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Sample records for superhard nitride superlattice

  1. Hard and superhard nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, J. [Univ. of West Bohemia, Plzen (Czech Republic). Dept. of Phys.

    2000-03-01

    This article reviews the development of hard coatings from a titanium nitride film through superlattice coatings to nanocomposite coatings. Significant attention is devoted to hard and superhard single layer nanocomposite coatings. A strong correlation between the hardness and structure of nanocomposite coatings is discussed in detail. Trends in development of hard nanocomposite coatings are also outlined. (orig.)

  2. Experimental studies of superhard materials carbon nitride CNx prepared by ion-beam synthesis method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛火平; 林成鲁; 许华平; 邹世昌; 石晓红; 吴兴龙; 朱宏; P.L.FHemment

    1996-01-01

    Formation of superhard materials carbon nitride CNt by using ion-beam synthesis method is reported.100-keV high-dose N+ ions were implanted into carbon thin films at different temperatures.The samples were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Fourier transformation-infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR),Raman spectroscopy,cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM),Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS).X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Vickers microhardness measurement.The results show that the buried carbon nitride CN> layer has been successfully formed by using 100-keV high-dose N+ ions implantation into carbon thin film.Implantation of reactive ions into silicon (IRIS) computer program has been used to simulate the formation of the buried β-C3N4 layer as N+ ions are implanted into carbon.A good agreement between experimental measurements and IRIS simulation is found.

  3. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  4. Quasi free-standing silicene in a superlattice with hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, T. P.

    2013-11-12

    We study a superlattice of silicene and hexagonal boron nitride by first principles calculations and demonstrate that the interaction between the layers of the superlattice is very small. As a consequence, quasi free-standing silicene is realized in this superlattice. In particular, the Dirac cone of silicene is preserved. Due to the wide band gap of hexagonal boron nitride, the superlattice realizes the characteristic physical phenomena of free-standing silicene. In particular, we address by model calculations the combined effect of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and an external electric field, which induces a transition from a semimetal to a topological insulator and further to a band insulator.

  5. Moire superlattice effects in graphene/boron-nitride van der Waals heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallbank, John R.; Chen, Xi; Fal' ko, Vladimir I. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Mucha-Kruczynski, Marcin [Department of Physics, University of Bath (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Van der Waals heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride feature a moire superlattice for graphene's Dirac electrons. Here, we review the effects generated by this superlattice, including a specific miniband structure featuring gaps and secondary Dirac points, and a fractal spectrum of magnetic minibands known as Hofstadter's butterfly. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Structure property relationships of nitride superlattice hard coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitin

    Today, more than 40% of all cutting tools used in machining applications are covered with coatings. Coatings improve wear resistance, increase tool life, enable use at higher speed, and broaden the application range. Superlattices, where thin layers (typically deposited in an alternating fashion, are widely used commercially. Importantly, the hardness value of a superlattice (e.g. TiN/AlN) can significantly exceed the rule of mixture value. Superlattice coatings built from crystallographically dissimilar materials are not widely studied but hold promise for improvements in performance by allowing for both hardness and toughness to be simultaneously optimized. This is what this thesis is concerned with: a structure-property comparison of isostructural superlattices with corresponding non-isostructural superlattices. In order to grow both isostructural and non-isostructural superlattices from the same set of materials, it is necessary to grow monolithic films in different phases. Towards this end, the synthesis of different phases of AlN, (Ti,Al)N, TaN, and TiN was investigated. Films were grown by pulsed laser deposition in two different chambers that had different base pressures to study the effect of background gases on the phases and orientations of the films. Growth of AlN and (Ti,Al)N films is strongly affected in a chamber that had a base pressure of 10-6 Torr, but the films adopt their stable nitride structures in a chamber with the lower base pressure of 10-8 Torr. TaN adopts either the cubic rock salt structure or its stable hexagonal structure, depending on the growth temperature, while TiN grows as rock salt in all conditions. Single crystal epitaxial superlattices were then grown with different compositions, periodicities, and crystallographic orientations to compare the effect of chemistry, nanostructure, and crystallographic texture on hardness. Finally, the structure-property relationships of non-isostructural (cubic/hexagonal) superlattices are

  7. Epitaxial superlattices with titanium nitride as a plasmonic component for optical hyperbolic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Gururaj V; Saha, Bivas; Liu, Jing; Saber, Sammy M; Stach, Eric A; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K; Sands, Timothy D; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2014-05-27

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a plasmonic material having optical properties resembling gold. Unlike gold, however, TiN is complementary metal oxide semiconductor-compatible, mechanically strong, and thermally stable at higher temperatures. Additionally, TiN exhibits low-index surfaces with surface energies that are lower than those of the noble metals which facilitates the growth of smooth, ultrathin crystalline films. Such films are crucial in constructing low-loss, high-performance plasmonic and metamaterial devices including hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs). HMMs have been shown to exhibit exotic optical properties, including extremely high broadband photonic densities of states (PDOS), which are useful in quantum plasmonic applications. However, the extent to which the exotic properties of HMMs can be realized has been seriously limited by fabrication constraints and material properties. Here, we address these issues by realizing an epitaxial superlattice as an HMM. The superlattice consists of ultrasmooth layers as thin as 5 nm and exhibits sharp interfaces which are essential for high-quality HMM devices. Our study reveals that such a TiN-based superlattice HMM provides a higher PDOS enhancement than gold- or silver-based HMMs.

  8. Coherent phonon transport in short-period two-dimensional superlattices of graphene and boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Carlos; Saiz, Fernan; Romero, David A.; Amon, Cristina H.

    2016-03-01

    Promoting coherent transport of phonons at material interfaces is a promising strategy for controlling thermal transport in nanostructures and an alternative to traditional methods based on structural defects. Coherent transport is particularly relevant in short-period heterostructures with smooth interfaces and long-wavelength heat-carrying phonons, such as two-dimensional superlattices of graphene and boron nitride. In this work, we predict phonon properties and thermal conductivities in these superlattices using a normal mode decomposition approach. We study the variation of the frequency dependence of these properties with the periodicity and interface configuration (zigzag and armchair) for superlattices with period lengths within the coherent regime. Our results showed that the thermal conductivity decreases significantly from the first period length (0.44 nm) to the second period length (0.87 nm), 13% across the interfaces and 16% along the interfaces. For greater periods, the conductivity across the interfaces continues decreasing at a smaller rate of 11 W/mK per period length increase (0.43 nm), driven by changes in the phonon group velocities (coherent effects). In contrast, the conductivity along the interfaces slightly recovers at a rate of 2 W/mK per period, driven by changes in the phonon relaxation times (diffusive effects). By changing the interface configuration from armchair to zigzag, the conductivities for all period lengths increase by approximately 7% across the interfaces and 19% along the interfaces.

  9. Strain compensated superlattices on m-plane gallium nitride by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Bonef, Bastien; Young, Erin C.; Nookala, Nishant; Belkin, Mikhail A.; Speck, James S.

    2017-08-01

    The results of tensile strained AlN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, and compressive strained InGaN/GaN superlattices (SLs) grown by Ammonia MBE (NH3-MBE) are presented. A combination of atom probe tomography and high-resolution X-ray diffraction confirms that periodic heterostructures of high crystallographic quality are achieved. Strain induced misfit dislocations (MDs), however, are revealed by cathodoluminescence (CL) of the strained AlN/GaN, AlGaN/GaN, and InGaN/GaN structures. MDs in the active region of a device are a severe problem as they act as non-radiative charge recombination centers, affecting the reliability and efficiency of the device. Strain compensated SL structures are subsequently developed, composed of alternating layers of tensile strained AlGaN and compressively strained InGaN. CL reveals the absence of MDs in such structures, demonstrating that strain compensation offers a viable route towards MD free active regions in III-Nitride SL based devices.

  10. VC/TiC超晶格薄膜的微结构及超硬效应%Microstructure and superhardness effect of VC/TiC superlattice films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董学超; 岳建岭; 王恩青; 李淼磊; 李戈扬

    2015-01-01

    Vanadium carbide/titanium carbide (VC/TiC) superlattice films were synthesized by magnetron sputtering method. The effects of modulation period on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were investigated by EDXA, XRD, HRTEM and nano-indentation. The results reveal that the VC/TiC superlattice films form an epitaxial structure when their modulation period is less than a critical value, accompanied with a remarkable increase in hardness. Further increasing the modulation period, the hardness of superlattices decreases slowly to the rule-of-mixture value due to the destruction of epitaxial structures. The XRD results reveal that three-directional strains are generated in superlattices when the epitaxial structure is formed, which may change the modulus of constituent layers. This may explain the remarkable hardness enhancement of VC/TiC superlattices.%采用磁控溅射工艺制备VC/TiC超晶格薄膜,并采用EDXA、XRD、HRTEM和纳米力学探针研究调制周期对超晶格薄膜的微结构和力学性能的影响。研究结果表明,当超晶格薄膜的调制周期低于临界厚度时,制备的VC/TiC超晶格薄膜能够形成共格生长结构,并获得硬度显著提高的超硬效应。然而,随着调制周期的进一步增大,超晶格薄膜的共格结构遭到破坏,导致薄膜的硬度逐渐降低,并最终趋于其组元的混合平均值。XRD结果表明,当形成共格生长结构时,超晶格薄膜内部将产生共格协调应变,从而改变不同调制层的弹性模量,这也是VC/TiC超晶格薄膜能够获得超硬效应的重要原因。

  11. Innovative Superhard Materials and Sustainable Coatings for Advanced Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jay; Novikov, Nikolay

    The book contains the results of the latest achievements of leading researchers from 9 countries in the field of diamond and diamond-like carbon, cubic boron nitride and other superhard materials; high-density engineering ceramics; high pressure-high temperature technique; computer-aided modeling; diamond, cubic boron nitride, ceramic and cemented carbide tools; development, production and applications of nanostructured materials; films and wear-resistant coating; methods for quality control of tool materials and tools.

  12. Selective layer disordering in intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattices with silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jonathan J., Jr.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Vawter, Gregory A.; Montaño, Ines

    2015-06-01

    Selective layer disordering in an intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattice using a silicon nitride (SiNx) capping layer is demonstrated. The SiNx capped superlattice exhibits suppressed layer disordering under high-temperature annealing. Additionally, the rate of layer disordering is reduced with increased SiNx thickness. The layer disordering is caused by Si diffusion, and the SiNx layer inhibits vacancy formation at the crystal surface and ultimately, the movement of Al and Ga atoms across the heterointerfaces. Patterning of the SiNx layer results in selective layer disordering, an attractive method to integrate active and passive III-nitride-based intersubband devices.

  13. Investigation of thermal conductivity of nitride mixed crystals and superlattices by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Takahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University (Japan); Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    The thermal conductivities of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N mixed crystal and AlN/GaN superlattices were investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. We used Stillinger-Weber potentials, and Green-Kubo's formula was employed to calculate thermal conductivity. The results showed that the value of thermal conductivity of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N was about 1/20 smaller than that of GaN. It was also found that the thermal conductivity of AlN/GaN superlattices along the c-axis, which is parallel to the growth direction, was much less than that of bulk GaN. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Superhard Nanocomposite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The recent development in the field of nanocomposite coatings with good mechanical properties is critically reviewed in this paper. The design principle and materials selection for the nanocomposite coatings are introduced. Different methods for the preparation of superhard nanocomposite coatings are described with emphasis on the magnetron sputtering. Based on recent theoretical and experimental results regarding the appearance of superhardness in nanocomposite coating, lattice parameter changes, crystallite size, microstructure and morphology are reviewed in detail. Also emphasized are the mechanical properties (especially on hardness) and the ways by which the properties are derived.

  15. Photodetectors based on intersubband transitions using III-nitride superlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Daniel; Baumann, Esther; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Theron, Ricardo [University of Neuchatel, 1 A.-L. Breguet, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Wu, Hong; Schaff, William J; Dawlaty, Jahan; George, Paul A; Eastman, Lester F; Rana, Farhan [Cornell University, Phillips Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kandaswamy, Prem K; Leconte, Sylvain; Monroy, Eva [Equipe mixte CEA-CNRS Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, INAC/SP2M/PSC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2009-04-29

    We review our recent progress on the fabrication of near-infrared photodetectors based on intersubband transitions in AlN/GaN superlattice structures. Such devices were first demonstrated in 2003, and have since then seen a quite substantial development both in terms of detector responsivity and high speed operation. Nowadays, the most impressive results include characterization up to 3 GHz using a directly modulated semiconductor laser and up to 13.3 GHz using an ultra-short pulse solid state laser.

  16. Epitaxial superlattices with titanium nitride as a plasmonic component for optical hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Saha, Bivas; Liu, Jing;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a plasmonic material having optical properties resembling gold. Unlike gold, however, TiN is complementary metal oxide semiconductor-compatible, mechanically strong, and thermally stable at higher temperatures. Additionally, TiN exhibits low-index surfaces with surface e...

  17. Recent Advances in Superhard Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhisheng; Xu, Bo; Tian, Yongjun

    2016-07-01

    In superhard materials research, two topics are of central focus. One is to understand hardness microscopically and to establish hardness models with atomic parameters, which can be used to guide the design or prediction of novel superhard crystals. The other is to synthesize superhard materials with enhanced comprehensive performance (i.e., hardness, fracture toughness, and thermal stability), with the ambition of achieving materials harder than natural diamond. In this review, we present recent developments in both areas. The microscopic hardness models of covalent single crystals are introduced and further generalized to polycrystalline materials. Current research progress in novel superhard materials and nanostructuring approaches for high-performance superhard materials are discussed. We also clarify a long-standing controversy about the criterion for performing a reliable indentation hardness measurement.

  18. Ultra-thin SiN{sub x} in superlattice via nitridation of a-Si in-situ hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dharmendra Kumar; Solanki, Chetan Singh; Balasubramaniam, K.R., E-mail: bala.kavaipatti@gmail.com

    2014-08-28

    The fabrication of ultra-thin SiN{sub x} (< 2 nm) is a necessary step in third generation photovoltaics, memory, or light-emitting diode applications. Using the low temperature, cheap, scaleable synthesis technique of hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for this purpose poses many challenges. Here, an approach of fabricating ultra thin SiN{sub x} of thickness ∼ 1.9 nm in a superlattice (SL) structure via nitridation of a-Si layers in-situ HWCVD at 250 °C is reported. Quantum well SL and quantum dot (QD) SL films are realized, wherein SiN{sub x} layers are formed by nitriding a-Si. Both these films investigated by Raman spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, reveal the formation of ultra-thin SiN{sub x} in a SL structure with a-Si, accompanied by sharp interfaces. In addition, annealing of the SL structures, results in QDs of crystalline Si in the a-Si layers, maintaining the SiN{sub x} layer as well as the sharp interface between the SiN{sub x} and a-Si layers of the as-deposited SL structure. - Highlights: • Ultra thin SiN{sub x} is fabricated by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. • SiN{sub x} layer of thickness ∼ 1.9 nm is formed via nitridation of a-Si layer at 250 °C. • Ultra thin SiN{sub x} layers are realized in superlattice films of quantum wells and quantum dots.

  19. Polymorphic phases of sp3-hybridized superhard CN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli

    2012-11-01

    It is well established that carbon nitride (CN) is a potential superhard material as its bond in network structures is slightly shorter than the C-C bond in diamond. However, the structure of superhard CN materials is yet to be determined experimentally. We have performed an extensive structural search for the high pressure crystalline phases of CN using the particle swarm optimization technique; seven low-energy polymorphic structures of sp3-hybridized CN have been found in an unbiased search. Density-functional theory calculations indicate that, among the seven low-energy crystalline structures, Pnnm structure (8 atoms/cell) is energetically more favorable than the previously reported most stable crystalline structure with 1:1 stoichiometry. Furthermore, Pnnm possesses the highest hardness (62.3 GPa). Formation enthalpies demonstrate that this material can be synthesized at pressure 10.9 GPa, lower than needed by β-C3N4 (14.1 GPa).

  20. Preparation of bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM); He, Duanwei (Sichuan, CN)

    2011-05-10

    Bulk, superhard, B--C--N nanocomposite compacts were prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture at a pressure in a range of from about 15 GPa to about 25 GPa, and sintering the pressurized encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a temperature in a range of from about 1800-2500 K. The product bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compacts were well sintered compacts with nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B--C--N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compacts had a measured Vicker's hardness in a range of from about 41 GPa to about 68 GPa.

  1. Synthesis of superhard materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir L. Solozhenko

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of solids at high pressures and temperatures is an important area of modern condensed matter physics, chemistry, and materials science. The last decade has seen revolutionary developments in the field of high-pressure experimentation: new types of cells allow a wider range of experiments at higher pressures, and third-generation synchrotrons have brought the possibility of conducting X-ray diffraction experiments that were unthinkable only 10 years ago. In this review, we give some recent examples to illustrate how modern high-pressure tools, such as the diamond anvil cell (DAC, multianvil press, and shock compression, can be used to answer questions relevant to the synthesis of new advanced materials. Our examples will be related mostly to superhard materials.

  2. Sintered Superhard Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentorf, R. H.; Devries, R. C.; Bundy, F. P.

    1980-05-01

    Diamond or cubic boron nitride particles can be sintered into strong masses at high temperatures and very high pressures at which these crystalline forms are stable. Most of the desirable physical properties of the sintered masses, such as hardness and thermal conductivity, approach those of large single crystals; their resistance to wear and catastrophic splitting is superior. The sintered masses are produced on a commercial scale and are increasingly used as cutting tools on hard or abrasive materials, as wire-drawing dies, in rock drills, and in special high-pressure apparatus.

  3. Research on the Cutting Performance of Cubic Boron Nitride Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There were only two kinds of superhard tool material at the past, i.e. diamond and cubic boron nitride (CBN). Manmade diamond and CBN are manufactured by the middle of 20th century. Various manufacturing methods and manmade superhard materials were developed later. They were widely used in different industry and science areas. Recently, a new kind of superhard tool material, C 3N 4 coating film, had been developed. American physical scientists, A. M. Liu and M. L. Cohen, designed a new kind of inorganic c...

  4. Theoretical design of diamondlike superhard structures at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Li; Wei-Tao, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Diamond, as the hardest known material, has been widely used in industrial applications as abrasives, coatings, and cutting and polishing tools, but it is restricted by several shortcomings, e.g., its low thermal and chemical stability. Considerable efforts have been devoted to designing or synthesizing the diamond-like B-C-N-O compounds, which exhibit excellent mechanical property. In this paper, we review the recent theoretical design of diamond-like superhard structures at high pressure. In particular, the recently designed high symmetric phase of low-energy cubic BC3 meets the experimental observation, and clarifies the actual existence of cubic symmetric phase for the compounds formed by B-C-N-O system, besides the classical example of cubic boron nitride. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51202084, 11474125, and 51372095).

  5. A New Superhard Phase of C3N2 Polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qun; Zhang, Meiguang; Yan, Haiyan; Li, Renxian; Zhu, Xuanmin; Lin, Zhengzhe; Yao, Ronghui

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nitrides are excellent candidates for extreme hardness materials. In this work, a new I4̅3m phase of C3N2 has been uncovered by replacing part of the nitrogen atoms in the cagelike diamondoid nitrogen N10 with carbon atoms. This phase is mechanically and dynamically stable up to at least 50 GPa. The elastic anisotropy of I4̅3m-C3N2 is investigated by comparing with previously proposed α-C3N2. The tensile directional dependence of Young's modulus obeys the following trend: E[111]>E[110]>E[100]. Electronic structure calculations reveal that I4̅3m-C3N2 is hole conducting. Hardness calculation shows that the I4̅3m-C3N2 is superhard with a hardness of 72.9 GPa.

  6. Theoretical design of diamondlike superhard structures at high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李全; 郑伟涛

    2016-01-01

    Diamond, as the hardest known material, has been widely used in industrial applications as abrasives, coatings, and cutting and polishing tools, but it is restricted by several shortcomings, e.g., its low thermal and chemical stability. Con-siderable efforts have been devoted to designing or synthesizing the diamond-like B–C–N–O compounds, which exhibit excellent mechanical property. In this paper, we review the recent theoretical design of diamond-like superhard structures at high pressure. In particular, the recently designed high symmetric phase of low-energy cubic BC3 meets the experimental observation, and clarifies the actual existence of cubic symmetric phase for the compounds formed by B–C–N–O system, besides the classical example of cubic boron nitride.

  7. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  8. Understanding the nature of "superhard graphite"

    CERN Document Server

    Boulfelfel, Salah Eddine; Leoni, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Numerous experiments showed that on cold compression graphite transforms into a new superhard and transparent allotrope. Several structures with different topologies have been proposed for this phase. While experimental data are consistent with these models, the only way to solve this puzzle is to find which structure is kinetically easiest to form. Using state-of-the-art molecular-dynamics transition path sampling simulations, we investigate kinetic pathways of the pressure-induced transformation of graphite to various superhard candidate structures. Unlike hitherto applied methods for elucidating nature of superhard graphite, transition path sampling realistically models nucleation events necessary for physically meaningful transformation kinetics. We demonstrate that nucleation mechanism and kinetics lead to $M$-carbon as the final product. $W$-carbon, initially competitor to $M$-carbon, is ruled out by phase growth. Bct-C$_4$ structure is not expected to be produced by cold compression due to less probabl...

  9. Superhard nanophase materials for rock drilling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadangi, R.K.; Voronov, O.A.; Tompa, G.S. [Diamond Materials Inc., Pisctaway, NJ (United States); Kear, B.H. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Diamond Materials Incorporated is developing new class of superhard materials for rock drilling applications. In this paper, we will describe two types of superhard materials, (a) binderless polycrystalline diamond compacts (BPCD), and (b) functionally graded triphasic nanocomposite materials (FGTNC). BPCDs are true polycrystalline diamond ceramic with < 0.5 wt% binders and have demonstrated to maintain their wear properties in a granite-log test even after 700{degrees}C thermal treatment. FGTNCs are functionally-graded triphasic superhard material, comprising a nanophase WC/Co core and a diamond-enriched surface, that combine high strength and toughness with superior wear resistance, making FGTNC an attractive material for use as roller cone stud inserts.

  10. Characterization of Superhard Solids to Mbar Pressures (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, T. S.; Mao, Z.; He, D.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the strength of materials at high pressure have applications to interpreting static and dynamic experiments, improving mechanical performance, and constraining the rheology of planetary interiors. Strength properties at high pressure are also of interest due to recent developments in theoretical determinations of ideal shear strength, the connection between strength and particle size in nanocrystals, and the search for new super hard solids. In recent years, new diamond anvil cell techniques have been developed to measure lattice strain under intentionally non-hydrostatic conditions using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. These studies constrain yield strength and provide insights into other properties including elastic anisotropy, equation of state, and texture development at very high pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments using a diamond anvil cell in a radial geometry have been carried out on candidate superhard ceramics at pressures above 50 GPa on B6O, SiO2 stishovite, c-Si3N4, c-BC2N, and Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite. Cubic boron carbide nitride was found to sustain the largest differential stresses of ~38 GPa at mean pressures of 70 GPa (Hong et al., PRB, 2009). The ratio of yield strength to shear modulus increases for all these materials under static loading and differential stresses reach 8-10% of the shear modulus at the highest pressures. Another avenue for identification of potential superhard materials is through shock compression experiments. These have recently identified several materials that appear to transform to highly incompressible solids at pressures above 100 GPa along the Hugoniot. One such material is Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG) which is found to transform to a phase that is less compressible than diamond above 170 GPa (Mashimo et al., 2006). Here I will describe recent diamond anvil cell experiments in which GGG is found to transform to a cubic perovskite phase above 90 GPa (Mao et al., 2010). The compression curve measured up to 180 GPa

  11. Influence of the Discharge Voltage during Pulse-Plasma Process on the Durability of Edges coated with Superhard Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Kupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the experimental results concerning the functional quality of thin, superhard coatings produced on cutting edges is described. Boron nitride coatings were deposited on insert cutting edges made cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method. The comparative investigations of mentioned coatings have been concerned of tool life of edges during steel machining. In these investigations for the purpose of additional increase of coated edge durability an interfacial layers were applied. Presented investigations particularly pointed out to essential influence of the values of discharge voltage on the coating structure and durability of edges coated with boron nitride.

  12. Theoretical Compton profile of diamond, boron nitride and carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Julio C.; Quevedo, Carlos R.; Gomez, José M.; Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we used the generalized gradient approximation method to determine the electron wave functions and theoretical Compton profiles of the following super-hard materials: diamond, boron nitride (h-BN), and carbon nitride in its two known phases: βC3N4 and gC3N4 . In the case of diamond and h-BN, we compared our theoretical results with available experimental data. In addition, we used the Compton profile results to determine cohesive energies and found acceptable agreement with previous experiments.

  13. Superhard BC(3) in cubic diamond structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Quan; Gao, Bo; Wang, Yanchao; Li, Hongdong; Chen, Changfeng; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    We solve the crystal structure of recently synthesized cubic BC(3) using an unbiased swarm structure search, which identifies a highly symmetric BC(3) phase in the cubic diamond structure (d-BC(3)) that contains a distinct B-B bonding network along the body diagonals of a large 64-atom unit cell. Simulated x-ray diffraction and Raman peaks of d-BC(3) are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Calculated stress-strain relations of d-BC(3) demonstrate its intrinsic superhard nature and reveal intriguing sequential bond-breaking modes that produce superior ductility and extended elasticity, which are unique among superhard solids. The present results establish the first boron carbide in the cubic diamond structure with remarkable properties, and these new findings also provide insights for exploring other covalent solids with complex bonding configurations.

  14. Modern comparative approach for carrier transport in InAlN/AlN superlattice device with characteristics and modelling using nitride (14N,15N) isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Kaushik; Ranjan, Rajeev Kumar; Shankar, Ravi; Priyadarshini, Bindu; Ghosal, Aniruddha

    2017-03-01

    As we all know that, the performance and characteristics of any semiconductor device are effected by change in operating temperature. The temperature dependencies of the transport properties of InAlN/Al14N15N have been investigated using theoretical and mathematical study. Here we have considered the Al14N15N with different ratio of 14N and 15N for the analysis owing to considerable interest in superlattice structures of large band gap semiconductors having various favourable material properties such as very high thermal conductivity, high carrier mobility and wide bandwidth operation. This paper deals with analysis of temperature effect on some of the device modelling parameters like carrier mobility and scattering.

  15. Influence of the Discharge Voltage during Pulse-Plasma Process on the Durability of Edges coated with Superhard Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaciejKupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the experimental results concerning the functional quality of thin, superhard coatings produced on cutting edges is described. Boron nitride coatings were deposited on insert cutting edges made cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method. The comparative investigations of mentioned coatings have been concerned of tool life of edges during steel machining. In these investigations for the purpose of additional increase of coated edge durability an interfacial layers were applied. Presented investigations particularly pointed out to essential influence of the values of discharge voltage on the coating structure and durability of edges coated with boron nitfide.

  16. Structure and properties of hard and superhard Zr-Cu-N nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeman, P.; Cerstvy, R.; Musil, J. [Univ. of West Bohemia, Plzen (Czech Republic). Dept. of Phys.; Mayrhofer, P.H.; Mitterer, C. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Werkstoffpruefung, Montanuniversitaet, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700, Leoben (Austria)

    2000-09-30

    Zr-Cu-N nanocomposite films represent a new material of the type-nanocrystalline transition metal nitride (nc-MeN)/metal. In the present work, films were deposited onto steel substrates using unbalanced dc reactive magnetron sputtering of a Zr-Cu (62/38 at.%) target. Film structure, chemical composition, mechanical and optical properties were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis, depth-sensing microindentation and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It was found that (i) there is a strong correlation between the film structure, Cu content and film properties and (ii) either hard or superhard Zr-Cu-N films can be formed. The superhard coatings with hardness H>40 GPa are characterized by a columnar structure, a strong 111 XRD peak from ZrN grains and no diffraction peaks from Cu. These films exhibit a high elastic recovery of about 80% and contain a very low amount of Cu, approximately 1-2 at.%. In contrast, the hard (<40 GPa) Zr-Cu-N films are characterized by many diffraction peaks from polyoriented ZrN and Cu grains, a more random microstructure and a Cu content higher than 2 at.%. The optical properties of nanocomposite Zr-Cu-N films depend on the stoichiometry of the hard ZrN{sub x} compound and the content of Cu in the film. (orig.)

  17. Raman fingerprint of aligned graphene/h-BN superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Axel; Park, Jaesung; Yang, Huafeng; Elias, Daniel; Mayorov, Alexander S; Yu, Geliang; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Gorbachev, Roman V; Lazzeri, Michele; Geim, Andre K; Casiraghi, Cinzia

    2013-11-13

    Graphene placed on hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) experiences a superlattice (Moiré) potential, which leads to a strong reconstruction of graphene's electronic spectrum with new Dirac points emerging at sub-eV energies. Here we study the effect of such superlattices on graphene's Raman spectrum. In particular, the 2D Raman peak is found to be exquisitely sensitive to the misalignment between graphene and h-BN lattices, probably due to the presence of a strain distribution with the same periodicity of the Moiré potential. This feature can be used to identify graphene superlattices with a misalignment angle smaller than 2°.

  18. Ballistic miniband conduction in a graphene superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Menyoung; Wallbank, John R.; Gallagher, Patrick; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2016-09-01

    Rational design of long-period artificial lattices yields effects unavailable in simple solids. The moiré pattern in highly aligned graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures is a lateral superlattice with high electron mobility and an unusual electronic dispersion whose miniband edges and saddle points can be reached by electrostatic gating. We investigated the dynamics of electrons in moiré minibands by measuring ballistic transport between adjacent local contacts in a magnetic field, known as the transverse electron focusing effect. At low temperatures, we observed caustics of skipping orbits extending over hundreds of superlattice periods, reversals of the cyclotron revolution for successive minibands, and breakdown of cyclotron motion near van Hove singularities. At high temperatures, electron-electron collisions suppress focusing. Probing such miniband conduction properties is a necessity for engineering novel transport behaviors in superlattice devices.

  19. Superhard nano-multilayers and nanocomposite coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xiaoming; ZHENG Weitao; AN Tao

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent development of nano-multilayers and nanocomposite coatings. The hardening mechanisms and design of hard coating are discussed in details. Recent research on Ti/TiN and nitride/nitride multilayer, Ti-Si-N and Ti-Al-Si-N nanocomposite coatings is described, and the perspectives of the related research are proposed.

  20. First-principles structural design of superhard materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Yanchao; Lv, Jian; Zhu, Chunye; Li, Qian; Zhang, Miao; Li, Quan; Ma, Yanming

    2013-03-21

    We reported a developed methodology to design superhard materials for given chemical systems under external conditions (here, pressure). The new approach is based on the CALYPSO algorithm and requires only the chemical compositions to predict the hardness vs. energy map, from which the energetically preferable superhard structures are readily accessible. In contrast to the traditional ground state structure prediction method where the total energy was solely used as the fitness function, here we adopted hardness as the fitness function in combination with the first-principles calculation to construct the hardness vs. energy map by seeking a proper balance between hardness and energy for a better mechanical description of given chemical systems. To allow a universal calculation on the hardness for the predicted structure, we have improved the earlier hardness model based on bond strength by applying the Laplacian matrix to account for the highly anisotropic and molecular systems. We benchmarked our approach in typical superhard systems, such as elemental carbon, binary B-N, and ternary B-C-N compounds. Nearly all the experimentally known and most of the earlier theoretical superhard structures have been successfully reproduced. The results suggested that our approach is reliable and can be widely applied into design of new superhard materials.

  1. Product surface hardening in non-self-sustained glow discharge plasma before synthesis of superhard coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, P. S.; Metel, A. S.; Nay, H. A.

    2017-05-01

    Before the synthesis of superhard coating, the product surface is hardened by means of plasma nitriding, which prevents the surface deformations and the coating brittle rupture. The product heating by ions accelerated from plasma by applied to the product bias voltage leads to overheating and blunting of the product sharp edges. To prevent the blunting, it is proposed to heat the products with a broad beam of fast nitrogen molecules. The beam injection into a working vacuum chamber results in filling of the chamber with quite homogeneous plasma suitable for nitriding. Immersion in the plasma of the electrode and heightening of its potential up to 50-100 V initiate a non-self-sustained glow discharge between the electrode and the chamber. It enhances the plasma density by an order of magnitude and reduces its spatial nonuniformity down to 5-10%. When a cutting tool is isolated from the chamber, it is bombarded by plasma ions with an energy corresponding to its floating potential, which is lower than the sputtering threshold. Hence, the sharp edges are sputtered only by fast nitrogen molecules with the same rate as other parts of the tool surface. This leads to sharpening of the cutting tools instead of blunting.

  2. ZrN/Cu nanocomposite film - a novel superhard material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, J.; Zeman, P. [Univ. of West Bohemia, Plzen (Czech Republic). Dept. of Phys.; Hruby, H.; Mayrhofer, P.H. [Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria). Inst. fuer Metallkunde und Werkstoffpruefung

    1999-11-01

    This article reports on the structure and hardness of ZrCu-N films prepared by dc reactive magnetron sputtering of a ZrCu alloyed target in a mixture of Ar+N{sub 2} using a round planar unbalanced magnetron of diameter 100 mm. It was found that there is a strong correlation between the structure of the film and its hardness. The hard (<40 GPa) ZrCu-N films are characterized by many weak reflections from poly-oriented ZrN and Cu grains. In contrast, the superhard ({>=}40 GPa) ZrCu-N films are characterized by a strong reflection from ZrN grains with a dominate ZrN(111) orientation and no reflections from Cu. The superhard ZrCu-N films with a hardness of 54 GPa are nc-ZrN/Cu nanocomposite films composed of strongly oriented ZrN grains surrounded by a thin layer of Cu. These films exhibit a high elastic recovery of about 80% (determined by a microhardness tester) and contain approximately 1-2 wt.% Cu. The superhard nc-ZrN/Cu nanocomposite films represent a new class of superhard materials of the type nc-MeN/metal. (orig.)

  3. Selective layer disordering in III-nitrides with a capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-06-14

    Selective layer disordering in a doped III-nitride superlattice can be achieved by depositing a dielectric capping layer on a portion of the surface of the superlattice and annealing the superlattice to induce disorder of the layer interfaces under the uncapped portion and suppress disorder of the interfaces under the capped portion. The method can be used to create devices, such as optical waveguides, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, solar cells, modulators, laser, and amplifiers.

  4. Superlattice Optical Bistability Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    multilayer heterojunction and superlattice device applications. 2.0 Growth Studies The MBE growth of mercury compound is still relatively new and novel...These superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy in a MBE system specifically designed to handle mercury . MBE is an ultrahigh vacuum evaporative...therefore the growth process is not as well understood as that of III-V semiconductor - compounds . In HgTe-CdTe superlattices the CdTe deposition is

  5. Ion implantation of superhard ceramic cutting tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Y. Kevin; Liu, Jie

    2004-08-01

    Despite numerous reports of tool life increase by ion implantation in machining operations, ion implantation applications of cutting tools remain limited, especially for ceramic tools. Mechanisms of tool-life improvement by implantation are not clearly established due to complexity of both implantation and tool-wear processes. In an attempt to improve performance of cubic boron nitride (CBN) tools for hard machining by ion implantation, a literature survey of ion-implanted cutting tools was carried out with a focus on mechanisms of tool-wear reduction by ion implantation. Implantation and machining experiments were then conducted to investigate implantation effects on CBN tools in hard machining. A batch of CBN tools was implanted with nitrogen ions at 150 keV and 2.5×1017 ions/cm2 and further used to cut 61 HRc AISI 52100 steel at different conditions. Results show that ion implantation has strong effects on partsurface finish, moderate effect on cutting forces, but an insignificant impact on tool wear. Friction coefficients, estimated from measured cutting forces, are possibly reduced by ion implantation, which may improve surface finish. However, surprisingly, 2-D orthogonal cutting to evaluate tribological loading in hard machining showed no difference on contact stresses and friction coefficients between implanted and nonimplanted CBN tools.

  6. Non-catalytic facile synthesis of superhard phase of boron carbide (B13C2) nanoflakes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sky Shumao; Su, Liap Tat; Guo, Jun; Vasylkiv, Oleg; Borodianska, Hanna; Xi, Zhu; Krishnan, Gireesh M; Su, Haibin; Tokl, Alfred I Y

    2012-01-01

    Boron Carbide is one the hardest and lightest material that is also relatively easier to synthesis as compared to other superhard ceramics like cubic boron nitride and diamond. However, the brittle nature of monolithic advanced ceramics material hinders its use in various engineering applications. Thus, strategies that can toughen the material are of fundamental and technological importance. One approach is to use nanostructure materials as building blocks, and organize them into a complex hierarchical structure, which could potentially enhance its mechanical properties to exceed that of the monolithic form. In this paper, we demonstrated a simple approach to synthesize one- and two-dimension nanostructure boron carbide by simply changing the mixing ratio of the initial compound to influence the saturation condition of the process at a relatively low temperature of 1500 degrees C with no catalyst involved in the growing process. Characterization of the resulting nano-structures shows B13C2, which is a superhard phase of boron carbide as its hardness is almost twice as hard as the commonly known B4C. Using ab-initio density functional theory study on the elastic properties of both B12C3 and B13C2, the high hardness of B13C2 is consistent to our calculation results, where bulk modulus of B13C2 is higher than that of B4C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the nanoflakes also reveals high density of twinning defects which could potentially inhibit the crack propagation, leading to toughening of the materials.

  7. Studies on nanosecond 532nm and 355nm and ultrafast 515nm and 532nm laser cutting super-hard materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, micro-processing of three kinds of super-hard materials of poly-crystal diamond (PCD)/tungsten-carbide (WC), CVD-diamond and cubic boron nitride (CNB) has been systematically studied using nanosecond laser (532nm and 355nm), and ultrafast laser (532nm and 515nm). Our purpose is to investigate a full laser micro-cutting solution to achieve a ready-to-use cutting tool insert (CTI). The results show a clean cut with little burns and recasting at edge. The cutting speed of 2-10mm/min depending on thickness was obtained. The laser ablation process was also studied by varying laser parameters (wavelength, pulse width, pulse energy, repetition rate) and tool path to improve cutting speed. Also, studies on material removal efficiency (MRE) of PCD/WC with 355nm-ns and 515nm-fs laser as a function of laser fluence show that 355nm-ns laser is able to achieve higher MRE for PCD and WC. Thus, ultrafast laser is not necessarily used for superhard material cutting. Instead, post-polishing with ultrafast laser can be used to clean cutting surface and improve smoothness.

  8. Present and possible future applications of superhard nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holubar, P.; Jilek, M.; Sima, M. [SHM, Ltd., Sumperk (Czech Republic)

    2000-11-01

    Recent investigations into the multicomponent (TiAlSi)N and TiBN superhard coatings revealed that the nanostructure, properties and deposition conditions needed for their preparation are in agreement with the known generic concept for the design of novel superhard nanocomposites due to thermodynamically driven phase segregation. All coatings to be reported here were developed on a production scale plasma PVD and CVD equipment consisting of vacuum arc evaporation from a central cathode for the metals in combination with PCVD of non-metals, such as boron, from gaseous reactant. Depending on the composition and deposition conditions the hardness of the coatings is controlled in the range between 35 and 45 GPa or higher. However, for the majority of applications the highest hardness is not the primary goal. More important is the appropriate combination of high hardness with other properties, such as fracture toughness, oxidation resistance, adhesion, etc. The effect of these properties on the resulting utility value of the coated tools will be discussed with respect to the available cutting tools made of cemented carbide and coated with the nanocomposites. Presently, dry milling, drilling and possibly turning are the most important applications of such coated tools. In view of the fairly fast transition from the initial development of these coatings towards their industrial production many further applications are expected. Therefore, future possibilities will be discussed as well. (orig.)

  9. Exploring the high-pressure behavior of superhard tungsten tetraboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Miao; Mohammadi, Reza; Mao, Zhu; Armentrout, Matt M.; Kavner, Abby; Kaner, Richard B.; Tolbert, Sarah H. (UCLA)

    2016-07-29

    In this work, we examine the high-pressure behavior of superhard material candidate WB{sub 4} using high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell up to 58.4 GPa. The zero-pressure bulk modulus, K{sub 0}, obtained from fitting the pressure-volume data using the second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state is 326 {+-} 3 GPa. A reversible, discontinuous change in slope in the c/a ratio is further observed at {approx}42 GPa, suggesting that lattice softening occurs in the c direction above this pressure. This softening is not observed in other superhard transition metal borides such as ReB{sub 2} compressed to similar pressures. Speculation on the possible relationship between this softening and the orientation of boron-boron bonds in the c direction in the WB{sub 4} structure is included. Finally, the shear and Young's modulus values are calculated using an isotropic model based on the measured bulk modulus and an estimated Poisson's ratio for WB{sub 4}.

  10. Structure, bonding, and possible superhardness of CrB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haiyang; Wang, Jiaqi; Chen, Xing-Qiu; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi; Lazar, Petr; Podloucky, Raimund; Kolmogorov, Aleksey N.

    2012-04-01

    By electron and x-ray diffraction we establish that the CrB4 compound discovered over 40 years ago crystallizes in the oP10 (Pnnm) structure, in disagreement with previous experiments but in agreement with a recent first-principles prediction. The 3D boron network in this structure is a distorted version of the rigid carbon sp3 network proposed recently for the high-pressure C4 allotrope. Our systematic density functional theory analysis of the electronic, structural, and elastic properties in ten related transition metal TMB4 tetraborides (TM = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc) identifies CrB4 as the prime candidate to be a superhard material. In particular, the compound's calculated weakest shear and tensile stresses exceed 50 GPa, and its Vickers hardness is estimated to be 48 GPa. We compare the reported and estimated Vickers hardness for notable (super)hard materials and find that the CrB4 calculated value is exceptionally high for a material synthesizable under standard ambient-pressure conditions.

  11. Magnetism in lanthanide superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Sarthour, R.S.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of heavy rare-earth superlattices have revealed the stabilization of novel magnetic phases chat are not present in bulk materials. The most striking result is the propagation of the magnetic ordering through nonmagnetic spacer materials. Here we describe some recent X......-ray magnetic resonant scattering studies of light rare-earth superlattices, which illuminate the mechanism of interlayer coupling, and provide access to different areas of Physics. such as the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. Magnetic X-ray diffraction is found to be particularly well suited...... to the study of the modulated magnetic structures in superlattices, and provides unique information on the conduction-electron spin-density wave responsible for the propagation of magnetic order. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Anisotropic elasticity and abnormal Poisson’s ratios in super-hard materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanwei Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigated the variable mechanical properties such as Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratios and compressibility in super-hard materials. Our tensorial analysis reveals that the mechanical properties of super-hard materials are strongly sensitive to the anisotropy index of materials. In sharp contrast to the traditional positive constant as thought before, the Poisson’s ratio of super-hard materials could be unexpectedly negative, zero, or even positive with a value much larger than the isotropic upper limit of 0.5 along definite directions. Our results uncover a correlation between compressibility and hardness, which offer insights on the prediction of new super-hard materials.

  13. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.;

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  14. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  15. A metallic superhard boron carbide: first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengdong; Yang, Bingchao; Li, Zihe; Hu, Meng; Wang, Qianqian; Cui, Lin; Yu, Dongli; He, Julong

    2015-04-21

    A monoclinic BC3 phase (denoted M-BC3) has been predicted using first principles calculations. The M-BC3 structure is formed by alternately stacking sequences of metallic BC-layers and insulating C atom layers, thus, the structure exhibits two-dimensional conductivity. Its stability has been confirmed by our calculations of the total energy, elastic constants, and phonon frequencies. The pressure of phase transition from graphite-like BC3 to M-BC3 is calculated to be 9.3 GPa, and the theoretical Vickers hardness of M-BC3 is 43.8 GPa, this value indicates that the compound is a potentially superhard material. By comparing Raman spectral calculations of M-BC3 and previously proposed structures with the experimental data, we speculate that the experimentally synthesized BC3 crystal may simultaneously contain M-BC3 and Pmma-b phases.

  16. Rapid Synthesis of Sub-5 nm Sized Cubic Boron Nitride Nanocrystals with High-Piezoelectric Behavior via Electrochemical Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhigang; Li, Lianhui; Cong, Shan; Xuan, Jinnan; Zhang, Dengsong; Geng, Fengxia; Zhang, Ting; Zhao, Zhigang

    2017-01-11

    A key challenge in current superhard materials research is the design of novel superhard nanocrystals (NCs) whereby new and unexpected properties may be predicted. Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is a superhard material which ranks next to diamond; however, downsizing c-BN material below the 10 nm scale is rather challenging, and the interesting new properties of c-BN NCs remain unexplored and wide open. Herein we report an electrochemical shock method to prepare uniform c-BN NCs with a lateral size of only 3.4 ± 0.6 nm and a thickness of only 0.74 ± 0.3 nm at ambient temperature and pressure. The fabrication process is simple and fast, with c-BN NCs produced in just a few minutes. Most interestingly, the NCs exhibit excellent piezoelectric performance with a large recordable piezoelectric coefficient of 25.7 pC/N, which is almost 6 times larger than that from bulk c-BN and even competitive to conventional piezoelectric materials. The phenomenon of enhancement in the piezoelectric properties of BN NCs might arise from the nanoscale surface effect and nanoscale shape effect of BN NCs. This work paves an interesting route for exploring new properties of superhard NCs.

  17. Magnetic Graphene Nanohole Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Decai; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wei; Liu, Feng

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of nano-holes (NHs) patterned in graphene using first principles calculations. We show that superlattices consisting of a periodic array of NHs form a new family of 2D crystalline "bulk" magnets whose collective magnetic behavior is governed by inter-NH spin-spin interaction. They exhibit long-range magnetic order well above room temperature. Furthermore, magnetic semiconductors can be made by doping magnetic NHs into semiconducting NH superlattices. Our findings offer a new material system for fundamental studies of spin-spin interaction and magnetic ordering in low dimensions, and open up the exciting opportunities of making engineered magnetic materials for storage media and spintronics applications.

  18. A Reinvestigation of a Superhard Tetragonal sp3 Carbon Allotrope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjiang Xing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available I 4 ¯ –carbon was first proposed by Zhang et al., this paper will report regarding this phase of carbon. The present paper reports the structural and elastic properties of the three-dimensional carbon allotrope I 4 ¯ –carbon using first-principles density functional theory. The related enthalpy, elastic constants, and phonon spectra confirm that the newly-predicted I 4 ¯ –carbon is thermodynamically, mechanically, and dynamically stable. The calculated mechanical properties indicate that I 4 ¯ –carbon has a larger bulk modulus (393 GPa, shear modulus (421 GPa, Young’s modulus (931 GPa, and hardness (55.5 GPa, all of which are all slightly larger than those of c-BN. The present results indicate that I 4 ¯ –carbon is a superhard material and an indirect-band-gap semiconductor. Moreover, I 4 ¯ –carbon shows a smaller elastic anisotropy in its linear bulk modulus, shear anisotropic factors, universal anisotropic index, and Young’s modulus.

  19. Superhard W0.5Ta0.5B nanowires prepared at ambient pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Michael T.; Akopov, Georgiy; Lin, Cheng-Wei; King, Daniel J.; Li, Rebecca L.; Sobell, Zachary C.; Mohammadi, Reza; Kaner, Richard B.

    2016-11-01

    The primary focus of superhard materials development has relied on chemical tuning of the crystal structure. While these intrinsic effects are invaluable, there is a strong possibility that hardness can be dramatically enhanced using extrinsic effects. Here, we demonstrate that the superhard metal W0.5Ta0.5B can be prepared as nanowires through flux growth. The aspect ratios of the nanowires are controlled by the concentration of boride in molten aluminum, and the nanowires grow along the boron-boron chains, confirmed via electron diffraction. This morphology inherently results from the crystal habit of borides and can inspire the development of other nanostructured materials.

  20. A study on the synthesis and microstructure of WC-TiN superlattice coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J.S.; Myung, H.S.; Han, J.G. [Sung Kyun Kwan Univ., Suwon (Korea). Plasma Appl. Mater. Lab.; Musil, J. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of West Bohemia (Czech Republic)

    2000-09-01

    WC-TiN superhard coatings are formulated to form a nanoscaled superlattice by separate arc reactive evaporation of Ti and WC. The microstructure of WC-TiN films was identified to be a superlattice of TiN and {beta}-WC{sub 1-x} phases with modulation period ({lambda}) of 5-13 nm and the lattice planes were continuous through the TiN and {beta}-WC{sub 1-x} layers. The residual stress of WC-TiN films was measured to be 7.9 GPa. This high stress was reduced to 2.2 GPa by introducing Ti or Ti-WC interlayers. Ti-WC interlayer also increased the film adhesion strength. In spite of almost the same residual stress of 2.2-2.3 GPa, Ti-WC/WC-TiN film showed a higher adhesion strength of 48.5 N than that of Ti/WC-TiN film. These results are attributed to the low residual stress and higher stiffness of the Ti-WC interlayer than the soft Ti interlayer. The microhardness of Ti-WC/WC-TiN film on cemented carbide was measured to be 40 GPa and the maximum hardness was obtained as the period ({lambda}) was approximately 7 nm. This value is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of the TiN single layer film. Other WC-TiN superlattice coatings with Ti and WC interlayers showed a hardness range of 38-40 GPa. The ratio H{sup 3}/E{sup 2} (plastic deformation resistance) of WC-TiN superlattice films with various interlayers was calculated to be in a range from 0.18 to 0.33. This paper reports the preparation of WC-TiN superlattice coatings on WC-Co and Si substrates using a multi-cathode arc ion-plating system. The microstructures and mechanical properties of WC-TiN superlattice films were investigated, too. (orig.)

  1. Jaynes Cummings Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A classical realization of the Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model, describing the interaction of a two-level atom with a quantized cavity mode, is proposed based on light transport in engineered waveguide superlattices. The optical setting enables to visualize in Fock space dynamical regimes not yet accessible in quantum systems, providing new physical insights into the deep strong coupling regime of the JC model. In particular, bouncing of photon number wave packets in Hilbert space and revivals of populations are explained as generalized Bloch oscillations in an inhomogeneous tight-binding lattice.

  2. Magnetic Rare-Earth Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Gibbs, D.; Böni, P.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic structures of several single‐crystal, magnetic rare‐earth superlattice systems grown by molecular‐beam epitaxy are reviewed. In particular, the results of recent neutron diffraction investigations of long‐range magnetic order in Gd‐Y, Dy‐Y, Gd‐Dy, and Ho‐Y periodic superlattices...... are presented. In the Gd‐Y system, an antiphase domain structure develops for certain Y layer spacings, whereas modified helical moment configurations are found to occur in the other systems, some of which are commensurate with the chemical superlattice wavelength. References are made to theoretical interaction...

  3. Aging in Magnetic Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Pleimling, Michel; Binek, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Aging phenomena can be observed in non-equilibrium systems with slow relaxation dynamics. Magnetic specimens with well defined interactions and dimensions can serve as model systems for universal aspects of aging. Magnetic thin films provide access to a wide range of microscopic parameters. Superlattice structures allow tuning the intra and inter-plane exchange and enable geometrical confinement of the spin fluctuations. We use Co/Cr thin film superlattices to study magnetic aging. The static and dynamic magnetic properties are affected via the Co and Cr film thicknesses. The Curie temperature of the Co films is reduced from the bulk value by geometrical confinement. Cr provides antiferromagnetic coupling between the Co films. In-plane magnetic set fields of some 10-100 mT are applied and the sample is exposed to the latter for various waiting times. After removing the field, relaxation of the magnetization is recorded via longitudinal Kerr-magnetometry and SQUID. The relaxation data are analyzed by scaling plots revealing universal aspects of aging. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, DMR-0904999, and MRSEC.

  4. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  5. Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, S. Y.; Allotey, F. K. A.; Adjepong, S. K.

    1993-10-01

    Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice has been studied for acoustic wave whose wavelength lambda = 2pi/q is smaller than the mean free path of the electrons l (where ql approaches 1). Unlike the homogeneous bulk material where Weinreich relation is independent of the wave number q in the superlattice we observe a dependence on q i.e. spatial dispersion. In the presence of applied constant field E a threshold value was obtained where the acoustoelectric current changes direction.

  6. Phoxonic Hybrid Superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Redondo, Elena; Huesmann, Hannah; El Boudouti, El-Houssaine; Tremel, Wolfgang; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Fytas, George

    2015-06-17

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the direction-dependent elastic and electromagnetic wave propagation in a supported film of hybrid PMMA (poly[methyl-methacrylate])-TiO2 superlattice (SL). In the direction normal to the layers, this one-dimensional periodic structure opens propagation band gaps for both hypersonic (GHz) phonons and near-UV photons. The high mismatch of elastic and optical impedance results in a large dual phoxonic band gap. The presence of defects inherent to the spin-coating fabrication technique is sensitively manifested in the band gap region. Utilizing Brillouin light scattering, phonon propagation along the layers was observed to be distinctly different from propagation normal to them and can, under certain conditions (SL thickness and substrate elasticity), reveal the nanomechanical properties of the constituent layers. Besides the first realization of unidirectional phoxonic behavior, hybrid (soft-hard) periodic materials are a promising simple platform for opto-acoustic interactions and applications such as filters and Bragg mirrors.

  7. Superconducting superlattices 2: Native and artificial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozovic, I.; Pavuna, D. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This volume is composed of 26 papers presented at the symposium. Topics covered include the following: high-{Tc} superlattices: intrinsic and artificial; low-{Tc} superlattices and multilayers; and theory.

  8. Ultrahard nanotwinned cubic boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Dongli; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Jiang, Yingbing; Hu, Wentao; Tang, Chengchun; Gao, Yufei; Luo, Kun; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Li-Min; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2013-01-17

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a well known superhard material that has a wide range of industrial applications. Nanostructuring of cBN is an effective way to improve its hardness by virtue of the Hall-Petch effect--the tendency for hardness to increase with decreasing grain size. Polycrystalline cBN materials are often synthesized by using the martensitic transformation of a graphite-like BN precursor, in which high pressures and temperatures lead to puckering of the BN layers. Such approaches have led to synthetic polycrystalline cBN having grain sizes as small as ∼14 nm (refs 1, 2, 4, 5). Here we report the formation of cBN with a nanostructure dominated by fine twin domains of average thickness ∼3.8 nm. This nanotwinned cBN was synthesized from specially prepared BN precursor nanoparticles possessing onion-like nested structures with intrinsically puckered BN layers and numerous stacking faults. The resulting nanotwinned cBN bulk samples are optically transparent with a striking combination of physical properties: an extremely high Vickers hardness (exceeding 100 GPa, the optimal hardness of synthetic diamond), a high oxidization temperature (∼1,294 °C) and a large fracture toughness (>12 MPa m(1/2), well beyond the toughness of commercial cemented tungsten carbide, ∼10 MPa m(1/2)). We show that hardening of cBN is continuous with decreasing twin thickness down to the smallest sizes investigated, contrasting with the expected reverse Hall-Petch effect below a critical grain size or the twin thickness of ∼10-15 nm found in metals and alloys.

  9. Defects in III-nitride microdisk cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C. X.; Puchtler, T. J.; Zhu, T.; Griffiths, J. T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Nitride microcavities offer an exceptional platform for the investigation of light–matter interactions as well as the development of devices such as high efficiency light emitting diodes (LEDs) and low-threshold nanolasers. Microdisk geometries in particular are attractive for low-threshold lasing applications due to their ability to support high finesse whispering gallery modes (WGMs) and small modal volumes. In this article we review the effect of defects on the properties of nitride microdisk cavities fabricated using photoelectrochemical etching of an InGaN sacrificial superlattice (SSL). Threading dislocations originating from either the original GaN pseudosubstrate are shown to hinder the undercutting of microdisk cavities during the photoelectric chemical etching process resulting in whiskers of unetched material on the underside of microdisks. The unetched whiskers provide a pathway for light to escape, reducing microdisk Q-factor if located in the region occupied by the WGMs. Additionally, dislocations can affect the spectral stability of quantum dot emitters, thus hindering their effective integration in microdisk cavities. Though dislocations are clearly undesirable, the limiting factor on nitride microdisk Q-factor is expected to be internal absorption, indicating that the further optimisation of nitride microdisk cavities must incorporate both the elimination of dislocations and careful tailoring of the active region emission wavelength and background doping levels.

  10. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Widlow, I

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes our most recent findings in the structure and properties of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings, synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering. By careful control of the plasma conditions via proper choice of process parameters such as substrate bias, target power and gas pressure, one can precisely control film structure and properties. With this approach, we were able to produce amorphous carbon nitride films with controlled hardness and surface roughness. In particular, we can synthesize ultrathin (1 nm thick) amorphous carbon nitride films to be sufficiently dense and uniform that they provide adequate corrosion protection for hard disk applications. We demonstrated the strong correlation between ZrN (111) texture and hardness in CN sub x /ZrN superlattice coatings. Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption show the predominance of sp sup 3 -bonded carbon in these superlattice coatings.

  11. Multiferroicity in Perovskite Manganite Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yong-Mei; Jiang, Xue-Fan; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Multiferroic properties of short period perovskite type manganite superlattice ((R1MnO3)n/(R2MnO3)n (n=1,2,3)) are considered within the framework of classical Heisenberg model using Monte Carlo simulation. Our result revealed the interesting behaviors in Mn spins structure in superlattice. Apart from simple plane spin cycloid structure which is shown in all manganites including bulk, film, and superlattice here in low temperature, a non-coplanar spiral spin structure is exhibited in a certain temperature range when n equals 1, 2 or 3. Specific heat, spin-helicity vector, spin correlation function, spin-helicity correlation function, and spin configuration are calculated to confirm this non-coplanar spiral spin structure. These results are associated with the competition among exchange interaction, magnetic anisotropy, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant No. 11447136

  12. Perovskite Superlattices as Tunable Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, H. M.; Harshavardhan, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that superlattices that comprise alternating epitaxial layers of dissimilar paraelectric perovskites can exhibit large changes in permittivity with the application of electric fields. The superlattices are potentially useful as electrically tunable dielectric components of such microwave devices as filters and phase shifters. The present superlattice approach differs fundamentally from the prior use of homogeneous, isotropic mixtures of base materials and dopants. A superlattice can comprise layers of two or more perovskites in any suitable sequence (e.g., ABAB..., ABCDABCD..., ABACABACA...). Even though a single layer of one of the perovskites by itself is not tunable, the compositions and sequence of the layers can be chosen so that (1) the superlattice exhibits low microwave loss and (2) the interfacial interaction between at least two of the perovskites in the superlattice renders either the entire superlattice or else at least one of the perovskites tunable.

  13. Superlattice Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Rama

    2002-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated a significant enhancement in thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) at 300K, of about 2.4 in p-type Bi2Te3/Sb2Te3 superlattices, using the concept of phonon-blocking electron-transmitting superlattice structures [1]. The phonon blocking arises from a complex localization-like behavior for phonons in nano-structured superlattices and the electron transmission is facilitated by optimal choice of band-offsets in these semiconductor hetero-structures. We will also discuss the ZT 1.2 results in n-type Bi2Te3/Bi2Te3-xSex superlattices and our initial understanding on the reasons behind the less-than-dramatic performance of these materials compared to the p-type superlattices. Due to the high ZT of the material, devices potentially offer high coefficient of performance (COP) in solid-state refrigeration. The thin-film devices, resulting from rather simple microelectronic processing, allow high cooling power densities to be achieved for a variety of high-power electronic applications. We have obtained 32K and 40K sub-ambient cooling at 298K and 353K, respectively, in these superlattice micro-thermoelements with potential localized active-cooling power densities approaching 700 W/cm2. In addition to high-performance (in terms of COP) and power densities, these thin-film microdevices are also extremely fast-acting, within 10 microsec and about a factor of 23,000 better than bulk thermoelectric technology. Thus, these are of significance for preventing thermal run-away in high-power electronics. We will present results to demonstrate this concept with infrared imaging of cooling/heating with superlattice micro-devices. We will also discuss outstanding issues such as heat removal from the heat sink towards the full exploitation of this technology. In addition, we will compare the state-of-the-art with other thin-film superlattice materials and device concepts. [1] R. Venkatasubramanian, E. Siivola, T. Colpitts, and B.C. O’Quinn, Thin

  14. t-C8B2N2: A potential superhard material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Shi, Rui; Gan, Li-Hua

    2017-02-01

    A potential superhard material C8B2N2 with I-4m2 space group is found and confirmed to be stable with first-principles calculations. The results show that its structure is highly incompressible with bulk modulus of 383.4 GPa and shear modulus of 383.0 GPa. It shows that this material is nearly isotropy with universal anisotropy index of 0.056, and its fractional anisotropy ratio of shear modulus and bulk modulus are 0.0055 and 0.0, respectively. Interestingly, its theoretical bulk modulus, shear modules, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and Vickers hardness are almost same to those of well-known superhard material c-BN.

  15. Advancements in the search for superhard ultra-incompressible metal borides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Jonathan B.; Tolbert, Sarah H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA Los Angeles, CA (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kaner, Richard B. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA Los Angeles, CA (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, UCLA Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-11-23

    Dense transition metal borides have recently been identified as superhard materials that offer the possibility of ambient pressure synthesis compared to the conventional high pressure, high temperature approach. This feature article begins with a discussion of the relevant physical properties for this class of compounds, followed by a summary of the synthesis and properties of several transition metal borides. A strong emphasis is placed on correlating mechanical properties with electronic and atomic structure of these materials in an effort to better predict new superhard compounds. It concludes with a perspective of future research directions, highlighting some recent results and presenting several new ideas that remain to be tested. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Superhard MgB sub 2 bulk material prepared by high-pressure sintering

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, H A; Chen, L X; Zhu, P W; Ren, G Z; Guo, W L; Fu, X Q; Zou Guang Tian; Ren, Z A; Che, G C; Zhao, Z X

    2002-01-01

    Superhard MgB sub 2 bulk material with a golden metallic shine was synthesized by high-pressure sintering for 8 h at 5.5 GPa and different temperatures. Appropriate pressure and temperature conditions for synthesizing polycrystalline MgB sub 2 with high hardness were investigated. The samples were characterized by means of atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The Vickers hardness, bulk density, and electrical resistivity were measured at room temperature.

  17. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  18. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  19. Strain-tunable half-metallicity in hybrid graphene-hBN monolayer superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanchao, E-mail: fanchao.meng@mail.mcgill.ca [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, QC H3A 0C5 (Canada); Zhang, Shiqi [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Lee, In-Ho [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, 1 Doryong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Sukky [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Ciobanu, Cristian V., E-mail: cciobanu@mines.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Armchair superlattices have a bandgap modulated by the deformed domain widths. • Strain and domain width lead to novel spin-dependent behavior for zigzag boundaries. • Limits for spin-dependent bandgap and half-metallic behavior have been charted. - Abstract: As research in 2-D materials evolves toward combinations of different materials, interesting electronic and spintronic properties are revealed and may be exploited in future devices. A way to combine materials is the formation of spatially periodic domain boundaries in an atom-thick monolayer: as shown in recent reports, when these domains are made of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, the resulting superlattice has half-metallic properties in which one spin component is (semi)metallic and the other is semiconductor. We explore here the range of spin-dependent electronic properties that such superlattices can develop for different type of domain boundaries, domain widths, and values of tensile strain applied to the monolayer. We show evidence of an interplay between strain and domain width in determining the electronic properties: while for armchair boundaries the bandgap is the same for both spin components, superlattices with zigzag boundaries exhibit rich spin-dependent behavior, including different bandgaps for each spin component, half-metallicity, and reversal of half-metallicity. These findings can lead to new ways of controlling the spintronic properties in hybrid-domain monolayers, which may be exploited in devices based on 2-D materials.

  20. Complex band structure and superlattice electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J. N.; McGill, T. C.

    1981-04-01

    The complex band structures of the bulk materials which constitute the alternating layer (001) semiconductor-semiconductor superlattice are investigated. The complex bands near the center of the Brillouin zone in the [001] direction are studied in detail. The decay lengths of superlattice states whose energies lie in the bulk band gaps of one of the semiconductors are determined from the dispersion curves of these bands for imaginary k-->. This method is applied using a tight-binding band-structure calculation to two superlattices: the AlAs-GaAs superlattice and the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. The decay lengths of AlAs-GaAs superlattice conduction-band minimum states are found to be substantially shorter than those for the CdTe-HgTe superlattice. These differences in the decay of the states in the two superlattices result in differences in the variation of the conduction-band effective masses with the thickness of the AlAs and CdTe layers. The conduction-band effective masses increase more rapidly with AlAs thickness in the AlAs-GaAs superlattice than with CdTe thickness in the CdTe-HgTe superlattice.

  1. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  2. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  3. Phonon-induced polariton superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, Jr., M. M.; Poel, Mike van der; Santos, P. V.;

    2006-01-01

    We show that the coherent interaction between microcavity polaritons and externally stimulated acoustic phonons forms a tunable polariton superlattice with a folded energy dispersion determined by the phonon population and wavelength. Under high phonon concentration, the strong confinement of the...... of the optical and excitonic polariton components in the phonon potential creates weakly coupled polariton wires with a virtually flat energy dispersion....

  4. Epitaxy, thin films and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagd Christensen, Morten

    1997-05-01

    This report is the result of structural investigations of 3d transition metal superlattices consisting of Fe/V, Cr/Mn, V/Mn and Fe/Mn, and a structural and magnetic study of a series of Ho/Pr alloys. The work includes preparation and characterization of substrates as well as growth of thin films and Fe/V superlattices by molecular beam epitaxy, including in-situ characterization by reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Structural characterization has been done by x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on the rotating copper anode at Risoe, and at synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Brookhaven, and the neutron scattering was done at the Danish research reactor DR3 at Risoe. In addition to longitudinal scans, giving information about the structural parameters in the modulation direction, non-specular scans were also performed. This type of scans gives information about in-plane orientation and lattice parameters. From the analysis, structural information is obtained about lattice parameters, epitaxial strain, coherence lengths and crystallographic orientation for the superlattice systems, except Fe/Mn superlattices, which could not be modelled. For the Ho/Pr alloys, x-ray magnetic scattering was performed, and the crystal and magnetic structure was investigated. (au) 14 tabs.; 58 ills., 96 refs.

  5. Superlattice of stress domains in nanometer-size semiconductor devices predicted from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Ebbsjö, Ingvar; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Kodiyalam, Sanjay; Madhukar, Anupam; Nakano, Aiichiro; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Walsh, Phillip; Vashishta, Priya

    2001-03-01

    Semiconductor industry association estimates pixel sizes in next generation devices to be on the order of 70 nm by the year of 2008. Although recent measurements of local strain distributions2 and strain relaxation in nano wires have reached 100-nm spatial resolution, experimental tools for determining stresses for sub 100 nm, feature sizes are still to be developed4. On the other hand, recent developments in efficient simulation algorithms on state-of-the-art parallel computers5 enable us to gain valuable information on interface structure and atomic level stresses in nanopixels of < 100 nm size. Here, we present results for a 27.5-million atom molecular-dynamics simulations of a 70 nm x 70 nm crystalline silicon nanopixel covered with amorphous silicon nitride and placed on a 140 nm x 140 nm crystalline silicon substrate. The stresses parallel to the silicon/silicon nitride interface exhibit a hexagonal superlattice of stress domains with a lattice constant of 12.8 (±1.8) nm. From our analysis of the 70 nm x 70 nm pixel and on comparing with a smaller 25 nm x 25 nm nanopixel, we conclude that for square pixels the superlattice constant is independent of the pixel size and is entirely determined by the mismatch between silicon and silicon nitride. Such stress inhomogeneity with values of up to ±2 GPa will have a significant impact on the performance of semiconductor devices with sub 100 nm features.

  6. Analytical Study of Electromagnetic Wave in Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical description of soliton solutions and exact analytical solutions in the sine-Gordon equation is extended to superlattice physics. A family of interesting exact solutions and a new exact analytical solution have been obtained for the electromagnetic wave propagating through a superlattice. In more general cases, the vector potential along the propagating direction obeys the sine-Gordon equation. Some mathematical results of theoretical investigation are given for different cases in superlattices.

  7. Self-Organized Growth of Alloy Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, E.; Floro, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lagally, M.G.; Liu, F.; Tersoff, J.; Venezuela, P.

    1998-10-19

    We predict theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the spontaneous formation of a superlattice during crystal growth. When a strained alloy grows by "step flow", the steps at the surface form periodic bunches. The resulting modulated strain biases the incorporation of the respective alloy components at different steps in the bunch, leading to the formation of a superlattice. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy for SiGe grown on Si give clear evidence for such spontaneous superlattice formation.

  8. Shear-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride to wurtzitic structure at room temperature and lower pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng; Levitas, Valery I; Zhu, Hongyang; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Marathe, Archis; Ma, Yanzhang

    2012-11-20

    Disordered structures of boron nitride (BN), graphite, boron carbide (BC), and boron carbon nitride (BCN) systems are considered important precursor materials for synthesis of superhard phases in these systems. However, phase transformation of such materials can be achieved only at extreme pressure-temperature conditions, which is irrelevant to industrial applications. Here, the phase transition from disordered nanocrystalline hexagonal (h)BN to superhard wurtzitic (w)BN was found at room temperature under a pressure of 6.7 GPa after applying large plastic shear in a rotational diamond anvil cell (RDAC) monitored by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. However, under hydrostatic compression to 52.8 GPa, the same hBN sample did not transform to wBN but probably underwent a reversible transformation to a high-pressure disordered phase with closed-packed buckled layers. The current phase-transition pressure is the lowest among all reported direct-phase transitions from hBN to wBN at room temperature. Usually, large plastic straining leads to disordering and amorphization; here, in contrast, highly disordered hBN transformed to crystalline wBN. The mechanisms of strain-induced phase transformation and the reasons for such a low transformation pressure are discussed. Our results demonstrate a potential of low pressure-room temperature synthesis of superhard materials under plastic shear from disordered or amorphous precursors. They also open a pathway of phase transformation of nanocrystalline materials and materials with disordered and amorphous structures under extensive shear.

  9. Shear-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride to wurtzitic structure at room temperature and lower pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng; Levitas, Valery I.; Zhu, Hongyang; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Marathe, Archis; Ma, Yanzhang

    2012-01-01

    Disordered structures of boron nitride (BN), graphite, boron carbide (BC), and boron carbon nitride (BCN) systems are considered important precursor materials for synthesis of superhard phases in these systems. However, phase transformation of such materials can be achieved only at extreme pressure–temperature conditions, which is irrelevant to industrial applications. Here, the phase transition from disordered nanocrystalline hexagonal (h)BN to superhard wurtzitic (w)BN was found at room temperature under a pressure of 6.7 GPa after applying large plastic shear in a rotational diamond anvil cell (RDAC) monitored by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. However, under hydrostatic compression to 52.8 GPa, the same hBN sample did not transform to wBN but probably underwent a reversible transformation to a high-pressure disordered phase with closed-packed buckled layers. The current phase-transition pressure is the lowest among all reported direct-phase transitions from hBN to wBN at room temperature. Usually, large plastic straining leads to disordering and amorphization; here, in contrast, highly disordered hBN transformed to crystalline wBN. The mechanisms of strain-induced phase transformation and the reasons for such a low transformation pressure are discussed. Our results demonstrate a potential of low pressure–room temperature synthesis of superhard materials under plastic shear from disordered or amorphous precursors. They also open a pathway of phase transformation of nanocrystalline materials and materials with disordered and amorphous structures under extensive shear. PMID:23129624

  10. Spin-dependent optical superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Dai, Han-Ning; Sun, Hui; Reingruber, Andreas; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-07-01

    We propose and implement a lattice scheme for coherently manipulating atomic spins. Using a vector light shift and a superlattice structure, we demonstrate experimentally its capability on addressing spins in double wells and square plaquettes with subwavelength resolution. The quantum coherence of spin manipulations is verified through measuring atom tunneling and spin exchange dynamics. Our experiment presents a building block for engineering many-body quantum states in optical lattices for realizing quantum simulation and computation tasks.

  11. Extrinsic Hardening of Superhard Tungsten Tetraboride Alloys with Group 4 Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopov, Georgiy; Yeung, Michael T; Turner, Christopher L; Mohammadi, Reza; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-05-04

    Alloys of tungsten tetraboride (WB4) with the group 4 transition metals, titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), and hafnium (Hf), of different concentrations (0-50 at. % on a metals basis) were synthesized by arc-melting in order to study their mechanical properties. The phase composition and purity of the as-synthesized samples were confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The solubility limit as determined by PXRD is 20 at. % for Ti, 10 at. % for Zr, and 8 at. % for Hf. Vickers indentation measurements of WB4 alloys with 8 at. % Ti, 8 at. % Zr, and 6 at. % Hf gave hardness values, Hv, of 50.9 ± 2.2, 55.9 ± 2.7 and 51.6 ± 2.8 GPa, respectively, compared to 43.3 GPa for pure WB4 under an applied load of 0.49 N. Each of the aforementioned compositions are considered superhard (Hv > 40 GPa), likely due to extrinsic hardening that plays a key role in these superhard metal borides. Furthermore, these materials exhibit a significantly reduced indentation size effect, which can be seen in the plateauing hardness values for the W1-xZrxB4 alloy. In addition, W0.92Zr0.08B4, a product of spinoidal decomposition, possesses nanostructured grains and enhanced grain hardening. The hardness of W0.92Zr0.08B4 is 34.7 ± 0.65 GPa under an applied load of 4.9 N, the highest value obtained for any superhard metal at this relatively high loading. In addition, the WB4 alloys with Ti, Zr, and Hf showed a substantially increased oxidation resistance up to ∼460 °C, ∼510 °C, and ∼490 °C, respectively, compared to ∼400 °C for pure WB4.

  12. Interwell excitons in GaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Sayed, Karim El; Sanders, G.;

    1997-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect excitons in superlattices with narrow minibands is investigated experimentally. The interwell exciton is similar to the first Wannier-Stark localized exciton of an electrically biased superlattice. However, in the present case the localization is mediated by th...

  13. Main development trends and some technical decisions on mining tools equipped with super-hard composite materials inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornikov, LT; Krestovozdvizhensky, PD; Nikitenko, SM; Korneyev, VA; Korneyev, PA

    2017-02-01

    Directions of a significant increase in effectiveness of rock destruction with tools equipped with super-hard composite material inserts are reviewed and justified. Drilling tool designs with the cutting insert in the form of elliptical Cassinian oval and the asymmetric ring cleaves are suggested. Versions of laboratory stand designs in order to determine the power consumption of rock destruction are developed.

  14. Predicting crystal structures and physical properties of novel superhard p-BN under pressure via first-principles investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jianping, E-mail: longjianping@cdut.cn [College of Materials and Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Shu, Chaozhu [The Mineral Resources Chemistry Key Laboratory of Sichuan Higher Education Institutions, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Yang, Lijun; Yang, Mei [College of Materials and Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2015-09-25

    Graphical abstract: The minimum thermal conductivity as a function of pressure for p-BN. - Highlights: • First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the physical properties of novel superhard p-BN under pressure. • The calculated Vicker’s hardness of p-BN was 55.4 GPa, which indicates that it is a superhard material. • The elastic constants, polycrystalline modulus and Debye temperature under pressure are obtained. • A new modified Clarke-type equation is used to calculate the minimum thermal conductivity. - Abstract: The first-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structure, elastic, hardness and thermodynamics properties of novel superhard p-BN under pressure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with previous theoretical results. The band structure, the density of states and the partial density of states are analyzed, which reveals the insulator character of p-BN. In addition, the elastic constants, polycrystalline modulus and Debye temperature under pressure are also successfully obtained. It is observed that the p-BN should be classified as brittle materials and possesses elastically anisotropic. The calculated Vicker’s hardness of p-BN was 55.4 GPa, which indicates that it is a superhard material. According to the calculated polycrystalline modulus, a new modified Clarke-type equation is used to calculate the minimum thermal conductivity. This work provides a useful guide for designing novel borides materials having excellent mechanical performance.

  15. Revisiting HOPG superlattices: Structure and conductance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sumati; Kolekar, Sadhu; Deshpande, Aparna

    2017-04-01

    Superlattices observed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been studied extensively by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The interest in the study of graphite superlattices has seen a resurgence since the discovery of graphene. Single layer graphene, bilayer graphene, and few layer graphene can now be grown on different substrates. The adherence of graphene to various substrates often leads to a periodic out-of-plane modulation and superlattices due to lattice mismatch. In this paper, we report STM imaging and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) of different kinds of superlattices on HOPG characterized by a variation in lattice periodicities. Our study also shows evidence of the displacement of the topmost HOPG layer by scanning different areas of the same superlattice. A correlation between the lattice periodicity with its conductance properties is derived. The results of this work are important for understanding the origin of the superlattice structure on HOPG. Investigation of such superlattices may open up possible ways to modify two dimensional electron systems to create materials with tailored electronic properties.

  16. Exact Surface States in Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Qiongtao

    2012-01-01

    We develop an analytical method to derive exact surface states in photonic superlattices. In a kind of infinite bichromatic superlattices satisfying some certain conditions, we analytically obtain their in-gap states, which are superpositions of finite numbers of unstable Bloch waves. By using the unstable in-gap states, we construct exactly several stable surface states in various photonic superlattices. We analytically explore the parametric dependence of these exact surface states. Our analysis provides an exact demonstration for the existence of surface states and would be also helpful to understand surface states in other lattice systems.

  17. New multifunctional tungsten nitride with energetic N6 and extreme hardness predicted from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Sha, Lei; Zhu, Chunye; Yao, Yansun

    2017-05-01

    We report a new member to the family of tungsten nitrides, WN6, predicted from the structure search. Ground-state convex hull calculation reveals that crystalline WN6 is thermodynamically stable at pressures above 16 GPa, but remains dynamically stable at ambient conditions. The predicted high-pressure WN6 structure contains chaired \\text{cyclo-N}6{6-} rings isoelectronic to cyclo-hexasulfur (S6), which is unprecedented in nitrogen. In the \\text{cyclo-N}6{6-} unit all nitrogen atoms are singly bonded and therefore contain a high energy density. By means of efficiently packing the covalent-bonded species, WN6 is estimated to have extremely high Vickers hardness greater than 40 GPa at ambient conditions, placing it as one of the hardest materials. The present results reveal that WN6 may be used as a superhard material but simultaneously maintaining other desirable properties, which represents an interesting example of multifunctional materials.

  18. Band gap engineering of ZnSnN2/ZnO (001) short-period superlattices via built-in electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, D. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Using density-functional-theory calculations combined with hybrid functional, we investigate the band gaps and built-in electric fields of ZnSnN2/ZnO (001) short-period superlattices. The band gap of ZnSnN2/ZnO (001) superlattice can be tuned from 1.9 eV to 0 eV by varying the thickness of both the ZnSnN2 and ZnO regions. Compared to the III-nitride superlattices, stronger built-in electric fields, induced by the polarizations, form inside the ZnSnN2/ZnO superlattices. The lowest electron and uppermost hole states are mainly localized at the two opposite interfaces of the superlattice, but the tails of the lowest electron states extend over several atomic layers. Based on the electrostatic argument, we demonstrate that variations of the band gap are approximately described by a geometric factor. The influence of the in-plane strain is also discussed. The results will be valuable in the design of ZnSnN2/ZnO heterostructures for electronics and optoelectronics applications.

  19. Magnetic structure of holmium-yttrium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehan, D.A.; McMorrow, D.F.; Cowley, R.A.;

    1993-01-01

    that the superlattices have high crystallographic integrity: the structural coherence length parallel to the growth direction is typically almost-equal-to 2000 angstrom, while the interfaces between the two elements are well defined and extend over approximately four lattice planes. The magnetic structures were......We present the results of a study of the chemical and magnetic structures of a series of holmium-yttrium superlattices and a 5000 angstrom film of holmium, all grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. By combining the results of high-resolution x-ray diffraction with detailed modeling, we show...... determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The moments on the Ho3+ ions in the superlattices form a basal-plane helix. From an analysis of the superlattice structure factors of the primary magnetic satellites, we are able to determine separately the contributions made by the holmium and yttrium...

  20. Interwell excitons in GaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Sayed, Karim El; Sanders, G.;

    1996-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect excitons in superlattices with narrow minibands is theoretically and experimentally investigated. We identify the experimental conditions for the observation of interwell excitons and find a distinct excitonic state energetically located between the Is exciton ...

  1. Polyadic Cantor superlattices with variable lacunarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggard, D L; Jaggard, A D

    1997-02-01

    Reflection and transmission properties of polyadic fractal superlattices are formulated, solved analytically, and characterized for variations in stage of growth, fractal dimension, and lacunarity. This is the first time to our knowledge that the effect of lacunarity on wave interactions with such structures has been considered. The results are summarized by families of reflection data that we denote twist plots. A new doubly recursive computational technique efficiently provides the reflection and transmission coefficients for a large class of Cantor superlattices with numerous interfaces.

  2. Analytical Study of Electromagnetic Wave in Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINChang; ZHANGXiu-Lian

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical description of soliton solutions and exact analytical solutions in the sine-Gordon equation is extended to superlattice physics. A family of interesting exact solutions and a new exact analytical solution have been obtained for the electromagnetic wave propagating through a superlattice. In more general cases, the vector potential along the propagating direction obeys the sine-Gordon equation. Some mathematical results of theoretical investigation are given for different cases in supedattices.

  3. HgTe-CdTe SUPERLATTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D; Mcgill, T.

    1984-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic properties of HgTe-CdTe superlattices. The band gap as a function of layer thickness, effective masses normal to the layer plane and tunneling length are compared to the corresponding (Hg, Cd)Te alloys. We find that the superlattice possesses a number of properties that may make it superior to the corresponding alloy as an infrared material.

  4. Mechanical properties, anisotropy and hardness of group IVA ternary spinel nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying-Chun; Chen, Min

    2013-10-01

    In this work, new ternary cubic spinel structures are designed by the substitutional method. The structures, elasticity properties, intrinsic hardness and Debye temperature of the cubic ternary spinel nitrides are studied by first principles based on the density-functional theory. The results show that γ-CSn2N4, γ-SiC2N4, γ-GeC2N4 and γ-SnC2N4 are not mechanically stable. The elastic constants Cij of these cubic spinel structures are obtained using the stress-strain method. Derived elastic constants, such as bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson coefficient and brittle/ductile behaviour are estimated using Voigt-Reuss-Hill theories. The B/G value, the Poisson's ratio and anisotropic factor are calculated for eight ternary stable crystals. Based on the microscopic hardness model, we further estimate the Vickers hardness of all the stable crystals. From the calculated hardness of the stable group IVA ternary spinel nitrides by Gao's and Jiang's methods, it is observed that the stable group IVA ternary spinel nitrides are not superhard materials except for γ-CSi2N4. Furthermore, the Debye temperature for the eight stable crystals is also estimated.

  5. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  6. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  7. Strength and bonding nature of superhard Z-carbon from first-principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqian Qin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Z-carbon is a candidate structure proposed recently for the cold-compressed phase of carbon. We have studied the mechanical properties of Z-carbon by performing the first-principles density functional calculations. The single-crystal elastic constants calculations show that Z-carbon is mechanically stable. The predicted bulk and shear moduli of Z-carbon are comparable to diamond and cubic BN, suggesting that Z-carbon can be a superhard material. We also obtained the ideal tensile and shear strengths for Z-carbon through deformation from the elastic regime to structural instability. The failure modes under tensile deformation were explored carefully based on the calculated charge density distribution and bonding evolution.

  8. Diamond Structure BeO, Designable Super-Hard Materials and Semiconductor Be-Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ji-An; SI Yan; SUN Zong-Qi; XIE Hong-Sen

    2009-01-01

    It is possible for Beryllium oxide (BeO) to have a cubic diamond structure although it normally has a hexagonal structure under ambient conditions. As the solution of cubic BN and diamond, the solid solution of cubic BeO-diamond or BeO-cBN-diamond can potentially be a kind of super-hard materials with designable hardness; and this solution has also been confirmed based on our preliminary first principles calculations. In addition, the nonstoichiometry of BeO could create a mobile carrier in the cubic BeO-C or BeO-BN-C system and it might lead to a new type of semiconductor Be-diamond.

  9. Strong reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in superlattices and quantum dot superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, V. M.; Nika, D. L.; Cocemasov, A. I.; Isacova, C. I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal transport is theoretically investigated in the planar Si/Ge superlattices and Si/Ge quantum dot superlattices. The phonon states in the considered nanostructures are obtained using the Face-centered Cubic Cell model of lattice dynamics. A significant reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity is revealed in both considered structures in a wide range of temperatures from 100 K to 400 K. This effect is explained by the removal of the high-energy and high-velocity phonon modes from the heat flux due to their localization in superlattice segments and the phonon scattering on the interfaces. The obtained results show prospects of the planar superlattices and quantum-dot superlattices for thermoelectric and thermo-insulating applications.

  10. Ultrasound focusing images in superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukihiro; Tamura, Shin-ichiro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-03-04

    We study theoretically ultrasound focusing in periodic multilayered structures, or superlattices, by solving the wave equation with the Green function method and calculating the transmitted ultrasound amplitude images of both the longitudinal and transverse modes. The constituent layers assumed are elastically isotropic but the periodically stacked structure is anisotropic. Thus anisotropy of ultrasound propagation is predicted even at low frequencies and it is enhanced significantly at higher frequencies due to the zone-folding effect of acoustic dispersion relations. An additional effect studied is the interference of ultrasound (known as the internal diffraction), which can be recognized when the propagation distance is comparable to the ultrasound wavelength. Numerical examples are developed for millimetre-scale Al/polymer multilayers used recently for imaging experiment with surface acoustic waves. (author)

  11. PHASE TRANSITION PROPERTIES OF A TWO COMPONENT FINITE MAGNETIC SUPERLATTICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIAO-GUANG; LIU NING-NING; PAN SHAO-HUA; YANG GUO-ZHEN

    2000-01-01

    We study an (l, n) finite superlattice, which consists of two alternative magnetic materials(components) of l and n atomic layers, respectively. Based on the Ising model, we examine the phase transition properties of the magnetic superlattice. By transfer matrix method we derive the equation for Curie temperature of the superlattice. Numerical results are obtained for the dependence of Curie temperature on the thickness and exchange constants of the superlattice.

  12. The phonon-polariton spectrum of one-dimensional Rudin-Shapiro photonic superlattices with uniaxial polar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Urrea, H. A.; Duque, C. A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of the optical-phonon-associated polaritonic modes that appear under oblique light incidence in 1D superlattices made of photonic materials are studied. The investigated systems result from the periodic repetition of quasiregular Rudin-Shapiro (RS) multilayer units. It is assume that the structure consists of both passive non-dispersive layers of constant refraction index and active layers of uniaxial polar materials. In particular, we consider III-V wurtzite nitrides. The optical axis of these polaritonic materials is taken along the growth direction. Maxwell equations are solved using the transfer matrix technique for all admissible values of the incidence angle.

  13. Anisotropy in layered half-metallic Heusler alloy superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadani, Javad G.; Munira, Kamaram; Sivakumar, Chockalingam; Butler, William H. [Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Romero, Jonathon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Ma, Jianhua; Ghosh, Avik W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    We show that when two Heusler alloys are layered in the [001], [110], or [111] directions for various thicknesses to form a superlattice, the Slater-Pauling rule may still be satisfied and the resulting superlattice is often half-metallic with gaps comparable to or larger than those of its constituents. In addition, uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is induced because of the differences in the electronic structure of the two Heuslers in the superlattice. Various full-full, full-half, and half-half Heusler superlattices are studied, and potential half-metallic superlattices with perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy are identified.

  14. Magnetic properties of rare earth superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, C J T

    2001-01-01

    Single-crystal Tm/Y and Tm/Lu superlattices have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their chemical structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction. Magnetisation measurements have revealed a more complicated phase diagram than that of pure Tm. Application of a field along the c-direction gave rise to an extra transition, and transitions were detected for the superlattices when the field was applied along the b-axis. In neutron diffraction studies, c-axis longitudinally modulated magnetic structures were found for both Tm/Y and Tm/Lu, which propagate coherently through the non-magnetic layers. In the case of Tm/Lu superlattices, there is evidence for ordering of the basal plane components.

  15. Electrical transport engineering of semiconductor superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Aliasghar

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of doping concentration on band structures of electrons and electrical transmission in a typical aperiodic semiconductor superlattice consisting of quantum well and barrier layers, theoretically. For this purpose, we assume that each unit cell of the superlattice contains alternately two types of material GaAs (as a well) and GaAlAs (as a barrier) with six sublayers of two materials. Our calculations are based on the generalized Kronig-Penny (KP) model and the transfer matrix method within the framework of the parabolic conductance band effective mass approximation in the coherent regime. This model reduces the numerical calculation time and enables us to use the transfer matrix method to investigate transport in the superlattices. We show that by varying the doping concentration and geometrical parameters, one can easily block the transmission of the electrons. The numerical results may be useful in designing of nanoenergy filter devices.

  16. Electrical transport engineering of semiconductor superlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, Aliasghar, E-mail: aashokri@tpnu.ac.ir

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of doping concentration on band structures of electrons and electrical transmission in a typical aperiodic semiconductor superlattice consisting of quantum well and barrier layers, theoretically. For this purpose, we assume that each unit cell of the superlattice contains alternately two types of material GaAs (as a well) and GaAlAs (as a barrier) with six sublayers of two materials. Our calculations are based on the generalized Kronig–Penny (KP) model and the transfer matrix method within the framework of the parabolic conductance band effective mass approximation in the coherent regime. This model reduces the numerical calculation time and enables us to use the transfer matrix method to investigate transport in the superlattices. We show that by varying the doping concentration and geometrical parameters, one can easily block the transmission of the electrons. The numerical results may be useful in designing of nanoenergy filter devices.

  17. Energy Band Calculations for Maximally Even Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Richard; Byrd, Jason

    2007-03-01

    Superlattices are multiple-well, semiconductor heterostructures that can be described by one-dimensional potential wells separated by potential barriers. We refer to a distribution of wells and barriers based on the theory of maximally even sets as a maximally even superlattice. The prototypical example of a maximally even set is the distribution of white and black keys on a piano keyboard. Black keys may represent wells and the white keys represent barriers. As the number of wells and barriers increase, efficient and stable methods of calculation are necessary to study these structures. We have implemented a finite-element method using the discrete variable representation (FE-DVR) to calculate E versus k for these superlattices. Use of the FE-DVR method greatly reduces the amount of calculation necessary for the eigenvalue problem.

  18. X-ray diffraction of III-nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moram, M A; Vickers, M E [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke St., Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mam65@cam.ac.uk

    2009-03-15

    The III-nitrides include the semiconductors AlN, GaN and InN, which have band gaps spanning the entire UV and visible ranges. Thin films of III-nitrides are used to make UV, violet, blue and green light-emitting diodes and lasers, as well as solar cells, high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and other devices. However, the film growth process gives rise to unusually high strain and high defect densities, which can affect the device performance. X-ray diffraction is a popular, non-destructive technique used to characterize films and device structures, allowing improvements in device efficiencies to be made. It provides information on crystalline lattice parameters (from which strain and composition are determined), misorientation (from which defect types and densities may be deduced), crystallite size and microstrain, wafer bowing, residual stress, alloy ordering, phase separation (if present) along with film thicknesses and superlattice (quantum well) thicknesses, compositions and non-uniformities. These topics are reviewed, along with the basic principles of x-ray diffraction of thin films and areas of special current interest, such as analysis of non-polar, semipolar and cubic III-nitrides. A summary of useful values needed in calculations, including elastic constants and lattice parameters, is also given. Such topics are also likely to be relevant to other highly lattice-mismatched wurtzite-structure materials such as heteroepitaxial ZnO and ZnSe.

  19. X-ray diffraction of III-nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moram, M A; Vickers, M E

    2009-03-01

    The III-nitrides include the semiconductors AlN, GaN and InN, which have band gaps spanning the entire UV and visible ranges. Thin films of III-nitrides are used to make UV, violet, blue and green light-emitting diodes and lasers, as well as solar cells, high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and other devices. However, the film growth process gives rise to unusually high strain and high defect densities, which can affect the device performance. X-ray diffraction is a popular, non-destructive technique used to characterize films and device structures, allowing improvements in device efficiencies to be made. It provides information on crystalline lattice parameters (from which strain and composition are determined), misorientation (from which defect types and densities may be deduced), crystallite size and microstrain, wafer bowing, residual stress, alloy ordering, phase separation (if present) along with film thicknesses and superlattice (quantum well) thicknesses, compositions and non-uniformities. These topics are reviewed, along with the basic principles of x-ray diffraction of thin films and areas of special current interest, such as analysis of non-polar, semipolar and cubic III-nitrides. A summary of useful values needed in calculations, including elastic constants and lattice parameters, is also given. Such topics are also likely to be relevant to other highly lattice-mismatched wurtzite-structure materials such as heteroepitaxial ZnO and ZnSe.

  20. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Rongke; Huang Andong [School of Science, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Li Da; Zhang Zhidong, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research and International Centre for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-10-19

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  1. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Ferreira, W. P.; Farias, G. A.; Ferreira, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov–Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born–von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov–Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  2. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D R; Chaves, A; Ferreira, W P; Farias, G A; Ferreira, R

    2017-04-26

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov-Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born-von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  3. Theory of Semiconducting Superlattices and Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Core excitons ir. superlattices We have developed the first theory of Hjalmarsor.- Frenke ’ core excitons in superlattices, and applied it to strained...technique has been described are accelerated. A kinetic tempcrature TK is defined as by Kirkpatrick et al.31 and uses thr Monte Carlo algo- the average...classical kinetic energy of the atoms, rithm of Metropolis et al.32 Monte Carlo steps are taken 3/2kTK=(l/N)4rn’mlv,, where i=1,2, . . . ,n is the

  4. FABRICATION OF PHOTONIC CRYSTAL WITH SUPERLATTICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cheng; Chen Haihua; Zhang Jizhong; Wei Hongmei; Gu Zhongze

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique was used to fabricate three-dimensional photonic crystals with superlattices. The super structure was fabricated by assembling monodispersed microspheres in the grooves of the scales of morpho butterfly, which makes the photonic crystal being composed of two kinds of different photonic structures (natural groove structure of butterfly wing and artificial microspherical colloids arrangement). The superstructural photonic crystal exhibits some unique optical properties different from both the butterfly wing and the colloidal crystal. The approach exhibited here provides a new way for fabricate photonic crystals with superlattices.

  5. Tunneling in quantum superlattices with variable lacunarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villatoro, Francisco R. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Monsoriu, Juan A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jmonsori@fis.upv.es

    2008-05-19

    Fractal superlattices are composite, aperiodic structures comprised of alternating layers of two semiconductors following the rules of a fractal set. The scattering properties of polyadic Cantor fractal superlattices with variable lacunarity are determined. The reflection coefficient as a function of the particle energy and the lacunarity parameter present tunneling curves, which may be classified as vertical, arc, and striation nulls. Approximate analytical formulae for such curves are derived using the transfer matrix method. Comparison with numerical results shows good accuracy. The new results may be useful in the development of band-pass energy filters for electrons, semiconductor solar cells, and solid-state radiation sources up to THz frequencies.

  6. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  7. Resonant x-ray scattering in perovskite manganite superlattice. Observation of 'orbital superlattice'

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyama, T; Ohsumi, H; Murakami, Y; Wakabayashi, Y; Izumi, M; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of resonant X-ray scattering (RXS) measurement of superlattices which consist of La sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 5 MnO sub 3 and La sub 0 sub . sub 6 sub 0 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 0 MnO sub 3 multilayers. An interference technique made it possible to observe RXS reflections from ferro-type orbital ordering in the superlattices. RXS can reveal the local circumstances around specific atoms in materials regulated atomically. In this experiment, we observed that the superlattice is actually composed of two kinds of layers with different lattice distortion states, presenting 'orbital superlattices', in which layers with different orbital states are stacked alternately in an atomic scale. (author)

  8. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  9. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  10. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  11. Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy of a Mg-doped AlGaN/GaN superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, S.E., E-mail: sb534@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Ulfig, R.M.; Clifton, P.H. [Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Kappers, M.J.; Barnard, J.S.; Humphreys, C.J.; Oliver, R.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The electronic characteristics of semiconductor-based devices are greatly affected by the local dopant atom distribution. In Mg-doped GaN, the clustering of dopants at structural defects has been widely reported, and can significantly affect p-type conductivity. We have studied a Mg-doped AlGaN/GaN superlattice using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Pyramidal inversion domains were observed in the TEM and the compositional variations of the dopant atoms associated with those defects have been studied using APT. Rarely has APT been used to assess the compositional variations present due to structural defects in semiconductors. Here, TEM and APT are used in a complementary fashion, and the strengths and weaknesses of the two techniques are compared. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Mg-rich regions of approximately 5 nm in size were revealed in Mg-doped AlGaN/GaN superlattices using atom probe tomography (APT). {yields} Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the superlattice sample showed pyramidal inversion domains, concluded to be the same Mg-rich features observed by APT. {yields} The information gained from both the 3D APT study and the 2D TEM characterisation was then compared to determine the strengths and weaknesses of each technique in analysing nanoscale features in nitride materials.

  12. Thermoelectric properties of In-rich InGaN and InN/InGaN superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James (Zi-Jian Ju

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The thermoelectric properties of n-type InGaN alloys with high In-content and InN/InGaN thin film superlattices (SL grown by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated. Room-temperature measurements of the thermoelectric properties reveal that an increasing Ga-content in ternary InGaN alloys (0 < x(Ga < 0.2 yields a more than 10-fold reduction in thermal conductivity (κ without deteriorating electrical conductivity (σ, while the Seebeck coefficient (S increases slightly due to a widening band gap compared to binary InN. Employing InN/InGaN SLs (x(Ga = 0.1 with different periods, we demonstrate that confinement effects strongly enhance electron mobility with values as high as ∼820 cm2/V s at an electron density ne of ∼5×1019 cm−3, leading to an exceptionally high σ of ∼5400 (Ωcm−1. Simultaneously, in very short-period SL structures S becomes decoupled from ne, κ is further reduced below the alloy limit (κ < 9 W/m-K, and the power factor increases to 2.5×10−4 W/m-K2 by more than a factor of 5 as compared to In-rich InGaN alloys. These findings demonstrate that quantum confinement in group-III nitride-based superlattices facilitates improvements of thermoelectric properties over bulk-like ternary nitride alloys.

  13. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  14. Modeling of the Interminiband Absorption Coefficient in InGaN Quantum Dot Superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Giannoccaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a model to estimate minibands and theinterminiband absorption coefficient for a wurtzite (WZ indium gallium nitride (InGaN self-assembled quantum dot superlattice (QDSL is developed. It considers a simplified cuboid shape for quantum dots (QDs. The semi-analytical investigation starts from evaluation through the three-dimensional (3D finite element method (FEM simulations of crystal mechanical deformation derived from heterostructure lattice mismatch under spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects. From these results, mean values in QDs and barrier regions of charge carriers’ electric potentials and effective masses for the conduction band (CB and three valence sub-bands for each direction are evaluated. For the minibands’ investigation, the single-particle time-independent Schrödinger equation in effective mass approximation is decoupled in three directions and resolved using the one-dimensional (1D Kronig–Penney model. The built-in electric field is also considered along the polar axis direction, obtaining Wannier–Stark ladders. Then, theinterminiband absorption coefficient in thermal equilibrium for transverse electric (TE and magnetic (TM incident light polarization is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule implementation based on a numerical integration into the first Brillouin zone. For more detailed results, an absorption coefficient component related to superlattice free excitons is also introduced. Finally, some simulation results, observations and comments are given.

  15. Economic expediency of production of composite materials made from metal nickel and super-hard materials and methods of its identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhina Lyudmyla V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a possibility of making composite materials from metal nickel and super-hard materials. It shows that such a product is available in the world market, but there is no information on technology of manufacture of such a product in open literature. It sets the issue of calculation of economic expediency and investment attractiveness of introduction of the said process into production, so that the methods of calculations would be clear for researchers who have no special education. The article provides a calculation of expediency and investment attractiveness of production of composite materials made from metal nickel and super-hard materials and offers methods of calculation.

  16. Interface bands in carbon nanotube superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskolski, W.; Pelc, M. [Instytut Fizyki UMK, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Santos, H.; Chico, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ayuela, A. [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales (Facultad de Quimicas), and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), 20080 Donostia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    We study the electronic band structure of several carbon nanotube superlattices built of two kinds of intermolecular junctions: (12, 0)/(6, 6) and (8, 0)/(14, 0). In particular, we focus on the energy bands originating from interface states. We find that in case of the metallic (12, 0)/(6, 6) superlattices, the interface bands change periodically their character from bonding- to antibonding-like vs. increasing length of the (6, 6) tube. We show that these changes are related to the decay of the charge density Friedel oscillations in the metallic (6, 6) tube. However, when we explore other chiralities without rotational symmetry, no changes in bondingantibonding character are observed for semiconductor superlattices, as exemplified in the case of (8, 0)/(14, 0) superlattices. Our results indicate that unless metallic tubes are employed in the junctions, the bonding-antibonding crossings are not present (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  18. Structural, electronic, elastic and superconducting properties of noble metal nitrides MN{sub 2} (M = Ru, Rh, Pd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puvaneswari, S. [Department of Physics, E.M.G. Yadava Women' s College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 014 (India); Rajeswarapalanichamy, R., E-mail: rrpcaspd2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S. Vellaichamy Nadar College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625019 (India); Sudha Priyanga, G. [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S. Vellaichamy Nadar College, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625019 (India)

    2015-02-01

    The structural stability, electronic structure, elastic and superconducting properties of noble metal nitrides MN{sub 2} (M = Ru, Rh, Pd) are investigated in tetragonal (P4/mbm), fluorite (Fm3m), orthorhombic (Pnnm), pyrite (Pa-3) and hexagonal (P6/mmm) phases using first principles calculations. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with other theoretical results. Among the considered structures, RhN{sub 2} and PdN{sub 2} are found to be most stable in tetragonal structure, whereas RuN{sub 2} is stable in fluorite structure. A sequence of structural phase transition is predicted under high pressure in these metal nitrides. The electronic structure reveals that these nitrides are metallic. These metal nitrides are found to be covalent, ionic and metallic in the stable phase. The observations show that these metal nitrides are mechanically stable at ambient condition. The superconducting transition temperatures for RuN{sub 2}, RhN{sub 2} and PdN{sub 2} are found to be 1.65 K, 5.01 K and 8.7 K respectively. - Highlights: • Electronic, structural and elastic properties of RuN{sub 2}, RhN{sub 2} and PdN{sub 2} are studied. • A pressure induced structural phase transition is predicted. • Electronic structure reveals that these materials exhibit metallic behavior. • High bulk modulus indicates that RuN{sub 2}, RhN{sub 2} and PdN{sub 2} are superhard materials. • Superconducting temperature values are reported.

  19. Thermal conductance of graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2017-03-01

    The lattice-based scattering boundary method is applied to compute the phonon mode-resolved transmission coefficients and thermal conductances of in-plane heterostructures built from graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). The thermal conductance of all structures is dominated by acoustic phonon modes near the Brillouin zone center that have high group velocity, population, and transmission coefficient. Out-of-plane modes make their most significant contributions at low frequencies, whereas in-plane modes contribute across the frequency spectrum. Finite-length superlattice junctions between graphene and hBN leads have a lower thermal conductance than comparable junctions between two graphene leads due to lack of transmission in the hBN phonon bandgap. The thermal conductances of bilayer systems differ by less than 10% from their single-layer counterparts on a per area basis, in contrast to the strong thermal conductivity reduction when moving from single- to multi-layer graphene.

  20. Exchange bias in Fe/Cr double superlattices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J. S.; Felcher, G. P.; Inomata, A.; Goyette, R.; Nelson, C.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-11-30

    Utilizing the oscillatory interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/Cr superlattices, we have constructed ''double superlattice'' structures where a ferromagnetic (F) and an antiferromagnetic (AF) Fe/Cr superlattice are coupled through a Cr spacer. The minor hysteresis loops in the magnetization are shifted from zero field, i.e., the F superlattice is exchange biased by the AF one. The double superlattices are sputter-deposited with (211) epitaxy and possess uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude of the bias field is satisfactorily described by the classic formula for collinear spin structures. The coherent structure and insensitivity to atomic-scale roughness makes it possible to determine the spin distribution by polarized neutron reflectivity, which confirms that the spin structure is collinear. The magnetic reversal behavior of the double superlattices suggests that a realistic model of exchange bias needs to address the process of nucleating local reverse domains.

  1. Nitride quantum light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype nitride quantum light sources, particularly single-photon emitters, have been successfully demonstrated, despite the challenges inherent in this complex materials system. The large band offsets available between different nitride alloys have allowed device operation at easily accessible temperatures. A wide range of approaches has been explored: not only self-assembled quantum dot growth but also lithographic methods for site-controlled nanostructure formation. All these approaches face common challenges, particularly strong background signals which contaminate the single-photon stream and excessive spectral diffusion of the quantum dot emission wavelength. If these challenges can be successfully overcome, then ongoing rapid progress in the conventional III-V semiconductors provides a roadmap for future progress in the nitrides.

  2. Superlattices: problems and new opportunities, nanosolids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Superlattices were introduced 40 years ago as man-made solids to enrich the class of materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The field metamorphosed to quantum wells and quantum dots, with ever decreasing dimensions dictated by the technological advancements in nanometer regime. In recent years, the field has gone beyond semiconductors to metals and organic solids. Superlattice is simply a way of forming a uniform continuum for whatever purpose at hand. There are problems with doping, defect-induced random switching, and I/O involving quantum dots. However, new opportunities in component-based nanostructures may lead the field of endeavor to new heights. The all important translational symmetry of solids is relaxed and local symmetry is needed in nanosolids.

  3. Ultrafast structural dynamics of perovskite superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerner, M.; Korff Schmising, C. von; Zhavoronkov, N.; Elsaesser, T. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany); Bargheer, M. [Universitaet Potsdam, Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Potsdam (Germany); Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond X-ray diffraction provides direct insight into the ultrafast reversible lattice dynamics of materials with a perovskite structure. Superlattice (SL) structures consisting of a sequence of nanometer-thick layer pairs allow for optically inducing a tailored stress profile that drives the lattice motions and for limiting the influence of strain propagation on the observed dynamics. We demonstrate this concept in a series of diffraction experiments with femtosecond time resolution, giving detailed information on the ultrafast lattice dynamics of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic superlattices. Anharmonically coupled lattice motions in a SrRuO{sub 3}/PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SRO/PZT) SL lead to a switch-off of the electric polarizations on a time scale of the order of 1 ps. Ultrafast magnetostriction of photoexcited SRO layers is demonstrated in a SRO/SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) SL. (orig.)

  4. Tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C L Roy

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to report a study of tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices (SSL); specially, we have analysed diverse features of transmission coefficient of SSL. The SSL we have considered is Ga0.7Al0.3As–GaAs which has been drawing considerable attention during the recent past on account of some typical features of its band structure. We have indicated how our results would help fabrication of ultra high speed devices.

  5. Dynamic square superlattice of Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Tuckerman, Laurette

    2014-11-01

    Faraday waves are computed in a 3D container using BLUE, a code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. A new dynamic superlattice pattern is described which consists of a set of square waves arranged in a two-by-two array. The corners of this array are connected by a bridge whose position oscillates in time between the two diagonals.

  6. Gaps induced by inversion symmetry breaking and second-generation Dirac cones in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eryin; Lu, Xiaobo; Ding, Shijie; Yao, Wei; Yan, Mingzhe; Wan, Guoliang; Deng, Ke; Wang, Shuopei; Chen, Guorui; Ma, Liguo; Jung, Jeil; Fedorov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Yuanbo; Zhang, Guangyu; Zhou, Shuyun

    2016-12-01

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has emerged as a model van der Waals heterostructure as the superlattice potential, which is induced by lattice mismatch and crystal orientation, gives rise to various novel quantum phenomena, such as the self-similar Hofstadter butterfly states. Although the newly generated second-generation Dirac cones (SDCs) are believed to be crucial for understanding such intriguing phenomena, fundamental knowledge of SDCs, such as locations and dispersion, and the effect of inversion symmetry breaking on the gap opening, still remains highly debated due to the lack of direct experimental results. Here we report direct experimental results on the dispersion of SDCs in 0°-aligned graphene/h-BN heterostructures using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our data unambiguously reveal SDCs at the corners of the superlattice Brillouin zone, and at only one of the two superlattice valleys. Moreover, gaps of approximately 100 meV and approximately 160 meV are observed at the SDCs and the original graphene Dirac cone, respectively. Our work highlights the important role of a strong inversion-symmetry-breaking perturbation potential in the physics of graphene/h-BN, and fills critical knowledge gaps in the band structure engineering of Dirac fermions by a superlattice potential.

  7. MBE growth and characterisation of light rare-earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.

    1996-01-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy growth techniques which have already successfully produced a range of heavy rare-earth superlattices have now been extended to produce superlattices of two light rare-earth elements, Nd/Pr, as well as superlattices and alloy films of a heavy/light system, Ho/Pr. High......-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis shows the Nd/Pr superlattices to be of high structural quality, while the Ho/Pr superlattices are significantly less so. In the Ho/Pr superlattices, Pr is found to retain its bulk dhcp crystal structure even in thin layers (down to 6 atomic planes thick) sandwiched between...... thick layers of hcp Ho. In addition, neutron diffraction studies of the He/Pr superlattices have shown that the helical Ho magnetic order is not coherent through the dhcp Pr layers, in contrast to previous hcp/hcp superlattices Ho/Y, Ho/Lu and Ho/Er. The series of Ho:Pr alloy films has shown structural...

  8. Wave-function reconstruction in a graded semiconductor superlattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, V. G.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Meinhold, D.

    2004-01-01

    We reconstruct a test wave function in a strongly coupled, graded well-width superlattice by resolving the spatial extension of the interband polarisation and deducing the wave function employing non-linear optical spectroscopy. The graded gap superlattice allows us to precisely control the dista...

  9. Current responsivity of semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignatov, Anatoly A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed for curr......The current responsivity of a semiconductor superlattice THz-photon detector is calculated using an equivalent circuit model which takes into account the finite matching efficiency between a detector antenna and the superlattice in the presence of parasitic losses. Calculations performed...... for currently available superlattice diodes show that both the magnitudes and the roll-off frequencies of the responsivity are strongly influenced by an excitation of hybrid plasma-Bloch oscillations which are found to be eigenmodes of the system in the THz-frequency band. The expected room temperature values...

  10. Plasmon nanoparticle superlattices as optical-frequency magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2012-07-02

    Nanocrystal superlattices have emerged as a new platform for bottom-up metamaterial design, but their optical properties are largely unknown. Here, we investigate their emergent optical properties using a generalized semi-analytic, full-field solver based on rigorous coupled wave analysis. Attention is given to superlattices composed of noble metal and dielectric nanoparticles in unary and binary arrays. By varying the nanoparticle size, shape, separation, and lattice geometry, we demonstrate the broad tunability of superlattice optical properties. Superlattices composed of spherical or octahedral nanoparticles in cubic and AB(2) arrays exhibit magnetic permeabilities tunable between 0.2 and 1.7, despite having non-magnetic constituents. The retrieved optical parameters are nearly polarization and angle-independent over a broad range of incident angles. Accordingly, nanocrystal superlattices behave as isotropic bulk metamaterials. Their tunable permittivities, permeabilities, and emergent magnetism may enable new, bottom-up metamaterials and negative index materials at visible frequencies.

  11. Transverse magnetic mode along THz waveguides with biased superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceituno, P. [Dpto. Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, 38206 Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: paceitun@ull.es; Hernandez-Cabrera, A. [Dpto. Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, 38206 Tenerife (Spain); Vasko, F.T. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS Ukraine, Pr. Nauki 41, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine)

    2008-05-15

    We study the propagation of transverse magnetic modes arising from a waveguide consisting on a GaAs-based superlattice located at vacuum-dielectric interface. The transverse mode is generated by the ultrafast intersubband response of the superlattice subjected to a high-frequency electric field. The superlattice is also subjected to a homogeneous bias potential to get a biased superlattice with equipopulated levels. The heterostructure is analyzed through the tight-binding approximation, and considering the level broadening caused by different scattering processes (homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening mechanisms). We pay special attention to the dispersion relations of the complex dielectric permittivity because of real and imaginary parts of this function play a key role in wide miniband superlattices.

  12. Theory of silicon superlattices - Electronic structure and enhanced mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, J. A.; Krishnamurthy, S.

    1983-01-01

    A realistic tight-binding band-structure model of silicon superlattices is formulated and used to study systems of potential applied interest, including periodic layered Si-Si(1-x)Ge(x) heterostructures. The results suggest a possible new mechanism for achieving enhanced transverse carrier mobility in such structures: reduced transverse conductivity effective masses associated with the superlattice band structure. For electrons in 100-line-oriented superlattices, a reduced conductivity mass arises intrinsically from the lower symmetry of the superlattice and its unique effect on the indirect bulk silicon band gap. An order of magnitude estimate of the range of mobility enhancement expected from this mechanism appears to be consistent with preliminary experimental results on Si-Si(1-x)Ge(x) superlattices.

  13. Analysis of plasma nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  14. Fatigue modelling for gas nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Weil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to develop an algorithm able to predict the fatigue lifetime of nitrided steels. Linear multi-axial fatigue criteria are used to take into account the gradients of mechanical properties provided by the nitriding process. Simulations on rotating bending fatigue specimens are made in order to test the nitrided surfaces. The fatigue model is applied to the cyclic loading of a gear from a simulation using the finite element software Ansys. Results show the positive contributions of nitriding on the fatigue strength

  15. Titanium Nitride Cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-07-01

    C ermets 7 Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Ni-Cr....26 Cerme ts S Effect of Amount of Metal on Strength of TiN-Co-Cr....27 Cermets 9...Figures 7 and 8. Titanium Nitride-Nickel-Chromium Cerme ts From Figure 7, it can be seen that 2900OF was the better firing temperature. The 20% metal

  16. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energ...

  17. Gallium nitride electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  18. Nonlinear THz response of metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichao; Andersen, David R.

    2016-11-01

    We study the third order THz nonlinear response of metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon superlattices in the presence of an elliptically-polarized excitation field using the time dependent perturbation theory. For a one-dimensional Kronig-Penney potential of infinite length, the nonlinear response can be described perturbatively by a low energy \\mathbf{k}\\centerdot \\mathbf{p} N-photon coupling model. Remarkably, as shown by Burset et al the energy dispersion of the metallic band in the direction parallel to the superlattice wavevector is independent of the applied superlattice potential while the energy dispersion in the direction perpendicular to the superlattice wavevector depends strongly on the superlattice parameters. As a result, we predict novel behavior for the nonlinear response of single layer metallic acGNR superlattices to an applied elliptically-polarized electric field. Our work shows that the superlattice potential, periodicity, Fermi level, excitation field polarization state, and temperature all play a significant role in the resulting THz nonlinear conductances.

  19. Transfer Matrix for Fibonacci Dielectric Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡祥宝

    2001-01-01

    The transfer matrices, which transfer the amplitudes of the electric fields of second- and third-harmonic waves from one side of the interface to the other, are defined for layers joined coherently, and the total transfer matrices for several sequential interfaces can be simply obtained by multiplication of the matrices. Using the transfer matrix method, the interacting processes of second- and third-harmonic waves in a one-dimensional finite Fibonacci dielectric superlattice are investigated. Applying the numerical procedure described in this letter, the dependence of the second- and third-harmonic fields on sample thickness is obtained. The numerical results agree with the quasi-phase-matching theory.

  20. Einstein's Photoemission from Quantum Confined Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 83th Birthday of Late Professor B. R. Nag, D.Sc., formerly Head of the Departments of Radio Physics and Electronics and Electronic Science of the University of Calcutta, a firm believer of the concept of theoretical minimum of Landau and an internationally well known semiconductor physicist, to whom the second author remains ever grateful as a student and research worker from 1974-2004. In this paper, an attempt is made to study, the Einstein's photoemission (EP) from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum well heavily doped superlattices (QWHDSLs) with graded interfaces in the presence of quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated electron dispersion relations within the frame work of k · p formalism. The EP from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum wells of heavily doped effective mass superlattices respectively has been presented under magnetic quantization. Besides the said emissions, from the quantum dots of the aforementioned heavily doped SLs have further investigated for the purpose of comparison and complete investigation in the context of EP from quantum confined superlattices. Using appropriate SLs, it appears that the EP increases with increasing surface electron concentration and decreasing film thickness in spiky manners, which are the characteristic features of such quantized hetero structures. Under magnetic quantization, the EP oscillates with inverse quantizing magnetic field due to Shuvnikov-de Haas effect. The EP increases with increasing photo energy in a step-like manner and the numerical values of EP with all the physical variables are totally band structure dependent for all the cases. The most striking features are that the presence of poles in the dispersion relation of the materials in the absence of band tails create the complex energy spectra in the corresponding HD constituent materials of such quantum confined superlattices and effective electron

  1. Magnetic Bloch oscillations in nanowire superlattice rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, D S

    2004-05-14

    The recent growth of semiconductor nanowire superlattices encourages hope that Bloch-like oscillations in such structures formed into rings may soon be observed in the presence of a time-dependent magnetic flux threading the ring. These magnetic Bloch oscillations are a consequence of Faraday's law; the time-dependent flux produces an electromotive force around the ring, thus leading to the Bloch-like oscillations. In the spectroscopic domain, generalized Wannier-Stark states are found that are manifestations of the emf-induced localization of the states.

  2. Layer disordering and doping compensation of an intersubband AlGaN/AlN superlattice by silicon implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, J. J.; Allerman, A. A.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Alford, C.; Vawter, G. A.; Montaño, I.

    2014-09-01

    Layer disordering and doping compensation of an Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattice by implantation are demonstrated. The as-grown sample exhibits intersubband absorption at ˜1.56 μm which is modified when subject to a silicon implantation. After implantation, the intersubband absorption decreases and shifts to longer wavelengths. Also, with increasing implant dose, the intersubband absorption decreases. It is shown that both layer disordering of the heterointerfaces and doping compensation from the vacancies produced during the implantation cause the changes in the intersubband absorption. Such a method is useful for removing absorption in spatially defined areas of III-nitride optoelectronic devices by, for example, creating low-loss optical waveguides monolithically that can be integrated with as-grown areas operating as electro-absorption intersubband modulators.

  3. Platinum nitride with fluorite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2005-01-31

    The mechanical stability of platinum nitride has been studied using first-principles calculations. By calculating the single-crystal elastic constants, we show that platinum nitride can be stabilized in the fluorite structure, in which the nitrogen atoms occupy all the tetrahedral interstitial sites of the metal lattice. The stability is attributed to the pseudogap effect from analysis of the electronic structure.

  4. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  5. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  6. Influence of Deviation on Optical Transmission through Aperiodic Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hai-Long; YANG Xiang-Bo; LAN Sheng; HU Wei

    2007-01-01

    We propose a deviation model and study the influences of the relative error and sensitivity of a machine on the transmission coefficients (TCs) of Fibonacci superlattices. It is found that for a system with fewer layers, the influence of deviation can be ignored. When superlattices become more complicated, they may be fabricated by a machine with suitable relative error and possess the designed value of TC. However, when the number of system layers exceeds some critical value, superlattices should be manufactured only by precise machines. The influence of the sensitivity is also discussed.

  7. ZnSe/ZnSeTe Superlattice Nanotips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young SJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors report the growth of ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips on oxidized Si(100 substrate. It was found the nanotips exhibit mixture of cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures. It was also found that photoluminescence intensities observed from the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips were much larger than that observed from the homogeneous ZnSeTe nanotips. Furthermore, it was found that activation energies for the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips with well widths of 16, 20, and 24 nm were 76, 46, and 19 meV, respectively.

  8. ZnSe/ZnSeTe Superlattice Nanotips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the growth of ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips on oxidized Si(100) substrate. It was found the nanotips exhibit mixture of cubic zinc-blende and hexagonal wurtzite structures. It was also found that photoluminescence intensities observed from the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips were much larger than that observed from the homogeneous ZnSeTe nanotips. Furthermore, it was found that activation energies for the ZnSe/ZnSeTe superlattice nanotips with well widths of 16, 20, and 24 nm were 76, 46, and 19 meV, respectively. PMID:20672085

  9. Sculptured 3D twister superlattices embedded with tunable vortex spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Denz, Cornelia; Joseph, Joby

    2011-09-01

    We present diverse reconfigurable complex 3D twister vortex superlattice structures in a large area embedded with tunable vortex spirals as well as dark rings, threaded by vortex helices. We demonstrate these tunable complex chiral vortex superlattices by the superposition of relatively phase engineered plane waves. The generated complex 3D twister lattice vortex structures are computationally as well as experimentally analyzed using various tools to verify the presence of phase singularities. Our observation indicates the application-specific flexibility of our approach to tailor the transverse superlattice spatial irradiance profile of these longitudinally whirling vortex-cluster units and dark rings.

  10. Aging in Co/Cr Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Pleimling, M.; Binek, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    Aging phenomena are observed in various systems brought into non-equilibrium and subsequently showing slow relaxation dynamics. Magnetic specimens with well defined interactions and dimensions can serve as model systems for universal aspects of aging. Magnetic thin films provide access to a wide range of microscopic parameters. Superlattice structures allow tuning the intra and inter-plane exchange and enable geometrical confinement of the spin fluctuations. We use Co/Cr thin film superlattices to study magnetic aging. The static and dynamic properties are affected via the Co and Cr film thicknesses. TC of the Co films is reduced from the bulk value by geometrical confinement. Non-ergodic behavior sets in at a tunable temperature T^* in a range of some 100K above zero. Cr provides antiferromagnetic coupling between the Co films. Non-equilibrium spin states are set via low field cooling in 5mT in-plane magnetic field to below T^*. Next various in-plane magnetic set fields of some 10-100 mT are applied and the sample is exposed to the latter for various waiting times tw, respectively. After removing the field, relaxation of the magnetization is recorded via longitudinal Kerr-magnetometry. The relaxation data are analyzed by scaling plots revealing universal aspects of aging. Financial support by Teledyne-Isco, NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC.

  11. Thermodynamics of Co/Cr superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Sahoo, S.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Binek, Ch.

    2008-03-01

    Progress in ultra thin film growth has resulted in many novel surface and interface induced properties of artificial heterostuctures. Here, we study magnetic superlattices of ultrathin Co and Cr films grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy methodology at a base pressure below 1x10-10 mbar. Our approach is based on controlling two distinct magnetic degrees of freedom. First, the critical temperature, Tc, of individual Co films is tailored via geometrical confinement of the correlation length perpendicular to the film. Various thickness dependent values, Tc(d), between zero and the bulk Curie temperature of 1388 K are realized. Second, the Tc-tailored Co films are antiferromagnetically coupled through Cr interlayer films. The oscillating coupling strength is tailored via the Cr interlayer thickness. The resulting thermodynamic properties of such Co/Cr superlattices are studied with the help of SQUID magnetometry. Particular emphasis is laid on tailoring magnetic entropy changes in the vicinity of room temperature. X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity are used to correlate structural data with the magnetic properties.

  12. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  13. Effects of Aqueous Vapour Consistence in Nitriding Furnace on the Quality of the Sintered Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZijiang

    1998-01-01

    If the aqueous vapour consistence is too high(>0.7%),it is very disadvantageous to the sintered products in the nitriding furnace,when silcon nitride bonded silicon carbide products are synthesized by nitridation of silicon.

  14. Quantum Transport: The Link between Standard Approaches in Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    Theories describing electrical transport in semiconductor superlattices can essentially be divided in three disjoint categories: (i) transport in a miniband; (ii) hopping between Wannier-Stark ladders; and (iii) sequential tunneling. We present a quantum transport model, based on nonequilibrium...

  15. Plasmonic Enhanced Type-II Superlattice Focal Plane Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  16. The soliton properties of dipole domains in superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张启义; 田强

    2002-01-01

    The formation and propagation of dipole domains in superlattices are studied both by the modified discrete driftmodel and by the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The spatiotemporal distribution of the electric field and electrondensity are presented. The numerical results are compared with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrodingerequation and analysed. It is shown that the numerical solutions agree with the soliton solutions of the nonlinearSchrodinger equation. The dipole electric-field domains in semiconductor superlattices have the properties of solitons.

  17. Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0048 TR-2015-0048 SUPERLATTICE INTERMEDIATE BAND SOLAR CELL ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE Alexandre Freundlich...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0232 Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...band solar cell incorporating low dimensional structures made with dilute nitrogen alloys of III-V semiconductors is investigated theoretically and

  18. Experimental evidence of delocalized states in random dimer superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Bellani, V.; Díez, E.; Hey, R.; Toni, L.; Tarricone, L.; Parravicini, G.B.; Domínguez-Adame Acosta, Francisco; Gómez-Alcalá, R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the electronic properties of GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices with intentional correlated disorder by means of photoluminescence and vertical dc resistance. The results are compared to those obtained in ordered and uncorrelated disordered superlattices. We report the first experimental evidence that spatial correlations inhibit localization of states in disordered low-dimensional systems, as our previous theoretical calculations suggested, in contrast to the earlier belief that all eigensta...

  19. Coherent quantum transport features in carbon superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, R.; Henley, S. J.; Silva, S. R. P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-10-01

    Whilst resonant transmission is well understood and can be fully harnessed for crystalline superlattices, a complete picture has not yet emerged for disordered superlattices. It has proven difficult to tune resonant transmission in disordered diamond-like carbon (DLC) superlattices as conventional models are not equipped to incorporate significant structural disorder. In this work, we present concurrent experimental and theoretical analysis which addresses resonant transmission in DLC superlattices. Devices were fabricated by growing alternate layers of DLC with different percentages of sp3 hybridized carbon.Coherent quantum transport effects were demonstrated in these structurally disordered DLC superlattices through distinct current modulation with negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage (I-V) measurements. A model was developed using tight-binding calculations assuming a random variation of the hopping integral to simulate structural (bond-length) disorder. Calculations of the I-V characteristics compliment the interpretation of the measurements and illustrate that while DLC superlattice structures are unlike their classical counterparts, the near-field structural order will help with the confinement of quantised states. The present model provides an empirical guide for tailoring the properties of future devices, giving rise to much hope that carbon electronics operating at high frequencies over large areas can now be developed.

  20. Carbon-coated nanoparticle superlattices for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Yiliguma, Affa; Wang, Yifei; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) superlattices represent a unique material architecture for energy conversion and storage. Recent reports on carbon-coated NP superlattices have shown exciting electrochemical properties attributed to their rationally designed compositions and structures, fast electron transport, short diffusion length, and abundant reactive sites via enhanced coupling between close-packed NPs, which are distinctive from their isolated or disordered NP or bulk counterparts. In this minireview, we summarize the recent developments of highly-ordered and interconnected carbon-coated NP superlattices featuring high surface area, tailorable and uniform doping, high conductivity, and structure stability. We then introduce the precisely-engineered NP superlattices by tuning/studying specific aspects, including intermetallic structures, long-range ordering control, and carbon coating methods. In addition, these carbon-coated NP superlattices exhibit promising characteristics in energy-oriented applications, in particular, in the fields of lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells, and electrocatalysis. Finally, the challenges and perspectives are discussed to further explore the carbon-coated NP superlattices for optimized electrochemical performances.

  1. Gate-dependent Pseudospin Mixing in Graphene/boron Nitride Moire Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    Optical micrograph of a two-terminal field-eect graphene /BN device on a SiO2 /Si substrate. c, Gate-dependent resistance of a typical graphene /BN device...of interband transitions in bare graphene , which is similar to that observed in graphene on SiO2 /Si substrates7–9. The sharp feature shows decreased...300 400 500 600 Energy (meV) a Low doped Si SiO2 BN Au IR beamGraphene Vg σ σ Figure 2 | Infrared micro-spectroscopy of the graphene /BN heterostructure

  2. Ion beam studies in strained layer superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Pathak, A P; Bhattacharya, D P; Dev, B N; Ghosh, S; Goswami, D K; Lakshmi-Bala, S; Nageswara-Rao, S V S; Satyam, P V; Siddiqui, A M; Srivastava, S K; Turos, A

    2002-01-01

    The potential device application of semiconductor heterostructures and strained layer superlattices has been highlighted. Metal organic chemical vapour deposition grown In sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 3 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 7 As/InP lattice-matched structure has been irradiated by 130 MeV Ag sup 1 sup 3 sup + and studied by RBS/Channelling using 3.5 MeV He sup 2 sup + ions. Ion irradiation seems to have induced a finite tensile strain in the InGaAs layer, indicating thereby that ion beam mixing occurs at this energy. Other complementary techniques like high resolution XRD and STM are needed to conclude the structural modifications in the sample.

  3. Nonreciprocal Multiferroic Superlattices with Broken Parity Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenghua; Zhang, Weiyi

    Multiferroic materials are characterized by the coexistence of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic (or antiferromagnetic) orders, the coupling to lattice vibration can be invoked either through piezoelectric or piezomagnetic effects. In this paper, the polaritonic band structures of multiferroic superlattices composed of oppositely polarized domains are investigated using the generalized transfer matrix method. For the primitive cell with broken parity symmetry, the polaritonic band structure is asymmetrical with respect to the forward and backward propagation directions (nonreciprocality). In particular, the band extreme points move away from the Brillouin zone center. This asymmetry in band-gap positions and widths can be used to design compact one-way optical isolators, while the extremely slow light velocities near the asymmetrical upper edges of lower bands includes the essential ingredients for designing slow light devices.

  4. Magnetocaloric properties of Co/Cr superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Skomski, Ralph; Sellmyer, David; Binek, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured materials aiming on refrigeration applications are experimentally realized by molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of Co/Cr superlattices using mean-field theoretical concepts as guiding principles.footnotetextT. Mukherjee, S. Sahoo, R. Skomski, D. J. Sellmyer, and Ch. Binek, Phys. Rev. B 79, 144406-1-9 (2009). Magnetocaloric properties are deduced from measurements of the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization of our samples. More generally, the potential of artificial antiferromagnets for near room-temperature refrigeration is explored. The effects of intra-plane and inter-plane exchange interactions on the magnetic phase diagram in Ising-type model systems are revisited in mean-field considerations with special emphasis on tailoring magnetocaloric properties. The experimental results are discussed in light of our theoretical findings, and extrapolations for future improved nanostructures are provided. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC.

  5. Magnetic Field in Superlattices Semiconductors of Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a study on the super-semiconductor networks, using the Kronig-Penney model for the effective mass approximation, and then the calculations for the application of the magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the layers of super lattices crystals. The magnetic field applied parallel to the layers, was used to adjust the resonance of a higher energy subband of a well by thermal excitation with a lower energy subband of the adjacent well, increasing energy levels in its tunneling rate. We use the formalism of Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics. Introducing the calculations in a systematic way in superlattices for each semiconductor quantum well to assess their energy spectrum systematically studied.

  6. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  7. Development of Strained-Layer Superlattice (SLS) IR Detector Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) detectors are a new class of detectors.   In our FY12 IRAD “Strained Layer Superlattice Infrared Detector Array...

  8. Synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles using mesoporous carbon nitride as reactive template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anna; Müller, Jens Oliver; Antonietti, Markus; Thomas, Arne

    2008-12-23

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride was used as both a nanoreactor and a reactant for the synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles. By infiltration of a mixture of two metal precursors into mesoporous carbon nitride, the pores act first as a nanoconfinement, generating amorphous mixed oxide nanoparticles. During heating and decomposition, the carbon nitride second acts as reactant or, more precisely, as a nitrogen source, which converts the preformed mixed oxide nanoparticles into the corresponding nitride (reactive templating). Using this approach, ternary metal nitride particles with diameters smaller 10 nm composed of aluminum gallium nitride (Al-Ga-N) and titanium vanadium nitride (Ti-V-N) were synthesized. Due to the confinement effect of the carbon nitride matrix, the composition of the resulting metal nitride can be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the preceding precursor solution. Thus, ternary metal nitride nanoparticles with continuously adjustable metal composition can be produced.

  9. Crossover from Incoherent to Coherent Phonon Scattering in Epitaxial Oxide Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-08

    of the superlattices. Figure 3a shows a high-resolution, short-angular-range θ–2θ X - ray diffraction (XRD) scan of a (STO)6/(CTO)6 superlattice...function of interface density. We do so by synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides and systematically varying the interface density, with unit-cell precision, using two

  10. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  11. Hemocompatibility of titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, I; Baquey, C; Candelon, B; Monties, J R

    1992-10-01

    The left ventricular assist device is based on the principle of the Maillard-Wenkel rotative pump. The materials which make up the pump must present particular mechanical, tribological, thermal and chemical properties. Titanium nitride (TiN) because of its surface properties and graphite because of its bulk characteristics have been chosen. The present study evaluated the in vitro hemocompatibility of TiN coating deposited by the chemical vapor deposition process. Protein adsorption, platelet retention and hemolysis tests have been carried out. In spite of some disparities, the TiN behavior towards albumin and fibrinogen is interesting, compared with the one of a reference medical grade elastomer. The platelet retention test gives similar results as those achieved with the same elastomer. The hemolysis percentage is near to zero. TiN shows interesting characteristics, as far as mechanical and tribological problems are concerned, and presents very encouraging blood tolerability properties.

  12. Engineering of hydrogenated two-dimensional h-BN/C superlattices as electrostatic substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhun; Zhong, Xiaoliang; Yan, Hui; Wang, Ru-Zhi

    2016-01-14

    Hybridized two-dimensional materials incorporating domains from the hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene is an interesting branch of materials science due to their highly tunable electronic properties. In the present study, we investigate the hydrogenated two-dimensional (2D) h-BN/C superlattices (SLs) with zigzag edges using first-principles calculations. We found that the domain width, the phase ratio, and the vertical dipole orientation all have significant influence on the stability of SLs. The electronic reconstruction is associated with the lateral polar discontinuities at the zigzag edges and the vertically polarized (B2N2H4)(m) domains, which modifies the electronic structures and the spatial potential of the SLs significantly. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the hydrogenated 2D h-BN/C SLs can be applied in engineering the electronic structure of graphene: laterally-varying doping can be achieved by taking advantage of the spatial variation of the surface potential of the SLs. By applying an external vertical electric field on these novel bidirectional heterostructures, graphene doping levels and band offsets can be tuned to a wide range, such that the graphene doping profile can be switched from the bipolar (p-n junction) to unipolar (n(+)-n junction) mode. It is expected that such bidirectional heterostructures provide an effective approach for developing novel nanoscale electronic devices and improving our understanding of the fundamentals of low-dimensional materials.

  13. Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 22-April-2013 to 21-April-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design...15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Dots , Optoelectronic Applications, Charge Transfer, Superlattices, Density Functional Theory, Coupling...FA2386-13-1-4074 “ Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation” April 21, 2014 PI and Co-PI

  14. High-Energy Density and Superhard Nitrogen-Rich B-N Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Lu, Siyu; Tse, John S.

    2015-09-01

    The pressure-induced transformation of diatomic nitrogen into nonmolecular polymeric phases may produce potentially useful high-energy-density materials. We combine first-principles calculations with structure searching to predict a new class of nitrogen-rich boron nitrides with a stoichiometry of B3N5 that are stable or metastable relative to solid N2 and h -BN at ambient pressure. The most stable phase at ambient pressure has a layered structure (h -B3N5 ) containing hexagonal B3N3 layers sandwiched with intercalated freely rotating N2 molecules. At 15 GPa, a three-dimensional C 2 2 21 structure with single N-N bonds becomes the most stable. This pressure is much lower than that required for triple-to-single bond transformation in pure solid nitrogen (110 GPa). More importantly, C 2 2 21-B3N5 is metastable, and can be recovered under ambient conditions. Its energy density of ˜3.44 kJ /g makes it a potential high-energy-density material. In addition, stress-strain calculations estimate a Vicker's hardness of ˜4 4 GPa . Structure searching reveals a new clathrate sodalitelike BN structure that is metastable under ambient conditions.

  15. Crystal structures and elastic properties of superhard IrN2 and IrN3 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Jian; Zhao, Er-Jun; Xiang, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xian-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Meng, Jian

    2007-08-01

    First principles calculations were performed to investigate the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of IrN2 for various space groups: cubic Fm-3m and Pa-3 , hexagonal P3221 , tetragonal P42/mnm , orthorhombic Pmmn , Pnnm , and Pnn2 , and monoclinic P21/c . Our calculation indicates that the P21/c phase with arsenopyrite-type structure is energetically more stable than the other phases. It is semiconducting (the remaining phases are metallic) and contains diatomic N-N with the bond distance of 1.414Å . These characters are consistent with the experimental facts that IrN2 is in lower symmetry and nonmetallic. Our conclusion is also in agreement with the recent theoretical studies that the most stable phase of IrN2 is monoclinic P21/c . The calculated bulk modulus of 373GPa is also the highest among the considered space groups. It matches the recent theoretical values of 357GPa within 4.3% and of 402GPa within 7.8%, but smaller than the experimental value of 428GPa by 14.7%. Chemical bonding and potential displacive phase transitions are discussed for IrN2 . For IrN3 , cubic skutterudite structure (Im-3) was assumed. Our calculation indicated that it is also promising to be superhard due to the large bulk modulus of 358GPa and shear modulus of 246GPa . The diatomic N-N bond distance is even shorter (1.272Å) .

  16. MORPHOFUNCTIONAL STATUS OF REGIONAL LYMPH NODES IN CONDITIONS OF INTRAMEDULLARY OSTEOSYNTHESIS BY RETAINERS WITH COAT BASED ON SUPERHARD COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. F. Akhtyamov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the morphofunctional state of the popliteal lymph nodes of the operated and intact pelvic rabbit limbs in conditions of intramedullary fixation of the tibia fracture with the implant coated with titanium nitride and hafnium. A morphological study of two groups of experimental animals was conducted. Osteoclasis of tibia and subsequent osteosynthesis with medical steel needles coated with and without titanium nitride and hafnium was made. In the lymph nodes of the animals in the comparison group both inflammatory (acute and chronic lymphadenitis and immunomorfologycal (hyperplasia of T-and B-dependent areas, sinus histiocytosis reactions were observed, with the latter being more common in the operated limb, and the inflammatory - in the intact one. The obtained data have proved the feasibility of using metal structures coated with nitrides of group IV metals (titanium and hafnium for external osteosynthesis.

  17. Quasi-Dirac points in one-dimensional graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Tseng, P.; Hsueh, W.J., E-mail: hsuehwj@ntu.edu.tw

    2016-08-26

    Quasi-Dirac points (QDPs) with energy different from the traditional Dirac points (TDPs) have been found for the first time in one-dimensional graphene superlattices. The angular-averaged conductance reaches a minimum value at the QDPs, at which the Fano factor approaches 1/3. Surprisingly, the minimum conductance at these QDPs may be lower than that at the TDPs under certain conditions. This is remarkable as the minimum conductance attainable in graphene superlattices was believed to appear at TDPs. - Highlights: • Quasi-Dirac points (QDPs) are found for the first time in one-dimensional graphene superlattices. • The QDP is different from the traditional Dirac points (TDPs) in graphene superlattices. • The angular-averaged conductance reaches a minimum value at the QDPs, at which the Fano factor approaches 1/3. • The minimum conductance at these QDPs may be lower than that at the TDPs under certain conditions. • The minimum conductance attainable in graphene superlattices was believed to appear at TDPs.

  18. Leachability of nitrided ilmenite in hydrochloric acid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swanepoel, JJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride in upgraded nitrided ilmenite (bulk of iron removed) can selectively be chlorinated to produce titanium tetrachloride. Except for iron, most other components present during this low temperature (ca. 200 °C) chlorination reaction...

  19. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  20. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,R.R.M.; de Araújo, F. O.; J. A. P. da Costa; Brandim,A.S.; R. A. de Brito; C. Alves

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  1. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-06-21

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  2. Effects of transverse mode coupling and optical confinement factor on gallium-nitride based laser diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Xiao-Ming; Zhang Bei; Dai Tao; Zhang Guo-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the transverse mode pattern and the optical field confinement factor of gallium nitride (GaN) laser diodes (LDs) theoretically. For the particular LD structure, composed of approximate 4μm thick n-GaN substrate layer, the maximum optical confinement factor was found to be corresponding to the 5th order transverse mode, the so-called lasing mode. Moreover, the value of the maximum confinement factor varies periodically when increasing the n-side GaN layer thickness, which simultaneously changes and increases the oscillation mode order of the GaN LD caused by the effects of mode coupling. The effects of the thickness and the average composition of Al in the AlGaN/GaN superlattice on the optical confinement factor are also presented. Finally, the mode coupling and optimization of the layers in the GaN-based LD are discussed.

  3. Gadolinium-doped Ⅲ-nitride diluted magnetic semiconductors for spintronics applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Yikai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present status of the Gd (gadolinium-Ⅲ-nitride semiconductor layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is described.No phase separation and substitutional incorporation are confirmed by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure measurements.Photoluminescence peak energy for the Gd-doped InGaN is shifted with InN molar fraction.Clear hysteresis and saturation are observed in the magnetization versus magnetic field curves at room temperature.Si co-doping as well as superlattice structures enhances the magnetization.Results are understood with the carrier-mediated ferromagnetism.Finally,examples of the spintronic semiconductor devices,where the relation between the spin-polarized carriers and the circular-polarized light is used,and the present status to realize such devices are described.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivities of superlattice nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨决宽; 陈云飞; 颜景平

    2003-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate heat transfer in superlattice nanowires. Results show that for fixed period length superlattice nanowires, the ratio of the total interfacial thermal resistance to the total thermal resistance and the effective thermal conductivities are invariant with the changes in interface numbers. Increasing the period length leads to an increase in the average interfacial thermal resistance, which indicates that the interfacial thermal resistance depends not only on the materials that constitute the alternating segments of superlattice nanowires, but also on the lattice strain throughout the segments. The modification of the lattice structure due to the lattice mismatch should be taken into account in the acoustic mismatch model. Simulation results also demonstrated the size confinement effect on the thermal conductivities for low dimensional structures, i.e. the thermal conductivities and the interfacial thermal resistance increase as the nanowire cross-sectional area increases.

  5. Interlayer diffusion studies of a Laves phase exchange spring superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Kohn, A; Wang, S G; Ward, R C C

    2011-03-23

    Rare earth Laves phase (RFe(2)) superlattice structures grown at different temperatures are studied using x-ray reflectivity (XRR), x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The optimized molecular beam epitaxy growth condition is matched with the XRR simulation, showing minimum diffusion/roughness at the interfaces. Electron microscopy characterization reveals that the epitaxial growth develops from initial 3D islands to a high quality superlattice structure. Under this optimum growth condition, chemical analysis by electron energy loss spectroscopy with high spatial resolution is used to study the interface. The analysis shows that the interface roughness is between 0.6 and 0.8 nm and there is no significant interlayer diffusion. The locally sharp interface found in this work explains the success of simple structural models in predicting the magnetic reversal behavior of Laves exchange spring superlattices.

  6. Rabi Oscillations in Realistic Superlattice with Finite Bloch Bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wen-Bin; ZHANG Ping; LUO Ying; ZHAO Xian-Geng

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical processes taking place in nanodevices by high-frequency dc-ac fields. We found that Rabi oscillations between minibands are clearly identified under theoretical resonant conditions derived by an ideal two-band superlattice model, the resonant conditions have broadened, and the amount of broadening is about four times of the Rabi oscillation frequency. We also want to elucidate the role of different mechanisms that could lead to loss of quantum coherence. Our results show how the dephasing effects of disorder of interface roughness and doping fluctuation that after some periods destroy coherent oscillations, such as Rabi oscillations,can be reduced dramatically if we apply a bias static electric field to the superlattice system. The doping fluctuation dephasing effect is much stronger than that of interface roughness in the coherent process of realistic superlattices.

  7. Defect enhanced spin and valley polarizations in silicene superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Lu, Wei-Tao; Li, Yun-Fang; Han, Hai-Hua

    2017-04-01

    We studied the effect of a defect of superlattice on the spin and valley dependent transport properties in silicene, where there is an abnormal barrier in height. It is found that the transmission resonance is greatly suppressed, because the symmetry of superlattice structure is destroyed by the defect. The spin-up and spin-down electrons near the K and K ‧ valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices and defects. Therefore, the conductances are strongly dependent on the spin and valley of electron. By adjusting the defect strength properly, the spin and valley polarizations could be dramatically enhanced in a wide energy region. Furthermore, the result suggests an application of the structure as a defect-controlled switch.

  8. The magnetic structure of holmium-erbium superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMorrow, D.F. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Simpson, J.A.; Cowley, R.A.; Jehan, D.A.; Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R. [Oxford Physics, Clarendon Lab. (United Kingdom); Thurston, T.R.; Gibbs, D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of completing crystal-field anisotropies on magnetic order has been investigated in a series of Ho/Er superlattices using neutron and resonant x-ray magnetic diffraction techniques. The neutron diffraction reveals that for temperatures in the interval T{sub N}(Er) {le} T {le} T{sub N}(Ho) the Ho basal-plane order propagates coherently through the paramagnetic Er, and that below T{sub N}(Er) the longitudinal component of the Er moments fails to order across the Ho block. The magnetic superlattice peaks observed in the x-ray scattering display an anomalous energy dependence: a sharp resonance is found at L{sub III}(Ho), with no resonance visible at L{sub III}(Er). These results are discussed with reference to models of exchange in metallic superlattices.

  9. Electronic states of InSe/GaSe superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkoç, Ş.; Allahverdi, K.; Ibrahim, Z.

    1994-06-01

    Analysis of recent publications revealed an increasing interest in epitaxial growth of InSe/GaSe superlattice. Within the effective mass theory we carried out self-consistent calculations of the confined and itinerant electronic states, potential profile and charge density distribution of InSe/GaSe superlattice, where the InSe layers are the well and the GaSe layers the barrier. Calculations were performed for three types of doping: uniform, modulated in the well, and modulated in the barrier. It has been found that the Coulomb interaction in the well and barrier forces the formation of localized states in the barrier region. The possibility of an insulator-metal transition in InSe/GaSe superlattice is predicted for modulation doping in the barrier and for a doping level n = 10 19cm-3. A decrease of the barrier height has been found for modulation doping in the well.

  10. Electric and magnetic superlattices in trilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Salah; Chan, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of one dimensional Kronig-Penney type of periodic electric and vector potential on ABC-trilayer graphene superlattices are investigated. The energy spectra obtained with periodic vector potentials shows the emergence of extra Dirac points in the energy spectrum with finite energies. For identical barrier and well widths, the original as well as the extra Dirac points are located in the ky = 0 plane. An asymmetry between the barrier and well widths causes a shift in the extra Dirac points away from the ky = 0 plane. Extra Dirac points having same electron hole crossing energy as that of the original Dirac point as well as finite energy Dirac points are generated in the energy spectrum when periodic electric potential is applied to the system. By applying electric and vector potential together, the symmetry of the energy spectrum about the Fermi level is broken. A tunable band gap is induced in the energy spectrum by applying both electric and vector potential simultaneously with different barrier and well widths.

  11. Negative capacitance in multidomain ferroelectric superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Pavlo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Hadjimichael, Marios; Fernandez-Pena, Stéphanie; Sené, Anaïs; Luk'Yanchuk, Igor; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    The stability of spontaneous electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is fundamental to many of their current applications, which range from the simple electric cigarette lighter to non-volatile random access memories. Research on nanoscale ferroelectrics reveals that their behaviour is profoundly different from that in bulk ferroelectrics, which could lead to new phenomena with potential for future devices. As ferroelectrics become thinner, maintaining a stable polarization becomes increasingly challenging. On the other hand, intentionally destabilizing this polarization can cause the effective electric permittivity of a ferroelectric to become negative, enabling it to behave as a negative capacitance when integrated in a heterostructure. Negative capacitance has been proposed as a way of overcoming fundamental limitations on the power consumption of field-effect transistors. However, experimental demonstrations of this phenomenon remain contentious. The prevalent interpretations based on homogeneous polarization models are difficult to reconcile with the expected strong tendency for domain formation, but the effect of domains on negative capacitance has received little attention. Here we report negative capacitance in a model system of multidomain ferroelectric-dielectric superlattices across a wide range of temperatures, in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. Using a phenomenological model, we show that domain-wall motion not only gives rise to negative permittivity, but can also enhance, rather than limit, its temperature range. Our first-principles-based atomistic simulations provide detailed microscopic insight into the origin of this phenomenon, identifying the dominant contribution of near-interface layers and paving the way for its future exploitation.

  12. Intrinsic noncollinear magnetization in Fe/Cr superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yartseva, N.S., E-mail: yartseva@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, UD of RAS, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Yartsev, S.V. [ZAO NPO “Spektr”, 14 Berezovskiy 623700 (Russian Federation); Demangeat, C. [UFR de Physique et d’Ingéniérie, Université de Strasbourg, 3 rue de l’Université, 67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic moments distribution in Fe{sub 3}Cr{sub n} superlattice series with fixed middle Fe monolayer and number of Cr monolayers (MLs) n from 1 to 45 is computed in the framework of collinear and noncollinear Periodic Anderson model. The superlattices are composed of layers in (0 0 1) and (1 1 0) plane with ideal interface. The total energy shows that noncollinear orientation of the magnetic moments remains the ground state for all superlattices with Cr thickness above 5 MLs. Distribution of the magnetic moments for Fe/Cr(0 0 1) superlattices depends on parity of the Cr MLs. For odd numbers Cr magnetic moments are canted and symmetrically distributed between the neighboring Fe slabs. The values of Cr moments are enhanced at the interface and weakened to the bulk in the middle. For even numbers of Cr MLs quasi-helicoidal magnetic moments distribution consisting of two interleaved spirals is found. The moments are screwing sequentially from Fe/Cr interface to perpendicular orientation, keeping the angles and moments for some successive MLs, and then continue screwing towards the next interface. In Fe/Cr(1 1 0) superlattices the magnetic moments of two nonequivalent atoms in the monolayer are canted to each other near Fe/Cr interface and then swing the direction on perpendicular to the fixed Fe moments. - Highlights: • Frustration destroys the collinear magnetization in Fe/Cr superlattices. • Spin spiral were investigated within basic noncollinear Periodic Anderson Model. • Total energy of the spin spiral is generally more stable than collinear magnetization. • Neither step nor alloying at the Fe/Cr interface is necessary for Spin Spiral stability. • The two interleaved spirals calculated are similar to Fishman’s helical state.

  13. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  14. Raman-induced Spin-Orbit Coupling in Optical Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junru; Huang, Wujie; Shteynas, Boris; Burchesky, Sean; Top, Furkan; Jamison, Alan; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme for spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of ultracold atoms. Instead of internal (hyperfine) states, two lowest bands in an optical superlattice were used as pseudospins. A Raman process was implemented to provide coupling between pseudospin and momentum. With single internal state and far-detuned beams used, our new scheme will allow convenient generalisation to a wide range of atoms. Pseudospin interaction is tuneable by controlling the superlattice, allowing us to study many-body phenomena in SOC systems such as the stripe phase.

  15. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  16. The solition properties of dipole domains in superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张启义; 田强

    2002-01-01

    The formation and propagation of dipole domains in superlattices are studied both by the modified discrete drift model and by the nonlinear schroedinger equation,the spatiotemporal distribution of the electric field and electron density are presented.The numerical results are compared with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and analysed.It is shown that the numerical solutions agree with the soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation.The dipole electric-field domains in semiconductor superlattices have the properties of solitons.

  17. Spin-dependent terahertz oscillator based on hybrid graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz, E.; Miralles, K.; Domínguez-Adame, F. [GISC, Departamento Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gaul, C., E-mail: cgaul@pks.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    We theoretically study the occurrence of Bloch oscillations in biased hybrid graphene systems with spin-dependent superlattices. The spin-dependent potential is realized by a set of ferromagnetic insulator strips deposited on top of a gapped graphene nanoribbon, which induce a proximity exchange splitting of the electronic states in the graphene monolayer. We numerically solve the Dirac equation and study Bloch oscillations in the lowest conduction band of the spin-dependent superlattice. While the Bloch frequency is the same for both spins, we find the Bloch amplitude to be spin dependent. This difference results in a spin-polarized ac electric current in the THz range.

  18. Photon BLOCH oscillations in porous silicon optical superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, V; del Río, J A; Malpuech, G; Zamfirescu, M; Kavokin, A; Coquillat, D; Scalbert, D; Vladimirova, M; Gil, B

    2004-03-01

    We report the first observation of oscillations of the electromagnetic field in an optical superlattice based on porous silicon. These oscillations are an optical equivalent of well-known electronic Bloch oscillations in crystals. Elementary cells of our structure are composed by microcavities whose coupling gives rise to the extended collective modes forming optical minigaps and minibands. By varying thicknesses of the cavities along the structure axis, we have created an effective electric field for photons. A very high quality factor of the confined optical state of the Wannier-Stark ladder may allow lasing in porous silicon-based superlattices.

  19. Binding Graphene Sheets Together Using Silicon: Graphene/Silicon Superlattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a superlattice consisting of graphene and monolayer thick Si sheets and investigate it using a first-principles density functional theory. The Si layer is found to not only strengthen the interlayer binding between the graphene sheets compared to that in graphite, but also inject electrons into graphene, yet without altering the most unique property of graphene: the Dirac fermion-like electronic structure. The superlattice approach represents a new direction for exploring basic science and applications of graphene-based materials.

  20. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  1. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  2. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea.

  3. Application and development of super-hard tools in machining of aluminum alloy piston%超硬刀具在铝合金活塞加工中的应用与发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宝国

    2011-01-01

    超硬刀具是实现高效高速加工的关键,介绍了超硬刀具的性能特点,回顾了超硬刀具在活塞加工中的应用推广情况,分析了超硬刀具在活塞加工中存在的各种问题及其原因,对超硬刀具在活塞加工的前景进行了展望,并对超硬刀具的应用推广提出了建议.%Super-hard cutting tool is the key for efficient high-speed machining. This paper describes the performance characteristics of superhard cutting tool, recalls application process of the superhard cutting tool in machining of the piston, analyzes the processing of superhard cutting tool in the piston and various problems, predicts superhard cutting tool processing in the prospect of the piston. The suggestions of super hard tools application promoting were put forward.

  4. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  5. Palatable and bio-functional wheat/rice products developed from pre-germinated brown rice of super-hard cultivar EM10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Satoh, Hikaru; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2010-01-01

    It became possible to produce high-quality and bio-functional wheat/rice bread and wheat/rice noodles by blending, pre-germinated and cooked brown rice of a super-hard cultivar with wheat flour. Super-hard rice (SHR) is not suitable for table rice because of its low palatability. Nevertheless, it was found to be suitable as a blending material for bread-making or noodle-making due to its hard texture and high content of resistant starch. We developed a novel rapid germination method to improve the quality and to save the time needed for germination. By blending pre-germinated and cooked SHR (30% w/w on a dry basis) as a rice gel with wheat flour (70% w/w on a dry basis), the bread became very soft and any hardening after bread-making was markedly retarded. Similarly, blending pre-germinated and cooked SHR as cooked a rice gel with wheat flour gave high-quality noodles with a similar texture to that of durum semolina noodles. The resistant starch of the SHR-blended bread and noodles was also markedly increased. White waxy rice (9%) soaked and cooked with the pre-germinated brown rice of SHR (21%) produced a rice gel that was very useful as a material for bread-making and noodle-making by blending with wheat flour (70%) to prepare soft, tasty and bio-functional wheat/rice bread and wheat/rice noodles.

  6. Superlattice conductivity sign change induced by intense electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.; Ionkina, E. S.

    2016-07-01

    The current density in a superlattice exposed to a quantizing electric field and the terahertz field has been calculated. The calculations have been carried out taking into account inelastic scattering of charge carriers by phonons. The possibility of an absolute negative conductivity, i.e., the emergence of electric current opposing the direction of the quantizing electric field, has been demonstrated.

  7. Strong impact of impurity bands on domain formation in superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    The formation of electric field domains in doped semiconductor superlattices is described within a microscopic model. Due to the presence of impurity bands in low-doped samples the current-voltage characteristic is essentially different compared to medium-doped samples. (C) 1998 Published by Else...

  8. Coherent magnetic structures in terbium/holmium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    1997-01-01

    Neutron-scattering techniques have been used to investigate the magnetic properties of three Tb/Ho superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. It is revealed that for temperatures in the range T = 10 to T-N(Ho)approximate to 130 K, there is a basal-plane ferromagnetic alignment of Tb moments...

  9. The structural and magnetic properties of holmium/scandium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    1997-01-01

    The properties of Ho/Sc superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have been investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Structural studies reveal the novel existence of more than one a lattice parameter. Examining the magnetic properties, it is found that the Ho 4f...

  10. Magnetic structures of holmium-lutetium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swaddling, P.P.; Cowley, R.A.; Ward, R.C.C.;

    1996-01-01

    Alloys and superlattices of Ho and Lu have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their magnetic structures determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The 4f moments in the alloys form a helix at all compositions with the moments aligned in the basal plane perpendicular to the wave vector...

  11. Bypassing of a barrier by dissociated and superlattice dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhushan, Karihaloo

    1975-01-01

    Very simple procedures are used to calculate the upper and lower bounds for the applied stress required for the leading extended (superlattice) dislocation in a group of n coplanar screw dislocations of like sign with Burgers vector b to bypass a noncoplanar perfect screw dislocation with Burgers...... vector mb (m...

  12. Type-II superlattice photodiodes: an alternative for VLWIR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gail J.; Houston, Shanee; Szmulowicz, Frank; Mahalingam, Krishnamur; Haugan, Heather; Wei, Yajun; Gin, Aaron; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2003-09-01

    In the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) band, λ>14 microns, the detector materials are currently limited to extrinsic semiconductors. These extrinsic materials can be either heavily doped bulk semiconductor, like silicon or germanium, or a doped quantum well heterostructure. An alternative choice that provides the opportunity for higher temperature operation for VLWIR sensing is an intrinsic material based on a type-II InAs/Ga(In)Sb superlattice. There are many possible designs for these superlattices which will produce the same narrow band gap by adjusting individual layer thicknesses, indium content or substrate orientation. The infrared properties of various compositions and designs of these type-II superlattices have been studied. In the past few years, excellent results have been obtained on photoconductive and photodiode samples designed for infrared detection beyond 15 microns. An overview of the status of this material system will be presented. In addition, the latest experimental results for superlattice photodiodes with cut-off wavelengths as long as 30 microns will be covered.

  13. Heterojunction and superlattice detectors for infrared to ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2016-07-01

    The interest in Infrared and Ultraviolet detectors has increased immensely due to the emergence of important applications over a wide range of activities. Detectors based on free carrier absorption known as Hetero-junction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HEIWIP) detectors and variations of these heterojunction structures to be used as intervalence band detectors for a wide wavelength region are presented. Although this internal photoemission concept is valid for all semiconductor materials systems, using a well-studied III-V system of GaAs/AlxGa1-x As to cover a wide wavelength range from UV to far-infrared (THz) is an important development in detector technology. Using the intervalence band (heavy hole, light hole and split off) transitions for high operating temperature detection of mid Infrared radiation is also discussed. A promising new way to extend the detection wavelength threshold beyond the standard threshold connected with the energy gap in a GaAs/AlxGa1-x As system is also presented. Superlattice detector technology, which is another promising detector architecture, can be optimized using both Type I and Type II heterostructures. Here the focus will be on Type II Strained Layer (T2SL) Superlattice detectors. T2SL Superlattices based on InAs/(In,GA)Sb have made significant improvements demonstrating focal plane arrays operating around 80 K and with multiple band detection capability. A novel spectroscopic method to evaluate the band offsets of both heterojunction and superlattice detectors is also discussed.

  14. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.;

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...

  15. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Abdul Aleem, B.J. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6Al-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  16. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Aleem, B. J. Abdul

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6A1-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  17. Designing Optical Properties in DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael Brendan

    A grand challenge of modern science has been the ability to predict and design the properties of new materials. This approach to the a priori design of materials presents a number of challenges including: predictable properties of the material building blocks, a programmable means for arranging such building blocks into well understood architectures, and robust models that can predict the properties of these new materials. In this dissertation, we present a series of studies that describe how optical properties in DNA-programmed nanoparticle superlattices can be predicted prior to their synthesis. The first chapter provides a history and introduction to the study of metal nanoparticle arrays. Chapter 2 surveys and compares several geometric models and electrodynamics simulations with the measured optical properties of DNA-nanoparticle superlattices. Chapter 3 describes silver nanoparticle superlattices (rather than gold) and identifies their promise as plasmonic metamaterials. In chapter 4, the concept of plasmonic metallurgy is introduced, whereby it is demonstrated that concepts from materials science and metallurgy can be applied to the optical properties of mixed metallic plasmonic materials, unveiling rich and tunable optical properties such as color and asymmetric reflectivity. Chapter 5 presents a comprehensive theoretical exploration of anisotropy (non-spherical) in nanoparticle superlattice architectures. The role of anisotropy is discussed both on the nanoscale, where several desirable metamaterial properties can be tuned from the ultraviolet to near-infrared, and on the mesoscale, where the size and shape of a superlattice is demonstrated to have a pronounced effect on the observed far-field optical properties. Chapter 6 builds upon those theoretical data presented in chapter 5, including the experimental realization of size and shape dependent properties in DNA-programmed superlattices. Specifically, nanoparticle spacing is explored as a parameter that

  18. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  19. The new Polish nitriding and nitriding like processes in the modern technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Has, Z.; Kula, P. [Technical Univ. of Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Modern technological methods for making nitrided layers and low-friction combined layers have been described. The possibilities of structures and properties forming were analyzed as well as the area and examples of application were considered. Nitrided layers are applied in high loaded frictional couples, widely. They can be formed on steel or cast iron machine parts by the classic gas nitriding process or by modern numerous nitriding technologies.

  20. Indium gallium nitride multijunction solar cell simulation using silvaco atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Baldomero

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential use of wurtzite Indium Gallium Nitride as photovoltaic material. Silvaco Atlas was used to simulate a quad-junction solar cell. Each of the junctions was made up of Indium Gallium Nitride. The band gap of each junction was dependent on the composition percentage of Indium Nitride and Gallium Nitride within Indium Gallium Nitride. The findings of this research show that Indium Gallium Nitride is a promising semiconductor for solar cell use. United...

  1. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  2. Piezoelectrics by Design: A Route through Short-period Perovskite Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Hena; Saha-Dasgupta, T

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory, we study piezoelectricity in short-period superlattices made with combination of ferroelectric and paraelectric components and exhibiting polar discontinuities. We show that piezoelectric response of such a superlattice can be tuned both in terms of sign and magnitude with a choice of its components. As these superlattices with nonswitchable polarization do not undergo ferroelectric transitions, we predict them to exhibit a robust piezoelectric response with weaker temperature dependence compared to their bulk counterparts.

  3. Phase identification of iron nitrides and iron oxy-nitrides with Mossbauer spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsa, DM; Boerma, DO

    2003-01-01

    The Mossbauer spectroscopy of all known Fe nitrides is the topic of this paper. Most of the data were accumulated during a study of the growth of the various Fe nitride phases using molecular beam epitaxy of Fe in the presence of a flux of atomic N, or by post-nitriding freshly grown Fe layers also

  4. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 11-Mar-2013 to 10-Mar-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Boron nitride nanotubes have been proposed as a...and titanium (Ti) metal clusters with boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). First-principles density-functional theory plus dispersion (DFT-D) calculations

  5. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  6. Picosecond luminescence approach to vertical transport in GaAs/GaAlAs superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaud, B.; Chomette, A.; Lambert, B.; Regreny, A.; Romestain, R.; Edel, P.

    1986-03-01

    Picosecond luminescence of GaAs/GaAlAs superlattices has been measured at 5 K. Asymetrical structures where one larger well is introduced at 9000 Å from the surface are studied. It is then possible to estimate the mean transfer time of photoexcited carriers through 9000 Å of superlattice. This time is found to be about 4 nsec in a 40/40 Å superlattice and 800 psec in a 30/30 Å one. This evidences the rather high mobility of small period superlattices in the growth direction.

  7. A GaAssolarAlAs superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnerl, S.; Pesahl, S.; Schomburg, E.; Grenzer, J.; Renk, K. F.; Pellemans, H. P. M.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Pavel'ev, D. G.; Koschurinov, Yu.; Ignatov, A. A.; Melzer, B.; Ustinov, V.; Ivanov, S.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a GaAs/AlAs, wide-miniband, superlattice autocorrelator for picosecond THz radiation pulses (operated at room temperature); the autocorrelator is based on the THz radiation-induced reduction of current through the superlattice. THz radiation (frequency 7.2 THz) from the FELIX (free-electron laser for infrared experiments) was coupled into the superlattice with an antenna system. We measured the current reduction for two time-delayed pulses and found that the signal decreased when the time delay was smaller than the pulse duration. With this superlattice autocorrelator we were able to resolve laser pulses that had a duration of a few picoseconds.

  8. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, K. V., E-mail: malyshev@bmstu.ru [Electronics and Laser Technology Department, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-28

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh–Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F{sup 0}{sub 11}(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional “cubic” diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  9. Feshbach shape resonance for high Tc pairing in superlattices of quantum stripes and quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bianconi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   The Feshbach shape resonances in the interband pairing in superconducting superlattices of quantum wells or quantum stripes is shown to provide the mechanism for high Tc superconductivity. This mechanism provides the Tc amplification driven by the architecture of material: superlattices of quantum wells (intercalated graphite or diborides and superlattices of quantum stripes (doped high Tc cuprate perovskites where the chemical potential is tuned to a Van Hove-Lifshitz singularity (vHs in the electronic energy spectrum of the superlattice associated with the change of the Fermi surface dimensionality in one of the subbands.

  10. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F011(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional "cubic" diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  11. High Coefficient of Performance HgCdTe And Metallic Superlattice-Based Thermoelectric Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of nanoscale superlattices (SLs) as the active elements of high efficiency thermoelectric coolers. Recent models predict that the...

  12. Silicon nitride equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  13. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically......The nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding has been investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Initially, the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x on a pure iron surface starts at grain boundaries meeting the surface, from where the nitride grains grow laterally into the iron...

  14. Photoacoustic transformation of Bessel light beams in magnetoactive superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mityurich, G. S., E-mail: George-mityurich@mail.ru [Belarusian Trade and Economics University of Consumer Cooperatives (Belarus); Chernenok, E. V.; Sviridova, V. V.; Serdyukov, A. N. [Gomel State University (Belarus)

    2015-03-15

    Photoacoustic transformation of the TE mode of a Bessel light beam (BLB) has been studied for piezoelectric detection in short-period superlattices formed by magnetoactive crystals of bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 12}GeO{sub 20}) and bismuth silicate (Bi{sub 12}SiO{sub 20}) types. It is shown that the resulting signal amplitude can be controlled using optical schemes of BLB formation with a tunable cone angle. A resonant increase in the signal amplitude has been found in the megahertz range of modulation frequencies and its dependences on the BLB modulation frequency, geometric sizes of the two-layer structure and piezoelectric transducer, radial coordinate of the polarization BLB mode, and dissipative superlattice parameters are analyzed.

  15. Thermodynamics and Magnetocaloric properties of Fe/Cr Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Michalski, S.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Binek, Ch.

    2011-03-01

    We explore MC properties of tailored Fe/Cr superlattices involving simple 3d metals. Our multilayers are fabricated by pulsed laser deposition with emphasis on maximizing magnetic entropy changes near room temperature. We use nanostructuring to tailor magnetic interaction and exploit geometrical confinement in order to fit the FM to paramagnetic transition temperature of the FM constituent films. In concert this leads to an optimized global metamagnetic transition maximizing the isothermal entropy change. Thermodynamic and MC properties of such Fe/Cr superlattices are studied with the help of SQUID magnetometry. Entropy changes are deduced via the Maxwell relation in single phase regions and via the Clausis-Clapeyron relations at first order metamagnetic transitions, X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity are used to correlate structural data with the magnetic properties. Financial support by NRI, and NSF through EPSCoR, Career DMR-0547887, and MRSEC Grant No. 0820521.

  16. Isolated structures in two-dimensional optical superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xin-Hao; Yang, Bao-Guo; Xu, Xia; Tang, Peng-Ju; Zhou, Xiao-Ji

    2017-10-01

    Overlaying commensurate optical lattices with various configurations called superlattices can lead to exotic lattice topologies and, in turn, a discovery of novel physics. In this study, by overlapping the maxima of lattices, a new isolated structure is created, while the interference of minima can generate various "sublattice" patterns. Three different kinds of primitive lattices are used to demonstrate isolated square, triangular, and hexagonal "sublattice" structures in a two-dimensional optical superlattice, the patterns of which can be manipulated dynamically by tuning the polarization, frequency, and intensity of laser beams. In addition, we propose the method of altering the relative phase to adjust the tunneling amplitudes in "sublattices". Our configurations provide unique opportunities to study particle entanglement in "lattices" formed by intersecting wells and to implement special quantum logic gates in exotic lattice geometries.

  17. Measuring spin correlations in optical lattices using superlattice potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind; Andersen, Brian Møller; Bruun, Georg Morten;

    2011-01-01

    We suggest two experimental methods for probing both short- and long-range spin correlations of atoms in optical lattices using superlattice potentials. The first method involves an adiabatic doubling of the periodicity of the underlying lattice to probe neighboring singlet (triplet) correlations...... for fermions (bosons) by the occupation of the resulting vibrational ground state. The second method utilizes a time-dependent superlattice potential to generate spin-dependent transport by any number of prescribed lattice sites, and probes correlations by the resulting number of doubly occupied sites....... For experimentally relevant parameters, we demonstrate how both methods yield large signatures of antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly repulsive fermionic atoms in a single shot of the experiment. Lastly, we show how this method may also be applied to probe d-wave pairing, a possible ground-state candidate...

  18. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Jonas R. F., E-mail: jonas.iasd@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC) - Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  19. Nonlinear thermoelectric efficiency of superlattice-structured nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbaschi, Hossein; Lovén, John; Courteaut, Klara; Wacker, Andreas; Leijnse, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate nonlinear ballistic thermoelectric transport in a superlattice-structured nanowire. By a special choice of nonuniform widths of the superlattice barriers—analogous to antireflection coating in optical systems—it is possible to achieve a transmission which comes close to a square profile as a function of energy. We calculate the low-temperature output power and power-conversion efficiency of a thermoelectric generator based on such a structure and show that the efficiency remains high also when operating at a significant power. To provide guidelines for experiments, we study how the results depend on the nanowire radius, the number of barriers, and on random imperfections in barrier width and separation. Our results indicate that high efficiencies can indeed be achieved with today's capabilities in epitaxial nanowire growth.

  20. Coupled bloch-phonon oscillations in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekorsy; Bartels; Kurz; Kohler; Hey; Ploog

    2000-07-31

    We investigate coherent Bloch oscillations in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs superlattices with electronic miniband widths larger than the optical phonon energy. In these superlattices the Bloch frequency can be tuned into resonance with the optical phonon. Close to resonance a direct coupling of Bloch oscillations to LO phonons is observed which gives rise to the coherent excitation of LO phonons. The density necessary for driving coherent LO phonons via Bloch oscillations is about 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the density necessary to drive coherent LO phonons in bulk GaAs. The experimental observations are confirmed by the theoretical description of this phenomenon [A.W. Ghosh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1084 (2000)].

  1. Resonant tunnelling in a Fibonacci bilayer graphene superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sinha, C. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Biswas, R. [Department of Physics, PK College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal (India)

    2010-02-15

    The transmission coefficients (TCs) and angularly averaged conductance for quasi-particle transport are studied for a bilayer graphene superlattice arranged according to the Fibonacci sequence. The transmission is found to be symmetric around the superlattice growth direction and highly sensitive to the direction of the quasi-particle incidence. The transmission spectra are fragmented and appear in groups due to the quasi-periodicity of the system. The average conductance shows interesting structures sharply dependent on the height of the potential barriers between two graphene strips. The low-energy conductance due to Klein transmission is substantially modified by the inclusion of quasi-periodicity in the system. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Phonons in Ge/Si superlattices with Ge quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Milekhin, A G; Pchelyakov, O P; Schulze, S; Zahn, D R T

    2001-01-01

    Ge/Si superlattices with Ge quantum dots obtained by means of molecular-beam epitaxy were investigated by means of light Raman scattering under resonance conditions. These structures are shown to have oscillation properties of both two-dimensional and zero-dimensional objects. Within spectrum low-frequency range one observes twisted acoustic phonons (up to 15 order) typical for planar superlattices. Lines of acoustic phonons are overlapped with a wide band of continuous emission. Analysis of frequencies of Ge and Ge-Si optical phonons shows that Ge quantum dots are pseudoamorphous ones and mixing of Ge and Si atoms is a negligible one. One detected low-frequency shift of longitudinal optical phonons at laser excitation energy increase (2.54-2.71 eV)

  3. Isolated Structures in Two-Dimensional Optical Superlattice

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Xinhao; Xu, Xia; Tang, Pengju; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2016-01-01

    Overlaying commensurate optical lattices with various configurations called superlattices can lead to exotic lattice topologies and, in turn, a discovery of novel physics. In this study, by overlapping the maxima of lattices, a new isolated structure is created, while the interference of minima can generate various "sublattice" patterns. Three different kinds of primitive lattices are used to demonstrate isolated square, triangular, and hexagonal "sublattice" structures in a two-dimensional optical superlattice, the patterns of which can be manipulated dynamically by tuning the polarization, frequency, and intensity of laser beams. In addition, we propose the method of altering the relative phase to adjust the tunneling amplitudes in "sublattices." Our configurations provide unique opportunities to study particle entanglement in "lattices" formed by intersecting wells and to implement special quantum logic gates in exotic lattice geometries.

  4. Epitaxial growth of III-V nitrides and phase separation and ordering in indium gallium nitride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Dharanipal

    The family of III-V nitrides are wide band-gap semiconductors with a broad range of opto-electronic applications in LEDs, laser diodes, UV detectors as well as high temperature/high frequency devices. Due to the lack of good quality native substrates, GaN is grown on foreign substrates that have a lattice and thermal mismatch with GaN. This results in a material with a high density of defects, which in turn adversely affects the opto-electronic properties of the epilayer. In this study, GaN films were epitaxially grown on various substrates (C-plane sapphire, A-plane sapphire, SiC and ZnO) by molecular beam epitaxy. Additionally, GaN homoepitaxy onto laterally overgrown thick GaN substrates was investigated. It was demonstrated that the polarity of the GaN film plays a major role in determining the properties of the films. The growth parameters were optimized to eliminate inversion domain boundaries, which result in domains of opposite polarity in the GaN lattice. For growth on A-plane sapphire, it was found that substrate nitridation and low temperature buffer deposition are critical in order to obtain good epitaxial growth, in spite of the relatively small mismatch between the film and substrate. A crystallographic model was developed to explain this observation. By optimizing growth parameters, GaN films with excellent structural, transport, optical and device properties were grown. The second part of this research involves growth of ternary alloys and superlattice structures, which are essential in the fabrication of many devices. It was found that the InN-GaN pseudo-binary system is not homogeneous over the entire composition range. Due to the mismatch between the tetrahedral radii of GaN and InN, InGaN alloys exhibited phase separation and long-range atomic ordering. Investigations of InxGa1-xN films grown over a wide range of compositions by XRD and TEM showed that the predominant strain relieving mechanism was phase separation in films with x > 0.2, and

  5. Structural, Electronic, and Optical Properties of Superhard Materials tP10-FeB4 and I4 1 /acd-FeB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze-Cheng; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Zhan, Li-Bo; Yi, You-Gen

    2017-04-01

    The geometrical, electronic, and optical properties of superhard structures tP10-FeB4 and I4 1 /acd-FeB4 have been investigated using different density functional theory (DFT) approaches. The geometrical and electronic properties were calculated using DFT with projector augmented wave pseudopotentials. To obtain reasonable fundamental bandgaps and optical properties, we performed post-DFT calculations by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) based on Green's function calculations. The absorption, reflectivity, refractivity, and photoconductivity were calculated, analyzed, and compared with results available in literature. The results of the BSE method show that the optical properties of both the tP10-FeB4 and I4 1 /acd-FeB4 structures demonstrate several novel characteristics, implying they are potential optical materials with various applications.

  6. Tribological Characteristics of Single-phase AlMgB14 and Nanocomposite AlMgB14-TiB2 Superhard Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Zhu, Dong [Eaton Corporation; Cook, Bruce A [Ames Laboratory; Elmoursi, Alaa A [Eaton Corporation

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the friction and wear characteristics of AlMgB14 and AlMgB14-TiB2 superhard coatings, produced by pulse laser deposition (PLD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD), respectively. Tests were conducted under unidirectional and reciprocating sliding against AISI 52100 bearing steel in both dry and oil-lubricated conditions. The AlMgB14 coating exhibited an encouraging but short-lived low friction stage (u = 0.2) in dry sliding. The AlMgB14-TiB2 coating reduced the wear rates by one order of magnitude for itself and three orders of magnitude for the counterface compared with the uncoated M2 tool steel in dry sliding. This nanocomposite coating also demonstrated significant extension (>2.5X) of the low friction (non-scuffing) stage in a lubricant starvation sliding.

  7. Effect of oxidation time on the microstructure and properties of ceramic coatings prepared by microarc oxidation on 7A04 superhard aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Chen, Hui; Miao, Jingguo; Du, Juan

    2017-07-01

    Under the sodium aluminates’ system, microarc oxidation treatment was conducted on the superhard aluminum alloy 7A04 for different times. The microstructure of microarc oxidation ceramic layer was investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The influences of different oxidation times on the adhesion strength of ceramic layer and substrate, the morphology of surface and cross-section, the phase composition and the electrochemical properties were studied. The results indicated that the connection of the coating and substrate appears to be metallurgical bonding and dense ceramic layer, and the surface is in a “volcanic vent” morphology, which is composed of γ-Al2O3 and little α-Al2O3. The corrosion resistance of ceramic layer is improved significantly in contrast with that of the substrate.

  8. Heterogenous Material Integration and Band Engineering With Type II Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    of chemical vapor deposited graphene transferred to SiO2 . Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 122108 (2011). 113 Ferrari, A. C. Raman spectroscopy of graphene ...extrinsic performance limits of graphene devices on SiO2 . Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 206-209 (2008). 130 Fang, T., Konar, A., Xing, H. & Jena, D. Mobility...AlSb strained layer superlattices. 15. SUBJECT TERMS crystal growth, characterization, semiconductor fabrication, infrared detectors, graphene

  9. Transparent conducting oxides: a δ-doped superlattice approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Valentino R; Seo, Sung S Ambrose; Lee, Suyoun; Kim, Jun Sung; Choi, Woo Seok; Okamoto, Satoshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-08-11

    Metallic states appearing at interfaces between dissimilar insulating oxides exhibit intriguing phenomena such as superconductivity and magnetism. Despite tremendous progress in understanding their origins, very little is known about how to control the conduction pathways and the distribution of charge carriers. Using optical spectroscopic measurements and density-functional theory (DFT) simulations, we examine the effect of SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layer thickness on the optical transparency and carrier distribution in La δ-doped STO superlattices. We experimentally observe that these metallic superlattices remain highly transparent to visible light; a direct consequence of the appropriately large gap between the O 2p and Ti 3d states. In superlattices with relatively thin STO layers, we predict that three-dimensional conduction would occur due to appreciable overlap of quantum mechanical wavefunctions between neighboring δ-doped layers. These results highlight the potential for using oxide heterostructures in optoelectronic devices by providing a unique route for creating novel transparent conducting oxides.

  10. Interface disorder and transport properties in HTC/CMR superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, N.; Guimpel, J.; Sirena, M.; Steren, L.B.; Campillo, G.; Saldarriaga, W.; Gomez, M.E

    2004-08-01

    The physical properties of superlattices are affected by interface disorder, like roughness and interdiffusion. X-ray diffraction allows its measurement through modeling and structure refinement. The high-T{sub c} RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (RBCO) and colossal magnetoresistance La{sub x}A{sub 1-x}MnO{sub 3} (LAMO) perovskites are interesting superlattice partners given their similar lattice parameters and because the combination of magnetic and superconducting properties is interesting for both basic and applied research. We have investigated the structural and transport properties of YBCO/La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} and GdBCO/La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.04}MnO{sub 3} superlattices grown by sputtering on (1 0 0)MgO. We find a roughness of 1 RBCO unit cell and a 30% interdiffusion in the same length from the interfaces for all samples. The superconducting behavior is found strongly dependent on the LAMO layer thickness.

  11. Shape-Anisotropy Driven Symmetry Transformations in Nanocrystal Superlattice Polymorphs

    KAUST Repository

    Bian, Kaifu

    2011-04-26

    Despite intense research efforts by research groups worldwide, the potential of self-assembled nanocrystal superlattices (NCSLs) has not been realized due to an incomplete understanding of the fundamental molecular interactions governing the self-assembly process. Because NCSLs reside naturally at length-scales between atomic crystals and colloidal assemblies, synthetic control over the properties of constituent nanocrystal (NC) building blocks and their coupling in ordered assemblies is expected to yield a new class of materials with remarkable optical, electronic, and vibrational characteristics. Progress toward the formation of suitable test structures and subsequent development of NCSL-based technologies has been held back by the limited control over superlattice spacing and symmetry. Here we show that NCSL symmetry can be controlled by manipulating molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface and the surrounding solvent. Specifically, we demonstrate solvent vapor-mediated NCSL symmetry transformations that are driven by the orientational ordering of NCs within the lattice. The assembly of various superlattice polymorphs, including face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, is studied in real time using in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) under controlled solvent vapor exposure. This approach provides quantitative insights into the molecular level physics that controls solvent-ligand interactions and assembly of NCSLs. Computer simulations based on all-atom molecular dynamics techniques confirm several key insights gained from experiment. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Theory of THz harmonic generation in semiconductor superlattices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mauro F.; Winge, David O.; Wacker, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Superlattices are artificial structures with a wide range of applications and open possibilities for controlling and study transport and optical [M.F. Pereira Jr., Phys. Rev. B 52, (1995)] properties of semiconductors. In this work, we start from the full Nonequilibrium Greens Functions approach [A. Wacker et a, IEEE Journal of Sel. Top. in Quantum Electron.,19 1200611, (2013),T. Schmielau and M.F. Pereira, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 231111, (2009)] to obtain Voltage-Current curves and compare them with experiments. By adjusting the numerical solutions of the corresponding Dyson equations to a simple model, analytical solutions are given for the nonlinear response of a biased superlattice under sub-THz radiation. The frequency multiplication process leading to multiple harmonicgeneration is described. This hybrid approach leads to predictive simulations and may have important application for a new generation of devices where the superlattices are used as both sources and detectors and may be particular useful for high resolution transient spectroscopy [A.A. Yablokov et at, IEEE Transactions on THz Science and Technology 5, 845 (2015)].

  13. Manganite/Cuprate Superlattice as Artificial Reentrant Spin Glass

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Junfeng

    2016-05-04

    Emerging physical phenomena at the unit-cell-controlled interfaces of transition-metal oxides have attracted lots of interest because of the rich physics and application opportunities. This work reports a reentrant spin glass behavior with strong magnetic memory effect discovered in oxide heterostructures composed of ultrathin manganite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and cuprate La2CuO4 (LCO) layers. These heterostructures are featured with enhanced ferromagnetism before entering the spin glass state: a Curie temperature of 246 K is observed in the superlattice with six-unit-cell LSMO layers, while the reference LSMO film with the same thickness shows much weaker magnetism. Furthermore, an insulator-metal transition emerges at the Curie temperature, and below the freezing temperature the superlattices can be considered as a glassy ferromagnetic insulator. These experimental results are closely related to the interfacial spin reconstruction revealed by the first-principles calculations, and the dependence of the reentrant spin glass behavior on the LSMO layer thickness is in line with the general phase diagram of a spin system derived from the infinite-range SK model. The results of this work underscore the manganite/cuprate superlattices as a versatile platform of creating artificial materials with tailored interfacial spin coupling and physical properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskin, Menderes

    2011-05-01

    We study the ground-state phases of the Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice in two dimensions, including the superfluid phase and the Mott and charge-density-wave insulators. First, we discuss the single-particle Hofstadter problem, and show that the presence of a checkerboard superlattice gives rise to a magnetic flux-independent energy gap in the excitation spectrum. Then, we consider the many-particle problem, and derive an analytical mean-field expression for the superfluid-Mott and superfluid-charge-density-wave insulator phase transition boundaries. Finally, since the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model on a checkerboard superlattice is in many ways similar to that of the extended Bose-Hubbard model, we comment on the effects of magnetic field on the latter model, and derive an analytical mean-field expression for the superfluid-insulator phase transition boundaries as well. This work is supported by Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (FP7-PEOPLE-IRG-2010-268239).

  15. Spectral properties of Fibonacci superlattices formed using armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A. M.; Litvynchuk, S. I.; Bagliuk, S. V.; Lazarenko, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss and analyze the dependence spectra of the transmission coefficient T on the quasiparticle energy E of one variety of graphene-based Fibonacci superlattices (SL). The SL is built from armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNR), and the quasi-periodicity is produced by metal-like (MGNR) and semiconductor (SCGNR) ribbons, placed along the lattice growth axis in accordance with the Fibonacci sequence, which are used as individual SL elements. It is shown that the difference in the values of quantized transverse quasi-momentum of electrons in MGNR and SCGNR is enough to form an effective quasi-periodic modulation in the examined structure (no additional factors required), and the optimal nanoribbon width range for this purpose is determined. We also analyzed the dependence of the spectral properties of the test structure on the geometric parameters of the superlattice, and the external electrostatic potential. We paid particular attention to the fact that each Fibonacci generation had a Dirac superlattice band gap. The results of the study can be useful in the determination of optimal parameters for graphene-based nanoelectronic devices.

  16. Thermoelectric properties of strontium titanate superlattices incorporating niobium oxide nanolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2014-04-22

    A novel superlattice structure based on epitaxial nanoscale layers of NbOx and Nb-doped SrTiO3 is fabricated using a layer-by-layer approach on lattice matched LAO substrates. The absolute Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the [(NbOx) a/(Nb-doped SrTiO3)b]20 superlattices (SLs) were found to increase with decreasing layer thickness ratio (a/b ratio), reaching, at high temperatures, a power factor that is comparable to epitaxial Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STNO) films (∼0.7 W m-1 K-1). High temperature studies reveal that the SLs behave as n-type semiconductors and undergo an irreversible change at a varying crossover temperature that depends on the a/b ratio. By use of high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, the irreversible changes are identified to be due to a phase transformation from cubic NbO to orthorhombic Nb2O5, which limits the highest temperature of stable operation of the superlattice to 950 K. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. Structure and magnetic properties of thin films and superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Bentall, M J

    2002-01-01

    Thin layers of rare earth elements and Laves phase superlattices were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Their structure and magnetic properties have been probed using x-ray and neutron scattering, magnetisation measurements and high resolution electron microscopy. When holmium is grown on yttrium, the x-ray scattering from layers with a thickness below T sub c ' 115 A is characteristic of a pseudomorphic layer with the same in-plane lattice parameter as the yttrium substrate to within 0.05%. For layers above T sub c ' there is a sharp reduction in misfit strain which is probably due to the creation of edge dislocations. When gadolinium is grown on yttrium, no sharp change of strain of the thin layer was observed up to a thickness of 2920 A. This is characteristic of a pseudomorphic layer, and a failure to nucleate dislocations. For the Laves phase superlattices, a study of the x-ray scattering near several Bragg reflections revealed the presence of numerous superlattice peaks, showing that the samples exhib...

  18. Reversible solvent vapor-mediated phase changes in nanocrystal superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Korgel, Brian A

    2011-04-26

    Colloidal nanocrystals are being explored for use in a variety of applications, from solar cells to transistors to medical diagnostics and therapy. Ordered assemblies of nanocrystals, or superlattices, are one particularly interesting class of these materials, in which the nanocrystals serve as modular building blocks to construct nanostructures by self-assembly with spatial and temporal complexity and unique properties. From a fundamental perspective, the nanocrystals are simple molecular models that can be manipulated and studied to test statistical mechanical and thermodynamic models of crystallization and disorder. An article by Bian et al. in this issue of ACS Nano reports surprising new phase behavior in semiconductor nanocrystal superlattices: reversible transitions between non-close-packed body-centered cubic (bcc) and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, and close-packed face-centered cubic (fcc) structures, observed by real-time in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements, upon solvent vapor exposure and increased interparticle separation. These studies offer new insight and raise new questions about superlattice structure and the forces that control self-assembly. Accompanying computer simulations show that ligand-ligand interactions are important. Furthermore, it appears that ligand-coated nanocrystals have more in common with soft microphase-separated materials, like diblock copolymers and surfactant assemblies, than previously realized.

  19. Shape-anisotropy driven symmetry transformations in nanocrystal superlattice polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Kaifu; Choi, Joshua J; Kaushik, Ananth; Clancy, Paulette; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Hanrath, Tobias

    2011-04-26

    Despite intense research efforts by research groups worldwide, the potential of self-assembled nanocrystal superlattices (NCSLs) has not been realized due to an incomplete understanding of the fundamental molecular interactions governing the self-assembly process. Because NCSLs reside naturally at length-scales between atomic crystals and colloidal assemblies, synthetic control over the properties of constituent nanocrystal (NC) building blocks and their coupling in ordered assemblies is expected to yield a new class of materials with remarkable optical, electronic, and vibrational characteristics. Progress toward the formation of suitable test structures and subsequent development of NCSL-based technologies has been held back by the limited control over superlattice spacing and symmetry. Here we show that NCSL symmetry can be controlled by manipulating molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface and the surrounding solvent. Specifically, we demonstrate solvent vapor-mediated NCSL symmetry transformations that are driven by the orientational ordering of NCs within the lattice. The assembly of various superlattice polymorphs, including face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and body-centered tetragonal (bct) structures, is studied in real time using in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) under controlled solvent vapor exposure. This approach provides quantitative insights into the molecular level physics that controls solvent-ligand interactions and assembly of NCSLs. Computer simulations based on all-atom molecular dynamics techniques confirm several key insights gained from experiment.

  20. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...

  1. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for...nitride nanotubes change with the presence of atomic oxygen were also carried out. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Nanotubes, Boron Nitride, Composites, Theoretical

  2. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, P.

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile s

  3. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  4. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    , the nitriding result is determined largely by the kinetics of the process. The nitriding kinetics have been shown to be characterised by the occurring local near-equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data have...

  5. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  6. Spin Filtering in a Nanowire Superlattice by Dresselhause Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samad Javidan

    2011-01-01

    @@ An InAs/GaSb nanowire Superlattice using GaAs for the impure layers is proposed.Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling eliminates spin degeneracy, induces one miniband in the superlattices to split into two minibands and leads to complete spin polarization and excellent filtering by optimizing the well and barrier widths and GaAs layer distances.

  7. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-07-27

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices.

  8. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  9. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  10. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  11. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C., E-mail: cwang@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Cao, J. C., E-mail: jccao@mail.sim.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terahertz Solid-State Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  12. Nonlinear optical response in Kronig-Penney type graphene superlattice in terahertz regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijuan; Yuan, Rui-Yang; Zhao, Xin; Lv, Jing; Yan, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The terahertz nonlinear optical response in Kronig-Penney (KP) type graphene superlattice is demonstrated. The single-, triple- and quintuple-frequencies of the fifth-order nonlinear responses are investigated for different frequencies and temperatures with the angle φ along the periodicity of the superlattice toward the external field tuning from 0 to π/2. The results show that the fifth-order nonlinear optical conductance of graphene superlattice is enhanced in the terahertz regime when φ = 0, i.e. an external field is applied along the periodicity of the superlattice. The fifth-order nonlinear optical conductances at φ = 0 for different frequencies and temperatures are calculated. The results show that the nonlinear optical conductance is enhanced in low frequency and low temperature. Our results suggest that KP type graphene superlattices are preferred structures for developing graphene-based nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics devices.

  13. ON THE CHARACTERIZATION OF METALLIC SUPERLATTICE STRUCTURES BY X—RAY DIFFRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINGXU; WenxueYU; 等

    1999-01-01

    To solve the problem on the microstructural characterization of metallic superlattices,taking the NiFe/Cu superlattices as example,we show that the sturctures of metallic superlattices can be characterized exactly by combining low-angle X-ray diffraction with high-angle X-ray diffraction.First,we determine exactly the total film thickness by a straightforward and precise method based on a modified Bragg law from the subsidiary maxima around the low-angle X-ray diffraction peak.Then.by combining with the simulation of high-angle X-ray diffraction.we obtain the sturctural parameters such as the superlattice period,the sublayer and buffer thickness,This characterization procedure is also applicable to other types of metallic superlattices.

  14. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  15. Method of synthesizing cubic system boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuzu, S.; Sumiya, H.; Degawa, J.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described for synthetically growing cubic system boron nitride crystals by using boron nitride sources, solvents for dissolving the boron nitride sources, and seed crystals under conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature for maintaining the cubic system boron nitride stable. The method comprises the following steps: preparing a synthesizing vessel having at least two chambers, arrayed in order in the synthesizing vessel so as to be heated according to a temperature gradient; placing the solvents having different eutectic temperatures in each chamber with respect to the boron nitride sources according to the temperature gradient; placing the boron nitride source in contact with a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively higher temperature and placing at least a seed crystal in a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively lower temperature; and growing at least one cubic system boron nitride crystal in each of the solvents in the chambers by heating the synthesizing vessel for establishing the temperature gradient while maintaining conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature.

  16. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  17. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  18. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  19. Plasma Nitriding of Low Alloy Sintered Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiva Mansoorzadeh; Fakhreddin Ashrafizadeh; Xiao-Ying Li; Tom Bell

    2004-01-01

    Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-0.3C and Fe-3Cr-1.4Mn-0.5Mo-0.367C sintered alloys were plasma nitrided at different temperatures. Characterization was performed by microhardness measurement, optical microscopy, SEM and XRD. Both materials had similar nitriding case properties. 1.4% manganese did not change the as-sintered microstructure considerably.It was observed that monophase compound layer, γ, formed with increasing temperature. Compound layer thickness increased with increasing temperature while nitriding depth increased up to a level and then decreased. Core softening was more pronounced at higher temperature owing to cementite coarsening.

  20. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  1. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one precip...... layer between the crystalline nitride and ferrite matrix. Usually precipitates are described as having (semi) coherent or incoherent interfaces, but in this case it is more energetically favourable to create an amorphous layer instead of the incoherent interface....

  2. Synthesis of ternary nitrides by mechanochemical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Zhu, J.J.; Lindelov, H.;

    2002-01-01

    Ternary metal nitrides ( of general formula MxM'N-y(z)) attract considerable interest because of their special mechanical, electrical, magnetic, and catalytic properties. Usually they are prepared by ammonolysis of ternary oxides (MxM'O-y(m)) at elevated temperatures. We show that ternary...... nitrides by mechanochemical alloying of a binary transition metal nitride (MxN) with an elemental transition metal. In this way, we have been able to prepare Fe3Mo3N and Co3Mo3N by ball-milling of Mo2N with Fe and Co, respectively. The transformation sequence from the starting materials ( the binary...

  3. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  4. Dynamics of alkyl chains in monolayer protected metal clusters and their superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, R [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mitra, S [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Johnson, M [Institute Lau-Langevin, BP156, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Pradeep, T [Department of Chemistry and SAIF, IITm, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2007-12-15

    Alkyl chains dynamics in monolayer protected metal cluster (MPC) systems of gold and silver have been studied by the quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. Isolated MPCs investigated are 6, 12 and 18 carbon n-alkyl chain thiolate protected 4 nm diameter gold clusters while the superlattices are their silver analogues. Evolution of dynamics with temperature is found to be very different in the isolated clusters and their superlattices. While continuous evolution of the dynamics of the monolayer was observed in isolated MPCs, it is abrupt in superlattice systems and occurs at a temperature consistent with the superlattice melting detected in calorimetry measurements. A model where the chain undergoes uniaxial rotational diffusion with additional body axis fluctuation was found to describe the data consistently. For the superlattice systems, the chains are found to be held by strong inter-chain interactions below the superlattice melting. The data from the planar silver thiolate systems show similar behavior like the superlattice systems, consistent with the calorimetric data.

  5. The Role of Ligand Packing Frustration in Body-Centered Cubic (bcc) Superlattices of Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Yu, Yixuan; Bosoy, Christian A; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Korgel, Brian A

    2015-07-02

    This paper addresses the assembly of body centered-cubic (bcc) superlattices of organic ligand-coated nanocrystals. First, examples of bcc superlattices of dodecanethiol-capped Au nanocrystals and oleic acid-capped PbS and PbSe nanocrystals are presented and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). These superlattices tend to orient on their densest (110) superlattice planes and exhibit a significant amount of {112} twinning. The same nanocrystals deposit as monolayers with hexagonal packing, and these thin films can coexist with thicker bcc superlattice layers, even though there is no hexagonal plane in a bcc lattice. Both the preference of bcc in bulk films over the denser face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattice structure and the transition to hexagonal monolayers can be rationalized in terms of packing frustration of the ligands. A model is presented to calculate the difference in entropy associated with capping ligand packing frustration in bcc and fcc superlattices.

  6. Progress in MBE grown type-II superlattice photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cory J.; Li, Jian V.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the status of GaSb/InAs type-II superlattice diodes grown and fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory designed for infrared absorption in the 8-12(mu)m range. Recent devices have produced detectivities as high as 8x10 to the tenth power Jones with a differential resistance-area product greater than 6 Ohmcm(sup 2) at 80K with a long wavelength cutoff of approximately 12(mu)m. The measured quantum efficiency of these front-side illuminated devices is close to 30% in the 10-11(mu)m range without antireflection coatings.

  7. Zener tunneling of light waves in an optical superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulinyan, Mher; Oton, Claudio J; Gaburro, Zeno; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Toninelli, Costanza; Wiersma, Diederik S

    2005-04-01

    We report on the observation of Zener tunneling of light waves in spectral and time-resolved transmission measurements, performed on an optical superlattice made of porous silicon. The structure was designed to have two photonic minibands, spaced by a narrow frequency gap. A gradient in the refractive index was introduced to create two optical Wannier-Stark ladders and, at a critical value of the optical gradient, tunneling between energy bands was observed in the form of an enhanced transmission peak and a characteristic time dependence of the transmission.

  8. Theory of the Fermi-level energy in semiconductor superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luscombe, J.H. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA)); Aggarwal, R. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA)); Reed, M.A. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (USA)); Frensley, W.R. (Central Research Laboratories, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, Texas (USA) Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas (USA)); Luban, M. (Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Ames Lab., IA (USA))

    1991-09-15

    A theoretical study of the properties of the Fermi level in semiconductor superlattices (SL's) is made which is based upon the carrier occupation of the minibands in thermal equilibrium. We find, for a fixed carrier density and temperature, that the SL Fermi level can differ significantly from that obtained using commonly employed three-dimensional approximations, depending upon the relative spacings and widths of the minibands, with the SL Fermi level being higher than the corresponding bulk value. We find that the SL Fermi level is a sensitive function of the relative widths of the quantum wells and barriers.

  9. The DUV Stability of Superlattice-Doped CMOS Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T.; Dickie, M.; Cheng, P.; Greer, H. F.; Nikzad, S.; Sgro, J.; Tsur, S.

    2013-01-01

    JPL and Alacron have recently developed a high performance, DUV camera with a superlattice doped CMOS imaging detector. Supperlattice doped detectors achieve nearly 100% internal quantum efficiency in the deep and far ultraviolet, and a single layer, Al2O3 antireflection coating enables 64% external quantum efficiency at 263nm. In lifetime tests performed at Applied Materials using 263 nm pulsed, solid state and 193 nm pulsed excimer laser, the quantum efficiency and dark current of the JPL/Alacron camera remained stable to better than 1% precision during long-term exposure to several billion laser pulses, with no measurable degradation, no blooming and no image memory at 1000 fps.

  10. Electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hemeng; Li, Changan; Song, Yun [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Tianxing, E-mail: txma@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Li-Gang, E-mail: sxwlg@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Lin, Hai-Qing [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices using transfer matrix method. By introducing two kinds of gradient potentials of square barriers along electrons propagation direction, we find that Bloch oscillations up to terahertz can occur. Wannier-Stark ladders, as the counterpart of Bloch oscillation, are obtained as a series of equidistant transmission peaks, and the localization of the electronic wave function is also signature of Bloch oscillation. Furthermore, the period of Bloch oscillation decreases linearly with increasing gradient of barrier potentials.

  11. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy of quantum wells and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach-Ashkenasy, N.; Kronik, L.; Shapira, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Rosenwaks, Y.; Hanna, M.C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Leibovitch, M.; Ram, P. [Physics Department, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) has been employed to monitor optical transitions in quantum well and superlattice structures at room temperature. Excellent agreement is found between theoretical predictions of heavy hole and electron energy level positions and the observed transitions. The results show that using this technique, the complete band diagram of the quantum structure may be constructed. SPS emerges as a powerful tool capable of monitoring optical transitions above the lowest one in a simple to interpret, contactless, and nondestructive way. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Plasma synthesis and HPHT consolidation of BN nanoparticles, nanospheres, and nanotubes to produce nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Christopher

    Plasma methods offer a variety of advantages to nanomaterials synthesis. The process is robust, allowing varying particle sizes and phases to be generated simply by modifying key parameters. The work here demonstrates a novel approach to nanopowder synthesis using inductively-coupled plasma to decompose precursor, which are then quenched to produce a variety of boron nitride (BN)-phase nanoparticles, including cubic phase, along with short-range-order nanospheres (e.g., nano-onions) and BN nanotubes. Cubic BN (c-BN) powders can be generated through direct deposition onto a chilled substrate. The extremely-high pyrolysis temperatures afforded by the equilibrium plasma offer a unique particle growth environment, accommodating long deposition times while exposing resulting powders to temperatures in excess of 5000K without any additional particle nucleation and growth. Such conditions can yield short-range ordered amorphous BN structures in the form of 20nm diameter nanospheres. Finally, when introducing a rapid-quenching counter-flow gas against the plasma jet, high aspect ratio nanotubes are synthesized, which are collected on substrate situated radially. The benefits of these morphologies are also evident in high-pressure/high-temperature consolidation experiments, where nanoparticle phases can offer a favorable conversion route to super-hard c-BN while maintaining nanocrystallinity. Experiments using these morphologies are shown to begin to yield c-BN conversion at conditions as low as 2.0 GPa and 1500°C when using micron sized c-BN seeding to create localized regions of high pressures due to Hertzian forces acting on the nanoparticles.

  13. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapczinski Myriam Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can be improved for samples treated with the following conditions: nitriding time of 3 h; plasma atmosphere consisting of 80%N2+20%H2 or 20%N2+80%H2; sample temperature during nitriding of 600 or 800 degreesC.

  14. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  15. Materials synthesis: Two-dimensional gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is used as a capping sheet to synthesize 2D gallium nitride by means of migration-enhanced encapsulation growth. This technique may allow the stabilization of 2D materials that are not amenable to synthesis by traditional methods.

  16. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  17. Reticulated porous silicon nitride-based ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzocchi, Mauro; Medri, Valentina; Guicciardi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The interest towards the production of porous silicon nitride originates from the unique combination of light weight, of mechanical and physical properties typical of this class of ceramics that make them attractive for many engineering applications. Although pores are generally believed to deteriorate the mechanical properties of ceramics (the strength of porous ceramics decreases exponentially with an increase of porosity), the recent literature reports that porous silicon nitride can exhib...

  18. Elastic superlattices with simultaneously negative effective mass density and shear modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Mora, I. S.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Pérez-Rodríguez, F.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of superlattices with layers of rubber and polyurethane foam, which can be either conventional or auxetic. Phononic dispersion calculations show a second pass band for transverse modes inside the lowest band gap of the longitudinal modes. In such a band, the superlattices behave as a double-negative elastic metamaterial since the effective dynamic mass density and shear modulus are both negative. The pass band is associated to a Fabry-Perot resonance band which turns out to be very narrow as a consequence of the high contrast between the acoustic impedances of the superlattice components.

  19. Physical properties of ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system in electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Wei; Lo Veng-Cheong; Bai Bao-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the differential operator technique, a transverse Ising model (TIM) in the effective-field theory is developed to study the physical properties of a ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system. The effects of an external electric field on the polarization, susceptibility and pyroelectric coefficient of the ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system are discussed in detail. The susceptibility of the ferroelectric superlattice A3/B3 system decreases with the increase of the electric field, implying that the polarization is weak.

  20. The intensive terahertz electroluminescence induced by Bloch oscillations in SiC natural superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, Vladimir; Andrianov, Alexandr; Petrov, Alexey; Zakhar'in, Alexey; Lepneva, Ala; Shkrebiy, Pavel

    2012-10-09

    : We report on efficient terahertz (THz) emission from high-electric-field-biased SiC structures with a natural superlattice at liquid helium temperatures. The emission spectrum demonstrates a single line, the maximum of which shifts linearly with increases in bias field. We attribute this emission to steady-state Bloch oscillations of electrons in the SiC natural superlattice. The properties of the THz emission agree fairly with the parameters of the Bloch oscillator regime, which have been proven by high-field electron transport studies of SiC structures with natural superlattices.

  1. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...... density approximation (LDA) with a semi-empirical correction for the ‘‘LDA gap error’’. A similarity is observed between the results of calculations for an InGaN/GaN superlattice (with one monolayer of InGaN) and the experimental results. This indicates that the fabricated InN quantum wells may contain...

  2. Effect of the degree of disorder on electronic and optical properties in random superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E. G.; Su, W. P.; Ting, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional tight-binding calculation is developed and used to study disorder effects in a realistic random superlattice. With increasing disorder, a tendency of possible indirect-direct band-gap transition is suggested. Direct evidence of mobility edges between localized and extended states in three-dimensional random systems is given. As system disorder increases, the optical absorption intensities increase dramatically from five to forty-five times stronger than the ordered (GaAs)(sub 1)/(AlAs)(sub 1) superlattice. It is believed that the degree of disorder significantly affects electronic and optical properties of GaAs/AlAs random superlattices.

  3. Optical Properties of Self-Organized PbS Quantum Dot Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Chang-Hui; YAO Lian-Zeng; MU Ji-Mei; SHI Gang; ZHANG Li-De

    2000-01-01

    Self-organization of PbS into quantum dot superlattices has been demonstrated for the first time, and hexaplanar colloidal crystals 1 - 10 μm in size made from PbS quantum dots 3 - 6 nm in diameter are revealed in transmissionelectron microscope micrographs, and the inner structures of the superlattices can be seen by a high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra have been recorded. The ordering of the superlattices is crucial for the understanding of the fundamental properties of quantum-dot arrays, as well as for their optimal utilization in optical and electronic applications.

  4. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  5. Modelling of the layer evolution during nitriding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, U.; Oseguera, J.; Schabes, P. [CEM, Atizapan (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    The evolution of concomitant layers of nitrides is presented. The layer formation is experimentally achieved through two processes: Nitriding with a weakly ionized plasma and nitrogen post-discharge nitriding. The nitriding processes were performed on samples of pure iron and carbon steel. Nitriding temperatures were close but different from the eutectoid transformation point temperature. The experimental layer growth pattern is compared with a model of mass transfer, in which interface mass balance is considered. In the model the authors have considered the formation of one and two compact nitride layers. For short time of treatment, it is shown that a parabolic profile does not satisfactorily describe the layer growth.

  6. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monson, Todd C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pearce, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or as inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.

  7. Multi-objective optimization of steel nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cavaliere

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel nitriding is a thermo-chemical process largely employed in the machine components production to solve mainly wear and fatigue damage in materials. The process is strongly influenced by many different variables such as steel composition, nitrogen potential (range 0.8–35, temperature (range 350–1200 °C, time (range 2–180 hours. In the present study, the influence of such parameters affecting the nitriding layers' thickness, hardness, composition and residual stress was evaluated. The aim was to streamline the process by numerical–experimental analysis allowing to define the optimal conditions for the success of the process. The optimization software that was used is modeFRONTIER (Esteco, through which was defined a set of input parameters (steel composition, nitrogen potential, nitriding time, etc. evaluated on the basis of an optimization algorithm carefully chosen for the multi-objective analysis. The mechanical and microstructural results belonging to the nitriding process, performed with different processing conditions for various steels, are presented. The data were employed to obtain the analytical equations describing nitriding behavior as a function of nitriding parameters and steel composition. The obtained model was validated through control designs and optimized by taking into account physical and processing conditions.

  8. Low dark current N structure superlattice MWIR photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Muti, Abdullah; Turan, Rasit; Ergun, Yuksel; Aydinli, Atilla

    2014-06-01

    Commercially available read out integrated circuits (ROICs) require the FPA to have high dynamic resistance area product at zero bias (R0A) which is directly related to dark current of the detector. Dark current arises from bulk and surface contributions. Recent band structure engineering studies significantly suppressed the bulk contribution of the type-II superlattice infrared photodetectors (N structure, M structure, W structure). In this letter, we will present improved dark current results for unipolar barrier complex supercell superlattice system which is called as "N structure". The unique electronic band structure of the N structure increases electron-hole overlap under bias, significantly. N structure aims to improve absorption by manipulating electron and hole wavefunctions that are spatially separated in T2SLs, increasing the absorption while decreasing the dark current. In order to engineer the wavefunctions, we introduce a thin AlSb layer between InAs and GaSb layers in the growth direction which also acts as a unipolar electron barrier. Despite the difficulty of perfect lattice matching of InAs and AlSb, such a design is expected to reduce dark current. Experiments were carried out on Single pixel with mesa sizes of 100 × 100 - 700 × 700 μm photodiodes. Temperature dependent dark current with corresponding R0A resistance values are reported.

  9. Weak Topological Insulators in PbTe/SnTe superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Liu, Junwei; Fu, Liang; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Chaoxing

    2014-03-01

    It is desirable to realize topological phases in artificial structures by engineering electronic band structures. In this paper, we investigate (PbTe)m(SnTe)2n-m superlattices along the [001] direction and find a robust weak topological insulator phase for a large variety of layer numbers m and 2 n - m . We confirm this topologically non-trivial phase by calculating Z2 topological invariants and topological surface states based on the first-principles calculations. We show that the folding of Brillouin zone due to the superlattice structure plays an essential role in inducing topologically non-trivial phases in this system. This mechanism can be generalized to other systems in which band inversion occurs at multiple momenta, and gives us a brand-new way to engineer topological materials in artificial structures. We acknowledge support from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China and the National Natural Science Foundation of China. LF is supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. Beating the amorphous limit in thermal conductivity by superlattices design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-16

    The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We have discovered that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts.

  11. Type-ii binary superlattices for infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razeghi, M.; Mohseni, H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston (United States); Brown, G. J. [WPAFB, Colombus (United States)

    2001-12-01

    III-V quantum wells and superlattices based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb, and related compounds have attracted many attentions due to their unique band alignments and physical properties. Recently, novel electronic and optoelectronic heterostructures have been proposed from this material system for hundred gigahertz logic circuits, terahertz transistors. RTDs, infrared lasers, and infrared detectors. In this paper we will describe the ongoing research at the Center for Quantum Devices to develop the theory, modeling, growth, characterization, and device fabrication techniques for this material system. We have demonstarted the first uncooled infrared detectors from type-II superlattices. The measured detectivity is more than 1 x 10{sup 8} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W at 10.6 {mu}m at room temperature which is higher than the commercially available uncooled photon detectors at similar wavelength. In paralle, we have demonstraed the first high-performance p-i-n type-II photodiode in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range operating at T=80K. The devices with cutoff wavelength of 16 mm showed a responsivity of 3.5 A/W at 80 K leading to a detectivity of {approx}1.51x10{sup 10} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W. Similar devices with cutoff wavelengths up to 25 {mu}m was demonstrated at 80 K. To enhance this technology further, we plan to move from quantum wells to quantum wire and quantum dots.

  12. Microemulsion-based synthesis of copper nanodisk superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Zhao, Yanbao; Guo, Wenjing; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-06-01

    Nanocrystal superlattices (NCSs) comprised of self-assembled copper nanodisks were successfully synthesized in quaternary W/O microemulsions containing Span 80-Tween 80, liquid paraffin and n-butanol. Morphologies, structure and thermal properties of the Cu nanocrystals were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). The reaction conditions which effect the growth of the Cu nanodisks were explored, and a mechanism for the formation of the Cu NCSs is proposed. XRD and TEM studies show that the as-synthesized Cu nanodisks exhibit a cubic crystal structure, and FT-IR and TG analysis show that the surfaces of the Cu nanodisks are covered with surfactants, which assist in the formation of the superlattice and prevent the oxidation of the Cu nanocrystals. Variation of the reaction parameters such as mass ratio of the surfactants and the presence of oleic acid is found to have a significant effect on the formation of the Cu nanodisks.

  13. Commensurability oscillations in a two-dimensional lateral superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John; Long, Andrew; Grant, David; Chowdhury, Suja

    2000-03-01

    We have calculated and measured conduction in a two-dimensional electron gas subject to a weak two-dimensional periodic potential and a normal magnetic field. Simulations with a potential Vx \\cos(2π x/a) + Vy \\cos(2π y/a) show the usual commensurability oscillations in ρ_xx(B) with Vx alone. The introduction of Vy suppresses these oscillations, rather than introducing the additional oscillations in ρ_yy(B) expected from previous perturbation theories. We explain this in terms of drift of the guiding center of cyclotron motion along contours of an effective potential: open orbits of the guiding center contribute to conduction but closed orbits do not. All orbits are closed in a symmetric superlattice with |V_x| = |V_y| and commensurability oscillations are therefore quenched. Experiments on etched superlattices confirm this picture. Conventional lattice-matched samples give a symmetric potential and weak oscillations; the symmetry is broken by the piezoelectric effect in stressed samples, leading to strong oscillations. Periodic modulation of the magnetic field can be treated in the same way, which explains previous experimental results.

  14. Magnetic domain wall energy in Ni/Co superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoki, Kentaro; Nishimura, Takashi; Harimoto, Shotaro; Shiratsuchi, Yu, E-mail: shiratsuchi@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2014-12-15

    The magnetic domain wall energy density σ{sub W} of a Ni/Co superlattice possessing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was determined using the magnetic domain theory derived by Kooy and Enz (1960). To determine σ{sub W}, we obtained the saturation magnetization, magnetic domain period, and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy by individual measurements. Using the magnetic domain period and the ferromagnetic layer thickness, we first determined the dipolar length. The estimated dipolar length was about 15–25 nm, which is in good agreement with the change in the magnetization curve with the ferromagnetic layer thickness. By using the dipolar length and saturation magnetization, the σ{sub W} was calculated to be 4–7 erg/cm{sup 2}. - Highlights: • Magnetic domain wall energy of a Ni/Co superlattice was determined experimentally. • The magnetic domain wall energy was estimated to be 4–8 erg/cm{sup 2}. • Using estimated value, the magnetization curves were reproduced well. • The estimated value is reasonable compared with the other ferromagnetic materials.

  15. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-01-01

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rare-earth system were rarely developed. Here, we develop a new type of ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting PMA based on abundant Heusler alloy families. The superlattice is formed by [MnGa/Co2FeAl] unit with their magnetizations antiparallel aligned. The effective anisotropy (Kueff) over 6 Merg/cm3 is obtained, and the SL can be easily built on various substrates with flexible lattice constants. The coercive force, saturation magnetization and Kueff of SLs are highly controllable by varying the thickness of MnGa and Co2FeAl layers. The SLs will supply a new choice for magnetic recording and spintronics memory application such as magnetic random access memory.

  16. Fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption in semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monozon, B. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-02-01

    Wannier-Mott excitons in a semiconductor layered superlattice (SL) are investigated analytically for the case that the period of the superlattice is much smaller than the 2D exciton Bohr radius. Additionally we assume the presence of a longitudinal external static electric field directed parallel to the SL axis. The exciton states and the optical absorption coefficient are derived in the tight-binding and adiabatic approximations. Strong and weak electric fields providing spatially localized and extended electron and hole states, respectively, are studied. The dependencies of the exciton states and the exciton absorption spectrum on the SL parameters and the electric field strength are presented in an explicit form. We focus on the fine structure of the ground quasi-2D exciton level formed by the series of closely spaced energy levels adjacent from the high frequencies. These levels are related to the adiabatically slow relative exciton longitudinal motion governed by the potential formed by the in-plane exciton state. It is shown that the external electric fields compress the fine structure energy levels, decrease the intensities of the corresponding optical peaks and increase the exciton binding energy. A possible experimental study of the fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption is discussed.

  17. Broadband mid-infrared superlattice light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, R. J.; Provence, S. R.; Norton, D. T.; Boggess, T. F.; Prineas, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice light-emitting diodes were fabricated to form a device that provides emission over the entire 3-5 μm mid-infrared transmission window. Variable bandgap emission regions were coupled together using tunnel junctions to emit at peak wavelengths of 3.3 μm, 3.5 μm, 3.7 μm, 3.9 μm, 4.1 μm, 4.4 μm, 4.7 μm, and 5.0 μm. Cascading the structure recycles the electrons in each emission region to emit several wavelengths simultaneously. At high current densities, the light-emitting diode spectra broadened into a continuous, broadband spectrum that covered the entire mid-infrared band. When cooled to 77 K, radiances of over 1 W/cm2 sr were achieved, demonstrating apparent temperatures above 1000 K over the 3-5 μm band. InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices are capable of emitting from 3 μm to 30 μm, and the device design can be expanded to include longer emission wavelengths.

  18. Dimensional control of cobalt spin state in oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Woon; Choi, W. S.; Okamoto, S.; Sohn, C. H.; Park, H. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Lee, H. N.; Kim, K. W.; Moon, S. J.; Noh, T. W.

    2013-03-01

    Perovskite cobalt oxide is a very intriguing system with various spin states owing to the delicate balance between crystal field splitting and Hund exchange energy. In this talk, we show that its spin state can be altered through dimensional control, enabled by digital synthesis of perovskite cobalt oxide superlattices. We employed a few unit cells of LaCoO3 as an active magnetic layer, separated by LaAlO3 spacer layer. High quality [(LaCoO3) n (LaAlO3) n ]8 (n = 2, 6, and 10) superlattices were fabricated using pulsed laser epitaxy. Spectroscopic tools including x-ray absorption spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy revealed clear evolution of the electronic structure and resultant spin state by changing dimensionality. Specifically, the spin state changed from a high to a low spin state with a larger optical band gap, as the dimension reduced from 3D to 2D. Dynamic mean field calculation supported the critical role of dimensionality on the spin state and electronic structure of LaCoO3.

  19. Artificially engineered Heusler ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q L; Zhang, X M; Miyazaki, T; Mizukami, S

    2015-01-19

    To extend density limits in magnetic recording industry, two separate strategies were developed to build the storage bit in last decade, introduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and adoption of ferrimagnetism/antiferromagnetism. Meanwhile, these properties significantly improve device performance, such as reducing spin-transfer torque energy consumption and decreasing signal-amplitude-loss. However, materials combining PMA and antiferromagnetism rather than transition-metal/rare-earth system were rarely developed. Here, we develop a new type of ferrimagnetic superlattice exhibiting PMA based on abundant Heusler alloy families. The superlattice is formed by [MnGa/Co2FeAl] unit with their magnetizations antiparallel aligned. The effective anisotropy (K(u)(eff)) over 6 Merg/cm(3) is obtained, and the SL can be easily built on various substrates with flexible lattice constants. The coercive force, saturation magnetization and K(u)(eff) of SLs are highly controllable by varying the thickness of MnGa and Co2FeAl layers. The SLs will supply a new choice for magnetic recording and spintronics memory application such as magnetic random access memory.

  20. XRR investigations of II-VI and III-nitrid based DBR-structures, multilayers and superlattices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, Radowan; Schmidt, Thomas; Zargham, Ardalan; Speckmann, Moritz; Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef; Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Thin layers, especially distributed bragg reflectors (DBR), are important components in vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL)- structures. The investigation of AlN/InGaN and MgS/ZnCdSe DBR structures with the method of X-ray reflection (XRR) enables the determination of electron density, multilayer thickness and roughness of the interfaces. Reducing the roughness is of peculiar interest to achieve high reflective DBRs.

  1. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  2. Junctions between a boron nitride nanotube and a boron nitride sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M

    2008-02-20

    For future nanoelectromechanical signalling devices, it is vital to understand how to connect various nanostructures. Since boron nitride nanostructures are believed to be good electronic materials, in this paper we elucidate the classification of defect geometries for combining boron nitride structures. Specifically, we determine possible joining structures between a boron nitride nanotube and a flat sheet of hexagonal boron nitride. Firstly, we determine the appropriate defect configurations on which the tube can be connected, given that the energetically favourable rings for boron nitride structures are rings with an even number of sides. A new formula E = 6+2J relating the number of edges E and the number of joining positions J is established for each defect, and the number of possible distinct defects is related to the so-called necklace and bracelet problems of combinatorial theory. Two least squares approaches, which involve variation in bond length and variation in bond angle, are employed to determine the perpendicular connection of both zigzag and armchair boron nitride nanotubes with a boron nitride sheet. Here, three boron nitride tubes, which are (3, 3), (6, 0) and (9, 0) tubes, are joined with the sheet, and Euler's theorem is used to verify geometrically that the connected structures are sound, and their relationship with the bonded potential energy function approach is discussed. For zigzag tubes (n,0), it is proved that such connections investigated here are possible only for n divisible by 3.

  3. Structural analysis of nitride layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma surface nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Bin Ren [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Xiao Hong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Long Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hong Zhanglian, E-mail: hong_zhanglian@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Hui [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu Sheng [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitride layer was formed on uranium by glow plasma surface nitriding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four zones were observed in the nitride layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemical states of uranium, nitrogen, and oxygen were identified by AES. - Abstract: The nitride layer was formed on uranium metal by a glow plasma surface nitriding method. The structure and composition of the layer were investigated by X-ray diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The nitride layer mainly consisted of {alpha}-phase U{sub 2}N{sub 3} nanocrystals with an average grain size about 10-20 nm. Four zones were identified in the layer, which were the oxide surface zone, the nitride mainstay zone, the oxide-existence interface zone, and the nitrogen-diffusion matrix zone. The gradual decrease of binding energies of uranium revealed the transition from oxide to nitride to metal states with the layer depth, while the chemical states of nitrogen and oxygen showed small variation.

  4. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, [approximately] 10 Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  5. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, {approximately} 10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  6. Controlling Nanocrystal Superlattice Symmetry and Shape-Anisotropic Interactions through Variable Ligand Surface Coverage

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2011-03-09

    The assembly of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) into superstructures with long-range translational and orientational order is sensitive to the molecular interactions between ligands bound to the NC surface. We illustrate how ligand coverage on colloidal PbS NCs can be exploited as a tunable parameter to direct the self-assembly of superlattices with predefined symmetry. We show that PbS NCs with dense ligand coverage assemble into face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattices whereas NCs with sparse ligand coverage assemble into body-centered cubic (bcc) superlattices which also exhibit orientational ordering of NCs in their lattice sites. Surface chemistry characterization combined with density functional theory calculations suggest that the loss of ligands occurs preferentially on {100} than on reconstructed {111} NC facets. The resulting anisotropic ligand distribution amplifies the role of NC shape in the assembly and leads to the formation of superlattices with translational and orientational order. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Simple theoretical analysis of the Einstein’s photoemission from quantum confined superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Roy, S.; Saha, A.; De, D.; Ghatak, K. P.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we study the Einstein's photoemission from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI and HgTe/CdTe quantum well superlattices (QWSLs) with graded interfaces and quantum well effective mass superlattices in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated dispersion relations in the respective cases. Besides, the same has been studied from the afore-mentioned quantum dot superlattices and it appears that the photoemission oscillates with increasing carrier degeneracy and quantizing magnetic field in different manners. In addition, the photoemission oscillates with film thickness and increasing photon energy in quantum steps together with the fact that the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation will introduce new physical ideas and new experimental findings under different external conditions. The influence of band structure is apparent from all the figures and we have suggested three applications of the analyses of this paper in the fields of superlattices and microstructures.

  8. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, Iza; Suski, Tadek; Staszczak, Grzegorz;

    2013-01-01

    with one monolayer of InN and 40 monolayers of GaN. The results are compared with calculations performed for different types of superlattices: InN/GaN, InGaN/GaN, and InN/InGaN/GaN with single monolayers of InN and/or InGaN. The superlattices are simulated by band structure calculations based on the local......Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways of conducting band gap engineering in the green-blue range of the spectrum. The present paper reports results of photoluminescence experiments, including pressure effects, on a superlattice sample consisting of unit cells...

  9. High-Detectivity Type-II Superlattice Detectors for 6-14 um Infrared Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SVT Associates proposes an novel type II superlattice structure to extend the cutoff wavelength and CBIRD SL photo diode structure with unipolar barriers to suppress...

  10. High Electric Field Quantum Transport: Submillimeter Wave AC Stark Localization in Vertical and Lateral Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    superlattices. These experiments have opened the arena of photon assisted transport to semiconductor devices and paved the way for future teraherz: electronics based on quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures.

  11. Engineering the electronic structure of graphene superlattices via Fermi velocity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene superlattices have attracted much research interest in the last years, since it is possible to manipulate the electronic properties of graphene in these structures. It has been verified that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic structure of the system. The electronic structure in the vicinity of these points has been studied for a gapless and gapped graphene superlattice and for a graphene superlattice with a spatially modulated energy gap. In each case a different behavior was obtained. In this work we show that via Fermi velocity engineering it is possible to tune the electronic properties of a graphene superlattice to match all the previous cases studied. We also obtained new features of the system never observed before, reveling that the electronic structure of graphene is very sensitive to the modulation of the Fermi velocity. The results obtained here are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  12. Huge spin-transfer torque in a magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H.; Tseng, P.; Ko, C. W.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2017-09-01

    Huge spin-transfer torque (STT) in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) achieved by superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The magnitude of the STT depends on the number of cells in the superlattice barrier and the nonmagnetic metal layer's thickness. The result shows that the STT of the novel superlattice-barrier MTJ can reach values up to four orders of magnitude greater than those of traditional single-barrier stacks based on three cells superlattice by designing the nonmagnetic metal layer's thickness. In addition, the spin-transfer torque of the proposed MTJ can also be thousands of magnitude greater than those of traditional double-barrier MTJs.

  13. Harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG LiFang; XIE WeiXia; ZHAO HaiTao; FAN WeiLi

    2009-01-01

    We report a harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in air/argon mixture at atmospheric pressure.The bifurcation scenario of harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern with the applied voltage increasing is given.The phase diagram of the pattern types as a function of the applied voltage and the air-concentration is obtained.The hysteresis of pattern transitions at the upward and downward stage of the applied voltage is observed.The correlation measurements indicate that harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern is an interleaving of two different transient sublattices.The spatial power spectrum demonstrates that harmonic hexagonal superlattice pattern has two separate wave vectors.Both small wave vector qh and big wave vector Kh,belong to the harmonic mode,and they obey a triad resonant interaction q1h + q2h,=Kh.

  14. Influence of Fermi velocity engineering on electronic and optical properties of graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aram, Tahereh Nemati [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Neel, 38042 Grenoble (France); Asgari, Asghar, E-mail: asgari@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, using Kronig–Penney model, the electronic states in graphene-based superlattices with various substrates and considering exact electron Fermi velocity values are investigated. The analysis of our results clearly indicates that the difference between Fermi velocity values of gaped and gapless graphene regions determines the patency rate of band gap. Also, using transfer matrix method (TMM) the absorbance spectrum of mentioned structures is calculated. The more important result is that the absorbance of these structures is significantly near zero. - Highlights: • The electronic states in graphene superlattices with various substrates are investigated. • The exact electron Fermi velocity values are considered. • Using TMM the absorbance spectrum of two graphene-based superlattices is calculated. • The widest (narrowest) energy band gap belong to quartz–SiC (quartz–h-BN) superlattice.

  15. Interwell and intrawell magnetoexcitons in GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timofeev, V. B.; Filin, A. I.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of spatially indirect (interwell) excitons in superlattices (SLs) with different barrier widths (different tunneling coupling) is experimentally investigated in a strong enough magnetic field with the use of photoluminescence (PL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE), reflectance spec...

  16. Thermal conductivity measurement of InGaAs/InGaAsP superlattice thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen; YANG Juekuan; ZHUANG Ping; CHEN Minhua; ZHU Jian; CHEN Yunfei

    2006-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of InGaAs/InGaAsP superlattices with different period lengths were measured from 100 to 320 K using 3ω method.In this temperature range, the thermal conductivities were found to decrease with an increase in temperature. For the period length-dependant thermal conductivity, the minimum value does exist at a certain period length, which demonstrates that at a short period length, superlattice thermal conductivity increases with a decrease in the period length. When the period is longer than a certain period length, the interface thermal resistance dominates in phonon transport. The experimental and theoretical results confirmed the previous predictions from the lattice dynamics analysis, i.e. with the increase in period length, the dominant mechanisms of phonon transport in superlattices will shift from wave mode to particle mode. This is crucial for the cutoff of the phonons and lays a sound foundation for the design of superlattice structures.

  17. Structural and magnetic properties of holmium-scandium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of Ho-Sc alloys and superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy have been investigated using x-ray and neutron-diffraction techniques. Structural studies reveal that the alloy samples have different a lattice parameters for the Sc-seed layer and the Ho:Sc alloy grown on top...... of the seed layer; while the superlattices have different a lattice parameters for the Sc seed, and for both the Ho and Sc in the superlattice layers. The structural characteristics are related to the large lattice mismatches (of the order 7%) between the constituent elements. The magnetic moments....... It is found that a good description of the dependence of T-N upon concentration is given by a virtual-crystal model where the peak in the conduction-electron susceptibility varies linearly between that of the pure constituents. In the superlattices, the moments also form a basal-plane helix at T...

  18. Superhard carbon deposited by pulsed high-current arc as protective nanocoating for magnetic hard disks; Superharter Kohlenstoff abgeschieden mit gepulstem Hochstrombogen als Nanoschutzschicht fuer Magnetspeicherplatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhaeuser, M.; Hilgers, H. [IBM Mainz (Germany). Abt. 4627; Witke, T. [Infenion Dresden (Germany). Bereich PVD; Siemroth, P. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie (IWS), Dresden (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Superhard amorphous carbon films (ta-C) deposited by pulsed high-current arc (HCA) possess a good perspective to be used as future ultrathin protective coatings for magnetic hard disks. The ta-C coatings meet all demands concerning the mechanical, chemical and tribological properties required for corrosion and wear protective coatings with thicknesses of 2-3 nm. From the current point of view the deposition technique also qualifies for an industrial mass production. Consequently there is a very good prospect that in near future the high-current arc technique will be the method of choice for carbon deposition in industrial hard disk drive production. (orig.) [German] Superharte amorphe Kohlenstoffschichten (ta-C), die mit gepulstem Hochstrombogen (high-current arc, HCA) abgeschieden werden, besitzen ein hohes Potential als zukuenftige ultraduenne Schutzschichten fuer Magnetspeicherplatten. Die ta-C-Schichten erfuellen alle wesentlichen Anforderungen, die in mechanischer, chemischer und tribologischer Hinsicht an 2-3 nm dicke Verschleiss- und Korrosionsschutzschichten gestellt werden. Auch die Beschichtungstechnik ist aus jetziger Sicht fuer die Massenproduktion geeignet. Damit bestehen sehr gute Aussichten, dass in naher Zukunft die Hochstrombogenverdampfung die Methode der Wahl fuer die Kohlenstoffabscheidung in der industriellen Festplattenproduktion darstellt. (orig.)

  19. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average...

  20. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  1. Transport in weakly-coupled superlattices: A quantitative approach for photon-assisted tunneling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1997-01-01

    Photon-assisted tunneling is studied in weakly-coupled semiconductor superlattices under THz irradiation. Using a microscopic transport model we find excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data for two different samples without using any fitting parameters.......Photon-assisted tunneling is studied in weakly-coupled semiconductor superlattices under THz irradiation. Using a microscopic transport model we find excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data for two different samples without using any fitting parameters....

  2. Electron transport across a quantum wire embedding a saw-tooth superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yuan-Ping; Yan Xiao-Hong; Lu Mao-Wang; Deng Yu-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By developing the recursive Green function method, the transport properties through a quantum wire embedding a finite-length saw-tooth superlattice are studied in the presence of magnetic field. The effects of magnetic modulation and the geometric structures of the superlattice on transmission coefficient are discussed. It is shown that resonant electron gas. The transmission spectrum can be tailored to match requirements through adjusting the size of saw-tooth quantum dot and field strength.

  3. Photonic band structure of one-dimensional aperiodic superlattices composed of negative refraction metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Michał H.; Salejda, Włodzimierz; Klauzer-Kruszyna, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Karol

    2007-05-01

    The dispersion relation for polarized light transmitting through a one-dimensional superlattice composed of aperiodically arranged layers made of ordinary dielectric and negative refraction metamaterials is calculated with finite element method. Generalized Fibonacci, generalized Thue-Morse, double-periodic and Rudin-Shapiro superlattices are investigated, using their periodic approximants. Strong dispersion of metamaterials is taken into account. Group velocities and effective refraction indices in the structures are calculated. The self-similar structure of the transmission spectra is observed.

  4. Tunable Negative Differential Resistance in Planer Graphene Superlattice Resonant Tunneling Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Sattari-Esfahlan, S. M.; Fouladi-Oskuei, J.; S. Shojaei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the controllable negative differential resistance (NDR) in a proposed planar graphene superlattice structure. High value of peak to valley ratio (PVR) is predicted. This is significant because of appearance of NDR with high PVR at low biases. Our finding is important since beside the other potential applications of the graphene, proposes implementation of the graphene based superlattice in electronic devices such as resonant tunneling diode and filters.

  5. Supersolid Phase in One-Dimensional Hard-Core Boson Hubbard Model with a Superlattice Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Huai-Ming; LIANG Ying

    2008-01-01

    The ground state of the one-dimensional hard-core boson Hubbard model with a superlattice potential is studied by quantum Monte Carlo methods. We demonstrate that besides the CDW phase and the Mort insulator phase, the supersolid phase emerges due to the presence of the superlattice potential, which reflects the competition with the hopping term. We also study the densities of sublattices and have a clear idea about the distribution of the bosons on the lattice.

  6. Self-Organization of PbS into Quantum Dots Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Self-organization of PbS into quantum dots superlattices is demonstrated for the first time, and hexaplanar colloidal crystals 1-10m m in size made from PbS quantum dots 4nm in diameter are shown in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) micrograph, and the inner structures of the superlattices can be seen from the High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM).

  7. Controlling Chaos Probability of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a Weak Optical Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; LUO Xiao-Bing

    2009-01-01

    @@ The spatial chaos probability of a Bose-Einstein condensate perturbed by a weak optical superlattice is studied. It is demonstrated that the spatial chaotic solution appears with a certain probability in a given parameter region under a random boundary condition. The effects of the lattice depths and wave vectors on the chaos probability are illustrated, and different regions associated with different chaos probabilities are found. This suggests a feasible scheme for suppressing and strengthening chaos by adjusting the optical superlattice experimentally.

  8. Study on band gap structure of Fibonacci quantum superlattices by using the transfer matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, V.; Castro-Palacio, J. C.; Marí, B.; Monsoriu, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    The scattering properties of particles in a one-dimensional Fibonacci sequence based potential have been analyzed by means of the Transfer Matrix Method. The electronic band gaps are examined comparatively with those obtained using the corresponding periodic potentials. The reflection coefficient shows self-similar properties for the Fibonacci superlattices. Moreover, by using the generalized Bragg's condition, the band gaps positions are derived from the golden mean involved in the design of the superlattice structure.

  9. Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium-Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained Layer Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Minority carrier lifetimes in undoped and Beryllium -doped Type-2 Ga-free, InAs/InAsSb strained layer superlattices (SLS) with...is unlimited. Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium -Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained Layer Superlattices The views, opinions and/or findings contained in...Brook University W-5510 Melville Library West Sayville, NY 11796 -3362 1 ABSTRACT Minority Carrier Lifetime in Beryllium -Doped InAs/InAsSb Strained

  10. Manganites in Perovskite Superlattices: Structural and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Jilili, Jiwuer

    2016-07-13

    Perovskite oxides have the general chemical formula ABO3, where A is a rare-earth or alkali-metal cation and B is a transition metal cation. Perovskite oxides can be formed with a variety of constituent elements and exhibit a wide range of properties ranging from insulators, metals to even superconductors. With the development of growth and characterization techniques, more information on their physical and chemical properties has been revealed, which diversified their technological applications. Perovskite manganites are widely investigated compounds due to the discovery of the colossal magnetoresistance effect in 1994. They have a broad range of structural, electronic, magnetic properties and potential device applications in sensors and spintronics. There is not only the technological importance but also the need to understand the fundamental mechanisms of the unusual magnetic and transport properties that drive enormous attention. Manganites combined with other perovskite oxides are gaining interest due to novel properties especially at the interface, such as interfacial ferromagnetism, exchange bias, interfacial conductivity. Doped manganites exhibit diverse electrical properties as compared to the parent compounds. For instance, hole doped La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 is a ferromagnetic metal, whereas LaMnO3 is an antiferromagnetic insulator. Since manganites are strongly correlated systems, heterojunctions composed of manganites and other perovskite oxides are sunject to complex coupling of the spin, orbit, charge, and lattice degrees of freedom and exhibit unique electronic, magnetic, and transport properties. Electronic reconstructions, O defects, doping, intersite disorder, magnetic proximity, magnetic exchange, and polar catastrophe are some effects to explain these interfacial phenomena. In our work we use first-principles calculations to study the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of manganite based superlattices. Firstly, we investigate the electronic

  11. Optical waveguide loss minimized into gallium nitride based structures grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, A.; Cho, E.; Dogheche, E.; Androussi, Y.; Troadec, D.; Pavlidis, D.; Decoster, D.

    2011-04-01

    The waveguide properties are reported for wide bandgap gallium nitride (GaN) structures grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on sapphire using a AlN/GaN short period-superlattice (SPS) buffer layer system. A detailed optical characterization of GaN structures has been performed using the prism coupling technique in order to evaluate its properties and, in particular, the refractive index dispersion and the propagation loss. In order to identify the structural defects in the samples, we performed transmission electron microscopy analysis. The results suggest that AlN/GaN SPS plays a role in acting as a barrier to the propagation of threading dislocations in the active GaN epilayer; above this defective region, the dislocations density is remarkably reduced. The waveguide losses were reduced to a value around 0.65dB/cm at 1.55 μm, corresponding to the best value reported so far for a GaN-based waveguide.

  12. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouleh Nikzad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  13. Thermal transport across few-layer boron nitride encased by silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Yuxiang; Dumitricǎ, Traian, E-mail: dtraian@umn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Jiang, Jiechao; Meletis, Efstathios [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, 501 West First St., Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracted attention for use in applications. Using equilibrium molecular dynamics, we examine the phonon transport in few-layer h-BN encased by silica (SiO{sub 2}). We report large interfacial thermal resistances, of about 2.2 × 10{sup −8} m{sup 2} K W{sup −1}, which are not sensitive to the number of h-BN layers or the SiO{sub 2} crystallinity. The h-BN/SiO{sub 2} superlattices exhibit ultra-low thermal conductivities across layers, as low as 0.3 W/m K. They are structurally stable up to 2000 K while retaining the low-thermal conductivity attributes. Our simulations indicate that incorporation of h-BN layers and nanoparticles in silica could establish thermal barriers and heat spreading paths, useful for high performance coatings and electronic device applications.

  14. Theoretical luminescence spectra in p-type quantum wells and superlattices based on InGaAsN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Thiago Freire de; Rodrigues, Sara Cristina Pinto [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Silva Junior, Eronides Felisberto da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Sipahi, Guilherme Matos [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Scolfaro, Luisa Maria Ribeiro [Texas State University, San Marcos, TX (United States), Dept. of Physics

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In the past few years, the dilute nitride system, InGaAsN, is proposed as a good candidate for several device applications. InGaAsN is considered a promising material for laser devices working at 1:3 or 1:5{mu}m and high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. Incorporation of In and N into GaAs result in a strong redshift of the emission wavelength. Besides, the strain can be minimized since the opposite effect of In and N on the lattice constant enables lattice matching of InGaAsN on GaAs. However, despite their great potential for applications, the understanding of their physical properties is rather incomplete. In particular, the dominant mechanisms of light emission in these alloys and their dependence on the nitrogen composition are not well established. Such information is crucial not only for a better understanding of the optical properties of the nitrogen containing III-V alloys, but also for a better technological control of alloy formation and optimization light emission efficiency. Another point concerns to investigation in p-type doping in InGaAsN. This is of great importance since, for example, can improve the transport in HBT (Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors) devices. In this work we report on theoretical luminescence spectra calculations for p-doped GaAs/InGaAsN quantum wells and superlattices. The calculations are performed within the k-vector.p-vector method by solving the full 8 x 8 Kane Hamiltonian, generalized to treat different materials. Strain effects due the lattice mismatch between InGaAsN and GaAs are taken into account. By varying the acceptor concentration we analyze the effect of exchange-correlation, which plays an important role in profile potential and electronic transition. These results can explain several important aspects about optical properties in these systems. (author)

  15. In induced reconstructions of Si(1 1 1) as superlattice matched epitaxial templates for InN growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuyyalil, Jithesh [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, F-35708 Rennes (France); Tangi, Malleswararao [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Shivaprasad, S.M., E-mail: smsprasad@jncasr.ac.in [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A novel growth method to form InN at low growth temperatures. ► Use of Si reconstruction as a growth template for group III nitrides. ► Band gap variation of InN – Moss–Burstein shift – non-parabolic conduction band for InN. ► Super lattice matching epitaxy of metal induced reconstructions with III–V unit cell. -- Abstract: Indium induced surface reconstructions of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 are used as templates to grow high quality InN. We grow InN on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7, Si(1 1 1)-4 × 1-In and Si(1 1 1)-1 × 1-In reconstructed surfaces and study the quality of the films formed using complementary characterization tools. InN grown on Si(1 1 1)-1 × 1-In reconstruction shows superior film quality with lowest band-edge emission having a narrow full width at half maximum, intense and narrow 0 0 0 2 X-ray diffraction, low surface roughness and carrier concentration an order lower than other samples. We attribute the high quality of the film formed at 300 °C to the integral matching of InN and super lattice dimensions, we also study the reasons for the band gap variation of InN in the literature. Present study demonstrates the proposed Superlattice Matched Epitaxy can be a general approach to grow good quality InN at much lower growth temperature on compatible In induced reconstructions of the Si surface.

  16. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  17. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Christoph

    The Type II InAs/GaInSb and InAs/InAsSb superlattices are material systems for implementation as photodetector absorbers in infrared imaging applications. In addition to cutoff wavelengths spanning the infrared spectrum, they offer degrees of freedom in their materials design (e.g. layer thicknesses, alloy compositions, number of layers in one superlattice period) that permit the optimization of an infrared photon detector's figures of merit such as detectivity through the tuning of material properties like generation/recombination lifetimes and optical absorption. We describe efforts to obtain accurate electronic band structures of superlattice semiconductors with infrared energy gaps, and employing them to evaluate nonradiative minority carrier lifetimes. Simple device models are utilized to suggest potential performance enhancements that arise from employing superlattices as infrared absorber. We also discuss current efforts to simulate the molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs/InAsSb superlattices to predict dominant native point defects and other growth nonidealities. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors.

  18. High-temperature crystallization of nanocrystals into three-dimensional superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liheng; Willis, Joshua J.; McKay, Ian Salmon; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Qin, Jian; Cargnello, Matteo; Tassone, Christopher J.

    2017-08-01

    Crystallization of colloidal nanocrystals into superlattices represents a practical bottom-up process with which to create ordered metamaterials with emergent functionalities. With precise control over the size, shape and composition of individual nanocrystals, various single- and multi-component nanocrystal superlattices have been produced, the lattice structures and chemical compositions of which can be accurately engineered. Nanocrystal superlattices are typically prepared by carefully controlling the assembly process through solvent evaporation or destabilization or through DNA-guided crystallization. Slow solvent evaporation or cooling of nanocrystal solutions (over hours or days) is the key element for successful crystallization processes. Here we report the rapid growth (seconds) of micrometre-sized, face-centred-cubic, three-dimensional nanocrystal superlattices during colloidal synthesis at high temperatures (more than 230 degrees Celsius). Using in situ small-angle X-ray scattering, we observe continuous growth of individual nanocrystals within the lattices, which results in simultaneous lattice expansion and fine nanocrystal size control due to the superlattice templates. Thermodynamic models demonstrate that balanced attractive and repulsive interparticle interactions dictated by the ligand coverage on nanocrystal surfaces and nanocrystal core size are responsible for the crystallization process. The interparticle interactions can also be controlled to form different superlattice structures, such as hexagonal close-packed lattices. The rational assembly of various nanocrystal systems into novel materials is thus facilitated for both fundamental research and for practical applications in the fields of magnetics, electronics and catalysis.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of the lattice thermal conductivity of Kr/Ar superlattice nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yunfei; Li Deyu; Yang Juekuan; Wu Yonghua; Lukes, J.R.; Majumdar, Arun

    2004-06-15

    The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method has been used to calculate the lattice thermal conductivities of Ar and Kr/Ar nanostructures in order to study the effects of interface scattering, boundary scattering, and elastic strain on lattice thermal conductivity. Results show that interface scattering poses significant resistance to phonon transport in superlattices and superlattice nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the Kr/Ar superlattice nanowire is only about ((1)/(3)) of that for pure Ar nanowires with the same cross-sectional area and total length due to the additional interfacial thermal resistance. It is found that nanowire boundary scattering provides significant resistance to phonon transport. As the cross-sectional area increases, the nanowire boundary scattering decreases, which leads to increased nanowire thermal conductivity. The ratio of the interfacial thermal resistance to the total effective thermal resistance increases from 30% for the superlattice nanowire to 42% for the superlattice film. Period length is another important factor affecting the effective thermal conductivity of the nanostructures. Increasing the period length will lead to increased acoustic mismatch between the adjacent layers, and hence increased interfacial thermal resistance. However, if the total length of the superlattice nanowire is fixed, reducing the period length will lead to decreased effective thermal conductivity due to the increased number of interfaces. Finally, it is found that the interfacial thermal resistance decreases as the reference temperature increases, which might be due to the inelastic interface scattering.

  20. Transport in semiconductor nanowire superlattices described by coupled quantum mechanical and kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, M; Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Melnik, R V N; Prabhakar, S

    2013-08-21

    In this paper we develop a kinetic model for the analysis of semiconductor superlattices, accounting for quantum effects. The model consists of a Boltzmann-Poisson type system of equations with simplified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisions, obtained from the general time-dependent Schrödinger-Poisson model using Wigner functions. This system for superlattice transport is supplemented by the quantum mechanical part of the model based on the Ben-Daniel-Duke form of the Schrödinger equation for a cylindrical superlattice of finite radius. The resulting energy spectrum is used to characterize the Fermi-Dirac distribution that appears in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision, thereby coupling the quantum mechanical and kinetic parts of the model. The kinetic model uses the dispersion relation obtained by the generalized Kronig-Penney method, and allows us to estimate radii of quantum wire superlattices that have the same miniband widths as in experiments. It also allows us to determine more accurately the time-dependent characteristics of superlattices, in particular their current density. Results, for several experimentally grown superlattices, are discussed in the context of self-sustained coherent oscillations of the current density which are important in an increasing range of current and potential applications.

  1. Evolving random fractal Cantor superlattices for the infrared using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, Jeremy A; Lin, Lan; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Ordered and chaotic superlattices have been identified in Nature that give rise to a variety of colours reflected by the skin of various organisms. In particular, organisms such as silvery fish possess superlattices that reflect a broad range of light from the visible to the UV. Such superlattices have previously been identified as 'chaotic', but we propose that apparent 'chaotic' natural structures, which have been previously modelled as completely random structures, should have an underlying fractal geometry. Fractal geometry, often described as the geometry of Nature, can be used to mimic structures found in Nature, but deterministic fractals produce structures that are too 'perfect' to appear natural. Introducing variability into fractals produces structures that appear more natural. We suggest that the 'chaotic' (purely random) superlattices identified in Nature are more accurately modelled by multi-generator fractals. Furthermore, we introduce fractal random Cantor bars as a candidate for generating both ordered and 'chaotic' superlattices, such as the ones found in silvery fish. A genetic algorithm is used to evolve optimal fractal random Cantor bars with multiple generators targeting several desired optical functions in the mid-infrared and the near-infrared. We present optimized superlattices demonstrating broadband reflection as well as single and multiple pass bands in the near-infrared regime.

  2. Thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, P.D., E-mail: pabloborges@ufv.br [Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tec., Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Petersen, J.E.; Scolfaro, L. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Leite Alves, H.W. [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João Del Rei, Caixa Postal 110, São João Del Rei 36300-000, MG (Brazil); Myers, T.H. [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Doping in a manner that introduces anisotropy in order to reduce thermal conductivity is a significant focus in thermoelectric research today. By solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in the constant scattering time (τ) approximation, in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory, we compare the Seebeck coefficient (S) and figure of merit (ZT) of bulk PbTe to PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures and PbTe doping superlattices (SLs) with periodically doped planes. Bismuth and Thallium were used as the n- and p-type impurities, respectively. The effects of carrier concentration are considered via chemical potential variation in a rigid band approximation. The impurity bands near the Fermi level in the electronic structure of PbTe SLs are of Tl s- and Bi p-character, and this feature is independent of the doping concentration or the distance between impurity planes. We observe the impurity bands to have a metallic nature in the directions perpendicular to the doping planes, yet no improvement on the values of ZT is found when compared to bulk PbTe. For the PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructures, the calculated S presents good agreement with recent experimental data, and an anisotropic behavior is observed for low carrier concentrations (n<10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}). A large value of ZT{sub ||} (parallel to the growth direction) of 3.0 is predicted for n=4.7×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and T=700 K, whereas ZT{sub p} (perpendicular to the growth direction) is found to peak at 1.5 for n=1.7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Both electrical conductivity enhancement and thermal conductivity reduction are analyzed. - Graphical abstract: Figure of merit for PbTe/SnTe/PbTe heterostructure along the [0 0 1] direction, P.D. Borges, J.E. Petersen, L. Scolfaro, H.W. Leite Alves, T.H. Myers, Improved thermoelectric properties of IV–VI-based heterostructures and superlattices. - Highlights: • Thermoelectric properties of IV

  3. Two-dimensional Confinement of Heavy Fermions in Artificial Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Hiroaki

    2011-03-01

    Low dimensionality and strong electron-electron Coulomb interactions are both key parameters for novel quantum states of condensed matter. A metallic system with the strongest electron correlations is reported in rare-earth and actinide compounds with f electrons, known as heavy-fermion compounds, where the effective mass of the conduction electrons are strikingly enhanced by the electron correlations up to some hundreds times the free electron mass. To date the electronic structure of all heavy-fermion compounds is essentially three-dimensional. We realized experimentally a two-dimensional heavy fermion system, adjusting the dimensionality in a controllable fashion. We grew artificial superlattices of CeIn 3 (m)/ LaIn 3 (n), in which m -layers of heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeIn 3 and n -layers of a non-magnetic isostructual compound LaIn 3 are stacked alternately, by a molecular beam epitaxy. By reducing the thickness of the CeIn 3 layers, the magnetic order was suppressed and the effective electron mass was further enhanced. The Néel temperature becomes zero at around m = 2 , concomitant with striking deviations from the standard Fermi liquid low-temperature electronic properties. Standard Fermi liquid behaviors are, however, recovered under high magnetic field. These behaviors imply new ``dimensional tuning'' towards a quantum critical point. We also succeeded to fabricate artificial superlattices of a heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn 5 and non-magnetic divalent Yb-compound YbCoIn 5 . Superconductivity survives even in CeCoIn 5 (3)/ YbCoIn 5 (5) films, while the thickness of CeCoIn 5 layer, 2.3 nm, is comparable to the c -axis coherence length ξc ~ 2 nm. This work has been done in collaboration with Y. Mizukami, S. Yasumoto, M. Shimozawa, H. Kontani, T. Shibauchi, T. Terashima and Y. Matsuda.superconductivity is realized in the artificial superlattices. This work has been done in collaboration with Y. Mizukami, S. Yasumoto, M. Shimozawa, H. Kontani, T

  4. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  5. [The effect of plasma nitriding on tungsten burs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciu, D; Russo, S; Grasso, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors have experimented the nitriding's effects on some cilindrical burs carbide utilized in dentistry after disamination on the applications methodics on plasma nitriding in neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery and in odontotherapy. This reacherys point out that nitriding plasma a durings increase and cutis greater capacity establish.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of germanene/MoS2 monolayer and silicene/MoS2 monolayer superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodan; Wu, Shunqing; Zhou, Sen; Zhu, Zizhong

    2014-01-01

    Superlattice provides a new approach to enrich the class of materials with novel properties. Here, we report the structural and electronic properties of superlattices made with alternate stacking of two-dimensional hexagonal germanene (or silicene) and a MoS2 monolayer using the first principles approach. The results are compared with those of graphene/MoS2 superlattice. The distortions of the geometry of germanene, silicene, and MoS2 layers due to the formation of the superlattices are all r...

  7. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  8. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Qiang Zhen; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr−N−O predominance diagrams were constructed for different tempera-tures. Chromium nitride formed at 700−1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  9. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  10. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  11. Nonlinear conductivity in silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Enis

    2017-08-01

    To better comprehend electrical silicon-package interaction in high voltage applications requires full characterization of the electrical properties of dielectric materials employed in wafer and package level design. Not only the packaging but wafer level dielectrics, i.e. passivation layers, would experience high electric fields generated by the voltage applied pads. In addition the interface between the passivation layer and a mold compound might develop space charge because of the mismatch in electrical properties of the materials. In this contribution electrical properties of a thin silicon nitride (Si3N4) dielectric is reported as a function of temperature and electric field. The measured values later analyzed using different temperature dependent exponential expressions and found that the Mott variable range hopping conduction model was successful to express the data. A full temperature/electric field dependency of conductivity is generated. It was found that the conduction in Si3N4 could be expressed like a field ionization or Fowler-Nordheim mechanism.

  12. Effective negative refractive index in ferromagnet-semiconductor superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkanyan, Roland H; Niarchos, Dimitris G

    2006-06-12

    Problem of anomalous refraction of electromagnetic waves is analyzed in a superlattice which consists of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and nonmagnetic semiconductor. Effective permittivity and permeability tensors are derived in the presence of an external magnetic field parallel to the plane of the layers. It is shown that in the case of the Voigt configuration, the structure behaves as a left-handed medium with respect to TE-type polarized wave, in the low-frequency region of propagation. The relative orientation of the Poynting vector and the refractive wave vector is examined in different frequency ranges. It is shown that the frequency region of existence for the backward mode can be changed using external magnetic field as tuning parameter.

  13. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks--cubes and octahedrons--when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block's facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. The presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.

  14. Dynamical Axion Field in a Magnetic Topological Insulator Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    We propose that the dynamical axion field can be realized in a magnetic topological insulator superlattice or a topological paramagnetic insulator. The magnetic fluctuations of these systems produce a pseudoscalar field which has an axionic coupling to the electromagnetic field, and thus it gives a condensed-matter realization of the axion electrodynamics. Compared to the previously proposed dynamical axion materials where a long range antiferromagnetic order is required, the systems proposed here have the advantage that only an uniform magnetization or a paramagnetic state is needed for the dynamic axion. We further propose several experiments to detect such a dynamical axion field. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  15. Kinetics of electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozik, A.J.; Turner, J.A.; Peterson, M.W.

    1988-05-05

    A kinetic model has been developed that quantitatively describes electron transfer from photoexcited superlattice electrodes into liquid solutions. The model permits electron transfer from all quantum levels as well as from surface states; it also takes into account recombination in the bulk, space charge layer, and surfaces states, and band-edge movement. The model calculations define the values of the rate constants for heterogeneous electron transfer and hot electron thermalization among the various energy levels in the supperlattice quantum wells that are necessary to achieve hot electron transfer from excited quantum states. The question of whether hot electron transfer is manifested by a dependence of the photocurrent action spectra on acceptor redox potential is examined in detail.

  16. Plasmon modes of a massive Dirac plasma, and their superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rashi; Thakur, Anmol; Vignale, Giovanni; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-05-01

    We explore the collective density oscillations of a collection of charged massive Dirac particles, in one, two, and three dimensions, and their one-dimensional (1D) superlattice. We calculate the long-wavelength limit of the dynamical polarization function analytically, and use the random phase approximation to obtain the plasmon dispersion. The density dependence of the long-wavelength plasmon frequency in massive Dirac systems is found to be different compared to systems with parabolic and gapless Dirac dispersion. We also calculate the long-wavelength plasmon dispersion of a 1D metamaterial made from 1D and 2D massive Dirac plasma. Our analytical results will be useful for exploring the use of massive Dirac materials as electrostatically tunable plasmonic metamaterials and can be experimentally verified by infrared spectroscopy, as in the case of graphene [L. Ju et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 6, 630 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.146].

  17. Electronic and magnetic properties of zincblende half-metal superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, C Y; Qian, M C; Pask, J; Yang, L H; Dag, S

    2003-11-05

    Zincblende half-metallic compounds such as CrAs, with large magnetic moments and high Curie temperatures, are promising materials for spintronic applications. They explore layered materials, consisting of alternating layers of zincblende half-metals, by first principles calculations, and find that superlattices of (CrAs){sub 1}(MnAs){sub 1} and (CrAs){sub 2}(MnAs){sub 2} are half-metallic with magnetic moments of 7.0{mu}{sub B} and 14.0{mu}{sub B} per unit cell, respectively. They discuss the nature of the bonding and half-metallicity in these materials and, based on the understanding acquired, develop a simple expression for the magnetic moment in such materials. They explore the range of lattice constants over which half-metallicity is manifested, and suggest corresponding substrates for growth in thin film form.

  18. Photon transport enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in disordered superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, Pin-Chun; McMillan, James; Tsai, Min-An; Lu, Ming; Panoiu, Nicolae; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-01-01

    One of the daunting challenges in optical physics is to accurately control the flow of light at the subwavelength scale, by patterning the optical medium one can design anisotropic media. The light transport can also be significantly affected by Anderson localization, namely the wave localization in a disordered medium, a ubiquitous phenomenon in wave physics. Here we report the photon transport and collimation enhanced by transverse Anderson localization in chip-scale dispersion engineered anisotropic media. We demonstrate a new type of anisotropic photonic structure in which diffraction is nearly completely arrested by cascaded resonant tunneling through transverse guided resonances. By perturbing the shape of more than 4,000 scatterers in these superlattices we add structural disordered in a controlled manner and uncover the mechanism of disorder-induced transverse localization at the chip-scale. Arrested spatial divergence is captured in the power-law scaling, along with exponential asymmetric mode profil...

  19. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  20. Tunable anisotropic superfluidity in an optical kagome superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Tao; Eggert, Sebastian; Pelster, Axel

    2015-07-01

    We study the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model on the kagome lattice with a broken sublattice symmetry. Such a superlattice structure can naturally be created and tuned by changing the potential offset of one sublattice in the optical generation of the frustrated lattice. The superstructure gives rise to a rich quantum phase diagram, which is analyzed by combining quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the generalized effective potential Landau theory. Mott phases with noninteger filling and a characteristic order along stripes are found, which show a transition to a superfluid phase with an anisotropic superfluid density. Surprisingly, the direction of the superfluid anisotropy can be tuned by changing the particle number, the hopping strength, or the interaction. Finally, we discuss characteristic signatures of anisotropic phases in time-of-flight absorption measurements.

  1. Laser induced structural transformation in chalcogenide based superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallo, Eugenio; Wang, Ruining; Bragaglia, Valeria; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-05-01

    Superlattices made of alternating layers of nominal GeTe and Sb2Te3 have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. A structural irreversible transformation into ordered GeSbTe alloy is induced by high power laser light exposure. The intensity ratio of anti-Stokes and Stokes scattering under laser illumination gives a maximum average temperature in the sample of 177 °C. The latter is lower than the growth temperature and of 400 °C necessary by annealing to transform the structure in a GeSbTe alloy. The absence of this configuration after in situ annealing even up to 300 °C evidences an electronic excitation induced-transition which brings the system into a different and stable crystalline state.

  2. Transport properties of graphene under periodic and quasiperiodic magnetic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Tao, E-mail: luweitao@lyu.edu.cn [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Wang, Shun-Jin [Department of Physics, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Wang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Hua [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China); Li, Wen [School of Science, Linyi University, 276005 Linyi (China)

    2013-08-15

    We study the transmission of Dirac electrons through the one-dimensional periodic, Fibonacci, and Thue–Morse magnetic superlattices (MS), which can be realized by two different magnetic blocks arranged in certain sequences in graphene. The numerical results show that the transmission as a function of incident energy presents regular resonance splitting effect in periodic MS due to the split energy spectrum. For the quasiperiodic MS with more layers, they exhibit rich transmission patterns. In particular, the transmission in Fibonacci MS presents scaling property and fragmented behavior with self-similarity, while the transmission in Thue–Morse MS presents more perfect resonant peaks which are related to the completely transparent states. Furthermore, these interesting properties are robust against the profile of MS, but dependent on the magnetic structure parameters and the transverse wave vector.

  3. Influence of impurity on electronic properties of carbon nanotube superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Shokri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   In this paper, electronic properties of single-wall armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs superlattices, n(12,0/m(6,6 and n(12,0/m(11,0 are investigated. For this reason, the topological defects of pentagon–heptagon pairs at interfaces of carbon hexagonal network appear. These defects break the symmetry of the system, and then change the electrical properties. The calculations include two parts: investigation of the structures in the absence and presence of the impurity effect, which are calculated by the nearest-neighbor tight binding model . Out numerical results can be useful in designing nanoelectronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  4. An organic donor/acceptor lateral superlattice at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Roberto; Ecija, David; Fernandez, Gustavo; Gallego, José María; Sanchez, Luis; Martín, Nazario; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2007-09-01

    A precise control of the nanometer-scale morphology in systems containing mixtures of donor/acceptor molecules is a key factor to improve the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices. Here we report on a scanning tunneling microscopy study of the first stages of growth of 2-[9-(1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)anthracen-10(9H)-ylidene]-1,3-dithiole, as electron donor, and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, as electron acceptor, on a Au(111) substrate under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Due to differences in bonding strength with the substrate and different interactions with the Au(111) herringbone surface reconstruction, mixed thin films spontaneously segregate into a lateral superlattice of interdigitated nanoscale stripes with a characteristic width of about 10-20 nm, a morphology that has been predicted to optimize the efficiency of organic solar cells.

  5. Spin-polarized transport in graphene nanoribbon superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xin-Xin; Xie Yue-E; OuYang Tao; Chen Yuan-Ping

    2012-01-01

    By the Green's function method,we investigate spin transport properties of a zigzag graphene nanoribbon superlattice (ZGNS) under a ferromagnetic insulator and edge effect.The exchange splitting induced by the ferromagnetic insulator eliminates the spin degeneracy,which leads to spin-polarized transport in structure.Spin-dependent minibands and minigaps are exhibited in the conductance profile near the Fermi energy.The location and width of the miniband are associated with the geometry of the ZGNS.In the optimal structure,the spin-up and spin-down minibands can be separated completely near the Fermi energy.Therefore,a wide,perfect spin polarization with clear stepwise pattern is observed,i.e.,the perfect spin-polarized transport can be tuned from spin up to spin down by varying the electron energy.

  6. Titanium-based silicide quantum dot superlattices for thermoelectrics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelli, Guillaume; Stein, Sergio Silveira; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Faucherand, Pascal; Montès, Laurent; Dilhaire, Stefan; Pernot, Gilles

    2015-07-10

    Ti-based silicide quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) are grown by reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition. They are made of titanium-based silicide nanodots scattered in an n-doped SiGe matrix. This is the first time that such nanostructured materials have been grown in both monocrystalline and polycrystalline QDSLs. We studied their crystallographic structures and chemical properties, as well as the size and the density of the quantum dots. The thermoelectric properties of the QDSLs are measured and compared to equivalent SiGe thin films to evaluate the influence of the nanodots. Our studies revealed an increase in their thermoelectric properties-specifically, up to a trifold increase in the power factor, with a decrease in the thermal conductivity-making them very good candidates for further thermoelectric applications in cooling or energy-harvesting fields.

  7. Formation and control of stoichiometric hafnium nitride thin films by direct sputtering of hafnium nitride target

    CERN Document Server

    Gotoh, Y; Ishikawa, J; Liao, M Y

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium nitride thin films were prepared by radio-frequency sputter deposition with a hafnium nitride target. Deposition was performed with various rf powers, argon pressures, and substrate temperatures, in order to investigate the influences of these parameters on the film properties, particularly the nitrogen composition. It was found that stoichiometric hafnium nitride films were formed at an argon gas pressure of less than 2 Pa, irrespective of the other deposition parameters within the range investigated. Maintaining the nitrogen composition almost stoichiometric, orientation, stress, and electrical resistivity of the films could be controlled with deposition parameters. (author)

  8. Designing magnetic superlattices that are composed of single domain nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M. Forrester

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The complex nature of the magnetic interactions between any number of nanosized elements of a magnetic superlattice can be described by the generic behavior that is presented here. The hysteresis characteristics of interacting elliptical nanomagnets are described by a quasi-static method that identifies the critical boundaries between magnetic phases. A full dynamical analysis is conducted in complement to this and the deviations from the quasi-static analysis are highlighted. Each phase is defined by the configuration of the magnetic moments of the chain of single domain nanomagnets and correspondingly the existence of parallel, anti-parallel and canting average magnetization states.Results: We give examples of the phase diagrams in terms of anisotropy and coupling strength for two, three and four magnetic layers. Each phase diagrams character is defined by the shape of the magnetic hysteresis profile for a system in an applied magnetic field. We present the analytical solutions that enable one to define the “phase” boundaries between the emergence of spin-flop, anti-parallel and parallel configurations. The shape of the hysteresis profile is a function of the coupling strength between the nanomagnets and examples are given of how it dictates a systems magnetic response. Many different paths between metastable states can exist and this can lead to instabilities and fluctuations in the magnetization.Conclusion: With these phase diagrams one can find the most stable magnetic configurations against perturbations so as to create magnetic devices. On the other hand, one may require a magnetic system that can easily be switched between phases, and so one can use the information herein to design superlattices of the required shape and character by choosing parameters close to the phase boundaries. This work will be useful when designing future spintronic devices, especially those manipulating the properties of CoFeB compounds.

  9. Fracture resistance of surface-nitrided zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, A.; Casellas, D.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Material Science and Metallurgy

    2002-07-01

    Heat treatments have been conducted at 1650 C for 2 hours in Y-TZP stabilised with 2.5% molar of yttria in two different environments: in air and in nitrogen gas with the specimens embedded in a zirconium nitride powder bed. Relevant microstructural changes were induced by these heat treatments. It is highlighted the formation of a nitrided surface layer of about 400 {mu}m in thickness. Such layer has clear microstructural differences with respect to the bulk, and is formed by different sublayers with cubic and tetragonal phases with distinct degrees of transformability, as revealed by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The fracture toughness and the hardness of the nitrided surface layer are higher than for the original Y-TZP. (orig.)

  10. Morphological Studies of Local Influence of Implants with Coatings Based on Superhard Compounds on Bone Tissue under Conditions of Induced Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galimzyan KABIROV

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the response of bone tissue to a transosseous introduction of implants made of copper (Cu, medical steel 12X18H9T, steel with nitrides of titanium and hafnium coatings (TiN + HfN, as well as steel coated with titanium and zirconium nitrides (TiN + ZrN into the diaphysis of the tibia of experimental rats. The obtained results showed that the restoration of the injured bone and bone marrow in groups with implants made of steel 12X18H9T occurred without the participation of the granulation and cartilaginous tissues, but with implants made of steel coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides (TiN + HfN, this bone recovery also took place in the early term. At the same time, in groups, where the implants were made of copper (Cu, implants were made of steel coated with titanium and zirconium nitrides (TiN + ZrN were used, such phenomena as necrosis, lysis and destruction of the bone were registered and the bone tissue repair went through formation of the cartilaginous tissue.

  11. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  12. Precipitate-Accommodated Plasma Nitriding for Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patama Visittipitukul; Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Hideyuki Kuwahara

    2004-01-01

    Reliable surface treatment has been explored to improve the strength and wear resistance of aluminum alloy parts in automotives. Long duration time as well as long pre-sputtering time are required for plasma nitriding of aluminum or its alloys only with the thickness of a few micrometers. New plasma inner nitriding is proposed to realize the fast-rate nitriding of aluminum alloys. Al-6Cu alloy is employed as a targeting material in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this plasma nitriding. Mechanism of fast-rate nitriding process is discussed with consideration of the role of Al2Cu precipitates.

  13. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  14. Microbial adherence to a nonprecious alloy after plasma nitriding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonugelen, Mehmet; Destan, Uhmut Iyiyapici; Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt; Oztürk, Berran; Karadeniz, Süleyman

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the microbial adherence to the surfaces of a nonprecious metal alloy after plasma nitriding. The plasma-nitriding process was performed to the surfaces of metals prepared from a nickel-chromium alloy. The microorganisms were labeled with technetium-99m. After the labeling procedure, 60 metal disks were treated with a microorganism for each use. The results revealed that the amount of adherence of all microorganisms on surfaces was changed by plasma-nitriding process; adherence decreased substantially (P plasma nitriding time were not significant (P> .05) With the plasma-nitriding process, the surface properties of nonprecious metal alloys can be changed, leading to decreased microbial adherence.

  15. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  16. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  17. Investigation of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of GaAs/AlAs Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran

    The thermal conductivities of superlattices are essential to improve the properties of thermoelectrics and optoelectronics; however, limited results in relation to both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities have been reported. A convenient, effective, and accurate experimental method is required to improve the current research on the thermal properties of superlattices. We conducted an experimental research study on two GaAs/AlAs superlattice samples with a total superlattice layer thickness of 2 microm using a combination of the 2-omega and 3-omega techniques. The samples have period thicknesses of 4 nm and 10 nm, respectively. To explore the thermal conductivities of the substrate and insulation layer of the superlattice samples indirectly, a controlled sample with the same structure, but without a superlattice layer, is used. We obtained the thermal conductivities of the GaAs substrate and insulation layer (SiO2 thin film) using the 3-omega technique and FEM simulation model. We also explored the deviation of the experimental results of the 2-omega technique from the Fourier's Law through the controlled sample. These parameters obtained from the controlled sample are used in the data analysis in the following superlattice research. In the superlattice study, we combine the 3-omega and 2-omega techniques to characterize the anisotropic thermal conductivity of GaAs/AlAs superlattice from the same wafer. The in-plane thermal conductivity, cross-plane thermal conductivity, and anisotropy are obtained from the same wafer by comparing the experimental results with the FEM simulated results. This combination works fine in general and demonstrates a significant reduction in thermal conductivity compared to that of equivalent bulk materials. Superlattices with different period thicknesses but the same total superlattice thickness present a significant difference in both the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of the superlattices. However, we

  18. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  19. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  20. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  1. Confined-plume chemical deposition: rapid synthesis of crystalline coatings of known hard or superhard materials on inorganic or organic supports by resonant IR decomposition of molecular precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Borislav L; Wellons, Matthew S; Lukehart, Charles M

    2009-08-26

    A one-step process for preparing microcrystalline coatings of known superhard, very hard, or ultraincompressible ceramic compositions on either inorganic or organic supports is reported. Midinfrared pulsed-laser irradiation of preceramic chemical precursors layered between IR-transmissive hard/soft supports under temporal and spatial confinement at a laser wavelength resonant with a precursor vibrational band gives one-step deposition of crystalline ceramic coatings without incurring noticeable collateral thermal damage to the support material. Reaction plume formation at the precursor/laser beam interface initiates confined-plume, chemical deposition (CPCD) of crystalline ceramic product. Continuous ceramic coatings are produced by rastering the laser beam over a sample specimen. CPCD processing of the Re-B single-source precursor, (B(3)H(8))Re(CO)(4), the dual-source mixtures, Ru(3)(CO)(12)/B(10)H(14) or W(CO)(6)/B(10)H(14), and the boron/carbon single-source precursor, o-B(10)C(2)H(12), confined between Si wafer or NaCl plates gives microcrystalline deposits of ReB(2), RuB(2), WB(4), or B(4)C, respectively. CPCD processing of Kevlar fabric wetted by (B(3)H(8))Re(CO)(4) produces an oriented, microcrystalline coating of ReB(2) on the Kevlar fabric without incurring noticeable thermal damage of the polymer support. Similarly, microcrystalline coatings of ReB(2) can be formed on IR-transmissive IR2, Teflon, or Ultralene polymer films.

  2. Dispersion relation for localized magnetic polaritons propagating at the junction of two ferromagnetic/ non-magnetic superlattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R T Tagiyeva

    2004-09-01

    Localized magnetic polaritons are investigated in the systems consisting of two magnetic superlattices, coupled by a ferromagnetic contact layer. The general dispersion relation for localized magnetic polaritons are derived in the framework of the electromagnetic wave theory in the Voigt geometry by the `transfer' matrix method. The numerical calculations were carried out for different parameters of the superlattices and contact layer and then discussed.

  3. Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Nitride Cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on dynamical characterization of silicon nitride cantilevers. These devices play an important role in micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). They consist of a mechanical part, a sensor or actuator, and an electronic part for readout and

  4. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission

  5. Nitridation of silicon by nitrogen neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yasuhirohara2002@yahoo.co.jp [Organization for Research and Development of Innovative Science and Technology, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nitrided silicon was formed by nitrogen neutral beam at room temperature. • Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer was formed at the acceleration voltage more than 20 V. • Formed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer show the effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process. - Abstract: Silicon nitridation was investigated at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) extracted at acceleration voltages of less than 100 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer on a Si (1 0 0) substrate when the acceleration voltage was higher than 20 V. The XPS depth profile indicated that nitrogen diffused to a depth of 36 nm for acceleration voltages of 60 V and higher. The thickness of the silicon nitrided layer increased with the acceleration voltages from 20 V to 60 V. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer thickness of 3.1 nm was obtained at an acceleration voltage of 100 V. Moreover, it was proved that the nitrided silicon layer formed by the nitrogen NB at room temperature was effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process.

  6. Alkaline fuel cell with nitride membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shen-Huei; Pilaski, Moritz; Wartmann, Jens; Letzkus, Florian; Funke, Benedikt; Dura, Georg; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate patterned nitride membranes with Si-MEMS-technology as a platform to build up new membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEA) for alkaline fuel cell applications. Two 6-inch wafer processes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were developed for the fabrication of separated nitride membranes with a nitride thickness up to 1 μm. The mechanical stability of the perforated nitride membrane has been adjusted in both processes either by embedding of subsequent ion implantation step or by optimizing the deposition process parameters. A nearly 100% yield of separated membranes of each deposition process was achieved with layer thickness from 150 nm to 1 μm and micro-channel pattern width of 1μm at a pitch of 3 μm. The process for membrane coating with electrolyte materials could be verified to build up MEA. Uniform membrane coating with channel filling was achieved after the optimization of speed controlled dip-coating method and the selection of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as electrolyte solvent. Finally, silver as conductive material was defined for printing a conductive layer onto the MEA by Ink-Technology. With the established IR-thermography setup, characterizations of MEAs in terms of catalytic conversion were performed successfully. The results of this work show promise for build up a platform on wafer-level for high throughput experiments.

  7. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage.

  8. Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Nitride Cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on dynamical characterization of silicon nitride cantilevers. These devices play an important role in micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). They consist of a mechanical part, a sensor or actuator, and an electronic part for readout and

  9. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  10. Giant piezoelectric response in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices due to flexoelectric effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wu, Huaping; Wang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Flexoelectricity describes the linear response of electrical polarization to a strain gradient, which can be used to enhance the piezoelectric effect of piezoelectric material or realize the piezoelectric effect in nonpiezoelectric materials. Here, we demonstrate from thermodynamics theory that a giant piezoelectric effect exists in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices due to flexoelectric effect. The apparent piezoelectric coefficient is calculated from the closed-form of analytical expression of the polarization distribution in the piezoelectric/dielectric superlattice subjected to a normal stress, in which the flexoelectric effect is included. It is found that there exists a strong nonlinear coupling between the flexoelectric and piezoelectric effects, which significantly enhances the apparent piezoelectric coefficient in the piezoelectric/dielectric superlattice. For a specific thickness ratio of the piezoelectric and dielectric layers, the enhanced apparent piezoelectric coefficient in the superlattice is ten times larger than that of its pure piezoelectric counterpart. The present work suggests an effective way to obtain giant apparent piezoelectric effect in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices through flexoelectric effect.

  11. Temperature-Dependent X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Infrared Superlattices Grown by MBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Reyner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained-layer superlattices (SLSs are an active research topic in the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE and infrared focal plane array communities. These structures undergo a >500 K temperature change between deposition and operation. As a result, the lattice constants of the substrate and superlattice are expected to change by approximately 0.3%, and at approximately the same rate. However, we present the first temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements of SLS material on GaSb and show that the superlattice does not contract in the same manner as the substrate. In both InAs/InAs0.65Sb0.35 and In0.8Ga0.2As/InAs0.65Sb0.35 SLS structures, the apparent out-of-plane strain states of the superlattices switch from tensile at deposition to compressive at operation. These changes have ramifications for material characterization, defect generation, carrier lifetime, and overall device performance of superlattices grown by MBE.

  12. Spin-dependent Seebeck effects in a graphene superlattice p–n junction with different shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Benliang; Yao, Yagang; Zhou, Guanghui; Hu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically calculate the spin-dependent transmission probability and spin Seebeck coefficient for a zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbon p–n junction with periodically attached stubs under a perpendicular magnetic field and a ferromagnetic insulator. By using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method combining with the tight-binding Hamiltonian, it is demonstrated that the spin-dependent transmission probability and spin Seebeck coefficient for two types of superlattices can be modulated by the potential drop, the magnetization strength, the number of periods of the superlattice, the strength of the perpendicular magnetic field, and the Anderson disorder strength. Interestingly, a metal to semiconductor transition occurs as the number of the superlattice for a crossed superlattice p–n junction increases, and its spin Seebeck coefficient is much larger than that for the T-shaped one around the zero Fermi energy. Furthermore, the spin Seebeck coefficient for crossed systems can be much pronounced and their maximum absolute value can reach 528 μV K-1 by choosing optimized parameters. Besides, the spin Seebeck coefficient for crossed p–n junction is strongly enhanced around the zero Fermi energy for a weak magnetic field. Our results provide theoretical references for modulating the thermoelectric properties of a graphene superlattice p–n junction by tuning its geometric structure and physical parameters.

  13. MgO/Cu2O Superlattices: Growth of Epitaxial Two-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M. J.; Wadekar, P. V.; Hsieh, W. C.; Huang, H. C.; Lin, C. W.; Chou, J. W.; Liao, C. H.; Chang, C. F.; Seo, H. W.; You, S. T.; Tu, L. W.; Lo, I. K.; Ho, N. J.; Yeh, S. W.; Liao, H. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    Alternated stacking of dissimilar layers can produce novel superlattice materials with multiple functionalities. The majority of such work reported in literature on epitaxial superlattices has been on alternating layers with the same space group (SG) and crystal structure (CS), whereas superlattices with the same CS but different SG have not been studied as much. We have grown superlattices with two well-known oxide materials, viz. cuprite (Cu2O, CS = cubic and SG = Pn bar{3} m) and magnesium oxide (MgO, CS = cubic, SG = Fm bar{3} m). An MgO buffer layer grown near 650°C at the film-substrate interface was found to be essential to achieving reasonable long-range atomic order. Grazing-angle x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and electron diffraction analyses as well as transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the interface abruptness, smoothness, and general crystallinity of the individual layers. Interdiffusion between MgO and Cu2O near interfacial regions places a limit of 250°C on the growth temperature for fabrication of superlattices with reasonably sharp interfaces.

  14. Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of (Ca , Sr)Fe2O5 Brownmillerite superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debangshu; Stone, Greg; Moon, Eun Ju; Young, Joshua; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Rondinelli, James; May, Steven; Alem, Nasim

    The brownmillerite phase A2B2O5 consists of ordered oxygen vacancies in alternate perovskite layers forming chiral tetrahedral chains. The handedness of these tetrahedral chains control the polarization of the structure. The current study focuses on 1-1 brownmillerite superlattices grown on a SrTiO3 substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The B-site in this structure is iron throughout the superlattice film, while the A-site alternates between calcium and strontium in the superlattice layers. In this study, we use atomic resolution aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to investigate the structure and chemistry of the film-substrate interface as well as the chemical structure of the superlattice. Atom positions are determined to measure displacement vectors of A-site cations in the superlattice structure. D.M., G.A.S., V.G. and N.A. were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1420620. E.J.M. and S.J.M. were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1151649.

  15. Energy landscape of self-assembled superlattices of PbSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Zewei; Wu, Di; Zhu, Jinlong; Evers, Wiel H; Boncella, James M; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Wang, Zhongwu; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Xu, Hongwu

    2014-06-24

    Self-assembly of nanocrystals (NCs) into superlattices is an intriguing multiscale phenomenon that may lead to materials with novel collective properties, in addition to the unique properties of individual NCs compared with their bulk counterparts. By using different dispersion solvents, we synthesized three types of PbSe NC superlattices--body-centered cubic (bcc), body-centered tetragonal (bct), and face-centered cubic (fcc)--as confirmed by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering. Solution calorimetric measurements in hexane show that the enthalpy of formation of the superlattice from dispersed NCs is on the order of -2 kJ/mol. The calorimetric measurements reveal that the bcc superlattice is the energetically most stable polymorph, with the bct being 0.32 and the fcc 0.55 kJ/mol higher in enthalpy. This stability sequence is consistent with the decreased packing efficiency of PbSe NCs from bcc (17.2%) to bct (16.0%) and to fcc (15.2%). The small enthalpy differences among the three polymorphs confirm a closely spaced energy landscape and explain the ease of formation of different NC superlattices at slightly different synthesis conditions.

  16. Optical constants of GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices and multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahen, K. B.; Leburton, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The optical properties of GaAs-Al sub x Ga sub 1-xAs superlattices are calculated as a function of the frequency and superlattice structure. The comutations are performed using a partition method which combines the vectors k.p method with the pseudopotential technique. The influence of the super-structure on the electronic properties of the systems is accounted for by appropriate quantization conditions. The anisotropy and structure dependence of the dielectric constant result mainly from the contribution of the gamma region while the contributions of the other regions of the Brillouin zone are rather insensitive to the superlattice structure. The superlattice index of refraction values are shown to attain maxima at the various quantized transition energies, where for certain structures, the difference between the refractive indices of the superlattices and its corresponding Al sub x Ga sub 1-xAs alloy can be as large as 2%. In general results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  18. Nitriding behavior of Ni and Ni-based binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonovic, Matej

    2015-01-15

    Gaseous nitriding is a prominent thermochemical surface treatment process which can improve various properties of metallic materials such as mechanical, tribological and/or corrosion properties. This process is predominantly performed by applying NH{sub 3}+H{sub 2} containing gas atmospheres serving as the nitrogen donating medium at temperatures between 673 K and 873 K (400 C and 600 C). NH{sub 3} decomposes at the surface of the metallic specimen and nitrogen diffuses into the surface adjacent region of the specimen whereas hydrogen remains in the gas atmosphere. One of the most important parameters characterizing a gaseous nitriding process is the so-called nitriding potential (r{sub N}) which determines the chemical potential of nitrogen provided by the gas phase. The nitriding potential is defined as r{sub N} = p{sub NH{sub 3}}/p{sub H{sub 2}{sup 3/2}} where p{sub NH{sub 3}} and p{sub H{sub 2}} are the partial pressures of the NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} in the nitriding atmosphere. In contrast with nitriding of α-Fe where the nitriding potential is usually in the range between 0.01 and 1 atm{sup -1/2}, nitriding of Ni and Ni-based alloys requires employing nitriding potentials higher than 100 atm{sup -1/2} and even up to ∞ (nitriding in pure NH{sub 3} atmosphere). This behavior is compatible with decreased thermodynamic stability of the 3d-metal nitrides with increasing atomic number. Depending on the nitriding conditions (temperature, nitriding potential and treatment time), different phases are formed at the surface of the Ni-based alloys. By applying very high nitriding potential, formation of hexagonal Ni{sub 3}N at the surface of the specimen (known as external nitriding) leads to the development of a compound layer, which may improve tribological properties. Underneath the Ni{sub 3}N compound layer, two possibilities exist: (i) alloying element precipitation within the nitrided zone (known as internal nitriding) and/or (ii) development of metastable and

  19. Crossover from incoherent to coherent phonon scattering in epitaxial oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Yadav, Ajay K.; Cheaito, Ramez; Rossen, Pim B.; Soukiassian, Arsen; Suresha, S. J.; Duda, John C.; Foley, Brian M.; Lee, Che-Hui; Zhu, Ye; Lichtenberger, Arthur W.; Moore, Joel E.; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Majumdar, Arun; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Zurbuchen, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    Elementary particles such as electrons or photons are frequent subjects of wave-nature-driven investigations, unlike collective excitations such as phonons. The demonstration of wave-particle crossover, in terms of macroscopic properties, is crucial to the understanding and application of the wave behaviour of matter. We present an unambiguous demonstration of the theoretically predicted crossover from diffuse (particle-like) to specular (wave-like) phonon scattering in epitaxial oxide superlattices, manifested by a minimum in lattice thermal conductivity as a function of interface density. We do so by synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides and systematically varying the interface density, with unit-cell precision, using two different epitaxial-growth techniques. These observations open up opportunities for studies on the wave nature of phonons, particularly phonon interference effects, using oxide superlattices as model systems, with extensive applications in thermoelectrics and thermal management.

  20. Controllable spin and valley polarized current through a superlattice of normal/ferromagnetic/normal silicene junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Z.; Hajati, Y.; Rezaeipour, S.; Baher, S.

    2017-02-01

    The spin and valley transports in a superlattice of normal/ferromagnetic/normal silicene junction are studied theoretically. Transport properties in particular valley-resolved conductance, spin and valley polarization have been computed by the Landauer Buttiker formula. We achieve fully valley and spin polarized current in the superlattice N/F/N structure. Our findings also imply that by increasing the number of ferromagnetic barriers, the onset of fully spin and valley polarized current always occur for lower values of staggered potential(Δz/E) and length of the ferromagnetic region (Kf L) in the silicene supelattice structure as compared with N/F/N silicene junction. Fully spin and valley polarizations make silicene superlattice a suitable candidate for spin-valleytronics applications.

  1. The Tip-Induced Twisted Bilayer Graphene Superlattice on HOPG: Capillary Attraction Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Long Jing; Feng, Ke Ke; Dou, Rui-Fen; Nie, Jia-Cai

    2014-01-01

    We use the tip of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to manipulate single weakly bound nanometer-sized sheets on the the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface through artifically increasing the tip and sample interaction in humid environment. By this means it is possible to tear apart a graphite sheet againt a step and fold this part onto the HOPG surface and thus generate the gaphene superlattices with hexagonal symmetry. The tip and sample surface interactions, including the van der Waals force, eletrostatic force and capillary attraction force originating from the Laplace pressure due to the formation of a highly curved fluid meniscus connecting the tip and sample, are discussed in details to understand the fromation mechnism of graphen superlattice induced by the STM tip. Especially, the capillary force is the key role in manipulating the graphite surface sheet in the hunmidity condition. Our approach may provides a simple and feasible route to prepare the controllable superlattices and g...

  2. Noise-enhanced spontaneous chaos in semiconductor superlattices at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, M.; Carretero, M.; Bonilla, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    Physical systems exhibiting fast spontaneous chaotic oscillations are used to generate high-quality true random sequences in random number generators. The concept of using fast practical entropy sources to produce true random sequences is crucial to make storage and transfer of data more secure at very high speeds. While the first high-speed devices were chaotic semiconductor lasers, the discovery of spontaneous chaos in semiconductor superlattices at room temperature provides a valuable nanotechnology alternative. Spontaneous chaos was observed in 1996 experiments at temperatures below liquid nitrogen. Here we show spontaneous chaos at room temperature appears in idealized superlattices for voltage ranges where sharp transitions between different oscillation modes occur. Internal and external noises broaden these voltage ranges and enhance the sensitivity to initial conditions in the superlattice snail-shaped chaotic attractor thereby rendering spontaneous chaos more robust.

  3. Optically and Electrically Tunable Dirac Points and Zitterbewegung in Graphene-Based Photonic Superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Hanying; Malomed, Boris A; Chen, Xianfeng; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that graphene-based photonic superlattices provide a versatile platform for electrical and all-optical control of photonic beams with deep-subwavelength accuracy. Specifically, by inserting graphene sheets into periodic metallo-dielectric structures one can design optical superlattices that posses photonic Dirac points (DPs) at frequencies at which the spatial average of the permittivity of the superlattice, $\\bar{ \\varepsilon}$, vanishes. Similar to the well-known zero-$\\bar{n}$ bandgaps, we show that these zero-$\\bar{\\varepsilon}$ DPs are highly robust against structural disorder. We also show that, by tuning the graphene permittivity via the optical Kerr effect or electrical doping, one can induce a spectral variation of the DP exceeding \\SI{30}{\

  4. Bulk elastic waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states in a time-dependent superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinteck, N., E-mail: swinteck@email.arizona.edu; Matsuo, S.; Runge, K.; Lucas, P.; Deymier, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Vasseur, J. O. [Institut d' Electronique, de Micro-électronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2015-08-14

    Recent progress in electronic and electromagnetic topological insulators has led to the demonstration of one way propagation of electron and photon edge states and the possibility of immunity to backscattering by edge defects. Unfortunately, such topologically protected propagation of waves in the bulk of a material has not been observed. We show, in the case of sound/elastic waves, that bulk waves with unidirectional backscattering-immune topological states can be observed in a time-dependent elastic superlattice. The superlattice is realized via spatial and temporal modulation of the stiffness of an elastic material. Bulk elastic waves in this superlattice are supported by a manifold in momentum space with the topology of a single twist Möbius strip. Our results demonstrate the possibility of attaining one way transport and immunity to scattering of bulk elastic waves.

  5. Phonon-pumped terahertz gain in n-type GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gregory; Soref, Richard A.

    2001-05-01

    Local population inversion and far-IR gain are proposed and theoretically analyzed for an unbiased n-doped GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As superlattice pumped solely by phonons. The lasing transition occurs at the Brillouin zone boundary of the superlattice wave vector kz between the two conduction minibands CB1 and CB2 of the opposite curvature in kz space. The proposed waveguided structure is contacted above and below by heat sinks at 300 K and 77 K, respectively. Atop the superlattice, a heat buffer layer confines longitudinal optical phonons for enhanced optical-phonon pumping of CB1 electrons. A gain of 345 cm-1 at 4.5 THz is predicted for a doping density of 2.8×1016cm-3.

  6. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Superlattices from an Adiabatic Bond Charge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alistair; Broido, David

    2007-03-01

    The adiabatic bond charge model (ABCM) has successfully rendered phonon dispersions of a host of bulk semiconductors [1,2] and has also been used to calculate the phonon dispersions in quantum well superlattices [3]. We have developed an ABCM for superlattices and combined it with a symmetry-based representation of the anharmonic interatomic forces to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of short-period superlattices, using an iterative solution to the Boltzmann-Peierls equation [4]. We compare our ABCM results with those obtained from some commonly used models for the interatomic forces in semiconductors to assess the importance of accurate descriptions of the phonon dispersions in thermal conductivity calculations. [1] W. Weber, Physical Review B 15, 4789 (1977). [2] K. C. Rustagi and W. Weber, Solid State Communications 18, 673 (1976). [3] S. K. Yip and Y. C. Chang, Physical Review B 30 7037 (1984). [4] D. A. Broido, A. Ward, and N. Mingo, Physical Review B 72, 014308 (2005).

  7. Synthesis and electrical properties of In2O3(ZnO)m superlattice nanobelt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐欣月; 高红; 武立立; 温静; 潘思明; 刘欣; 张喜田

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) In2O3(ZnO)m superlattice nanobelts are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method. The formation of In2O3(ZnO)m superlattice is verified by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images. The typical zigzag boundaries could be clearly observed. An additional peak at 614 cm−1 is found in the Raman spec-trum, which may correspond to the superlattice structure. The study about the electrical transport properties reveals that the In2O3(ZnO)m nanobelts exhibit peculiar nonlinear I–V characteristics even under the Ohmic contact measurement con-dition, which are different from the Ohmic behaviors of the In-doped ZnO nanobelts. The photoelectrical measurements show the differences in photocurrent property between them, and their transport mechanisms are also discussed.

  8. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA–nanoparticle superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Vaccarezza, Victoria M.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin , Chad A. (NWU)

    2016-06-15

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure–function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  9. Wannier-Stark localization and terahertz electroluminescence of natural SiC superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankin, V. I.; Andrianov, A. V.; Petrov, A. G.; Zakhar' in, A. O. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04

    We report on efficient terahertz electroluminescence in the region of 1.5-2 THz from high electric field biased 6H-SiC n{sup +}−n{sup −}−n{sup +} structures with a natural superlattice at 7 K. The properties of the terahertz emission allow it to be attributed to spontaneous radiation resulting from electron Bloch oscillations in SiC natural superlattice. The use of the unique object, namely, natural superlattice of SiC allowed us to demonstrate a whole series of remarkable effects of Wannier-Stark localization and to get the intensive terahertz emission under steady-state electrical excitation of Bloch oscillations.

  10. Spin selector based on periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Fan Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a spin selector based on periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier (DMS/NB superlattices subjected to an external magnetic field. We find that the periodic DMS/NB superlattices can achieve 100% spin filtering over a dramatically broader range of incident energies than the diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/semiconductor (DMS/S case studied previously. And the positions and widths of spin-filtering bands can be manipulated effectively by adjusting the geometric parameters of the system or the strength of external magnetic field. Such a compelling filtering feature stems from the introduction of nonmagnetic barrier and the spin-dependent giant Zeeman effect induced by the external magnetic field. We also find that the external electric field can exert a significant influence on the spin-polarized transport through the DMS/NB superlattices.

  11. Spin selector based on periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping-Fan; Guo, Yong, E-mail: guoy66@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Zhu, Rui [Department of Physics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2015-07-15

    We propose a spin selector based on periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier (DMS/NB) superlattices subjected to an external magnetic field. We find that the periodic DMS/NB superlattices can achieve 100% spin filtering over a dramatically broader range of incident energies than the diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/semiconductor (DMS/S) case studied previously. And the positions and widths of spin-filtering bands can be manipulated effectively by adjusting the geometric parameters of the system or the strength of external magnetic field. Such a compelling filtering feature stems from the introduction of nonmagnetic barrier and the spin-dependent giant Zeeman effect induced by the external magnetic field. We also find that the external electric field can exert a significant influence on the spin-polarized transport through the DMS/NB superlattices.

  12. Enhancing chaotic behavior at room temperature in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Garcia, M.; Essen, J.; Carretero, M.; Bonilla, L. L.; Birnir, B.

    2017-02-01

    Previous theoretical and experimental work has put forward 50-period semiconductor superlattices as fast, true random number generators at room temperature. Their randomness stems from feedback between nonlinear electronic dynamics and stochastic processes that are intrinsic to quantum transitions. This paper theoretically demonstrates that shorter superlattices with higher potential barriers contain fully chaotic dynamics over several intervals of the applied bias voltage compared to the 50-period device which presented a much weaker chaotic behavior. The chaos arises from deterministic dynamics, hence it persists even in the absence of additional stochastic processes. Moreover, the frequency of the chaotic current oscillations is higher for shorter superlattices. These features should allow for faster and more robust generation of true random numbers.

  13. Effect of roughness on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in (Co90Fe10/Pt)n superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jinjun; Meng, Zhaoliang; Yang, Yi; Ying, Ji Feng; Yap, Qi Jia; Han, Guchang

    2016-05-01

    Superlattice [Co90Fe10(0.21)/Pt(0.23)]n (unit in nm) with the repeat cycles n ranging from 3 to 30 were studied. Both effective anisotropy (Keff) and PMA constant (KU) reached a maximum at n=8. When the 3 nm Pt underlayer was deposited at low energy condition, the Keff and KU of (CoFe/Pt)8 are 4.0 and 6.1 Merg/cc, respectively. On the other hand, the Keff and KU increased to 6.8 and 9.7 Merg/cc, respectively, when the Pt underlayer deposited at high energy condition. As the n increases, the surface roughness monotonously increases and d111 inside the superlattice layers increase and relax from bottom to top part. The interface roughness and relaxation in superlattice reduce the PMA considerably.

  14. Effect of roughness on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in (Co90Fe10/Ptn superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun Qiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Superlattice [Co90Fe10(0.21/Pt(0.23]n (unit in nm with the repeat cycles n ranging from 3 to 30 were studied. Both effective anisotropy (Keff and PMA constant (KU reached a maximum at n=8. When the 3 nm Pt underlayer was deposited at low energy condition, the Keff and KU of (CoFe/Pt8 are 4.0 and 6.1 Merg/cc, respectively. On the other hand, the Keff and KU increased to 6.8 and 9.7 Merg/cc, respectively, when the Pt underlayer deposited at high energy condition. As the n increases, the surface roughness monotonously increases and d111 inside the superlattice layers increase and relax from bottom to top part. The interface roughness and relaxation in superlattice reduce the PMA considerably.

  15. A Comparative Study of Densitometric Parameters of the Bone Tissue Under Transosseous Osteosynthesis by Using Experimental Implants Coated with Superhard Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galimzyan KABIROV

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available By X-ray computed tomography (CT, density characteristics of the tibiae bones in 25 experimental adult male rats were studied after their tibiae bones have experimentally fractured and then repaired by osteosynthesis using different implants. According to the data that was obtained by computed tomography, it has been defined that bone densities depend on the type of the implant and the chemical composition of the coating which is applied on the surface of the implant. Thus, average values of the density of the tibiae bones in the experimental rats with implants coated with a combination of titanium and hafnium nitrides were not different from the density values of the intact bones. At the same time, the densities of the tibiae in rats with implants made of copper and implants coated with a combination of titanium and zirconium nitrides were 1.5-2 times lower than those of the intact bones. This leads us to conclude that implants coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides are biologically and chemically inert because less pathologic changes in the bone tissue were observed, in contrast to the copper-based implants and those where the coating contains zirconium.

  16. Modeling functional piezoelectricity in perovskite superlattices with competing instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Charles; Wu, Xifan

    2012-02-01

    Multi-component Perovskite Superlattices (SLs) of the form ABO3, provide a very promising avenue for the design of materials with multifunctional properties. Furthermore the interfaces of such multi-component SLs are home to competing anti-ferrodistortive and ferroelectric instabilities which can produce unexpected functionalities. However, at present first principles calculations exceeding more than 10 units cells, are particularly costly as they scale with the valence electrons as N^3. We present a first-principles modeling technique that allows us to accurately model the piezoelectric strains of paraelectric/ferroelectric SLs, BaTiO3/CaTiO3 and PbTiO3/SrTiO3, under a fixed displacement field. The model is based on a maximally localized wannier center layer polarization technique, as well as a truncated cluster expansion, that makes use of the fact that such PE/FE SLs have been shown to have highly localized ionic and electronic interface effects. The prediction of the piezoelectricity for a SL of an arbitrary stacking sequence will be demonstrated. We also use our model to conduct a systemic study of the interface effects on piezoelectric response in the above SLs paying special attention to a strong non-linear effect observed in Bulk SrTiO3.

  17. ``N'' structure for type-II superlattice photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Muti, Abdullah; Kutluer, Kutlu; Tansel, Tunay; Turan, Rasit; Ergun, Yuksel; Aydinli, Atilla

    2012-08-01

    In the quest to raise the operating temperature and improve the detectivity of type II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors, we introduce a design approach that we call the "N structure." N structure aims to improve absorption by manipulating electron and hole wavefunctions that are spatially separated in T2SLs, increasing the absorption while decreasing the dark current. In order to engineer the wavefunctions, we introduce a thin AlSb layer between InAs and GaSb layers in the growth direction which also acts as a unipolar electron barrier. Unlike the symmetrical insertion of AlSb into GaSb layers, N design aims to exploit the shifting of the electron and hole wavefunctions under reverse bias. With cutoff wavelength of 4.3 μm at 77 K, temperature dependent dark current and detectivity measurements show that the dark current density is 3.6 × 10-9 A/cm2, under zero bias. Photodetector reaches background limited infrared photodetection (BLIP) condition at 125 K with the BLIP detectivity (D*BLIP) of 2.6 × 1010 Jones under 300 K background and -0.3 V bias voltage.

  18. Artificial charge-modulationin atomic-scale perovskite titanate superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtomo, A; Muller, D A; Grazul, J L; Hwang, H Y

    2002-09-26

    The nature and length scales of charge screening in complex oxides are fundamental to a wide range of systems, spanning ceramic voltage-dependent resistors (varistors), oxide tunnel junctions and charge ordering in mixed-valence compounds. There are wide variations in the degree of charge disproportionation, length scale, and orientation in the mixed-valence compounds: these have been the subject of intense theoretical study, but little is known about the microscopic electronic structure. Here we have fabricated an idealized structure to examine these issues by growing atomically abrupt layers of LaTi(3+)O(3) embedded in SrTi(4+)O(3). Using an atomic-scale electron beam, we have observed the spatial distribution of the extra electron on the titanium sites. This distribution results in metallic conductivity, even though the superlattice structure is based on two insulators. Despite the chemical abruptness of the interfaces, we find that a minimum thickness of five LaTiO(3) layers is required for the centre titanium site to recover bulk-like electronic properties. This represents a framework within which the short-length-scale electronic response can be probed and incorporated in thin-film oxide heterostructures.

  19. Quasi-ternary nanoparticle superlattices through nanoparticle design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, Jeffrey; Shevchenko, Elena V.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-06-19

    Individual nanoscale building blocks exhibit a wide range of size-dependent properties, since their size can be tuned over known characteristic length scales of bulk materials. In the last several years, the possibility of combining different materials in the form of two and three component nanoparticles (NPs) has been extensively explored. Also multi-component materials can be obtained via self-assembly of NPs from their binary colloidal mixtures. These new nanocrystal solids may possess tunable collective properties that originate from interactions between size and composition controlled building blocks. Exchange coupling between neighboring NPs of magnetically soft and hard materials enhances the magnetic energy product of the nanocomposite material. Randomly mixed solids of small and large semiconducting CdSe NPs revealed enhancement of photoluminescence intensity of large semiconductor particles accompanied by quenching of photoluminescence of the small particles because of long-range resonant transfer of electronic excitations from the more electronically confined small particles to higher excited states of the large particles. Recently, it was demonstrated that binary semiconducting composite materials can show strongly enhanced electronic properties with about 100-fold higher conductance as compared to the sum of individual conductances of single-component films. Creation of highly periodic superlattices is expected not just provide the control of the homogeneity of the sample but also affect their properties. It was shown that silver nanocrystals organized into periodic cubic structures vibrated coherently [20] and demonstrated a change in electronic transport properties.

  20. Thiol passivation of MWIR type II superlattice photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, O.; Muti, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Poor passivation on photodetectors can result in catastrophic failure of the device. Abrupt termination of mesa side walls during pixel definition generates dangling bonds that lead to inversion layers and surface traps leading to surface leakage currents that short circuit diode action. Good passivation, therefore, is critical in the fabrication of high performance devices. Silicondioxide has been the main stay of passivation for commercial photodetectors, deposited at high temperatures and high RF powers using plasma deposition techniques. In photodetectors based on III-V compounds, sulphur passivation has been shown to replace oxygen and saturate the dangling bonds. Despite its effectiveness, it degrades over time. More effort is required to create passivation layers which eliminate surface leakage current. In this work, we propose the use of sulphur based octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, as a passivation layer for the InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors that acts as a self assembled monolayer (SAM). ODT SAMs consist of a chain of 18 carbon atoms with a sulphur atom at its head. ODT Thiol coating is a simple process that consist of dipping the sample into the solution for a prescribed time. Excellent electrical performance of diodes tested confirm the effectiveness of the sulphur head stabilized by the intermolecular interaction due to van der Walls forces between the long chains of ODT SAM which results in highly stable ultrathin hydrocarbon layers without long term degradation.

  1. One-way electromagnetic waveguide using multiferroic Fibonacci superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenghua; Lei, Dajun; Huang, Jianquan; Jin, Gui; Qiu, Feng; Yan, Wenyan

    2015-12-01

    The multiferroic Fibonacci superlattices (MFSs) are composed of single-phase multiferroic domains with polarization and magnetization according to the rule of Fibonacci sequence. We propose to construct a one-way electromagnetic waveguide by the MFSs. The forbidden band structures of the MFSs for the forward and backward electromagnetic waves are not completely overlapped, and an obvious translation between them occurs around the fixed point ω bar = 1 with broken time-reversal and space inversion symmetries (TRSIS), which indicates the existence of one-way electromagnetic modes in the MFSs. Transmission spectrum is utilized to present this property and to indicate further one-way electromagnetic modes lying within the polaritonic band gap. The maximum forbidden bandwidth (divided by midgap frequency) of 5.4% for the backward electromagnetic wave (BEW) is found, in which the forward electromagnetic wave (FEW) can pass. The functions of one-way propagation modes and polaritonic band gap integrated into the MFSs can miniaturize the one-way photonic devices. The properties can also be applied to construct compact microwave isolators.

  2. Topological hierarchy matters — topological matters with superlattices of defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Kou, Su-Peng

    2016-11-01

    Topological insulators/superconductors are new states of quantum matter with metallic edge/surface states. In this paper, we review the defects effect in these topological states and study new types of topological matters — topological hierarchy matters. We find that both topological defects (quantized vortices) and non topological defects (vacancies) can induce topological mid-gap states in the topological hierarchy matters after considering the superlattice of defects. These topological mid-gap states have nontrivial topological properties, including the nonzero Chern number and the gapless edge states. Effective tight-binding models are obtained to describe the topological mid-gap states in the topological hierarchy matters. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB921803 and 2012CB921704), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174035, 11474025, 11404090, and 11674026), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. A2015205189), the Hebei Education Department Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. QN2014022), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China.

  3. Coercivity enhancement in (Co/CoO)n superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Binek, Christian

    2009-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the coercivity is studied in (Co/CoO)n periodic multilayer thin film superstructures below and above the exchange bias blocking temperature. The ferromagnetic Co thin films are grown with the help of MBE at a base pressure of 10E-10 m.bar whereas antiferromagnetic CoO thin films are grown from in-situ oxidized Co. The thicknesses of these films are monitored by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). A mean-field theory^1 is outlined which provides an analytic and intuitive expression for the enhancement of the coercivity of the ferromagnet which experiences the exchange coupling with a neighboring antiferromagnet. An experimental approach is developed allowing to determine the interface susceptibility of an individual antiferromagnetic pinning layer by systematic change in the thickness of the antiferromagnet thin films in various sets of superlattice samples measured at different temperatures, respectively. The experiment enables us to separate out the intrinsic coercivity from the contribution induced by exchange coupling at the interface. It is the goal of our study to evidence or disprove if it is simply this susceptibility of the reversible interface magnetization creating the spin drag effect and by that the coercivity enhancement. Financial support by NSF through CAREER DMR-0547887, NRI and Nebraska MRSEC. ^1G. Scholten, K. D. Usadel, and U. Nowak, Phys. Rev B. 71, 064413 (2005).

  4. Ge/SiGe superlattices for nanostructured thermoelectric modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrastina, D., E-mail: daniel@chrastina.net [L-NESS Politecnico di Milano, Polo di Como, via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Cecchi, S. [L-NESS Politecnico di Milano, Polo di Como, via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Hague, J.P. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Frigerio, J. [L-NESS Politecnico di Milano, Polo di Como, via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Samarelli, A.; Ferre–Llin, L.; Paul, D.J. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Müller, E. [Electron Microscopy ETH Zurich (EMEZ), ETH-Zürich, CH-8093 (Switzerland); Etzelstorfer, T.; Stangl, J. [Institut für Halbleiter und Festkörperphysik, Universität Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Isella, G. [L-NESS Politecnico di Milano, Polo di Como, via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Thermoelectrics are presently used in a number of applications for both turning heat into electricity and also for using electricity to produce cooling. Mature Si/SiGe and Ge/SiGe heteroepitaxial growth technology would allow highly efficient thermoelectric materials to be engineered, which would be compatible and integrable with complementary metal oxide silicon micropower circuits used in autonomous systems. A high thermoelectric figure of merit requires that electrical conductivity be maintained while thermal conductivity is reduced; thermoelectric figures of merit can be improved with respect to bulk thermoelectric materials by fabricating low-dimensional structures which enhance the density of states near the Fermi level and through phonon scattering at heterointerfaces. We have grown and characterized Ge-rich Ge/SiGe/Si superlattices for nanofabricated thermoelectric generators. Low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been used to obtain nanoscale-heterostructured material which is several microns thick. Crystal quality and strain control have been investigated by means of high resolution X-ray diffraction. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the material and interface quality. Electrical conductivity has been characterized by the mobility spectrum technique. - Highlights: ► High-quality Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells for thermoelectric applications ► Mobility spectra of systems featuring a large number of parallel conduction channels ► Competitive thermoelectric properties measured in single devices.

  5. Study of Crystals Semiconductors in Superlattices via Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *1A. L. C. L. Jamshidi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes, from the effects related to the processes of transportation of carrier and the changes in the electronic structure of semiconductors materials due to the presence of defects and disorders in the crystalline net. These defects are located in specific areas of the material and either interact or remain inert. In general, they are described by local wave functions. The study of superlattices of semiconductor crystal considers important parameters such as disorder effects in crystals and the alternate periodic growth of the layer of two semiconductors with different gaps and minigaps energies. The quantum mechanical calculations are applied for determining the physical properties of the semiconductors crystals. This study encompasses the effects of defects and the crystalline disorders evaluation by quantum mechanics. Further, it is discuss the presence of defects in the periodic, quasiperiodic and disordered arrangements. The theoretical approach use to understand the mechanism and the results of experimental techniques in which are characterized the current and optic transportation of a semiconductor crystal.

  6. Angle-dependent bandgap engineering in gated graphene superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Cervantes, H.; Sotolongo-Costa, O. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Gaggero-Sager, L. M. [CIICAp, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Naumis, G. G. [Instituto Física, Depto. de Física-Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000, México D.F., México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Vargas, I., E-mail: isaac@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias, IICBA, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac., México (Mexico)

    2016-03-15

    Graphene Superlattices (GSs) have attracted a lot of attention due to its peculiar properties as well as its possible technological implications. Among these characteristics we can mention: the extra Dirac points in the dispersion relation and the highly anisotropic propagation of the charge carriers. However, despite the intense research that is carried out in GSs, so far there is no report about the angular dependence of the Transmission Gap (TG) in GSs. Here, we report the dependence of TG as a function of the angle of the incident Dirac electrons in a rather simple Electrostatic GS (EGS). Our results show that the angular dependence of the TG is intricate, since for moderated angles the dependence is parabolic, while for large angles an exponential dependence is registered. We also find that the TG can be modulated from meV to eV, by changing the structural parameters of the GS. These characteristics open the possibility for an angle-dependent bandgap engineering in graphene.

  7. Hetero-engineering infrared detectors with type-II superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z.-B.; DeCuir, E. A.; Gautam, N.; Krishna, S.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Pattison, J. W.; Dhar, N.; Welser, R. E.; Sood, A. K.

    2013-09-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2-SLs) are of great interest as they provide a lot of band engineering flexibility. A wide variety of unipolar barrier structures have been investigated with this material system. In this report, we will present our recent work on the development of low noise long-wave infrared (LWIR) InAs/GaSb T2-SLs photodetectors. By adopting a so-called pBiBn design, the dark current of LWIR photodetectors is greatly suppressed. The LWIR pBiBn device has demonstrated a dark current density as low as 1.42×10-5 A/cm2 at -60 mV, and R0A of 5365 Ωcm2 at 76 K. A peak detectivity at 7.8 μm of 7.7×1011 cmHz1/2W-1 is obtained at 76 K. Further effort to reduce the operating bias is also reported. By refining the energy-band alignment, a 2-μm-thick LWIR pBiBn device has demonstrated a single pass (no AR coating) quantum efficiency of 20% at 10 μm under zero-bias at 77 K. We have recently extended our efforts to further reduce the dark current by using an interband cascade (IC) photodetector structure. Some further details about the device operation and results will be discussed.

  8. Dimensionality Control of d-orbital Occupation in Oxide Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Woon; Choi, Woo Seok; Okamoto, Satoshi; Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Kyung Wan; Moon, Soon Jae; Cho, Deok-Yong; Lee, Ho Nyung; Noh, Tae Won

    2014-08-01

    Manipulating the orbital state in a strongly correlated electron system is of fundamental and technological importance for exploring and developing novel electronic phases. Here, we report an unambiguous demonstration of orbital occupancy control between t2g and eg multiplets in quasi-two-dimensional transition metal oxide superlattices (SLs) composed of a Mott insulator LaCoO3 and a band insulator LaAlO3. As the LaCoO3 sublayer thickness approaches its fundamental limit (i.e. one unit-cell-thick), the electronic state of the SLs changed from a Mott insulator, in which both t2g and eg orbitals are partially filled, to a band insulator by completely filling (emptying) the t2g (eg) orbitals. We found the reduction of dimensionality has a profound effect on the electronic structure evolution, which is, whereas, insensitive to the epitaxial strain. The remarkable orbital controllability shown here offers a promising pathway for novel applications such as catalysis and photovoltaics, where the energy of d level is an essential parameter.

  9. Development of Type-II superlattice VLWIR detectors in JAXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Michito; Murooka, Jumpei; Kumeta, Ayaka; Kimura, Toshiyoshi; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro; Hiroe, Yuta; Kimata, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    One of JAXA's future missions, using an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), requires the focal plane array (FPA) that has high sensitivity up to the very long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region. Since a Type-II superlattice (T2SL) is the only known infrared material to exhibit performance that is theoretically predicted to be higher than that of HgCdTe additionally the cutoff wavelength can be tailored in the wavelength region of 3-30 μm, we started the research and development of the T2SL detector in 2009. In order to confirm our final goal, which is to realize the FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, we first fabricated the 320 × 256 (QVGA format) InAs/GaInSb T2SL FPA with a cutoff wavelength of 15 μm, and the large-format 640 × 512 (VGA format) T2SL FPA is followed because the other missions, using an infrared imager, require the large-format FPA. The noise-equivalent delta temperature measured with F1.4 optics was 0.15 K for QVGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K. It was 0.35 K for VGA format T2SL FPA at 77 K, but there is non-uniformity, and further improvements are necessary to achieve high performance FPAs.

  10. Examination of Plasma Nitriding Microstructure with Addition of Rare Earths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张津

    2004-01-01

    Medium-carbon alloy steel was plasma nitrided with rare earths La,Ce and Nd into the nitriding chamber respectively.The nitriding layer microstructures with and without rare earths were compared using optical microscope,normal SEM and high resolution SEM,as well as TEM.It was found that the extent of the influence on plasma nitriding varies with different contents of rare earth.The effect of plasma nitriding is benefit from adding of Ce or Nd.The formation of hard and brittle phase Fe2-3N can be prevented and the butterfly-like structure can be improved by adding Ce or Nd.However,pure La may prevent the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of iron nitride,and reduce the depth of diffusion layer.

  11. Liquid flow cells having graphene on nitride for microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Dunn, Gabriel; Zettl, Alexander K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to liquid flow cells for microscopy. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate having a first and a second oxide layer disposed on surfaces of the substrate. A first and a second nitride layer are disposed on the first and second oxide layers, respectively. A cavity is defined in the first oxide layer, the first nitride layer, and the substrate, with the cavity including a third nitride layer disposed on walls of the substrate and the second oxide layer that define the cavity. A channel is defined in the second oxide layer. An inlet port and an outlet port are defined in the second nitride layer and in fluid communication with the channel. A plurality of viewports is defined in the second nitride layer. A first graphene sheet is disposed on the second nitride layer covering the plurality of viewports.

  12. The Study of Plasma Nitriding of AISI304 Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; SUN Jun-cai

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results on the plasma nitriding of AISI 304 stainless steel at different temperatures in NH 3 gas. The working pressure was 100~200 Pa and the discharge voltage was 700~800V. The phase of nitrided layer formed on the surface was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The hardness of the samples was measured by using a Vickers microhardness tester with the load of 50g. After nitriding at about 400 ℃ for two hours a nitrided layer consisting of single γN phase with thickness of 5μm was obtained. Microhardness measurements showed significant increase in the hardness from 240 HV (for untreated samples) up to 950 HV (for nitrided samples at temperature of 420℃). The phase composition, the thickness, the microstructure and the surface topography of the nitrided layer as well as its properties depend essentially on the process parameters.

  13. Direct probing of vertical electron movement in superlattices by sub-picosecond luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaud, B.; Chomette, A.; Clérot, F.; Lambert, B.; Auvray, P.; Gauneau, M.; Regreny, A.

    Vertical transport in GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices is probed in structures with graded composition. Such structures allow boi to impose a quasi-electric field to the carriers and to evidence the carrier movement by the temporal changes in the luminescence lineshape. The fit of this lineshape by a drift-diffusion model gives the transport properties of electrons. High mobility of the electrons is evidenced for the shortest period superlattices, in agreement with previous optical measurements. Smaller mobilities are observed when the miniband width becomes smaller.

  14. Fabrication of Si/SiO2 Superlattice Microwire Array Solar Cells Using Microsphere Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Yamada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A fabrication process for silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2 superlattice microwire array solar cells was developed. The Si/SiO2 superlattice microwire array was fabricated using a microsphere lithography process with polystyrene particles. The solar cell shows a photovoltaic effect and an open-circuit voltage of 128 mV was obtained. The limiting factors of the solar cell performance were investigated from the careful observations of the solar cell structures. We also investigated the influence of the microwire array structure on light trapping in the solar cells.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity of GaN/AlN quantum dot superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Takahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    We calculated thermal conductivity of GaN/AlN quantum dot superlattices by molecular dynamics simulation. The results of investigation of the effect of quantum dots on thermal conductivity as a function of superlattice period are presented in this paper. An empirical potential function of Stillinger-Weber potential was used for simulations. Thermal conductivity was obtained by Green-Kubo's equation. The results show that the values of thermal conductivity parallel to the wetting layers decreased due to the effect of quantum dots. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Second-Harmonic and Third-Harmonic Generations in the Thue-Morse Dielectric Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡祥宝

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical work on the optical properties of the one-dimensional dielectric superlattice is extended. 3Byv means of a transfer matrix method, the second-harmonic and third-harmonic generations in a one-dimensional tinite Thue Morse dielectric superlattice are analysed. The electric field amplitude variables of the second-harmonic and third-harmonic can be expressed by the formula of matrices. Taking advantage of numerical procedure, we discuss the dependence of the second-harmonic and third-harmonic on the fundamental wavelength and the field amplitude variables of the fundamental wave. High conversion efficiency of the third-harmonic can be obtained at some special fundamental wavelength.

  17. Investigation of InAs/GaSb-based superlattices by diffraction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashuach, Y.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lakin, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Zolotoyabko, E., E-mail: zloto@tx.technion.ac.i [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Grossman, S.; Klin, O.; Weiss, E. [SCD, SemiConductor Devices, P. O. Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    We use high-resolution X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy in order to study the strain state, atomic intermixing and layer thicknesses in the MBE-grown GaSb/InSb/InAs/InSb superlattices. Simple and fast metrology procedure is developed, which allows us to obtain the most important technological parameters, such as the thicknesses of the GaSb, InAs and ultra-thin InSb sub-layers, the superlattice period and the fraction of atomic substitutions in the InSb sub-layers.

  18. Formation of uniform magnetic structures and epitaxial hydride phases in Nd/Pr superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    1997-01-01

    , and that the stacking sequence is coherent over many bilayer repeats. The neutron measurements show that for the hexagonal sites of the dhcp structure, the Nd magnetic order propagates coherently through the Pr, whereas the order on the cubic sites is either suppressed or confined to single Nd blocks. It is also shown...... that the singlet ground state of Pr is perturbed to produce a local moment on the hexagonal sites, so that in some cases there is a uniform magnetic structure throughout the superlattice. These results cast new light on the theory of magnetic interactions in rare-earth superlattices. Within a few months of growth...

  19. Effect of exchange interaction in ferromagnetic superlattices: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masrour, R.; Jabar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation is used to investigate the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic superlattices through the Ising model. The reduced critical temperatures of the ferromagnetic superlattices are studied each as a function of layer thickness for different values of exchange interaction. The exchange interaction in each layer within the interface and the crystal field in the unit cell are studied. The magnetic coercive fields and magnetization remnants are obtained for different values of exchange interaction, different values of temperature and crystal field with fixed values of physical parameters.

  20. 2D wave-front shaping in optical superlattices using nonlinear volume holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Hong, Xu-Hao; Lu, Rong-Er; Yue, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Chao; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear volume holography is employed to realize arbitrary wave-front shaping during nonlinear processes with properly designed 2D optical superlattices. The concept of a nonlinear polarization wave in nonlinear volume holography is investigated. The holographic imaging of irregular patterns was performed using 2D LiTaO3 crystals with fundamental wave propagating along the spontaneous polarization direction, and the results agree well with the theoretical predictions. This Letter not only extends the application area of optical superlattices, but also offers an efficient method for wave-front shaping technology.

  1. Strain-free polarization superlattice in silicon carbide: a theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, Peter; Buruzs, Adam; Gali, Adam; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2006-06-16

    A strain-free superlattice of inversion domains along the hexagonal axis of SiC is investigated by theoretical calculations. The induced polarization causes a zigzag shape in the band edges, leading to spatial separation of photoexcited carriers and to an effective band gap narrowing tunable over a wide range by the geometry and on a smaller scale by the intensity of the excitation. Calculations on the SiC surface indicate that preparation of such a superlattice might be possible in atomic layer epitaxy with properly chosen sources and temperatures.

  2. Acoustic analogue of electronic BLOCH oscillations and resonant Zener tunneling in ultrasonic superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Alepuz, Helios; Kosevich, Yuriy A; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2007-03-30

    We demonstrate the existence of Bloch oscillations of acoustic fields in sound propagation through a superlattice of water cavities and layers of methyl methacrylate. To obtain the acoustic equivalent of a Wannier-Stark ladder, we employ a set of cavities with different thicknesses. Bloch oscillations are observed as time-resolved oscillations of transmission in a direct analogy to electronic Bloch oscillations in biased semiconductor superlattices. Moreover, for a particular gradient of cavity thicknesses, an overlap of two acoustic minibands occurs, which results in resonant Zener-like transmission enhancement.

  3. Semiconductor-Superlattice Parametric Oscillator as a Subterahertz and Possible Terahertz Radiation Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl F. Renk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the operation of a semiconductor-superlattice parametric oscillator (SPO at a subterahertz frequency (near 300 GHz. The oscillator is driven by a microwave source (frequency near 100 GHz. We also present an analysis indicating that operation at frequencies above 1 THz should be possible. The SPO is based on the ability of conduction electrons in a superlattice to perform Bloch oscillations. Broadband tunability as well as the monochromacy of a driving microwave field are transferred to the SPO.

  4. Synchrotron X-Ray Study on Structures of Ni80Fe20/Cu Superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ming; LUO Guang-Ming; CHAI Chun-Lin; YANG Tao; MAI Zhen-Hong; LAI Wu-Yan; WU Zhong-Hua; WANG De-Wu

    2001-01-01

    We have shown that, in contrast to the results in the literature, the Bragg peak intensity of Ni80Fe20/Cu superlattices is enhanced at the incident x-ray energy slightly higher than the absorption edge of the heavier element (Cu). The atomic density at Ni80Fe20/Cu interface was analysed by the diffraction anomalous fine structure technology with the incident angle of x-ray fixed at the first Bragg peak. Our results demonstrate the epitaxy growth of Ni80Fe20/Cu superlattices. Upon annealing, the epitaxity of Ni80Fe20/Cu multilayers becomes poor but the local crystallinity in each layer is improved.

  5. The chemical and magnetic structures of holmium-yttrium and holmium-lutetium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMorrow, D.F.; Jehan, D.A.; Swaddling, P.P.;

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the chemical and magnetic structures of Ho/Y and Ho/Lu superlattices, all grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By combining the results of high-resolution X-ray diffraction with detailed modelling we show that the superlattices have high crystallographic integrity......: the average structural coherence length in the growth direction is approximately 2000 angstrom, while the interfaces between the two elements are well defined, extending over approximately four lattice planes. The magnetic structures were determined using neutron scattering techniques. In the case of the Ho...

  6. THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, K V [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-30

    The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

  7. Design and Manufacture of GeSi/Si Superlattice Nanocrystalline Photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    According to Maxwell's theory, the optical transmission characteristics in GeSi/Si superlattice nanocrystalline layer have been analyzed and calculated. The calculated result shows that when the total thickness L is 340nm, the single mode lightwave can be transmitted only at periodic number M≥15.5. In addition, at the direction of transmission, when the transmission distance is larger than 500μm, the lightwave intensity is decreased greatly. Based on the above parameters, the design and manufacture of GeSi/Si superlattice nanocrystalline photodetector are carried out.

  8. Resonant tunnelling and intersubband absorption in AlN - GaN superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, E.; Giorgetta, F.R.; Hofstetter, D. [University of Neuchatel, 1 A.-L. Breguet, Neuchatel, 2000 (Switzerland); Wu, H.; Schaff, W.J.; Eastman, L.F. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kirste, L. [Fraunhofer-Institute of Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, Freiburg, 79108 (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    We report on intersubband absorption and photovoltage measurements on regular GaN/AlN-based superlattice structures at 1.55 {mu}m. For high barriers, the photovoltage peaks at a higher energy than the absorbance spectrum due to the decrease of the tunnelling probability. The observed photovoltage is thus the macroscopic manifestation that the 2-dimensional electron gas at the top of the superlattice gets depleted by a vertical transport of electrons. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Thermal conductivity of GaAs/AlAs superlattices:The Umklapp process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu-Rong; Yan Xiao-Hong; Cao Jue-Xian; Xiao Yang; Mao Yu-Liang; Xiang Jun; Yu Hai-Lin

    2004-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of GaAs/AlAs superlattices limited by the three-phonon Umklapp process and boundary scattering has been studied theoretically based on the model of lattice dynamics with force constant matrix. It was found that the Umklapp relaxation rate approximates BTω2/n with a fitting parameter B. The thermal conductivity increases with the increase of temperature at low temperatures, and would show a peak behaviour at about 60K before falling off at high temperatures. In addition, the thermal conductivity increases with the increase of period thickness of the superlattices.

  10. Wide-bandgap III-Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Jun-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation The views...Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation Report Title It was demonstrated that GaN, AlGaN and AlN lateral polar structures can...research have been socialized to the III - Nitride Optoelectronics Center of Excellence (ARL SEDD) and to the 2013 ARO Staff Research Symposium and at

  11. Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride by Guangli Hu, C. Q. Chen, K. T. Ramesh, and J. W. McCauley ARL-RP-0487...Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP-0487 June 2014 Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2010–January 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamic Multiaxial Response of a Hot-Pressed Aluminum Nitride 5a

  12. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  13. Magnetism induced by electrochemical nitriding on an austenitic stainless steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watanabe, Takashi; Sagara, Akio; Hishinuma, Yoshimitsu; Takayama, Sadatsugu; Tanaka, Teruya; Sano, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    .... The Nitrogen diffusion layers were predominately formed at nitrogen concentration of 23 at%. The nitriding process drastically also changed its magnetic property from non-magnetic to ferromagnetic...

  14. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N{sup 15} gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work.

  15. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...... contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...

  16. Comparative infrared study of silicon and germanium nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraton, M. I.; Marchand, R.; Quintard, P.

    1986-03-01

    Silicon and germanium nitride (Si 3N 4 and Ge 3N 4) are isomorphic compounds. They have been studied in the β-phase which crystallises in the hexagonal system. The space group is P6 3/m (C 6h2). The IR transmission spectra of these two nitrides are very similar but the absorption frequencies of germanium nitride are shifted to the lower values in comparison with silicon nitride. We noted that the atomic mass effect is the only cause of this shift for the streching modes but not for the bending modes.

  17. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... of pure Fe-N phases has not been fully achieved. It is shown that taking into account the ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron nitride phases leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although consideration of thermodynamics indicates the state the system strives for...... of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials....

  18. Aluminum Reduction and Nitridation of Bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhikuan; ZHANG Dianwei; XU Enxia; HOU Xinmei; DONG Yanling

    2007-01-01

    The application of bauxite with low Al2O3 content has been studied in this paper and β-SiAlON has been obtained from two kinds of bauxites (Al203 content 68.08 mass% and 46.30 mass% respectively) by aluminum reduction and nitridation method.The sequence of reactions has been studied using thermal analysis (TG-DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS.Compared with carbon thermal reduction and nitridation of aluminosilicates employed presently,the reaction in the system of bauxite-Al-N2 occurs at lower temperature.β-SiAlON appears as one of the main products from 1573K and exists' stably in the range of the present experimental temperature.The microstructure of β-SiAlON obtained at 1773 K is short column with 5-10μm observed by SEM.

  19. Sheath Characteristic in ECR Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sheath plasma characteristics changing with the negative bias applied to the substrate during electron cyclotron resonance plasma nitriding are studied. The sheath characteristics obtained by a Langmuir single probe and an ion energy analyzer show that when the negative bias applied to the substrate is increasing, the most probable energy of ions in the sheath and the full width of half maximum of ions energy distribution increase, the thickness of the sheath also increases, whereas the saturation current of ion decreases. It has been found from the optical emission spectrum that there are strong lines of N2 and N2+. Based on our experiment results the mechanism of plasma nitriding is discussed.

  20. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R., E-mail: g.r.nash@exeter.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-28

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.