. Even though catastrophical vessel failure is a rare event, it is considered to be a major technological hazard. Modeling the initial phase of depressurisation and vaporization of the contents is an essential step for the subsequent analysis of the spread and dispersion of the materials liberated. There is only limited understanding of this inertial expansion stage of the superheated liquid, before gravity and atmospheric turbulence begin to dominate the expansion. This work aims at a better understanding of the vaporization process and to supply more precise source-term data. It is also intended to provide knowledge for the prediction of the behavior of large-scale releases by the investigation of boiling on a small scale. Release experiments with butane, propane, R-134a and water were conducted. The vaporization of liquids that became superheated by sudden depressurisation was studied in nucleation-site-free glass receptacles. Several novel techniques for preventing undesired nucleation and for opening the test-section were developed. Releases from pipes and from a cylindrical geometry allowed both linear one-dimensional, and radial-front two-dimensional propagation to be investigated. Releases were made to atmospheric pressure over a range of superheats. It was found that, above a certain superheat temperature, the free surface of the metastable liquid rapidly broke up and ejected a high-velocity vapor/liquid stream. The zone of intense vaporization and liquid fragmentation proceeded as a front that advanced into the test fluids. No nucleation of bubbles in the bulk of the superheated liquid was observed. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  18. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  19. Stationary phases for superheated water chromatography

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, S

    2002-01-01

    This project focused on the comparison of conventional liquid chromatography and superheated water chromatography. It examined the differences in efficiency and retention of a range of different stationary phases. Alkyl aryl ketones and eight aromatic compounds were separated on PBD-zirconia, Xterra RP 18, Luna C sub 1 sub 8 (2) and Oasis HLB columns using conventional LC and superheated water chromatography system. The retention indices were determined in the different eluents. On changing the organic component of the eluent from methanol to acetonitrile to superheated water considerable improvements were found in the peak shapes and column efficiencies on the PBD-zirconia and Oasis HLB columns. PS-DVB, PBD-zirconia and Xterra RP 18 columns have been used in efficiency studies. It was found that simply elevating the column temperature did not increase the efficiency of a separation in superheated water chromatography. The efficiency depended on flow rate, injection volume and also mobile phase preheating sys...

  20. Neutron spectrometry in mixed fields: superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Matzke, M

    2003-07-01

    This handbook describes the instruments and methods which may be used in workplace environments in the nuclear industry, at accelerator facilities, and in aircraft, to measure: neutron spectra, photon spectra in mixed neutron gamma fields, and the direction distribution for both types of radiation. This information is needed in radiation protection research both to characterise those fields where it is important to know the dose equivalent accurately, and to investigate the performance of area survey meters and personal dosemeters in order to select the most suitable devices or to determine correction factors, or to do both. For neutron fields neither types of dosemeter, can, in general, be relied upon to give the correct answer. The spectrometry instrumentation is covered here in sufficient detail to enable an end user to select the optimum system for a particular application, and also to construct and commission the chosen system.

  1. LET dependence of bubbles evaporation pulses in superheated emulsion detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fulvio, Angela; Huang, Jean; Staib, Lawrence; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Superheated emulsion detectors are suspensions of metastable liquid droplets in a compliant inert medium. Upon interaction with ionizing radiation, the droplets evaporate, generating visible bubbles. Bubble expansion associated with the boiling of the droplets is accompanied by pressure pulses in both the sonic and ultrasonic frequency range. In this work, we analyzed the signal generated by bubble evaporation in the frequency and time domain. We used octafluoropropane (R-218) based emulsions, sensitive to both photons and neutrons. The frequency content of the detected pulses appears to extend well into the hundreds of kHz, beyond the range used in commercial devices to count bubbles as they are formed (typically 1-10 kHz). Kilohertz components characterize the early part of the waveforms, potentially containing information about the energetics of the explosive bubble initial growth phase. The power spectral density of the acoustic signal produced by neutron-induced evaporation shows a characteristic frequency pattern in the 200-400 kHz range, which is not observed when bubbles evaporate upon gamma ray-induced irradiation. For practical applications, detection of ultrasonic pulses associated with the boiling of the superheated drops can be exploited as a fast readout method, negligibly affected by mechanical ambient noise.

  2. Explosive Boiling of Superheated Cryogenic Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Baidakov, V G

    2007-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the description of the kinetics of spontaneous boiling of superheated liquefied gases and their solutions. Experimental results are given on the temperature of accessible superheating, the limits of tensile strength of liquids due to processes of cavitation and the rates of nucleation of classical and quantum liquids. The kinetics of evolution of the gas phase is studied in detail for solutions of cryogenic liquids and gas-saturated fluids. The properties of the critical clusters (bubbles of critical sizes) of the newly evolving gas phase are analyzed for initial st

  3. Superheated Droplet Detector Response for Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Superheated droplet detector has the following advantages: Used repeatedly, recording the cumulative dose, using both indoors and outdoors, compacting; relatively low cost, direct reading of the bubbles using the naked eye, and working in gamma-neutron mixed-field well

  4. A superheated Bose-condensed gas

    OpenAIRE

    Gaunt, Alexander L.; Fletcher, Richard J.; Robert P. Smith; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of various states of matter usually relies on the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. However, the transitions between different phases of matter can be strongly affected by non-equilibrium phenomena. Here we demonstrate and explain an example of non-equilibrium stalling of a continuous, second-order phase transition. We create a superheated atomic Bose gas, in which a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) persists above the equilibrium critical temperature, $T_c$, if its coup...

  5. Dark matter searches using superheated liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Bou-Cabo; Miguel, Ardid; Ivan, Felis

    2016-07-01

    Direct detection of dark matter is one of the most important topics in modern physics. It is estimated that 22% of universe matter is composed by dark matter in front of 0.4% of ordinary matter like stars, galaxies planets and all kind of known astrophysical objects. Several kinds of experiments are nowadays involved in detection of one of the more accepted particle candidates to be dark matter: WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). These detectors, using several kinds of techniques: Cryogenic semiconductors, scintillation materials like I Na or noble gas chambers among others, are reporting very interesting but inconclusive results. In this paper a review of detectors that are using the superheated liquid technique in bubble chambers in order to detect WIMPs is reported. Basically, we will report about Coupp (Chicagoland observatory for underground particle physics), PICO that is composed by Coupp and Picasso researchers having the aim to build a ton experiment and also about a new detector named MOSCAB (Materia oscura a bolle) that recently published a first results of a test chamber that uses also superheated liquid technique but as a Geyser chamber.

  6. Dark matter searches using superheated liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bou-Cabo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct detection of dark matter is one of the most important topics in modern physics. It is estimated that 22% of universe matter is composed by dark matter in front of 0.4% of ordinary matter like stars, galaxies planets and all kind of known astrophysical objects. Several kinds of experiments are nowadays involved in detection of one of the more accepted particle candidates to be dark matter: WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles. These detectors, using several kinds of techniques: Cryogenic semiconductors, scintillation materials like I Na or noble gas chambers among others, are reporting very interesting but inconclusive results. In this paper a review of detectors that are using the superheated liquid technique in bubble chambers in order to detect WIMPs is reported. Basically, we will report about Coupp (Chicagoland observatory for underground particle physics, PICO that is composed by Coupp and Picasso researchers having the aim to build a ton experiment and also about a new detector named MOSCAB (Materia oscura a bolle that recently published a first results of a test chamber that uses also superheated liquid technique but as a Geyser chamber.

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Homogeneous nucleation for superheated crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    1999-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation of liquid droplets in superheated crystals is considered in order to estimate the maximum superheating of crystals. Using the previously derived universal order parameter model of the crystal-melt transition (Iwamatsu M and Horii K 1996 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 65 2311), it is determined that the catastrophic homogeneous nucleation occurs at 0953-8984/11/1/001/img1, where 0953-8984/11/1/001/img2 is the equilibrium melting point. This numerical estimation is consistent with the results of maximum-superheating experiments.

  8. Thermoeconomic optimization of subcooled and superheated vapor compression refrigeration cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selbas, Resat; Kizilkan, OEnder; Sencan, Arzu [Technical Education Faculty, Department of Mechanical Education, Sueleyman Demirel University, Isparta 32260 (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    An exergy-based thermoeconomic optimization application is applied to a subcooled and superheated vapor compression refrigeration system. The advantage of using the exergy method of thermoeconomic optimization is that various elements of the system - i.e., condenser, evaporator, subcooling and superheating heat exchangers - can be optimized on their own. The application consists of determining the optimum heat exchanger areas with the corresponding optimum subcooling and superheating temperatures. A cost function is specified for the optimum conditions. All calculations are made for three refrigerants: R22, R134a, and R407c. Thermodynamic properties of refrigerants are formulated using the Artificial Neural Network methodology. (author)

  9. Superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Yeliz; Graham, Laurie A.; Mok, Yee-Foong; Bar, Maya; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to stop ice crystal growth, they must irreversibly bind to the ice surface. Surface-adsorbed AFPs should also prevent ice from melting, but to date this has been demonstrated only in a qualitative manner. Here we present the first quantitative measurements of superheating of ice in AFP solutions. Superheated ice crystals were stable for hours above their equilibrium melting point, and the maximum superheating obtained was 0.44 °C. When me...

  10. Superheating in linear polymers studied by ultrafast nanocalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakov, A A; Wurm, A; Schick, C

    2007-05-01

    To study phase transition kinetics on submillisecond time scale a sensitive ultrafast nanocalorimeter was constructed. Controlled ultrafast cooling, as well as heating, up to 10(6) K/s was attained. The method was applied for the measurements of the superheating phenomenon in a set of linear polymers: iPS, PBT, PET, and iPP. A power law relation between the superheating and the heating rate holds in the heating rate range 10(-2) - 10(4) K/s. A limiting superheating of about 10% of the melting temperature was observed at rates above 10(4) - 10(5) K/s. This limit depends on annealing conditions before sample melting. The observed superheating limit, as well as the power law, can be accounted for the internal stresses near the crystalline amorphous interface in semicrystalline polymers induced by heating, which are related to the thermal expansion gradients inherent in a semicrystalline material.

  11. WIMP searches with superheated droplet detectors Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Limagne, D; Miley, H S; Morlat, T; Puibasset, J; Waysand, G

    2001-01-01

    SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLE searches) employs superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter. As a result of the intrinsic SDD insensitivity to minimum ionizing particles and high fluorine content of target liquids, competitive WIMP limits were already obtained at the early prototype stage. We comment here on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the program and on future plans to exploit this promising technnique.

  12. Heat treatment of scallop adductor muscle using superheated steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T; Miyashita, K

    2007-08-01

    Scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis) adductor muscles were heated using superheated steam (150 and 200 degrees C), boiling (98 degrees C), and normal steaming (95 degrees C). The amounts of amino acids, water-soluble peptides, and nucleotides, expressed as extractive nitrogen in scallop products, are very important elements of quality and taste. After 15-min heating of scallop muscles with normal steaming and boiling, respective losses of 50% and 64% of the extractive nitrogen were observed. However, most extractive nitrogen (> 86%) remained in the scallop muscles treated with superheated steam at 150 and 200 degrees C. Protective effects of superheated steam against elution loss of nitrogen compounds were also observed in amino acid analyses of the heated products. The scallop-muscle surface temperature during treatment with superheated steam increased more quickly than that with normal steaming and boiling. The rapid water loss and the surface protein denaturation engendered formation of a 30-mum-thick film covering the surface, which prevented extractive nitrogen loss from internal tissues. Superheated steam treatment at 200 degrees C caused browning, surface shrinkage, and 47% weight loss. In marked contrast, the appearance and the weight loss of sample treated at 150 degrees C were almost the same as those of normal steaming and boiling-treated samples. These results suggested that superheated steaming at 150 degrees C is an optimal heat treatment of scallop adductor muscles.

  13. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields. Progress report, May 30, 1991--June 1, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carleson, T.E.

    1992-06-24

    In certain cases droplet direct contact heat transfer rates can be significantly enhanced by the application of an alternating electric field. This field can produce shape oscillations in a droplet which will enhance mixing. The theoretical evaluation of the effect of the interaction of the field with drop charge on the hydrodynamics has been completed for small amplitude oscillations. Previous work with a zero order perturbation method was followed up with a first order perturbation method to evaluate the effect of drop distortion on drop charge and field distribution. The first order perturbation results show secondary drop oscillations of four modes and two frequencies in each mode. The most significant secondary oscillation has the same mode and frequency as the second mode oscillation predicted from the first order perturbation work. The resonant frequency of all oscillations decrease with increasing electric field strength and drop charge. Work is currently underway to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement from an applied alternating electric field.

  14. Discrimination of events in superheated liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Simon

    2010-02-01

    PICASSO is a Dark Matter search experiment using superheated droplets of C4F10 as the active detector material, suspended in an elastic polymer. If a WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) hits a nucleus inside a droplet, the recoiling nucleus will deposit its energy in a heat spike, triggering a phase transition. The setup, installed at SNOLab, 2 km underground, consists of 32 cylindrical detectors of 4.5L. The acoustic signals emitted during a phase transition are recorded by nine piezo-electric transducers mounted on the detector walls and the waveforms are analysed offline. In this way, different types of events can be identified using different variables. One of these variables, which is proportional to the total energy of the acoustic signal, allows discrimination among neutron or WIMP-induced events, background alpha particle induced events and electronic noise; another discrimination variable is constructed from the Fast Fourier Transform of the signal and allows the discrimination of other classes of backgrounds. )

  15. An experimental study of evaporation waves in a superheated liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Larry G.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporation waves in superheated liquids are studied using a rapid-depressurization facility consisting of a vertical glass test cell situated beneath a large, low-pressure reservoir. The objective of this study is to learn more about the physical mechanisms of explosive boiling (of which an evaporation wave is a specific example), as well as properties of the flow it produces.The test cell is initially sealed from the reservoir by a foil diaphragm, and is partially filled with a volatile liquid (Refrigerant 12 or 114). An experiment is initiated by rupturing the diaphragm via a pneumatically driven cutter. The instrumentation consists of fast-response pressure measurements, high-speed motion pictures, and spark-illuminated still photographs. The liquid temperature is typically 20°C; the liquid superheat is controlled by setting the reservoir pressure to values between vacuum and 1 atm. The pressures subsequent to depressurization are very much less than the critical pressure, and the initial temperatures are sufficiently low that, although the test liquid is highly superheated, the superheat limit is not approached. Evaporation waves in which bubble nucleation within the liquid column is suppressed entirely are considered almost exclusively.When the diaphragm is ruptured, the liquid pressure drops to virtually the reservoir value within a few milliseconds. Provided that the liquid superheat so obtained is sufficiently high, the free surface then erupts in a process known as explosive boiling, which is characterized by violent, fine-scale fragmentation of the superheated liquid and extremely rapid evaporation. The explosive boiling process proceeds as a "wavefront" into the liquid column, producing a highspeed, two-phase flow that travels upward into the low-pressure reservoir, emptying the test cell in a few hundred milliseconds. The speed of the wavefront varies between 0.2 and 0.6 m/s, depending on run conditions; the corresponding two-phase flow varies between

  16. Superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Yeliz; Graham, Laurie A.; Mok, Yee-Foong; Bar, Maya; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to stop ice crystal growth, they must irreversibly bind to the ice surface. Surface-adsorbed AFPs should also prevent ice from melting, but to date this has been demonstrated only in a qualitative manner. Here we present the first quantitative measurements of superheating of ice in AFP solutions. Superheated ice crystals were stable for hours above their equilibrium melting point, and the maximum superheating obtained was 0.44 °C. When melting commenced in this superheated regime, rapid melting of the crystals from a point on the surface was observed. This increase in melting temperature was more appreciable for hyperactive AFPs compared to the AFPs with moderate antifreeze activity. For each of the AFP solutions that exhibited superheating, the enhancement of the melting temperature was far smaller than the depression of the freezing temperature. The present findings clearly show that AFPs adsorb to ice surfaces as part of their mechanism of action, and this absorption leads to protection of ice against melting as well as freezing. PMID:20215465

  17. Superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Yeliz; Graham, Laurie A; Mok, Yee-Foong; Bar, Maya; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2010-03-23

    It has been argued that for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to stop ice crystal growth, they must irreversibly bind to the ice surface. Surface-adsorbed AFPs should also prevent ice from melting, but to date this has been demonstrated only in a qualitative manner. Here we present the first quantitative measurements of superheating of ice in AFP solutions. Superheated ice crystals were stable for hours above their equilibrium melting point, and the maximum superheating obtained was 0.44 degrees C. When melting commenced in this superheated regime, rapid melting of the crystals from a point on the surface was observed. This increase in melting temperature was more appreciable for hyperactive AFPs compared to the AFPs with moderate antifreeze activity. For each of the AFP solutions that exhibited superheating, the enhancement of the melting temperature was far smaller than the depression of the freezing temperature. The present findings clearly show that AFPs adsorb to ice surfaces as part of their mechanism of action, and this absorption leads to protection of ice against melting as well as freezing.

  18. Research on steam-supply performance of ship micro-superheated steam generating system%船舶微过热蒸汽发生系统供汽性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨元龙

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve ship micro-superheated steam generating system stability and optimize its performance parameters, the micro-superheated steam generating system steam-supply response characteristic under the steady and transient state will be cleared. The ship micro-superheated steam generating system was taken as the mechanism model herein. The steady characteristics of velocity pressure, and temperature field for micro-superheated steam generating system were calculated by method of CFD simulation. The boundary conditions were introduced to treat as actual operating parameters of this system. The dynamic simulation study on micro-superheated steam generating system steam-supply response characteristic was carried out. The key parameters distributions of saturated and superheated steam mixing massflow, micro-superheated steam pressure and temperature were obtained. Meanwhile, the micro-superheated steam mixing factor was proposed, which could express quantificationally micro-superheated steam generating system mixing characteristics and effects of micro-superheated steam temperature. The calculated results showed that the pressure drop of saturated steam was higher than one of superheated steam. The micro-superheated steam pressure reduced gradually, leading to larger saturated and superheated steam massflow. These caused micro-superheated steam mixing factor to reduce, which resulted in that the micro-superheated steam temperature reduced slightly. Based on the analysis of the micro-superheated steam generating system steam-supply performance parameters, it could satisfy demand for equipment performance. These could be used to design ship steam power system.%为提高船舶微过热蒸汽发生系统的稳定性和优化微过热系统性能参数,探析稳态、动态工况下微过热蒸汽发生系统供汽响应特性。本文以船舶微过热蒸汽发生系统为机理模型,采用 CFD模拟方法计算了微过热蒸汽发生系统速度场、压

  19. Numerical calculation of superheating magnetic fields and currents for superconducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, I. L.; Rinderer, L.

    1995-08-01

    Numerical calculations of superheating magnetic fields and superheating currents for superconducting slabs for a wide range of the sample thickness are presented. The calculations were made for low values of Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ, i.e., for type-1 superconductors. We propose also experimental procedures to measure superheating fields and currents in films and bulk samples.

  20. Acoustic response of superheated droplet detectors to neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Size; Zhang, Guiying; Ni, Bangfa; Zhao, Changjun; Zhang, Huanqiao; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Zhe; Xiao, Caijin; Liu, Chao; Liu, Cunxiong

    2012-03-01

    The search for dark matter (DM) is a hot field nowadays, a number of innovative techniques have emerged. The superheated droplet technique is relatively mature; however, it is recently revitalized in a number of frontier fields including the search for DM. In this work, the acoustic response of Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs) to neutrons was studied by using a 252Cf neutron source, SDDs developed by the China Institute of Atomic Energy, a sound sensor, a sound card and a PC. Sound signals were filtered. The characteristics of FFT spectra, power spectra and time constants were used to determine the authenticity of the bubbles analyzed.

  1. Superheated starch: A novel approach towards spreadable particle gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneken, P.A.M.; Woortman, A.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    When aqueous potato starch suspensions were heated into the solution state and cooled, spreadable particle gels were obtained with a spherulite morphology and a cream-like texture. This so-called superheated starch (SHS) exhibits more effective gelling properties than maltodextrin, which is

  2. La moral de los superhéroes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Rozo Mila

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Los superhéroes, el deber moral y la obligación; El caso de Spider-Man y los X-Men. Laura Victoria Bolaño Pérez; Universidad del Rosario, colección Ópera Prima, Bogotá, 2012, 309 págs.

  3. Ultra Low Level Environmental Neutron Measurements Using Superheated Droplet Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, A.C. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Felizardo, M.; Girard, T.A.; Kling, A.; Ramos, A.R. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques, J.G.; Prudencio, M.I.; Marques, R.; Carvalho, F.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Through the application of superheated droplet detectors (SDDs), the SIMPLE project for the direct search for dark matter (DM) reached the most restrictive limits on the spin-dependent sector to date. The experiment is based on the detection of recoils following WIMP-nuclei interaction, mimicking those from neutron scattering. The thermodynamic operation conditions yield the SDDs intrinsically insensitive to radiations with linear energy transfer below ∼150 keVμm{sup -1} such as photons, electrons, muons and neutrons with energies below ∼40 keV. Underground facilities are increasingly employed for measurements in a low-level radiation background (DM search, gamma-spectroscopy, intrinsic soft-error rate measurements, etc.), where the rock overburden shields against cosmic radiation. In this environment the SDDs are sensitive only to α-particles and neutrons naturally emitted from the surrounding materials. Recently developed signal analysis techniques allow discrimination between neutron and α-induced signals. SDDs are therefore a promising instrument for low-level neutron and α measurements, namely environmental neutron measurements and α-contamination assays. In this work neutron measurements performed in the challenging conditions of the latest SIMPLE experiment (1500 mwe depth with 50-75 cm water shield) are reported. The results are compared with those obtained by detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron background induced by {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th traces in the facility, shielding and detector materials. Calculations of the neutron energy distribution yield the following neutron fluence rates (in 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}): thermal (<0.5 eV): 2.5; epithermal (0.5 eV-100 keV): 2.2; fast (>1 MeV): 3.9. Signal rates were derived using standard cross sections and codes routinely employed in reactor dosimetry. The measured and calculated neutron count rates per unit of active mass were 0.15 ct/kgd and 0.33 ct/kg-d respectively. As the major

  4. Numerical simulation of superheated vapor bubble rising in stagnant liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkhaniani, N.; Ansari, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    In present study, the rising of superheated vapor bubble in saturated liquid is simulated using volume of fluid method in OpenFOAM cfd package. The surface tension between vapor-liquid phases is considered using continuous surface force method. In order to reduce spurious current near interface, Lafaurie smoothing filter is applied to improve curvature calculation. Phase change is considered using Tanasawa mass transfer model. The variation of saturation temperature in vapor bubble with local pressure is considered with simplified Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The couple velocity-pressure equation is solved using PISO algorithm. The numerical model is validated with: (1) isothermal bubble rising and (2) one-dimensional horizontal film condensation. Then, the shape and life time history of single superheated vapor bubble are investigated. The present numerical study shows vapor bubble in saturated liquid undergoes boiling and condensation. It indicates bubble life time is nearly linear proportional with bubble size and superheat temperature.

  5. Superheated water chromatography--a green technology for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger M

    2008-03-14

    Reversed phase liquid chromatography using superheated water as the mobile phase, at temperatures between 100 and 250 degrees C, offers a number of advantages for the analyst. It is an environmentally clean solvent, reducing solvent usage and disposal costs. It has advantages in detection, allowing UV spectra to be monitored down to short wavelengths, as well as a compatibility with universal flame ionisation detection and mass spectroscopy. By employing deuterium oxide as the eluent, solvent free NMR spectra can be measured. The development of newer more thermally stable stationary phases, including hybrid phases, have expanded the analytes that can be examined and these now range from alkylbenzenes, phenols, alkyl aryl ketones and a number of pharmaceuticals to carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. Very few compounds have been found to be unstable during the analysis. The separation methods can be directly coupled to superheated water extraction providing a totally solvent free system for sample extraction and analysis.

  6. Fuzzy cascade control based on control's history for superheated temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guangjun; LI Gang; SHEN Shuguang

    2007-01-01

    To address the characteristics of the large delay and uncertainty of superheated temperature,a new cascade control system is presented based on control's history.Based on the analysis of the control objects' dynamic characteristics,historical control information (substituting for the deviation change rate) is used as the basis for decision-making of the fuzzy control.Therefore,the changing trend of the controlled variable can be accurately reflected.Furthermore,a proportional component is introduced,the advantages of PID and fuzzy controllers are integrated,and the structure weaknesses of conventional fuzzy controllers are overcome.Simulation shows that this control method can effectively reduce the adverse impact of the delay on control effects and,therefore,exhibit strong adaptability by comparing the superheated temperature control system by this controller with PID and conventional fuzzy controllers.

  7. Superheated Droplet Detectors as CDM Detectors The SIMPLE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Limagne, D; Waysand, G

    1996-01-01

    Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs) are becoming commonplace in neutron personnel dosimetry. Their total insensitivity to minimum ionizing radiation (while responsive to nuclear recoils of energies ~ few keV), together with their low cost, ease of production, and operation at room temperature and 1 atm makes them ideal for Cold Dark Matter (CDM) searches. SDD's are optimal for the exploration of the spin-dependent neutralino coupling due to their high fluorine content. The status of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) is presented. Under realistic background considerations, we expect an improvement in the present Cold Dark Matter sensitivity of 2-3 orders of magnitude after ~1 kg-y of data acquisition.

  8. Neutron - Alpha irradiation response of superheated emulsion detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Girard, T. A.; Kling, A.; Fernandes, A. C.; Marques, J. G.; Carvalho, F.; Ramos, A. R.

    2017-08-01

    We report new experimental investigations of the response of single superheated emulsion detectors with small droplet (<30 μm radii) size distributions to both α- and neutron irradiations. Analysis of the results in terms of the underlying detector physics yields a toy model which reasonably reproduces the observations, and identifies the initial energy of the α in the liquid and distribution of droplet sizes as primarily responsible for the detector capacity to distinguish between nuclear recoil and α events.

  9. AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE DRUM BOILER SUPERHEATED STEAM TEMPERATURE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juravliov A.A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The control system of the temperature of the superheated steam of the drum boiler is examined. Main features of the system are the PI-controller in the external control loop and introduction of the functional component of the error signal of the external control loop with the negative feedback of the error signal between the prescribed value of steam flowrate and the signal of the steam flowrate in the exit of the boiler in the internal control loop.

  10. Dynamic behavior of superheated steam and ways of control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu LI

    2008-01-01

    A simple way of calculating the dynamic behavior of a superheater is presented. A comparison of the measured data with the calculated result verifies the accuracy of this simple method. It is the first time that a phase compensation for real roots, i.e., the twin lead/lag loop which is facile for engineering applications, is used in superheated steam temperature control. Numerous simu-lation results show that both the response time lapse and maximal dynamic deviation are greatly reduced. Moreover, a formula to calculate the setting parameters is presented, together with a practical example of its engineering application in superheated steam temperature control with single-stage attemperation in a power plant boiler. This method can remarkably improve the control performance of superheated steam temperature and makes it possible for one stage attemperation to be sufficient for the superheater of power plant boilers, thus simplifying the superheater system and reducing investment. Because the control performance is remarkably raised, the set values of the steam temperature control system can be raised above rated values and also the operational economy, without impairing the operation safety.

  11. Development of a Parching Machine Using Super-Heated Vapor or Super-Heated High-Moisture Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shoichi; Shinsho, Seiji; Iriki, Hiroyuki; Asai, Junya; Suganuma, Hirofumi; Shibata, Tsutomu

    We developed a new parching machine with super-heated vapor or super-heated highmoisture atmosphere as a heat medium, and investigated the influence exerted on the characteristics of manufactured tea and crude tea quality. (1)We developed machine specifications that improved throughput and allowed us to control stable quality compared with the conventional kamairicha parching machine. (2)The new parching machine could not only manufacture like kamairicha but also achieve various degrees of steaming of products like green tea or heavily steamed sencha. (3)The new parching machine could not only deactivate enzymes but dry leaves. (4)The influence of throughput was great with respect to the grade of pan-parched flavour, which meant that there was a contact opportunity for tea leaves and the surface of machine's wall. (5)Unpleasant smells such as that produced in a summer crop of tea were reduced by the new parching machine.

  12. Quenching of a highly superheated porous medium by injection of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichot, F.; Bachrata, A.; Repetto, G.; Fleurot, J.; Quintard, M.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding of two-phase flow through porous medium with intense phase change is of interest in many situations, including nuclear, chemical or geophysical applications. Intense boiling occurs when the liquid is injected into a highly superheated medium. Under such conditions, the heat flux extracted by the fluid from the porous medium is mainly governed by the nucleation of bubbles and by the evaporation of thin liquid films. Both configurations are possible, depending on local flow conditions and on the ratio of bubble size to pore size. The present study is motivated by the safety evaluation of light water nuclear reactors in case of a severe accident scenario, such as the one that happened in Fukushima Dai-ichi plant in March, 2011. If water sources are not available for a long period of time, the reactor core heats up due to the residual power and eventually becomes significantly damaged due to intense oxidation of metals and fragmentation of fuel rods resulting in the formation of a porous medium where the particles have a characteristic length-scale of 1 to 5 mm. The coolability of the porous medium will depend on the water flow rate which can enter the medium under the available driving head and on the geometrical features of the porous matrix (average pore size, porosity). Therefore, it is of high interest to evaluate the conditions for which the injection of water in such porous medium is likely to stop the progression of the accident. The present paper addresses the issue of modelling two-phase flow and heat transfers in a porous medium initially dry, where water is injected. The medium is initially at a temperature well above the saturation temperature of water. In a first part, a summary of existing knowledge is provided, showing the scarcity of models and experimental data. In a second part, new experimental results obtained in an IRSN facility are analysed. The experiment consists in a bed of steel particles that are heated up to 700

  13. Soft drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew J. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marzani, Simone [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Soyez, Gregory [IPhT, CEA Saclay, CNRS URA 2306,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-29

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called “soft drop declustering”, which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters — a soft threshold z{sub cut} and an angular exponent β — with the β=0 limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the β dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The β=0 limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only “Sudakov safe” but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic results to parton shower simulations and find good agreement, and we also estimate the impact of non-perturbative effects such as hadronization and the underlying event. Finally, we demonstrate how soft drop can be used for tagging boosted W bosons, and we speculate on the potential advantages of using soft drop for pileup mitigation.

  14. Effects of superheated steam on the drying of rubberwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokwan Buaphud

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Rubberwood drying is the most time and energy consuming step in the processing of wood product. This research studied the effect of superheated steam drying on the drying time required and the physical and mechanical properties of rubberwood after drying. In this study, a cylindrical drying chamber with a length of 1.2 m and a diameter of 0.5 m was constructed and injected with superheated steam. The dimensions of the wood lumber were 1 m × 7.62 cm × 2.54 cm. The wood samples were impinged with alternating cycles of superheated steam and hot air at ratios of 6:1, 4:1 and 1:6 hours until the moisture content was less than 15% dry basis. The conditions inside the chamber were 110ºC and ambient pressure. Continuous superheated steam and continuous hot air were also used for comparisons. The drying rate and the temperature profile for each process were determined.Initial acceptability of the dried wood was conducted using the prong test and visual inspection. Results showed that if the drying rate was too fast, the dried wood did not pass the prong test due to stress buildup. Therefore, an optimum drying condition was developed based on minimizing defects and reducing the drying time. For the optimum condition, the following schedule was carried out: (1 saturated steam at 100ºC was used during the first 4 hours of drying to prevent the wood surface from drying too quickly which would minimize the moisture gradient between the center and wood surface, (2 superheated steam at 105ºC and 110ºC was used in alternating cycle with hot air (80ºC during the main drying stages to rapidly remove the free water and majority of the bound water inside the wood, and (3 hot air was used continuously during the final stages of drying to reduce the relative humidity inside the chamber making it possible for the removal of the residual bound water. This process successfully reduced the drying time to less than 2 days without causing any defects which compared

  15. a Theoretical Model of a Superheated Liquid Droplet Neutron Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Mark Joseph

    Neutrons can interact with the atoms in superheated liquid droplets which are suspended in a viscous matrix material, resulting in the formation of charged recoil ions. These ions transfer energy to the liquid, sometimes resulting in the droplets vaporizing and producing observable bubbles. Devices employing this mechanism are known as superheated liquid droplet detectors, or bubble detectors. The basis of bubble detector operation is identical to that of bubble chambers, which have been well characterized by researchers such as Wilson, Glaser, Seitz, and others since the 1950's. Each of the microscopic superheated liquid droplets behaves like an independent bubble chamber. This dissertation presents a theoretical model which considers the three principal aspects of detector operation: nuclear reactions, charged particle energy deposition, and thermodynamic bubble formation. All possible nuclear reactions were examined and those which could reasonably result in recoil ions sufficiently energetic to vaporize a droplet were analyzed in detail. Feasible interactions having adequate cross sections include elastic and inelastic scattering, n-proton, and n-alpha reactions. Ziegler's TRansport of Ions in Matter (TRIM) code was used to calculate the ions' stopping powers in various compounds based on the ionic energies predicted by standard scattering distributions. If the ions deposit enough energy in a small enough volume then the entire droplet will vaporize without further energy input. Various theories as to the vaporization of droplets by ionizing radiation were studied and a novel method of predicting the critical (minimum) energy was developed. This method can be used to calculate the minimum required stopping power for the ion, from which the threshold neutron energy is obtainable. Experimental verification of the model was accomplished by measuring the response of two different types of bubble detectors to monoenergetic thermal neutrons, as well as to neutrons

  16. Study of low frequency acoustic signals from superheated droplet detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, P K; Das, M; Bhattacharjee, P

    2013-01-01

    The bubble nucleation process in superheated droplet detector (SDD) is associated with the emission of an acoustic pulse that can be detected by an acoustic sensor. We have studied the neutron and gamma-ray induced nucleation events in a SDD with the active liquid R-12 (CCl2F2, b.p. -29.8oC) using a condenser microphone sensor. A comparative study in the low frequency region (~ 0-10kHz) for the neutron and gamma-ray induced nucleation is presented here. From the analysis of the waveforms we observe a significant difference between the neutron and gamma-ray induced acoustic events.

  17. Soft Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Soyez, Gregory; Thaler, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called "soft drop declustering", which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters--a soft threshold $z_\\text{cut}$ and an angular exponent $\\beta$--with the $\\beta = 0$ limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the $\\beta$ dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The $\\beta = 0$ limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only "Sudakov safe" but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic r...

  18. Superheated Water-Cooled Small Modular Underwater Reactor Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel fully passive small modular superheated water reactor (SWR for underwater deployment is designed to produce 160 MWe with steam at 500ºC to increase the thermodynamic efficiency compared with standard light water reactors. The SWR design is based on a conceptual 400-MWe integral SWR using the internally and externally cooled annular fuel (IXAF. The coolant boils in the external channels throughout the core to approximately the same quality as a conventional boiling water reactor and then the steam, instead of exiting the reactor pressure vessel, turns around and flows downward in the central channel of some IXAF fuel rods within each assembly and then flows upward through the rest of the IXAF pins in the assembly and exits the reactor pressure vessel as superheated steam. In this study, new cladding material to withstand high temperature steam in addition to the fuel mechanical and safety behavior is investigated. The steam temperature was found to depend on the thermal and mechanical characteristics of the fuel. The SWR showed a very different transient behavior compared with a boiling water reactor. The inter-play between the inner and outer channels of the IXAF was mainly beneficial except in the case of sudden reactivity insertion transients where additional control consideration is required.

  19. Phase transition time delays in irradiated superheated superconducting granules

    CERN Document Server

    Abplanalp, M; Czapek, G; Diggelmann, U; Furlan, M; Gabutti, A; Janos, S; Moser, U; Pozzi, R; Pretzl, Klaus P; Schmiemann, K; Perret-Gallix, D; Van den Brandt, B; Konter, J A; Mango, S

    1994-01-01

    The time difference between a particle interaction in a Superheated Superconducting Granule (SSG) and the resulting phase transition signal has been explored. Detectors containing Zn and Sn SSG were irradiated with neutrons and protons to study the heating mechanism taking place in nuclear recoil and ionizing events. Scattered neutrons have been detected by a scintillator hodoscope behind the SSG with a recoil energy measurement resolution of 10\\% and an interaction time resolution of 1ns. The fast transition of the metastable granules allowed to determine the elapsed time between an energy deposition and the phase transition signal. In the case of Sn granules, the results show that the time distributions are narrow and independent of the deposited energy in nuclear recoil and ionizing events. In Zn, however, the time distributions are much broader and depend on the energy deposition in the granule.

  20. Aquathermolysis of conventional heavy oil with superheated steam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Guangshou; Zhou Tiyao; Cheng Linsong; Wang Yunxian; Tian Guoqing; Pi Jian; Zhang Zheng

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new aquathermolysis study of conventional heavy oil in superheated steam. A new high temperature autoclave was designed, where volume and pressure could be adjusted. Aquathermolysis was studied on two different conventional heavy oil samples under different reaction times and temperatures. Experimental results show that aquathermolysis does take place for conventional heavy oil. As reaction time increases, the oil viscosity reduces. However, the reaction will reach equilibrium after a certain period of time and won't be sensitive to any further reaction time any more. Analysis shows that, while resin and asphaltenes decrease, saturated hydrocarbons and the H/C ratio increase after reaction. The main mechanism of aquathermolysis includes hydrogenization, desulfuration reaction of resin and asphaltenes, etc.

  1. Rewetting of a low superheated rod with saturated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portillo, O.; Reyes, R.; Wayner, P.C. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    The study of the rewetting of a superheated surface has application in several technological fields. It is related to the control mechanism for loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in nuclear reactors. An adsorption model as the precursory mechanism for rewetting of a superheated surface is extended from its application to non-polar liquids to a polar fluid, and modeling calculations are compared with experimental data found in the literature. The adsorption model is based on interfacial forces acting at the tip of the rewetting front, the three-phase region. In this region, solid, liquid and vapor interfaces generate a contact angle that depends on the degree of superheat and describes the velocity of rewetting. The contact angle is a function of interfacial forces calculated through the disjoining pressure of the adsorbed film precursory of the rewetting. The influences of van der Waals and electrostatic intermolecular forces in the film thickness are analyzed. The authors find that the order of magnitude of the film thickness in the controlling region is of a few angstroms: thus, only van der Waals intermolecular forces define the interactions. For the prediction of the velocity of rewetting the temperature profile along the rod's surface is required and a one-dimensional and a two-dimensional heat conduction balances are solved. The thermophysical properties in the adsorption model are predicted by ASPEN PLUS data bank and from ASME steam tables. Variations of the predicted values have a strong influence on the results. The surface boundary condition on the rod contains an evaporative heat transfer coefficient that is calculated from the fitted experimental rewetting velocities and the two-dimensional temperature field in the rod. Using this calculation scheme the values of the evaporative heat transfer coefficient are obtained in the normal range of values. Therefore the adsorption model gives results that are consistent with experimental observations.

  2. Medium-Range Order Structure and Fragility of Superheated Melts of Amorphous CuHf Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Xiu-Fang; SUN Bao-An; HU Li-Na

    2006-01-01

    @@ The structural factors of amorphous CuHf alloys at different temperatures are determined by using a high temperature x-ray diffractometer. It is found that not only the short-range order structure but also the medium-range order structure exists in amorphous CuHf alloys. The dynamic viscosities of CuHf alloy melts are measured by a torsional oscillation viscometer. The fragility of superheated melts of CuHf alloys is calculated based on the viscosity data. The experimental results show that the glass-forming ability of the CuHf alloys is closely related to the fragility of their superheated melt. The relationship between the medium-range order structures and the fragility of superheated melts has also been established in amorphous CuHf alloys. In contrast to the fragility of supercooled liquids, the fragility of superheated liquids promises a better approach to reflecting the dynamics of glass forming liquids.

  3. Study of acoustic emission due to vaporisation of superheated droplets at higher pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rupa; Mondal, Prasanna Kumar; Chatterjee, Barun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Bubble nucleation in superheated liquids can be controlled by adjusting the ambient pressure and temperature. At higher pressure the threshold energy for bubble nucleation increases, and we have observed that the amplitude of the acoustic emission during vaporisation of superheated droplet decreases with increase in pressure at any given temperature. Other acoustic parameters such as the primary harmonic frequency and the decay time constant of the acoustic signal also decrease with increase in pressure. This behavior is independent of the type of superheated liquid. The decrease in signal amplitude limits the detection of bubble nucleation at higher pressure. This effect is explained by the emission of shockwave generated during the supersonic growth of the microbubble in superheated liquids.

  4. Ginzburg-Landau theory of the superheating field anisotropy of layered superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Transtrum, Mark K.; Sethna, James P.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effects of material anisotropy on the superheating field of layered superconductors. We provide an intuitive argument both for the existence of a superheating field, and its dependence on anisotropy, for κ =λ /ξ (the ratio of magnetic to superconducting healing lengths) both large and small. On the one hand, the combination of our estimates with published results using a two-gap model for MgB2 suggests high anisotropy of the superheating field near zero temperature. On the other hand, within Ginzburg-Landau theory for a single gap, we see that the superheating field shows significant anisotropy only when the crystal anisotropy is large and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ is small. We then conclude that only small anisotropies in the superheating field are expected for typical unconventional superconductors near the critical temperature. Using a generalized form of Ginzburg Landau theory, we do a quantitative calculation for the anisotropic superheating field by mapping the problem to the isotropic case, and present a phase diagram in terms of anisotropy and κ , showing type I, type II, or mixed behavior (within Ginzburg-Landau theory), and regions where each asymptotic solution is expected. We estimate anisotropies for a number of different materials, and discuss the importance of these results for radio-frequency cavities for particle accelerators.

  5. Issues related to waste sewage sludge drying under superheated steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamawand Ihsan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge was dried in a rotary drum dryer under superheated steam. Particle size and moisture content were shown to have significant influences on sticking and agglomeration of the materials. Pouring partially dried sludge (70–80% moisture content, wet basis directly into the screw feeder of the drum dryer resulted in a significant sticking to the surface of the drum and the final particle size of the product was greater than 100 mm in diameter. The moisture content of this product was slightly less than its initial value. To overcome this issue, the sludge was mixed with lignite at variety ratios and then chopped before being introduced to the feeding screw. It was found that mixing the sludge with lignite and then sieving the chopped materials through a four millimetre mesh sieve was the key to solve this issue. This technique significantly reduced both stickiness and agglomeration of the material. Also, this enabled for a significant reduction in moisture content of the final product.

  6. Microwave superheated water extraction of polysaccharides from spent coffee grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Cláudia P; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2013-04-15

    The spent coffee grounds (SCG) are a food industry by-product that can be used as a rich source of polysaccharides. In the present work, the feasibility of microwave superheated water extraction of polysaccharides from SCG was studied. Different ratios of mass of SCG to water, from 1:30 to 1:5 (g:mL) were used for a total volume of 80 mL. Although the amount of material extracted/batch (MAE1) increased with the increase of the concentration of the sample, the amount of polysaccharides achieved a maximum of 0.57 g/batch for 1:10. Glycosidic-linkage composition showed that all extraction conditions allowed to obtain mainly arabinogalactans. When the unextracted insoluble material was re-extracted under the same conditions (MAE2), a further extraction of polysaccharides was observed (0.34 g/batch for 1:10), mainly galactomannans. Also, a high amount of oligosaccharides, mainly derived from galactomannans, can be obtained in MAE2 (0.96 g/batch for 1:10). This technology allows to obtain galactomannans and arabinogalactans in proportions that are dependent on the operating conditions.

  7. Wicking of liquid nitrogen into superheated porous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenyuk, Yulia; Dreyer, Michael E.

    2016-09-01

    Evaporation in porous elements of liquid-vapor separation devices can affect the vapor-free cryogenic propellant delivery to spacecraft engines. On that account, the capillary transport of a cryogenic liquid subjected to evaporation needs to be understood and assessed. We investigate wicking of liquid nitrogen at saturation temperature into superheated porous media. A novel test facility was built to perform wicking experiments in a one-species system under non-isothermal conditions. A setup configuration enabled to define the sample superheat by its initial position in a stratified nitrogen vapor environment inside the cryostat. Simultaneous sample weight and temperature measurements indicated the wicking front velocity. The mass of the imbibed liquid nitrogen was determined varying the sample superheat, geometry and porous structure. To the author's extent of knowledge, these are the first wicking experiments performed with cryogenic fluids subjected to evaporation using the weight-time measurement technique. A one-dimensional macroscopic model describes the process theoretically. Results revealed that the liquid loss due to evaporation at high sample superheats leads to only a slight imbibition rate decrease. However, the imbibition rate can be greatly affected by the vapor flow created due to evaporation that counteracts the wicking front propagation.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Ultra-Superheated Steam Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Fen

    Pure steam gasification has been of interest in hydrogen production, but with the challenge of supplying heat for endothermic reactions. Traditional solutions included either combusting feedstocks at the price of decreasing carbon conversion ratio, or using costly heating apparatus. Therefore, a distributed gasifier with an Ultra-Superheated-Steam (USS) generator was invented, satisfying the heat requirement and avoiding carbon combustion in steam gasification. This project developed the first version of the Ultra-Superheated-Steam-Fluidization-Model (USSFM V1.0) for the USS gasifier. A stand-alone equilibrium combustion model was firstly developed to calculate the USS mixture, which was the input to the USSFM V1.0. Model development of the USSFM V1.0 included assumptions, governing equations, boundary conditions, supporting equations and iterative schemes of guessed values. There were three nested loops in the dense bed and one loop in the freeboard. The USSFM V1.0 included one main routine and twenty-four subroutines. The USSFM V1.0 was validated with experimental data from the Enercon USS gasifier. The calculated USS mixture had a trace of oxygen, validating the initial expectation of creating an oxygen-free environment in the gasifier. Simulations showed that the USS mixture could satisfy the gasification heat requirement without partial carbon combustion. The USSFM V1.0 had good predictions on the H2% in all tests, and on other variables at a level of the lower oxygen feed. Provided with higher oxygen feed, the USSFM V1.0 simulated hotter temperatures, higher CO% and lower CO2%. Errors were explained by assumptions of equilibrium combustion, adiabatic reactors, reaction kinetics, etc. By investigating specific modeling data, gas-particle convective heat transfers were found to be critical in energy balance equations of both emulsion gas and particles, while bubble size controlled both the mass and energy balance equations of bubble gas. Parametric study

  9. Utilization of virtual reality for reading the superheated emulsion detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Sobrinho, Jose C.; Santo, Andre C.E.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Mol, Antonio C.A., E-mail: volksparati@hotmail.com, E-mail: cotelli.andre@gmail.com, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a method based on Virtual Reality for reading the Superheated Emulsion Detector (Bubble Detector). The proposed method is an alternative to: automatic counters offered by the manufacturers of detectors, since they have a relatively high cost (acquisition, maintenance and periodic calibration), and visual counting of detectors, since it only has an advantage when there are a small number of bubbles. The method starts with the collection of detector's digital images in order to obtain a sequence of images to create an animation that is displayed with the help of Virtual Reality. To this end, it is modeled, using OpenGL graphics library, a virtual environment for visualizing and manipulating virtual detector. It is made, then a calibration of this virtual environment thus ensuring the correspondence of the model with reality. The reading of the detector (bubbles count) is made visually by the user with the assistance of stereo vision and a 3D cursor to navigation, marking and counting the bubbles. The user views a further auxiliary display that shows the three-dimensional cursor position, the labeled amount of bubbles and the measured dose. After testing, the following results were achieved: better precision in counting the bubbles compared with the 10% reported by the manufacturer of the automatic reader; achieving a low cost tool that requires no calibration constant in the process of maintenance and/or lifetime; minimizing the problem of manual counting for large number of bubbles and ease of use, because can be operated by a common user. (author)

  10. Characterization of R-134A superheated droplet detector for neutron detection

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Prasanna Kumar; Chatterjee, Barun Kumar

    2013-01-01

    R-134A (C2H2F4) is a low cost, easily available and chlorine free refrigerant, which in its superheated state can be used as an efficient neutron detector. Due to its high solubility in water the R-134A based superheated droplet detectors (SDD) are usually very unstable unless the detector is fabricated using a suitable additive, which stabilizes the detector. The SDD is known to have superheated droplets distributed in a short-lived and in a relatively longer-lived metastable state. We have studied the detector response to neutrons using a 241AmBe neutron source and obtained the temperature variation of the nucleation parameters and the interstate kinetics of these droplets using a two-state model.

  11. Casting structure of pure aluminum by electric pulse modification at different superheated temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingang Qi; Jianzhong Wang; Xingjiang Liu; Bing Wang; Daqiang Cang

    2005-01-01

    Electric pulse modification (EPM) is a novel technique that reduces grain size by altering the structure of a melt. It was investigated that the response of the casting structure of high pure aluminum to EPM in different superheated melts. The results indicate that the grain refining effect of a given pulse electric field holds an optimal temperature range, moreover, a lower or higher superheated temperature will both disadvantage the improvements of casting structure. It essentially lies in the cooperative action between the distorted absorption of clusters and the activated capability of atoms in the aluminum melt.

  12. Static and dynamic superheated water extraction of essential oil components from Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina; Wianowska, Dorota

    2009-09-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) performed in both static and dynamic condition (S-SWE and D-SWE, respectively) was applied for the extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris L. The influence of extraction pressure, temperature, time, and flow rate on the total yield of essential oil and the influence of extraction temperature on the extraction of some chosen components are discussed in the paper. The SWE extracts are related to PLE extracts with n-hexane and essential oil obtained by steam distillation. The superheated water extraction in dynamic condition seems to be a feasible option for the extraction of essential oil components from T. vulgaris L.

  13. PID Controller Parameters Tuning Based-on Satisfaction for Superheated Steam Temperature of Power Station Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benxian Xiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Proposed the PID controller parameters tuning method based-on New Luus-Jaakola (NLJ algorithm and satisfaction idea. According to the different requirements of each performance index, designed the satisfaction function with fuzzy constraint attributes, and then determined the comprehensive satisfaction function for PID tuning by NLJ algorithm. Provided the steps of PID controller parameters tuning based on the NLJ algorithm and satisfaction, and applied this tuning method to the cascade control system of superheated steam temperature for Power Station Boiler. Finally the simulation and experiment results have shown the proposed method has good dynamic and static control performances for this complicated superheated steam temperature control system.

  14. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE ROASTING CHESTNUTS PROCESS BY SUPERHEATED STEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematic modeling for chestnuts roasting process by superheated steam is conducted. Diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients are used for process description. Initial conditions and boundary conditions of the third kind for thermal conductivity and mass transfer equations are set.

  15. Correlation Between Superheated Liquid Fragility And Onset Temperature Of Crystallization For Al-Based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous alloys or metallic glasses have attracted significant interest in the materials science and engineering communities due to their unique physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. The viscous flow of amorphous alloys exhibiting high strain rate sensitivity and homogeneous deformation is considered to be an important characteristic in thermoplastic forming processes performed within the supercooled liquid region because it allows superplastic-like deformation behavior. Here, the correlation between the superheated liquid fragility, and the onset temperature of crystallization for Al-based alloys, is investigated. The activation energy for viscous flow of the liquid is also investigated. There is a negative correlation between the parameter of superheated liquid fragility and the onset temperature of crystallization in the same Al-based alloy system. The activation energy decreases as the onset temperature of crystallization increases. This indicates that the stability of a superheated liquid can affect the thermal stability of the amorphous alloy. It also means that a liquid with a large superheated liquid fragility, when rapidly solidified, forms an amorphous alloy with a low thermal stability.

  16. Inhibition of lipid oxidation in pork bundles processing by superheated steam frying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Ho, Chi-Tang; Fu, Hui-Yin

    2004-05-19

    The effect of superheated steam treatment on the oxidative stability of lipids in packaged Zousoon (pork bundles) was investigated. The aroma quality of Zousoon samples was evaluated by sensory analysis and chromatographic analysis of volatiles. Results of this study indicated that oxidation of lipids occurred in pan-fried Zousoon after prolonged storage. Significant amounts of highly volatile compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, and hexanal in Zousoon were identified by a modified method of cysteamine derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Superheated steam was found to be effective in suppressing lipid oxidation in canned Zousoon as compared with Zousoon fried by the conventional method in a frying pan. The superheated steam-fried samples had relatively low thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and peroxide (POV) values before and after storage, whereas samples prepared by pan frying had relatively high TBARS and POV values before and after storage. Superheated steam-fried Zousoon had superior lipid stability to that prepared by the conventional pan-frying method.

  17. Effect of Melt Superheating Treatment on Directional Solidification Interface Morphology of Multi-component Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changshuai Wang; Jun Zhang; Lin Liu; Hengzhi Fu

    2011-01-01

    The influence of melt superheating treatment on the solid/liquid (S/L) interface morphology of directionally solidified Ni-based superalloy DZ125 is investigated to elucidate the relationship between melt characteristic and S/L interface stability. The results indicate that the interface morphology is not only related to the withdrawal velocity (R) but also to the melt superheating temperature (Ts) when the thermal gradient of solidification interface remains constant for different Ts with appropriate superheating treatment regulation. The interface morphology changes from cell to plane at R of 1.1 μm/s when Ts increases from 1500°C to 1650°C, and maintains plane with further elevated Ts of 1750°C. However, the interface morphology changes from coarse dendrite to cell and then to cellular dendrite at R of 2.25 μm/s when Ts increases from 1500°C to 1650°C and then to 1750°C. It is proved that the solidification onset temperature and the solidification interval undergo the nonlinear variation when Ts increases from 1500°C to 1680°C, and the turning point is 1650°C at which the solidification onset temperature and the solidification interval are all minimum. This indicates that the melt superheating treatment enhances the solidification interface stability and has important effect on the solidification characteristics.

  18. Microwave super-heated boiling of organic liquids: Origin, effect and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chemat, F.; Esveld, E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the state of the art of the microwave super-heated boiling phenomenon. When a liquid is heated by microwaves, the temperature increases rapidly to reach a steady temperature while refluxing. It happens that this steady state temperature can be up to 40 K higher than the boiling po

  19. Coalescence of a Drop inside another Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, Vivek; Jian, Zhen; Yang, Fan; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence dynamics of a pendent drop sitting inside another drop, has been studied experimentally and in numerical simulations. Using an in-house fabricated composite micro-nozzle, a smaller salt-water drop is introduced inside a larger oil drop which is pendent in a tank containing the same liquid as the inner drop. On touching the surface of outer drop, the inner drop coalesces with the surrounding liquid forming a vortex ring, which grows in time to form a mushroom-like structure. The initial dynamics at the first bridge opening up is quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while matching the refractive index of the two liquids. The phenomenon is also numerically simulated using the open-source code Gerris. The problem is fully governed by two non-dimensional parameters: the Ohnesorge number and the diameter ratios of the two drops. The validated numerical model is used to better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon. In some cases a coalescence cascade is observed with liquid draining intermittently and the inner drop reducing in size.

  20. The Reaction of Carbonates in Contact with Superheated Silicate Melts: New Insights from MEMIN Laser Melting Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, C.; Hecht, L.; Schäffer, S.; Deutsch, A.; Lexow, B.

    2016-08-01

    The reaction of carbonates in contact with silicate impact melts is discussed quite controversially in the impact community. Here, we discuss four MEMIN laser melting experiments involving carbonates in contact with superheated silicate melts.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of a vapor bubble expanding in a superheated region of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkova, E. A.; Kreider, W.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2015-10-01

    Growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid is studied theoretically. Contrary to the typical situation of boiling, when bubbles grow in a uniformly heated liquid, here the superheated region is considered in the form of a millimeter-sized spherical hot spot. An initial micron-sized bubble is positioned at the hot spot center and a theoretical model is developed that is capable of studying bubble growth caused by vapor pressure inside the bubble and corresponding hydrodynamic and thermal processes in the surrounding liquid. Such a situation is relevant to the dynamics of vapor cavities that are created in soft biological tissue in the focal region of a high-intensity focused ultrasound beam with a shocked pressure waveform. Such beams are used in the recently proposed treatment called boiling histotripsy. Knowing the typical behavior of vapor cavities during boiling histotripsy could help to optimize the therapeutic procedure.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of a vapor bubble expanding in a superheated region of finite size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annenkova, E. A., E-mail: a-a-annenkova@yandex.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kreider, W. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Sapozhnikov, O. A. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St., Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid is studied theoretically. Contrary to the typical situation of boiling, when bubbles grow in a uniformly heated liquid, here the superheated region is considered in the form of a millimeter-sized spherical hot spot. An initial micron-sized bubble is positioned at the hot spot center and a theoretical model is developed that is capable of studying bubble growth caused by vapor pressure inside the bubble and corresponding hydrodynamic and thermal processes in the surrounding liquid. Such a situation is relevant to the dynamics of vapor cavities that are created in soft biological tissue in the focal region of a high-intensity focused ultrasound beam with a shocked pressure waveform. Such beams are used in the recently proposed treatment called boiling histotripsy. Knowing the typical behavior of vapor cavities during boiling histotripsy could help to optimize the therapeutic procedure.

  3. Superheating and melting behaviors of Ag clusters with Ni coating studied by molecular dynamics and experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics with embedded-atom-type interatomicpotentials, we simulated the melting behavior of a spherical Ag3055 cluster coated with Ni. The semi-coherent Ag/Ni interface formed at low temperatures acts as an effective barrier against the surface melting and leads to a substantial superheating of the Ag cluster. The melting point was found to be about 100 K above the equilibrium melting point of the bulk Ag crystal (1230 K±15 K) and about 290 K above that (1040 K) of the free Ag3055 cluster. A superheating of 70 K was observed in the high-temperature differential scanning calorimetry measurement for Ag particles with a mean size of 30 nm embedded in Ni matrix prepared by means of melt-spinning. Melting is initiated locally at the defective interfacial area and then propagates inwards, suggesting a heterogeneously nucleated melting event at the Ag/Ni interface.

  4. Graphical procedure for comparing thermal death of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores in saturated and superheated steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHULL, J J; ERNST, R R

    1962-09-01

    The thermal death curve of dried spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus in saturated steam was characterized by three phases: (i) a sharp initial rise in viable count; (ii) a low rate of death which gradually increased; and (iii) logarithmic death at maximal rate. The first phase was a reflection of inadequate heat activation of the spore population. The second and third phases represented the characteristic thermal death curve of the spores in saturated steam. A jacketed steam sterilizer, equipped with a system for initial evacuation of the chamber, was examined for superheat during normal operation. Measurements of spore inactivation and temperature revealed superheat in surface layers of fabrics being processed in steam at 121 C. The high temperature of the fabric surfaces was attributed to absorption of excess heat energy from superheated steam. The superheated steam was produced at the beginning of the normal sterilizing cycle by transfer of heat from the steam-heated jacket to saturated steam entering the vessel.

  5. Specific heat of superheated Al-10Sr alloy melts[Foundation item

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The specific heat of superheated Al-10Sr melts was determined at different heating rates between 1  K/min and 20  K/min using a differential scanning calorimeter(DSC). As a whole, the specific heat increases with increasing temperature. A hump is observed on the specific heat curve at the temperature corresponding to the phase boundary temperature dependent on heating rate. Moreover, the hump shifts to higher temperature in the measured temperature range from about 840  ℃ to 890  ℃ with increasing heating rate. At certain temperature in the higher superheated zone, the specific heat of the melt as a function of temperature shows a sharp rise . The result indicates that disorder zone fraction begins to increase while atom clusters fraction decreases at the breaking temperature.

  6. Status of Superheated Spray and Post Combustor Particulate Modeling for NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Raju, Suri; Wey, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    At supersonic cruise conditions, high fuel temperatures, coupled with low pressures in the combustor, create potential for superheated fuel injection leading to shorter fuel jet break-up time and reduced spray penetration. Another issue particularly important to the supersonic cruise is the aircraft emissions contributing to the climate change in the atmosphere. Needless to say, aircraft emissions in general also contribute to the air pollution in the neighborhood of airports. The objectives of the present efforts are to establish baseline for prediction methods and experimental data for (a) liquid fuel atomization and vaporization at superheated conditions and (b) particle sampling systems and laboratory or engine testing environments, as well as to document current capabilities and identify gaps for future research.

  7. Eye Drop Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  8. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  9. Generalized computer algorithms for enthalpy, entropy and specific heat of superheated vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowden, Michael W.; Scaringe, Robert P.; Gebre-Amlak, Yonas D.

    This paper presents an innovative technique for the development of enthalpy, entropy, and specific heat correlations in the superheated vapor region. The method results in a prediction error of less than 5 percent and requires the storage of 39 constants for each fluid. These correlations are obtained by using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state and a least-squares regression for the coefficients involved.

  10. Superheating Suppresses Structural Disorder in Layered BiI3 Semiconductors Grown by the Bridgman Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, Paul M.; Sulekar, Soumitra; Yeo, Shinyoung; Baciak, James E.; Bliss, Mary; Nino, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility of layered structures to stacking faults is a problem in some of the more attractive semiconductor materials for ambient-temperature radiation detectors. In the work presented here, Bridgman-grown BiI3 layered single crystals are investigated to understand and eliminate this structural disorder, which reduces radiation detector performance. The use of superheating gradients has been shown to improve crystal quality in non-layered semiconductor crystals; thus the technique was here explored to improve the growth of BiI3. When investigating the homogeneity of non-superheated crystals, highly geometric void defects were found to populate the bulk of the crystals. Applying a superheating gradient to the melt prior to crystal growth improved structural quality and decreased defect density from the order of 4600 voids per cm3 to 300 voids per cm3. Corresponding moderate improvements to electronic properties also resulted from the superheat gradient method of crystal growth. Comparative measurements through infrared microscopy, etch-pit density, x-ray rocking curves, and sheet resistivity readings show that superheat gradients in BiI3 growth led to higher quality crystals.

  11. Superheating suppresses structural disorder in layered BiI3 semiconductors grown by the Bridgman method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Paul M.; Sulekar, Soumitra; Yeo, Shinyoung; Baciak, J. E.; Bliss, Mary; Nino, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility of layered structures to stacking faults is a problem in some of the more attractive semiconductor materials for ambient-temperature radiation detectors. In this work, Bridgman-grown BiI3 layered single crystals are investigated to understand and eliminate structural disorder, which reduces radiation detector performance. The use of superheating gradients has been shown by others to improve crystal quality in non-layered semiconductor crystals (Rudolph et al., 1996) [26]; thus the technique was explored to improve the growth of BiI3. When investigating the homogeneity of non-superheated crystals, highly geometric void defects were found to populate the bulk of the crystals. Applying a superheating gradient to the melt prior to crystal growth improved structural quality and decreased defect density from the order of 4600 voids per cm3 to 300 voids per cm3. Corresponding moderate improvements to electronic properties also resulted from the superheat gradient method of crystal growth. Comparative measurements through infrared microscopy, etch-pit density, X-ray rocking curves, and sheet resistivity readings show that superheat gradients in BiI3 growth led to higher quality crystals.

  12. Direct injection of superheated steam for continuous hydrolysis reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Weicheng

    2012-09-01

    The primary intent for previous continuous hydrolysis studies was to minimize the reaction temperature and reaction time. In this work, hydrolysis is the first step of a proprietary chemical process to convert lipids to sustainable, drop-in replacements for petroleum based fuels. To improve the economics of the process, attention is now focused on optimizing the energy efficiency of the process, maximizing the reaction rate, and improving the recovery of the glycerol by-product. A laboratory-scale reactor system has been designed and built with this goal in mind.Sweet water (water with glycerol from the hydrolysis reaction) is routed to a distillation column and heated above the boiling point of water at the reaction pressure. The steam pressure allows the steam to return to the reactor without pumping. Direct injection of steam into the hydrolysis reactor is shown to provide favorable equilibrium conditions resulting in a high quality of FFA product and rapid reaction rate, even without preheating the inlet water and oil and with lower reactor temperatures and lower fresh water demand. The high enthalpy of the steam provides energy for the hydrolysis reaction. Steam injection offers enhanced conditions for continuous hydrolysis of triglycerides to high-purity streams of FFA and glycerol. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Experimental research of heterogeneous nuclei in superheated steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoš Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mobile steam expansion chamber has been developed to investigate experimentally homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation processes in steam, both in the laboratory and at power plants using the steam withdrawn from the steam turbine. The purpose of the device is to provide new insight into the physics of nonequilibrium wet steam formation, which is one of the factors limiting the efficiency and reliability of steam turbines. The expanded steam or a mixture of steam with a non-condensable gas rapidly expands in the expansion chamber. Due to adiabatic cooling, the temperature drops below the dew point of the steam at a given pressure. When reaching a sufficiently high supersaturation, droplets are nucleated. By tuning the supersaturation in the so-called nucleation pulse, particles of various size ranges can be activated. This fact is used in the present study to measure the aerosol particles present in the air. Homogeneous nucleation was negligible in this case. The experiment demonstrates the functionality of the device, data acquisition system and data evaluation methods.

  14. Experimental research of heterogeneous nuclei in superheated steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoš, Ondřej; Kolovratník, Michal; Šmíd, Bohuslav; Hrubý, Jan

    2016-03-01

    A mobile steam expansion chamber has been developed to investigate experimentally homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation processes in steam, both in the laboratory and at power plants using the steam withdrawn from the steam turbine. The purpose of the device is to provide new insight into the physics of nonequilibrium wet steam formation, which is one of the factors limiting the efficiency and reliability of steam turbines. The expanded steam or a mixture of steam with a non-condensable gas rapidly expands in the expansion chamber. Due to adiabatic cooling, the temperature drops below the dew point of the steam at a given pressure. When reaching a sufficiently high supersaturation, droplets are nucleated. By tuning the supersaturation in the so-called nucleation pulse, particles of various size ranges can be activated. This fact is used in the present study to measure the aerosol particles present in the air. Homogeneous nucleation was negligible in this case. The experiment demonstrates the functionality of the device, data acquisition system and data evaluation methods.

  15. Quench front progression in a superheated porous medium: experimental analysis and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Repetto, G., E-mail: andrea.bachrata@irsn.fr, E-mail: florian.fichot@irsn.fr, E-mail: georges.repetto@irsn.fr [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Quintard, M., E-mail: michel.quintard@imft.fr [Univ. de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); Fleurot, J. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France)

    2011-07-01

    In case of severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the fuel rods may be highly damaged and oxidized and finally collapse to form a debris bed. Removal of decay heat from a debris bed is a challenging issue because of the difficulty for water to flow inside. Currently, IRSN has started experimental program PEARL with two experimental facilities PRELUDE and PEARL, to investigate the reflood process at high temperature, for various particle sizes. On the basis of PRELUDE experimental results, the thermal hydraulic features of the quench front have been analysed and the intensity of heat transfers was estimated. From a selection of experimental results, a reflooding model was improved and validated. The model is implemented in the code ICARE-CATHARE developed by IRSN which is used for severe accident reactor analysis. (author)

  16. Condensation on surface energy gradient shifts drop size distribution toward small drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley M; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H

    2014-02-25

    During dropwise condensation from vapor onto a cooled surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Drop surface coverage dictates the heat transfer characteristics and depends on both drop size and number of drops present on the surface at any given time. Thus, manipulating drop distributions is crucial to maximizing heat transfer. On earth, manipulation is achieved with gravity. However, in applications with small length scales or in low gravity environments, other methods of removal, such as a surface energy gradient, are required. This study examines how chemical modification of a cooled surface affects drop growth and coalescence, which in turn influences how a population of drops evolves. Steam is condensed onto a horizontally oriented surface that has been treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact angle (hydrophilic, hydrophobic) or a continuous radial gradient of contact angles (hydrophobic to hydrophilic). The time evolution of number density and associated drop size distributions are measured. For a uniform surface, the shape of the drop size distribution is unique and can be used to identify the progress of condensation. In contrast, the drop size distribution for a gradient surface, relative to a uniform surface, shifts toward a population of small drops. The frequent sweeping of drops truncates maturation of the first generation of large drops and locks the distribution shape at the initial distribution. The absence of a shape change indicates that dropwise condensation has reached a steady state. Previous reports of heat transfer enhancement on chemical gradient surfaces can be explained by this shift toward smaller drops, from which the high heat transfer coefficients in dropwise condensation are attributed to. Terrestrial applications using gravity as the primary removal mechanism also stand to benefit from inclusion of gradient surfaces because the critical threshold size required for

  17. A Novel Strategy for Simulating the Main Fractionator of Delayed Cokers by Separating the De-superheating Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Yang; ZHANG Bingjian; HOU Xiaoqiong; CHEN Qinglin

    2013-01-01

    Delayed coking is an important process in refinery to convert heavy residue oils from crude distillation units (CDUs) and fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCUs) into dry gas,liquefied petroleum gas (LPG),gasoline,diesel,gas oils and cokes.The main fractionator,separating superheating reaction vapors from the coke drums into lighter oil products,involves a de-superheating section and a rectifying section,and couldn't be simulated as a whole column directly because of non-equilibrium in the de-superheating section.It is very important to correctly simulate the main fractionator for operational parameter and energy-use optimization of delayed cokers.This paper discusses the principle of de-superheating processes,and then proposes a new simulation strategy.Some key issues such as composition prediction of the reaction vapors,selection of thermodynamic methods,estimation of tray efficiency,etc.are discussed.The proposed simulation approach is applied to two industrial delayed cokers with typical technological processes in a Chinese refinery by using PRO/II.The simulation results obtained are well consistent with the actual operation data,which indicates that the presented approach is suitable to simulate the main fractionators of delayed cokers or other distillation columns consisting of de-superheating sections and rectifying sections.

  18. Drag on Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  19. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  20. Improvement of the phase transition homogeneity of superheated superconducting tin granules

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Czapek, G; Ebert, T R; Hasenbalg, F; Hauser, M G; Janos, S; Kainer, K U; Knoop, K M; Moser, U; Palmieri, V G; Pretzl, Klaus P; Sahli, B; Sgobba, Stefano; Vollenberg, W; Wyss, C

    2000-01-01

    A considerably improved phase transition homogeneity was observed with superheated superconducting Sn spheres as a result of laser melting and fast cooling. These spheres exhibited a very homogeneous phase transition behaviour independent of the orientation of the spheres with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Compared to previously untreated Sn spheres the spread of the phase transition boundaries was reduced by almost an order of magnitude. In addition, we studied mass production of Sn structures using vacuum evaporation and deposition. First encouraging results are reported. (7 refs).

  1. Heat Transfer of Condensation in Smooth Round Tube from Superheated Vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jiange; Hrnjak, Pega

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer of R134a condensing in a horizontal smooth round tube with 6.1 mm inner diameter is invested in this study. Experimental results on the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) with mass flux from 50 to 200 kg m-2 s-1 and heat flux from 5 to 15 kW m-2 are provided. Heat transfer behavior is compared between condensing superheated (CSH) region and two-phase (TP) region. Experimental result shows that in TP region, higher mass flux results in higher HTC while heat flux does not affect HTC....

  2. Superheating and Homogeneous Single Bubble Nucleation in a Solid-State Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Gaku; Levine, Edlyn V.; Hoogerheide, David P.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate extreme superheating and single bubble nucleation in an electrolyte solution within a nanopore in a thin silicon nitride membrane. The high temperatures are achieved by Joule heating from a highly focused ionic current induced to flow through the pore by modest voltage biases. Conductance, nucleation, and bubble evolution are monitored electronically and optically. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are achieved just before bubble nucleation with the system at atmospheric pressure. Bubble nucleation is homogeneous and highly reproducible. This nanopore approach more generally suggests broad application to the excitation, detection, and characterization of highly metastable states of matter. PMID:25062192

  3. First Dark Matter Limits from a Large-Mass, Low-Background Superheated Droplet Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J.I.; Girard, T.A.; Limagne, D.; Miley, H.S.; Waysand, G.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the fabrication aspects and calibration of the first large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) modules of SIMPLE, a search for particle dark matter using Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs). While still limited by the statistical uncertainty of the small data sample on hand, the first weeks of operation in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt already provide a sensitivity to axially-coupled Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) competitive with leading experiments, confirming SDDs as a convenient, low-cost alternative for WIMP detection.

  4. Machine Learning Method Applied in Readout System of Superheated Droplet Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Sullivan, Clair Julia; d'Errico, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    Direct readability is one advantage of superheated droplet detectors in neutron dosimetry. Utilizing such a distinct characteristic, an imaging readout system analyzes image of the detector for neutron dose readout. To improve the accuracy and precision of algorithms in the imaging readout system, machine learning algorithms were developed. Deep learning neural network and support vector machine algorithms are applied and compared with generally used Hough transform and curvature analysis methods. The machine learning methods showed a much higher accuracy and better precision in recognizing circular gas bubbles.

  5. Improvement of the phase transition homogeneity of superheated superconducting tin granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calatroni, S.; Casalbuoni, S. E-mail: sara@lhc.lhep.unibe.ch; Czapek, G.; Ebert, T.; Hasenbalg, F.; Hauser, M.; Janos, S.; Kainer, K.U.; Knoop, K.M.; Moser, U.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pretzl, K.; Sahli, B.; Sgobba, S.; Vollenberg, W.; Wyss, Ch.P

    2000-04-07

    A considerably improved phase transition homogeneity was observed with superheated superconducting Sn spheres as a result of laser melting and fast cooling. These spheres exhibited a very homogeneous phase transition behaviour independent of the orientation of the spheres with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Compared to previously untreated Sn spheres the spread of the phase transition boundaries was reduced by almost an order of magnitude. In addition, we studied mass production of Sn structures using vacuum evaporation and deposition. First encouraging results are reported.

  6. Extraction of amino acids from soils and sediments with superheated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C. N.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    A method of extraction for amino acids from soils and sediments involving superheated water has been investigated. About 75-97 per cent of the amino acids contained in four soils of a soil profile from Illinois were extracted by this method. Deep penetration of water into soil aggregates and partial hydrolysis of peptide bonds during this extraction by water at high temperature are likely mechanisms responsible for the release of amino acids from samples. This extraction method does not require subsequent desalting treatments when analyses are carried out with an ion-exchange amino acid analyzer.

  7. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Roeland Cornelis Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study t

  8. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  9. The role of superheating in the formation of Glass Mountain obsidians (Long Valley, CA) inferred through crystallization of sanidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Laura E.; Andrews, Benjamin J.

    2016-10-01

    The Glass Mountain obsidians (Long Valley, CA) are crystal poor (obsidians. The obsidian in this study (GM-11) is saturated in nine phases (sanidine + quartz + plagioclase + titanomagnetite + ilmenite + zircon + apatite + allanite + biotite), and results of high-resolution SEM compositional mapping and electron microprobe analysis reveal that individual sanidine crystals are normally zoned and span a range of compositions (Or40-78). Sanidines have a "granophyric" texture, characterized by intergrowths of quartz and sanidine. Mineral phases in the natural sample are compared to H2O-saturated phase equilibrium experiments conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, over a range of conditions (700-850 °C; 75-225 MPa), and all are found to be plausible phenocrysts. Comparison of sanidine compositions from the natural sample with those grown in phase equilibrium experiments demonstrates that sanidine in the natural sample occurs in a reduced abundance. Further comparison with phase equilibrium experiments suggests that sanidine compositions track progressive loss of dissolved melt water (±cooling), suggesting that crystallization in the natural obsidian was driven predominantly by degassing resulting from decompression. It is paradoxical that an effusively (slowly) erupted lava should contain multiple phenocryst phases, including sanidine crystals that span a range of compositions with granophyric textures, and yet remain so crystal poor. To resolve this paradox, it is necessary that the solidification mechanism (degassing or cooling) that produced the sanidine crystals (and other mineral phases) must have an associated kinetic effect(s) that efficiently hinders crystal nucleation and growth. Decompression experiments conducted in this study and from the literature collectively demonstrate that the simplest way to inhibit nucleation during degassing-induced crystallization is to initiate degassing ± cooling from superliquidus conditions, and therefore, the Glass

  10. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  11. Sub-micrometer dropwise condensation under superheated and rarefied vapor condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sushant; Son, Sang Young

    2010-11-16

    Phase change accompanying conversion of a saturated or superheated vapor in the presence of subcooled surfaces is one of the most common occurring phenomena in nature. The mode of phase change that follows such a transformation is dependent upon surface properties such as contact angle and thermodynamic conditions of the system. In present studies, an experimental approach is used to study the physics behind droplet growth on a partially wet surface. Superheated vapor at low pressures of 4-5 Torr was condensed on subcooled silicon surface with a static contact angle of 60° in the absence of noncondensable gases, and the condensation process was monitored using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with sub-microscopic spatial resolution. The condensation process was analyzed in the form of size growth of isolated droplets before a coalescence event ended the regime of single droplet growth. Droplet growth obtained as a function of time reveals that the rate of growth decreases as the droplet increases in size. This behavior is indicative of an overall droplet growth law existing over larger time scales for which the current observations in their brief time intervals could be fitted. A theoretical model based on kinetic theory further support the experimental observations indicating a mechanism where growth occurs by interfacial mass transport directly on condensing droplet surface. Evidence was also found that establishes the presence of sub-microscopic droplets nucleating and growing between microscopic droplets for the partially wetting case.

  12. Laminar film condensation from downward flowing superheated vapors onto a non-isothermal sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, C.H. [Dept. of Mold and Die Engineering, National Kaohsiung Univ. of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung (Taiwan)

    2001-11-01

    A model is developed for the study of mixed convection film condensation from downward flowing superheated vapors onto a sphere with variable wall temperature. The model combined natural convection dominated and forced convection dominated film condensation, including effects of superheated vapor, pressure gradient and wall temperature variation can be solved numerically by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. By the present numerical approach, the mean heat transfer is evaluated up to the critical angle of the condensate layer, {phi}{sub c}. In general, the result of mean heat transfer shows that, as A, the wall-temperature amplitude, increases, the value of NuRe{sup -1/2} with inclusion of P, the pressure gradient effect, goes down slightly, however, the value of NuRe{sup -1/2} with the pressure gradient effect ignored will remain almost uniform. Further, for P=2.0, the mean heat transfer coefficient increases significantly, by 8.6-23.9%, depending on A, as the superheat parameter, Sp, increases within a practical range. (orig.)

  13. Effect of Superheated Steam Treatment on Changes in Moisture Content and Colour Properties of Coconut Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah Sook Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drying is one of the methods to preserve the quality and prolong the shelf life of food. Coconut meat was sliced and dried using superheated steam oven at 140°C, 160°C and 180°C. Drying was carried out at different drying time (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes. The effect of drying temperature and time on the moisture content and colour properties (L, a, b and BI of the coconut slices were studied. The temperature and time significantly (p < 0.05 affected the moisture loss and colour values of coconut slices during superheated steam drying. The moisture content decreased with increased drying temperature and time. The values of L decreased with drying temperature and time. The a and b value of coconut slice dried at 140°C decreased initially then increased with time. Coconut slices dried at 160°C had their a values increased up to 20 minutes then decreased and b values increased up to 20 minutes then fluctuated. The a and b values of coconut slices dried at 180°C showed fluctuation. BI values of coconut slices increased with increasing drying time and temperature.

  14. Effect of Superheated Steam Roasting on Radical Scavenging Activity and Phenolic Content of Robusta Coffee Beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi Ee Shan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Robusta coffee is one of the coffee species grown in Malaysia. However, there is little research conducted on Robusta coffee beans as Arabica coffee is more popular among the consumers. Coffee is a rich source of antioxidants, therefore research on antioxidant properties of Robusta coffee beans is important to explore its market value. Nowadays, most of coffee analysis is on conventional roasted coffee which reduces their antioxidant properties. In this study, Robusta coffee beans (Coffea canephora were subjected to superheated steam roasting at 200, 220 and 240 ˚C for 20-40 min to obtain light, medium and dark roast. The effect of different roasting temperature and time on the total phenolic content (TPC and radical scavenging activity (RSA of Robusta coffee bean was investigated. Total phenolic content of coffee brews decreased with the increase of roasting degree due to the degradation of phenolic compounds. The highest phenolic content was found at 220 ˚C for 20 min. Meanwhile, brews extracted from light roasted coffee and medium roasted at 220 ˚C for 20 min showed a maximum scavenging activity than those from green coffee. Brews from dark roasted coffee showed lowest radical scavenging activity and total phenol content. Hence, based on the results from this study, the best superheated steam roasting condition is at 220 ˚C for 20 min (medium roast to achieve a maximum antioxidant activity and highest phenolic content.

  15. Investigation of effects of chemical dosing on fuel consumption in central heating systems with superheated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilen, Kemal [Kirikkale University, Engineering Faculty, Mechanical Engineering Department, Kirikkale (Turkey); email: kemal.bilen92@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    In Turkey, a significant percentage of energy is consumed by buildings and heating accounts for most of it. These is therefore a need to increase the efficiency of such systems. As a regional heating option, central heating systems with superheated water are preferred and chemical dosing of these systems has become prevalent in recent years. This study analyses the energy and exergy of a superheated water, central heating system operated on natural gas, on a university campus with a population of 15000 people, and investigates the effect of chemical dosing on their efficiencies. The study results showed that the average energy and exergy efficiencies of the system were 92.07% and 62.45%, respectively. The results also demonstrated that there was a 5.21% and 2.74% increase in hourly gas consumption when the dosing concentration was changed from 5 ppm to 101 ppm and 50 ppm to 101 ppm, respectively. It was concluded that for lower fuel consumption, chemical dosing should be avoided.

  16. Intrinsic noise of a superheated droplet detector for neutron background measurements in massively shielded facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana C.; Morlat, Tomoko A.; Felizardo, Miguel; Kling, Andreas; Marques, José G.; Prudêncio, Maria I.; Marques, Rosa; Carvalho, Fernando P.; Roche, Ignácio Lázaro; Girard, Thomas A.

    2017-09-01

    Superheated droplet detectors are a promising technique to the measurement of low-intensity neutron fields, as detectors can be rendered insensitive to minimum ionizing radiations. We report on the intrinsic neutron-induced signal of C2ClF5 devices fabricated by our group that originate from neutron- and alpha-emitting impurities in the detector constituents. The neutron background was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX-PoliMi code in order to extract the recoil distributions following neutron interaction with the atoms of the superheated liquid. Various nuclear techniques were employed to characterise the detector materials with respect to source isotopes (238U, 232Th and 147Sm) for the normalisation of the simulations and also light elements (B, Li) having high (α, n) neutron production yields. We derived a background signal of 10-3 cts/day in a 1 liter detector of 1-3 wt.% C2ClF5, corresponding to a detection limit in the order of 10-8 n cm-2s-1. Direct measurements in a massively shielded underground facility for dark matter search have confirmed this result. With the borosilicate detector containers found to be the dominant background source in current detectors, possibilities for further noise reduction by 2 orders of magnitude based on selected container materials are discussed.

  17. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  18. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTY CHANGES AND ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS ENHANCEMENT OF OIL PALM EMPTY FRUIT BUNCHES TREATED WITH SUPERHEATED STEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezyana Kamal Bahrin,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of superheated steam treatment on oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB was investigated in terms of physicochemical property changes and enzymatic hydrolysis enhancement. The experimental treatment was carried out at different temperatures (140-210°C and durations (20-90 min. Results showed that as the superheated steam temperature and time increased, the size distribution also changed, resulting in more small particles. Analysis on the surface texture, color, and mechanical properties of the treated OPEFB also showed that significant changes resulted due to the superheated steam treatment. In support to this, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric (TG analyses showed that solubilization and removal of the hemicelluloses component also took place. As a result of this phenomenon, higher total sugar and glucose yield was achieved once the treated OPEFB was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis. This suggests that superheated steam treatment could enhance OPEFB structure degradation for the preparation of a suitable substrate in order to produce a higher glucose yield in the enzymatic hydrolysis process.

  19. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  20. Searching for universal behaviour in superheated droplet detector with effective recoil nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mala Das; Susnata Seth

    2013-06-01

    Energy calibration of superheated droplet detector is discussed in terms of the effective recoil nucleus threshold energy and the reduced superheat. This provides a universal energy calibration curve valid for different liquids used in this type of detector. Two widely used liquids, R114 and C4F10, one for neutron detection and the other for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) dark matter search experiment, have been compared. Liquid having recoil nuclei with larger values of linear energy transfer (LET) provides better neutron- discrimination. Gamma () response of C4F10 has also been studied and the results are discussed. Behaviour of nucleation parameter with the effective recoil nucleus threshold energy and the reduced superheat have been explored.

  1. Influence of element Cu on hydrogen content in superheated aluminum melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen content in molten Al-Cu alloy increases remarkably when the temperature of the melt rises to about 780  ℃. The effects of alloying element are theoretically analyzed in terms of Wagner interaction parameter. Furthermore, analyses indicate that the alloy element Cu plays an important role in the hydrogen content in superheated Al-Cu alloy melt below about 780  ℃. The conclusion is drawn that the degree of gassing in molten Al-Cu alloy is bound up with the properties of oxide film of Al alloy melts. The results make it clear that the hydrogen content in the molten aluminum reduces with increasing element Cu dissolved in aluminum melts at the same temperature.

  2. Explosive boiling of a metallic glass superheated by nanosecond pulse laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, M. Q., E-mail: mqjiang@imech.ac.cn, E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of Materials Physics, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany); Wei, Y. P. [Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Fluid Solid Coupling Systems, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wilde, G. [Institute of Materials Physics, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany); Dai, L. H., E-mail: mqjiang@imech.ac.cn, E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-01-12

    We report an explosive boiling in a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1) bulk metallic glass irradiated by a nanosecond pulse laser with a single shot. This critical phenomenon is accompanied by the ejection of high-temperature matter from the target and the formation of a liquid-gas spinodal pattern on the irradiated area. An analytical model reveals that the glassy target experiences the normal heating (melting) and significant superheating, eventually culminating in explosive boiling near the spinodal limit. Furthermore, the time lag of nucleation and the critical radius of vapor bubbles are theoretically predicted, which are in agreement with the experimental observations. This study provides the investigation on the instability of a metallic glass liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature.

  3. Effect of Melt Superheating Treatment on the Latent Heat Release of Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junfeng; Dang, Bo; Fan, Dandan; Jian, Zengyun

    2017-03-01

    The accuracy of the baseline evaluation is of importance for calculating the transition enthalpy such as the latent heat of the crystallization. This study demonstrates the modified method of the equivalent non-latent heat baseline, by which the transition enthalpy can be measured accurately according to the transition peak in differential scanning calorimetric curve. With this method, the effect of melt superheating treatment time on the latent heat release upon the solidification of tin is investigated. The results show that the latent heat increases by increasing the treatment time, and is close to a constant when the treatment time is large enough, indicating the homogeneous system. And then, a simple model is established to describe the changes of the crystallization latent heat with the treatment time, which is confirmed by the experimental data of Sn.

  4. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    ;rbæk's case study presented at PEPM '95, most polyvariant specializers for procedural programs operate on recursive equations. To this end, in a pre-processing phase, they lambda-lift source programs into recursive equations, As a result, residual programs are also expressed as recursive equations, often......Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... with dozens of parameters, which most compilers do not handle efficiently. Lambda-dropping in a post-processing phase restores their block structure and lexical scope thereby significantly reducing both the compile time and the run time of residual programs....

  5. Antifreeze protein-induced superheating of ice inside Antarctic notothenioid fishes inhibits melting during summer warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziko, Paul A; DeVries, Arthur L; Evans, Clive W; Cheng, Chi-Hing Christina

    2014-10-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) of polar marine teleost fishes are widely recognized as an evolutionary innovation of vast adaptive value in that, by adsorbing to and inhibiting the growth of internalized environmental ice crystals, they prevent death by inoculative freezing. Paradoxically, systemic accumulation of AFP-stabilized ice could also be lethal. Whether or how fishes eliminate internal ice is unknown. To investigate if ice inside high-latitude Antarctic notothenioid fishes could melt seasonally, we measured its melting point and obtained a decadal temperature record from a shallow benthic fish habitat in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. We found that AFP-stabilized ice resists melting at temperatures above the expected equilibrium freezing/melting point (eqFMP), both in vitro and in vivo. Superheated ice was directly observed in notothenioid serum samples and in solutions of purified AFPs, and ice was found to persist inside live fishes at temperatures more than 1 °C above their eqFMP for at least 24 h, and at a lower temperature for at least several days. Field experiments confirmed that superheated ice occurs naturally inside wild fishes. Over the long-term record (1999-2012), seawater temperature surpassed the fish eqFMP in most summers, but never exceeded the highest temperature at which ice persisted inside experimental fishes. Thus, because of the effects of AFP-induced melting inhibition, summer warming may not reliably eliminate internal ice. Our results expose a potentially antagonistic pleiotropic effect of AFPs: beneficial freezing avoidance is accompanied by melting inhibition that may contribute to lifelong accumulation of detrimental internal ice crystals.

  6. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  7. Coalescence of sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Pomeau, Yves; Andrieu, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical description of the kinetics of coalescence of two water drops on a plane solid surface. The case of partial wetting is considered. The drops are in an atmosphere of nitrogen saturated with water where they grow by condensation and eventually touch each other and coalesce. A new convex composite drop is rapidly formed that then exponentially and slowly relaxes to an equilibrium hemispherical cap. The characteristic relaxation time is proportional to the drop radius R * at final equilibrium. This relaxation time appears to be nearly 10 7 times larger than the bulk capillary relaxation time t b = R * $\\eta$/$\\sigma$, where $\\sigma$ is the gas--liquid surface tension and $\\eta$ is the liquid shear viscosity. In order to explain this extremely large relaxation time, we consider a model that involves an Arrhenius kinetic factor resulting from a liquid--vapour phase change in the vicinity of the contact line. The model results in a large relaxation time of order t b exp(L/R...

  8. Sessile drops in microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces with a liquid are governing several phenomena. For instance, these interfaces are giving the shape of sessile droplets and rule the spread of liquids on surfaces. Here we analyze the shape of sessile axisymmetric drops and how it is depending on the gravity, obtaining results in agreement with experimental observations under conditions of microgravity.

  9. Non-Intrusive, Real-Time, On-Line Temperature Sensor for Superheated Hydrogen at High Pressure and High Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SSC needs a hydrogen temperature sensor that can provide high accuracy, fast response and can be operated on a superheated hydrogen (SHH2) environment. This will...

  10. Thermal Hydraulic Design and Analysis of a Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket with Superheated Steam for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoman; Ma, Xuebin; Jiang, Kecheng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-09-01

    The water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) is one of the blanket candidates for China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR). In order to improve power generation efficiency and tritium breeding ratio, WCCB with superheated steam is under development. The thermal-hydraulic design is the key to achieve the purpose of safe heat removal and efficient power generation under normal and partial loading operation conditions. In this paper, the coolant flow scheme was designed and one self-developed analytical program was developed, based on a theoretical heat transfer model and empirical correlations. Employing this program, the design and analysis of related thermal-hydraulic parameters were performed under different fusion power conditions. The results indicated that the superheated steam water-cooled blanket is feasible. supported by the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  11. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J; Stone, H A; Eggers, Jens; Lister, John R.; Stone, Howard A.

    1999-01-01

    When two drops of radius $R$ touch, surface tension drives an initially singular motion which joins them into a bigger drop with smaller surface area. This motion is always viscously dominated at early times. We focus on the early-time behavior of the radius $\\rmn$ of the small bridge between the two drops. The flow is driven by a highly curved meniscus of length $2\\pi \\rmn$ and width $\\Delta\\ll\\rmn$ around the bridge, from which we conclude that the leading-order problem is asymptotically equivalent to its two-dimensional counterpart. An exact two-dimensional solution for the case of inviscid surroundings [Hopper, J. Fluid Mech. ${\\bf 213}$, 349 (1990)] shows that R)]$; and thus the same is true in three dimensions. The case of coalescence with an external viscous fluid is also studied in detail both analytically and numerically. A significantly different structure is found in which the outer fluid forms a toroidal bubble of radius $\\Delta \\propto \\rmn^{3/2}$ at the meniscus and $\\rmn \\sim (t\\gamma/4\\pi\\eta)...

  12. Coupled phase field, heat conduction, and elastodynamic simulations of kinetic superheating and nanoscale melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I

    2015-12-21

    An advanced continuum model for nanoscale melting and kinetic superheating of an aluminum nanolayer irradiated by a picosecond laser is formulated. Barrierless nucleation of surface premelting and melting occurs, followed by a propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other and their collision. For a slow heating rate of Q = 0.015 K ps(-1) melting occurs at the equilibrium melting temperature under uniaxial strain conditions T = 898.1 K (i.e., below equilibrium melting temperature Teq = 933.67 K) and corresponding biaxial stresses, which relax during melting. For a high heating rate of Q = 0.99-84 K ps(-1), melting occurs significantly above Teq. Surprisingly, an increase in heating rate leads to temperature reduction at the 3 nm wide moving interfaces due to fast absorption of the heat of fusion. A significant, rapid temperature drop (100-500 K, even below melting temperature) at the very end of melting is revealed, which is caused by the collision of two finite-width interfaces and accelerated melting in about the 5 nm zone. For Q = 25-84 K ps(-1), standing elastic stress waves are observed in a solid with nodal points at the moving solid-melt interfaces, which, however, do not have a profound effect on melting time or temperatures. When surface melting is suppressed, barrierless bulk melting occurs in the entire sample, and elastodynamic effects are more important. Good correspondence with published, experimentally-determined melting time is found for a broad range of heating rates. Similar approaches can be applied to study various phase transformations in different materials and nanostructures under high heating rates.

  13. Evaluation of the thermal effect on separation selectivity in anion-exchange processes using superheated water ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Masami; Taguchi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Saitoh, Kazunori; Hiaki, Toshihiko; Yarita, Takashi

    2012-07-07

    The thermal effect on retention and separation selectivity of inorganic anions and aromatic sulfonate ions in anion-exchange chromatography is studied on a quaternized styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer anion-exchange column in the temperature range of 40-120 °C using superheated water chromatography. The selectivity coefficient for a pair of identically charged anions approaches unity as temperature increases provided the ions have the same effective size, such that the retention of an analyte ion decreases with an increase in temperature when the analyte ion has stronger affinity for the ion-exchanger than that of the eluent counterion, whereas it increases when it has weaker affinity. The change in anion-exchange selectivity with temperature observed with superheated water chromatography has been discussed on the basis of the effect of temperature on hydration of the ions. At elevated temperatures, especially in superheated water, the electrostatic interaction or association of the ions with the fixed ion in the resin phase becomes a predominant factor resulting in a different separation selectivity from that obtained at ambient temperature.

  14. Emission estimation of neat paradise tree oil combustion assisted with superheated hydrogen in a 4-stroke natural aspirated DICI engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundararajan Karthikayan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work investigates the use of neat paradise tree oil in a 4-stroke natural aspirated direct injection compression ignition engine assisted with the help of super-heated hydrogen (hydrogen in gaseous state or above its saturation temperature as a combustion improver. The high calorific gaseous fuel hydrogen gas was used as a combustion improver and admitted into the engine during the suction stroke. A 4-stroke single cylinder Diesel engine was chosen and its operating parameters were suitably modified. Neat paradise tree oil was admitted through standard injector of the engine and hydrogen was admitted through induction manifold. Inducted super-heated hydrogen was initiated the intermediate compounds combustion of neat paradise tree oil. This process offers higher temperature combustion and results in complete combustion of heavier molecules of neat paradise tree oil within shorter duration. The results of the experiment reveal that 40% higher NOx, 20% lower smoke, 5% lower CO, and 45% lower HC than that of neat paradise tree oil fuel operation and the admission of superheated hydrogen has improved the combustion characteristics of neat paradise tree oil. The investigation successfully proved that the application of neat paradise tree oil with 15% of hydrogen improver is possible under a regular Diesel engine with minimal engine modification.

  15. Role of superheated water in the origin of life; Seimei no kigen ni hatashita nessui no yakuwari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, H. [Mitsubishi Kasei Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    High-temperature hot water environments at the bottom of seas are drawing attentions recently. This paper describes the consideration on actions of superheated water that contribute to the origin of life. Gushing of superheated water from cracks in ocean bottoms is discovered in the eastern Pacific oceanic rises, Okinawa and other parts of the world. Jet holes are characterized by having higher concentration in such a reducing gas as methane (CH4), and being more reducing than the surrounding sea water. Concentrations of ions of metals such as Fe is 1000 times or more higher than that in the sea water, which is advantageous for organics composing reaction in the superheated water. An investigation has been carried out on organics synthesis under the environment where ocean bottom hot water jet holes exist. Sea waters were manufactured on an experimental basis by using a hot water jetting hole model. As a result of various discussions, proteins such as glycine, amino acid, and non-protein {beta}-alanine were produced. With respect to the evolution of chemical actions, high-pressure heating of mixed solution containing glycine has generated microsphere. Temperature dependence of peptide generation was also made clear. Regarding the hydrogen fugacity at the actual jetting holes, the stability of amino acid is remarkably increased when 1% H2 is added into the pressurizing N2. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Superheated water ion-exchange chromatography: an experimental approach for interpretation of separation selectivity in ion-exchange processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Masami; Shimasaki, Tomomi; Saito, Shingo; Yarita, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    Cation-exchange selectivity for alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions and tetraalkylammonium ions on a strongly acidic sulfonic acid cation-exchange resin has been investigated in the temperature range of 40-175 degrees C using superheated water chromatography. Dependence of the distribution coefficient (ln KD) on the reciprocal of temperature (1/T) is not linear for most of the ions studied, and the selectivity coefficient for a pair of alkali metal ions or that of alkaline-earth metal ions approaches unity as temperature increases. On the other hand, the retention order of tetraalkylammonium ions is reversed at 160 degrees C or above when eluted with Na2SO4 aqueous solution and the larger ions are eluted faster than the smaller ones contrary to the retention order obtained at ambient temperature. The change in ion-exchange selectivity with temperature observed with superheated water chromatography has been discussed on the basis of the effect of temperature on hydration of the ions and specific adsorption or distribution of ionic species between the external solution and ion-exchange resin. In superheated water, the electrostatic interaction or association of the ions with the fixed ion becomes a predominant mechanism resulting in different separation selectivity from that obtained at ambient temperature.

  17. Hydrodynamics of evaporating sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Several dynamical stages of the Marangoni convection of an evaporating sessile drop are obtained. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop and the diffusion of vapor in air. The stages are characterized by different number of vortices in the drop and the spatial location of vortices. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a non-monotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size, which is calculated similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. The number of vortices quickly decreases with time, resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortex structure finally evolves into the single convection vortex in the drop, existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  18. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  19. Sequential microwave superheated water extraction of mannans from spent coffee grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Cláudia P; Moreira, Ana S P; Domingues, M Rosário M; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2014-03-15

    The feasibility of using sequential microwave superheated water extraction (MAE) for the recovery of mannans from spent coffee grounds (SCG) was studied. Due to the high contents of mannose still present in the SCG residue left after two consecutive MAE, the unextracted material was re-suspended in water and submitted to a third microwave irradiation (MAE3) at 200 °C for 3 min. With MAE3, mannose recovery achieved 48%, increasing to 56% by MAE4, and reaching a maximum of 69% with MAE5. Glycosidic-linkage analysis showed that in MAE3 mainly galactomannans were recovered, while debranched galactomannans were recovered with MAE4 and MAE5. With increasing the number of extractions, the average degree of polymerization of the mannans decreased, as observed by size-exclusion chromatography and by methylation analysis. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a decrease on cell walls thickness. After final MAE5, the remaining un-extracted insoluble material, representing 22% of the initial SCG, was composed mainly by cellulose (84%).

  20. Modification of oil palm mesocarp fiber characteristics using superheated steam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Noor Ida Amalina Ahamad; Ariffin, Hidayah; Andou, Yoshito; Hassan, Mohd Ali; Shirai, Yoshihito; Nishida, Haruo; Yunus, Wan Zin Wan; Karuppuchamy, Subbian; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2013-07-30

    In this study, oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF) was treated with superheated steam (SHS) in order to modify its characteristics for biocomposite applications. Treatment was conducted at temperatures 190-230 °C for 1, 2 and 3 h. SHS-treated OPMF was evaluated for its chemical composition, thermal stability, morphology and crystallinity. OPMF treated at 230 °C exhibited lower hemicellulose content (9%) compared to the untreated OPMF (33%). Improved thermal stability of OPMF was found after the SHS treatment. Moreover, SEM and ICP analyses of SHS-treated OPMF showed that silica bodies were removed from OPMF after the SHS treatment. XRD results exhibited that OPMF crystallinity increased after SHS treatment, indicating tougher fiber properties. Hemicellulose removal makes the fiber surface more hydrophobic, whereby silica removal increases the surface roughness of the fiber. Overall, the results obtained herewith suggested that SHS is an effective treatment method for surface modification and subsequently improving the characteristics of the natural fiber. Most importantly, the use of novel, eco-friendly SHS may contribute to the green and sustainable treatment for surface modification of natural fiber.

  1. Influence of Elemental Iron on Hydrogen Content in Superheated Aluminum-iron Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Li-na; BIAN Xiu-fang; ANANDA Mahto; DUAN You-feng

    2004-01-01

    The hydrogen content in liquid binary aluminum alloys with 1,3,5 and 8 wt% iron has been determined in the temperature range from 973K to 1103K.The hydrogen content in molten Al-Fe alloys increases remarkably when the temperature of the melt rises to about 1053K.This work indicates that the alloying element iron plays an important role in hydrogen content in superheated Al-Fe alloy melts below about 1053K.The results make it clear that the hydrogen content in the melt aluminum reduces with the increasing element levels.A conclusion is drawn that the degree of gassing in molten Al-Fe alloys is bound up with the properties of oxide film of aluminum alloy melts.The element iron has no effect on the compact structure of oxide film in aluminum melts.The effects of alloying element are theoretically analyzed in terms of Wagner interaction parameter.According to the values of the first order interaction parameter,it is concluded that the interaction between iron atom and aluminum is much stronger than that between hydrogen atom and aluminum,and the addition of the alloying element decreases the affinity of liquid aluminum for hydrogen.

  2. Investigation of coherent structures in a superheated jet using decomposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Avick; Gopalakrishnan, Shivasubramanian; Balasubramanian, Sridhar

    2016-11-01

    A superheated turbulent jet, commonly encountered in many engineering flows, is complex two phase mixture of liquid and vapor. The superposition of temporally and spatially evolving coherent vortical motions, known as coherent structures (CS), govern the dynamics of such a jet. Both POD and DMD are employed to analyze such vortical motions. PIV data is used in conjunction with the decomposition methods to analyze the CS in the flow. The experiments were conducted using water emanating into a tank containing homogeneous fluid at ambient condition. Three inlet pressure were employed in the study, all at a fixed inlet temperature. 90% of the total kinetic energy in the mean flow is contained within the first five modes. The scatterplot for any two POD coefficients predominantly showed a circular distribution, representing a strong connection between the two modes. We speculate that the velocity and vorticity contours of spatial POD basis functions show presence of K-H instability in the flow. From DMD, eigenvalues away from the origin is observed for all the cases indicating the presence of a non-oscillatory structure. Spatial structures are also obtained from DMD. The authors are grateful to Confederation of Indian Industry and General Electric India Pvt. Ltd. for partial funding of this project.

  3. Condensation on Highly Superheated Surfaces: Unstable Thin Films in a Wickless Heat Pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundan, Akshay; Nguyen, Thao T T; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C; Chao, David F; Sicker, Ronald J

    2017-03-03

    A wickless heat pipe was operated on the International Space Station to provide a better understanding of how the microgravity environment might alter the physical and interfacial forces driving evaporation and condensation. Traditional heat pipes are divided into three zones: evaporation at the heated end, condensation at the cooled end, and intermediate or adiabatic in between. The microgravity experiments reported herein show that the situation may be dramatically more complicated. Beyond a threshold heat input, there was a transition from evaporation at the heated end to large-scale condensation, even as surface temperatures exceeded the boiling point by 160 K. The hotter the surface, the more vapor was condensed onto it. The condensation process at the heated end is initiated by thickness and temperature disturbances in the thin liquid film that wet the solid surface. Those disturbances effectively leave the vapor "superheated" in that region. Condensation is amplified and sustained by the high Marangoni stresses that exist near the heater and that drive liquid to cooler regions of the device.

  4. Kinetics of the reaction between H{sup ·} and superheated water probed with muonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcorn, Chris D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada); Brodovitch, Jean-Claude [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Percival, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Smith, Marisa [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar, E-mail: kghandi@mta.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick E4L 1G8 (Canada)

    2014-05-19

    Highlights: • Rate constants for reactions of H with water resolve a controversy. • H reacts with superheated water via two channels. • The findings have important implications for the safety of some nuclear power reactors. - Abstract: Safe operation of supercritical water-cooled reactors requires knowledge of the kinetics of transient species formed by the radiolysis of water in the range 300–650 °C. Using muonium, it is possible to study aqueous H{sup ·} atom chemistry over this temperature range. An important reaction to study is that of the H{sup ·} atom with water itself, because it is a potential source of molecular H{sub 2}. The concentration of H{sub 2} is important to plant coolant chemistry, as H{sub 2} is currently added to suppress oxidative corrosion in CANDU reactors. The reaction of muonium with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O was studied experimentally up to 450 °C, and also via quantum chemical computations to investigate possible isotope effects. Our results suggest that although the H{sup ·} atom abstraction from H{sub 2}O is important at temperatures above 300 °C, the electron-producing channel (H{sup ·} + H{sub 2}O ⇌ H{sub 3}O{sup +} + e{sub aq}{sup -}) is significant at temperatures up to 300 °C, and becomes the dominant reaction channel at lower temperatures.

  5. Modification of Oil Palm Mesocarp Fiber Characteristics Using Superheated Steam Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbian Karuppuchamy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, oil palm mesocarp fiber (OPMF was treated with superheated steam (SHS in order to modify its characteristics for biocomposite applications. Treatment was conducted at temperatures 190–230 °C for 1, 2 and 3 h. SHS-treated OPMF was evaluated for its chemical composition, thermal stability, morphology and crystallinity. OPMF treated at 230 °C exhibited lower hemicellulose content (9% compared to the untreated OPMF (33%. Improved thermal stability of OPMF was found after the SHS treatment. Moreover, SEM and ICP analyses of SHS-treated OPMF showed that silica bodies were removed from OPMF after the SHS treatment. XRD results exhibited that OPMF crystallinity increased after SHS treatment, indicating tougher fiber properties. Hemicellulose removal makes the fiber surface more hydrophobic, whereby silica removal increases the surface roughness of the fiber. Overall, the results obtained herewith suggested that SHS is an effective treatment method for surface modification and subsequently improving the characteristics of the natural fiber. Most importantly, the use of novel, eco-friendly SHS may contribute to the green and sustainable treatment for surface modification of natural fiber.

  6. Kinetics of Texture and Colour Changes in Chicken Sausage during Superheated Steam Cooking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhameed Asmaa A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a kinetic model to describe the texture and colour changes of chicken sausage during superheated steam cooking. Chicken sausages were cooked at temperature ranging from 150-200°C with treatment times ranging from 2-6 mins. The texture profile was evaluated in terms of hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness, while the colour parameters were estimated in terms of lightness (L*, redness (a*, yellowness (b*, and total colour difference (∆E. Experimental data showed a gradual reduction in texture parameters as cooking times and temperatures increased. The L* value of the colour showed a linear reduction with cooking condition, while the a*, b*, and ∆E values showed a contrary effects. The decrease in texture parameters and L*-value of colour parameter followed the first-order kinetic model. While, zero-order kinetic model was adapted to fit the a* and b*. The modified first order kinetic showed a good fit for total ∆E. Significant correlations between colour and texture parameters were observed, which showed that a* alone could be used to predict the texture of chicken sausage.

  7. Superheated Steam Reasonable Application in the Papermaking Process%过热蒸气在造纸过程中的合理应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建蒙; 陈巧花; 徐国华; 何小星

    2013-01-01

    文章以过热蒸气为对象,通过比较减温减压点不同,分析管径、壁厚、法兰、流速的变化,过热蒸气和饱和蒸气在运输过程中的能耗及运输管道成本.结果表明在输送过程中输送过热蒸气是最合理的,也是经济的.分析过热蒸气对钢材的强度、热膨胀、过度热应力的影响,说明过热蒸气影响设备安全性和寿命.%Superheated steam was taken as a research object, through analyzing the variety of pipe diameter, wall thickness, flange and flow changes under different temperature and pressure reduction, superheated steam and saturated steam were compared in energy consumption and piping costs during transportation process. The results show that superheated steam is the most reasonable, and also economical in the transportation process. Through analysis of superheated steam effecting on the strength steel, thermal expansion and excessive thermal stress, it illustrates that the superheated steam affects the equipment's safety and life.

  8. Optical-cell evidence for superheated ice under gas-hydrate-forming conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Hogenboom, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported indirect but compelling evidence that fine-grained H2O ice under elevated CH4 gas pressure can persist to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while slowly reacting to form methane clathrate hydrate. This phenomenon has now been visually verified by duplicating these experiments in an optical cell while observing the very slow hydrate-forming process as the reactants were warmed from 250 to 290 K at methane pressures of 23 to 30 MPa. Limited hydrate growth occurred rapidly after initial exposure of the methane gas to the ice grains at temperatures well within the ice subsolidus region. No evidence for continued growth of the hydrate phase was observed until samples were warmed above the equilibrium H2O melting curve. With continued heating, no bulk melting of the ice grains or free liquid water was detected anywhere within the optical cell until hydrate dissociation conditions were reached (292 K at 30 MPa), even though full conversion of the ice grains to hydrate requires 6-8 h at temperatures approaching 290 K. In a separate experimental sequence, unreacted portions of H2O ice grains that had persisted to temperatures above their ordinary melting point were successfully induced to melt, without dissociating the coexisting hydrate in the sample tube, by reducing the pressure overstep of the equilibrium phase boundary and thereby reducing the rate of hydrate growth at the ice-hydrate interface. Results from similar tests using CO2 as the hydrate-forming species demonstrated that this superheating effect is not unique to the CH4-H2O system.

  9. Pengembangan Proses Produksi Biodiesel Biji Karet Metode Non-Katalis Superheated Methanol pada Tekanan Atmosfir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Susila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of biodiesel production from rubber seed (hevea brasiliensis is conducted in Indonesia in general using catalyst (acid or alkaline and wet washing method or dry washing method. Catalyst method brings many weaknesses include: a long production time, high production costs due to wear or magnesol as a catalyst absorban, especially if the purification uses water (wet wash system because it will be harmful to engine components such as: seal leaks quickly, easily arise fungus, rust/corrosion on the cylinder heads, pumps and fuel filters are often clogged, etc. Biodiesel production process with non-catalytic method can overcome the weaknesses mentioned above. In this study, rubber seed oil is obtained by the method of pressing.The oil specifications are as follow: viscosity 5.19 cSt, density 0.9209 g/ml, water content 0.2%, free fatty acid (FFA 6.66%, and the boiling point 305 oC.The methodology used is processing rubber seed into biodiesel with superheated methanol non-catalyst method. Transesterification performed in a Bubble Column Reactor (BCR at the reaction temperature 270oC, 275oC, 280oC, 285oC, and 290 oC and held at atmospheric pressure. The molar ratio of methanol and rubber seed oil were: 140, 150, and 160. The results showed that the process of making biodiesel from vegetable oil catalyst method is usually carried out through the various stages of the process e.g: degumming process to remove mucus or sap it contains, esterification to reduce the FFA content to below 2,5% to prevent saponification, and tranesterification to obtain methyl esters or biodiesel and then washing. But in its development by using non-catalytic method turns out that the rubber seed oil has a high FFA content (above 2.5% can be directly processed tranesterification without any saponification formed and can produce biodiesel without having to experience the process of degumming, esterification and washing. The density, cetane number, pour point, flash

  10. Investigations of structural transformation within metal (austenite chromium-manganese steel) at the external surface of steam superheating tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, V. A.; Pshechenkova, T. P.; Shumovskaya, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The elemental composition of an altered layer at the external surface of a steam superheating tube of grade DI59 steel is investigated after long-term operation. It is shown that the layer is located between a scale and a matrix and depleted by silicon, manganese, copper, and chromium with the maximum oxidizer affinity, enriched by iron and nickel to 90%, and mainly composed of the α-Fe phase (ferrite) with the ferromagnetic properties. The layer formed as a result of selective oxidation and diffusion from the matrix into the metal scale with the less standard free energy of the formation of sulfides and oxides. A magnetic ferrite meter is used in the experimental investigation of the layer evolution by testing grade DI59 steel for heat resistance in air environment at temperatures of 585, 650, and 700°C for 15 × 103 h; creep at a temperature of 750°C and a stress of 60 MPa; and long-term strength at temperatures of 700 and 750°C and stresses of from 30 to 80 MPa. Specimens for tests are made of tubes under as-received conditions. The relationship between the ferrite phase content in the surface metal layer and the temperature and time of test is determined. The dependence is developed to evaluate the equivalent temperature for operation of the external surface of steam superheating tubes using data of magnetic ferritometry. It is shown that operation temperatures that are determined by the ferrite phase content and the σ phase concentration in the metal structure of steam superheating tubes with the significant operating time are close. It is proposed to use magnetic ferritometry for revelation of thermal nonuniformity and worst tubes of steam superheaters of HPP boilers.

  11. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  12. Microwave-Assisted Superheating and/or Microwave-Specific Superboiling (Nucleation-Limited Boiling of Liquids Occurs under Certain Conditions but is Mitigated by Stirring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ferrari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporary superheating and sustained nucleation-limited “superboiling” of unstirred liquids above the normal atmospheric boiling point have been documented during microwave heating. These phenomena are reliably observed under prescribed conditions, although the duration (of superheating and magnitude (of superheating and superboiling vary according to system parameters such as volume of the liquid and the size and shape of the vessel. Both phenomena are mitigated by rapid stirring with an appropriate stir bar and/or with the addition of boiling chips, which provide nucleation sites to support the phase-change from liquid to gas. With proper experimental design and especially proper stirring, the measured temperature of typical organic reaction mixtures heated at reflux will be close to the normal boiling point temperature of the solvent, whether heated using microwave radiation or conventional convective heat transfer. These observations are important to take into consideration when comparing reaction rates under conventional and microwave heating.

  13. Sound Response of Superheated Drop Bubble Detectors to Neutrons%过热液滴探测器对中子的声频响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高思泽; 聂鹏; 倪邦发; 张贵英; 赵常军; 陈喆; 管永精; 肖才锦; 刘超; 刘存兄

    2012-01-01

    The sound response of the bubble detectors to neutrons by using 252Cf neutron source was described. Sound signals were filtered by sound card and PC. The short-time signal energy, FFT spectrum, power spectrum, and decay time constant were got to determine the authenticity of sound signal for bubbles.%本文主要研究中国原子能科学研究院的过热液滴探测器在252Cf中子源辐照下的气泡声音响应.通过对声音信号进行滤波预处理,得到短时信号能量、FFT频谱图、功率谱图、波形衰减时间常数,以此来确定气泡声音信号的真伪.

  14. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  15. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...... the pressure drop in a contraction are given....

  16. Experimental Attempts to Investigate the Influence of Petrographic Properties on Drying Characteristics of Lignite in Superheated Steam Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sciazko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A superheated steam fluidized bed dryer (SSFBD in a self-heat recuperative configuration has a great potential of improving thermal efficiency of a lignite-fired power plant by recovering both of latent heat of vaporization of water kept in the fuel and part of sensible heat during the fuel processing. However, the optimal design of the dryer requires the fundamental knowledge of drying characteristics in respect to the individual properties of the utilized fuel. Experimental investigation to determine the correlation between a specific coal properties originated from geological background and its drying characteristics is thus the major concern in this paper. The investigated lignite is a representative of Turoszow deposit in Poland. Experimental attempts unveiling drying kinetics were carried out for 5 mm and 10 mm diameter spherical samples in the superheated steam atmosphere in the temperature range of 110 °C–170 °C. Simultaneous and continuous measurements of changes in weight, surface and interior temperatures and appearance on each tested sample were carried out for describing drying behavior. Analytical investigation was applied to explain the drying characteristics, which are strongly affected by the individual properties of coal and the inherent ash composition.

  17. Asymptotic approach in the limit of small contact angles to sessile vapor bubble growth in a superheated environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rednikov, Alexey; Hollander, Nicolas; Hernando Revilla, Marta; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    A model of nucleate pool boiling is considered, and more concretely the growth dynamics of a single spherical-cap vapor bubble on a flat superheated substrate in a large volume of an equally superheated liquid. An asymptotic scheme is developed valid in the limit of small contact angles. These are basically supposed to be the evaporation-induced ones and hence finite even in the case of a perfectly wetting liquid implied here. The consideration generally involves four regions: i) microregion, where the contact line singularities are resolved and the evaporation-induced contact angles are established, ii) Cox-Voinov region, iii) foot of the bubble, and iv) macroregion. It is only in the latter region, which remarkably appears to leading order in the form of the exterior of a sphere touching a planar surface in one point (hence a fixed geometry even for variable contact angles), that the full Navier-Stokes and heat equations are to be (numerically) resolved. ESA & BELSPO PRODEX, F.R.S.-FNRS.

  18. Liquid drops on soft solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2014-03-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract each other due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  19. Excited Sessile Drops Perform Harmonically

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Steen, Paul H

    2013-01-01

    In our fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate our method of visualizing and identifying various mode shapes of mechanically oscillated sessile drops. By placing metal mesh under an oscillating drop and projecting light from below, the drop's shape is visualized by the visually deformed mesh pattern seen in the top view. The observed modes are subsequently identified by their number of layers and sectors. An alternative identification associates them with spherical harmonics, as demonstrated in the tutorial. Clips of various observed modes are presented, followed by a 10-second quiz of mode identification.

  20. Modification of technological control units for superheated steam temperature at 210-MW power units of the Primor'ye Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.V. Slesarenko; A.A. Belousov; V.V. Milush [Far East State Engineering University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2008-06-15

    The results of analysis of operation of the temperature control system for superheated steam at the BKZ-670-140F boilers of the Primor'ye Power Plant (GRES) are presented. The possibility of updating of the injection system to improve the reliability and economic efficiency of power units of electric power plants is considered.

  1. Modification of technological control units for superheated steam temperature at 210-MW power units of the Primor'ye Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesarenko, V. V.; Belousov, A. A.; Milush, V. V.

    2008-06-01

    The results of analysis of operation of the temperature control system for superheated steam at the BKZ-670-140F boilers of the Primor’ye Power Plant (GRES) are presented. The possibility of updating of the injection system to improve the reliability and economic efficiency of power units of electric power plants is considered.

  2. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  3. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  4. Many Drops Make a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya S. Mudgal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The desire and drive for excellence in any endeavor in life requires an effort from the individual; in addition it requires a constellation of features around such individuals that help them to become successful. For surgeons, it is the operating room staff, the administrative and medical assistants and our residents and fellows. However, perhaps the most important contribution to a physician’s success, are his or her patients.  As I get older, I find myself doing and saying things that seemingly, just a few years ago I used to hear my own teachers say and do. And then with some wry amusement, I wonder...when did this change happen in me? Change is inevitable, progressive and relentless. However, what remains constant is the compassion and care that our patients need and deserve. In this day and age of advancing technology and minimally invasive surgery, sometimes we surgeons forget that our patients are human beings. Our patients are the ones who teach us the most. It is therefore incumbent upon us to treat them with the greatest amount of dignity and respect that is possible. Sir Isaac Newton had said “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants”. My fervent advice to all my trainees is to recognize and acknowledge their own personal giants early and often, for it is their shoulders upon which they will stand to see further. First and foremost among my personal giants are my patients, and then my parents, my teachers, my wife and children. It is they who have collectively helped me to achieve my personal goals.  It is imperative that as clinicians and scientists we strive for excellence, and also continuously remember to be humble. Drs. Ebrahimzadeh, Kachooei and their team embody this very principle. Their efforts in getting this journal organized and come to fruition are enormous. Yet, it is the result of a collective effort to achieve excellence for the ongoing care of our patients; the desire to achieve

  5. Monte Carlo studies of nuclei and quantum liquid drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandharipande, V.R.; Pieper, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in application of variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods to nuclei is reviewed. The nature of single-particle orbitals in correlated quantum liquid drops is discussed, and it is suggested that the difference between quasi-particle and mean-field orbitals may be of importance in nuclear structure physics. 27 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Research of IGPC Control Strategy Based-on Hybrid Optimization for Power Station Boiler Superheated Steam Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benxian Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Implicit Generalized Predictive Control (IGPC algorithm can directly identify controller parameters without the need of solving Diophantine equation, thus can reduce the on-line algorithm computation time. In order to improve IGPC performance and extend its application, modified Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm is introduced into IGPC rolling horizon optimization, combined with general IGPC gradient optimization method under unconstrained condition, a new hybrid optimization method is obtained, this modified IGPC can be used to both of the non-constraint industry process control and the constraint industry process control. Aiming at the superheated steam temperature control of sub-critical 600MW boiler, a new cascade compound control strategy that combines an outer loop IGPC master adjuster and an inner loop PID auxiliary adjuster is adopted. Finally the simulation results have shown that the proposed method can constrain the control action, prevent dramatic change of the input signal, thus can achieve good static and dynamic performances.

  7. Influence of Superheated Steam Temperature Regulation Quality on Service Life of Boiler Steam Super-Heater Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Kulakov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates influence of change in quality of superheated steam temperature regulations on service life of super-heater metal. А dependence between metal service life and dispersion value for different steel grades has been determined in the paper. Numerical values pertaining to increase of super-heater metal service life in case of transferring from manual regulation to standard system of automatic regulation (SAR have been determined and in case of transferring from standard SAR to improved SAR. The analysis of tabular data and plotted dependencies makes it possible to conclude that any change in conditions of convection super-heater metal work due to better quality of the regulation leads to essential increase of time period which is left till the completion of the service life of a super-heater heating surface.

  8. Phase field simulation of kinetic superheating and melting of aluminum nanolayer irradiated by pico- and femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok Hwang, Yong [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Levitas, Valery I. [Departments of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Material Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Two melting mechanisms are reproduced and quantified for superheating and melting of Al nanolayer irradiated by pico- and femtosecond laser using the advanced phase-field approach coupled with mechanics and a two-temperature model. At heating rates Q≤79.04 K/ps induced by picosecond laser, two-sided barrierless surface melting forms two solid-melt interfaces, which meet near the center of a sample. The temperature for surface melting is a linear function, and for complete melting it is a cubic function, of logQ. At Q≥300 K/ps induced by femtosecond laser, barrierless and homogeneous melting (without nucleation) at the sample center occurs faster than due to interface propagation. Good agreement with experimental melting time was achieved in a range of 0.95≤Q≤1290 K/ps without fitting of material parameters.

  9. Study of gamma ray response of R404A superheated droplet detector using a two-state model

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, P K

    2013-01-01

    The superheated droplet detector (SDD) is known to be gamma insensitive below a threshold temperature which made them excellent candidates for neutron detection in the presence of gamma rays. Above the threshold temperature, the gamma ray detection efficiency increases with increase in temperature. In this work the gamma ray threshold temperature has been studied for SDD using R404A as the active liquid and is compared to the theoretical prediction. The temperature variation of gamma ray detection efficiency and interstate transition kinetics has also been studied using a two-state model. The experiments are performed at the ambient pressure of 1 atmosphere and in the temperature range of 17-32oC using a 662 keV 137Cs gamma ray source.

  10. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  11. Drop stability in wind: theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyon

    2015-11-01

    Water drops may remain pinned on a solid substrate against external forcing due to contact angle hysteresis. Schmucker and White investigated this phenomenon experimentally in a high Reynolds number regime, by measuring the critical wind velocity at which partially wetting water drops depin inside a wind tunnel. Due to the unsteady turbulent boundary layer, droplets are observed to undergo vortex-shedding induced oscillations. By contrast, the overall elongation of the drop prior to depinning occurs on a much slower timescale with self-similar droplet shapes at the onset. Based on these observations, a simple, quasi-static model of depinning droplet is developed by implementing the phenomenological description of the boundary layer. The resultant model successfully captures the critical onset of droplet motion and is the first of on-going studies that connect the classical boundary layer theory with droplet dynamics.

  12. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  13. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also pr

  14. New identities for sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Hajirahimi, Maryam; Fatollahi, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    A new set of mathematical identities is presented for axi-symmetric sessile drops on flat and curved substrates. The geometrical parameters, including the apex curvature and height, and the contact radius, are related by the identities. The validity of the identities are checked by various numerical solutions both for flat and curved substrates.

  15. Egg Drop: An Invention Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an activity designed to stimulate elementary and junior high students to become actively engaged in thinking creatively rather than only analytically, convergently, or repetitively. The activity requires students to devise means of dropping an egg from a height without it breaking. (JR)

  16. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Guéna, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe; Cazabat, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    22 pages 9 figures; Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  17. ``Quantum'' interference with bouncing drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    In a series of recent papers (most recently) Yves Couder and collaborators have explored the dynamics of walking drops on the surface of a vibrated bath of silicon oil and have demonstrated a close analogy to quantum phenomena. The bouncing drop together with the surface wave that it excites seems to be very similar to the pilot wave envisaged by de Broglie for quantum particles. In particular, have studied a double slit experiment with walking drops, where an interference pattern identical to the quantum version is found even though it is possible to follow the orbits of the drops and unambigously determine which slit it goes through, something which in quantum mechanics would be ruled out by the Heisenberg uncertainly relations. We have repeated the experiment and present a somewhat more complicated picture. Theoretically, we study a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localised ``particle'' being simultaneously guided by the wave. We present simple solutions to such a field theory and discuss the fundamental difficulties met by such a theory in order to comply with quantum mechanics.

  18. Drops, contact lines, and electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannetje, 't D.J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the behaviour of drops and contact lines under the influence of electric fields, and how these can answer fundamental and industrial questions. Our focus is on studying the varying balance of the electric field, hysteresis forces and inertia as the speed of a contact line chan

  19. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu'ena, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, Anne-Marie; Gu\\'{e}na, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  20. Drops spreading on flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somszor, Katarzyna; Boulogne, François; Sauret, Alban; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous media are encountered in many engineered systems such as textile, paper and insulating materials. In most of these materials, fibers are randomly oriented and form a complex network in which drops of wetting liquid tend to accumulate at the nodes of the network. Here we investigate the role of the fiber flexibility on the spreading of a small volume of liquid on a pair of crossed flexible fibers. A drop of silicone oil is dispensed at the point of contact of the fibers and we characterize the liquid morphologies as we vary the volume of liquid, the angle between the fibers, and the length and bending modulus of the fibers. Drop morphologies previously reported for rigid fibers, i.e. a drop, a column and a mixed morphology, are also observed on flexible fibers with modified domains of existence. Moreover, at small inclination angles of the fibers, a new behavior is observed: the fibers bend and collapse. Depending on the volume, the liquid can adopt a column or a mixed morphology on the collapsed fibers. We rationalize our observations with a model based on energetic considerations. Our study suggests that the fiber flexibility adds a rich variety of behaviors that can be crucial for industrial applications.

  1. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...

  2. Design and Study of Multifarious Plans on Superheated Steam Saturator%过热蒸汽饱和器的多种方案设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周根明; 程颖

    2011-01-01

    本文基于传热传质基本原理,提出了一种过热蒸汽饱和器,可将换热设备中的过热蒸汽转化成饱和蒸汽.并详细介绍没计了3种供液方案--重力水箱式、文丘里管式和泵式装置,使之满足不同用户的多种需要.%Based on the principle of heat and mass exchange , a type of superheated steam saturator is designed. The superheated steam could be saturated by the saturator. Three plans of feed liquid equipments are described in detail, and the style contains gravity water tank、Venturi tube pattern and pump form. It would be satisfied by the multiple demands of many consumers.

  3. Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

  4. Superheating and melting within aluminum core-oxide shell nanoparticles for a broad range of heating rates: multiphysics phase field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I

    2016-10-19

    The external surface of metallic particles is usually covered by a thin and strong oxide shell, which significantly affects superheating and melting of particles. The effects of geometric parameters and heating rate on characteristic melting and superheating temperatures and melting behavior of aluminum nanoparticles covered by an oxide shell were studied numerically. For this purpose, the multiphysics model that includes the phase field model for surface melting, a dynamic equation of motion, a mechanical model for stress and strain simulations, interface and surface stresses, and the thermal conduction model including thermoelastic and thermo-phase transformation coupling as well as transformation dissipation rate was formulated. Several nontrivial phenomena were revealed. In comparison with a bare particle, the pressure generated in a core due to different thermal expansions of the core and shell and transformation volumetric expansion during melting, increases melting temperatures with the Clausius-Clapeyron factor of 60 K GPa(-1). For the heating rates Q ≤ 10(9) K s(-1), melting temperatures (surface and bulk start and finish melting temperatures, and maximum superheating temperature) are independent of Q. For Q ≥ 10(12) K s(-1), increasing Q generally increases melting temperatures and temperature for the shell fracture. Unconventional effects start for Q ≥ 10(12) K s(-1) due to kinetic superheating combined with heterogeneous melting and geometry. The obtained results are applied to shed light on the initial stage of the melt-dispersion-mechanism of the reaction of Al nanoparticles. Various physical phenomena that promote or suppress melting and affect melting temperatures and temperature of the shell fracture for different heating-rate ranges are summarized in the corresponding schemes.

  5. Influence of the type of working fluid in the lower cycle and superheated steam parameters in the upper cycle on effectiveness of operation of binary power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stachel Aleksander A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presented have been the results of the analysis of effectiveness of operation of binary power plant consisting of combined two Clausius-Rankine cycles, namely the binary cycle with water as a working fluid in the upper cycle and organic substance as a working fluid in the lower cycle, as well as a single fluid component power plant operating also in line with the C-R cycle for superheated steam, with water as a working fluid. The influence of the parameters of superheated steam in the upper cycle has been assessed as well as the type of working fluid in the lower cycle. The results of calculations have been referred to the single-cycle classical steam power plant operating at the same parameters of superheated steam and the same mass flow rate of water circulating in both cycles. On the basis of accomplished analysis it has been shown that the binary power plant shows a greater power with respect to the reference power plant.

  6. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ristenpart, W D; Belmonte, A; Dollar, F; Stone, H A

    2009-01-01

    Oppositely charged drops have long been assumed to experience an attractive force that favors their coalescence. In this fluid dynamics video we demonstrate the existence of a critical field strength above which oppositely charged drops do not coalesce. We observe that appropriately positioned and oppositely charged drops migrate towards one another in an applied electric field; but whereas the drops coalesce as expected at low field strengths, they are repelled from one another after contact at higher field strengths. Qualitatively, the drops appear to `bounce' off one another. We directly image the transient formation of a meniscus bridge between the bouncing drops.

  7. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  8. Dancing drops over vibrating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Helbig, Markus; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Bestehorn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We study the motion of a liquid drop on a solid plate simultaneously submitted to horizontal and vertical harmonic vibrations. The investigation is done via a phase field model earlier developed for describing static and dynamic contact angles. The density field is nearly constant in every bulk region (ρ = 1 in the liquid phase, ρ ≈ 0 in the vapor phase) and varies continuously from one phase to the other with a rapid but smooth variation across the interfaces. Complicated explicit boundary conditions along the interface are avoided and captured implicitly by gradient terms of ρ in the hydrodynamic basic equations. The contact angle θ is controlled through the density at the solid substrate ρ S , a free parameter varying between 0 and 1 [R. Borcia, I.D. Borcia, M. Bestehorn, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066307 (2008)]. We emphasize the swaying and the spreading modes, earlier theoretically identified by Benilov and Billingham via a shallow-water model for drops climbing uphill along an inclined plane oscillating vertically [E.S. Benilov, J. Billingham, J. Fluid Mech. 674, 93 (2011)]. The numerical phase field simulations will be completed by experiments. Some ways to prevent the release of the dancing drops along a hydrophobic surface into the gas atmosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  9. Linear Stepper Actuation Driving Drop Resonance and Modifying Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katariya, Mayur; Huynh, So Hung; McMorran, Darren; Lau, Chun Yat; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-23

    In this work, 2 μL water drops are placed on substrates that are created to have a circular hydrophilic region bounded by superhydrophobicity so that they exhibit high contact angles. When the substrate is translated by a linear stepper actuator, the random force components present in the actuator are shown to cause the drop to rock resonantly. When the substrate is translated downward at inclination angles of up to 6° with respect to the horizontal, the contact angle hysteresis increases progressively to a limiting condition. When the substrate is moved up at inclined angles, alternatively, the contact angle hysteresis increases initially to the limiting condition before it is progressively restored to its static state. These behaviors are accounted for by the reversible micro-Cassie to Wenzel wetting state transformations that are made possible by the hierarchical microscale and nanoscale structures present in the superhydrophobic regions.

  10. Process analysis of superheated steam pre-treatment of wheat straw and its relative effect on ethanol selling price

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Barchyn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing bioethanol operations rely on starch-based substrates, which have been criticized for their need to displace food crops in order to be produced. As an alternative to these first generation biofuels, the use of agricultural residues is being considered to create more environmentally-benign second generation, or cellulosic biofuels. Recalcitrance of these substrates to fermentation requires extensive pre-treatment processes, which often consume more energy than can be extracted from the ethanol that they produce, so one of the priorities in developing cellulosic ethanol is an effective and efficient pre-treatment method. This study examines the use of superheated steam (SS as a process medium by which wheat straw lignocellulosic material is pre-treated. Following enzymatic hydrolysis, it was found that 47% of the total glucose could be liberated from the substrate, and the optimal conditions for pre-treatment were 15 min in hot water (193 kPa, 119˚C followed by 2 min in SS. Furthermore, a preliminary relative economic analysis showed that the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP was comparable to that obtained from steam explosion, a similar process, while energy consumption was 22% less. The conclusion of the study is that SS treatment stands to be a competitive pre-treatment technology to steam explosion.

  11. [Retroperitoneal fibrosis with eye-drops containing timolol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, E; Vial, T; Rabilloud, M; de Carlan, H; Evreux, J C

    1990-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis occurred in a 62-year-old man who had been treated during 4 years eye-drops containing timolol. The disease was diagnosed after a sudden episode of nephritic colic. The recovery was progressive and uneventful. No corticosteroid therapy was used. Six months later the patient remained free of symptoms. Although an idiopathic origin could not be excluded, the causal relationship with timolol treatment is likely due to the chronology of events and the lack of other causes.

  12. Star-shaped Oscillations of Leidenfrost Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-organized, star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a heated, curved surface. We observe modes with $n = 2-13$ lobes around the drop periphery. We find that both the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations depend only on the capillary length of the liquid, and are independent of the drop radius and substrate temperature. However, the number of observed modes depend sensitively on the liquid viscosity. The dominant frequency of pressure variations under the drop is approximately twice that the drop oscillation frequency, consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. Our results suggest that the star-shaped oscillations are hydrodynamic in origin, and are driven by capillary waves beneath the drop. The exact mechanism by which the vapor flow initiates the capillary waves is likely related to static "brim waves" in levitated, viscous drops.

  13. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  14. Electrohydrodynamics of a particle-covered drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouriemi, Malika; Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a drop nearly-completely covered with a particle monolayer in a uniform DC electric field. The weakly conducting fluid system consists of a silicon oil drop suspended in castor oil. A broad range of particle sizes, conductivities, and shapes is explored. In weak electric fields, the presence of particles increases drop deformation compared to a particle-free drop and suppresses the electrohydrodynamic flow. Very good agreement is observed between the measured drop deformation and the small deformation theory derived for surfactant-laden drops (Nganguia et al., 2013). In stronger electric fields, where drops are expected to undergo Quincke rotation (Salipante and Vlahovska, 2010), the presence of the particles greatly decreases the threshold for rotation and the stationary tilted drop configuration observed for clean drop is replaced by a spinning drop with either a wobbling inclination or a very low inclination. These behaviors resemble the predicted response of rigid ellipsoids in uniform electric fields. At even stronger electric fields, the particles can form dynamic wings or the drop implodes. The similar behavior of particle-covered and surfactant-laden drops provides new insights into understanding stability of Pickering emulsions. Supported by NSF-CBET 1437545.

  15. Experimental analysis on pressure drop and heat transfer of a terminal fan-coil unit with ice slurry as cooling medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Diz, Ruben; Uhia, Francisco J.; Dopazo, J. Alberto [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    This paper is concerned with the experimental analysis of a standard terminal fan-coil unit with ice slurry as coolant. The ice slurry was produced from an ethylene glycol 10 wt% aqueous solution. The pressure drop measurements are presented as a function of volumetric flow rate, ice concentration and Reynolds number. The experimental friction factors are obtained and discussed. The fan-coil capacity was experimentally determined for chilled water and melting ice slurry with inlet ice fractions around 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt%, considering in each case three different fan rotation velocities. The fan-coil capacity is higher with melting ice slurry than with chilled water by factors between 3.7 and 4.9. The heat transfer analysis realizes that the air side thermal resistance controls the heat transfer process. Experimental results for the melt off rate of ice in the fan coil and the superheating at the fan-coil outlet are shown and discussed. (author)

  16. 污泥过热蒸汽干燥工艺优化%Process parameters optimization of superheated steam drying for sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绪坤; 温祥东; 罗俊; 吴起; 徐刚; 徐建国

    2015-01-01

    The sludge is known as the byproduct generated in the process of pollution control. It is featured by the high moisture content, complicated components and massive deadly microorganism, thus easily leading to secondary pollution. The dehydration is a necessary process to realize the sludge harmless reduce the sludge amount and improve the resource utilization. The thermal drying is a feasible method to reduce the moisture content. The process of hot air drying will cause a large amount of harmful exhaust gas, adding to the difficulty and cost of controlling exhaust gas. The sludge drying, which uses superheated steam as the drying medium, will further lower the risk of explosion and reduce the harmful gas account due to the absence of oxygen in the drying medium. However, the superheated steam drying of sludge is also faced with the problems such as energy consumption and long drying time. Hence, it has become a major task to dry the sludge in an economic and effective manner. The purpose of this research is to determine the technological parameters for optimal sludge superheated steam drying. Besides building the experimental device for superheated steam drying under atmospheric pressure and choosing the relative unit energy consumption and the average drying strength as the evaluation indices, this paper has also designed the experiment of three-factor quadratic orthogonal rotation combination. A mathematical model is also built, which adopts the technological parameters for sludge superheated steam drying including superheated steam temperature sludge quality and superheated steam flow. In addition, this paper has employed the single-factor and two-factor method to analyze the relationship between various factors and evaluation indices. According to the analysis on experimental data, the established regression equation of establishing is significant, and the coefficient of determination on the relative unit energy consumption and the average drying strength were

  17. Drop shaping by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Alexander L; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamic response of a falling drop hit by a laser pulse. Combining high-speed with stroboscopic imaging we report that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a milli-Joule nanosecond laser-pulse deforms and propels forward at several meters per second, until it eventually fragments. We show that the drop motion results from the recoil momentum imparted at the drop surface by water vaporization. We measure the propulsion speed and the time-deformation law of the drop, complemented by boundary integral simulations. We explain the drop propulsion and shaping in terms of the laser pulse energy and drop surface tension. These findings are crucial for the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in lithography machines.

  18. Unstable Leidenfrost Drops on Roughened Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, Jonathan B

    2010-01-01

    Drops placed on a surface with a temperature above the Leidenfrost point float atop an evaporative vapor layer. In this fluid dynamics video, it is shown that for roughened surfaces the Leidenfrost point depends on the drop size, which runs contrary to previous claims of size independence. The thickness of the vapor layer is known to increase with drop radius, suggesting that the surface roughness will not be able to penetrate the vapor layer for drops above a critical size. This size dependence was experimentally verified: at a given roughness and temperature, drops beneath a critical size exhibited transition boiling while drops above the critical size were in the Leidenfrost regime. These Leidenfrost drops were unstable; upon evaporation down to the critical size the vapor film suddenly collapsed.

  19. Transcriptional response of selected genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilm cells during inactivation by superheated steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Hyunjin

    2015-01-02

    Superheated steam (SHS), produced by the addition of heat to saturated steam (SS) at the same pressure, has great advantages over conventional heat sterilization due to its high temperature and accelerated drying rate. We previously demonstrated that treatment with SHS at 200°C for 10 sec inactivated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes biofilm cells on the surface of stainless steel to below the detection limit. However, bacteria withstanding heat stress become more resistant to other stress conditions, and may be more virulent when consumed by a host. Herein, we studied the transcriptional regulation of genes important for stress resistance and virulence in Salmonella biofilms after SHS treatments. Genes encoding heat shock proteins and general stress resistance proteins showed transcriptional surges after 1 sec of SHS treatment at 200°C, with parallel induction of stress-related regulator genes including rpoE, rpoS, and rpoH. Interestingly, Salmonella biofilm cells exposed to SHS showed decreased transcription of flagella and Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) genes required for motility and invasion of host cells, respectively, whereas increased transcription of SPI-2 genes, important for bacterial survival and replication inside host cells, was detected. When the transcriptional response was compared between cells treated with SHS (200°C) and SS (100°C), SHS caused immediate changes in gene expression by shorter treatments. Understanding the status of Salmonella virulence and stress resistance induced by SHS treatments is important for wider application of SHS in controlling Salmonella biofilm formation during food production.

  20. Drying of foodstuffs by low-pressure superheated steam%食品低压过热蒸汽干燥技甫

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马怡光; 张绪坤; 佘蓉; 魏伟

    2012-01-01

    Superheated steam drying is a new technology developed recently, compared with conventional hot air drying, it has some advantages, such as high drying efficiency, low energy consumption, better products' quality and so on. Drying of foodstuffs with superheated steam features advantages in comparison with traditional hot air drying are absence of oxygen prevents oxidative reactions, rendering a very porous material, easily rehydrated and with a minimum of volume reduction in most cases. Especially, drying of foodstuffs with low-pressure superheated which avoid the disadvantages of products qualities dried use atmospheric pressure or higher, it will be widely developed in the future.%过热蒸汽干燥是近年来发展起来的新技术,和传统的热风对流干燥相比具有干燥效率高、能耗低和干燥产品质量好等优点。过热蒸汽应用于食品的干燥,其显著的特点是能实现无氧或少氧的干燥环境,干燥过程不会出现“硬壳”或“结皮”的现象,消除了进一步干燥可能出现的障碍,产品具有多孔的结构。特别是低压过热蒸汽干燥应用于食品等热敏性物料,避免了过热蒸汽干燥操作温度高,从而影响产品质量的问题,具有广阔的发展前景。

  1. Network-based reliability control for superheated steam temperature%基于网络的过热蒸汽温度可靠性控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾伟; 庄宝春; 刘金良

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of reliability control for network-based superheated steam temperature control system , taking into account the actuator failure and transmition of the control signal of superheated steam through network .An integrated model for stochastic actuator failure was established , which takes the cascade con-trol as the basic control strategy .By using Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequities ( LMIs) technolo-gy, the randomly and equally divided stability conditions for the system are given , and then the controller design method for superheated steam temperature control system which takes actuator stochastic fault into account was put forward.At last, an application example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method .%研究了在考虑执行器故障情况下,以及过热汽温的控制信号通过网络进行传输的情况下,过热汽温的温度控制系统的可靠性控制问题。建立了执行器随机故障模型,以串级控制为基本控制策略,利用Lyapunov 稳定性理论和线性矩阵不等式( linear matrix inequities , LMIs)技术,给出了系统随机均分稳定条件,提出了考虑执行器具有随机故障的过热蒸汽控制系统的控制器设计方法。通过仿真实验证明了提出的控制器设计方案的有效性。

  2. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  3. 过热蒸汽膨化干燥番茄及其理化品质%Physicochemical characteristics of superheated steam puffing dried tomato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐将; 安凤平; 赖彩如; 仇东朝; 宋洪波

    2013-01-01

    利用过热蒸汽膨化干燥技术,对热风干燥与过热蒸汽膨化干燥的干燥特性、处理前后番茄的理化品质进行比较和分析,结果表明:番茄经过热蒸汽膨化后干燥,干燥速度快,比单纯采用热风干燥所需的干燥时间缩短34.4%;过热蒸汽膨化干燥的番茄体积饱满,色泽较好,营养保存率高,微观组织呈现明显的蜂窝状结构,复水比高,复水温度较高时的复水比明显高于热风干燥的番茄;过热蒸汽膨化干燥的番茄在85℃的水中复水6 min,其硬度和粘性适中,弹性和咀嚼性值最大,感官评价最好.%superheated steam puffing drying technique was used to process tomato, the drying property between hot air dried tomato and superheated steam puffing dried tomato was compared, the physicochemical characteristics of tomato before and after the treatment of superheated steam puffing drying were also compared. The results showed that tomato after the treatment of superheated steam puffing drying had full volume bulk, better color and high nutrients preserving rate; the porous microstructure was significantly enlarged; the drying velocity was speeded up, the drying time was curtailed 34.4% than hot air drying. Meanwhile, the puffing dried tomato also had higher rehydration rate. After 6 min rehydration at the temperature of 85 ℃, the tomato had moderate hardness and mucosity, maximal elasticity and chewiness, as well as the highest sensory evaluation score. Temperature of 85 ℃, time of 6 min was chosen to be rehydration condition.

  4. Footprint Geometry and Sessile Drop Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H.

    2016-11-01

    How does a sessile drop resonate if its footprint is square (square drop)? In this talk, we discuss the two distinct families of observed modes in our experiments. One family (spherical modes) is identified with the natural modes of capillary spherical caps, and the other (grid modes) with Faraday waves on a square bath (square Faraday waves). A square drop exhibits grid or spherical modes depending on its volume, and the two families of modes arise depending on how wavenumber selection of footprint geometry and capillarity compete. For square drops, a dominant effect of footprint constraint leads to grid modes which are constrained response; otherwise the drops exhibit spherical modes, the characteristic of sessile drops on flat plates. Chun-Ti Chang takes his new position at National Taiwan University on Aug. 15th, 2016. Until then, Chun-Ti Chang is affiliated with Technical University Dortmund, Germany.

  5. Sepsis from dropped clips at laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Sarwat E-mail: sarwathussain@hotmail.com

    2001-12-01

    We report seven patients in whom five dropped surgical clips and two gallstones were visualized in the peritoneal cavity, on radiological studies. In two, subphrenic abscesses and empyemas developed as a result of dropped clips into the peritoneal cavity during or following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In one of these two, a clip was removed surgically from the site of an abscess. In two other patients dropped gallstones, and in three, dropped clips led to no complications. These were seen incidentally on studies done for other indications. Abdominal abscess secondary to dropped gallstones is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We conclude that even though dropped surgical clips usually do not cause problems, they should be considered as a risk additional to other well-known causes of post-LC abdominal sepsis.

  6. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  7. The Analysis on Advantages of Superheated Steam Stimulation Technology in Thin Heavy Oil Reservoir%薄层稠油油藏过热蒸汽吞吐技术优势解析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔连训; 庞占喜; 李媛媛; 路涛

    2012-01-01

    在过热蒸汽开发稠油油藏提高采收率机理分析基础上,利用数值模拟技术对1-3 m、3-5 m和5 m以上薄层稠油油藏实施过热蒸汽吞吐的开发效果进行了对比和分析.通过对比普通湿蒸汽、高温湿蒸汽和过热蒸汽的增油能力、节约蒸汽效果及油藏特征,分析了稠油油藏过热蒸汽吞吐的技术优势.研究结果表明,过热蒸汽吞吐的增油能力明显高于普通湿饱和蒸汽吞吐和高温湿蒸汽,但当过热度超过20℃后,增油幅度变缓;相同产油量时,过热蒸汽要比湿饱和蒸汽节约大量蒸汽.这是因为过热蒸汽携热量大,比容高,可以有效萃取稠油中的轻质组分,有效扩大波及体积,增加洗油效率.%Base on the mechanisms of superheated steam enhancing oil recovery in heavy oil reservoirs, numerical simulation was employed to analyze development effectiveness of superheated steam stimulation in thin heavy oil reservoirs with different net pay, such as 1-3 m, 3-5 m and over 5 m. By contrasting of incremental oil effect, steam-saving volume, reservoir features among conventional saturated steam, hot saturated steam and superheated steam, the technological advantages of superheated steam stimulation was analyzed to develop heavy oil reservoirs. The results show that incremental oil effect of superheated steam is much higher than conventional saturated steam and hot saturated steam, but it gradually increases slower when degree of superheat was over 20 ℃. When the same volume of heavy oil was produced by the three kinds of steams, superheated steam could save amount of steam. This is because that superheated steam has higher heat quantity and larger specific volume. Superheated steam can effectively extract light component in heavy oil, increase swept volume and enhance washing oil efficiency in heavy oil reservoirs.

  8. Mass Remaining During Evaporation of Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    to> \\fyj Greek Symbols P Contact angle of sessile drop . n Droplet shape factor = h/d 6 Non-dimensional time = t/i V Air kinematic viscosity...factor n, = h / d (where h = maximum height of the drop ), which can also be directly related to the contact angle (P) of the drop , that is r| = (l-cos(P...three drop size (initial mass or volume) conditions with all other conditions the same. These runs have a constant contact angle , (3 = 16.5° ± 1.5

  9. Rapid Drop Dynamics During Superhydrophobic Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Boreyko, Jonathan; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2008-11-01

    Rapid drop motion is observed on superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation; condensate drops with diameter of order 10 μm can move at above 100G and 0.1 m/s. When water vapor condenses on a horizontal superhydrophobic surface, condensate drops move in a seemingly random direction. The observed motion is attributed to the energy released through coalescence of neighboring condensate drops. A scaling analysis captured the initial acceleration and terminal velocity. Our work is a step forward in understanding the dynamics of superhydrophobic condensation occurring in both natural water-repellant plants and engineered dropwise condensers.

  10. Numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    A vibrated drop constitutes a very rich physical system, blending both interfacial and volume phenomena. A remarkable experimental study was performed by M. Costalonga highlighting sessile drop motion subject to horizontal, vertical and oblique vibration. Several intriguing phenomena are observed such as drop walking and rapid droplet ejection. We perform three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drops where the phenomena described above are computed using the massively parallel multiphase code BLUE. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  11. Impact force of a falling drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Dan; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Xavier Boutillon Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Controlling droplet deposition is crucial in many industrial processes such as spraying pesticides on crops, inkjet printing or spray coating. Therefore, the dynamics of drop impacts have been extensively studied for more than one century. However, few literature describe the impacting force of a drop on a solid flat surface, although it might be a way to measure the size distribution of a collection of falling drops. We investigated experimentally how the instantaneous force at impact depends on impact velocity and drop radius. We also propose a new model to understand our observations. Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, CNRS, ESPCI, Paris France & Ladhyx, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France.

  12. Drops moving along and across a filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    The present work is devoted to the experimental study of oil drop motion both along and across a filament due to the air jet blowing. In case of drop moving along the filament, phenomena such as drop stick-slip motion, shape oscillations, shedding of a tail along the filament, the tail capillary instability and drop recoil motion were observed which were rationalized in the framework of simplified models. Experiments with cross-flow of the surrounding gas relative to the filament with an oil drop on it were conducted, with air velocity in the range of 7.23 to 22.7 m s-1. The Weber number varied from 2 to 40 and the Ohnesorge number varied from 0.07 to 0.8. The lower and upper critical Weber numbers were introduced to distinguish between the beginning of the drop blowing off the filament and the onset of the bag-stamen breakup. The range of the Weber number between these two critical values is filled with three types of vibrational breakup: V1 (a balloon-like drop being blown off), V2 (a drop on a single stamen being blown off), and V3 (a drop on a double stamen being blown off). The Weber number/Ohnesorge number plane was delineated into domains of different breakup regimes. The work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  13. Drop deformation by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Klein, Alexander L; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Lohse, Detlef; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2015-01-01

    A free-falling absorbing liquid drop hit by a nanosecond laser-pulse experiences a strong recoil-pressure kick. As a consequence, the drop propels forward and deforms into a thin sheet which eventually fragments. We study how the drop deformation depends on the pulse shape and drop properties. We first derive the velocity field inside the drop on the timescale of the pressure pulse, when the drop is still spherical. This yields the kinetic-energy partition inside the drop, which precisely measures the deformation rate with respect to the propulsion rate, before surface tension comes into play. On the timescale where surface tension is important the drop has evolved into a thin sheet. Its expansion dynamics is described with a slender-slope model, which uses the impulsive energy-partition as an initial condition. Completed with boundary integral simulations, this two-stage model explains the entire drop dynamics and its dependance on the pulse shape: for a given propulsion, a tightly focused pulse results in a...

  14. Correlation for Sessile Drop Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Zion, Peter; Pursell, Christopher; Wassom, Gregory; Mandelkorn, Brenton; Nkinthorn, Chris

    2016-11-01

    To better understand how the evaporation of sessile drops and small puddles is controlled by the vapor phase transport mechanisms of mass diffusion and buoyancy-induced convection, the evaporation rates of eight liquids evaporating under a broad range of ambient conditions were correlated with physical and geometrical properties. Examination of the correlation provides valuable insight into how the roles of diffusive and convective transport change with physical and geometrical parameters. The correlation predicts measured evaporation rates to within a root-mean-square error of 7.3%. The correlation is composed of two terms, a term which provides the rate of evaporation under diffusion-only conditions, and a term which provides the influence of convection. This second term suggests the manner in which the processes of diffusion and convection are coupled. Both processes are dependent on the distribution of the vapor, through the molar concentration gradient for diffusion and through the mass density gradient for convection. The term representing the influence of convection is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of diffusivity, indicating the tendency of diffusive transport to reduce convection by making the vapor distribution more uniform. Financial support was provided by the ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  15. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving a ......-stimulation-evoked torque decreased acutely after each training session relative to pre-exercise values (P ......The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving...... a progressive increase in load impact with respect to the number of jumps performed, drop (platform) height, squat depth amplitude, and addition of weights. Maximal concentric and isometric knee extensor strength were assessed immediately before and 10 min after each training session. Voluntary and 100 Hz...

  16. Characterizing and Exploring the Formation Mechanism of Salt Deposition by Reusing Advanced-softened, Silica-rich, Oilfield-produced Water (ASOW) in Superheated Steam Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Xu, Ying; Lin, Senmin; Dai, Xiaohu

    2015-11-01

    To dispose of large volumes of oilfield-produced water, an environmentally friendly method that reuses advanced-softened, silica-rich, oilfield-produced water (ASOW) as feedwater was implemented via a 10-month pilot-scale test in oilfield. However, salt deposition detrimental to the efficiency and security of steam injection system was generated in superheated steam pipeline. To evaluate the method, the characteristics and formation mechanism of the deposition were explored. The silicon content and total hardness of the ASOW were 272.20 mg/L and 0.018 mg/L, respectively. Morphology and composition of the deposition were determined by scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Na2Si2O5, Na2CO3 and trace silanes were identified in the deposition. In addition, the solubility of the deposition was about 99%, suggesting that it is very different from traditional scaling. The results of a simulation experiment and thermal analysis system (TGA and TG-FTIR) proved that Na2CO3 and Si(OH)4 (gas) are involved in the formation of Na2Si2O5, which is ascribed mainly to the temperature difference between the superheated steam and the pipe wall. These findings provide an important reference for improving the reuse of ASOW and reducing its deposition.

  17. Approximate Analytical Solution for One-Dimensional Solidification Problem of a Finite Superheating Phase Change Material Including the Effects of Wall and Thermal Contact Resistances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid El Qarnia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports an analytical solution for the solidification of a superheating phase change material (PCM contained in a rectangular enclosure with a finite height. The analytical solution has been obtained by solving nondimensional energy equations by using the perturbation method for a small perturbation parameter: the Stefan number, ε. This analytical solution, which takes into account the effects of the superheating of PCM, finite height of the enclosure, thickness of the wall, and wall-solid shell interfacial thermal resistances, was expressed in terms of nondimensional temperature distributions of the bottom wall of the enclosure and both PCM phases, and the dimensionless solid-liquid interface position and its dimensionless speed. The developed solution was firstly compared with that existing in the literature for the case of nonsuperheating PCM. The predicted results agreed well with those published in the literature. Next, a parametric study was carried out in order to study the impacts of the dimensionless control parameters on the dimensionless temperature distributions of the wall, the solid shell, and liquid phase of the PCM, as well as the solid-liquid interface position and its dimensionless speed.

  18. Total Site Heat Integration Considering Pressure Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew Hong Chew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop is an important consideration in Total Site Heat Integration (TSHI. This is due to the typically large distances between the different plants and the flow across plant elevations and equipment, including heat exchangers. Failure to consider pressure drop during utility targeting and heat exchanger network (HEN synthesis may, at best, lead to optimistic energy targets, and at worst, an inoperable system if the pumps or compressors cannot overcome the actual pressure drop. Most studies have addressed the pressure drop factor in terms of pumping cost, forbidden matches or allowable pressure drop constraints in the optimisation of HEN. This study looks at the implication of pressure drop in the context of a Total Site. The graphical Pinch-based TSHI methodology is extended to consider the pressure drop factor during the minimum energy requirement (MER targeting stage. The improved methodology provides a more realistic estimation of the MER targets and valuable insights for the implementation of the TSHI design. In the case study, when pressure drop in the steam distribution networks is considered, the heating and cooling duties increase by 14.5% and 4.5%.

  19. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  20. Self-Excited Drop Oscillations in Electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Decre, Michel M.J.; Mugele, Frieder

    2007-01-01

    We studied millimeter-sized aqueous sessile drops in an ambient oil environment in a classical electrowetting configuration with a wire-shaped electrode placed at a variable height above the substrate. Within a certain range of height and above a certain threshold voltage, the drop oscillates period

  1. Static shapes of levitated viscous drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, L.; Lister, J. R.; Lange, U.

    2005-06-01

    We consider the levitation of a drop of molten glass above a spherical porous mould, through which air is injected with constant velocity. The glass is assumed to be sufficiently viscous compared to air that motion in the drop is negligible. Thus static equilibrium shapes are determined by the coupling between the lubricating pressure in the supporting air cushion and the Young-Laplace equation. The upper surface of the drop is under constant atmospheric pressure; the static shape of the lower surface of the drop is computed using lubrication theory for the thin air film. Matching of the sessile curvature of the upper surface to the curvature of the mould gives rise to a series of capillary "brim" waves near the edge of the drop which scale with powers of a modified capillary number. Several branches of static solutions are found, such that there are multiple solutions for some drop volumes, but no physically reasonable solutions for other drop volumes. Comparison with experiments and full Navier-Stokes calculations suggests that the stability of the process can be predicted from the solution branches for the static shapes, and related to the persistence of brim waves to the centre of the drop. This suggestion remains to be confirmed by a formal stability analysis.

  2. University Drop-Out: An Italian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloc, Filippo; Maruotti, Antonello; Petrella, Lea

    2010-01-01

    University students' drop-out is a crucial issue for the universities' efficiency evaluation and funding. In this paper, we analyze the drop-out rate of the Economics and Business faculty of Sapienza University of Rome. We use administrative data on 9,725 undergraduates students enrolled in three-years bachelor programs from 2001 to 2007 and…

  3. Dynamic Stability of Equilibrium Capillary Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William M.; Kim, Inwon C.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a model for contact angle motion of quasi-static capillary drops resting on a horizontal plane. We prove global in time existence and long time behavior (convergence to equilibrium) in a class of star-shaped initial data for which we show that topological changes of drops can be ruled out for all times. Our result applies to any drop which is initially star-shaped with respect to a small ball inside the drop, given that the volume of the drop is sufficiently large. For the analysis, we combine geometric arguments based on the moving-plane type method with energy dissipation methods based on the formal gradient flow structure of the problem.

  4. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  5. Temperature Effect on Photovoltaic Modules Power Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Mohammed Aish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar module could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic power generation. Changing in powers due to higher temperatures (25oC, 35oC, and 45oC have been done for three types of solar modules: monocrystalline , polycrystalline, and copper indium gallium (di selenide (CIGS. The Prova 200 solar panel analyzer is used for the professional testing of three solar modules at different ambient temperatures; 25oC, 35oC, and 45oC and solar radiation range 100-1000 W/m2. Copper indium gallium (di selenide module has the lowest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.38%/oC while monocrystalline module has the highest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.54%/oC, while polycrystalline module has a percentage power drop of 0.49%/oC.

  6. Pressure drop in CIM disk monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelic, Igor; Nemec, Damjan; Podgornik, Ales; Koloini, Tine

    2005-02-11

    Pressure drop analysis in commercial CIM disk monolithic columns is presented. Experimental measurements of pressure drop are compared to hydrodynamic models usually employed for prediction of pressure drop in packed beds, e.g. free surface model and capillary model applying hydraulic radius concept. However, the comparison between pressure drop in monolith and adequate packed bed give unexpected results. Pressure drop in a CIM disk monolithic column is approximately 50% lower than in an adequate packed bed of spheres having the same hydraulic radius as CIM disk monolith; meaning they both have the same porosity and the same specific surface area. This phenomenon seems to be a consequence of the monolithic porous structure which is quite different in terms of the pore size distribution and parallel pore nonuniformity compared to the one in conventional packed beds. The number of self-similar levels for the CIM monoliths was estimated to be between 1.03 and 2.75.

  7. Universality in freezing of an asymmetric drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Md Farhad; Waghmare, Prashant R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the evidence of universality in conical tip formation during the freezing of arbitrary-shaped sessile droplets. The focus is to demonstrate the relationship between this universality and the liquid drop shape. We observe that, in the case of asymmetric drops, this universal shape is achieved when the tip reconfigures by changing its location, which subsequently alters the frozen drop shape. The proposed "two-triangle" model quantifies the change in the tip configuration as a function of the asymmetry of the drop that shows a good agreement with the experimental evidence. Finally, based on the experimental and theoretical exercise, we propose the scaling dependence between the variations in the tip configuration and the asymmetry of the drop.

  8. Patients dropping out of treatment in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlino, M; Martucci, G; Musella, V; Bolzan, M; de Girolamo, G

    1995-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the extent and the specific features of drop-out for patients having a first contact with an university psychiatric outpatient clinic in Italy over the course of 1 year and to determine which variables were associated with early termination of treatment. Of the 158 patients selected for this study, there was an overall 3-month drop-out rate following the first visit of 63%. Of the 59 patients who had returned once after the initial contact, 28 interrupted subsequently the treatment, although the therapist's plan included further visits. The overall drop-out rate at 3 months was thus 82%. The only 2 variables associated with drop-out rates were the patients' perception of the severity of their disorder and the psychiatric history: continuing patients were more frequently in agreement with the clinician's judgment as compared with those who dropped out and were more likely to have already been in psychiatric treatment.

  9. A Maximum Entropy Modelling of the Rain Drop Size Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Tapiador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a maximum entropy approach to Rain Drop Size Distribution (RDSD modelling. It is shown that this approach allows (1 to use a physically consistent rationale to select a particular probability density function (pdf (2 to provide an alternative method for parameter estimation based on expectations of the population instead of sample moments and (3 to develop a progressive method of modelling by updating the pdf as new empirical information becomes available. The method is illustrated with both synthetic and real RDSD data, the latest coming from a laser disdrometer network specifically designed to measure the spatial variability of the RDSD.

  10. External Heat Transfer in Moist Air and Superheated Steam for Softwood Drying%软木干燥中湿空气和过热蒸汽的外部传热

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Shusheng

    2004-01-01

    In kiln drying of softwood timber, external heat and moisture mass transfer coefficients are important in defining boundary temperature and moisture content at the wood surface. In addition, superheated steam drying of wood is a promising technology but this has not been widely accepted commercially, partially due to the lack of understanding of the drying phenomena occurred during drying. In this work, experimental investigation was performed to quantify the heat transfer between wood surface and surrounding moist air or superheated steam. In the experiment, saturated radiata pine sapwood samples were dried using dry-bulb/wet-bulb temperatures of 60℃/50℃,90℃/60℃, 120℃/70℃, 140℃/90℃, 160℃/90℃, 140℃/100℃ and 160℃/100℃. The last two schedules were for superheated steam drying as the wet-bulb temperature was set at 100℃. The circulation velocity over the board surface was controlled at 4.2 m·s-1. Two additional runs (90℃/60℃) using air velocities of 2.4 m·s-1 and 4.8 m·s-1were performed to check the effect of the circulation velocity. During drying, sample weight and temperatures at wood surface and different depths were continuously measured. From these measurements, changes in wood temperature and moisture content were calculated and external heat-transfer coefficient was determined for both the moist air and the superheated steam drying.

  11. Experimental research and design of superheated steam vacuum drying chest based on sea cucumber%海参过热蒸汽真空干燥装置的设计与试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵火英; 袁陆峰

    2012-01-01

    结合过热蒸汽干燥和真空干燥方式的特点,完成海参过热蒸汽真空干燥箱的设计.以海参为被干燥物料,进行不同工况下海参过热蒸汽真空干燥特性的试验研究,主要分析物料质量和脱水率的变化规律以及不同蒸汽温度下干燥速率的变化规律.结果表明:在相同真空度下,过热蒸汽温度越高,干燥速率越快,而且过热蒸汽干燥初期的速率最快.%The superheated steam vacuum drying chest has been designed by combining the good qualities of the superheated steam drying and the vacuum drying. Some kind of sea cucumber has been dried by superheated steam under different kinds of drying conditions. The regularity of quality, dehydration rate and drying velocity changes has been mainly analyzed. The results indicate that the temperature of superheated steam is the primary influencing factor of the drying velocity under the same vacuum pressure, and the higher temperature is, the faster drying velocity can reach. The drying velocity is the fastest at the initial stage along the drying process.

  12. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  13. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Brandenbourger, Martin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a non-volatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can experience a Leidenfrost effect even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014)] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrea...

  14. Interaction of Drops on a Soft Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract eachother due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  15. Conically shaped drops in electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Howard A.; Brenner, Michael P.; Lister, John R.

    1996-11-01

    When an electric field is applied to a dielectric liquid containing a suspended immiscible fluid drop, the drop deforms into a prolate ellipsoidal shape. Above a critical field strength the drop develops conical ends, as first observed by Zeleny [Phys. Rev. 10, 1 (1917)] and Wilson & Taylor [Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 22, 728 (1925)] for, respectively, the case of conducting drops and soap films in air. The case of two dielectric liquids was studied recently using a slender drop approximation by Li, Halsey & Lobkovsky [Europhys. Lett 27, 575 (1994)]. In this presentation we further develop the slender body approximation to obtain coupled ordinary differential equations for the electric field and the drop shape. Analytical formulae are derived which approximately give the cone angle as a function of the dielectric constant ratio between the two fluids, and the minimum applied electric field at which conical tips first form as a function of the dielectric constant ratio. Finally, drops shapes are calculated numerically and compared with the common prolate shape assumption.

  16. Vibration-induced drop atomization and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, A.

    2003-02-01

    A liquid drop placed on a vibrating diaphragm will burst into a fine spray of smaller secondary droplets if it is driven at the proper frequency and amplitude. The process begins when capillary waves appear on the free surface of the drop and then grow in amplitude and complexity as the acceleration amplitude of the diaphragm is slowly increased from zero. When the acceleration of the diaphragm rises above a well-defined critical value, small secondary droplets begin to be ejected from the free-surface wave crests. Then, quite suddenly, the entire volume of the drop is ejected from the vibrating diaphragm in the form of a spray. This event is the result of an interaction between the fluid dynamical process of droplet ejection and the vibrational dynamics of the diaphragm. During droplet ejection, the effective mass of the drop diaphragm system decreases and the resonance frequency of the system increases. If the initial forcing frequency is above the resonance frequency of the system, droplet ejection causes the system to move closer to resonance, which in turn causes more vigorous vibration and faster droplet ejection. This ultimately leads to drop bursting. In this paper, the basic phenomenon of vibration-induced drop atomization and drop bursting will be introduced, demonstrated, and characterized. Experimental results and a simple mathematical model of the process will be presented and used to explain the basic physics of the system.

  17. Dropped head congenital muscular dystrophy caused by de novo mutations in LMNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglu, Pakize; Quizon, Nicolas; Pergande, Matthias; Wang, Haicui; Polat, Ayşe Ipek; Ersen, Ayca; Özer, Erdener; Willkomm, Lena; Hiz Kurul, Semra; Heredia, Raúl; Yis, Uluç; Selcen, Duygu; Çirak, Sebahattin

    2017-04-01

    Dropped head syndrome is an easily recognizable clinical presentation of Lamin A/C-related congenital muscular dystrophy. Patients usually present in the first year of life with profound neck muscle weakness, dropped head, and elevated serum creatine kinase. Two patients exhibited head drop during infancy although they were able to sit independently. Later they developed progressive axial and limb-girdle weakness. Creatine kinase levels were elevated and muscle biopsies of both patients showed severe dystrophic changes. The distinctive clinical hallmark of the dropped head led us to the diagnosis of Lamin A/C-related congenital muscular dystrophy, with a pathogenic de novo mutation p.Glu31del in the head domain of the Lamin A/C gene in both patients. Remarkably, one patient also had a central involvement with white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Lamin A/C-related dropped-head syndrome is a rapidly progressive congenital muscular dystrophy and may lead to loss of ambulation, respiratory insufficiency, and cardiac complications. Thus, the genetic diagnosis of dropped-head syndrome as L-CMD and the implicated clinical care protocols are of vital importance for these patients. This disease may be underdiagnosed, as only a few genetically confirmed cases have been reported. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Terminal Effect of Drop Coalescence on Single Drop Mass Transfer Measurements and Its Minimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For the mass transfer to single drops during the stage of steady buoyancy-driven motion, experimental measurement is complicated with the terminal effect of additional mass transfer during drop formation and coa lescence at the drop collector. Analysis reveals that consistent operating conditions and experimental procedure are of critical significance for minimizing the terminal effect of drop coalescence on the accuracy of mass transfer measurements. The novel design of a totally-closed extraction column is proposed for this purpose, which guaran tees that the volumetric rate of drop phase injection is exactly equal to that of withdrawal of drops. Tests in two extraction systems demonstrate that the experimental repeatability is improved greatly and the terminal effect of mass transfer during drop coalescence is brought well under control.

  19. Laplacian drop shapes and effect of random perturbations on accuracy of surface tension measurement for different drop constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical drop shapes are calculated for three drop constellations: pendant drops, constrained sessile drops, and unconstrained sessile drops. Based on total Gaussian curvature, shape parameter and critical shape parameter are discussed as a function of different drop sizes and surface tensions. The shape parameter is linked to physical parameters for every drop constellation. The as yet unavailable detailed dimensional analysis for the unconstrained sessile drop is presented. Results show that the unconstrained sessile drop shape depends on a dimensionless volume term and the contact angle. Random perturbations are introduced and the accuracy of surface tension measurement is assessed for precise and perturbed profiles of the three drop constellations. It is concluded that pendant drops are the best method for accurate surface tension measurement, followed by constrained sessile drops. The unconstrained sessile drops come last because they tend to be more spherical at low and moderate contact angles. Of course, unconstrained sessile drops are the only option if contact angles are to be measured.

  20. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  1. Deviation of viscous drops at chemical steps

    CERN Document Server

    Semprebon, Ciro; Filippi, Daniele; Perlini, Luca; Pierno, Matteo; Brinkmann, Martin; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic wetting experiments and numerical simulations of gravity driven liquid drops sliding on a plane substrate decorated with a linear chemical step. Surprisingly, the optimal direction to observe crossing is not the one perpendicular to the step, but a finite angle that depends on the material parameters. We computed the landscapes of the force acting on the drop by means of a contact line mobility model showing that contact angle hysteresis dominates the dynamics at the step and determines whether the drop passes onto the lower substrate. This analysis is very well supported by the experimental dynamic phase diagram in terms of pinning, crossing, sliding and sliding followed by pinning.

  2. New Hydrodynamic Mechanism for Drop Coarsening

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a new mechanism of drop coarsening due to coalescence only, which describes the late stages of phase separation in fluids. Depending on the volume fraction of the minority phase, we identify two different regimes of growth, where the drops are interconnected and their characteristic size grows linearly with time, and where the spherical drops are disconnected and the growth follows (time) 1/3. The transition between the two regimes is sharp and occurs at a well defined volume fraction of order 30%.

  3. On the Deepwater Horizon drop size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Peischl, J.; Brock, C. A.; McKeen, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations of the fate of gas and oil released following the Deepwater Horizon blowout in 2012 depend critically on the assumed drop size distributions. We use direct observations of surfacing time, surfacing location, and atmospheric chemical composition to infer an average drop size distribution for June 10, 2012, providing robust first-order constraints on parameterizations in models. We compare the inferred drop size distribution to published work on Deepwater Horizon and discuss the ability of this approach to determine the efficacy of subsurface dispersant injection.

  4. Assessing the accuracy of contact angle measurements for sessile drops on liquid-repellent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-11-15

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased optical noise in the drop profile near the solid-liquid free surface and the progressive failure of simple geometric approximations. We demonstrate a systematic approach to determining the effective contact angle of drops on super-repellent surfaces. We use a perturbation solution of the Bashforth-Adams equation to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops of water, ethylene glycol, and diiodomethane on an omniphobic surface using direct measurements of the maximum drop width and height. The results and analysis can be represented in terms of a dimensionless Bond number that depends on the maximum drop width and the capillary length of the liquid to quantify the extent of gravity-induced sagging. Finally, we illustrate the inherent sensitivity of goniometric contact angle measurement techniques to drop dimensions as the apparent contact angle approaches 180°.

  5. Proceedings of the Second International Colloquium on Drops and Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecroissette, D. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Applications of bubble and drop technologies are discussed and include: low gravity manufacturing, containerless melts, microballoon fabrication, ink printers, laser fusion targets, generation of organic glass and metal shells, and space processing. The fluid dynamics of bubbles and drops were examined. Thermomigration, capillary flow, and interfacial tension are discussed. Techniques for drop control are presented and include drop size control and drop shape control.

  6. Spreading of liquid drops over porous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-07-01

    The spreading of small liquid drops over thin and thick porous layers (dry or saturated with the same liquid) has been investigated in the case of both complete wetting (silicone oils of different viscosities) and partial wetting (aqueous SDS solutions of different concentrations). Nitrocellulose membranes of different porosity and different average pore size have been used as a model of thin porous layers, glass and metal filters have been used as a model of thick porous substrates. The first problem under investigation has been the spreading of small liquid drops over thin porous layers saturated with the same liquid. An evolution equation describing the drop spreading has been deduced, which showed that both an effective lubrication and the liquid exchange between the drop and the porous substrates are equally important. Spreading of silicone oils over different nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes was carried out. The experimental laws of the radius of spreading on time confirmed the theory predictions. The spreading of small liquid drops over thin dry porous layers has also been investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The drop motion over a dry porous layer appears caused by the interplay of two processes: (a). the spreading of the drop over already saturated parts of the porous layer, which results in a growth of the drop base, and (b). the imbibition of the liquid from the drop into the porous substrate, which results in a shrinkage of the drop base and a growth of the wetted region inside the porous layer. As a result of these two competing processes the radius of the drop base goes through a maximum as time proceeds. A system of two differential equations has been derived to describe the time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the porous layer. This system includes two parameters, one accounts for the effective lubrication coefficient of the liquid over the wetted porous substrate, and

  7. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  8. How to Use Nose Drops Properly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use nose drops only as long as directed Store medications out of reach of children Copyright 2013, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced, displayed, modified, or distributed ...

  9. How to Use Eye Drops Properly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doses Use the exact number of drops recommended Store medications out of reach of children Copyright 2013, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced, displayed, modified, or distributed ...

  10. Drop impact of shear thickening liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Francois; Dijksman, J Frits; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    The impact of drops of concentrated non-Brownian suspensions (cornstarch and polystyrene spheres) onto a solid surface is investigated experimentally. The spreading dynamics and maxi- mal deformation of the droplet of such shear thickening liquids are found to be markedly different from the impact of Newtonian drops. A particularly striking observation is that the maximal de- formation is independent of the drop velocity and that the deformation suddenly stops during the impact phase. Both observations are due to the shear-thickening rheology of the suspensions, as is theoretically explained from a balance between the kinetic energy and the viscously-dissipated en- ergy, from which we establish a scaling relation between drop maximal deformation and rheological parameters of concentrated suspensions.

  11. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-07-18

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  12. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number.

  13. Fluid Flower : Microliquid Patterning via Drop Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Minhee

    2008-01-01

    In microfluidic technologies, direct patterning of liquid without resorting to micromachined solid structures has various advantages including reduction of the frictional dissipation and the fabrication cost. This fluid dynamics video illustrates the method to micropattern a liquid on a solid surface with drop impact. We experimentally show that a water drop impacting with the wettability-patterned solid retracts fast on the hydrophobic regions while being arrested on the hydrophilic areas.

  14. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis.

  15. Energy and Exergy Analysis of a Novel Efficient Combined Process by Hydrothermal Degradation and Superheated Steam Drying of Degradable Organic Wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqing GUO; Yunhan XIAO; Wendong TIAN; Zhedian ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers the combination of hydrothermal degradation (HTD) and superheated steam (SHS) drying in disposal and processing of degradable organic wastes in municipal solid wastes (MSW). In SHS drying, a fraction of dryer thermal energy input can be recovered and used to satisfy the heat requirement in maintaining the HTD operating temperature. Both energy and exergy analysis are applied to the combined process. The analysis covers ranges of dryer inlet temperatures of 202.38-234.19℃ and feed water content of 32.5-65%. Thermal energy analysis shows that the combination of HTD and SHS drying can achieve thermal energy self-sufficiency (TES)by manipulating process variables. The exergy analysis indicates the location, type, and magnitude of the exergy losses during the whole process by applying the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. Are All Obsidians Super-Heated? Insights from Observations of Crystallization Kinetics in Experiments on Glass Mountain Obsidians (Long Valley, CA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, L.; Andrews, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Glass Mountain obsidians (Long Valley, CA) are crystal-poor (obsidians, if the mineral assemblage is phenocrystic. Results of high-resolution SEM mapping and electron microprobe analysis of a Glass Mountain sample reveal that the obsidian is saturated in nine phases (sanidine + quartz + plagioclase + ilmenite + titanomagnetite + zircon + apatite + allanite + biotite). Sanidine (Or78-Or35) and quartz occur in the largest abundances, and plagioclase (obsidians, requires that the mechanism that produced these obsidians have an associated kinetic effect that strongly hinders nucleation. Decompression and cooling experiments, conducted in this study and from the literature, demonstrate that the simplest way to hinder nucleation is to initiate degassing or cooling from super-liquidus conditions. Therefore, the Glass Mountain obsidians were super-heated prior to crystallization, achieved either by fluid under-saturated decompression from a crystalline mush or H2O-saturated partial melting.

  17. Drop Performance Test of CRDMs for JRTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Chung, Jong-Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun [POSCO Plandtec Co. Ltd, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan-Hee [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The drop test results of CRDMs with AC-type electromagnet show that the initial delay times are not satisfied with the requirement, 0.15 seconds. After the replacement of the electromagnet from AC-type to DCtype, the drop times of CARs and accelerations due to the impact of moving parts are satisfied with all requirements. As a result, it is found that four CRDMs to be installed at site have a good drop performance, and meet all performance requirements. A control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) is a device to control the position of a control absorber rod (CAR) in the core by using a stepping motor which is commanded by the reactor regulating system (RRS) to control the reactivity during the normal operation of the reactor. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the performances such as the stepping, drop, endurance, vibration, seismic and structural integrity for active components. Especially, the CAR drop curves are important data for the safety analysis. This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performances of a prototype and 4 CRDMs to be installed at site. The tests are carried out at a test rig simulating the actual reactor's conditions.

  18. Transition Mode Shapes in a Vibrating Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2000-11-01

    Vertical, time-periodic vibration of a diaphragm has been used to atomize a primary sessile drop into a fine spray of secondary droplets. The evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the sessile drop and the piezoelectrically-driven, low-mass diaphragm. The evolution of the free surface of the drop is characterized by the appearance of a hierarchy of surface waves that we investigated using high-speed imaging and laser vibrometry. At low-driving amplitudes, we see the appearance of time-harmonic axisymmetric waves on the drop's free surface induced by the motion of the contact line. As the vibration amplitude increases, azimuthal waves at the subharmonic of the forcing frequency appear around the periphery of the drop and propagate towards its center. A striking lattice mode emerges upon the breakdown of the axisymmetric wave pattern, followed by the appearance of the highly-agitated free surface of the pre-ejection mode shape. Subsequent to the breakdown of the lattice structure, the frequency of the most energetic mode is a subharmonic of the driving frequency. The complex interaction of the fundamental and subharmonic waves ultimately leads to the breakdown of the free surface and the atomization of the drop.

  19. Fast and Accurate Pressure-Drop Prediction in Straightened Atherosclerotic Coronary Arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.C. Schrauwen (Jelle); D. Koeze (Dion); J.J. Wentzel (Jolanda); F.N. van de Vosse (Frans); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); F.J.H. Gijsen (Frank)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAtherosclerotic disease progression in coronary arteries is influenced by wall shear stress. To compute patient-specific wall shear stress, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is required. In this study we propose a method for computing the pressure-drop in regions proximal and distal to

  20. Spreading of Electrolyte Drops on Charged Surfaces: Electric Double Layer Effects on Drop Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyeong; Sinha, Shayandev; Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Drop spreading is one of the most fundamental topics of wetting. Here we study the spreading of electrolyte drops on charged surfaces. The electrolyte solution in contact with the charged solid triggers the formation of an electric double layer (EDL). We develop a theory to analyze how the EDL affects the drop spreading. The drop dynamics is studied by probing the EDL effects on the temporal evolution of the contact angle and the base radius (r). The EDL effects are found to hasten the spreading behaviour - this is commensurate to the EDL effects causing a ``philic'' tendency in the drops (i.e., drops attaining a contact angle smaller than its equilibrium value), as revealed by some of our recent papers. We also develop scaling laws to illustrate the manner in which the EDL effects make the r versus time (t) variation deviate from the well known r ~tn variation, thereby pinpointing the attainment of different EDL-mediated spreading regimes.

  1. Charge and Size Distributions of Electrospray Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan L; de la Mora JF

    1997-02-15

    The distributions of charge q and diameter d of drops emitted from electrified liquid cones in the cone-jet mode are investigated with two aerosol instruments. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA, Vienna type) first samples the spray drops, selects those with electrical mobilities within a narrow band, and either measures the associated current or passes them to a second instrument. The drops may also be individually counted optically and sized by sampling them into an aerodynamic size spectrometer (API's Aerosizer). For a given cone-jet, the distribution of charge q for the main electrospray drops is some 2.5 times broader than their distribution of diameters d, with qmax/qmin approximately 4. But mobility-selected drops have relative standard deviations of only 5% for both d and q, showing that the support of the (q, d) distribution is a narrow band centered around a curve q(d). The approximate one-dimensionality of this support region is explained through the mechanism of jet breakup, which is a random process with only one degree of freedom: the wavelength of axial modulation of the jet. The observed near constancy of the charge over volume ratio (q approximately d3) shows that the charge is frozen in the liquid surface at the time scale of the breakup process. The charge over volume ratio of the primary drops varies between 98 and 55% of the ratio of spray current I over liquid flow rate Q, and decreases at increasing Q. I/Q is therefore an unreliable measure of the charge density of these drops.

  2. Shape oscillation of a levitated drop in an acoustic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ran, Weiyu

    2013-01-01

    A `star drop' refers to the patterns created when a drop, flattened by some force, is excited into shape mode oscillations. These patterns are perhaps best understood as the two dimensional analog to the more common three dimensional shape mode oscillations. In this fluid dynamics video an ultrasonic standing wave was used to levitate a liquid drop. The drop was then flattened into a disk by increasing the field strength. This flattened drop was then excited to create star drop patterns by exciting the drop at its resonance frequency. Different oscillatory modes were induced by varying the drop radius, fluid properties, and frequency at which the field strength was modulated.

  3. Drops with non-circular footprints

    CERN Document Server

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D; Diez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. This type of drops is a consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to hysteresis effects of the contact angle since some parts of the contact line are wetting, while others are dewetting. Here, we obtain a peculiar drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate, and analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non--trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of...

  4. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  5. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  6. Drops with non-circular footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D.; González, Alejandro G.; Diez, Javier A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. These drops are consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to the hysteresis of the contact angle since there is a wetting process in some parts of the contact line, while a dewetting occurs in other parts. Here, we obtain a characteristic drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate. We analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non-trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and we compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equation, where we emulate the hysteretic effects with an appropriate spatial distribution of the static contact angle over the substrate.

  7. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Spencer D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  8. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Leal, L. Gary; Thomas, D. A.; Crouch, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Free drops and bubbles are weakly nonlinear mechanical systems that are relatively simple to characterize experimentally in 1-G as well as in microgravity. The understanding of the details of their motion contributes to the fundamental study of nonlinear phenomena and to the measurement of the thermophysical properties of freely levitated melts. The goal of this Glovebox-based experimental investigation is the low-gravity assessment of the capabilities of a modular apparatus based on ultrasonic resonators and on the pseudo- extinction optical method. The required experimental task is the accurate measurements of the large-amplitude dynamics of free drops and bubbles in the absence of large biasing influences such as gravity and levitation fields. A single-axis levitator used for the positioning of drops in air, and an ultrasonic water-filled resonator for the trapping of air bubbles have been evaluated in low-gravity and in 1-G. The basic feasibility of drop positioning and shape oscillations measurements has been verified by using a laptop-interfaced automated data acquisition and the optical extinction technique. The major purpose of the investigation was to identify the salient technical issues associated with the development of a full-scale Microgravity experiment on single drop and bubble dynamics.

  9. Liquid Drop Measuring Device for Analyzing Liquid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the correlation between certain properties of liquid and the properties of the corresponding liquid drop formed under given conditions, a liquid drop measuring device is utilized to monitor the drop formation process of the liquid sample with photoelectric measuring methods. The mechanical and optical characteristic of the liquid is explored with the optical fibers from the internal of the liquid drop during its formation. The drop head capacitor is utilized to monitor the growth process of the liquid drop to gain the drop volume information related to the physical property of liquid. The unique liquid drop trace containing the integrated properties of liquid is generated, and it is proved by experiment that for different liquids their liquid drop traces are different. The analysis on liquid properties and discrimination between different liquids can be proceeded with the liquid drop trace obtained by the liquid drop measuring device.

  10. Settling of copper drops in molten slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warczok, A.; Utigard, T. A.

    1995-02-01

    The settling of suspended metal and sulfide droplets in liquid metallurgical, slags can be affected by electric fields. The migration of droplets due to electrocapillary motion phenomena may be used to enhance the recovery of suspended matte/metal droplets and thereby to increase the recovery of pay metals. An experimental technique was developed for the purpose of measuring the effect of electric fields on the settling rate of metallic drops in liquid slags. Copper drops suspended in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Cu2O slags were found to migrate toward the cathode. Electric fields can increase the settling rate of 5-mm-diameter copper drops 3 times or decrease the settling until levitation by reversal of the electric field. The enhanced settling due to electric fields decreases with increasing Cu2O contents in the slag.

  11. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  12. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  13. Drop impact on a flexible fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Dressaire, Emilie; Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    When droplets impact fibrous media, the liquid can be captured by the fibers or contact then break away. Previous studies have shown that the efficiency of drop capture by a rigid fiber depends on the impact velocity and defined a threshold velocity below which the drop is captured. However, it is necessary to consider the coupling of elastic and capillary effects to achieve a greater understanding of the capture process for soft substrates. Here, we study experimentally the dynamics of a single drop impacting on a thin flexible fiber. Our results demonstrate that the threshold capture velocity depends on the flexibility of fibers in a non-monotonic way. We conclude that tuning the mechanical properties of fibers can optimize the efficiency of droplet capture.

  14. Secondary breakup of coal water slurry drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2011-11-01

    To investigate secondary atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), deformation and breakup of eight kinds of CWS drops are presented using high speed digital camera. Based on morphology, deformation and breakup regimes of CWS drops can be termed some different modes: deformation, multimode breakup (including two sub-modes: hole breakup and tensile breakup), and shear breakup. Correlations on the ranges of breakup modes are also obtained. The conventional Weber number and Ohnesorge number are found to be insufficient to classify all breakup modes of CWS drops, so two other non-dimensional numbers based on rheology of CWS are suggested to use in the deformation and breakup regime map. Finally, total breakup time is studied and correlated, which increases with Ohnesorge number.

  15. Water drops dancing on ice: how sublimation leads to drop rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Bernagozzi, I; Jung, S; Poulikakos, D; Marengo, M

    2013-07-05

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces but can also be induced through the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here we demonstrate that drop rebound can also originate from another physical phenomenon, the solid substrate sublimation. Through drop impact experiments on a superhydrophobic surface, a hot plate, and solid carbon dioxide (commonly known as dry ice), we compare drop rebound based on three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common (superhydrophobicity, evaporation, and sublimation), but lead to the same rebound phenomenon in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300 °C down to even below -79 °C. The formation and unprecedented visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop are also reported.

  16. The new Drop Tower catapult system

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Rath, Hans J.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of the "Drop Tower" began. Since then, the eye-catching tower with a height of 146 m and its characteristic glass roof has become the emblem of the technology centre in Bremen. The Drop Tower Bremen provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness. Items are considered weightless, when they are in "free fall", i.e. moving without propulsion within the gravity field of the earth. The height of the tower limits the simple "free fall" experiment period to max. 4.74 s. With the inauguration of the catapult system in December 2004, the ZARM is entering a new dimension. This world novelty will meet scientists' demands of extending the experiment period up to 9.5 s. Since turning the first sod on May 3rd, 1988, the later installation of the catapult system has been taken into account by building the necessary chamber under the tower. The catapult system is located in a chamber 10 m below the base of the tower. This chamber is almost completely occupied by 12 huge pressure tanks. These tanks are placed around the elongation of the vacuum chamber of the drop tube. In its centre there is the pneumatic piston that accelerates the drop capsule by the pressure difference between the vacuum inside the drop tube and the pressure inside the tanks. The acceleration level is adjusted by means of a servo hydraulic breaking system controlling the piston velocity. After only a quarter of a second the drop capsule achieves its lift-off speed of 175 km/h. With this exact speed, the capsule will rise up to the top of the tower and afterwards fall down again into the deceleration unit which has been moved under the drop tube in the meantime. The scientific advantages of the doubled experiment time are obvious: during almost 10 s of high

  17. Electrohydrodynamic removal of particles from drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudurupati, S.; Janjua, M.; Singh, P.; Aubry, N.

    2009-07-01

    A uniform electric field is used for cleaning drops of the particles they often carry on their surface. In a first step, particles migrate to either the drop’s poles or equator. This is due to the presence of an electrostatic force for which an analytical expression is derived. In a second step, particles concentrated near the poles are released into the ambient liquid via tip streaming, and those near the equator are removed by stretching the drop and breaking it into several droplets. In the latter case, particles are all concentrated in a small middle daughter droplet.

  18. Development of revolving drop surface tensiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, S; Sakai, K

    2012-01-01

    A revolving drop surface tensiometer, which measures the surface tension of a small amount of liquid, is proposed. A remarkable feature of this device is that while using the pendant drop method, it employs a centrifugal force to deform the liquid droplet. The centrifugal force induces a large distortion of the droplet, which enables an accurate measurement of the surface tension to be made. In our experimental setup, the centrifugal force can be increased so that the apparent acceleration becomes up to 100 times larger than that due to gravity, and the capability of this method to measure surface tensions was demonstrated with ethylene glycol.

  19. Millikan "oil drop" stabilized by growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L K; Gertler, A W; Reiss, H

    1979-01-26

    A diffusion cloud chamber has been used to qualitatively study some dynamic properties of liquid drops by suspending them in an electric field at the plane of saturation (p/ps = 1, where p is the actual partial pressure of the vapor at a given elevation and ps is the equilibrium pressure at that temperature characteristic of that elevation). By varying the strength of the electric field, it is possible to change the size of the suspended droplets and even, if desired, to isolate a single drop.

  20. Transformation of the bridge during drop separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of flows during separation of pendant drops of liquids with significantly different physical properties (alcohol, water, glycerin, oil) has been studied by high-speed video recording. The dynamics of the processes involving the formation of bridges of two characteristic shapes—slightly nonuniform in thickness and with thinning of the upper and lower ends—has been investigated. It has been shown that the shape change of the separated bridge has a number of stages determined by the properties of the liquid. As a result, the bridge is transformed into a small drop—a satellite drop.

  1. Vortex-induced buckling of a viscous drop impacting a pool

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2017-07-20

    We study the intricate buckling patterns which can form when a viscous drop impacts a much lower viscosity miscible pool. The drop enters the pool by its impact inertia, flattens, and sinks by its own weight while stretching into a hemispheric bowl. Upward motion along the outer bottom surface of this bowl produces a vortical boundary layer which separates along its top and rolls up into a vortex ring. The vorticity is therefore produced in a fundamentally different way than for a drop impacting a pool of the same liquid. The vortex ring subsequently advects into the bowl, thereby stretching the drop liquid into ever thinner sheets, reaching the micron level. The rotating motion around the vortex pulls in folds to form multiple windings of double-walled toroidal viscous sheets. The axisymmetric velocity field thereby stretches the drop liquid into progressively finer sheets, which are susceptible to both axial and azimuthal compression-induced buckling. The azimuthal buckling of the sheets tends to occur on the inner side of the vortex ring, while their folds can be stretched and straightened on the outside edge. We characterize the total stretching from high-speed video imaging and use particle image velocimetry to track the formation and evolution of the vortex ring. The total interfacial area between the drop and the pool liquid can grow over 40-fold during the first 50 ms after impact. Increasing pool viscosity shows entrapment of a large bubble on top of the drop, while lowering the drop viscosity produces intricate buckled shapes, appearing at the earliest stage and being promoted by the crater motions. We also present an image collage of the most intriguing and convoluted structures observed. Finally, a simple point-vortex model reproduces some features from the experiments and shows variable stretching along the wrapping sheets.

  2. I000MW超超临界机组过热汽温控制策略%Controlling strategy to the superheated steam temperature for 1000MW supercritical unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋强; 石磐

    2011-01-01

    Guangzhou Taishan 1000MW supercritical unit , as an example,the paper analyzes dynamic characteristic of the superheated steam temperature control for supercritical Unit of dynamic characteristic and discusses control strategy to superheated steam temperature fuel - water ratio and desuperheating water control. Finally, according to the practical examples, the paper carries out deliberate analysis and research.%以广州台山1000MW超超临界机组为例,分析了超超临界机组过热汽温控制的动态特性,论述了过热汽温控制中的燃水比和减温水控制策略,并根据实例进行了详细的分析和研究。

  3. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  4. Best Measuring Time for a Millikan Oil Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    In a Millikan oil drop experiment, there is a best measuring time for observing the drop, due to Brownian motion of the drop and the experimenter's reaction time. Derives an equation for the relative error in the measurement of the drop's excess charge, and obtains a formula for the best measuring time. (Author/MLH)

  5. Two-Phase condensation Heat Transfer Coefficients Heat Transfer Coefficients and Pressure drops of R-404A for different Condensing Temperatures in a smooth and Micro-Fin Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. S.N. Sapali

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two phase heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops of R-404A in a smooth (8.56 mm ID and micro-fin tube (8.96 mm ID are experimentally investigated. Different from previous studies, the present experiments are performed for different condensing temperatures, with superheating and sub cooling and using hermetically sealed compressor. The test runs are done at average saturated condensing temperatures ranging from 35oC to 60oC. The mass fluxes are between 90 and 800 kg m-2s-1 . The experimental results from both smooth and micro-fin tubes show that the average heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop increases with mass flux but decreases with increasing condensing temperature. The average heat transfer coefficient is 30-210% higher for micro-fin tube than that of smooth tube, with moderate increase in pressure drop ranging from 10-55%. New correlations based on the data gathered during the experimentation for predicting condensation heat transfer coefficients are proposed for wide range of practical applications.

  6. 一种太阳能吸热器过热蒸汽温度控制系统%Temperature control system of superheated steam for one type solar water/steam receiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭铁铮; 刘国耀; 刘德有; 郭苏; 许昌

    2012-01-01

    介绍了一种应用于塔式太阳能热发电系统的水/蒸汽吸热器过热蒸汽温度控制系统.受到太阳辐射能间歇性和不确定性的影响,吸热器产生的过热蒸汽温度难于控制.控制系统根据吸热器在蒸汽流量变化、光功率变化和减温水流量变化等3种主要扰动下的过热汽温度动态响应特性,以减温水流量作为控制量,光功率和蒸汽负荷作为前馈信号,设计和研制了两段式过热蒸汽温度控制系统,使吸热器过热区出口汽温维持在允许的范围内.%A superheated steam temperature control system of heat receiver in solar power tower plant was introduced. It is hard to control superheated steam temperature of receiver because solar radiant energy is intermittent and unsteady. A superheated steam temperature control system with two phases was designed and developed based on dynamic response characteristics of superheated steam caused by three main influencing factors such as steam flow, solar radiation and flow of desuperheating water. The flow of desuperheating water was used as control variable, and solar radiation and steam load as feed-forward signal, the steam outlet temperature at superheat zone in receiver changed within allowable arrange.

  7. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  8. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    CERN Document Server

    Thoraval, M -J; Etoh, T G; Thoroddsen, S T

    2012-01-01

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting onto a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 264506 (2012)]. These dynamics occur mostly within 50 {\\mu}s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million frames/sec. For a water drop impacting onto a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Re above about 12 000, up to 10 partial bubble-rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is about 20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into microbubbles. The different refractive index in the pool l...

  9. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  10. Scaling the drop size in coflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Hernandez, E; Gordillo, J M [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gundabala, V; Fernandez-Nieves, A [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)], E-mail: jgordill@us.es

    2009-07-15

    We perform extensive experiments with coflowing liquids in microfluidic devices and provide a closed expression for the drop size as a function of measurable parameters in the jetting regime that accounts for the experimental observations; this expression works irrespective of how the jets are produced, providing a powerful design tool for this type of experiments.

  11. Drop Shaping by Laser-Pulse Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.L.; Bouwhuis, W.; Visser, C.W.; Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, C.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Villermaux, E.; Lohse, D.; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    We show how the deposition of laser energy induces propulsion and strong deformation of an absorbing liquid body. Combining high speed with stroboscopic imaging, we observe that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a millijoule nanosecond laser pulse propels forward at several meters per second

  12. Thermocapillary motion of bubbles and drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of interface-driven motions of drops and bubbles. It is shown that even in the simplest cases, theory predicts exotic flow topologies. Attention is given to several unsolved problems that must be addressed both theoretically and experimentally.

  13. Equilibrium drop surface profiles in electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, F.; Buehrle, J.

    2007-01-01

    Electrowetting is becoming a more and more frequently used tool to manipulate liquids in various microfluidic applications. On the scale of the entire drop, the effect of electrowetting is to reduce the apparent contact angle of partially wetting conductive liquids upon application of an external vo

  14. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  15. Liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Inwon

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional model describing the motion of liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane (the so-called quasi-static approximation model). We prove existence and uniqueness of a solution and investigate its long time behavior for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous medium (i.e. constant and non-constant contact angle). We also obtain some homogenization results.

  16. Drop-Out Challenges: Pathways to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Evguenia; McKee, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an action research at an alternative high school which explores drop-out prevention strategies with first-year students. Student retention is extremely challenging for alternative schools. Because their mission is to provide a second chance to students who could not succeed in a regular setting, those schools regularly must…

  17. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Large Packaging design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.955(e) of this subpart. (b... § 178.960(d). (d) Test method. (1) Samples of all Large Packaging design types must be dropped onto a... be restored to the upright position for observation. (2) Large Packaging design types with a capacity...

  18. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  19. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  20. Acoustic levitation of liquid drops: Dynamics, manipulation and phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Yu, Yinkai; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Wu, Hongjing; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    The technique of acoustic levitation normally produces a standing wave and the potential well of the sound field can be used to trap small objects. Since no solid surface is involved it has been widely applied for the study of fluid physics, nucleation, bio/chemical processes, and various forms of soft matter. In this article, we survey the works on drop dynamics in acoustic levitation, focus on how the dynamic behavior is related to the rheological properties and discuss the possibility to develop a novel rheometer based on this technique. We review the methods and applications of acoustic levitation for the manipulation of both liquid and solid samples and emphasize the important progress made in the study of phase transitions and bio-chemical analysis. We also highlight the possible open areas for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Drop Impact of Viscous Suspensions on Solid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolleddula, Daniel; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    Droplet impact is a well studied subject with over a century of progress. Most studies are motivated by applications such as inkjet printing, agriculture spraying, or printed circuit boards. Pharmaceutically relevant fluids provide an experimental set that has received little attention. Medicinal tablets are coated by the impaction of micron sized droplets of aqueous suspensions and subsequently dried for various purposes such as brand recognition, mask unpleasant taste, or functionality. We will present a systematic study of micron sized drop impact of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids used in pharmaceutical coating processes. In our experiments we extend the range of Ohnesorge numbers, O(1), of previous studies on surfaces of varying wettability and roughness.

  2. CONDENSATION OF R134a SUPERHEATED VAPOR IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL MICROFIN TUBE%R134a过热蒸汽在三维内微肋管内的凝结换热特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈清华; 崔文智; 辛明道; 周杰; 张罡

    2000-01-01

    本文对三维内微肋管内进口区段R134a过热蒸汽的凝结换热过程进行了实验研究。结果表明:微肋管内过热蒸汽过热度降低的速率明显高于光管,且主要受质量流率和管壁过冷度的影响。本文得到的过热蒸汽凝结换热计算式与实验的偏差在±15%以内。%An experimental investigation of R134a superheated vapor condensation in the entrance region of three-dimensional microfin tube is conducted. The decease rate of superheated vapor temperature in the 3-D microfin tube is larger than that in smooth tube. The obtained empirical correlation of superheated vapor condensation has ±15% deviation when compared with the experimental data.

  3. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  4. Coalescence collision of liquid drops I: Off-center collisions of equal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH is used here to model off-center collisions of equal-size liquid drops in a three-dimensional space. In this study the Weber number is calculated for several conditions of the droplets dynamics and the velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown. For the permanent coalescence the evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown and also the approaching to equilibrium of the resulting drop. Depending of the Weber number three possible outcomes for the collision of droplets is obtained: permanent coalescence, flocculation and fragmentation. The fragmentation phenomena are modeled and the formation of small satellite drops can be seen. The ligament that is formed follows the “end pinching” mechanism and it is transformed into a flat structure.

  5. Coalescence collision of liquid drops II: Off-center collisions of unequal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method to simulate for first time in the three-dimensional space the hydrodynamic off-center collisions of unequal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. The Weber number for several conditions of the droplets dynamics is determined. Also the velocity vector fields inside the drops are shown in the collision process. The evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown for the permanent coalescence case. The resulting drops tend to deform, and depending of the Weber number two possible outcomes for the collision of droplets arise: either permanent coalescence or flocculation. In the permanent coalescence of the drops a fragmentation case is modeled, yielding the formation of little satellite droplets.

  6. Development of an HPLC method to analyze and prepare elsinochrome C and hypocrellin A in the submerged fermentation broth of Shiria sp. SUPER-H168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingming; Cai, Yujie; Liao, Xiangru; Hao, Zhikui; Liu, Jiayang

    2012-06-01

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method based on reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was first developed to simultaneously determine elsinochrome C (EC) and hypocrellin A (HA) in the submerged fermentation. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-water 60:40 (v/v) with a flow-rate of 1 mL/min. The calibration curves were as follows: y = 37,625x + 249,775 for EC, y = 30,813x + 556,409 for HA and linear at the investigated concentration. The correlation coefficients (R(2) ) were 0.9989 and 0.9998 respectively for EC and HA. The limits of detection and quantification were 175 and 585 µg/L for EC and 205 and 610 µg/L for HA. The precisions of concentration and retention times were less than 2.5 and 0.3%. The recovery of the method was greater than 95.0%. The methodology was applied to analyze simultaneously EC and HA concentrations in a submerged fermentation, and was adequate for analysis of biosynthesis of perylenequinones. The method was also amplified to separate and purify EC and HA using a semi-preparative C(18) column. In addition, elsinochrome C was first identified in the submerged fermentation broth of Shiraia sp. SUPER-H168. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Pollination Drop in Juniperus communis: Response to Deposited Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaini, Serena; Nepi, Massimo; Guarnieri, Massimo; Piotto, Beti; Pacini, Ettore

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The pollination drop is a liquid secretion produced by the ovule and exposed outside the micropyle. In many gymnosperms, pollen lands on the surface of the pollination drop, rehydrates and enters the ovule as the drop retracts. The objective of this work was to study the formation of the pollination drop in Juniperus communis, its carbohydrate composition and the response to deposition of conspecific pollen, foreign pollen and other particulate material, in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of pollination drop retraction. Method Branches with female cones close to pollination drop secretion were collected. On the first day of pollination drop exposure, an eyelash mounted on a wooden stick with paraffin was used to collect pollen or silica gel particles, which were then deposited by contact with the drop. Volume changes in pollination drops were measured by using a stereomicroscope with a micrometer eyepiece 3 h after deposition. The volume of non-pollinated control drops was also recorded. On the first day of secretion, drops were also collected for sugar analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Key Results The pollination drop persisted for about 12 d if not pollinated, and formed again after removal for up to four consecutive days. After pollination with viable conspecific pollen, the drop retracted quickly and did not form again. Partial withdrawal occurred after deposition of other biological and non-biological material. Fructose was the dominant sugar; glucose was also present but at a much lower percentage. Conclusions Sugar analysis confirmed the general trend of fructose dominance in gymnosperm pollination drops. Complete pollination drop withdrawal appears to be triggered by a biochemical mechanism resulting from interaction between pollen and drop constituents. The results of particle deposition suggest the existence of a non-specific, particle-size-dependent mechanism that induces partial pollination drop withdrawal

  8. Semisupervised Community Detection by Voltage Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications show that semisupervised community detection is one of the important topics and has attracted considerable attention in the study of complex network. In this paper, based on notion of voltage drops and discrete potential theory, a simple and fast semisupervised community detection algorithm is proposed. The label propagation through discrete potential transmission is accomplished by using voltage drops. The complexity of the proposal is OV+E for the sparse network with V vertices and E edges. The obtained voltage value of a vertex can be reflected clearly in the relationship between the vertex and community. The experimental results on four real networks and three benchmarks indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective and flexible. Furthermore, this algorithm is easily applied to graph-based machine learning methods.

  9. SURVEY OF PACKET DROPPING ATTACK IN MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Janani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad-hoc NETwork (MANET is an application of wireless network with self-configuring mobile nodes. MANET does not require any fixed infrastructure. Its development never has any threshold range. Nodes in MANET can communicate with each other if and only if all the nodes are in the same range. This wide distribution of nodes makes MANET vulnerable to various attacks, packet dropping attack or black hole attack is one of the possible attack. It is very hard to detect and prevent. To prevent from packet dropping attack, detection of misbehavior links and selfish nodes plays a vital role in MANETs. In this paper, a omprehensive investigation on detection of misbehavior links and malicious nodes is carried out.

  10. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  11. Diffraction and interference of walking drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Harris, Daniel M.; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-11-01

    A decade ago, Yves Couder and Emmanuel Fort discovered a wave-particle association on the macroscopic scale: a drop can bounce indefinitely on a vibrating bath of the same liquid and can be piloted by the waves that it generates. These walking droplets have been shown to exhibit several quantum-like features, including single-particle diffraction and interference. Recently, the original diffraction and interference experiments of Couder and Fort have been revisited and contested. We have revisited this system using an improved experimental set-up, and observed a strong dependence of the behavior on system parameters, including drop size and vibrational forcing. In both the single- and the double-slit geometries, the diffraction pattern is dominated by the interaction of the walking droplet with a planar boundary. Critically, in the double-slit geometry, the walking droplet is influenced by both slits by virtue of its spatially extended wave field. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  12. Measuring Pressure Drop Under Non Ideal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of measurement of the pressure drop (PD of cigarette filter rods and the draw resistance of cigarettes is defined in ISO 6565-2002 (1. This standard defines the calibration and use of a transfer standard to calibrate the measuring instrument and also defines the measurement procedure for cigarette and filter samples. The procedure described in the standard assumes that the measurement conditions are constant and that the sample is in equilibrium with the measurement environment.

  13. Impact of water drops on small targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, A.; Prunet-Foch, B.; Vignes-Adler, M.

    2002-10-01

    The collision of water drops against small targets was studied experimentally by means of a high-speed photography technique. The drop impact velocity was about 3.5 m/s. Drop diameters were in the range of 2.8-4.0 mm. The target was a stainless steel disk of 3.9 mm diameter. The drop spread beyond the target like a central cap surrounded by a thin, slightly conical lamella bounded by a thicker rim. By mounting a small obstacle near the target, surface-tension driven Mach waves in the flowing lamella were generated, which are formally equivalent to the familiar compressibility driven Mach waves in gas dynamics. From the measurement of the Mach angle, the values of some flow parameters could be obtained as functions of time, which provided insight into the flow structure. The liquid flowed from the central cap to the liquid rim through the thin lamella at constant momentum flux. At a certain stage of the process, most of the liquid accumulated in the rim and the internal part of the lamella became metastable. In this situation, a rupture wave propagating through the metastable internal part of the lamella caused the rim to retract while forming outwardly directed secondary jets. The jets disintegrated into secondary droplets due to the Savart-Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Prior to the end of the retraction, an internal circular wave of rupture was formed. It originated at the target and then it propagated to meet the retracting rim. Their meeting resulted in a crown of tiny droplets. A theoretical analysis of the ejection process is proposed.

  14. Probable warfarin interaction with menthol cough drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coderre, Karen; Faria, Claudio; Dyer, Earl

    2010-01-01

    Warfarin is a widely used and effective oral anticoagulant; however, the agent has an extensive drug and food interaction profile. We describe a 46-year-old African-American man who was receiving warfarin for a venous thromboembolism and experienced a decrease in his international normalized ratio (INR). No corresponding reduction had been made in his warfarin dosage, and no changes had been made in his concomitant drug therapy or diet. The patient's INR fell from a therapeutic value of 2.6 (target range 2-3) to 1.6 while receiving a weekly warfarin dose of 50 mg. His INR remained stable at 1.6 for 3 weeks despite incremental increases in his warfarin dose. The patient reported that he had been taking 8-10 menthol cough drops/day due to dry conditions at his workplace during the time period that the INR decreased. Five days after discontinuing the cough drops, his INR increased from 1.6 to 2.9. Over the subsequent 5 weeks, his INR was stabilized at a much lower weekly warfarin dose of 40 mg. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated that the decreased INR was probably related to the concomitant use of menthol cough drops during warfarin therapy. The mechanism for this interaction may be related to the potential for menthol to affect the cytochrome P450 system as an inducer and inhibitor of certain isoenzymes that would potentially interfere with the metabolism of warfarin. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of an interaction between warfarin and menthol. Patients receiving warfarin should be closely monitored, as they may choose to take over-the-counter products without considering the potential implications, and counseled about a possible interaction with menthol cough drops.

  15. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Mozumder; M. R. Ullah; Hossain, A.; Islam, M A

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot...

  16. Low-Pressure-Drop Shutoff Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornborrow, John

    1994-01-01

    Flapper valve remains open under normal flow conditions but closes upon sudden increases to high rate of flow and remains closed until reset. Valve is fluid/mechanical analog of electrical fuse or circuit breaker. Low-pressure-drop shutoff valve contains flapper machined from cylindrical surface. During normal flow conditions, flapper presents small cross section to flow. (Useful in stopping loss of fluid through leaks in cooling systems.)

  17. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  18. Rapid analysis of neonicotinoid insecticides in guttation drops of corn seedlings obtained from coated seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapparo, Andrea; Giorio, Chiara; Marzaro, Matteo; Marton, Daniele; Soldà, Lidia; Girolami, Vincenzo

    2011-06-01

    Regarding the hypothesis that neonicotinoid insecticides used for seed coating of agricultural crops - mainly corn, sunflower and seed rape - are related to the extensive death of honey bees, the phenomenon of corn seedling guttation has been recently considered as a possible route of exposure of bees to these systemic insecticides. In the present study, guttation drops of corn plants obtained from commercial seeds coated with thiamethoxam, clothianidin, imidacloprid and fipronil have been analyzed by an optimized fast UHPLC-DAD procedure showing excellent detection limits and accuracy, both adequate for the purpose. The young plants grown both in pots - in greenhouse - and in open field from coated seeds, produced guttation solutions containing high levels of the neonicotinoid insecticides (up to 346 mg L(-1) for imidacloprid, 102 mg L(-1) for clothianidin and 146 mg L(-1) for thiamethoxam). These concentration levels may represent lethal doses for bees that use guttation drops as a source of water. The neonicotinoid concentrations in guttation drops progressively decrease during the first 10-15 days after the emergence of the plant from the soil. Otherwise fipronil, which is a non-systemic phenylpyrazole insecticide, was never detected into guttation drops. Current results confirm that the physiological fluids of the corn plant can effectively transfer neonicotinoid insecticides from the seed onto the surface of the leaves, where guttation drops may expose bees and other insects to elevated doses of neurotoxic insecticides.

  19. Joint partially linear model for longitudinal data with informative drop-outs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sehee; Zeng, Donglin; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2017-03-01

    In biomedical research, a steep rise or decline in longitudinal biomarkers may indicate latent disease progression, which may subsequently cause patients to drop out of the study. Ignoring the informative drop-out can cause bias in estimation of the longitudinal model. In such cases, a full parametric specification may be insufficient to capture the complicated pattern of the longitudinal biomarkers. For these types of longitudinal data with the issue of informative drop-outs, we develop a joint partially linear model, with an aim to find the trajectory of the longitudinal biomarker. Specifically, an arbitrary function of time along with linear fixed and random covariate effects is proposed in the model for the biomarker, while a flexible semiparametric transformation model is used to describe the drop-out mechanism. Advantages of this semiparametric joint modeling approach are the following: 1) it provides an easier interpretation, compared to standard nonparametric regression models, and 2) it is a natural way to control for common (observable and unobservable) prognostic factors that may affect both the longitudinal trajectory and the drop-out process. We describe a sieve maximum likelihood estimation procedure using the EM algorithm, where the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) are considered to select the number of knots. We show that the proposed estimators achieve desirable asymptotic properties through empirical process theory. The proposed methods are evaluated by simulation studies and applied to prostate cancer data.

  20. Drop floating on a granular raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  1. Drop impacts on electrospun nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    This work reports a study of drop impacts of polar and non-polar liquids onto electrospun nanofiber membranes (of 8-10 mm thickness and pore sizes of 3-6 nm) with an increasing degree of hydrophobicity. The nanofibers used were electrospun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), nylon 6/6, polycaprolactone (PCL) and Teflon. It was found that for any liquid/fiber pair there exists a threshold impact velocity (1.5 to 3 m/s) above which water penetrates membranes irrespective of their wettability. The low surface tension liquid left the rear side of sufficiently thin membranes as a millipede-like system of tiny jets protruding through a number of pores. For such a high surface tension liquid as water, jets immediately merged into a single bigger jet, which formed secondary drops due to capillary instability. An especially non-trivial result is that superhydrophobicity of the porous nano-textured Teflon skeleton with the interconnected pores is incapable of preventing water penetration due to drop impact, even at relatively low impact velocities close to 3.46 m/s. A theoretical estimate of the critical membrane thickness sufficient for complete viscous dissipation of the kinetic energy of penetrating liquid corroborates with the experimental data. The current work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  2. Cusp formation in drops inside Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Here, we report the formation of cusp in insulating drops inside compound Taylor cones. The action of the electrical shear stress acting on the outer interface, which is transmitted by viscous forces inside the Taylor cone, tends to deform the drop of insulating liquid placed inside. For appropriate values of the capillary number, the insulating drop develops a steady cusp angle which depends on both the capillary number and the conducting to insulating viscosity ratio. A self-similar analysis has been developed to qualitatively describe the flow inside these compounds Taylor cones. Any perturbation of the cusp gives rise to an intermittent emission of tiny droplets; this effect may recall the tip-streaming observed by G.I. Taylor in his four-roll mill device. This emission can be stabilized by an appropriate control of the injected flow rate of the insulating liquid. When the capillary number increases, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of nanocapsules, coaxial nanofibers and nanotubes (Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; JACS 126, 5376, 2004).

  3. Ultrafast Drop Movements Arising from Curvature Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-01-01

    We report experimental observation of a kind of fast spontaneous movements of water drops on surfaces of cones with diameters from 0.1 to 1.5 mm. The observed maximum speed (0.22 m/s) under ambient conditions were at least two orders of magnitude higher than that resulting from any known single spontaneous movement mechanism, for example, Marangoni effect due to gradient of surface tension. We trapped even higher spontaneous movement speeds (up to 125 m/s) in virtual experiments for drops on nanoscale cones by using molecular dynamics simulations. The underlying mechanism is found to be universally effective - drops on any surface either hydrophilic or hydrophobic with varying mean curvature are subject to driving forces toward the gradient direction of the mean curvature. The larger the mean curvature of the surface and the lower the contact angle of the liquid are, the stronger the driving force will be. This discovery can lead to more effective techniques for transporting droplets.

  4. Low arc drop hybrid mode thermionic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K.

    1977-01-01

    The hybrid mode operation for the reduction of plasma drops is being investigated. This report discusses the results obtained from two molybdenum emitter converters. One converter had a molybdenum collector and the other a nickel collector. The molybdenum collector converter was operated in a hybrid mode (at an interelectrode distance of 1.7 mm) and produced a minimum barrier index of 1.96 eV at an emitter temperature of 1500 K. The arc drop was calculated to be 0.14 eV, using the published results for a molybdenum collector. On the other hand, the nickel collector converter was operated in a conventional ignited mode (at an interelectrode distance of 0.5 mm) and produced a minimum barrier index of 2.1 eV at an emitter temperature of 1700 K. It is tentatively concluded that a large-gap operation of the hybrid mode converter permits the diffusion of cesium ions to a distance in the order of one millimeter for an effective neutralization of electron space charge. By employing a low work function collector (1.55 eV) in a hybrid mode converter with an arc drop of 0.14 eV, it appears that a barrier index as low as 1.69 eV could be achieved.

  5. Experimental investigation of fluid drop spreading on heterogeneous and anisotropic porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Deepak; Deshpande, Abhijit P; Chakravarthy, S R

    2006-01-15

    Study of spreading phenomena on porous substrates is important from theoretical as well as applications point of view. An example of such applications is composite processing, where operations involve displacement of air/volatiles by polymeric fluids through porous media composed of fibers. In this work, dynamics of drop spreading was investigated on fibrous porous substrates used in composite processing. These porous media are heterogeneous and anisotropic. Spreading front of silicon oil drops was tracked on borosilicate glass, quartz, and two different kinds of glass fiber mats: woven fabric and unidirectional. For the woven fabric, spreading front was observed to progress in steps of increasing and decreasing rate. For the unidirectional mat, the spreading front progressed with decreasing rate. The dynamics of spreading were fitted to power law in order to compare results with other porous substrates.

  6. Surfactant and nonlinear drop dynamics in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovsky, Joseph Charles

    2000-11-01

    Large amplitude drop dynamics in microgravity were conducted during the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission carried onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (20 October-5 November 1995). Centimeter- sized drops were statically deformed by acoustic radiation pressure and released to oscillate freely about a spherical equilibrium. Initial aspect ratios of up to 2.0 were achieved. Experiments using pure water and varying aqueous concentrations of Triton-X 100 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were performed. The axisymmetric drop shape oscillations were fit using the degenerate spherical shape modes. The frequency and decay values of the fundamental quadrupole and fourth order shape mode were analyzed. Several large amplitude nonlinear oscillation dynamics were observed. Shape entrainment of the higher modes by the fundamental quadrupole mode occurred. Amplitude- dependent effects were observed. The nonlinear frequency shift, where the oscillation frequency is found to decrease with larger amplitudes, was largely unaffected by the presence of surfactants. The percentage of time spent in the prolate shape over one oscillation cycle was found to increase with oscillation amplitude. This prolate shape bias was also unaffected by the addition of surfactants. These amplitude-dependent effects indicate that the nonlinearities are a function of the bulk properties and not the surface properties. BSA was found to greatly enhance the surface viscoelastic properties by increasing the total damping of the oscillation, while Triton had only a small influence on damping. The surface concentration of BSA was found to be diffusion-controlled over the time of the experiments, while the Triton diffusion rate was very rapid. Using the experimental frequency and decay values, the suface viscoelastic properties of surface dilatational viscosity ( ks ) and surface shear viscosity ( ms ) were found for varying surfactant concentrations using the transcendental equation of Lu

  7. Dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    The dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop in the presence of non-uniform DC electric field is investigated analytically and numerically. Considering the presence of bulk-insoluble surfactants at the drop interface, we first perform asymptotic solution for both low and high surface Péclet numbers, where the surface Péclet number signifies the strength of surface convection of surfactants as compared to the diffusion at the drop interface. Neglecting fluid inertia and interfacial charge convection effects, we obtain explicit expression for dielectrophoretic drop velocity for low and high Péclet numbers by assuming small deviation of drop shape from sphericity and small deviation of surfactant concentration from the equilibrium uniform distribution. We then depict a numerical solution, assuming spherical drop, for arbitrary values of Péclet number. Our analyses demonstrate that the asymptotic solution shows excellent agreement with the numerical solution in the limiting conditions of low and high Péclet numbers. The present analysis shows that the flow-induced redistribution of the surfactants at the drop interface generates Marangoni stress, owing to the influence of the surfactant distribution on the local interfacial tension, at the drop interface and significantly alters the drop velocity at steady state. For a perfectly conducting/dielectric drop suspended in perfectly dielectric medium, Marangoni stress always retards the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop as compared with a surfactant-free drop. For a leaky dielectric drop suspended in another leaky dielectric medium, in the low Péclet number limit, depending on the electrical conductivity and permittivity of both the liquids, the Marangoni stress may aid or retard the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop. The Marangoni stress also has the ability to move the drop in the opposite direction as compared with a surfactant-free drop. This non-intuitive reverse motion of the drop is

  8. Drop by drop scattering properties of a radar bin : a numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development and initial results of a numerical simulation of pseudo-radar observations computed as the sum of the electric field backscattered by each drop. Simulations are carried out for three successive radar bins with a gate length of 30 m and beam width of 1°. The first step is the simulation of a 100 m x 100 m x 100 m volume with all its drops. The 3D raindrop generator relies on the findings on the rainfall field very small scales (mm to few tens of m) spatio-temporal structure, of the HYDROP experiment and a recent analysis of 2D video disdrometer data in a Multifractal framework. More precisely: (i) The Liquid Water Content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. (ii) Within each 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops according to a pre-defined Drop Size Distribution (DSD) and located randomly uniformly. (iii) Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops uniformly distributed over the 50 x 50 x 50 m3 volume. Then the backscattered field by the drops located within a radar bin are computed as the sum a individual contribution. Antenna beam weighing is taken into account Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the "patches" size for rainfall, it appears that as theoretically expected we retrieved an exponential distribution for potential measure horizontal reflectivity. A much lower dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable to reproduce radar observations, and turbulence must be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  9. Single-Molecule Enzymology Based On The Principle Of The Millikan Oil Drop Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Leiske, Danielle L; Chow, Andrea; Dettloff, Roger; Farinas, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The ability to monitor the progress of single molecule enzyme reactions is often limited by the need to use fluorogenic substrates. A method based on the principle of the Millikan Oil Drop Experiment was developed to monitor the change in charge of substrates bound to a nanoparticle and offers a means of detecting single enzyme reactions without fluorescence detection. As a proof of principle of the ability to monitor reactions which result in a change in substrate charge, polymerization on a...

  10. Experimental Investigation of Pendant and Sessile Drops in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Brutin, David; Liu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Mourembles, Alexandre; Xie, Jing-Chang; Tadrist, Lounes

    2010-09-01

    The experiments regarding the contact angle behavior of pendant and sessile evaporating drops were carried out in microgravity environment. All the experiments were performed in the Drop Tower of Beijing, which could supply about 3.6 s of microgravity (free-fall) time. In the experiments, firstly, drops were injected to create before microgravity. The wettability at different surfaces, contact angles dependance on the surface temperature, contact angle variety in sessile and pendant drops were measured. Different influence of the surface temperature on the contact angle of the drops were found for different substrates. To verify the feasibility of drops creation in microgravity and obtain effective techniques for the forthcoming satellite experiments, we tried to inject liquid to create bigger drop as soon as the drop entering microgravity condition. The contact angle behaviors during injection in microgravity were also obtained.

  11. Rolling ferrofluid drop on the surface of a liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Sterr, V; Morozov, K I; Rehberg, I; Engel, A; Richter, R

    2008-01-01

    We report on the controlled transport of drops of magnetic liquid, which are swimming on top of a non-magnetic liquid layer. A magnetic field which is rotating in a vertical plane creates a torque on the drop. Due to surface stresses within the immiscible liquid beneath, the drop is propelled forward. We measure the drop speed for different field amplitudes, field frequencies and drop volumes. Simplifying theoretical models describe the drop either as a solid sphere with a Navier slip boundary condition, or as a liquid half-sphere. An analytical expression for the drop speed is obtained which is free of any fitting parameters and is well in accordance with the experimental measurements. Possible microfluidic applications of the rolling drop are also discussed.

  12. Oscillating and star-shaped drops levitated by an airflow

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Peters, Ivo R; Brunet, Philippe; van der Meer, Devaraj; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous oscillations of drops levitated above an air cushion, eventually inducing a breaking of axisymmetry and the appearance of `star drops'. This is strongly reminiscent of the Leidenfrost stars that are observed for drops floating above a hot substrate. The key advantage of this work is that we inject the airflow at a constant rate below the drop, thus eliminating thermal effects and allowing for a better control of the flow rate. We perform experiments with drops of different viscosities and observe stable states, oscillations and chimney instabilities. We find that for a given drop size the instability appears above a critical flow rate, where the latter is largest for small drops. All these observations are reproduced by numerical simulations, where we treat the drop using potential flow and the gas as a viscous lubrication layer. Qualitatively, the onset of instability agrees with the experimental results, although the typical flow rates are too large by a factor 10. Our results...

  13. Simplified procedure for determining of drop and stilling basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R. Vatankhah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drops are used to effectively dissipate the surplus energy of the water flow. A closed conduit drop conveys water and stills it at its downstream. I-type pipe drop is one kind of the closed conduit drops which is used in irrigation networks as a typical hydraulic structure. Sump elevation is an important design parameter for I-type pipe drop. Similarly, in supercritical flow structures, such as open channel chutes, determination of stilling basin invert elevation is very important. At present, these key design parameters are determined by the momentum and energy equations using tedious trial-and-error procedure. In this study, square conduit drop, pipe drop, and rectangular stilling basin are considered, and three explicit equations have been developed by (multiple nonlinear regression technique to determine the sump and stilling basin invert elevations. Being very simple and accurate, these equations can be easily used to design the closed conduit drops and stilling basins by hydraulic engineers.

  14. Validation of a DNA mixture statistics tool incorporating allelic drop-out and drop-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Adele A; Tamariz, Jeannie; O'Connell, Kathleen; Ducasse, Nubia; Budimlija, Zoran; Prinz, Mechthild; Caragine, Theresa

    2012-12-01

    DNA mixture analysis is a current topic of discussion in the forensics literature. Of particular interest is how to approach mixtures where allelic drop-out and/or drop-in may have occurred. The Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) of The City of New York has developed and validated the Forensic Statistical Tool (FST), a software tool for likelihood ratio analysis of forensic DNA samples, allowing for allelic drop-out and drop-in. FST can be used for single source samples and for mixtures of DNA from two or three contributors, with or without known contributors. Drop-out and drop-in probabilities were estimated empirically through analysis of over 2000 amplifications of more than 700 mixtures and single source samples. Drop-out rates used by FST are a function of the Identifiler(®) locus, the quantity of template DNA amplified, the number of amplification cycles, the number of contributors to the sample, and the approximate mixture ratio (either unequal or approximately equal). Drop-out rates were estimated separately for heterozygous and homozygous genotypes. Drop-in rates used by FST are a function of number of amplification cycles only. FST was validated using 454 mock evidence samples generated from DNA mixtures and from items handled by one to four persons. For each sample, likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed for each true contributor and for each profile in a database of over 1200 non-contributors. A wide range of LRs for true contributors was obtained, as true contributors' alleles may be labeled at some or all of the tested loci. However, the LRs were consistent with OCME's qualitative assessments of the results. The second set of data was used to evaluate FST LR results when the test sample in the prosecution hypothesis of the LR is not a contributor to the mixture. With this validation, we demonstrate that LRs generated using FST are consistent with, but more informative than, OCME's qualitative sample assessments and that LRs for non

  15. Drying models and characteristics of thin layer sludge in superheated steam drying%污泥过热蒸汽薄层干燥特性及干燥模型构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绪坤; 孙瑞晨; 王学成; 苏志伟; 曹伟

    2014-01-01

    为了解污泥常压过热蒸汽薄层干燥特性,搭建了常压过热蒸汽干燥试验台,进行了2、4、6和10 mm厚度污泥在不同过热蒸汽温度160~280℃下薄层干燥试验,并分段对试验数据进行拟合分析,得到了模型参数与过热蒸汽温度、污泥厚度之间的关系。结果表明:污泥在较高温度过热蒸汽干燥后没有氧化燃烧,且裂纹密集,表面粗糙,利于干燥的进行。污泥薄层在干燥初始阶段存在凝结过程,过热蒸汽凝结在物料表面使其质量不降反而增加,导致干燥时间延长,凝结水质量和干燥时间的增幅受过热蒸汽温度的影响较大,过热蒸汽温度越高,增幅越小,而污泥的厚度对污泥质量和干燥时间的增幅影响较小。根据斐克第二定律,得到2、4、6和10 mm厚度污泥在160~280℃过热蒸汽干燥水分有效扩散系数分别为2.0641×10-9~8.8527×10-9、4.3738×10-9~1.6626×10-8、6.6082×10-9~2.46×10-8和1.1916×10-8~4.0806×10-8 m2/s,由Arrhenius方程建立有效扩散系数的对数与温度倒数的线性关系,得到水分的活化能分别为26.250、22.032、21.894和20.961 kJ/mol。试验结果可为污泥过热蒸汽干燥工艺参数优化及干燥设备研制提供参考。%Generally, sludge exists with high moisture content. De-water is the first and crucial step in disposal processes such as land filling, composting, building materials, and incineration. Currently, there are many studies on sludge drying by different heat transfer modes such as conduction and convection. But in most studies, the sludge drying was carried out under an atmosphere of air, which had disadvantages in high-energy consumption and an abundant quantity of exhaust. Superheated steam drying has been used to dehydrate a variety of products, including meat, grain stillage, lignite, and wood, because of environmental protection, non-oxidation, and higher drying efficiency advantages

  16. Hydrodynamics and evaporation of a sessile drop of capillary size

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamics video of an evaporating sessile drop of capillary size is presented. The corresponding simulation represents the description taking into account jointly time dependent hydrodynamics, vapor diffusion and thermal conduction in an evaporating sessile drop. The fluid convection in the drop is driven by Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension. For the first time the evolution of the vortex structure in the drop during an evaporation process is obtained.

  17. Hydrodynamics and evaporation of a sessile drop of capillary size

    OpenAIRE

    Barash, L. Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamics video of an evaporating sessile drop of capillary size is presented. The corresponding simulation represents the description taking into account jointly time dependent hydrodynamics, vapor diffusion and thermal conduction in an evaporating sessile drop. The fluid convection in the drop is driven by Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension. For the first time the evolution of the vortex structure in the drop during an evaporation process...

  18. NanoDrop microvolume quantitation of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Philippe; Conklin, Deborah

    2010-11-22

    Biomolecular assays are continually being developed that use progressively smaller amounts of material, often precluding the use of conventional cuvette-based instruments for nucleic acid quantitation for those that can perform microvolume quantitation. The NanoDrop microvolume sample retention system (Thermo Scientific NanoDrop Products) functions by combining fiber optic technology and natural surface tension properties to capture and retain minute amounts of sample independent of traditional containment apparatus such as cuvettes or capillaries. Furthermore, the system employs shorter path lengths, which result in a broad range of nucleic acid concentration measurements, essentially eliminating the need to perform dilutions. Reducing the volume of sample required for spectroscopic analysis also facilitates the inclusion of additional quality control steps throughout many molecular workflows, increasing efficiency and ultimately leading to greater confidence in downstream results. The need for high-sensitivity fluorescent analysis of limited mass has also emerged with recent experimental advances. Using the same microvolume sample retention technology, fluorescent measurements may be performed with 2 μL of material, allowing fluorescent assays volume requirements to be significantly reduced. Such microreactions of 10 μL or less are now possible using a dedicated microvolume fluorospectrometer. Two microvolume nucleic acid quantitation protocols will be demonstrated that use integrated sample retention systems as practical alternatives to traditional cuvette-based protocols. First, a direct A260 absorbance method using a microvolume spectrophotometer is described. This is followed by a demonstration of a fluorescence-based method that enables reduced-volume fluorescence reactions with a microvolume fluorospectrometer. These novel techniques enable the assessment of nucleic acid concentrations ranging from 1 pg/ μL to 15,000 ng/ μL with minimal consumption of

  19. How microstructures affect air film dynamics prior to drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der R.C.A.; Hendrix, M.H.W.; Tran, A.T.; Sun, C.; Tsai, P.A.; Lohse, D.

    2014-01-01

    When a drop impacts a surface, a dimple can be formed due to the increased air pressure beneath the drop before it wets the surface. We employ a high-speed color interferometry technique to measure the evolution of the air layer profiles under millimeter-sized drops impacting hydrophobic micropatter

  20. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  1. Inverse Leidenfrost Effect: Levitating Drops on Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adda-Bedia, M; Kumar, S; Lechenault, F; Moulinet, S; Schillaci, M; Vella, D

    2016-05-03

    We explore the interaction between a liquid drop (initially at room temperature) and a bath of liquid nitrogen. In this scenario, heat transfer occurs through film-boiling: a nitrogen vapor layer develops that may cause the drop to levitate at the bath surface. We report the phenomenology of this inverse Leidenfrost effect, investigating the effect of the drop size and density by using an aqueous solution of a tungsten salt to vary the drop density. We find that (depending on its size and density) a drop either levitates or instantaneously sinks into the bulk nitrogen. We begin by measuring the duration of the levitation as a function of the radius R and density ρd of the liquid drop. We find that the levitation time increases roughly linearly with drop radius but depends weakly on the drop density. However, for sufficiently large drops, R ≥ Rc(ρd), the drop sinks instantaneously; levitation does not occur. This sinking of a (relatively) hot droplet induces film-boiling, releasing a stream of vapor bubbles for a well-defined length of time. We study the duration of this immersed-drop bubbling finding similar scalings (but with different prefactors) to the levitating drop case. With these observations, we study the physical factors limiting the levitation and immersed-film-boiling times, proposing a simple model that explains the scalings observed for the duration of these phenomena, as well as the boundary of (R,ρd) parameter space that separates them.

  2. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  3. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  4. Dynamics of Ferrofluidic Drops Impacting Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bolleddula, D A; Alliseda, A; Bhosale, P; Berg, J C

    2010-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video illustrating the impact of ferrofluidic droplets on surfaces of variable wettability. Surfaces studied include mica, teflon, and superhydrophobic. A magnet is placed beneath each surface, which modifies the behavior of the ferrofluid by applying additional downward force apart from gravity resulting in reduced droplet size and increased droplet velocity. For the superhydrophobic droplet a jetting phenomena is shown which only occurs in a limited range of impact speeds, higher than observed before, followed by amplified oscillation due to magnetic field as the drop stabilizes on the surface.

  5. DNA Dynamics in A Water Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, A K

    2002-01-01

    Due to its polyionic character the DNA double helix is stable and biologically active only in salty aqueous media where its charge is compensated by solvent counterions. Monovalent metal ions are ubiquitous in DNA environment and they are usually considered as the possible driving force of sequence-dependent modulations of DNA structure that make it recognizable by proteins. In an effort to directly examine this hypothesis, MD simulations of DNA in a water drop surrounded by vacuum were carried out, which relieves the requirement of charge neutrality. Surprisingly, with zero concentration of counterions a dodecamer DNA duplex appears metastable and its structure remains similar to that observed in experiments.

  6. Experimental investigation on combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Fedorov, V. A.; Alekseev, M. V.; Bogomolov, A. R.; Sorokin, A. L.; Azikhanov, S. S.; Shevyrev, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental data are represented on the investigation of combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated (initial temperature of approximately 150°C) steam at atmospheric pressure. The influence of the ratio of mass flows of the combustible mixture and steam on the qualitative composition of combustion products and the temperature of produced steam is revealed. Main laws for combustion of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, which affect the completeness of mixture combustion, are determined. Experimental data on the influence of concentrations of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the flow of the steam and the combustible mixture upon the completeness of combustion are given. It is found that, when burning the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow with a temperature of 1000-1200°C, it is possible using a variation of the combustible mixture flow. At the same time, the volume fraction of noncondensable gases in the produced steam is no more than 2%. It is revealed that there are several combustion modes of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, in which, in one case, the steam always suppresses combustion and, in another one, detonation of the combustible mixture combustible mixture occurs. It is found that with the excess air factor close to unit, the combustion of the methane-oxygen mixture within steam and the vapor conversion of methane, which result in the appearance of free hydrogen in the produced high-temperature steam, are possible. The description and the principle of the operation of the experimental bench for investigation of combustion of methane-oxygen and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in the medium of steam are given. Results of experimental investigations of burning fuel and oxygen in the medium of steam are used in the development of a steam superheater for a hightemperature steam turbine.

  7. PROGRAM DROP: A computer program for prediction of evaporation from freely falling multicomponent drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavin, P.M. [Gavin Consulting, Newark, OH (United States)

    1996-12-01

    PROGRAM DROP consists of a series of FORTRAN routine which together are used to model the evaporation of a freely falling, multicomponent drop composed of an arbitrary number of volatile species and a single nonvolatile, inert component. The physics underlying the model are clearly identified, and the model`s relationship to previous work in the literature is described. Test cases are used to illustrate the viability of the model and to highlight its potential usefulness in the accurate prediction of multicomponent droplet vaporization in a variety of applications.

  8. Football APP based on smart phone with FES in drop foot rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciou, Shih-Hsiang; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Chih-Chen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chen, Shih-Ching; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2017-01-01

    Long-term, sustained progress is necessary in drop foot rehabilitation. The necessary inconvenient body training movements, the return trips to the hospital and repetitive boring training using functional electrical stimulation (FES) often results in the patient suspending their training. The patient's drop foot rehabilitation will not progress if training is suspended. A fast spread, highly portable drop foot rehabilitation training device based on the smart phone is presented. This device is combined with a self-made football APP and feedback controlled FES. The drop foot patient can easily engage in long term rehabilitation training that is more convenient and interesting. An interactive game is established on the smart phone with the Android system using the originally built-in wireless communications. The ankle angle information is detected by an external portable device as the game input signal. The electrical stimulation command to the external device is supplemented with FES stimulation for inadequate ankle efforts. After six-weeks training using six cases, the results indicated that this training device showed significant performance improvement (p< 0.05) in the patient's ankle dorsiflexion strength, ankle dorsiflexion angle, control timing and Timed Up and Go. Preliminary results show that this training device provides significant positive help to drop foot patients. Moreover, this device is based on existing and universally popular mobile processing, which can be rapidly promoted. The responses of clinical cases also show this system is easy to operate, convenient and entertaining. All of these features can improve the patient's willingness to engage in long term rehabilitation.

  9. Leidenfrost effect: Accurate drop shape modeling and refined scaling laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, B; Rednikov, A; Dorbolo, S; Colinet, P

    2014-11-01

    We here present a simple fitting-parameter-free theory of the Leidenfrost effect (droplet levitation above a superheated plate) covering the full range of stable shapes, i.e., from small quasispherical droplets to larger puddles floating on a pocketlike vapor film. The geometry of this film is found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with the interferometric measurements of Burton et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.074301]. We also obtain new scalings generalizing classical ones derived by Biance et al. [Phys. Fluids 15, 1632 (2003)PHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.1572161] as far as the effect of plate superheat is concerned and highlight the relative role of evaporation, gravity, and capillarity in the vapor film. To further substantiate these findings, a treatment of the problem by matched asymptotic expansions is also presented.

  10. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  11. Detailed model of bouncing drops on a bounded, vibrated bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Francois; Gilet, Tristan

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed model of drops bouncing on a bounded vibrated bath. These drops are known to bounce indefinitely and to exhibit complex and varied vertical dynamics depending on the acceleration of the bath. In addition, in a narrow parameter regime, these drops travel horizontally while being guided by the waves they generate. Our model tracks the drop's vertical radius and position, as well as the eigenmodes of the waves generated via ordinary differential equations only. We accurately capture the vertical dynamics, as well as some of the horizontal dynamics. Our model may be extended to account for interactions with other drops or obstacles, such as slits and corrals.

  12. Deformed liquid marbles: Freezing drop oscillations with powders

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2012-09-01

    In this work we show that when a liquid drop impacts onto a fine-grained hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. In all cases, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we find that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a near-complete coverage of powder, which then freezes the drop oscillations during rebound. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  13. The bounce-splash of a viscoelastic drop

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Federico; Zenit, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 61st Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD (fluid dynamics videos). This video shows the collision and rebound of viscoelastic drops against a solid wall. Using a high speed camera, the process of approach, contact and rebound of drops of a viscoelastic liquid is observed. We found that these drops first splash, similar to what is observed in Newtonian colliding drops; after a few instants, the liquid recoils, recovering its original drop shape and bounce off the wall.

  14. Development of a Drop Tester for Portable Electronic Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Portable electronic products are susceptible to accidental drop impact which can cause various functional and physical damage. This paper first presents a patent pending drop tester which allows portable electronic products free drop at any orientation and drop height, and then introduces the drop tester experiment setup and its design principle. Using a cellular phone as an experiment object, we obtain some data such as the impact forces, the impact accelerations, and the strain of an interested spot. By analyzing experiment data the influence of impact to products in various states is investigated with the aim to provide help for the design of products and improvement of reliability.

  15. Impact Dynamics of Oxidized Liquid Metal Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2013-01-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during the impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number $We^{\\star}$ is employed that uses an effective surface...

  16. Vlasov simulations of parallel potential drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gunell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An auroral flux tube is modelled from the magnetospheric equator to the ionosphere using Vlasov simulations. Starting from an initial state, the evolution of the plasma on the flux tube is followed in time. It is found that when applying a voltage between the ends of the flux tube, about two thirds of the potential drop is concentrated in a thin double layer at approximately one Earth radius altitude. The remaining part is situated in an extended region 1–2 Earth radii above the double layer. Waves on the ion timescale develop above the double layer, and they move toward higher altitude at approximately the ion acoustic speed. These waves are seen both in the electric field and as perturbations of the ion and electron distributions, indicative of an instability. Electrons of magnetospheric origin become trapped between the magnetic mirror and the double layer during its formation. At low altitude, waves on electron timescales appear and are seen to be non-uniformly distributed in space. The temporal evolution of the potential profile and the total voltage affect the double layer altitude, which decreases with an increasing field aligned potential drop. A current–voltage relationship is found by running several simulations with different voltages over the system, and it agrees with the Knight relation reasonably well.

  17. 电厂过热汽温串级系统的约束预测控制%Cascade Constrained Model Predictive Control for Power Plant Superheated Steam Temperature System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯建苗; 李少远

    2011-01-01

    Power plant superheated steam temperature system is characterized by large inertia and large lag.Usually spray system is applied to form a cascade control system and cascade PID scheme is usually employed to control superheated steam temperature.The spray valve is subject to physical constraints so that actuator saturation happens because of the set point computed by the outer loop controller.The method of cascade model predictive control was applied.Constrained model predictive control(CMPC) was used to handle constraints and obtain optimal solution with system satisfying the corresponding constraints.In addition,simulation of superheated steam system was realized.%针对实际电厂过热汽温系统中减温水阀门受到物理约束限制,外环控制器计算的设定值造成执行机构饱和从而影响系统性能的问题,提出了串级预测控制算法,并采用约束预测控制算法进行求解,在系统约束范围内求得系统性能的优化解,对电厂过热汽温控制系统进行了仿真论证.仿真结果表明,过热汽温系统控制量能被有效控制在约束范围内,并且系统保持了良好的运行结果.

  18. Direct observation of drops on slippery lubricant-infused surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Xie, Jing; Encinas, Noemí; Hardy, Alexandre; Klapper, Markus; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2015-10-14

    For a liquid droplet to slide down a solid planar surface, the surface usually has to be tilted above a critical angle of approximately 10°. By contrast, droplets of nearly any liquid "slip" on lubricant-infused textured surfaces - so termed slippery surfaces - when tilted by only a few degrees. The mechanism of how the lubricant alters the static and dynamic properties of the drop remains elusive because the drop-lubricant interface is hidden. Here, we image the shape of drops on lubricant-infused surfaces by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The contact angle of the drop-lubricant interface with the substrate exceeds 140°, although macroscopic contour images suggest angles as low as 60°. Confocal microscopy of moving drops reveals fundamentally different processes at the front and rear. Drops recede via discrete depinning events from surface protrusions at a defined receding contact angle, whereas the advancing contact angle is 180°. Drops slide easily, as the apparent contact angles with the substrate are high and the drop-lubricant interfacial tension is typically lower than the drop-air interfacial tension. Slippery surfaces resemble superhydrophobic surfaces with two main differences: drops on a slippery surface are surrounded by a wetting ridge of adjustable height and the air underneath the drop in the case of a superhydrophobic surface is replaced by lubricant in the case of a slippery surface.

  19. Characterization of biofluids prepared by sessile drop formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A; Esmonde-White, Francis W L; Morris, Michael D; Roessler, Blake J

    2014-06-07

    Sessile drop formation, also called drop deposition, has been studied as a potential medical diagnostic, but the effects of complex biofluid rheology on the final deposition pattern are not well understood. We studied two model biofluids, blood plasma and synovial fluid, when deposited onto slightly hydrophilic substrates forming a contact angle of 50-90°. Drops were imaged during the evaporation process and geometric properties of the drop, such as contact angle and drop height, were calculated from the images. The resulting dried biofluid drops were then examined using light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to assess morphological and chemical composition of the dried drop. The effect of substrate contact angle (surface wetting) and fluid concentration was examined. We found that when biofluids are deposited onto slightly hydrophilic surfaces, with a contact angle of 50-90°, a ring-shaped deposit was formed. Analysis of the drying drop's geometric properties indicates that biofluid dynamics follow the piling model of drop formation, as proposed by Deegan et al. The final deposition pattern varied with substrate surface and concentration, as shown by light microscopy photos of dried drops. The chemical composition of the outer ring was minimally affected by substrate surface, but the spatial heterogeneity of protein distribution within the ring varied with concentration. These results indicate that biofluid drop deposition produces ring-shaped deposits which can be examined by multiple analytical techniques.

  20. Drop-out from the Swedish addiction compulsory care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padyab, Mojgan; Grahn, Robert; Lundgren, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Drop-out of addiction treatment is common, however, little is known about drop-out of compulsory care in Sweden. Data from two national register databases were merged to create a database of 4515 individuals sentenced to compulsory care 2001-2009. The study examined (1) characteristics associated with having dropped out from a first compulsory care episode, (2) the relationship between drop-out and returning to compulsory care through a new court sentence, and (3) the relationship between drop-out and mortality. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to address Aim 1 and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was applied to respond to Aims 2 and 3. Age and previous history of crime were significant predictors for drop-out. Clients who dropped out were 1.67 times more likely to return to compulsory care and the hazard of dying was 16% higher than for those who dropped-out. This study finds that 59% of clients assigned to compulsory care drop-out. Younger individuals are significantly more likely to drop-out. Those who drop out are significantly more likely to experience negative outcomes (additional sentence to compulsory care and higher risk of mortality). Interventions need to be implemented that increase motivation of youth to remain in compulsory care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Vibration of an Inviscid Incompressible Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marc

    2009-11-01

    The fundamental frequencies and normal modes of vibration of a sessile drop supported on a horizontal planar surface are found using an integrated analytical and numerical technique. Spherical coordinates are used to describe the interface shape, but the potential flow field inside the drop is computed numerically using the finite element method. The numerical velocity potentials at the interface for both the fluid inside the drop and outside are fitted using a Legendre series. When these series are combined in the interfacial normal-stress balance the result is a linear eigenvalue problem that is solved numerically. Results will be presented for sessile drops with different contact angles without gravity and compared to experimental data. This technique can also be extended to sessile drops with gravity, in which the drop shape is flattened, and to substrate geometries that are not planar, such as a drop in a shallow cavity or hole.

  2. Asymmetry of Drop Impacts on Patterned Hydrophobic Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Geoff; Robson, Simon; Broom, Matheu

    2016-11-01

    When a water drop falls on to a flat solid surface, asymmetries in the geometry of the spreading drop can be specifically determined by patterned surface microstructures. For hydrophobic (or superhydrophobic) micropillar arrays, the most important asymmetric mechanisms appear to be the surface energy of contact lines, and pathways for gas escaping from penetrated microstructure. In this presentation, static wetting and drop impact experiments will be discussed in relation to drop asymmetries. In addition to micropillar arrays, natural superhydrophobic surfaces (leaves) have been studied, and may suggest possibilities for controlling drop impacts in applications. Some of the clearest large scale drop asymmetries on leaves, which are similar to those associated with low drop impact contact times on synthetic surfaces, appear to be caused by features which generate high contact angle hysteresis, and are therefore indicative of poor superhydrophocity.

  3. Destabilising Pickering emulsions by drop flocculation and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Catherine P; Khairul Anwar, Hunainah; Hughes, James

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated how emulsions of water drops coated by organoclay particles destabilise in organic solvents. The drops destabilise and the emulsions undergo a fluid-solid transition if the particles are poorly wetted by the solvent. We show that the drops adhere together and form three-dimensional networks as the fraction of the poor-quality solvent in the mixture increases. Microscopic observations revealed that the drops coalesce into buckled, non-spherical shapes in mixtures rich in poor-quality solvent. A key finding is that destabilisation is favoured under conditions where the energy of adhesion between the particle layers coating drops is comparable to the energy required to detach the particles from the drops. Rupture of the interfacial layer produces particle flocs and uncoated, unstable water drops that settle out of the emulsion.

  4. Drop dynamics on a stretched viscoelastic filament: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    Capillary pressure can destabilize a thin liquid filament during breakup into a succession of drops. Besides, the addition of a linear, high molecular weight, flexible and soluble polymer is enough to modify the morphology of this instability. In the time period preceding the breakup, the development of beads-on-a-string structures where drops are connected by thin threads is monitored. The drops dynamics involve drop formation, drop migration and drop coalescence. Experiments using a high-speed camera on stretched bridges of viscoelastic polymeric solutions were conducted for a range of viscosities and polymer concentrations. The rheological properties of the solutions are also quantified through conventional shear rheology and normal stress difference. The overall goal of this experimental investigation is to gain more insight into the formation and time evolution of the drops. The project BIOENGINE is co-financed by the European Union with the European regional development fund and by the Normandie Regional Council.

  5. Neural Network Internal Model Control for Superheated Steam Temperature of Supercritical Boiler Unit%超临界锅炉过热汽温神经网络内模控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马良玉; 冯谦; 易祖耀

    2013-01-01

    锅炉过热汽温是燃煤机组运行中的重要参数,过高、过低都会对机组的安全经济运行构成威胁.由于锅炉结构复杂,系统庞大,汽温对象具有变时滞、变参数等特性,喷水减温系统采用的串级PID控制,在大范围变工况下效果往往很不理想,且PID参数整定耗时耗力.为此,该文针对600 MW超临界锅炉过热器的喷水减温系统,研究了过热汽温神经网络(ANN)内模控制方案.基于Matlab建立了汽温系统的ANN正模型和逆模型,并设计出ANN内模实时控制器.仿真表明,与原串级PID控制相比,该方案显著改善了过热汽温的控制品质.%Boiler SST was an important parameter closely related to the safe and economic operation of a coal-fired power plant. Superheated steam temperature either too high or too low will pose a threat on the operation safety and economy. Because the boiler superheater system was relatively complex with large delay,large inertia and higher non-linearity, satisfactory control effects can often not be obtained with conventional cascade PID control scheme at wide operating range. Retuning of the PID parameters was often a time-consuming and labor-intensive work. For this reason, a neural network IMC scheme was studied for the two-stage desuperheating system of a 600 MW supercritical boiler unit, studying the system with the method based on superheated steam temperature control scheme. The neural network direct models and inverse models of the superheater system are built and trained with MATLAB software. Then neural network model based IMC controllers for the superheated steam temperature were designed,programmed and tested with a full-scope power plant simulator. It was shown that the neural network IMC scheme can significantly improve the superheated steam temperature control quality compared to the original cascade PID control.

  6. The Oil Drop Experiment: How Did Millikan Decide What Was an Appropriate Drop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2003-01-01

    The oil drop experiment is considered an important contribution to the understanding of modern physics and chemistry. The objective of this investigation is to study and contrast the views and understanding with respect to the experiment of physicists or philosophers of science with those of authors of physics or chemistry textbooks and…

  7. Drop Pinch-Off for Discrete Flows from a Capillary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson M.C.T.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of drop formation and pinch-off from a capillary tube under the influence of gravity has been extensively studied when the internal capillary pressure gradient is constant. This ensures a continuous time independent flow field inside the capillary tube typically of the Poiseuille flow type. Characteristic drop ejection behaviour includes: periodic drop ejection, drop ejection with associated satellite production, complex dripping, chaotic behaviour and jetting. It is well known that this characteristic behaviour is governed by the Weber (We and Ohnesorge (Oh numbers (for a given Bond number and may be delineated in a We verses Oh operability diagram. An in-depth physical understanding of drop ejection is also of great importance to industry where the tight control of drop size and ejection velocity are of critical importance in industrial processes such as sealants used in electronics assembly and inkjet printing. However, the use of such a continuous flow approach for drop ejection in industry is often impractical since such flows cannot be operator controlled. For this reason it is important to investigate so-called discrete pipe flows where the flow can be turned on and off at will. This means the flow inside the pipe is now time-dependent being controlled in a step-wise fashion. As a first stage in the investigation of drop pinch-off behaviour in discrete pipe flows this paper will study the critical pinch-off time required for drop ejection starting from a pendant drop. This is the discrete amount of time the pipe flow is turned on for in order for a drop to be ejected from the capillary. A Newtonian incompressible free-surface CFD flow code developed at the University of Leeds is used to investigate the critical pinch-off time for a range of internal pipe velocities (the central flow maximum in Poiseuille flow. It is found that the time required for drop ejection to occur decreases exponentially with internal pipe velocity

  8. Drop splashing is independent of substrate wetting

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, Andrzej; Nagel, Sidney R; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    A liquid drop impacting a dry solid surface with sufficient kinetic energy will splash, breaking apart into numerous secondary droplets. This phenomenon shows many similarities to forced wetting, including the entrainment of air at the contact line. Because of these similarities and the fact that forced wetting has been shown to depend on the wetting properties of the surface, existing theories predict splashing to depend on wetting properties as well. However, using high-speed interference imaging we observe that wetting properties have no effect on splashing for various liquid-surface combinations. Additionally, by fully resolving the Navier-Stokes equations at length and time scales inaccessible to experiments, we find that the shape and motion of the air-liquid interface at the contact line are independent of wettability. We use these findings to evaluate existing theories and to compare splashing with forced wetting.

  9. Nonlinear Resonance of Mechanically Excited Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The spectrum of frequencies and mode shapes for an inviscid drop on a planar substrate have recently been documented. For vertical excitation, zonal modes respond to the driving frequency harmonically and non-zonal modes subharmonically, consistent with the prior literature. In this study, we report observations from the regime of nonlinear response. Here, zonals can respond non-harmonically, both sub- and super-harmonic responses are reported. The principal challenge to generating and observing superharmonic resonances of higher zonal modes is a mode-mixing behavior. However, using a simple visual simulation based on the ray-tracing technique, the individual contributions to the mixed resonance behavior can be extracted. In summary, results from experiment and theory show that the zonal modes, which respond harmonically and can mix with non-zonal modes without interfering with one another in the linear regime, tend to respond sub- or superharmonically and compete with non-zonal modes in the nonlinear regime.

  10. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  11. Drop Impact on a Solid Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Josserand, C.

    2015-09-22

    © Copyright 2016 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved. A drop hitting a solid surface can deposit, bounce, or splash. Splashing arises from the breakup of a fine liquid sheet that is ejected radially along the substrate. Bouncing and deposition depend crucially on the wetting properties of the substrate. In this review, we focus on recent experimental and theoretical studies, which aim at unraveling the underlying physics, characterized by the delicate interplay of not only liquid inertia, viscosity, and surface tension, but also the surrounding gas. The gas cushions the initial contact; it is entrapped in a central microbubble on the substrate; and it promotes the so-called corona splash, by lifting the lamella away from the solid. Particular attention is paid to the influence of surface roughness, natural or engineered to enhance repellency, relevant in many applications.

  12. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mozumder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot metallic surface was measured and compared with a proposed correlation as well. With the time temperature plot of these experimental data, the Leidenfrost phenomena had been elucidated. In the pool boiling curve for liquid, just after the transition boiling region and before the film boiling region, the heat transfer approaches its minimum value. The corresponding temperature of this minimum value was termed as the Leidenfrost temperature and the phenomenon is known as Leidenfrost phenomena. According to the experimental data, the Leidenfrost temperature was within a range of 150-200°C for all the experimental conditions. Results: This revealed that Leidenfrost temperature was independent of thermo-physical properties of solid and liquid. Sessile drop evaporation time was the maximum for water, then decreases gradually for Nacl solution, methanol and was the minimum for ethanol for a particular solid material. On the other hand, this time was the highest for copper and the lowest for mild steel for a specific liquid. Conclusion: The experimental data for the evaporation time fairly agree with the proposed correlation within a certain range. The collected time and temperature data may be used as a good data bank for the researchers.

  13. Interaction of two deformable viscous drops under external temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Berejnov, V V; Nir, A

    2001-01-01

    The axisymmetric deformation and motion of interacting droplets in an imposed temperature gradient is considered using boundary-integral techniques for slow viscous motion. Results showing temporal drop motion, deformations and separation are presented for equal-viscosity fluids. The focus is on cases when the drops are of equal radii or when the smaller drop trails behind the larger drop. For equal-size drops, our analysis shows that the motion of a leading drop is retarded while the motion of the trailing one is enchanced compared to the undeformable case. The distance between the centers of equal-sized deformable drops decreases with time. When a small drop follows a large one, two patterns of behavior may exist. For moderate or large initial separation the drops separate. However, if the initial separation is small there is a transient period in which the separation distance initially decreases and only afterwards the drops separate. This behavior stems from the multiple time scales that exist in the syst...

  14. Dynamics of Vapor Layer Under a Leidenfrost Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Caswell, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    In the Leidenfrost effect a small drop of fluid is levitated above a sufficiently hot surface, on a persistent vapor layer generated by evaporation from the drop. The vapor layer thermally insulates the drop from the surface leading to extraordinarily long drop lifetimes. The top-view shape of the levitated drops can exhibit persistent star-like vibrations. I extend recent work [Burton et al. PRL 2012] to study the bottom surface of the drop using interference-imaging. In this work I use a high-speed camera and automated image analysis to image, locate and classify the interference fringes. From the interference fringes I reconstruct the shape and height profile of the rim where the drop is closest to the surface. I measure the drop-size dependence of the planar vibrational mode frequencies, which agree well with previous work. I observe a distinct breathing mode in the average radius of the drop, the frequency of which scales differently with drop size than the other modes. This breathing mode can be tightly...

  15. [Preservatives in eye drops: toward awareness of their toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaede, D; Baudouin, C; Warnet, J-M; Brignole-Baudouin, F

    2010-09-01

    Preservatives are present in numerous multidose eyedrops and provide the sterility of the solution against bacteria and fungi. However, numerous studies have shown their toxicity for the ocular surface, particularly in long-term treatments. The most widely used preservative in eyedrops is benzalkonium chloride. This quaternary ammonium acts as a detergent, antiseptic, disinfectant, fungicide, bactericide, and spermicide. Its use on the ocular surface therefore has significant consequences. Indeed, the preservatives are pro-apoptotic, pro-inflammatory and they cause the dissolution of the lachrymal film. The prolonged administration of one or several eye drops containing preservatives induces changes in the superficial structures (conjunctiva, cornea) as well as in deeper structures (trabecula, lens). The least severe symptoms are irritation and discomfort, including sensation of a foreign body, itching, or burning sensations. However, more severe side effects have been described, such as chronic inflammation of variable intensity or the progressive development of fibrosis with higher risk of failure after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ideally, preservative-free eyedrops should be recommended, or at least a reduction of the number of instilled preserved eyedrops should be considered. All these strategies could increase patient comfort, quality of life, and compliance, with better outcome at the time of filtering surgery.

  16. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  17. Drop motion due to oscillations of an inclined substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    A sessile drop on a stationary inclined substrate remains pinned unless the angle of inclination is greater than some critical value. Alternatively, when shaken at even small angles of inclination, the drop undergoes shape deflections which may lead to drop translation. Translation occurs when large contact angle fluctuations, favored by oscillations at resonance, overcome contact angle hysteresis. In this study, resonance is triggered by substrate-normal oscillations. The drop translation is typically observed to be of constant speed for a given set of parameters. The speed is measured experimentally as a function of resonance mode, driving amplitude and drop volume. This technique of activating the motion of drops having a particular volume can be utilized for applications of droplet selection and transport.

  18. Collision between chemically-driven self-propelled drops

    CERN Document Server

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    We consider analytically and numerically head-on collision between two self-propelled drops. Each drop is driven by chemical reactions that produce or consume the concentration isotropically. The isotropic distribution of the concentration field is destabilized by motion of the drop which is itself made by Marangoni flow from concentration-dependent surface tension. This symmetry-breaking self-propulsion is distinct from other self-propulsion mechanisms due to the intrinsic polarity such as squirmers and self-phoretic motion; there is a bifurcation point below which the drop is stationary and above which it moves spontaneously. When two drops moving along the same axis with opposite direction, the interactions arise both from hydrodynamics and concentration overlap. We found that two drops exhibit either elastic collision or fusion depending on the distance from the bifurcation point controlled, for instance, by viscosity. The elastic collision results from the balance between dissipation and energy injection...

  19. Drop Test Results of CRDM under Seismic Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Kim, Gyeong-Ho; Sun, Jong-Oh; Huh, Hyung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performance of CRDM under seismic loads. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the drop performance under seismic loads such as operating basis earthquake (OBE) and safe shutdown earthquake (SSE). Especially, the CAR drop times are important data for the safety analysis. confirm the drop performance under seismic loads. The delay of drop time at Rig no. 2 due to seismic loads is greater than that at Rig no. 3. The total pure drop times under seismic loads are estimated as 1.169 and 1.855, respectively.

  20. Microwave Dielectric Heating of Drops in Microfluidic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Issadore, David; Brown, Keith A; Sandberg, Lori; Weitz, David; Westervelt, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique to locally and rapidly heat water drops in microfluidic devices with microwave dielectric heating. Water absorbs microwave power more efficiently than polymers, glass, and oils due to its permanent molecular dipole moment that has a large dielectric loss at GHz frequencies. The relevant heat capacity of the system is a single thermally isolated picoliter drop of water and this enables very fast thermal cycling. We demonstrate microwave dielectric heating in a microfluidic device that integrates a flow-focusing drop maker, drop splitters, and metal electrodes to locally deliver microwave power from an inexpensive, commercially available 3.0 GHz source and amplifier. The temperature of the drops is measured by observing the temperature dependent fluorescence intensity of cadmium selenide nanocrystals suspended in the water drops. We demonstrate characteristic heating times as short as 15 ms to steady-state temperatures as large as 30 degrees C above the base temperature of the microfluidi...

  1. Drop Impact on Textile Material: Effect of Fabric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romdhani Zouhaier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of impact of water drop on a surface in a spreading regime with no splashing. Three surfaces were studied: virgin glass, coating film and woven cotton fabric at different construction parameters. All experiments were carried out using water drop with the same free fall high. Digidrop with high-resolution camera is used to measure the different parameters characterising this phenomenon. Results show an important effect of the height of the free fall on the drop profile and the spreading behaviour. An important drop deformation at the surface impact was observed. Then, fabric construction as the weft count deeply affects the drop impact. For plain weave, an increase of weft count causes a decrease in penetration and increase in the spreading rate. The same result was obtained for coated fabric. Therefore, the impact energy was modified and the drop shape was affected, which directly influenced the spreading rate.

  2. How geometry determines the coalescence of low-viscosity drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eddi, A; Snoeijer, J H

    2013-01-01

    The coalescence of water drops on a substrate is studied experimentally. We focus on the rapid growth of the bridge connecting the two drops, which very quickly after contact ensues from a balance of surface tension and liquid inertia. For drops with contact angles below $90^\\circ$, we find that the bridge grows with a self-similar dynamics that is characterized by a height $h\\sim t^{2/3}$. By contrast, the geometry of coalescence changes dramatically for contact angles at $90^\\circ$, for which we observe $h\\sim t^{1/2}$, just as for freely suspended spherical drops in the inertial regime. We present a geometric model that quantitatively captures the transition from 2/3 to 1/2 exponent, and unifies the inertial coalescence of sessile drops and freely suspended drops.

  3. Coalescence of bubbles and drops in an outer fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Paulsen, Joseph D; Kannan, Anerudh; Burton, Justin C; Nagel, Sidney R

    2014-01-01

    When two liquid drops touch, a microscopic connecting liquid bridge forms and rapidly grows as the two drops merge into one. Whereas coalescence has been thoroughly studied when drops coalesce in vacuum or air, many important situations involve coalescence in a dense surrounding fluid, such as oil coalescence in brine. Here we study the merging of gas bubbles and liquid drops in an external fluid. Our data indicate that the flows occur over much larger length scales in the outer fluid than inside the drops themselves. Thus we find that the asymptotic early regime is always dominated by the viscosity of the drops, independent of the external fluid. A phase diagram showing the crossovers into the different possible late-time dynamics identifies a dimensionless number that signifies when the external viscosity can be important.

  4. Shaping and Capturing Leidenfrost drops with a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2012-01-01

    Liquid oxygen, which is intrinsically paramagnetic, also undergoes Leidenfrost effect at room temperature. In this article, we first study the deformation of oxygen drops in a magnetic field via an effective capillary length, that includes the magnetic force. In a second part, we show that these ultra-mobile drops passing above a magnet significantly slow down and can even be trapped if slow enough. The critical velocity below which a drop is captured is determined from the deformation induced by the field.

  5. Behavior of liquid drop situated between two oscillating planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenchenko, A E [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Science, Ural Branch, 101 Amundsen str., Ekaterinburg 620219 (Russian Federation); Beskachko, V P [South Ural State University, 76 Lenin str., Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: korenchenko@physics.susu.ac.ru

    2008-02-15

    The levitation drop technique is widely used for the measurement of the surface tension and viscosity of liquids. An experiment with a drop situated between two horizontal rigid planes gives the same possibilities. The dynamic problem is solved numerically in the following cases: (1) the free oscillations of the drop when the plates are motionless; (2) the forced oscillations when the upper plate makes a translational vibration in the normal direction. The possibility of viscosity determination in such experiments is shown.

  6. On the coalescence of sessile drops with miscible liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, R; Bestehorn, M

    2011-08-01

    Sessile drops sitting on highly wettable solid substrates fuse in qualitatively different ways after contact, depending on the surface tension gradients between the mixing droplets. In early time evolution the drop coalescence can be fast or delayed (intermittent). In long time evolution a secondary drop formation can occur. We study numerically droplet dynamics during coalescence in two and three spatial dimensions, within a phase field approach. We discuss criteria to distinguish different coalescence regimes. A comparison with recent experiments will be done.

  7. A drop jumps to weightlessness: a lecture demo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.; Saranin, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    The paper discusses the lecture demonstration of the phenomenon in which a drop lying on a solid unwettable substrate jumps when making the transition to weightlessness. An elementary theory of the phenomenon is given. A jump speed estimate is obtained for small and large drops. The natural vibrational frequency of a flying drop is determined. A full-scale model of Einstein’s elevator is described. Experimental and theoretical results are found to agree satisfactorily.

  8. Drop-out from a psychodynamic group psychotherapy outpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Drop-out from psychotherapy is common and represents a considerable problem in clinical practice and research. Aim. To explore pre-treatment predictors of early and late drop-out from psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient unit for non-psychotic disorders in Denmark. Methods. Naturalistic design including 329 patients, the majority with mood, neurotic and personality disorders referred to 39-session group therapy. Predictors were socio-demographic and clinical variables, self-reported symptoms (Symptom Check List-90-Revised) and personality style (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II). Drop-out was classified into early and late premature termination excluding patients who dropped out for external reasons. Results. Drop-out comprised 20.6% (68 patients) of the sample. Logistic regression revealed social functioning, vocational training, alcohol problems and antisocial behavior to be related to drop-out. However, early drop-outs had prominent agoraphobic symptoms, lower interpersonal sensitivity and compulsive personality features, and late drop-outs cognitive and somatic anxiety symptoms and antisocial personality features. Clinical and psychological variables accounted for the major part of variance in predictions of drop-out, which ranged from 15.6% to 19.5% (Nagelkerke Pseudo R-Square). Conclusion. Social functioning was consistently associated with drop-out, but personality characteristics and anxiety symptoms differentiated between early and late drop-out. Failure to discriminate between stages of premature termination may explain some of the inconsistencies in the drop-out literature. Clinical implications. Before selection of patients to time-limited psychodynamic groups, self-reported symptoms should be thoroughly considered. Patients with agoraphobic symptoms should be offered alternative treatment. Awareness of and motivation to work with interpersonal issues may be essential for compliance with group therapy.

  9. Student Drop Tower Competitions: Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) and What If No Gravity? (WING)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nancy R.; Stocker, Dennis P.; DeLombard, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes two student competition programs that allow student teams to conceive a science or engineering experiment for a microgravity environment. Selected teams design and build their experimental hardware, conduct baseline tests, and ship their experiment to NASA where it is operated in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. The hardware and acquired data is provided to the teams after the tests are conducted so that the teams can prepare their final reports about their findings.

  10. "Drop in" gastroscopy outpatient clinic - experience after 9 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huppertz-Hauss Gert

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Logistics handling referrals for gastroscopy may be more time consuming than the examination itself. For the patient, "drop in" gastroscopy may reduce uncertainty, inadequate therapy and time off work. Methods After an 8-9 month run-in period we asked patients, hospital staff and GPs to fill in a questionnaire to evaluate their experience with "drop in" gastroscopy and gastroscopy by appointment, respectively. The diagnostic gain was evaluated. Results 112 patients had "drop in" gastroscopy and 101 gastroscopy by appointment. The number of "drop in" patients varied between 3 and 12 per day (mean 6.5. Mean time from first GP consultation to gastroscopy was 3.6 weeks in the "drop in" group and 14 weeks in the appointment group. The half-yearly number of outpatient gastroscopies increased from 696 before introducing "drop in" to 1022 after (47% increase and the proportion of examinations with pathological findings increased from 42% to 58%. Patients and GPs expressed great satisfaction with "drop in". Hospital staff also acclaimed although it caused more unpredictable working days with no additional staff. Conclusions "Drop in" gastroscopy was introduced without increase in staff. The observed increase in gastroscopies was paralleled by a similar increase in pathological findings without any apparent disadvantages for other groups of patients. This should legitimise "drop in" outpatient gastroscopies, but it requires meticulous observation of possible unwanted effects when implemented.

  11. How to optimize the drop plate method for enumerating bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herigstad, B; Hamilton, M; Heersink, J

    2001-03-01

    The drop plate (DP) method can be used to determine the number of viable suspended bacteria in a known beaker volume. The drop plate method has some advantages over the spread plate (SP) method. Less time and effort are required to dispense the drops onto an agar plate than to spread an equivalent total sample volume into the agar. By distributing the sample in drops, colony counting can be done faster and perhaps more accurately. Even though it has been present in the laboratory for many years, the drop plate method has not been standardized. Some technicians use 10-fold dilutions, others use twofold. Some technicians plate a total volume of 0.1 ml, others plate 0.2 ml. The optimal combination of such factors would be useful to know when performing the drop plate method. This investigation was conducted to determine (i) the standard deviation of the bacterial density estimate, (ii) the cost of performing the drop plate procedure, (iii) the optimal drop plate design, and (iv) the advantages of the drop plate method in comparison to the standard spread plate method. The optimal design is the combination of factor settings that achieves the smallest standard deviation for a fixed cost. Computer simulation techniques and regression analysis were used to express the standard deviation as a function of the beaker volume, dilution factor, and volume plated. The standard deviation expression is also applicable to the spread plate method.

  12. Underwater sound produced by individual drop impacts and rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Crum, L. A.; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of the underwater sound produced by water drop impacts on the surface is described. It is found that sound may be produced in two ways: first when the drop strikes the surface and, second, when a bubble is created in the water. The first process occurs for every drop......; the second occurs for some impacts but not others. A range of conditions is described in which a bubble is produced for every drop impact, and it is shown that these conditions are likely to be met by a significant fraction of the raindrops in a typical shower. Underwater sound produced by artificial as well...

  13. Numerical investigation of phase relationships in an oscillating sessile drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenchenko, A. E.; Malkova, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    Forced linear oscillations of a viscous drop placed on a horizontal surface vibrating in perpendicular direction are investigated. The problem is solved for two cases: (1) constant contact angle, and (2) pinned contact line. Phase-frequency and amplitude-frequency characteristics of oscillations of the drop apex are found for the first axisymmetrical mode of oscillations. The independence of the difference of oscillation phases of the drop apex and the substrate on fluid density, viscosity, surface tension, and drop size as well as on presence or absence of the gravity force was demonstrated.

  14. Wetting and absorption of water drops on Nafion films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sharonmoyee; Klaus, Shannon; Benziger, Jay

    2008-08-19

    Water drops on Nafion films caused the surface to switch from being hydrophobic to being hydrophilic. Contact angle hysteresis of >70 degrees between advancing and receding values were obtained by the Wilhelmy plate technique. Sessile drop measurements were consistent with the advancing contact angle; the sessile drop contact angle was 108 degrees . Water drop adhesion, as measured by the detachment angle on an inclined plane, showed much stronger water adhesion on Nafion than Teflon. Sessile water and methanol drops caused dry Nafion films to deflect. The flexure went through a maximum with time. Flexure increased with contact area of the drop, but was insensitive to the film thickness. Methanol drops spread more on Nafion and caused larger film flexure than water. The results suggest that the Nafion surface was initially hydrophobic but water and methanol drops caused hydrophilic sulfonic acid domains to be drawn to the Nafion surface. Local swelling of the film beneath the water drop caused the film to buckle. The maximum flexure is suggested to result from motion of a water swelling front through the Nafion film.

  15. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B; Steen, Paul H; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate.

  16. Communications: Wall free capillarity and pendant drop removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Siang-Jie; Chang, Feng-Ming; Chan, Seong Heng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2010-04-28

    When a sessile drop encounters a pendant drop through a hole, it is generally anticipated that they will coalesce and flow downward due to gravity. However, like "wall-free" capillarity, we show that the pendant drop may be sucked up by a sliding drop instantaneously if the radius of the curvature of the former is smaller than that of the later. This phenomenon can be explained by Laplace-Young equation and convective Ostwald ripening. Our results indicate that superhydrophilic perforated surface can be used as an effective way for the removal of small droplets adhering to the inner walls of microchannel systems.

  17. Studies of the Stability and Dynamics of Levitated Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikumar, A.; Lee, Chun Ping; Wang, T. G.

    1996-01-01

    This is a review of our experimental and theoretical studies relating to equilibrium and stability of liquid drops, typically of low viscosity, levitated in air by a sound field. The major emphasis here is on the physical principles and understanding behind the stability of levitated drops. A comparison with experimental data is also given, along with some fascinating pictures from high-speed photography. One of the aspects we shall deal with is how a drop can suddenly burst in an intense sound field; a phenomenon which can find applications in atomization technology. Also, we are currently investigating the phenomenon of suppression of coalescence between drops levitated in intense acoustic fields.

  18. UNSTEADY MODEL OF DROP MARANGONI MIGRATION IN MICROGRAVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿荣慧; 胡文瑞; 金友兰; 敖超

    2002-01-01

    The experiments of drop Marangoni migration have been performed by the drop shift facility of short period of 4.5 s, and the drop accelerates gradually to an asymptotic velocity during the free fall. The unsteady and axisymmetric model is developed to study the drop migration for the case of moderate Reynolds number Re = O(1), and the results are compared with the experimental ones in the present paper. Both numerical and experimental results show that the migration velocity for moderate Reynolds number is several times smaller than that given by the linear YGB theory.

  19. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B.; Steen, Paul H.; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate.

  20. Symmetric and Asymmetric Coalescence of Drops on a Substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Sanchez, J F; Eddi, A; Snoeijer, J H

    2012-01-01

    The coalescence of viscous drops on a substrate is studied experimentally and theoretically. We consider cases where the drops can have different contact angles, leading to a very asymmetric coalescence process. Side view experiments reveal that the "bridge" connecting the drops evolves with self-similar dynamics, providing a new perspective on the coalescence of sessile drops. We show that the universal shape of the bridge is accurately described by similarity solutions of the one-dimensional lubrication equation. Our theory predicts a bridge that grows linearly in time and stresses the strong dependence on the contact angles. Without any adjustable parameters, we find quantitative agreement with all experimental observations.

  1. PRESERVATIVES FROM THE EYE DROPS AND THE OCULAR SURFACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroi, Mihaela Cristina; Bungau, Simona; Tit, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The use of preservatives in eye drops (eyewashes) has known glory at the beginning, but the side effects that they have on the ocular surface have led to a decrease of their popularity. Lachrymal film dysfunction, ocular hyperemia, dotted keratitis or toxic keratopathy were reported and analyzed in terms of pathophysiological mechanism of the role played by preservatives in ophthalmic drops (eyewashes). This article reviews the most common preservatives and the existing alternatives for the maintenance of the eye sterile drops. Keywords: preservatives, eye drops, ocular surface

  2. Insights from the pollination drop proteome and the ovule transcriptome of Cephalotaxus at the time of pollination drop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone-Davies, Cary; Prior, Natalie; von Aderkas, Patrick; Smith, Derek; Hardie, Darryl; Friedman, William E; Mathews, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Many gymnosperms produce an ovular secretion, the pollination drop, during reproduction. The drops serve as a landing site for pollen, but also contain a suite of ions and organic compounds, including proteins, that suggests diverse roles for the drop during pollination. Proteins in the drops of species of Chamaecyparis, Juniperus, Taxus, Pseudotsuga, Ephedra and Welwitschia are thought to function in the conversion of sugars, defence against pathogens, and pollen growth and development. To better understand gymnosperm pollination biology, the pollination drop proteomes of pollination drops from two species of Cephalotaxus have been characterized and an ovular transcriptome for C. sinensis has been assembled. Mass spectrometry was used to identify proteins in the pollination drops of Cephalotaxus sinensis and C. koreana RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) was employed to assemble a transcriptome and identify transcripts present in the ovules of C. sinensis at the time of pollination drop production. About 30 proteins were detected in the pollination drops of both species. Many of these have been detected in the drops of other gymnosperms and probably function in defence, polysaccharide metabolism and pollen tube growth. Other proteins appear to be unique to Cephalotaxus, and their putative functions include starch and callose degradation, among others. Together, the proteins appear either to have been secreted into the drop or to occur there due to breakdown of ovular cells during drop production. Ovular transcripts represent a wide range of gene ontology categories, and some may be involved in drop formation, ovule development and pollen-ovule interactions. The proteome of Cephalotaxus pollination drops shares a number of components with those of other conifers and gnetophytes, including proteins for defence such as chitinases and for carbohydrate modification such as β-galactosidase. Proteins likely to be of intracellular origin, however, form a larger component of drops

  3. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  4. IS A DROP OF WATER WORTH SAVING??

    OpenAIRE

    Anantha Krishna; Lakshman; Ajitha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this era of progressive draught, a conscious effort needs to be made to conserve water. Routine scrubbing with soap and water prior to surgery is a standard for surgical disinfection. Recently waterless dry scrubbing technique using nonaqueous disinfectant, otherwise called Hand rub technique has been proposed to be an equally effective alternative. This study has attempted to find out if any differences exist between the two methods of surgical scrubbing with refer...

  5. On the spreading of impacting drops

    CERN Document Server

    Wildeman, Sander; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The energy budget and dissipation mechanisms during droplet impact on solid surfaces are studied numerically and theoretically. We find that for high impact velocities and negligible surface friction, about one half of the initial kinetic energy is transformed into surface energy, independent of the impact parameters and the detailed energy loss mechanism(s). We argue that this seemingly universal rule is related to the deformation mode of the droplet and is reminiscent of pipe flow undergoing a sudden expansion, for which the head loss can be calculated by multiplying the kinetic energy of the incoming flow by a geometrical factor. For impacts on a no-slip surface also dissipation in the shear boundary layer at the solid surface is important. In this case the head loss acts as a lower bound on the total dissipation for small viscosities. This new view on the impact problem allows for simple analytical estimates of the maximum spreading diameter of impacting drops as a function of the impact parameters and th...

  6. Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.K. Scheider

    2001-04-26

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 11) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.

  7. That's one small drop for Mankind...

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    In August, the members of an ISOLDE project called LOI88 successfully employed a new technique to study the interaction of metal ions in a liquid. It’s the first time that specific ions have been studied in a liquid medium - a technical achievement that opens promising doors for biochemistry.   In the heart of the LOI88 experiment: this is the point where the metal ions (from the left) enter the drop.  “More than half of the proteins in the human body contain metal ions such as magnesium, zinc and copper,” explains Monika Stachura, a biophysicist at the University of Copenhagen and the LOI88 project leader. “We know that these elements are crucial to a protein’s structure and function but their behaviour and interactions are not known in detail.” Detecting these ions directly in  a body-like environment is problematic as their closed atomic shells make them invisible to most spectroscopic techniques. However, using ...

  8. Pressure drop in saturated flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Francisco J. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    A new mass balance for flow boiling have been recently suggested by the author following a quite simple idea: if the phases have different velocities, they can not cover the same distance -the control volume length for a 1-d system- in the same time. Thus, the time scales of the phases have to be different, and we should scale the time dependent magnitudes of one phase to the other one before combining them. Furthermore, it is reasonable to think that conservation equations should have to include in some manner this evident physical fact. In complete coherence with the former mass balance, a new energy balance, which does include the slip ratio has been also stated. This work, whilst reviews these new fundamentals for saturated flow boiling, stresses those aspects related with the prediction of the pressure drop in saturated flow boiling. The new correlations found for the data carefully measured by Thom during the Cambridge project would confirm the new two-phase flowapproach.

  9. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  10. The Digital Drag and Drop Pillbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Bradi B.; Locke, Susan C.; Bowers, Margaret; Sawyer, Tenita; Shang, Howard; Abernethy, Amy P.; Bloomfield, Richard A.; Gilliss, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We present the design and feasibility testing for the “Digital Drag and Drop Pillbox” (D-3 Pillbox), a skill-based educational approach that engages patients and providers, measures performance, and generates reports of medication management skills. Methods: A single-cohort convenience sample of patients hospitalized with heart failure was taught pill management skills using a tablet-based D-3 Pillbox. Medication reconciliation was conducted, and aptitude, performance (% completed), accuracy (% correct), and feasibility were measured. Results: The mean age of the sample (n = 25) was 59 (36–89) years, 50% were women, 62% were black, 46% were uninsured, 46% had seventh-grade education or lower, and 31% scored very low for health literacy. However, most reported that the D-3 Pillbox was easy to read (78%), easy to repeat-demonstrate (78%), and comfortable to use (tablet weight) (75%). Accurate medication recognition was achieved by discharge in 98%, but only 25% reported having a “good understanding of my responsibilities.” Conclusions: The D-3 Pillbox is a feasible approach for teaching medication management skills and can be used across clinical settings to reinforce skills and medication list accuracy. PMID:28282304

  11. The viruses of wild pigeon droppings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Gia Phan

    Full Text Available Birds are frequent sources of emerging human infectious diseases. Viral particles were enriched from the feces of 51 wild urban pigeons (Columba livia from Hong Kong and Hungary, their nucleic acids randomly amplified and then sequenced. We identified sequences from known and novel species from the viral families Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, Picornaviridae, Reoviridae, Adenovirus, Astroviridae, and Caliciviridae (listed in decreasing number of reads, as well as plant and insect viruses likely originating from consumed food. The near full genome of a new species of a proposed parvovirus genus provisionally called Aviparvovirus contained an unusually long middle ORF showing weak similarity to an ORF of unknown function from a fowl adenovirus. Picornaviruses found in both Asia and Europe that are distantly related to the turkey megrivirus and contained a highly divergent 2A1 region were named mesiviruses. All eleven segments of a novel rotavirus subgroup related to a chicken rotavirus in group G were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. This study provides an initial assessment of the enteric virome in the droppings of pigeons, a feral urban species with frequent human contact.

  12. Low-Bond Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis for Surface Tension and Contact Angle Measurements of Sessile Drops

    OpenAIRE

    Stalder, A.F.; Melchior, T.; Müller, M.; Sage, D; T. Blu; Unser, M

    2010-01-01

    A new method based on the Young-Laplace equation for measuring contact angles and surface tensions is presented. In this approach, a first-order perturbation technique helps to analytically solve the Young-Laplace equation according to photographic images of axisymmetric sessile drops. When appropriate, the calculated drop contour is extended by mirror symmetry so that reflection of the drop into substrate allows the detection of position of the contact points. To keep a wide range of applica...

  13. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  14. Axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD): a film balance technique for high collapse pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Acosta, Edgar J; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2008-10-07

    Collapse pressure of insoluble monolayers is a property determined from surface pressure/area isotherms. Such isotherms are commonly measured by a Langmuir film balance or a drop shape technique using a pendant drop constellation (ADSA-PD). Here, a different embodiment of a drop shape analysis, called axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD) is used as a film balance. It is shown that ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The ability to measure very low surface tension values (e.g., drop setup, and leak-proof design make the constrained sessile drop constellation a better choice than the pendant drop constellation in many situations. Results of compression isotherms are obtained on three different monolayers: octadecanol, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC), and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol (DPPG). The collapse pressures are found to be reproducible and in agreement with previous methods. For example, the collapse pressure of DPPC is found to be 70.2 mJ/m2. Such values are not achievable with a pendant drop. The collapse pressure of octadecanol is found to be 61.3 mJ/m2, while that of DPPG is 59.0 mJ/m2. The physical reasons for these differences are discussed. The results also show a distinctive difference between the onset of collapse and the ultimate collapse pressure (ultimate strength) of these films. ADSA-CSD allows detailed study of this collapse region.

  15. Small-Scale Variability of Large Cloud Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Y.; Wiscombe, Warren

    2004-01-01

    Cloud droplet size distribution is one of the most fundamental subjects in cloud physics. Understanding of spatial distribution and small-scale fluctuations of cloud droplets is essential for both cloud physics and atmospheric radiation. For cloud physics, it relates to the coalescence growth of raindrops while for radiation, it has a strong impact on a cloud's radiative properties. Most of the existing cloud radiation and precipitation formation models assume that the mean number of drops with a given radius varies proportionally to volume. The analysis of microphysical data on liquid water drop sizes shows that, for sufficiently small volumes, the number is proportional to the drop size dependent power of the volume. For abundant small drops present, the exponent is 1 as assumed in the conventional approach. However, for rarer large drops, the exponents fall below unity. At small scales, therefore, the mean number of large drops decreases with volume at a slower rate than the conventional approach assumes, suggesting more large drops at these scales than conventional models account for; their impact is consequently underestimated. Size dependent models of spatial distribution of cloud drops that simulate the observed power laws show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents. The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. Current theories of photon-cloud interaction and warm rain formation will need radical revision in order to produce these statistics; their underlying equations are unable to yield the observed power law.

  16. Free fall of water drops in laboratory rainfall simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, M. Nasimul; Testik, Firat Y.; Hornack, Mathew C.; Khan, Abdul A.

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by various hydrological and meteorological applications, this paper investigates the free fall of water drops to provide guidance in laboratory simulations of natural rainfall and to elucidate drop morphodynamics. Drop fall velocity and shape parameters such as axis ratio (ratio of the maximum vertical and horizontal chords of the drop), chord ratio [ratio of the two orthogonal chords where one chord (cl) is the longest chord in the drop and the other one (cs) is the longest chord that is orthogonal to cl], canting angle (angle between the longest chord of the drop and the horizontal axis), and relative fluctuation of chords (difference between vertical and horizontal chord fluctuations) were investigated for three selected water drop sizes (2.6, 3.7, and 5.1 mm spherical volume equivalent diameter) using high speed imaging. Based upon experimental observations, three distinct fall zones were identified: Zone I, in which source-induced oscillations and shape adjustment take place; Zone II, in which equilibrium-shaped drops accelerate to achieve terminal velocity; and Zone III, in which equilibrium-shaped drops fall at terminal velocity. Our results revealed that the fall distance values of approximately 6 m and 12 m can be used as conservative reference values for rainfall experiments with oscillation-free fall of drops (i.e. end of Zone I and onset of Zone II) and with equilibrium-shaped drops falling at terminal velocities (i.e. end of Zone II and onset of Zone III), respectively, for the entire raindrop size spectrum in natural rainfall. These required fall distance values are smaller than the distances discussed in the literature. Methodology and results presented here will facilitate optimum experimental laboratory simulations of natural rainfall.

  17. Nerve growth factor eye drops improve visual acuity and electrofunctional activity in age-related macular degeneration: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Lambiase

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is a severe disease affecting visual function in the elderly. Currently available surgical and medical options do not guarantee a significant impact on the outcome of the disease. We describe the effects of nerve growth factor eye drop treatment in a 94 years old female with ARMD, whose visual acuity was progressively worsening in spite of previous surgical and medical treatments. NGF eye drops improved visual acuity and electrofunctional parameters as early as 3 months after initiation of treatment. These results are in line with previous reports on a neuroprotective effect of NGF on retinal cells and on NGF eye drops bioavailability in the retina and optic nerve. No side effects were observed after five years of follow-up, suggesting that topical NGF treatment may be a safe and effective therapy for ARMD.

  18. Superheated rubber for cold storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberg, Frank; Heuwers, Benjamin; Tiller, Joerg Christian [Biomaterials and Polymer Science, Department of Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, TU Dortmund, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2011-04-26

    Highly stretched rubber cools down upon relaxation. A natural rubber material that stores high elongations up to 1000% strain upon strain-induced crystallization at room temperature is reported. The strain recovered and, with this, the stored ''cold'' is released only by a thermal or athermal trigger. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Why Did They Not Drop Out? Narratives from Resilient Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Anne; Fortin, Laurier; Marcotte, Diane; Potvin, Pierre; Royer, Egide

    2009-01-01

    There is much to be learned from students who were at-risk for dropping out of school but persevered and graduated. The purpose of the study on which this article is based, was to describe how students who were at-risk for dropping out of school persevered and graduated. The voices of two students are introduced, highlighting the challenges they…

  20. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  1. Understanding (sessile/constrained) bubble and drop oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, A J B; Defez, B; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M; Amirfazli, A

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse literature on drop oscillation is reviewed, with an emphasis on capillary wave oscillations of constrained drops. Based on the review, a unifying conceptual framework is presented for drop and bubble oscillations, which considers free and constrained drops/bubbles, oscillation of the surface or the bulk (i.e. center of mass) of the drop/bubble, as well as different types of restoring forces (surface tension, gravity, electromagnetic, etc). Experimental results (both from literature and from a new set of experiments studying sessile drops in cross flowing air) are used to test mathematical models from literature, using a novel whole profile analysis technique for the new experiments. The cause of oscillation (cross flowing air, vibrated surface, etc.) is seen not to affect oscillation frequency. In terms of models, simplified models are seen to poorly predict oscillation frequencies. The most advanced literature models are found to be relatively accurate at predicting frequency. However it is seen that no existing models are reliably accurate across a wide range of contact angles, indicating the need for advanced models/empirical relations especially for drops undergoing the lowest frequency mode of oscillation (the order 1 degree 1 non-axisymmetric 'bending' mode that corresponds to a lateral 'rocking' motion of the drop).

  2. Stokes flow near the contact line of an evaporating drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.; Bloemen, O.; Snoeijer, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation of sessile drops in quiescent air is usually governed by vapour diffusion. For contact angles below , the evaporative flux from the droplet tends to diverge in the vicinity of the contact line. Therefore, the description of the flow inside an evaporating drop has remained a challenge

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  4. Delayed frost growth on jumping-drop superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Collier, C Patrick

    2013-02-26

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an interdrop frost wave. The growth of this interdrop frost front is shown to be up to 3 times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of interdrop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an interdrop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser minimized frost formation relative to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by limiting the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  5. Simulation of the drop impact test for moulded thermoplastic containers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, P.E.; Breedveld, G.; Lim, B.C.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis is made of the drop impact test for moulded plastics containers, as a first step towards the simulation of the impact event for design and development purposes. Experimental data are analysed from instrumented base drop impact testing of water-filled blow-moulded bottles, 20 and 210 l dr

  6. Pressure Drop of Non-Newtonian Liquid Flow Through Elbows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on the pressure drop across different types of elbow for non-Newtonian pseudoplastic liquid flow in laminar condition have been presented. A generalized correlation has been developed for predicting the frictional pressure drop across the elbows in the horizontal plane.

  7. Segregation in desiccated sessile drops of biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevich, Yu Yu; Pravoslavnova, D M

    2007-04-01

    It is shown here that concurrence between advection and diffusion in a drying sessile drop of a biological fluid can produce spatial redistribution of albumen and salt. The result gives an explanation for the patterns observed in the dried drops of the biological fluids.

  8. Simple Model of Shape Evolution of Desiccated Colloidal Sessile Drop

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasevich, Yu. Yu.; Vodolazskaya, I. V.; Isakova, O. P.

    2011-01-01

    We propose simple model of colloidal sessile drop desiccation. The model describes correctly both evolution of the phase boundary between sol and gel inside such a drop and the final shape of the dried film (deposit). The model is based on mass conservation and natural assumption that deposit (gel phase) prevents flows and evaporation.

  9. Electrowetting-driven oscillating drops sandwiched between two substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Eral, H.B.; Staicu, A.D.; Mugele, F.; Ende, van den D.

    2013-01-01

    Drops sandwiched between two substrates are often found in lab-on-chip devices based on digital microfluidics. We excite azimuthal oscillations of such drops by periodically modulating the contact line via ac electrowetting. By tuning the frequency of the applied voltage, several shape modes can be

  10. Shape of a large drop on a rough hydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonsik; Park, Jaebum; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Ho-Young

    2013-02-01

    Large drops on solid surfaces tend to flatten due to gravitational effect. Their shapes can be predicted by solving the Young-Laplace equation when their apparent contact angles are precisely given. However, for large drops sitting on rough surfaces, the apparent contact angles are often unavailable a priori and hard to define. Here we develop a model to predict the shape of a given volume of large drop placed on a rough hydrophobic surface using an overlapping geometry of double spheroids and the free energy minimization principle. The drop shape depends on the wetting state, thus our model can be used not only to predict the shape of a drop but also to infer the wetting state of a large drop through the comparison of theory and experiment. The experimental measurements of the shape of large water drops on various micropillar arrays agree well with the model predictions. Our theoretical model is particularly useful in predicting and controlling shapes of large drops on surfaces artificially patterned in microscopic scales, which are frequently used in microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technology.

  11. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2013-01-01

    -out of true alleles is possible. As part of the validation of the IrisPlex assay in our ISO17025 accredited, forensic genetic laboratory, we estimated the probability of drop-out of specific SNP alleles using 29 and 30 PCR cycles and 25, 50 and 100 Single Base Extension (SBE) cycles. We observed no drop...

  12. Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid-drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, W.; van der Veen, Roeland; Tran, Tuan; Keij, D.L.; Winkels, K.G.; Peters, I.R.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface, an air bubble can be entrapped. Here, we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: for large drop impact velocity and large droplets, the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for

  13. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  14. Complex cooling water systems optimization with pressure drop consideration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop consideration has shown to be an essential requirement for the synthesis of a cooling water network where reuse/recycle philosophy is employed. This is due to an increased network pressure drop associated with additional reuse...

  15. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces.

  16. [Drop-out from clinical psychotherapeutic treatment of personality problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, A T J; Poppe, E; Ouwens, M A

    2010-01-01

    Drop-out is a serious problem in psychotherapy. Earlier studies have shown that the main factors associated with drop-out are young age, low socio-economic status and pathological symptoms such as severity of the problems and problematic substance-abuse. To investigate patient's and pathological characteristics that predict drop-out among patients with predominantly personality problems. Patient's characteristics and pathological characteristics of 372 subjects were ascertained via a retrospective study by means of four databases: intake letters, scid-ii personality questionnaires, scid-i and ii interviews and discharge letters. The association between these characteristics and drop-out was tested by means of bivariate and multivariate analysis. results The drop-out rate was 33.3 %. The main predictors of drop-out were young age, a low Global Assessment of Functioning (gaf)-score and the existence of problematic substance-abuse at discharge. The degree and severity of axis i disorders and the nature of personality problems made hardly any contribution to the prediction of drop-out. These findings indicate that more attention needs to be given to the existence of substance-abuse before psychotherapy begins. Drop-out is still a problem and is difficult to predict and hard to influence.

  17. Asymmetric Spreading of a Drop upon Impact onto a Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, H; Amirfazli, A

    2017-06-13

    Study of the spreading of an impacting drop onto a surface has gained importance recently due to applications in printing, coating, and icing. Limited studies are conducted to understand asymmetric spreading of a drop seen upon drop impact onto a moving surface; there is no relation to describe such spreading. Here, we experimentally studied the spreading of a drop over a moving surface; such study also provides insights for systems where a drop impacts at an angle relative to a surface, i.e., drop has both normal and tangential velocities relative to the surface. We developed a model that for the first time allows prediction of time evolution for the asymmetric shape of the lamella during spreading. The developed model is demonstrated to be valid for a range of liquids and surface wettabilities as well as drop and surface velocities, making this study a comprehensive examination of the topic. We also found out how surface wettability can affect the recoil of the drop after spreading and explained the role of contact angle hysteresis and receding contact angle in delaying the recoil process.

  18. Student Drop-Out from German Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    28% of students of any one year currently give up their studies in bachelor degree programmes at German higher education institutions. Drop-out is to be understood as the definite termination in the higher education system without obtaining an academic degree. The drop-out rate is thereby calculated with the help of statistical estimation…

  19. Drop Out Patterns in the East Los Angeles Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waktola, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    This study attempted to analyze the drop out problem from spatial perspectives within the context of East Los Angeles Community College, California. Selected urban land-use types, which positively and negatively influence the propensity to drop out or persist-in colleges, were selected and captured during a global positioning system (GPS)-based…

  20. Square wave voltammetry at the dropping mercury electrode: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, J.H.; Turner, J.A.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of square wave voltammetry at the dropping mercury electrode are presented. The technique involves scanning the entire potential range of interest on a single drop of a DME. Asymmetries in the waveform as well as variations in current measurement parameters are discussed. Indications are that previous uses of the waveform may not have utilized all its capabilities.

  1. Did Millikan observe fractional charges on oil drops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbank, William M.; Franklin, Allan

    1982-05-01

    We have reanalyzed Millikan's 1913 data on oil drops to examine the evidence for charge quantization and for fractional residual charge. We find strong evidence in favor of charge quantization and no convincing evidence for fractional residual charges on the oil drops.

  2. Millikan Oil-Drop Experiment in the Introductory Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Mark A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a simplified Millikan oil-drop experiment which emphasizes the enplanation of basic concepts in mechanics and electrostatics, the use of home-made apparatus, the request for an individual's observation of his own drop, and the application of statistical analysis in data interpretation. (CC)

  3. Total sleep time severely drops during adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Leger

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Restricted sleep duration among young adults and adolescents has been shown to increase the risk of morbidities such as obesity, diabetes or accidents. However there are few epidemiological studies on normal total sleep time (TST in representative groups of teen-agers which allow to get normative data. PURPOSE: To explore perceived total sleep time on schooldays (TSTS and non schooldays (TSTN and the prevalence of sleep initiating insomnia among a nationally representative sample of teenagers. METHODS: Data from 9,251 children aged 11 to 15 years-old, 50.7% of which were boys, as part of the cross-national study 2011 HBSC were analyzed. Self-completion questionnaires were administered in classrooms. An estimate of TSTS and TSTN (week-ends and vacations was calculated based on specifically designed sleep habits report. Sleep deprivation was estimated by a TSTN - TSTS difference >2 hours. Sleep initiating nsomnia was assessed according to International classification of sleep disorders (ICSD 2. Children who reported sleeping 7 hours or less per night were considered as short sleepers. RESULTS: A serious drop of TST was observed between 11 yo and 15 yo, both during the schooldays (9 hours 26 minutes vs. 7 h 55 min.; p<0.001 and at a lesser extent during week-ends (10 h 17 min. vs. 9 h 44 min.; p<0.001. Sleep deprivation concerned 16.0% of chidren aged of 11 yo vs. 40.5% of those of 15 yo (p<0.001. Too short sleep was reported by 2.6% of the 11 yo vs. 24.6% of the 15 yo (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Despite the obvious need for sleep in adolescence, TST drastically decreases with age among children from 11 to 15 yo which creates significant sleep debt increasing with age.

  4. Size of the top jet drop produced by bubble bursting

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabache, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    As a bubble bursts at a liquid-air interface, a tiny liquid jet rises and can release the so-called \\textit{jet drops}. In this paper, the size of the top jet drop produced by a bubble bursting is investigated experimentally. We determine, and discuss, the first scaling law enabling the determination of the top jet drop size as a function of the corresponding mother bubble radius and the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension, density), along with its regime of existence. Furthermore, in the aim of decoupling experimentally the effects of bubble collapse and jet dynamics on the drop detachment, we propose a new scaling providing the top drop size only as a function of the jet velocity and liquid parameters. In particular, this allows us to untangle the intricate roles of viscosity, gravity and surface tension in the \\textit{end-pinching} of the bubble bursting jet.

  5. Electrowetting-driven oscillating drops sandwiched between two substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Eral, H Burak; Staicu, Adrian; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    Drops sandwiched between two substrates are often found in lab-on-chip devices based on digital microfluidics. We excite azimuthal oscillations of such drops by periodically modulating the contact line via ac electrowetting. By tuning the frequency of the applied voltage, several shape modes can be selected one by one. The frequency of the oscillations is half the frequency of the contact angle modulation by electrowetting, indicating a parametric excitation. The drop response to sinusoidal driving deviates substantially from sinusoidal behavior in a "stop and go" fashion. Although our simple theoretical model describes the observed behavior qualitatively, the resonances appear at lower frequencies than expected. Moreover, the oscillations produce a nonperiodic fluid transport within the drop with a typical velocity of 1 mm/s. In digital microfluidic devices, where the typical drop size is less than 1 mm, this flow can result in very fast mixing on the spot.

  6. Electrowetting-driven oscillating drops sandwiched between two substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Burak Eral, H.; Staicu, Adrian; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    Drops sandwiched between two substrates are often found in lab-on-chip devices based on digital microfluidics. We excite azimuthal oscillations of such drops by periodically modulating the contact line via ac electrowetting. By tuning the frequency of the applied voltage, several shape modes can be selected one by one. The frequency of the oscillations is half the frequency of the contact angle modulation by electrowetting, indicating a parametric excitation. The drop response to sinusoidal driving deviates substantially from sinusoidal behavior in a “stop and go” fashion. Although our simple theoretical model describes the observed behavior qualitatively, the resonances appear at lower frequencies than expected. Moreover, the oscillations produce a nonperiodic fluid transport within the drop with a typical velocity of 1 mm/s. In digital microfluidic devices, where the typical drop size is less than 1 mm, this flow can result in very fast mixing on the spot.

  7. Tunable transport of drops on a vibrating inclined fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bick, Alison; Sauret, Alban; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Transport of liquid drops in fibrous media occurs in various engineering systems such as fog harvesting or cleaning of textiles. The ability to tune or to control liquid movement can increase the system efficiency and enable new engineering applications. In this Letter, we experimentally investigate how partially wetting drops on a single fiber can be manipulated by vibrating the fiber. We show that a sliding motion along the fiber or a dripping of the drop can be triggered by standing waves. We identify the conditions on the drop volume, the fiber tilt angle and the amplitude and frequency of oscillations to observe these different behaviors. Finally, we experimentally illustrate that vibrations can be used to control the transport and the collection of water drops along a fiber using a combination of the sliding and dripping transitions.

  8. Emulsion Design. Analysis of Drop Deformations in Mixed Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm, Runi Ditlev

    2008-01-01

    the drop deformation and drop position a twin camera system is applied. In the subsequent data analysis the recorded movies are analysed using an automated image analysis procedure which leads to the deformation history of the drop and the drop trajectory in the device. However, due to the geometric...... of Brackbill, Kothe & Zemach (1992) are implemented. Due to the high interface curvatures associated with highly deformed drops it is necessary to use a high resolution mesh for our calculations. This leads to extensive computation times mainly due to factorization and back substitution of the discretized flow...... field equations. In order to reduce the computational cost a 2-level procedure is implemented where the fluid tracking algorithms are associated with a fine VOF mesh while the flow field variables are associated with a coarser FE mesh. In the 2-level algorithm the calculation of interfacial tension...

  9. Capillary-inertial colloidal catapults upon drop coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Roger L.; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James J.; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Surface energy released upon drop coalescence is known to power the self-propelled jumping of liquid droplets on superhydrophobic solid surfaces, and the jumping droplets can additionally carry colloidal payloads toward self-cleaning. Here, we show that drop coalescence on a spherical particle leads to self-propelled launching of the particle from virtually any solid surface. The main prerequisite is an intermediate wettability of the particle, such that the momentum from the capillary-inertial drop coalescence process can be transferred to the particle. By momentum conservation, the launching velocity of the particle-drop complex is proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity based on the drop radius and to the fraction of the liquid mass in the total mass. The capillary-inertial catapult is not only an alternative mechanism for removing colloidal contaminants, but also a useful model system for studying ballistospore launching.

  10. Deformation and stability of surfactant - or particle - laden drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Quentin; Pradillo, Gerardo; Oberlander, Andrew; Vlahovska, Petia; SoftMech@Brown Team

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the behavior of a drop covered with insoluble surfactant or colloidal particles in a uniform DC electric field. Steady drop shapes, drop evolution upon application of the field, and drop relaxation after the field is turned off are observed for leaky dielectric fluids: Polybutadiene (PB), Silicon oil (PDMS), and Castor oil (CO). The surfactant is generated at the drop interface by reaction between end-functionalized PB and PDMS. The experimental data is compared with existing theoretical models for the steady shape of surfactant covered droplet, and adjusted models taking into account the presence of colloidal spheres with range of electrical properties. We will discuss the complex interplay of shape deformation, surfactant elasticity, particle redistribution, and interfacial charging in droplet electrohydrodynamics. Our results are important for understanding electrorheology of emulsions commonly found in the petroleum industry. We acknowledge grant NSF CBET 1437545 for funding.

  11. The migration of a compound drop due to thermocapillarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, David S.; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1990-01-01

    The quasistatic thermocapillary motion of a compound drop in an unbounded fluid possessing a uniform temperature gradient is analyzed. For completeness, gravitational effects are included in the treatment. The general model is formulated, and the equations for the concentric case are solved using spherical polar coordinates, while the eccentric case is handled using bispherical coordinates. Results are given for the velocity of the drop as well as that of the droplet with respect to the drop, along with useful approximations. Illustrative results are presented graphically for the thermocapillary migration of a compound drop in the special case when the droplet is a gas bubble. In addition to the velocities of the drop and the bubble, representative isotherms and streamlines also are presented which display interesting qualitative features.

  12. [The antiallergic eye drops "polynadyme": development, experimental and clinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭchuk, Iu F; Pozdniakov, V I; Pozdniakova, V V; Iakushina, L N

    2006-01-01

    The antiallergic eye drops "Polynadyme", proposed by the Helmgolz Moscow Research Institute of Eye Diseases, have been prepared by the "Sintez" PJSC (Kurgan). The drops exert a combination of antihistaminic and vasoconstrictive effects and, for better tolerability, contain a low-toxic preserving complex. The drops are polymer-based, which ensures a long action and an artificial tear effect. Preclinical rabbit trials have shown the safety of the "Polynadyme" eye drops, their specific activity in preventing an allergic reaction, and their antiallergic effect on a model of allergic conjunctivitis. Comparative clinical trials covering 150 patients have yielded excellent and good results in 93% of cases. In acute allergic reactions, hyperemia, itch, and burning diminished just 5 minutes after administration. The "Polynadyme" eye drops are effective in treating pollinous conjunctivitis, spring (vernal) keratoconjunctivitis, allergic reactions when wearing contact lenses, the dry eye syndrome, drug-induced and toxicoallergic conjunctivitis, and other ocular allergic reactions.

  13. As-placed contact angles for sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, Rafael; Yadav, Preeti S

    2008-01-01

    As-placed contact angle is the contact angle a drop adapts as a result of its placement on a surface. As expected, the as-placed contact angle, thetaAP, of a sessile drop on a horizontal surface decreases with the drop size due to the increase in hydrostatic pressure. We present a theoretical prediction for thetaAP which shows that it is a unique function of the advancing contact angle, thetaA, drop size, and material properties (surface tensions and densities). We test our prediction with published and new data. The theory agrees with the experiments. From the relation of the as-placed contact angle to drop size the thermodynamic equilibrium contact angle is also calculated.

  14. Factors predicting drop-out in community mental health centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneses, Blanca; Muñoz, Elena; López-Ibor, Juan José

    2009-10-01

    This study aimed to identify treatment, therapist and patient factors associated with dropping out of treatment in four outpatient mental health services. The experimental group comprised all 789 individuals who attended for the first time the mental health services during one year and dropped out of treatment in the same year or during the two following ones. The control group consisted of the same number of individuals, chosen at random from patients who, in the same year, attended for the first time the services and did not subsequently drop out of treatment. The overall drop-out rate was 33.2%. According to logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of dropping out were: being treated in a particular centre, the involvement of more than one therapist in treatment, having no previous history of psychiatric disorders, being young and being male.

  15. Building micro-soccer-balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Marín, Álvaro G.; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Housselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    Drop evaporation can be used to self-assemble particles into three-dimensional microstructures on a scale where direct manipulation is impossible. We present a unique method to create highly-ordered colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion drops from a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the drop remains in Cassie-Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the drop consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the drop evaporation dynamics, particle size, and number of particles in the system.

  16. A Comparative Study on Pro-drop and Non-pro-drop Language-Taking Chi-nese (Pro-drop Language) and English (Non-pro-drop Language) as the Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li

    2014-01-01

    In Chomsky’s Government and Binding theory, null subject is a kind of Empty Category, namely“pro”. Whether subject can be empty constitutes an important parameter of universal grammar, called pro-drop Parameter which is often used to indicate the syntactic difference in human language. According to that, Chomsky divides human language into two categories:pro-drop language and non pro-drop language. The former one allows the loss of the subject, stood for by Italian, Spanish, Chi-nese, etc. The latter consists of English, French, etc. whose subjects cannot be omitted. Through a comparative study, taking Chi-nese and English as the examples, this paper aims to disclose the differences between pro-drop language and non pro-drop lan-guage.

  17. Symmetry-breaking in drop bouncing on curved surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yahua; Li, Jing; Yeomans, Julia M; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-01-01

    The impact of liquid drops on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature, and of practical importance in many industrial processes. A drop hitting a flat surface retains a circular symmetry throughout the impact process. Here we show that a drop impinging on Echevaria leaves exhibits asymmetric bouncing dynamics with distinct spreading and retraction along two perpendicular directions. This is a direct consequence of the cylindrical leaves which have a convex/concave architecture of size comparable to the drop. Systematic experimental investigations on mimetic surfaces and lattice Boltzmann simulations reveal that this novel phenomenon results from an asymmetric momentum and mass distribution that allows for preferential fluid pumping around the drop rim. The asymmetry of the bouncing leads to ~40% reduction in contact time.

  18. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carleson, T.E.

    1992-06-24

    In certain cases droplet direct contact heat transfer rates can be significantly enhanced by the application of an alternating electric field. This field can produce shape oscillations in a droplet which will enhance mixing. The theoretical evaluation of the effect of the interaction of the field with drop charge on the hydrodynamics has been completed for small amplitude oscillations. Previous work with a zero order perturbation method was followed up with a first order perturbation method to evaluate the effect of drop distortion on drop charge and field distribution. The first order perturbation results show secondary drop oscillations of four modes and two frequencies in each mode. The most significant secondary oscillation has the same mode and frequency as the second mode oscillation predicted from the first order perturbation work. The resonant frequency of all oscillations decrease with increasing electric field strength and drop charge. Work is currently underway to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement from an applied alternating electric field.

  19. Coalescence and noncoalescence of sessile drops: impact of surface forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Hanske, Christoph; Fery, Andreas; Riegler, Hans

    2014-06-17

    Due to capillarity, sessile droplets of identical liquids will instantaneously fuse when they come in contact at their three-phase lines. However, with drops of different, completely miscible liquids, instantaneous coalescence can be suppressed. Instead, the drops remain in a state of noncoalescence for some time, with the two drop bodies connected only by a thin neck. The reason for this noncoalescence is the surface tension difference, Δγ, between the liquids. If Δγ is sufficiently large, then it induces a sufficiently strong Marangoni flow, which keeps the main drop bodies temporarily separated. Studies with spreading drops have revealed that the boundary between instantaneous coalescence and noncoalescence is sharp (Karpitschka, S.; Riegler, H. J. Fluid. Mech. 2014, 743, R1). The boundary is a function of two parameters only: Δγ and Θ(a), the arithmetic mean of the contact angles in the moment of drop-drop contact. It appears plausible that surface forces (the disjoining pressure) could also influence the coalescence behavior. However, in experiments with spreading drops, surface forces always promote coalescence and their influence might be obscured. Therefore, we present here coalescence experiments with partially wetting liquids and compare the results to the spreading case. We adjust different equilibrium contact angles (i.e., different surface forces) with different substrate surface coatings. As for spreading drops, we observe a sharp boundary between regimes of coalescence and noncoalescence. The boundary follows the same power law relation for both partially and completely wetting cases. Therefore, we conclude that surface forces have no significant, explicit influence on the coalescence behavior of sessile drops from different miscible liquids.

  20. Ab initio calculations of ^12C and neutron drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Steven C.

    2009-10-01

    Ab initio calculations of nuclei, which treat a nucleus as a system of A nucleons interacting by realistic two- and three-nucleon forces, have made tremendous progress in the last 15 years. This is a result of better Hamiltonians, rapidly increasing computer power, and new or improved many-body methods. Three methods are principally being used: Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC), no-core shell model, and coupled cluster. In the limit of large computer resources, all three methods produce exact eigenvalues of a given nuclear Hamiltonian. With DOE SciDAC and INCITE support, all three methods are using the largest computers available today. Under the UNEDF SciDAC grant, the Argonne GFMC program was modified to efficiently use more than 2000 processors. E. Lusk (Argonne), R.M. Butler (Middle Tennessee State U.) and I have developed an Asynchronous Dynamic Load-Balancing (ADLB) library. In addition all the cores in a node are used via OpenMP as one ADLB/MPI client. In this way we obtain very good scalability up to 30,000 processors on Argonne's IBM Blue Gene/P. Two systems of particular interest that require this computer power are ^12C and neutron drops. V.R. Pandharipande (UIUC, deceased), J. Carlson (LANL), R.B. Wiringa (Argonne), and I have developed new trial wave functions that explicitly contain the three-alpha particle structure of ^12C. These are being used with the Argonne V18 and Illinois-7 potentials which reproduce the energies of 51 states in 3energy-density functionals.

  1. A boundary-integral model for drop deformation between two parallel plates with non-unit viscosity ratio drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, P. J. A.; Anderson, P. D.

    2008-10-01

    A boundary-integral method is presented for drop deformation between two parallel walls for non-unit viscosity ratio systems. To account for the effect of the walls the Green's functions are modified and all terms for the double-layer potential are derived. The full three-dimensional implementation is validated, and the model is shown to be accurate and consistent. The method is applied to study drop deformation in shear flow. An excellent match with small-deformation theory is found at low capillary numbers, and our results match with other BIM simulations for pressure-driven flows. For shear flow with moderate capillary numbers, we see that the behavior of a low-viscosity drop is similar to that of drop with a viscosity ratio of unity. High-viscosity drops, on the other hand, are prevented from rotating in shear flow, which results in a larger deformation, but less overshoot in the drop axes is observed. In contrast with unconfined flow, high-viscosity drops can be broken in shear flow between parallel plates; for low-viscosity drops the critical capillary number is higher in confined situations.

  2. Maximizing allele detection: Effects of analytical threshold and DNA levels on rates of allele and locus drop-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakay, Christine A; Bregu, Joli; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2012-12-01

    Interpretation of DNA evidence depends upon the ability of the analyst to accurately compare the DNA profile obtained from an item of evidence and the DNA profile of a standard. This interpretation becomes progressively more difficult as the number of 'drop-out' and 'drop-in' events increase. Analytical thresholds (AT) are typically selected to ensure the false detection of noise is minimized. However, there exists a tradeoff between the erroneous labeling of noise as alleles and the false non-detection of alleles (i.e. drop-out). In this study, the effect ATs had on both types of error was characterized. Various ATs were tested, where three relied upon the analysis of baseline signals obtained from 31 negative samples. The fourth AT was determined by utilizing the relationship between RFU signal and DNA input. The other ATs were the commonly employed 50, 150 and 200 RFU thresholds. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) plots showed that although high ATs completely negated the false labeling of noise, DNA analyzed with ATs derived using analysis of the baseline signal exhibited the lowest rates of drop-out and the lowest total error rates. In another experiment, the effect small changes in ATs had on drop-out was examined. This study showed that as the AT increased from ∼10 to 60 RFU, the number of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of one allele increased. Between ATs of 60 and 150 RFU, the frequency of allelic drop-out remained constant at 0.27 (±0.02) and began to decrease when ATs of 150 RFU or greater were utilized. In contrast, the frequency of heterozygous loci exhibiting the loss of both alleles consistently increased with AT. In summary, for samples amplified with less than 0.5ng of DNA, ATs derived from baseline analysis of negatives were shown to decrease the frequency of drop-out by a factor of 100 without significantly increasing rates of erroneous noise detection.

  3. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy: A Recurrent and Bilateral Foot Drop Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Flor-de-Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, “sausage-like” swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis.

  4. Proposition of stair climb of a drop using chemical wettability gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seerha, Prabh P. S.; Kumar, Parmod; Das, Arup K.; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a passive technique for a drop to climb along the staircase textured surface using chemical wettability gradients. The stair structure, droplet configuration, and contact angle gradient are modeled using Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The stair climb efficiency of the droplet is found to be a function of wettability gradient strength. Using analytical balance of actuation and resistive forces across droplets, physical reasons behind stair climbing are established and influencing parameters are identified. Evolution of the droplet shape along with the advancing and the receding contact angles is presented from where instantaneous actuation and hysteresis forces are calculated. Using history of Lagrangian particles, circulation at the foot of stairs and progressing development of the advancing drop front are monitored. Higher efficiency in stair climbing in the case of a bigger sized drop than smaller one is obtained from simulation results and realized from force balance. Difficulty in climbing steeper stairs is also demonstrated to delineate the effect of gravitational pull against the actuation force due to the wettability gradient.

  5. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  6. Thermal infrared mapping of the Leidenfrost drop evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wciślik, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents an author complementary study on the Leidenfrost drop evaporation. The research was conducted under ambient conditions and in the film boiling regime. Large water drops were placed on the copper substrate of the constant temperature Tw ranging from 297.6 to 404oC. The initial single drop diameter and its mass was D0 ≈ 1cm and m0 ≈ 1g respectively. One of the obtained results, for each Tw are the drop thermal images versus time. They were used to calculate an average temperature over the drop upper surface (Td). For an exemplary heating surface temperature of Tw = 297.6oC the average drop temperature is approximately 11oC lower than the saturation one and equals Td = 88,95oC. This value is estimated for the first 200s of evaporation and with time step size Δt = 0,5s. The drop upper surface temperature is highly variable and indicates strong convection inside it. This is due to the complex nature of heat and mass transfer. The maximum standard deviation from Td = 88,95oC is SD = 1.21.

  7. Internal flow measurements of drop impacting a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Santosh; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.; Hong, Jiarong

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the fundamental physical process involved in drop impacts is important for a variety of engineering and scientific applications. Despite exhaustive research efforts on the dynamics of drop morphology upon impact, very few studies investigate the fluid dynamics induced within a drop upon impact. This study employs planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) with fluorescent particles to quantify the internal flow field of a drop impact on a solid surface. The image distortion caused by the curved liquid-air interface at the drop boundary is corrected using a ray-tracing algorithm. PIV analysis using the corrected images has yielded interesting insights into the flow initiated within a drop upon impact. Depending on the pre-impact conditions, characterized by impact number, different vortex modes are observed in the recoil phase of the drop impact. Further, the strength of these vortices and the kinetic energy of the internal flow field have been quantified. Our studies show a consistent negative power law correlation between vortex strength, internal kinetic energy and the impact number.

  8. Collision between chemically driven self-propelled drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke; Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    We consider analytically and numerically head-on collision between two self-propelled drops. Each drop is driven by chemical reactions that produce or consume the concentration isotropically. The isotropic distribution of the concentration field is destabilized by motion of the drop which is itself made by Marangoni flow from concentration-dependent surface tension. This symmetry-breaking self-propulsion is distinct from other self-propulsion mechanisms due to the intrinsic polarity such as squirmers and self-phoretic motion; there is a bifurcation point below which the drop is stationary and above which it moves spontaneously. When two drops moving along the same axis with opposite direction, the interactions arise both from hydrodynamics and concentration overlap. We found that two drops exhibit either elastic collision or fusion depending on the distance from the bifurcation point controlled, for instance, by viscosity. The elastic collision results from the balance between dissipation and energy injection by chemical reactions. We derive the reduced equations for the collision between two drops and analyze the contributions from the two interactions. The concentration-mediated interaction is found to dominate the hydrodynamic interaction.

  9. Modeling drop impacts on inclined flowing soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saikat; Yawar, Ali; Concha, Andres; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    Small drops impinging on soap films flowing at an angle primarily exhibit three fundamental regimes of post-impact dynamics: (a) the drop bounces off the film surface, (b) it coalesces with the downstream flow, and (c) it pierces through the film. During impact, the drop deforms along with a simultaneous, almost elastic deformation of the film transverse to the stream direction. Hence, the governing dynamics for this interaction present the rare opportunity to explore the in-tandem effects of elasticity and hydrodynamics alike. In this talk, we outline the analytical framework to study the drop impact dynamics. The model assumes a deformable drop and a deformable three-dimensional soap film and invokes a parametric study to qualify the three mentioned impact types. The physical parameters include the impact angle, drop impact speed, and the diameters of the drop prior to and during impact when it deforms and spreads out. Our model system offers a path towards optimization of interactions between a spray and a flowing liquid.

  10. Bed of polydisperse viscous spherical drops under thermocapillary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharanya, V.; Raja Sekhar, G. P.; Rohde, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Viscous flow past an ensemble of polydisperse spherical drops is investigated under thermocapillary effects. We assume that the collection of spherical drops behaves as a porous media and estimates the hydrodynamic interactions analytically via the so- called cell model that is defined around a specific representative particle. In this method, the hydrodynamic interactions are assumed to be accounted by suitable boundary conditions on a fictitious fluid envelope surrounding the representative particle. The force calculated on this representative particle will then be extended to a bed of spherical drops visualized as a Darcy porous bed. Thus, the "effective bed permeability" of such a porous bed will be computed as a function of various parameters and then will be compared with Carman-Kozeny relation. We use cell model approach to a packed bed of spherical drops of uniform size (monodisperse spherical drops) and then extend the work for a packed bed of polydisperse spherical drops, for a specific parameters. Our results show a good agreement with the Carman-Kozeny relation for the case of monodisperse spherical drops. The prediction of overall bed permeability using our present model agrees well with the Carman-Kozeny relation when the packing size distribution is narrow, whereas a small deviation can be noted when the size distribution becomes broader.

  11. Trapped liquid drop at the end of capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengjia; Yen, Hung-Yu; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2013-10-01

    The liquid drop captured at the capillary end, which is observed in capillary valve and pendant drop technique, is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Because of contact line pinning of the lower meniscus, the lower contact angle is able to rise from the intrinsic contact angle (θ*) so that the external force acting on the drop can be balanced by the capillary force. In the absence of contact angle hysteresis (CAH), the upper contact angle remains at θ*. However, in the presence of CAH, the upper contact angle can descend to provide more capillary force. The coupling between the lower and upper contact angles determines the equilibrium shape of the captured drop. In a capillary valve, the pinned contact line can move across the edge as the pressure difference exceeds the valving pressure, which depends on the geometrical characteristic and wetting property of the valve opening. When CAH is considered, the valving pressure is elevated because the capillary force is enhanced by the receding contact angle. For a pendant drop under gravity, the maximal capillary force is achieved as the lower contact angle reaches 180° in the absence of CAH. However, in the presence of CAH, four regimes can be identified by three critical drop volumes. The lower contact angle can exceed 180°, and therefore the drop takes on the shape of a light bulb, which does not exist in the absence of CAH. The comparisons between Surface Evolver simulations and experiments are quite well.

  12. Application of Proteomics to the Study of Pollination Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Prior

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Pollination drops are a formative component in gymnosperm pollen-ovule interactions. Proteomics offers a direct method for the discovery of proteins associated with this early stage of sexual reproduction. Methods: Pollination drops were sampled from eight gymnosperm species: Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Port Orford cedar, Ephedra monosperma, Ginkgo biloba, Juniperus oxycedrus (prickly juniper, Larix ×marschlinsii, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir, Taxus ×media, and Welwitschia mirabilis. Drops were collected by micropipette using techniques focused on preventing sample contamination. Drop proteins were separated using both gel and gel-free methods. Tandem mass spectrometric methods were used including a triple quadrupole and an Orbitrap. Results: Proteins are present in all pollination drops. Consistency in the protein complement over time was shown in L. ×marschlinsii. Representative mass spectra from W. mirabilis chitinase peptide and E. monosperma serine carboxypeptidase peptide demonstrated high quality results. We provide a summary of gymnosperm pollination drop proteins that have been discovered to date via proteomics. Discussion: Using proteomic methods, a dozen classes of proteins have been identified to date. Proteomics presents a way forward in deepening our understanding of the biological function of pollination drops.

  13. Understanding the drop impact on moving hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, H; Amirfazli, A

    2017-03-08

    In this paper, a systematic study was performed to understand the drop impact on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces that were moving in the horizontal direction. Drops (D0 = 2.5 mm) of liquids with three different viscosities were used. Wide ranges of drop normal velocity (0.5 to 3.4 m s(-1)) and surface velocity (0 to 17 m s(-1)) were studied. High speed imaging from the top and side was used to capture the impact phenomena. It was found that drop impact behavior on a moving surface significantly differs from that on a stationary surface at both the lamella extension stage (i.e. t ≤ tmax) and the retraction stage (t > tmax). Starting with the lamella extension stage, it was observed that the drop spreads asymmetrically over a moving surface. It was also found that the splashing behavior of the drop upon impact on a moving surface, unlike the understanding in the literature, is azimuthally different along the lamella contact line. In the case of the drop spreading over a moving surface, the surface movement stretches the expanded lamella in the direction of the surface motion. For hydrophilic surfaces, the stretched lamella pins to the surface and moves with the surface velocity; however, for hydrophobic surfaces, the lamella recoils during such stretching. A new model was developed to determine the splashing threshold of the drop impact on a moving surface. The model is capable of describing the azimuthally different behavior of the splashing which is a function of normal capillary and Weber numbers, surface velocity, and surface wettability. It was also found that the increase of the viscosity decreases the splashing threshold. Finally, comprehensive regime maps of the drop impact outcome on a moving surface were provided for both t ≤ tmax and t > tmax stages.

  14. Partial coalescence of sessile drops with different liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We examine numerically the interaction between two deformable drops consisting of two perfectly miscible liquids sitting on a solid substrate under a given contact angle. Driven by solutal Marangoni forces, several distinct coalescence regimes are achieved after the droplets collision. Phase diagrams for different control parameters are emphasized, which give predictions about drop behavior along the solid substrates, control of various interfacial effects, manipulations of tiny droplets in micro- and nano-fluidic devices without power supply, design of droplets or cleaning surfaces. This work was partially supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the project ``Dynamics of interfaces between drops with miscible liquids''.

  15. Exact Solution of a Drop-Push Model for Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Dean, David S.

    2002-08-01

    Motivated by a computer science algorithm known as ``linear probing with hashing,'' we study a new type of percolation model whose basic features include a sequential ``dropping'' of particles on a substrate followed by their transport via a ``pushing'' mechanism. Our exact solution in one dimension shows that, unlike the ordinary random percolation model, the drop-push model has nontrivial spatial correlations generated by the dynamics itself. The critical exponents in the drop-push model are also different from those of the ordinary percolation. The relevance of our results to computer science is pointed out.

  16. Self-assembly and manipulation of particles on drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, M.; Fischer, I. S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    We have recently shown that particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop can be self-assembled at the poles or the equator of the drop by applying a uniform electric field, and that this method can be used to separate on the surface of a drop particles experiencing positive dielectrophoresis from those experiencing negative dielectrophoresis. In this talk we show that the frequency of the electric field is an important parameter which can be used to modify the distribution of self-assembled monolayers.

  17. Contact angle hysteresis of a drop spreading over metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Geniy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental data on the contact angle hysteresis of the distilled water drop spreading over the surfaces of non-ferrous metals. The measurements of the advancing and receding contact angles were carried out by method of sitting drop on the horizontal surface during increasing and decreasing drop volume with a syringe pump. It was found that the contact line speed has a great influence on the hysteresis of the polished non-elastic substrates. The mechanism of spreading was described using the balance of the forces from the physical point of view.

  18. PERSAMAAN DROP SIZE DI DALAM KOLOM BERPENGADUK CAKRAM (RDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martunus Martunus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Perpindahan massa dari satu fase cair ke fase cair lainnya di dalam kolom ekstraksi cair-cair ditentukan dengan luas perpindahan antara kedua fase. Luas perpindahan ini dapat dinyatakan dengan drop size yang merupakan faktor yang sangat penting dalam perancangan kolom ekstraksi cair-cair berpengaduk (Rotating Disc Contactor, RDC. Tiga model yang berhubungan dengan drop size dikembangkan untuk variabel operasi kolom yang didasarkan pada kecepatan putaran yaitu yaitu model untuk ekstraksi tanpa pengadukan atau pengadukan dengan putaran sangat rendah, model dengan kecepatan pengadukan medium, dan model pengadukan dengan putaran tinggi. Artikel ini berisi pembahasan persamaan drop size yang sudah dipublikasikan menyangkut ketiga kondisi operasi tersebut.

  19. Drop impact on soft surfaces: beyond the static contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioboo, Romain; Voué, Michel; Adão, Helena; Conti, Joséphine; Vaillant, Alexandre; Seveno, David; De Coninck, Joël

    2010-04-06

    The wettability of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer films and of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers with water has been measured and compared using various methods. Contact angle hysteresis values were compared with values reported in the literature. A new method to characterize advancing, receding contact angles, and hysteresis using drop impact have been tested and compared with usual methods. It has been found that for the rigid surfaces the drop impact method is comparable with other methods but that for elastomer surfaces the hysteresis is function of the drop impact velocity which influences the extent of the deformation of the soft surface at the triple line.

  20. Drop interaction with solid boundaries in liquid/liquid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep

    The present experimental work was motivated primarily by the CO 2 sequestration process. In a possible scenario during this process, gravity driven CO2 bubbles coalesce at an interface near the rock surface. In another scenario, trapped CO2 fluid may escape from a porous matrix overcoming interfacial force inside a pore. Based on these potential scenarios, the current research was divided into two broad experimental studies. In the first part, coalescence at a quiescent interface of two analogous fluids (silicone oil and water/glycerin mixture) was investigated for water/glycerin drops with Bond number (Bo) ~7 and Ohnesorge number ~ 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic PIV. Two perturbation cases with a solid particle wetted in oil and water/glycerin placed adjacent to the coalescing drop were considered. The results were compared with coalescence of a single drop and that of a drop neighBored by a second drop of equivalent size. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location, subsequent film retraction and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The trends in local retraction speed of the ruptured film and the overall dynamics of the collapsing drops were discussed in detail. In the second part, the motion of gravity driven drops (B o~0.8-11) through a confining orifice d/Dwater/glycerin, surrounded by silicone oil, fall toward and encounter the orifice plate after reaching terminal speed. The effects of surface wettability were investigated for Both round-edged and sharp-edged orifices. For the round-edged case, a thin film of surrounding oil prevented the drop fluid from contacting the orifice surface, such that the flow outcomes of the drops were independent of surface wettability. For d/Dsurface tension time scale. For the sharp-edged case