WorldWideScience

Sample records for superfund alternative approach

  1. Alternative Auditing Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, Alicen J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-15

    This presentation for the 2017 Energy Exchange in Tampa, Florida, offers information about advanced auditing technologies and techniques including alternative auditing approaches and considerations and caveats.

  2. Superfund Query

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Superfund Query allows users to retrieve data from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) database.

  3. Potential alternative approaches to xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Lisha; Chen, Fengjiao; Dai, Yifan; Cai, Zhiming; Cooper, David K C

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing worldwide shortage of organs and cells for transplantation in patients with end-stage organ failure or cellular dysfunction. This shortage could be resolved by the transplantation of organs or cells from pigs into humans. What competing approaches might provide support for the patient with end-stage organ or cell failure? Four main approaches are receiving increasing attention - (i) implantable mechanical devices, although these are currently limited almost entirely to devices aimed at supporting or replacing the heart, (ii) stem cell technology, at present directed mainly to replace absent or failing cells, but which is also fundamental to progress in (iii) tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, in which the ultimate aim is to replace an entire organ. A final novel potential approach is (iv) blastocyst complementation. These potential alternative approaches are briefly reviewed, and comments added on their current status and whether they are now (or will soon become) realistic alternative therapies to xenotransplantation.

  4. Alternative systematic approaches to training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    This handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and contractors. The handbook was prepared primarily for DOE nuclear facilities, but the information can be effectively used by any other type of facility. DOE nuclear, DOE non-nuclear, commercial nuclear reactor, fuel fabrication, chemical processing, or other types of facilities may also apply the principles of this approach and find it useful and applicable to local needs. The handbook provides DOE and contractor operating organizations with concepts and guidance regarding the use of alternative techniques to implement a systematic approach to training (SAT). The techniques described in this handbook are endorsed by DOE and use of the guidance in this handbook is appropriate for establishment of technical training programs at DOE nuclear facilities. The use of guidance on selection and implementation of appropriate training approaches after consideration of job complexity, the consequences of error based on risk/hazard potential, and available training media should result in effective and efficient training programs. The information presented in this handbook can be used to grade the level of effort and formality used in developing training programs.

  5. SUPERFUND CLEANUPS AND INFANT HEALTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Greenstone, Michael; Moretti, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We are the first to examine the effect of Superfund cleanups on infant health rather than focusing on proximity to a site. We study singleton births to mothers residing within 5km of a Superfund site between 1989–2003 in five large states. Our “difference in differences” approach compares birth outcomes before and after a site clean-up for mothers who live within 2,000 meters of the site and those who live between 2,000– 5,000 meters of a site. We find that proximity to a Superfund site before cleanup is associated with a 20 to 25% increase in the risk of congenital anomalies. PMID:25152535

  6. Using a triad approach in the assessment of hazardous waste site leaching from a Superfund site to an adjacent stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppanen, C.J. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Molecular Biology; Blanner, P.M.; Allan, R.S.; Maier, K.J. [Univ. of Memphis, TN (United States); Benson, W.H. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A triad approach was used in the evaluation of sediment in the Wolf River adjacent to the North Hollywood Dump, a federally listed Superfund site. Chemical analyses were done for 18 organochlorine pesticides, 21 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, and 10 metals. Sediment toxicity was evaluated with freshwater invertebrates. Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca. Benthic macroinvertebrate diversity and abundance were assessed with a family-level biotic index. Mean Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in sediments collected in the spring. Both spring and fall sediments exhibited toxicity downstream from, adjacent to, and upstream from the dump, with toxicity significantly higher in fall sediments; however, a consistent trend was not observed. Toxicity was typically greater in the fall, and metal concentrations were typically higher in spring sediments, suggesting that metals were not responsible for the toxicity. Sediment-associated organochlorine pesticide and PCB congener concentrations were all below detectable limits, suggesting that these potential contaminants are not contributing to the observed toxicity. No differences were found in benthic macroinvertebrate community structure, which was composed of predominantly pollution-tolerant families, among seasons or river reaches, which appear to be limited by the physical characteristics of the river. Sediments in urban reaches of the Wolf River appear to be degraded; the North Hollywood Dump cannot be isolated as a source of toxicity in this study. In situ testing, sediment toxicity identification and evaluation testing, acid-volatile sulfide analyses, or artificial substrate work would be appropriate to follow.

  7. Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fight Stress / Stress and Your Brain / Can Prolonged Stress Affect Whether Breast Cancer Returns? / Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Health Winter 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 1 Page ...

  8. Alternative approaches to epilepsy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy-Cox, Caitlin

    2009-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a diverse group of health care practices and products that fall outside the realm of traditional Western medical theory and practice and that are used to complement or replace conventional medical therapies. The use of CAM has increased over the past two decades, and surveys have shown that up to 44% of patients with epilepsy are using some form of CAM treatment. This article reviews the CAM modalities of meditation, yoga, relaxation techniques, biofeedback, nutritional and herbal supplements, dietary measures, chiropractic care, acupuncture, Reiki, and homeopathy and what is known about their potential efficacy in patients with epilepsy.

  9. Necrotizing fasciitis: an alternative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Percival, R.; Hargreaves, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of necrotizing fasciitis are presented. The initial management of necrotizing fasciitis remains undisputed. However, following a limited success with a conventional treatment policy, a more radical approach with immediate skin grafting following debridement is suggested.

  10. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  11. Superfund Site Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes a number of individual data sets related to site-specific information for Superfund, which is governed under the Comprehensive Environmental...

  12. Superfund Technical Assistance Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes data related to the Superfund Technical Assistance Grant program, including grant number, award amounts, award dates, period of performance,...

  13. Alternative perturbation approaches in classical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Raya, Alfredo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (Conicet, UNLP), Blvd. 113 y 64 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2005-11-01

    We discuss two alternative methods, based on the Lindstedt-Poincare technique, for the removal of secular terms from the equations of perturbation theory. We calculate the period of an anharmonic oscillator by means of both approaches and show that one of them is more accurate for all values of the coupling constant. We believe that present discussion and comparison may be a suitable exercise for teaching perturbation theory in advanced undergraduate courses on classical mechanics.

  14. Introducing linear functions: an alternative statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Caroline; Herbert, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of linear functions is the turning point where many students decide if mathematics is useful or not. This means the role of parameters and variables in linear functions could be considered to be `threshold concepts'. There is recognition that linear functions can be taught in context through the exploration of linear modelling examples, but this has its limitations. Currently, statistical data is easily attainable, and graphics or computer algebra system (CAS) calculators are common in many classrooms. The use of this technology provides ease of access to different representations of linear functions as well as the ability to fit a least-squares line for real-life data. This means these calculators could support a possible alternative approach to the introduction of linear functions. This study compares the results of an end-of-topic test for two classes of Australian middle secondary students at a regional school to determine if such an alternative approach is feasible. In this study, test questions were grouped by concept and subjected to concept by concept analysis of the means of test results of the two classes. This analysis revealed that the students following the alternative approach demonstrated greater competence with non-standard questions.

  15. Alternative algebraic approaches in quantum chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Various algebraic approaches of quantum chemistry all follow a common principle: the fundamental properties and interrelations providing the most essential features of a quantum chemical representation of a molecule or a chemical process, such as a reaction, can always be described by algebraic methods. Whereas such algebraic methods often provide precise, even numerical answers, nevertheless their main role is to give a framework that can be elaborated and converted into computational methods by involving alternative mathematical techniques, subject to the constraints and directions provided by algebra. In general, algebra describes sets of interrelations, often phrased in terms of algebraic operations, without much concern with the actual entities exhibiting these interrelations. However, in many instances, the very realizations of two, seemingly unrelated algebraic structures by actual quantum chemical entities or properties play additional roles, and unexpected connections between different algebraic structures are often giving new insight. Here we shall be concerned with two alternative algebraic structures: the fundamental group of reaction mechanisms, based on the energy-dependent topology of potential energy surfaces, and the interrelations among point symmetry groups for various distorted nuclear arrangements of molecules. These two, distinct algebraic structures provide interesting interrelations, which can be exploited in actual studies of molecular conformational and reaction processes. Two relevant theorems will be discussed.

  16. An alternative approach to symmetric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véron, Alain

    2016-11-01

    We propose an alternative approach to treat problems with axial or spherical symmetry. Its main characteristic consists of using Cartesian coordinates instead of curvilinear coordinates as usual. To this end, we derive general mathematical expressions giving the spatial derivatives of tensors of arbitrary order along the direction normal to an arbitrary meridian plane for systems with axial symmetry, or along two orthogonal directions normal to an arbitrary radius for systems with spherical symmetry. These relations allow the reduction of the initial three-dimensional problem to a domain with a lower dimension (two for axial symmetry, one for spherical symmetry), while keeping Cartesian coordinates within this domain. The method is illustrated for the flow of a Newtonian fluid between two coaxial cylinders (Couette cell), the Weissenberg effect for viscoelastic fluids and the flow of complex fluids like liquid crystals.

  17. Understanding Prudence Corporate Governance: An Alternative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Zakaria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, the world was stunned by the collapse of few established corporate organization worldwide. These high profile organizations are said to have a weak corporate governance system among others lack of accountability, lack of transparency and poor leadership and decision making that plunge their organization towards an endemic financial and management crisis. Since then and until today, corporate governance received a continuous high attention by all parties concerned, whereby exercising good corporate governance practises is becoming a mandatory within their respective organization. To elaborate further, perhaps maybe there is an abundance of established guidelines and practical perspective of corporate governance within the literature, however, this paper offers an attention-grabbing alternative approach of understanding prudent corporate governance thought that based on Islamic perspective. Perhaps we could revisit the philosophy of corporate governance, review the possibilities in light of adopting a more comprehensive perspective on the concept of development which includes individual, organizational and societal goals.

  18. Alternative Approaches to Recycling Nuclear Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, William H.

    2007-04-01

    Nuclear power exists, and as the demand for non-fossil electricity generation increases, many more nuclear plants are being planned and built. The result is growing inventories of spent nuclear fuel containing plutonium that -- in principle, at least -- can be used to make nuclear explosives. There are countries and organizations that are believed to want nuclear weapons, posing a knotty proliferation problem that calls for realistic control of nuclear materials. Phasing out nuclear power and sequestering all dangerous materials in guarded storage or in geological formations would not be a realistic approach. Plutonium from commercial spent fuel is very hard to make into a weapon. However, a rogue nation could operate a power plant so as to produce plutonium with weapons-quality isotopics, and then chemically purify it. IAEA safeguards are designed to discourage this, but the only enforcement is referral to the United Nations General Assembly. The traditional reprocessing method, PUREX, produces plutonium that has the chemical purity needed for weapons. However, there are alternative approaches that produce only highly radioactive blends of fissionable materials and fission products. Recycle offers a market for spent nuclear fuel, promoting more rigorous accounting of these materials. Unlike PUREX, the new technologies permit the recycle and consumption of essentially all of the high-hazard transuranics, and will reduce the required isolation time for the waste to less than 500 years. Facilities for recovering recyclable materials from LWR spent fuel will be large and expensive. Only a very few such plants will be needed, leading to appropriate concentration of safeguards measures. Plants for recycling the spent fuel from fast burner reactors can be collocated with the power plants and share the safeguards.

  19. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access Database contains a selected set of...

  20. 75 FR 49414 - Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 35 RIN 2050-AG58 Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund... Superfund Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts. DATES: This rule is effective October 12... requirements shall apply to all new Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts, funded under...

  1. Teaching Mathematical Induction: An Alternative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lucas G.

    2001-01-01

    Describes experience using a new approach to teaching induction that was developed by the Mathematical Methods in High School Project. The basic idea behind the new approach is to use induction to prove that two formulas, one in recursive form and the other in a closed or explicit form, will always agree for whole numbers. (KHR)

  2. Alternative approach to community detection in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medus, A. D.; Dorso, C. O.

    2009-06-01

    The problem of community detection is relevant in many disciplines of science and modularity optimization is the widely accepted method for this purpose. It has recently been shown that this approach presents a resolution limit by which it is not possible to detect communities with sizes smaller than a threshold, which depends on the network size. Moreover, it might happen that the communities resulting from such an approach do not satisfy the usual qualitative definition of commune; i.e., nodes in a commune are more connected among themselves than to nodes outside the commune. In this paper we present a different method for community detection in complex networks. We define merit factors based on the weak and strong community definitions formulated by Radicchi [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 2658 (2004)] and we show that these local definitions avoid the resolution limit problem found in the modularity optimization approach.

  3. 'Medical ethics'--an alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, J J

    1986-09-01

    Contemporary medical ethics is generally concerned with the application of ethical theory to medico-moral dilemmas and with the critical analysis of the concepts of medicine. This paper presents an alternative programme: the development of a medical philosophy which, by taking as its starting point the two questions: what is man? and, what constitutes goodness in life? offers an account of health as one of the primary concepts of value. This view of the subject resembles that implied by ancient theories of goodness, and in later sections of the paper it is shown how Aristotle points us towards a coherent theory of human nature as psycho-physical, which overcomes the inadequacies of dualism and physicalist reductionism. What is on offer therefore, is the prospect of an integrated account of human nature and of what constitutes its flourishing: to be healthy is to be an active unity-of-parts in equilibrium.

  4. An alternative allergen risk management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Louise; Soon, Jan Mei

    2016-05-31

    Protein components in food can trigger immune-mediated response in susceptible individuals. International law requires risk assessment to be undertaken by competent individuals to minimize food safety risk to consumers. Historically, allergen control legislation has been food focused and on the requirement for on pack labeling, and the need for formal food recalls in the event of misleading or inappropriate labeling. In order to develop a mechanism for decision makers when assessing allergenic risk from plant derived materials, the aim of this research was to consider a more holistic risk assessment method whereby rather than just using the food-based approach, an additive element in terms of considering the families of proteins is included. This approach reflects the need for food professionals to fully understand the role of proteins in triggering an allergic response to plant material and the health risk to individuals who show cross-reactivity to such proteins.

  5. Matching Alternative Addresses: a Semantic Web Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariannamazi, S.; Karimipour, F.; Hakimpour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of crowd-sourcing or volunteered geographic information (VGI) provides opportunities for authoritatives that deal with geospatial information. Heterogeneity of multiple data sources and inconsistency of data types is a key characteristics of VGI datasets. The expansion of cities resulted in the growing number of POIs in the OpenStreetMap, a well-known VGI source, which causes the datasets to outdate in short periods of time. These changes made to spatial and aspatial attributes of features such as names and addresses might cause confusion or ambiguity in the processes that require feature's literal information like addressing and geocoding. VGI sources neither will conform specific vocabularies nor will remain in a specific schema for a long period of time. As a result, the integration of VGI sources is crucial and inevitable in order to avoid duplication and the waste of resources. Information integration can be used to match features and qualify different annotation alternatives for disambiguation. This study enhances the search capabilities of geospatial tools with applications able to understand user terminology to pursuit an efficient way for finding desired results. Semantic web is a capable tool for developing technologies that deal with lexical and numerical calculations and estimations. There are a vast amount of literal-spatial data representing the capability of linguistic information in knowledge modeling, but these resources need to be harmonized based on Semantic Web standards. The process of making addresses homogenous generates a helpful tool based on spatial data integration and lexical annotation matching and disambiguating.

  6. Domain Approach: An Alternative Approach in Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengadasalam, Chander; Mamat, Wan Hasmah Wan; Mail, Fauziah; Sudramanian, Munimah

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of the domain approach in moral education in an upper secondary school in Malaysia. Moral Education needs a creative and an innovative approach. Therefore, a few forms of approaches are used in the teaching-learning of Moral Education. This research describes the use of domain approach which comprises the moral domain…

  7. Teaching the Sociology of Law: Alternative Approaches to Course Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Explores subject matter of law-related undergraduate courses which arose from social and political upheavals of the 1960s. Emphasizes course content and organization in both conventional and alternative approaches to studying the role of law in society. Examines alternatives based upon varying theoretical perspectives and those organized around…

  8. Alternative Approaches to Group IV Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedaker, Matthew Loren

    In the pursuit of energy efficiency, there is a demand for systems capable of recovering waste heat. A temperature gradient across a thermoelectric material results in the thermal diffusion of charge carriers from the hot side to the cold side, giving rise to a voltage that can be used to convert waste heat to electricity. Silicon germanium (SiGe) alloys are the standard materials used for thermoelectric generators at high temperatures. We report an alternative method for preparing p-type Si1- xGex alloys from a boron-doped silica-germania nanocomposite. This is the first demonstration of the thermoelectric properties of SiGe-based thermoelectrics prepared at temperatures below the alloy's melting point through a magnesiothermic reduction of the (SiO 2)1-x(GeO2) x. We observe a thermoelectric power factor that is competitive with the literature record for the conventionally prepared SiGe. The large grain size in our hot pressed SiGe limits the thermoelectric figure of merit to 0.5 at 800°C for an optimally doped p-type Si80Ge 20 alloy. A phosphorus-doped oxide can yield n-type Si1- xGex; however, the current processing method introduces a background boron content that compensates ~10% of the donor impurities and limits the thermoelectric power factor. Spark plasma sintering of the nano-Si1-xGe x yields a heterogeneous alloy with thermal conductivity lower than that of the hot pressed homogeneous alloy due to a reduction in the average crystallite size. Magnesiothermic reduction in the presence of molten salts allows some control over crystallite growth and the extent of Si-Ge alloying.

  9. MATCHING ALTERNATIVE ADDRESSES: A SEMANTIC WEB APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ariannamazi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of crowd-sourcing or volunteered geographic information (VGI provides opportunities for authoritatives that deal with geospatial information. Heterogeneity of multiple data sources and inconsistency of data types is a key characteristics of VGI datasets. The expansion of cities resulted in the growing number of POIs in the OpenStreetMap, a well-known VGI source, which causes the datasets to outdate in short periods of time. These changes made to spatial and aspatial attributes of features such as names and addresses might cause confusion or ambiguity in the processes that require feature’s literal information like addressing and geocoding. VGI sources neither will conform specific vocabularies nor will remain in a specific schema for a long period of time. As a result, the integration of VGI sources is crucial and inevitable in order to avoid duplication and the waste of resources. Information integration can be used to match features and qualify different annotation alternatives for disambiguation. This study enhances the search capabilities of geospatial tools with applications able to understand user terminology to pursuit an efficient way for finding desired results. Semantic web is a capable tool for developing technologies that deal with lexical and numerical calculations and estimations. There are a vast amount of literal-spatial data representing the capability of linguistic information in knowledge modeling, but these resources need to be harmonized based on Semantic Web standards. The process of making addresses homogenous generates a helpful tool based on spatial data integration and lexical annotation matching and disambiguating.

  10. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag. The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag-2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed-power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NTF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  11. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.;

    2016-01-01

    could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four chemical...... Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which......-product application scenarios were examined to test the concept, to understand the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision-making. The group has developed a classification approach for ingredient and product parameters to support comparisons between alternatives as well...

  12. Propensity Score Analysis: An Alternative Statistical Approach for HRD Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiffer, Greggory L.; Lane, Forrest C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to introduce matching in propensity score analysis (PSA) as an alternative statistical approach for researchers looking to make causal inferences using intact groups. Design/methodology/approach: An illustrative example demonstrated the varying results of analysis of variance, analysis of covariance and PSA on a heuristic…

  13. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, T. E.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher human or environmental...... in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of three chemical-product application scenarios were examined to test the concept, to understand the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision- making. The group has developed a classification approach...... exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered, minimizing the likelihood of regrettable substitution. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information...

  14. A Comparison of Five Alternative Approaches to Information Systems Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Hirschheim

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The field of information systems (IS has grown dramatically over the past three decades. Recent trends have transformed the IS landscape. These trends include: the evolution of implementation technology from centralized mainframe environments towards distributed client-server architectures, embracing the internet and intranets; changes in user interface technology from character-based to graphical user interfaces, multimedia, and the World Wide Web; changes in applications from transaction processing systems towards systems supporting collaborative work; and the use of information technology as an enabler of business process reengineering and redesign. These technology changes coupled with changes in organizations and their operating environment, such as the growth of the network and virtual organization, internationalization and globalization of many organizations, intensified global competition, changes in values such as customer orientation (service quality and Quality of Working Life, have imposed new demands on the development of information systems. These changes have led to an increasing discussion about information systems development (ISO, and in particular, the various methods, tools, methodologies, and approaches for ISD. We believe such discussion has opened the door for new, alternative IS development approaches and methodologies. Our paper takes up this theme by describing five alternative ISD approaches, namely the Interactionist approach, the Speech Act-based approach, Soft Systems Methodology, the Trade Unionist approach, and the Professional Work Practices approach. Despite the fact that most of these approaches have a history of over 15 years, their relevance to IS development is not well recognized in the mainstream of IS practice and research, nor is their institutional status comparable to traditional approaches such as structured analysis and design methods. Therefore we characterize the five approaches as 'alternative' in

  15. Alternatives to peer review: novel approaches for research evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksandr eBirukou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review several novel approaches for research evaluation. We start with a brief overview of the peer review, its controversies, and metrics for assessing efficiency and overall quality of the peer review. We then discuss five approaches, including reputation-based ones, that come out of the research carried out by the LiquidPub project and research groups collaborated with LiquidPub. Those approaches are alternative or complementary to traditional peer review. We discuss pros and cons of the proposed approaches and conclude with a vision for the future of the research evaluation, arguing that no single system can suit all stakeholders in various communities.

  16. An Alternative Approach for Nonlinear Latent Variable Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooijaart, Ab; Bentler, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades there has been an increasing interest in nonlinear latent variable models. Since the seminal paper of Kenny and Judd, several methods have been proposed for dealing with these kinds of models. This article introduces an alternative approach. The methodology involves fitting some third-order moments in addition to the means and…

  17. Derivation of the Hypergeometric Distribution: An Alternative Reasoning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broca, D. S.

    2008-01-01

    This note presents an alternative approach to the reasoning process and derivation of the hypergeometric probability mass function (pmf), and contrasts it with a binomial model. It utilizes the essential concept of sampling without replacement directly in the development of the mass function.

  18. Calculation of plantar pressure time integral, an alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melai, Tom; IJzerman, T Herman; Schaper, Nicolaas C; de Lange, Ton L H; Willems, Paul J B; Meijer, Kenneth; Lieverse, Aloysius G; Savelberg, Hans H C M

    2011-07-01

    In plantar pressure measurement, both peak pressure and pressure time integral are used as variables to assess plantar loading. However, pressure time integral shows a high concordance with peak pressure. Many researchers and clinicians use Novel software (Novel GmbH Inc., Munich, Germany) that calculates this variable as the summation of the products of peak pressure and duration per time sample, which is not a genuine integral of pressure over time. Therefore, an alternative calculation method was introduced. The aim of this study was to explore the relevance of this alternative method, in different populations. Plantar pressure variables were measured in 76 people with diabetic polyneuropathy, 33 diabetic controls without polyneuropathy and 19 healthy subjects. Peak pressure and pressure time integral were obtained using Novel software. The quotient of the genuine force time integral over contact area was obtained as the alternative pressure time integral calculation. This new alternative method correlated less with peak pressure than the pressure time integral as calculated by Novel. The two methods differed significantly and these differences varied between the foot sole areas and between groups. The largest differences were found under the metatarsal heads in the group with diabetic polyneuropathy. From a theoretical perspective, the alternative approach provides a more valid calculation of the pressure time integral. In addition, this study showed that the alternative calculation is of added value, along peak pressure calculation, to interpret adapted plantar pressures patterns in particular in patients at risk for foot ulceration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation of Alternative Clusterings Using the CAMI Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Bailey, James

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory data analysis aims to discover and generate multiple views of the structure within a dataset. Conventional clustering techniques, however, are designed to only provide a single grouping or clustering of a dataset. In this paper, we introduce a novel algorithm called CAMI, that can...... uncover alternative clusterings from a dataset. CAMI takes a mathematically appealing approach, combining the use of mutual information to distinguish between alternative clusterings, coupled with an expectation maximization framework to ensure clustering quality. We experimentally test CAMI on both...

  20. Microlaminate composites: An alternate approach to thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunshah, R. F.; Deshpandey, C. V.; Obrien, B. P.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings suffer from a major drawback, i.e., brittle behavior. An alternate approach is microlaminate composite coatings consisting of alternate layers of metal and oxide. As the thickness of the individual laminae decrease while keeping the total thickness of the coating constant, the thermal conductivity drops markedly. Data on the Fe-Cu system will be presented. A model is proposed for an MCrAlY-Al2O3 microlaminate coating for thermal barriers. The methods of fabrication will also be discussed.

  1. Reattachment of complicated tooth fracture: An alternative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nujella B. P. Surya Kumari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the anterior teeth is relatively a common occurrence. There are several treatment modalities for such condition, one of which is reattachment of fractured fragment itself. Reattachment of fractured fragment provides immediate treatment with better esthetics, restoration of function, and is a faster and less complicated procedure. Reattachment of tooth fragment should be the first choice and is a viable alternative to conventional approaches because of simplicity, natural esthetics, and conservation of tooth structure. Patient cooperation and understanding of the limitations of the treatment is of utmost importance for good prognosis.The present case report describes management of a complicated fracture of maxillary right central incisor treated endodontically, followed by reattachment of the same fragment. Reattachment of fractured tooth fragments offers a viable restorative alternative, immediately restores tooth function for the clinician because it restores tooth function and esthetics with the use of a very conservative and cost-effective approach.

  2. Tolerating diabetes: an alternative therapeutic approach for diabetic neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    It is becoming apparent that a number of pathogenic mechanisms contribute to diabetic neuropathy, so that therapeutic interventions that target one particular mechanism may have limited success. A recently published preclinical study has adopted an alternative approach by using a novel small molecule to induce heat-shock protein 70. This confers upon neurons, and perhaps other cells of the nervous system, the ability to better tolerate the diverse stresses associated with diabetes rather than...

  3. Tolerating diabetes: an alternative therapeutic approach for diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel A Calcutt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming apparent that a number of pathogenic mechanisms contribute to diabetic neuropathy, so that therapeutic interventions that target one particular mechanism may have limited success. A recently published preclinical study has adopted an alternative approach by using a novel small molecule to induce heat-shock protein 70. This confers upon neurons, and perhaps other cells of the nervous system, the ability to better tolerate the diverse stresses associated with diabetes rather than intervening in their production.

  4. Tolerating diabetes: an alternative therapeutic approach for diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Nigel A

    2010-09-09

    It is becoming apparent that a number of pathogenic mechanisms contribute to diabetic neuropathy, so that therapeutic interventions that target one particular mechanism may have limited success. A recently published preclinical study has adopted an alternative approach by using a novel small molecule to induce heat-shock protein 70. This confers upon neurons, and perhaps other cells of the nervous system, the ability to better tolerate the diverse stresses associated with diabetes rather than intervening in their production.

  5. Alternative Monte Carlo Approach for General Global Illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐庆; 李朋; 徐源; 孙济洲

    2004-01-01

    An alternative Monte Carlo strategy for the computation of global illumination problem was presented.The proposed approach provided a new and optimal way for solving Monte Carlo global illumination based on the zero variance importance sampling procedure. A new importance driven Monte Carlo global illumination algorithm in the framework of the new computing scheme was developed and implemented. Results, which were obtained by rendering test scenes, show that this new framework and the newly derived algorithm are effective and promising.

  6. Implicit spiritual assessment: an alternative approach for assessing client spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R

    2013-07-01

    To provide optimal services, a spiritual assessment is often administered to understand the intersection between clients' spirituality and service provision. Traditional assessment approaches, however, may be ineffective with clients who are uncomfortable with spiritual language or who are otherwise hesitant to discuss spirituality overtly. This article orients readers to an implicit spiritual assessment, an alternative approach that may be more valid with such clients. The process of administering an implicit assessment is discussed, sample questions are provided to help operationalize this approach, and suggestions are offered to integrate an implicit assessment with more traditional assessment approaches. By using terminology that is implicitly spiritual in nature, an implicit assessment enables practitioners to identify and operationalize dimensions of clients' experience that may be critical to effective service provision but would otherwise be overlooked.

  7. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - NPL Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Priorities List (NPL) Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access...

  8. Superfund Site Information - Site Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes Superfund site-specific sampling information including location of samples, types of samples, and analytical chemistry characteristics of...

  9. CERCLIS (Superfund) ASCII Text Format - CPAD Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access Database (CPAD) contains a selected set...

  10. The European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA): Promoting Alternative Methods in Europe and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    COZIGOU, Gwenole; Crozier, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Coenraad; Manou, Irene; Ramirez-Hernandez, Tzutzuy; Weissenhorn, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Here in we introduce the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA) and its activities, which are focused on international cooperation toward alternative methods. The EPAA is one of the leading organizations in Europe for the promotion of alternative approaches to animal testing. Its innovative public–private partnership structure enables a consensus-driven dialogue across 7 industry sectors to facilitate interaction between regulators and regulated stakeholders....

  11. California energy approach: from conventional to alternative energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varanini, E.E. III

    1981-08-01

    The paper outlines the work of a State Government Agency, the California Energy Commission, which is now completing its major analytical task - forecasting California's future energy demand five, ten, and twenty years hence and formulating an optimal state strategy for energy production and conservation. The approach of the Commission was to study, in depth, the evolution of the demand of each category of end users. Supplemented by a realistic assessment of the impact of various conservation measures and by extensive discussions with different groups of concerned citizens, the Commission's approach produced much lower and quite manageable estimates of future energy demand. In devising an energy-supply strategy, the Commission postulated a mix of conventional and alternative energy technologies of proven practicability and diverse lead times. Providing such latitude in the choice of energy options increases the flexibility of the state's strategy to cope with possible unforeseen developments.

  12. The European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA): promoting alternative methods in Europe and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozigou, Gwenole; Crozier, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Coenraad; Manou, Irene; Ramirez-Hernandez, Tzutzuy; Weissenhorn, Renate

    2015-03-01

    Here in we introduce the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA) and its activities, which are focused on international cooperation toward alternative methods. The EPAA is one of the leading organizations in Europe for the promotion of alternative approaches to animal testing. Its innovative public-private partnership structure enables a consensus-driven dialogue across 7 industry sectors to facilitate interaction between regulators and regulated stakeholders. Through a brief description of EPAA's activities and organizational structure, we first articulate the value of this collaboration; we then focus on 2 key projects driven by EPAA. The first project aims to address research gaps on stem cells for safety testing, whereas the second project strives for an approach toward demonstration of consistency in vaccine batch release testing. We highlight the growing need for harmonization of international acceptance and implementation of alternative approaches and for increased international collaboration to foster progress on nonanimal alternatives.

  13. Femoral approach: an exceptional alternative for permanent pacemaker implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereno Valente, Bruno; Conceição, José M; Nogueira da Silva, Manuel; M Oliveira, Mário; S Cunha, Pedro; Lousinha, Ana; Galrinho, Ana; C Ferreira, Rui

    2014-05-01

    The classic transvenous implantation of a permanent pacemaker in a pectoral location may be precluded by obstruction of venous access through the superior vena cava or recent infection at the implant site. When these barriers to the procedure are bilateral and there are also contraindications or technical difficulties to performing a thoracotomy for an epicardial approach, the femoral vein, although rarely used, can be a viable alternative. We describe the case of a patient with occlusion of both subclavian veins and a high risk for mini-thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy, who underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber pacemaker via the right femoral vein. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites - SUPERFUND_IDEM_IN: Superfund Program Facilities in Indiana (Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — SUPERFUND_IDEM_IN is a point shapefile that contains GPS-located Superfund Program facility locations in Indiana, provided by personnel of Indiana Department of...

  15. Alternative Measuring Approaches in Gamma Scanning on Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihm Kvenangen, Karen

    2007-06-15

    In the future, the demand for energy is predicted to grow and more countries plan to utilize nuclear energy as their source of electric energy. This gives rise to many important issues connected to nuclear energy, such as finding methods that can verify that the spent nuclear fuel has been handled safely and used in ordinary power producing cycles as stated by the operators. Gamma ray spectroscopy is one method used for identification and verification of spent nuclear fuel. In the specific gamma ray spectroscopy method called gamma scanning the gamma radiation from the fission products Cs-137, Cs-134 and Eu-154 are measured in a spent fuel assembly. From the results, conclusions can be drawn about the fuels characteristics. This degree project examines the possibilities of using alternative measuring approaches when using the gamma scanning method. The focus is on examining how to increase the quality of the measured data. How to decrease the measuring time as compared with the present measuring strategy, has also been investigated. The main part of the study comprises computer simulations of gamma scanning measurements. The simulations have been validated with actual measurements on spent nuclear fuel at the central interim storage, Clab. The results show that concerning the quality of the measuring data the conventional strategy is preferable, but with other starting positions and with a more optimized equipment. When focusing on the time aspect, the helical measuring strategy can be an option, but this needs further investigation.

  16. An alternate dissection approach to the female urogenital triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Margaret I; Walters, Linda M

    2013-09-01

    Traditional dissections of the female urogenital (UG) triangle can lead to early destruction of the erectile tissues, associated musculature, and neurovascular structures. Here, we present an alternate dissection of the female UG triangle. Rather than begin the female UG triangle dissection with the fatty tissue of the labia majora, we utilize an early identification of the suspensory ligament of the clitoris to organize the dissection. The suspensory ligament leads to the body of the clitoris, which can be palpated from distal to proximal to find the crura of the clitoris with overlying ischiocavernosus muscles. Once the crura have been defined, the bulbs of the vestibule with overlying bulbospongiosus muscles can be palpated medially and posteriorly. This dissection approach results in a clean dissection that well demonstrates homologies between male and female external genitalia. Through the use of this method, most student dissection attempts are able to demonstrate the erectile tissues and associated musculature that comprise the female UG triangle. This technique can also be used for male UG triangle dissections, encouraging identification of male and female homologies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Superfund National Priority List (NPL) Site Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A set of site boundaries for each site in EPA Region 1 (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont) on EPA's Superfund National...

  18. Entrainment and motor emulation approaches to joint action: Alternatives or complementary approaches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln John Colling

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint actions, such as music and dance, rely crucially on the ability of two, or more, agents to align their actions with great temporal precision. Within the literature that seeks to explain how this action alignment is possible, two broad approaches have appeared. The first, what we term the entrainment approach, has sought to explain these alignment phenomena in terms of the behavioural dynamics of the system of two agents. The second, what we term the emulator approach, has sought to explain these alignment phenomena in terms of mechanisms, such as forward and inverse models, that are implemented in the brain. They have often been pitched as alternative explanations of the same phenomena; however, we argue that this view is mistaken, because, as we show, these two approaches are engaged in distinct, and not mutually exclusive, explanatory tasks. While the entrainment approach seeks to uncover the general laws that govern behaviour the emulator approach seeks to uncover mechanisms. We argue that is possible to do both and that the entrainment approach must pay greater attention to the mechanisms that support the behavioural dynamics of interest. In short, the entrainment approach must be transformed into a neuroentrainment approach by adopting a mechanistic view of explanation and by seeking mechanisms that are implemented in the brain.

  19. Are alternative investments the right approach for your organization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Charles J; Dodd, Thomas H

    2010-04-01

    The decision by a healthcare provider to implement and monitor an alternative investment program requires careful consideration and planning. There are several things an organization should do when making this decision: Begin slowly. Consider access and liquidity. Don't force the investment to fill a target allocation. View an alternative investment as an opportunity investment."

  20. Regional Urban Planning for Energy Conservation: Alternative Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Shri

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the role of urban and regional planners in redesigning land use patterns which reinforce energy conservation while preserving satisfying living conditions. A model for evaluating energy conservation planning alternatives for Perth, Australia is described. (AM)

  1. Alternative methods in toxicity testing: the current approach

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo,Gabrielle Luck de; Campos,Maria Augusta Amaral; Valente,Maria Anete Santana; Silva,Sarah Cristina Teixeira; França,Flávia Dayrell; Chaves,Miriam Martins; Tagliati, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Alternative methods are being developed to reduce, refine, and replace (3Rs) animals used in experiments, aimed at protecting animal welfare. The present study reports alternative tests which are based on the principles of the 3Rs and the efforts made to validate these tests. In Europe, several methodologies have already been implemented, such as tests of irritability, cell viability, and phototoxicity as well as in vitro mathematical models together with the use of in silico tools. This is a...

  2. The Ecological Approach to Development: An Alternative to Cognitivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Stephen; Katz, Stuart

    1981-01-01

    Two approaches to development are identified--ecological and cognitive. A comparison of the two approaches is made, and decisions are made favoring the ecological approach. A detailed description of the advantages of the ecological approach is provided by means of a systems theory model. (Author/DB)

  3. 40 CFR 35.6315 - Alternative methods for obtaining property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative methods for obtaining property. 35.6315 Section 35.6315 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions...

  4. Alternative Wages and Teacher Mobility: A Human Capital Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Bill D.; Parker, Carl D.

    1990-01-01

    Using Current Population Survey data, this study investigates the effect of a wage differential between a teacher's current wage and wages of alternative occupations on teachers' decisions to leave the profession. Results show that opportunity costs (wage differentials) influence teacher supply. A merit-based, market-sensitive teacher salary…

  5. Alternative approaches to research in physical therapy: positivism and phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, K F; Jensen, G M; Schmoll, B J; Hack, L M; Gwyer, J

    1993-02-01

    This article presents philosophical approaches to research in physical therapy. A comparison is made to demonstrate how the research purpose, research design, research methods, and research data differ when one approaches research from the philosophical perspective of positivism (predominantly quantitative) as compared with the philosophical perspective of phenomenology (predominantly qualitative). Differences between the two approaches are highlighted by examples from research articles published in Physical Therapy. The authors urge physical therapy researchers to become familiar with the tenets, rigor, and knowledge gained from the use of both approaches in order to increase their options in conducting research relevant to the practice of physical therapy.

  6. Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Pain Relief during Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Tournaire

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluated the effect of complementary and alternative medicine on pain during labor with conventional scientific methods using electronic data bases through 2006 were used. Only randomized controlled trials with outcome measures for labor pain were kept for the conclusions. Many studies did not meet the scientific inclusion criteria. According to the randomized control trials, we conclude that for the decrease of labor pain and/or reduction of the need for conventional analgesic methods: (i There is an efficacy found for acupressure and sterile water blocks. (ii Most results favored some efficacy for acupuncture and hydrotherapy. (iii Studies for other complementary or alternative therapies for labor pain control have not shown their effectiveness.

  7. Mixture Experiment Alternatives to the Slack Variable Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Landmesser, Samantha M.

    2009-07-01

    A mixture experiment involves mixing two or more components in various proportions and measuring one or more response variables on each mixture. This article presents mixture-experiment approaches for designing experiments and/or modeling the resulting data in situations where the slack-variable (SV) approach has been used. With the SV approach, one mixture component is designated the SV and the experiment is designed and/or the data are analyzed in terms of the remaining components. In a SV design, the proportion of the SV is obtained by subtracting from one the sum of the proportions of the remaining components, thus "taking up the slack". With the mixture-experiment approach, the experiment is designed and the data are analyzed using all of the mixture components. The article considers four situations in which the SV approach has been used, and explains for each situation that it is generally preferable to use an appropriate mixture-experiment approach. For each situation, the recommended mixture-experiment approach is discussed and compared to the SV approach using an example.

  8. Multidimensional poverty: an alternative measurement approach for the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waglé, Udaya R

    2008-06-01

    International poverty research has increasingly underscored the need to use multidimensional approaches to measure poverty. Largely embraced in Europe and elsewhere, this has not had much impact on the way poverty is measured in the United States. In this paper, I use a comprehensive multidimensional framework including economic well-being, capability, and social inclusion to examine poverty in the US. Data from the 2004 General Social Survey support the interconnectedness among these poverty dimensions, indicating that the multidimensional framework utilizing a comprehensive set of information provides a compelling value added to poverty measurement. The suggested demographic characteristics of the various categories of the poor are somewhat similar between this approach and other traditional approaches. But the more comprehensive and accurate measurement outcomes from this approach help policymakers target resources at the specific groups.

  9. Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth: Alternative Approaches to Causality Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehdanz, Katrin (Christian-Albrechts Univ., Kiel (Germany)); Maddison, David J. (Univ. of Birmingham, Dept. of Economics, Birmingham (United Kingdom))

    2008-07-01

    Numerous papers have examined data on energy and GDP for evidence of Granger causality. More recently this technique has been extended to looking at the relationship between carbon emissions and GDP per capita. These analyses frequently reach differing conclusions concerning the existence and direction of Granger causality. This paper compares the standard fixed-dynamic-effects approach to a heterogenous panel approach testing for evidence of a causal relationship between GDP per capita and carbon emissions per capita allowing for heterogeneity. Overall there is strong evidence for the existence of a bidirectional causal relationship between GDP per capita and CO{sub 2} emissions per capita

  10. Counselling--Alternative Approaches. Information Bank Working Paper No. 2476.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Jeannie

    This document looks at various types of counseling approaches and includes sections on Rogerian counseling, Gestalt therapy, and rational emotive therapy. The section on Rogerian counseling includes a discussion of the principles of counseling from Rogers'"Client Centered Therapy." Gestalt therapy is explained in more detail and a…

  11. Surgical correction of the webbed neck: an alternative lateral approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Turki, Imen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The webbed neck deformity or pterygium colli is the number one symptom of the Turner syndrome that leads the patient to consult a doctor. Various but rare surgical approaches have been described to correct this deformity. We reviewed our experience with the surgical correction of the pterygium colli.Methods: Through five clinical cases, we describe the surgical technique with a lateral approach which provides a better control of the operative site, allows for the excision of the underlying trapezial fascial web, thus preventing recurrence seen in the posterior approach, and restores a normal hairline. Results: No postoperative wound infection occurred. No recurrence was observed through 24 months. Three patients developed hypertrophic scars.Conclusion: The lateral approach associated with an advanced flap and a Z-plasty is an effective technique for correction of this neck deformity. The presence of a multidisciplinary team, formed with maxillofacial and plastic surgeons, endocrinologists and psychologists, is required to treat these patients allowing reintegration into society and family.

  12. Surgical correction of the webbed neck: an alternative lateral approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri Turki, Imen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The webbed neck deformity or pterygium colli is the number one symptom of the Turner syndrome that leads the patient to consult a doctor. Various but rare surgical approaches have been described to correct this deformity. We reviewed our experience with the surgical correction of the pterygium colli. Methods: Through five clinical cases, we describe the surgical technique with a lateral approach which provides a better control of the operative site, allows for the excision of the underlying trapezial fascial web, thus preventing recurrence seen in the posterior approach, and restores a normal hairline. Results: No postoperative wound infection occurred. No recurrence was observed through 24 months. Three patients developed hypertrophic scars. Conclusion: The lateral approach associated with an advanced flap and a Z-plasty is an effective technique for correction of this neck deformity. The presence of a multidisciplinary team, formed with maxillofacial and plastic surgeons, endocrinologists and psychologists, is required to treat these patients allowing reintegration into society and family.

  13. Freinet Pedagogy: An Alternative Approach to Traditional Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the philosophy and operation of schools based on the ideas of Celestin Freinet, founder of the Ecole Moderne movement. Discusses the child-centered approach, cooperative-learning techniques, and participatory decision making that are characteristic of these schools. Points out that the curriculum frequently emphasizes contemporary social…

  14. Sequential Bayesian technique: An alternative approach for software reliability estimation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chatterjee; S S Alam; R B Misra

    2009-04-01

    This paper proposes a sequential Bayesian approach similar to Kalman filter for estimating reliability growth or decay of software. The main advantage of proposed method is that it shows the variation of the parameter over a time, as new failure data become available. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated with some real life data

  15. UAV-based NDVI calculation over grassland: An alternative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Aguilar, Abraham; Tomelleri, Enrico; Asam, Sarah; Zebisch, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is one of the most widely used indicators for monitoring and assessing vegetation in remote sensing. The index relies on the reflectance difference between the near infrared (NIR) and red light and is thus able to track variations of structural, phenological, and biophysical parameters for seasonal and long-term monitoring. Conventionally, NDVI is inferred from space-borne spectroradiometers, such as MODIS, with moderate resolution up to 250 m ground resolution. In recent years, a new generation of miniaturized radiometers and integrated hyperspectral sensors with high resolution became available. Such small and light instruments are particularly adequate to be mounted on airborne unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) used for monitoring services reaching ground sampling resolution in the order of centimetres. Nevertheless, such miniaturized radiometers and hyperspectral sensors are still very expensive and require high upfront capital costs. Therefore, we propose an alternative, mainly cheaper method to calculate NDVI using a camera constellation consisting of two conventional consumer-grade cameras: (i) a Ricoh GR modified camera that acquires the NIR spectrum by removing the internal infrared filter. A mounted optical filter additionally obstructs all wavelengths below 700 nm. (ii) A Ricoh GR in RGB configuration using two optical filters for blocking wavelengths below 600 nm as well as NIR and ultraviolet (UV) light. To assess the merit of the proposed method, we carry out two comparisons: First, reflectance maps generated by the consumer-grade camera constellation are compared to reflectance maps produced with a hyperspectral camera (Rikola). All imaging data and reflectance maps are processed using the PIX4D software. In the second test, the NDVI at specific points of interest (POI) generated by the consumer-grade camera constellation is compared to NDVI values obtained by ground spectral measurements using a

  16. An ecological approach to language development: an alternative functionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, C H

    1990-11-01

    I argue for a new functionalist approach to language development, an ecological approach. A realist orientation is used that locates the causes of language development neither in the child nor in the language environment but in the functioning of perceptual systems that detect language-world relationships and use them to guide attention and action. The theory requires no concept of innateness, thus avoiding problems inherent in either the innate ideas or the genes-as-causal-programs explanations of the source of structure in language. An ecological explanation of language is discussed in relation to concepts and language, language as representation, problems in early word learning, metaphor, and syntactic development. Finally, problems incurred in using the idea of innateness are summarized: History prior to the chosen beginning point is ignored, data on organism-environment mutuality are not collected, and the explanation claims no effect of learning, which cannot be tested empirically.

  17. Eigenvalues from power-series expansions: an alternative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (UNLP, CCT La Plata-CONICET), Division Quimica Teorica, Diag. 113 y 64 (S/N), Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: paolo.amore@gmail.com, E-mail: fernande@quimica.unlp.edu.ar

    2009-02-20

    An appropriate rational approximation to the eigenfunction of the Schroedinger equation for anharmonic oscillators enables one to obtain the eigenvalue accurately as the limit of a sequence of roots of Hankel determinants. The convergence rate of this approach is greater than that for a well-established method based on power-series expansions weighted by a Gaussian factor with an adjustable parameter (the so-called Hill-determinant method)

  18. The Alternative to Sprawl: A Civil Consolidation - Integrated Interdisciplinary Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Moussamim, Saad

    2014-01-01

    Being a suggestive method of interpreting, and responding to the suburban context, my approach does not draw guidelines or promotes a personal agenda. In the same way that an architectural treatise is not a handbook, it is far from becoming a written code. It is an attempt at understanding how universal values, from our shared past, can contribute to our designs for the future. Therefore, let us first reinterpret the way we consider architectural history. Let us ask: H...

  19. Schwinger-boson approach to anisotropy ferrimagnetic chain with bond alternation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李殷翔; 陈斌

    2015-01-01

    We use the Schwinger-boson approach to study the anisotropy ferrimagnetic spin-(1/2,1) chain with bond alternation. Based on the effect of bond alternationδ, we obtain energy gap, free energy, and specific heat, respectively. The specific heat with larger bond alternation (δ >0.7) displays a peak at low temperature. Based on the effect of X X Z anisotropy parameter∆, we present excited spectrums, free energy, and specific heat, respectively.

  20. An alternative subspace approach to EEG dipole source localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiaoliang [KC Science and Technologies Inc., Naperville, IL 60565 (United States); Xu, Bobby [Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, IL 60506 (United States); He Bin [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2004-01-21

    In the present study, we investigate a new approach to electroencephalography (EEG) three-dimensional (3D) dipole source localization by using a non-recursive subspace algorithm called FINES. In estimating source dipole locations, the present approach employs projections onto a subspace spanned by a small set of particular vectors (FINES vector set) in the estimated noise-only subspace instead of the entire estimated noise-only subspace in the case of classic MUSIC. The subspace spanned by this vector set is, in the sense of principal angle, closest to the subspace spanned by the array manifold associated with a particular brain region. By incorporating knowledge of the array manifold in identifying FINES vector sets in the estimated noise-only subspace for different brain regions, the present approach is able to estimate sources with enhanced accuracy and spatial resolution, thus enhancing the capability of resolving closely spaced sources and reducing estimation errors. The present computer simulations show, in EEG 3D dipole source localization, that compared to classic MUSIC, FINES has (1) better resolvability of two closely spaced dipolar sources and (2) better estimation accuracy of source locations. In comparison with RAP-MUSIC, FINES' performance is also better for the cases studied when the noise level is high and/or correlations among dipole sources exist.

  1. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Tuohy, A.; Brooks, D.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. Frequency responsive reserve arrests the frequency decline resulting in the stabilization of system frequency, and avoids the triggering of under-frequency load-shedding or the reaching of unstable frequencies that could ultimately lead to system blackouts. It is a crucial service required to maintain a reliable and secure power system. Regions with restructured electricity markets have historically had a lack of incentives for frequency responsive reserve because generators inherently provided the response and on large interconnected systems, more than sufficient response has been available. This may not be the case in future systems due to new technologies and declining response. This paper discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  2. Alternate approaches to future electron-positron linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, G.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this article is two-fold: to review the current international status of various design approaches to the next generation of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders, and on the occasion of his 80th birthday, to celebrate Richard B. Neal`s many contributions to the field of linear accelerators. As it turns out, combining these two tasks is a rather natural enterprise because of Neal`s long professional involvement and insight into many of the problems and options which the international e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider community is currently studying to achieve a practical design for a future machine.

  3. An alternative approach to absolute-value test for the parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An alternative approach to absolute-value test for the parameters of multiple linear regression models. ... Global Journal of Mathematical Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or ...

  4. An Alternative Approach to the Teaching of Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry with the transition metal chemistry skeleton features of interest. The "skeleton" is intended as a guide to predicting the chemistry of a selected compound. (Author/SA)

  5. An Intelligent Alternative Approach to the efficient Network Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTÍN, A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing complexity and heterogeneity of networks and services, many efforts have been made to develop intelligent techniques for management. Network intelligent management is a key technology for operating large heterogeneous data transmission networks. This paper presents a proposal for an architecture that integrates management object specifications and the knowledge of expert systems. We present a new approach named Integrated Expert Management, for learning objects based on expert management rules and describe the design and implementation of an integrated intelligent management platform based on OSI and Internet management models. The main contributions of our approach is the integration of both expert system and managed models, so we can make use of them to construct more flexible intelligent management network. The prototype SONAP (Software for Network Assistant and Performance is accuracy-aware since it can control and manage a network. We have tested our system on real data to the fault diagnostic in a telecommunication system of a power utility. The results validate the model and show a significant improvement with respect to the number of rules and the error rate in others systems.

  6. Rank regression: an alternative regression approach for data with outliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tian; Tang, Wan; Lu, Ying; Tu, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Linear regression models are widely used in mental health and related health services research. However, the classic linear regression analysis assumes that the data are normally distributed, an assumption that is not met by the data obtained in many studies. One method of dealing with this problem is to use semi-parametric models, which do not require that the data be normally distributed. But semi-parametric models are quite sensitive to outlying observations, so the generated estimates are unreliable when study data includes outliers. In this situation, some researchers trim the extreme values prior to conducting the analysis, but the ad-hoc rules used for data trimming are based on subjective criteria so different methods of adjustment can yield different results. Rank regression provides a more objective approach to dealing with non-normal data that includes outliers. This paper uses simulated and real data to illustrate this useful regression approach for dealing with outliers and compares it to the results generated using classical regression models and semi-parametric regression models.

  7. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO GLOBAL ROBUST OUTPUT REGULATION OF OUTPUT FEEDBACK SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie HUANG

    2007-01-01

    The global robust output regulation problem of the output feedback systems has been extensively studied under various assumptions of the complexity and uncertainty. All these approaches boil down to a stabilization problem of a so-called augmented extended system. This paper will describe an alternative approach which converts the original problem into a stabilization problem of a so-called extended augmented system. As the extended augmented system is somewhat simpler than the augmented extended system, this alternative approach is also simpler than the first approach.

  8. Asteroseismology of rapidly rotating neutron stars - an alternative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Doneva, Daniela D

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we examine gravitational wave asteroseismology relations for f-modes of rapidly rotating neutron stars. An approach different to the previous studies is employed - first, the moment of inertia is used instead of the stellar radius, and second, the normalization of the oscillation frequencies and damping times is different. It was shown that in the non-rotating case this can lead to a much stronger equation of state independence and our goal is to generalize the static relations to the rapidly rotating case and values of the spherical mode number $l\\ge2$. We employ realistic equations of state that cover a very large range of stiffness in order to check better the universality of the relations. At the end we explore the inverse problem, i.e. obtain the neutron star parameters from the observed gravitational frequencies and damping times. It turns out that with this new set of relations we can solve the inverse problem with a very good accuracy using three frequencies that was not possible ...

  9. Peatland geoengineering: an alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Christopher; Fenner, Nathalie; Shirsat, Anil H

    2012-09-13

    Terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems contribute almost equally to the sequestration of ca 50 per cent of anthropogenic CO(2) emissions, and already play a role in minimizing our impact on Earth's climate. On land, the majority of the sequestered carbon enters soil carbon stores. Almost one-third of that soil carbon can be found in peatlands, an area covering just 2-3% of the Earth's landmass. Peatlands are thus well established as powerful agents of carbon capture and storage; the preservation of archaeological artefacts, such as ancient bog bodies, further attest to their exceptional preservative properties. Peatlands have higher carbon storage densities per unit ecosystem area than either the oceans or dry terrestrial systems. However, despite attempts over a number of years at enhancing carbon capture in the oceans or in land-based afforestation schemes, no attempt has yet been made to optimize peatland carbon storage capacity or even to harness peatlands to store externally captured carbon. Recent studies suggest that peatland carbon sequestration is due to the inhibitory effects of phenolic compounds that create an 'enzymic latch' on decomposition. Here, we propose to harness that mechanism in a series of peatland geoengineering strategies whereby molecular, biogeochemical, agronomical and afforestation approaches increase carbon capture and long-term sequestration in peat-forming terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - Non-NPL Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Non-NPL Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access Database contains a...

  11. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) - Contaminants at CERCLIS (Superfund) Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Contaminants at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Sites - The CERCLIS Public Access Database...

  12. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - Responsible Parties at CERCLIS Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Responsible Parties at CERCLIS Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access...

  13. An Alternative Educational Approach for an Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory Course in Industrial and Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Andres; Sanchez-Barba, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We describe an alternative educational approach for an inorganic chemistry laboratory module named "Experimentation in Chemistry", which is included in Industrial Engineering and Chemical Engineering courses. The main aims of the new approach were to reduce the high levels of failure and dropout on the module and to make the content match the…

  14. An Alternative Educational Approach for an Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory Course in Industrial and Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Andres; Sanchez-Barba, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We describe an alternative educational approach for an inorganic chemistry laboratory module named "Experimentation in Chemistry", which is included in Industrial Engineering and Chemical Engineering courses. The main aims of the new approach were to reduce the high levels of failure and dropout on the module and to make the content match the…

  15. ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY SYNTHETIC APPROACHES TO β CARBOXY-α-METHYLENE-γ-BUTYROLACTONE ETHYL ESTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle Liberge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative synthetic approaches to a variety of β substituted and carboxylated α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones have been developed. In the first approach the mandatory methylene unit was incorporated on precursor compounds at early stage of the synthesis on reliance with Horner-Emmons protocol. In the alternative approach which further tolerates multifarious substituents at γ-position of the lactone template the unsaturated moiety α to the lactone carbonyl group is connected at a later stage through a deprotonation / methoxymethylation / elimination sequence.

  16. An alternative approach for teacher education framed by a collaborative partnership setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte Schou

    2010-01-01

    The study presents an alternative didactical approach to teacher education linking practice and theory through a collaborative partnership setting. Using a ―small scale teaching design in which students alternate between schools and college it was possible to show someevidence that, by following...... this approach, first year student teachers in a science & technology class developed teacher knowledge (as aspects of PCK). The study identifies an example using Co-Re and PaPeR as a Resource Folio to show where evidence of developing teacher knowledge is seen. This didactical approach turns the traditional...... teacher education on its head and begins with a focus on practice so students alternate between school–based and college–based teaching in a cyclical fashion, and are encouraged to link theory with practice. This kind of college teaching demands a new teacher educational paradigm for which collaboration...

  17. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES FRAMED BY A COLLABORATE PARTNERSHIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    The study presents an alternative didactical approach to teacher education linking practice and theory through a collaborative partnership setting. Using a “small scale” teaching design in which students alternate between schools and college it was possible to show some evidence that, by following...... this approach, first year student teachers in a science & technology class developed teacher knowledge (as aspects of PCK). The study identifies an example using Co-Re and PaPeR as a Resource Folio to show where evidence of developing teacher knowledge is seen. This didactical approach turns the traditional...... teacher education on its head and begins with a focus on practice so students alternate between school–based and college–based teaching in a cyclical fashion, and are encouraged to link theory with practice. This kind of college teaching demands a new teacher educational paradigm for which collaboration...

  18. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-06-01

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spreadsheet Assurance by "Control Around" is a Viable Alternative to the Traditional Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ettema, Harmen; de Swart, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The traditional approach to spreadsheet auditing generally consists of auditing every distinct formula within a spreadsheet. Although tools are developed to support auditors during this process, the approach is still very time consuming and therefore relatively expensive. As an alternative to the traditional "control through" approach, this paper discusses a "control around" approach. Within the proposed approach not all distinct formulas are audited separately, but the relationship between input data and output data of a spreadsheet is audited through comparison with a shadow model developed in a modelling language. Differences between the two models then imply possible errors in the spreadsheet. This paper describes relevant issues regarding the "control around" approach and the circumstances in which this approach is preferred above a traditional spreadsheet audit approach.

  20. Treatment of holocord spinal epidural abscess via alternating side unilateral approach for bilateral laminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Roy; Yung, Brian H; Sedney, Cara; Miele, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    To date, this is the first reported case of the surgical management of a holocord epidural abscess done through level-skipping laminectomies. It is also the first reported case of these laminectomies being performed via an alternating side unilateral approach for this condition. A 51-year-old patient presenting with progressive lower extremity weakness secondary to a spinal epidural abscess extending from C4 to S1. A minimally disruptive method of relieving the spinal cord compression via evacuation of the abscess was employed successfully. This report demonstrates the efficacy of level skipping laminectomies via a unilateral approach for holocord epidural abscesses (extending 20 vertebral levels). Performing the laminectomies via a unilateral approach as well as alternating the side of the approach minimized iatrogenic instability risk. Both strategies were designed to minimize incision size, tissue disruption, and the amount of muscular weakness/imbalance postoperatively.

  1. A Half-Flipped Classroom or an Alternative Approach?: Primary Sources and Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Edward B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines an alternate approach to the "flipped" classroom paradigm for an upper level history class using a blended on-line and in-class format. The concept of the flipped classroom has received increasing emphasis based on its potential to create a student-centered learning environment that incorporates practical instruction…

  2. A Computer-Assisted Multiliteracies Programme as an Alternative Approach to EFL Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungmee; Ardeshiri, Minoo; Cummins, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a computer-assisted multiliteracies programme (CaMP) as an alternative approach to English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instruction in order to overcome the educational limitations that are inherent in most EFL settings. In a number of monolingual societies with a dominant language other than English,…

  3. An Alternative Bayesian Approach to Structural Breaks in Time Series Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van den Hauwe (Sjoerd); R. Paap (Richard); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new approach to deal with structural breaks in time series models. The key contribution is an alternative dynamic stochastic specification for the model parameters which describes potential breaks. After a break new parameter values are generated from a so-called baseline pr

  4. An Alternative Approach to Large Historical Databases; Exploring Best Practices with Collaboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormans, S.E.M.; Kok, J.

    2010-01-01

    In their exploration of an alternative approach to large historical databases, the authors aim to bridge the gap between the anticipations regarding Web-based collaborative work and the prevailing practices and academic culture in social and economic history. Until now, the collaboratory model

  5. Communicative Approach: An Alternative Method Used in Improving Students' Academic Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmawati, Noer Doddy

    2012-01-01

    Academic reading is a difficult subject to be mastered. It is needed because most of books or references are written in English. The emphasis is on academic reading which becomes a compulsory subject that must be taught and understood in Faculty of Letters UAD Yogyakarta. Communicative approach is used and applied as an alternative method in the…

  6. Exploring an Alternative Science Teaching Approach. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddulph, Fred; Roger, Juliet

    An alternative teaching model has been proposed by the Learning in Science Project (Primary)--LISP(P). The model uses a six-step approach (outlined in an appendix) which fosters an environment in which children can ask questions about a situation, offer explanations, carry out investigations, and report their findings. This paper reports on the…

  7. Hermeneutic-Narrative Approach to Career Counselling: An Alternative to Postmodernism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrif, Erin; Amundson, Norman

    2005-01-01

    Postmodern approaches to career counselling have been suggested as a viable alternative to traditional career theories that rely on modernist assumptions. However, some of the assumptions that underlie postmodernism may prove to be unhelpful to career development practice in the long run. In this article we examine critiques of postmodern…

  8. The Design of Treatment Wetlands in the United Kingdom: Successes, Failures, and Alternative Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guangzhi; ZHANG Guangxin

    2008-01-01

    Constructed wetland was first introduced into the United Kingdom in the middle of 1980s, following a visit by a group of scientist to Western Germany. In the past 2 decades, the applications of constructed wetlands in this country have expanded substantially, due to the demand for green technologies and rising cost of fossil fuel energies. This paper reported a statistical investigation of the performances of 78 horizontal flow wetlands, representatives of such system in the United Kingdom. Alternative design equations, based on organic matter removal efficiency, have been developed from Monod kinetics, and the accuracy and reliability of current and alternative design approaches have been examined.

  9. Feasibility study for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoff, A.H. [US Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco, CA (United States). Region IX; Costan, G.P.; Montgomery, M.S.; White, P.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The United Heckathom Superfund Site in Richmond, California, was used to formulate pesticides from approximately 1947 to 1966. Soils at the site and sediments in the harbor were contaminated with various chlorinated pesticides, primarily DDT, as a result of these activities. The US Environmental Protection Agency listed the site on the Superfund National Priorities List in 1990. This document is part of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study phase of the Superfund response, which will provide the basis for selection of a final remedy that will protect human health and the environment and achieve compliance with federal and state envirorunental laws.

  10. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES FRAMED BY A COLLABORATE PARTNERSHIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    The study presents an alternative didactical approach to teacher education linking practice and theory through a collaborative partnership setting. Using a “small scale” teaching design in which students alternate between schools and college it was possible to show some evidence that, by following...... teacher education on its head and begins with a focus on practice so students alternate between school–based and college–based teaching in a cyclical fashion, and are encouraged to link theory with practice. This kind of college teaching demands a new teacher educational paradigm for which collaboration...... between schools and colleges is paramount. This study indicates that a collaborative partnership setting involving college and S&T- profile schools can provide a “room for study”, and that this kind of teaching design enhances the opportunities for students’ to develop teacher knowledge (aspects...

  11. an alternative approach to t reservations for hand ative approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    basic functions of the Radio Resource layer in the G architecture is the ... cellular network, both the mobile station and the B .... approach in which each base station monitors the ... of a communication network system revolves around ..... Once a single space is reserved for handover calls, ... International Journal of Computer.

  12. HESI pilot project: Testing a qualitative approach for incorporating exposure into alternatives assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.;

    Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more-quantitative...... exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical and product exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four exposure examples were examined to test the concept, to understand...... the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision-making. The group has developed ingredient and product parameter categorization to support comparisons between chemicals and methodology to address data quality. The ingredient parameters include a range of physicochemical...

  13. An Alternative Approach for Determining Photoionization Rate in H2+: Numerical Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu; ZHANG Gui-Zhong; XIANG Wang-Hua; W.T. Hill Ⅲ

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present an alternative approach for determining the photoionization rate of hydrogen molecules under the interaction of intense light, by calculating the spatial overlap integral between the potential function and the time-dependent wavefunction. The suggested method was applied to varying excitation pulse shapes: square envelope and chirped hyperbolic secant envelope. The computed results confirmed that our method was robust and could be extended to general molecular dynamics calculations.

  14. Communicating with parents of children with autism about vaccines and complementary and alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vidya Bhushan

    2010-05-01

    Despite incontrovertible evidence that vaccines do not cause autism, some parents continue to refuse them and many parents of children with autism seek hope in unproven and potentially harmful complementary and alternative (CAM) approaches. This commentary explores the reasons for such behaviors and proposes that pediatricians may support parents in their pursuit of hope in unproven treatments as long as these are not potentially harmful to the child or prohibitively expensive. While respecting parental autonomy and hope the pediatricians should share with parents their concerns about lack of scientific evidence about CAM and potential for harm by some approaches.

  15. Alternative approach for Article 5. Energie Efficiency Directive; Alternatieve aanpak artikel 5. Energy Efficiency Directive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menkveld, M.; Jablonska, B. [ECN Beleidsstudies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    Article 5 of the Energy Efficiency Directive (EED) is an annual obligation to renovate 3% of the building stock of central government. After renovation the buildings will meet the minimum energy performance requirements laid down in Article 4 of the EPBD. The Directive gives room to an alternative approach to achieve the same savings. The Ministry of Interior Affairs has asked ECN to assist with this alternative approach. ECN calculated what saving are achieved with the 3% renovation obligation under the directive. Then ECN looked for the possibilities for an alternative approach to achieve the same savings [Dutch] In artikel 5 van de Energie Efficiency Directive (EED) staat een verplichting om jaarlijks 3% van de gebouwvoorraad van de centrale overheid te renoveren. Die 3% van de gebouwvoorraad moet na renovatie voldoen aan de minimum eisen inzake energieprestatie die door het betreffende lidstaat zijn vastgelegd op grond van artikel 4 in de EPBD. De verplichting betreft gebouwen die in bezit en in gebruik zijn van de rijksoverheid met een gebruiksoppervlakte groter dan 500 m{sup 2}, vanaf juli 2015 groter dan 250 m{sup 2}. De gebouwen die eigendom zijn van de Rijksgebouwendienst betreft kantoren van rijksdiensten, gerechtsgebouwen, gebouwen van douane en politie en gevangenissen. Van de gebouwen van Defensie hoeven alleen kantoren en legeringsgebouwen aan de verplichting te voldoen.

  16. The beyond must also be useful: the burden of alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Eric P; Dege, Martin

    2008-06-01

    Advocates of many different approaches have, for years, attempted to usurp cognitive psychology's dominance in the field of psychology. Unfortunately, none of these approaches have yet made a convincing case that they could take cognitive psychology's place. Because of its explicit use of the mind-as-computer model, cognitivism gains a false sense of concreteness, and becomes pragmatically useful. Because their models are implicit, alternatives, such as phenomenology, gain a false sense of ambiguity and lose their pragmatic potential. In addition, alternative theories often alienate potential sympathizers through unnecessarily harsh criticism. This leads to a professional attitude in which one must take sides, rather than an attitude that appreciates the benefits of diversity, and may lead to the emergence of other beneficial models. If alternative approaches, such as Dr. Flores-González's (Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Sciences, 2008), could push through to the point of immediate usefulness, and present themselves in a less adversarial way, they would be much better placed make meaningful contributions.

  17. Report: Remedial Project Manager Turnover at Superfund Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2001-M-000015, June 15, 2001. We determined that EPA Region III did not have formal procedures in place to mitigate continuity problems caused by turnover of EPA personnel in the Superfund program.

  18. Mid-Face Degloving: An Alternate Approach to Extended Osteotomies of the Midface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Anantanarayanan; Jayakumar, Naveen Kumar; Ramanathan, Manikandhan; Sailer, Hermann F

    2017-01-01

    Extended osteotomies for mid-face advancement require generous exposure of the anterior maxilla, nasal bones, infraorbital rims, orbital floor, zygoma, and the anterior third of the zygomatic arches. This cannot be obtained with an exclusive transoral approach. Hence, the surgeon is usually compelled to utilize supplemental cutaneous incisions that are a compromise on the purpose behind a cosmetic surgery. In order to alleviate the need for such compromise, the authors advocate the mid face degloving approach for extended osteotomies at Lefort II and Lefort III levels. Mid face degloving involves a combination of circumvestibular incision, with inter cartilaginous and transfixation components from a nasal incision. The authors have utilized this technique for 9 patients and documented favorable results. The purpose of this paper is to focus the utility of this approach in orthognathic surgery and promote this as a viable alternative to traditional approaches in surgery of the mid face because of the absence of external scars.

  19. Implementation of an approach to replacing the construction hydrostatic test with an alternative integrity validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Alan; Purcell, Jennifer; Rudge, Paul; Hudson, Bob [TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., Toronto (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Hydrostatic testing has been an accepted method of verifying the integrity of newly constructed pipelines prior to putting them in-service since the mid 1950s. Since that time many things have changed that have reduced the incidence of hydrostatic test failures both during the strength and leak testing portion. Critical to these changes have been improvements in pipeline design, materials and construction technology. Using these advancements TransCanada developed an Alternative Integrity Validation (AIV) approach that could be used to replace the field hydrostatic test on natural gas pipelines. This process was validated with key stake holders and the regulatory body (Alberta Energy Utilities Board) and experimental approval was given to apply the approach on a recent pipeline project. The paper will describe the background to the approach, the AIV process and its successful application on an onshore pipeline project completed in March 2005. The paper will also describe the current limitations in applying the approach and path forward. (author)

  20. Alternative approaches for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep farming: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimpraga, Miljenko; Ljubičić, Iva; Hlede, Jadranka Pejaković; Vugrovečki, Ana Shek; Marinculić, Albert; Tkalčić, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are a serious health problem and represent the most significant constraint in sheep grazing operations. Problems tend to be worse in organic sheep farming systems, as a consequence of a less restricted access of animals to outdoor environment with a higher exposure to infective larvae. In domestic animals, GIN are effectively controlled by an aggressive prophylactic administration of commercially available anthelmintics. As a consequence to a common overdose and misuse of readily available antiparasitic treatments, there is an inevitable development of populations of GIN resistant to all major classes of anthelmintics. Also, the control of GIN that is based entirely on the anthelmintic use, threatens sustainability of the sheep farming worldwide. The combination of the optimized use of anthelmintic drugs and alternative approaches seem to be a reasonable choice in sustainable parasitic control programs that offer a substantial reduction of anthelmintic treatments and conservation of anthelmintic efficacy. In that aspect, a "targeted selective treatment (TST)" directed towards animals clinically diagnosed with GIN, seems to be an effective approach to leave some parasite populations unexposed to anthelmintics (refugia) and to reduce development of anthelmintic resistance. Also, many current research efforts aim to find and validate sustainable non-chemotherapeutic approaches to GIN control, including changes in grazing management, optimized nutrition, dietary supplementation, consumption of plants with anthelmintic properties, biological control by nematophagous fungi, copper oxide wire particles (COWP), and homeopathic treatments. This manuscript outlines (outlines) and discusses relevant alternative approaches for GIN control in modern sheep farming systems.

  1. Advanced neuroprotection for brain ischemia: an alternative approach to minimize stroke damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Maria Irene; Montaner, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research on neuroprotectants in the fight against ischemic stroke, no successful results have been obtained and new alternative approaches are urgently needed. Translation of effective candidate drugs in experimental studies to patients has systematically failed. However, some of those treatments or neuroprotectant diets which demonstrated only beneficial effects if given before (but not after) ischemia induction and discarded for conventional neuroprotection, could be rescued in order to apply an 'advanced neuroprotection strategy' (ADNES). Herein, the authors discuss how re-profiling those neuroprotective candidate drugs and diets with the best potential, some of which are mentioned in this article as an ADNES, may be a good approach for developing successful treatments that protect the brain against ischemic damage. This novel approach would try to protect the brain of patients who are at high risk of suffering a stroke, before damage occurs, in order to minimize brain injury by having the neuroprotectant drug or diet 'on board' if unfortunately stroke occurs.

  2. Comparison of theoretical approaches for computing the bond length alternation of polymethineimine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique Appliquee, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: denis.jacquemin@fundp.ac.be; Perpete, Eric A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique Appliquee, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Chermette, Henry [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Theorique, Universite Claude Bernard, Lyon I Bat. 210, and CNRS UMR 5180 43, Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, Laboratoire Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique, UMR CNRS ENSCP no. 7575, rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 11 F-75321 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2007-01-25

    Using electron-correlated wavefunction approaches and several pure and hybrid density functionals combined with three atomic basis sets, we have optimized the ground-state geometry of increasingly long polymethineimine oligomers presenting all-trans and gliding-plane symmetries. It turns out that MP2 bond length alternations (BLA) are in good agreement with higher-order electron-correlated wavefunction approaches, whereas, for both conformers, large qualitative and quantitative discrepancies between MP2 and DFT geometries have been found. Indeed, all the selected GGA, meta-GGA and hybrid functionals tend to overestimate bond length equalization in extended polymethineimine structures. On the other hand, self-interaction corrections included in the ADSIC framework provide, in this particular case, a more efficient approach to predict the BLA for medium-size oligomers.

  3. Comparison of theoretical approaches for computing the bond length alternation of polymethineimine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Denis; Perpète, Eric A.; Chermette, Henry; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Using electron-correlated wavefunction approaches and several pure and hybrid density functionals combined with three atomic basis sets, we have optimized the ground-state geometry of increasingly long polymethineimine oligomers presenting all- trans and gliding-plane symmetries. It turns out that MP2 bond length alternations (BLA) are in good agreement with higher-order electron-correlated wavefunction approaches, whereas, for both conformers, large qualitative and quantitative discrepancies between MP2 and DFT geometries have been found. Indeed, all the selected GGA, meta-GGA and hybrid functionals tend to overestimate bond length equalization in extended polymethineimine structures. On the other hand, self-interaction corrections included in the ADSIC framework provide, in this particular case, a more efficient approach to predict the BLA for medium-size oligomers.

  4. Mega-phylogeny approach for comparative biology: an alternative to supertree and supermatrix approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaulieu Jeremy M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biology has increasingly recognized the necessity to build and utilize larger phylogenies to address broad evolutionary questions. Large phylogenies have facilitated the discovery of differential rates of molecular evolution between trees and herbs. They have helped us understand the diversification patterns of mammals as well as the patterns of seed evolution. In addition to these broad evolutionary questions there is increasing awareness of the importance of large phylogenies for addressing conservation issues such as biodiversity hotspots and response to global change. Two major classes of methods have been employed to accomplish the large tree-building task: supertrees and supermatrices. Although these methods are continually being developed, they have yet to be made fully accessible to comparative biologists making extremely large trees rare. Results Here we describe and demonstrate a modified supermatrix method termed mega-phylogeny that uses databased sequences as well as taxonomic hierarchies to make extremely large trees with denser matrices than supermatrices. The two major challenges facing large-scale supermatrix phylogenetics are assembling large data matrices from databases and reconstructing trees from those datasets. The mega-phylogeny approach addresses the former as the latter is accomplished by employing recently developed methods that have greatly reduced the run time of large phylogeny construction. We present an algorithm that requires relatively little human intervention. The implemented algorithm is demonstrated with a dataset and phylogeny for Asterales (within Campanulidae containing 4954 species and 12,033 sites and an rbcL matrix for green plants (Viridiplantae with 13,533 species and 1,401 sites. Conclusion By examining much larger phylogenies, patterns emerge that were otherwise unseen. The phylogeny of Viridiplantae successfully reconstructs major relationships of vascular plants that previously

  5. Evolving the Principles and Practice of Validation for New Alternative Approaches to Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Maurice; Eskes, Chantra

    Validation is essential for the translation of newly developed alternative approaches to animal testing into tools and solutions suitable for regulatory applications. Formal approaches to validation have emerged over the past 20 years or so and although they have helped greatly to progress the field, it is essential that the principles and practice underpinning validation continue to evolve to keep pace with scientific progress. The modular approach to validation should be exploited to encourage more innovation and flexibility in study design and to increase efficiency in filling data gaps. With the focus now on integrated approaches to testing and assessment that are based on toxicological knowledge captured as adverse outcome pathways, and which incorporate the latest in vitro and computational methods, validation needs to adapt to ensure it adds value rather than hinders progress. Validation needs to be pursued both at the method level, to characterise the performance of in vitro methods in relation their ability to detect any association of a chemical with a particular pathway or key toxicological event, and at the methodological level, to assess how integrated approaches can predict toxicological endpoints relevant for regulatory decision making. To facilitate this, more emphasis needs to be given to the development of performance standards that can be applied to classes of methods and integrated approaches that provide similar information. Moreover, the challenge of selecting the right reference chemicals to support validation needs to be addressed more systematically, consistently and in a manner that better reflects the state of the science. Above all however, validation requires true partnership between the development and user communities of alternative methods and the appropriate investment of resources.

  6. 77 FR 13603 - Anniston PCB Superfund Site; Anniston, Calhoun County, AL; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... AGENCY Anniston PCB Superfund Site; Anniston, Calhoun County, AL; Correction AGENCY: Environmental... concerning the Anniston PCB Superfund Site located in Anniston. The settlement is not an amendment, but a new... name Anniston PCB by one of the following methods:...

  7. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Superfund National Priority List (NPL) Sites, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Superfund National Priority List Sites as part of the CIMC web service. Superfund is a program administered by the EPA to locate,...

  8. 78 FR 729 - Ellman Battery Superfund Site; Orlando, Orange County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Ellman Battery Superfund Site; Orlando, Orange County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... concerning a previous Removal Action at the Ellman Battery Superfund Site located in Orlando, Orange...

  9. An alternative experimental approach for subcritical configurations of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnelli, E.; Lee, S. M.; Pinto, L. N.; Landim, H. R.; Diniz, R.; Jerez, R.; dos Santos, A.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents an alternative approach for the reactivity worth experiments analysis in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor considering highly subcritical arrays. In order to reach the subcritical levels, the removal of a specific number of fuel rods is proposed. Twenty three configurations were carried out for this purpose. The control bank insertion experiment was used only as reference for the fuel rod experiment and, in addition, the control banks were maintained completely withdrawn during all the fuel rods experiment. The theoretical simulation results using the MCNP5 code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 library neutron data are in a very good agreement to experimental results.

  10. Peptide-Centric Approaches Provide an Alternative Perspective To Re-Examine Quantitative Proteomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhibin; Zhang, Xu; Mayne, Janice; Figeys, Daniel

    2016-02-16

    Quantitative proteomics can provide rich information on changes in biological functions and processes. However, its accuracy is affected by the inherent information degeneration found in bottom-up proteomics. Therefore, the precise protein inference from identified peptides can be mistaken since an ad hoc rule is used for generating a list of protein groups that depends on both the sample type and the sampling depth. Herein, we propose an alternative approach for examining quantitative proteomic data which is peptide-centric instead of protein-centric. We discuss the feasibility of the peptide-centric approach which was tested on several quantitative proteomic data sets. We show that peptide-centric quantification has several advantages over protein level analysis: (1) it is more sensitive for sample segregation, (2) it avoids the issues associated with protein inference, and (3) it can retrieve significant peptides lost in protein-centric quantification for further downstream analysis.

  11. Surfactant-mediated cloud point extractions: An environmentally benign alternative separation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quina, F.H.; Hinze, W.L.

    1999-11-01

    Aqueous solutions of certain surfactant micelles exhibit phase separation behavior upon temperature alteration. This phenomenon can be exploited in separation science for the development of extraction, purification, and preconcentration schemes for desired analyses. Since the addition of just a small amount of an appropriate nonionic or zwitterionic surfactant to the aqueous sample solution is required, this approach is convenient and fairly benign, eliminating the need for the use of organic solvents as in conventional liquid-liquid or solid-liquid extraction. The basic features, experimental protocols, and selected recent applications of this alternative extraction approach, termed cloud point extraction (CPE) or micelle-mediated extraction (ME), are briefly reviewed. In addition, the advantages, limitations, and anticipated future directions of this methodology are discussed.

  12. Imaging MALDI MS of Dosed Brain Tissues Utilizing an Alternative Analyte Pre-extraction Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiason, Cristine M.; Shahidi-Latham, Sheerin K.

    2015-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry has been adopted in the pharmaceutical industry as a useful tool to detect xenobiotic distribution within tissues. A unique sample preparation approach for MALDI imaging has been described here for the extraction and detection of cobimetinib and clozapine, which were previously undetectable in mouse and rat brain using a single matrix application step. Employing a combination of a buffer wash and a cyclohexane pre-extraction step prior to standard matrix application, the xenobiotics were successfully extracted and detected with an 8 to 20-fold gain in sensitivity. This alternative approach for sample preparation could serve as an advantageous option when encountering difficult to detect analytes.

  13. Exploring the use of systems thinking approaches in the management of alternative food networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena

    This PhD-study takes up two challenges: firstly, to suggest, describe and analyse Systems Thinking approaches, especially Problem Structuring Methods (PSMs), as means to problem solving and enhancing management processes within Alternative Food Networks; secondly, to empirically assess the claim...... that PSMs can improve the quality of group conversations in terms of fostering a productive dialogue, and to empirically compare the behaviours of expert and novice facilitators during problem structuring workshops. To meet these challenges the researcher adopts a research approach based on multimethodology......) a dialogue lens and (ii) an expert versus novice facilitator lens. In this presentation the researcher mainly focusses on the claim that expert and novice facilitators behave differently during problem structuring workshops. The researcher explores this claim by examining the transcript of a two-day PSM...

  14. 78 FR 13056 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; in re: Factory H Superfund Site, Meriden...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; in re: Factory H Superfund Site, Meriden...)(1) concerning the Factory H Superfund Site in Meriden, Connecticut (``Site'') with the following... refer to the Factory H Superfund Site, U.S. EPA Docket No. CERCLA-01-2012-0112. FOR FURTHER...

  15. 75 FR 53694 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site located in Davie, Broward County, Florida for publication..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-0729 or Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund...

  16. 77 FR 8255 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site... available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Constitution Road Drum Superfund...

  17. Alternative surgical approach for the management of uterine prolapse in young women: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatayli, Rengin; Balci, Osman; Gezginç, Kazim; Yildirim, Pinar; Karanfil, Fikriye; Acar, Ali

    2013-10-01

    To demonstrate an alternative surgical approach for the management of uterine prolapse in young women by a technique that was previously defined for post-hysterectomy vaginal vault suspension in published work and also to demonstrate successful operative results. The study population consisted of 12 women aged 28-41 years who had stage 4 uterine prolapse and who were surgically treated by abdominal hysteropexy using autogenous rectus fascia strips. Operative results and postoperative follow-up Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification and Prolapse Quality of Life results were recorded. Mean age of patients was 35.5 ± 4.1 years (range, 28-41). Mean parity in the study group was 2.6 ± 1.0 (range, 1-5). Mean operation time was 32.0 ± 5.2 min (range, 25-42). All patients were discharged on the postoperative 3rd day and no complications were observed postoperatively. Mean follow-up period was 20 ± 7.0 months (range, 12-36). All of the patients had complete remission for uterine prolapse and none of the patients had complaints related to the operation. Abdominal hysteropexy operation using rectus fascia strips provides a safe and alternative approach for the management of uterine prolapse in young women who desire to preserve their uterus. But further analysis is needed to confirm our results. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Field analytical support during Superfund site remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, W.L.; Catherman, D.R. [Environmental Resources Management, Inc., Exton, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    ERM-FAST{reg_sign} Services has provided cost-effective and critical field analytical support for a wide variety of investigatory and remedial projects over the past four years. Two recent projects involving soils remediation at Superfund sites exemplify the power of real time field analytical support in reducing time and expense during a project`s remedial phase. ERM-FAST on-site analytical facilities were able to meet, in a real time scenario, all data quality objectives (DQOs), all regulatory agency requirements, and satisfied the client`s needs. ERM-FAST made this possible through the development of unique analytical strategies, the proper selection of analytical technologies, and by streamlining the analytical methodologies. Both of these remedial efforts offer illustrations of the effectiveness of field analysis for vastly differing site contaminants. This case study focuses on the use of portable Gas Chromatography (GC) instrumentation as a tool for providing analytical support during a CERCLA site remediation program. The project discussed provides an example of how low cost portable analytical instrumentation can be utilized in a field setting to meet analytical DQOs consistent with CERCLA compliance and to meet the requirements for remedial activity cost control. Substantial savings were realized both by reducing total project analytical cost, and by efficient and effective process and schedule management.

  19. Alternative approaches for better municipal solid waste management in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Sarika

    2006-01-01

    Waste is an unavoidable by product of human activities. Economic development, urbanization and improving living standards in cities, have led to an increase in the quantity and complexity of generated waste. Rapid growth of population and industrialization degrades the urban environment and places serious stress on natural resources, which undermines equitable and sustainable development. Inefficient management and disposal of solid waste is an obvious cause of degradation of the environment in most cities of the developing world. Municipal corporations of the developing countries are not able to handle increasing quantities of waste, which results in uncollected waste on roads and in other public places. There is a need to work towards a sustainable waste management system, which requires environmental, institutional, financial, economic and social sustainability. This study explores alternative approaches to municipal solid waste (MSW) management and estimates the cost of waste management in Mumbai, India. Two alternatives considered in the paper are community participation and public private partnership in waste management. Data for the present study are from various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and from the private sector involved in waste management in Mumbai. Mathematical models are used to estimate the cost per ton of waste management for both of the alternatives, which are compared with the cost of waste management by Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM). It is found that the cost per ton of waste management is Rs. 1518 (35 US dollars) with community participation; Rs. 1797 (41 US dollars) with public private partnership (PPP); and Rs. 1908 (44 US dollars) when only MCGM handles the waste. Hence, community participation in waste management is the least cost option and there is a strong case for comprehensively involving community participation in waste management.

  20. Alternative SERRS probes for the immunochemical localization of ovalbumin in paintings: an advanced mapping detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Giorgia; Litti, Lucio; Lofrumento, Cristiana; Prati, Silvia; Ricci, Marilena; Gobbo, Marina; Roda, Aldo; Castellucci, Emilio; Meneghetti, Moreno; Mazzeo, Rocco

    2013-08-21

    In the field of analytical chemistry, many scientific efforts have been devoted to develop experimental procedures for the characterization of organic substances present in heterogeneous artwork samples, due to their challenging identification. In particular, performances of immunochemical techniques have been recently investigated, optimizing ad hoc systems for the identification of proteins. Among all the different immunochemical approaches, the use of metal nanoparticles - for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection - remains one of the most powerful methods that has still not been explored enough for the analysis of artistic artefacts. For this reason, the present research work was aimed at proposing a new optimized and highly efficient indirect immunoassay for the detection of ovalbumin. In particular, the study proposed a new SERRS probe composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalised with Nile Blue A and produced with an excellent green and cheap alternative approach to the traditional chemical nanoparticles synthesis: the laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS). This procedure allows us to obtain stable nanoparticles which can be easily functionalized without any ligand exchange reaction or extensive purification procedures. Moreover, the present research work also focused on the development of a comprehensive analytical approach, based on the combination of potentialities of immunochemical methods and Raman analysis, for the simultaneous identification of the target protein and the different organic and inorganic substances present in the paint matrix. An advanced mapping detection system was proposed to achieve the exact spatial location of all the components through the creation of false colour chemical maps.

  1. Understanding anorexia: an hermeneutic approach as a methodological alternative for the field of contemporary anorexia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Puuronen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Theories of anorexia nervosa have mainly been dominated by psychiatry and concentrate upon its physiological aspects, both in diagnosis and treatment. This has led to a search for organic causes behind anorectic conditions, instead of seeing it as molded and shaped both by the individual and the socio-cultural context. This "medicalisation" has been an impediment to a more complete conceptualisation of the experience of discipline and of the ascetic modes of action in anorexia. The intension is to approach anorexia as lived process. The focus is not in explaining what cause anorexia, but is centered on the contents of living experience as such. Thus, the author proposes a phenomenological approach to anorexia as a methodological alternative compared to the dominant medico-psychological approaches to anorexia of today. If we consider the body of an anorectic person as an intersection in which the subject's relationship to social reality will be materialized and verified, we are able to see first how accurate a picture of the dual meanings, double bindings and paradoxical commitments of our present culture and its relation to a woman's body anorexia will draw up. Also, because the fact is that anorexia is a predominantly "women's" illness we have to take in account that the construction of subjectivity and in this context the construction of a lived anorectic experience of discipline, is not a gender-neutral process.

  2. Case Report: Modified Laparoscopic Subtotal Cholecystectomy: An Alternative Approach to the “Difficult Gallbladder”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Michael S.; Huynh, Richard H.; Wright, George O.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 56 Final Diagnosis: Acute cholecystitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain Medication:— Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure. In certain situations visualization of the Callot triangle can become difficult due to inflammation, adhesions, and sclerosing of the anatomy. Without being able to obtain the “critical view of safety” (CVS), there is increased risk of damage to vital structures. An alternative approach to the conventional conversion to an open cholecystectomy (OC) would be a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy (LSC). Case Report: We present a case of a 56-year-old male patient with acute cholecystitis with a “difficult gallbladder” managed with LSC. Due to poor visualization of the Callot triangle due to adhesions, safe dissection was not feasible. In an effort to avoid injury to the common bile duct (CBD), dissection began at the dome of the gallbladder allowing an alternative view while ensuring safety of critical structures. Conclusions: We discuss the potential benefits and risks of LSC versus conversion to OC. Our discussion incorporates the pathophysiology that allows LSC in this particular circumstance to be successful, and the considerations a surgeon faces in making a decision in management. PMID:28220035

  3. Anterior sagittal anorectoplasty: An alternative to posterior approach in management of congenital vestibular fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Mohan Harjai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Better exposure, possibility of extension if needed and precise placement of the anal canal within the external sphincter complex have made the posterior and anterior sagittal approaches more popular and established for the correction of anovestibular fistula. The mini posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP was the procedure of choice for female ARM at our center till date. As an alternative surgical option, we performed anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP in 15 cases of anovestibular fistula and compared them with 12 cases of vestibular fistula operated by PSARP technique. Patients and Methods: Fifteen female infants with vestibular fistula who had anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP procedure were reviewed. The procedure and its outcome were evaluated. Results : The manoeuvering during anesthesia and operative access were quite easier in ASARP compared to PSARP. Delineation of plane in ASARP between rectum and vagina was easier and clearer in comparison to PSARP. Rent occurred in the posterior vaginal wall in three cases of ASARP and two cases of PSARP. There were two cases of wound infection in each group. Three cases of PSARP group developed anal stenosis and constipation while one in the ASARP group developed constipation. Conclusion : Anesthesia and access in ASARP makes it an easier alternative option to PSARP in the management of anovestibular fistula in girls.

  4. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becvar, Dorothy S; Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we delineate the qualitative phase of a mixed-method research study focused on understanding the relationship between Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) and complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Based on an analysis of the data derived from telephone interviews with 54 respondents, we describe four themes: definitional issues, depth of awareness of CAM, fit with MFT, and ethical considerations. Our discussion focuses on the findings of this phase, considerations from the quantitative phase, and reflections on the research study as a whole. While acknowledging the limitations of the study, we conclude that the growing awareness of and involvement with CAM approaches and practitioners among MFTs suggest a need for further education for both professionals and clients. We also note the importance of additional research support for the use of CAM practices.

  5. Economic development: the need for an alternative approach. [Case of Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinches, C.R.

    1977-10-01

    The economic growth of Libya is used to illustrate the need for a more relevant way of assessing development so that it includes an appreciation for the process of change. It is shown that many changes do not appear in the traditional economic statistics. A new approach is suggested that would enable a society to handle changes in ways that are in accord with its national goals and traditions. This would take into account future developments, international relations, the basic skill levels, and other factors rather than a limited measurement of the country's ability to absorb capital. Libya has chosen, as an alternative to increased consumption, policies for developing self-sufficiency, a limited foreign investment, and an emphasis on education as a basis for modernization. The goal is to evolve a national identity and ideology that will be unique to the Arab world. (DCK)

  6. Alternative approach of developing all-optical Fredkin and Toffoli gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Dhoumendra; Mandal, Sumana; Garai, Sisir Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Reversible logic gates show potential roles in communication technology, and it has a wide area of applicability such as in sequential and combinational circuit of optical computing, optical signal processing, multi-valued logic operations, etc. because of its advantageous aspects of data-recovering capabilities, low power consumption, least power dissipation, faster speed of processing, less hardware complexity, etc. In a reversible logic gate not only the outputs can be determined from the inputs, but also the inputs can be uniquely recovered from the outputs. In this article an alternative approach has been made to develop three-input-output Fredkin and Toffoli gates using the frequency conversion property of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and frequency-based beam routing by optical multiplexers and demultiplexers. Simulation results show the feasibility of our proposed scheme.

  7. Alternative Approaches to Calculate Benefits of an Energy Imbalance Market With Wind and Solar Energy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The anticipated increase in variable generation in the Western Interconnection over the next several years has raised concerns about how to maintain system balance, especially in smaller Balancing Authority Areas (BAAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. The consequent increase in variability and uncertainty that must be managed by the conventional generation fleet and responsive loads has resulted in a proposal for an Energy Imbalance Market (EIM). This paper extends prior work to estimate the reserve requirements for regulation, spinning, and non-spinning reserves with and without the EIM. We also discuss alternative approaches to allocating reserve requirements and show that some apparently attractive allocation methods have undesired consequences.

  8. Management of Crohn's disease in smokers: Is an alternative approach necessary?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pilar Nos; Eugeni Domènech

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition with a pathogenic background that involves both genetic and environmental factors. Although important progress has been made regarding the former in the last decade, scarce knowledge is available for the latter. In this sense, smoking remains the most important environmental factor in IBD. Active smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease (CD). Moreover, CD patients who start or continue smoking after disease diagnosis are at risk for poorer outcomes such as higher therapeutic requirements and disease-related complications, as compared to those patients who quit smoking or who never smoked. However, the harmful effect of active smoking is not uniform in all patients or in all clinical scenarios. Interventions designed to facilitate smoking cessation may impact the course of the disease. In this article, the available evidence of the deleterious effects of smoking on CD is reviewed in detail, and alternative therapeutic approaches to CD in smokers are proposed.

  9. Q-methodology: an alternative approach to research in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Janet H

    2008-11-01

    An understanding of student experiences and perspectives are central to the delivery of quality nurse education programmes; implicit with this is a need to understand the attributes and characteristics of such individuals, their subjectivity. Traditional such inquiry has taken the form of questionnaires or interviews and focus groups. Q-methodology is offered as an alternative approach which provides insight into, and a method for studying, individual subjectivity through the use of factor analysis. Within Q-methodology, individuals are asked to rank-order (Q-sort) statements, which are then intercorrelated and subjected to factor analysis. In this way groups of individuals holding similar expressed subjectivities are identified. The factors are interpreted to provide an understanding of underlying subjectivities. This paper explores the theoretical underpinnings of Q-methodology and its application as a research method in the field of nurse education, providing a brief illustration of its use in mental health nurse education.

  10. An Axiomatic Setup for Algorithmic Homological Algebra and an Alternative Approach to Localization

    CERN Document Server

    Barakat, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we develop an axiomatic setup for algorithmic homological algebra of Abelian categories. This is done by exhibiting all existential quantifiers entering the definition of an Abelian category, which for the sake of computability need to be turned into constructive ones. We follow this explicitly for the often-studied example Abelian category of finitely presented modules over a so-called computable ring R. As expected, solving one-sided (in)homogenous linear systems over R is the key algorithm. For a finitely generated maximal ideal m in a commutative ring R we show how solving (in)homogenous linear systems over R_m can be reduced to solving associated systems over R, yielding, as a by-product, a complexity estimation for the ideal membership problem over local polynomial rings. Finally, in the case of local polynomial rings we compare an existing implementation of Mora's algorithm with the implementation of our homologically motivated alternative approach.

  11. Towards electromechanical computation: An alternative approach to realize complex logic circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, M. A. A.

    2016-08-18

    Electromechanical computing based on micro/nano resonators has recently attracted significant attention. However, full implementation of this technology has been hindered by the difficulty in realizing complex logic circuits. We report here an alternative approach to realize complex logic circuits based on multiple MEMS resonators. As case studies, we report the construction of a single-bit binary comparator, a single-bit 4-to-2 encoder, and parallel XOR/XNOR and AND/NOT logic gates. Toward this, several microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned through an electrothermal modulation scheme. The microresonators operating in the linear regime do not require large excitation forces, and work at room temperature and at modest air pressure. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, tunable resonator, several essential complex logic functions can be achieved.

  12. Towards electromechanical computation: An alternative approach to realize complex logic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, M. A. A.; Kosuru, L.; Younis, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    Electromechanical computing based on micro/nano resonators has recently attracted significant attention. However, full implementation of this technology has been hindered by the difficulty in realizing complex logic circuits. We report here an alternative approach to realize complex logic circuits based on multiple MEMS resonators. As case studies, we report the construction of a single-bit binary comparator, a single-bit 4-to-2 encoder, and parallel XOR/XNOR and AND/NOT logic gates. Toward this, several microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned through an electrothermal modulation scheme. The microresonators operating in the linear regime do not require large excitation forces, and work at room temperature and at modest air pressure. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, tunable resonator, several essential complex logic functions can be achieved.

  13. A Cost Comparison of Alternative Approaches to Distance Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Gerard G.; Kalu, Alex

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a cost comparison of three approaches to two-way interactive distance learning systems for developing countries. Included are costs for distance learning hardware, terrestrial and satellite communication links, and designing instruction for two-way interactive courses. As part of this project, FSEC is developing a 30-hour course in photovoltaic system design that will be used in a variety of experiments using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). A primary goal of the project is to develop an instructional design and delivery model that can be used for other education and training programs. Over two-thirds of the world photovoltaics market is in developing countries. One of the objectives of this NASA-sponsored project was to develop new and better energy education programs that take advantage of advances in telecommunications and computer technology. The combination of desktop video systems and the sharing of computer applications software is of special interest. Research is being performed to evaluate the effectiveness of some of these technologies as part of this project. The design of the distance learning origination and receive sites discussed in this paper were influenced by the educational community's growing interest in distance education. The following approach was used to develop comparative costs for delivering interactive distance education to developing countries: (1) Representative target locations for receive sites were chosen. The originating site was assumed to be Cocoa, Florida, where FSEC is located; (2) A range of course development costs were determined; (3) The cost of equipment for three alternative two-way interactive distance learning system configurations was determined or estimated. The types of system configurations ranged from a PC-based system that allows instructors to originate instruction from their office using desktop video and shared application software, to a high cost system that uses a

  14. A Cost Comparison of Alternative Approaches to Distance Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Gerard G.; Kalu, Alex

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a cost comparison of three approaches to two-way interactive distance learning systems for developing countries. Included are costs for distance learning hardware, terrestrial and satellite communication links, and designing instruction for two-way interactive courses. As part of this project, FSEC is developing a 30-hour course in photovoltaic system design that will be used in a variety of experiments using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). A primary goal of the project is to develop an instructional design and delivery model that can be used for other education and training programs. Over two-thirds of the world photovoltaics market is in developing countries. One of the objectives of this NASA-sponsored project was to develop new and better energy education programs that take advantage of advances in telecommunications and computer technology. The combination of desktop video systems and the sharing of computer applications software is of special interest. Research is being performed to evaluate the effectiveness of some of these technologies as part of this project. The design of the distance learning origination and receive sites discussed in this paper were influenced by the educational community's growing interest in distance education. The following approach was used to develop comparative costs for delivering interactive distance education to developing countries: (1) Representative target locations for receive sites were chosen. The originating site was assumed to be Cocoa, Florida, where FSEC is located; (2) A range of course development costs were determined; (3) The cost of equipment for three alternative two-way interactive distance learning system configurations was determined or estimated. The types of system configurations ranged from a PC-based system that allows instructors to originate instruction from their office using desktop video and shared application software, to a high cost system that uses a

  15. Challenges and implications of global modeling approaches that are alternatives to using constant plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegom, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years a number of approaches have been developed to provide alternatives to the use of plant functional types (PFTs) with constant vegetation characteristics for simulating vegetation responses to climate changes. In this presentation, an overview of those approaches and their challenges is given. Some new approaches aim at removing PFTs altogether by determining the combination of vegetation characteristics that would fit local conditions best. Others describe the variation in traits within PFTs as a function of environmental drivers, based on community assembly principles. In the first approach, after an equilibrium has been established, vegetation composition and its functional attributes can change by allowing the emergence of a new type that is more fit. In the latter case, changes in vegetation attributes in space and time as assumed to be the result intraspecific variation, genetic adaptation and species turnover, without quantifying their respective importance. Hence, it is assumed that -by whatever mechanism- the community as a whole responds without major time lags to changes in environmental drivers. Recently, we showed that intraspecific variation is highly species- and trait-specific and that none of the current hypotheses on drivers of this variation seems to hold. Also genetic adaptation varies considerably among species and it is uncertain whether it will be fast enough to cope with climate change. Species turnover within a community is especially fast in herbaceous communities, but much slower in forest communities. Hence, it seems that assumptions made may not hold for forested ecosystems, but solutions to deal with this do not yet exist. Even despite the fact that responsiveness of vegetation to environmental change may be overestimated, we showed that -upon implementation of trait-environment relationships- major changes in global vegetation distribution are projected, to similar extents as to those without such responsiveness.

  16. Experimenting with an Alternative Teaching Approach on "Metals." Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 113.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddulph, Fred; McMinn, Bill

    An alternative approach for teaching primary school science has been proposed by the Learning in Science Project (Primary--LISP(P). This study investigated the use of the approach during three series of lessons on the topic "metals." Each series followed the same general pattern: (1) an introductory session to stimulate children to ask…

  17. Total soil DNA quantification as an alternative microbial biomass determination approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    .87 indicated slight (about 13%) underestimation of microbial biomass-C obtained by the CFE approach. Thus, quantification of microbial dsDNA is an alternative option to determine soil microbial biomass under extreme conditions, e.g., in frozen and alkaline soils. In contrast to approaches based on indirect characteristics (respiration, etc.), the DNA-based approach enables evaluating microbial biomass using the immediate content of basic cell compounds universal to all living organisms. This research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, Project No 14-14-00625.

  18. Alternative 3D Modeling Approaches Based on Complex Multi-Source Geological Data Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明超; 韩彦青; 缪正建; 高伟

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complex nature of multi-source geological data, it is difficult to rebuild every geological struc-ture through a single 3D modeling method. The multi-source data interpretation method put forward in this analysis is based on a database-driven pattern and focuses on the discrete and irregular features of geological data. The geological data from a variety of sources covering a range of accuracy, resolution, quantity and quality are classified and inte-grated according to their reliability and consistency for 3D modeling. The new interpolation-approximation fitting construction algorithm of geological surfaces with the non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) technique is then pre-sented. The NURBS technique can retain the balance among the requirements for accuracy, surface continuity and data storage of geological structures. Finally, four alternative 3D modeling approaches are demonstrated with reference to some examples, which are selected according to the data quantity and accuracy specification. The proposed approaches offer flexible modeling patterns for different practical engineering demands.

  19. Report on noninvasive prenatal testing: classical and alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantiukh, Kateryna S; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Zaigrin, Igor V; Zotov, Alexei M; Mazur, Alexander M; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2016-01-01

    Concerns of traditional prenatal aneuploidy testing methods, such as low accuracy of noninvasive and health risks associated with invasive procedures, were overcome with the introduction of novel noninvasive methods based on genetics (NIPT). These were rapidly adopted into clinical practice in many countries after a series of successful trials of various independent submethods. Here we present results of own NIPT trial carried out in Moscow, Russia. 1012 samples were subjected to the method aimed at measuring chromosome coverage by massive parallel sequencing. Two alternative approaches are ascertained: one based on maternal/fetal differential methylation and another based on allelic difference. While the former failed to provide stable results, the latter was found to be promising and worthy of conducting a large-scale trial. One critical point in any NIPT approach is the determination of fetal cell-free DNA fraction, which dictates the reliability of obtained results for a given sample. We show that two different chromosome Y representation measures-by real-time PCR and by whole-genome massive parallel sequencing-are practically interchangeable (r=0.94). We also propose a novel method based on maternal/fetal allelic difference which is applicable in pregnancies with fetuses of either sex. Even in its pilot form it correlates well with chromosome Y coverage estimates (r=0.74) and can be further improved by increasing the number of polymorphisms.

  20. An alternative surgical approach reduces variability following filament induction of experimental stroke in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Trotman-Lucas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Animal models are essential for understanding the pathology of stroke and investigating potential treatments. However, in vivo stroke models are associated, particularly in mice, with high variability in lesion volume. We investigated whether a surgical refinement where reperfusion is not reliant on the Circle of Willis reduced outcome variability. Mice underwent 60 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion avoiding ligation of the external carotid artery. During reperfusion, the common carotid artery was either ligated (standard approach, or it was repaired to allow re-establishment of blood flow through the common carotid artery. All mice underwent MRI scanning for assessment of infarct volume, apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy, along with terminal assessment of infarct volume by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining. Repairing the common carotid artery following middle cerebral artery occlusion enhanced reperfusion (P<0.01 and reduced the variability seen in both total (histological analysis, P=0.008; T2-weighted MRI, P=0.015 and core (diffusion tensor MRI, P=0.043 lesion volume. Avoiding external carotid artery ligation may improve animal wellbeing, through reduced weight loss, while using an alternative surgical approach that enabled reperfusion through the common carotid artery decreased the variability in lesion volume seen within groups.

  1. Report on noninvasive prenatal testing: classical and alternative approaches [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna S. Pantiukh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concerns of traditional prenatal aneuploidy testing methods, such as low accuracy of noninvasive and health risks associated with invasive procedures, were overcome with the introduction of novel noninvasive methods based on genetics (NIPT. These were rapidly adopted into clinical practice in many countries after a series of successful trials of various independent submethods. Here we present results of own NIPT trial carried out in Moscow, Russia. 1012 samples were subjected to the method aimed at measuring chromosome coverage by massive parallel sequencing. Two alternative approaches are ascertained: one based on maternal/fetal differential methylation and another based on allelic difference. While the former failed to provide stable results, the latter was found to be promising and worthy of conducting a large-scale trial. One critical point in any NIPT approach is the determination of fetal cell-free DNA fraction, which dictates the reliability of obtained results for a given sample. We show that two different chromosome Y representation measures—by real-time PCR and by whole-genome massive parallel sequencing—are practically interchangeable (r=0.94. We also propose a novel method based on maternal/fetal allelic difference which is applicable in pregnancies with fetuses of either sex. Even in its pilot form it correlates well with chromosome Y coverage estimates (r=0.74 and can be further improved by increasing the number of polymorphisms.

  2. Integrating knowledge exchange and the assessment of dryland management alternatives - A learning-centered participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Susana; Llovet, Joan; Ocampo-Melgar, Anahí; Vilagrosa, Alberto; Mayor, Ángeles G; Murias, Cristina; Vallejo, V Ramón; Orr, Barron J

    2017-06-15

    The adoption of sustainable land management strategies and practices that respond to current climate and human pressures requires both assessment tools that can lead to better informed decision-making and effective knowledge-exchange mechanisms that facilitate new learning and behavior change. We propose a learning-centered participatory approach that links land management assessment and knowledge exchange and integrates science-based data and stakeholder perspectives on both biophysical and socio-economic attributes. We outline a structured procedure for a transparent assessment of land management alternatives, tailored to dryland management, that is based on (1) principles of constructivism and social learning, (2) the participation of stakeholders throughout the whole assessment process, from design to implementation, and (3) the combination of site-specific indicators, identified by local stakeholders as relevant to their particular objectives and context conditions, and science-based indicators that represent ecosystem services of drylands worldwide. The proposed procedure follows a pattern of eliciting, challenging, and self-reviewing stakeholder perspectives that aims to facilitate learning. The difference between the initial baseline perspectives and the final self-reviewed stakeholder perspectives is used as a proxy of learning. We illustrate the potential of this methodology by its application to the assessment of land uses in a Mediterranean fire-prone area in East Spain. The approach may be applied to a variety of socio-ecological systems and decision-making and governance scales. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Alternative approach to precision narrow-angle astrometry for Antarctic long baseline interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Y; Rizzuto, A C; Tuthill, P G; Robertson, J G; Warrington, B A; Tango, W J

    2014-01-01

    The conventional approach to high-precision narrow-angle astrometry using a long baseline interferometer is to directly measure the fringe packet separation of a target and a nearby reference star. This is done by means of a technique known as phase-referencing which requires a network of dual beam combiners and laser metrology systems. Using an alternative approach that does not rely on phase-referencing, the narrow-angle astrometry of several closed binary stars (with separation less than 2$"$), as described in this paper, was carried out by observing the fringe packet crossing event of the binary systems. Such an event occurs twice every sidereal day when the line joining the two stars of the binary is is perpendicular to the projected baseline of the interferometer. Observation of these events is well suited for an interferometer in Antarctica. Proof of concept observations were carried out at the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) with targets selected according to its geographical location....

  4. An Alternative Methodological Approach for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Decision Making in Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulakis, Vasilios; Mitropoulou, Christina; van Schaik, Ron H; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Patrinos, George P

    2016-05-01

    Genomic Medicine aims to improve therapeutic interventions and diagnostics, the quality of life of patients, but also to rationalize healthcare costs. To reach this goal, careful assessment and identification of evidence gaps for public health genomics priorities are required so that a more efficient healthcare environment is created. Here, we propose a public health genomics-driven approach to adjust the classical healthcare decision making process with an alternative methodological approach of cost-effectiveness analysis, which is particularly helpful for genomic medicine interventions. By combining classical cost-effectiveness analysis with budget constraints, social preferences, and patient ethics, we demonstrate the application of this model, the Genome Economics Model (GEM), based on a previously reported genome-guided intervention from a developing country environment. The model and the attendant rationale provide a practical guide by which all major healthcare stakeholders could ensure the sustainability of funding for genome-guided interventions, their adoption and coverage by health insurance funds, and prioritization of Genomic Medicine research, development, and innovation, given the restriction of budgets, particularly in developing countries and low-income healthcare settings in developed countries. The implications of the GEM for the policy makers interested in Genomic Medicine and new health technology and innovation assessment are also discussed.

  5. Alternate approaches to verifying the structural adequacy of the Defense High Level Waste Shipping Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, A.; Koploy, M.

    1991-12-01

    In the early 1980s, the US Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) initiated a project to develop a safe and efficient transportation system for defense high level waste (DHLW). A long-standing objective of the DHLW transportation project is to develop a truck cask that represents the leading edge of cask technology as well as one that fully complies with all applicable DOE, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. General Atomics (GA) designed the DHLW Truck Shipping Cask using state-of-the-art analytical techniques verified by model testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The analytical techniques include two approaches, inelastic analysis and elastic analysis. This topical report presents the results of the two analytical approaches and the model testing results. The purpose of this work is to show that there are two viable analytical alternatives to verify the structural adequacy of a Type B package and to obtain an NRC license. It addition, this data will help to support the future acceptance by the NRC of inelastic analysis as a tool in packaging design and licensing.

  6. Comparison of marine spatial planning methods in Madagascar demonstrates value of alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allnutt, Thomas F; McClanahan, Timothy R; Andréfouët, Serge; Baker, Merrill; Lagabrielle, Erwann; McClennen, Caleb; Rakotomanjaka, Andry J M; Tianarisoa, Tantely F; Watson, Reg; Kremen, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The Government of Madagascar plans to increase marine protected area coverage by over one million hectares. To assist this process, we compare four methods for marine spatial planning of Madagascar's west coast. Input data for each method was drawn from the same variables: fishing pressure, exposure to climate change, and biodiversity (habitats, species distributions, biological richness, and biodiversity value). The first method compares visual color classifications of primary variables, the second uses binary combinations of these variables to produce a categorical classification of management actions, the third is a target-based optimization using Marxan, and the fourth is conservation ranking with Zonation. We present results from each method, and compare the latter three approaches for spatial coverage, biodiversity representation, fishing cost and persistence probability. All results included large areas in the north, central, and southern parts of western Madagascar. Achieving 30% representation targets with Marxan required twice the fish catch loss than the categorical method. The categorical classification and Zonation do not consider targets for conservation features. However, when we reduced Marxan targets to 16.3%, matching the representation level of the "strict protection" class of the categorical result, the methods show similar catch losses. The management category portfolio has complete coverage, and presents several management recommendations including strict protection. Zonation produces rapid conservation rankings across large, diverse datasets. Marxan is useful for identifying strict protected areas that meet representation targets, and minimize exposure probabilities for conservation features at low economic cost. We show that methods based on Zonation and a simple combination of variables can produce results comparable to Marxan for species representation and catch losses, demonstrating the value of comparing alternative approaches during

  7. Comparison of marine spatial planning methods in Madagascar demonstrates value of alternative approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Allnutt

    Full Text Available The Government of Madagascar plans to increase marine protected area coverage by over one million hectares. To assist this process, we compare four methods for marine spatial planning of Madagascar's west coast. Input data for each method was drawn from the same variables: fishing pressure, exposure to climate change, and biodiversity (habitats, species distributions, biological richness, and biodiversity value. The first method compares visual color classifications of primary variables, the second uses binary combinations of these variables to produce a categorical classification of management actions, the third is a target-based optimization using Marxan, and the fourth is conservation ranking with Zonation. We present results from each method, and compare the latter three approaches for spatial coverage, biodiversity representation, fishing cost and persistence probability. All results included large areas in the north, central, and southern parts of western Madagascar. Achieving 30% representation targets with Marxan required twice the fish catch loss than the categorical method. The categorical classification and Zonation do not consider targets for conservation features. However, when we reduced Marxan targets to 16.3%, matching the representation level of the "strict protection" class of the categorical result, the methods show similar catch losses. The management category portfolio has complete coverage, and presents several management recommendations including strict protection. Zonation produces rapid conservation rankings across large, diverse datasets. Marxan is useful for identifying strict protected areas that meet representation targets, and minimize exposure probabilities for conservation features at low economic cost. We show that methods based on Zonation and a simple combination of variables can produce results comparable to Marxan for species representation and catch losses, demonstrating the value of comparing alternative

  8. Promoting functional foods as acceptable alternatives to doping: potential for information-based social marketing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ricky; Naughton, Declan P; Petróczi, Andrea

    2010-11-10

    Substances with performance enhancing properties appear on a continuum, ranging from prohibited performance enhancing drugs (PED) through dietary supplements to functional foods (FF). Anti-doping messages designed to dissuade athletes from using PEDs have been typically based on moralising sport competition and/or employing scare campaigns with focus on the negative consequences. Campaigns offering comparable and acceptable alternatives are nonexistent, nor are athletes helped in finding these for themselves. It is timely that social marketing strategies for anti-doping prevention and intervention incorporate media messages that complement the existing approaches by promoting comparable and acceptable alternatives to doping. To facilitate this process, the aim of this study was to ascertain whether a single exposure knowledge-based information intervention led to increased knowledge and subsequently result in changes in beliefs and automatic associations regarding performance enhancements. In a repeated measure design, 115 male recreational gym users were recruited and provided with a brief information pamphlet on nitrite/nitrate and erythropoietin as a comparison. Measures of knowledge, beliefs and automatic associations were taken before and after the intervention with at least 24 hours between the two assessments. The psychological tests included explicit measures of beliefs and cognitive attitudes toward FF and PED using a self-reported questionnaire and computerised assessments of automatic associations using the modified and shortened version of the Implicit Association Test. The information based intervention significantly increased knowledge (p social marketing campaigns for drug free sport should follow appropriate market segmentation and use targeted messages via promoting the natural form as opposed to the purified form of the main active ingredient.

  9. An integrated approach to shaping the future of alternative energy in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, D. [EnergyINet Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    EnergyINet Inc. is an energy innovation network that is part of the Alberta Energy Research Institute and the Alberta Government. Its mandate is to link industry, government and academia to facilitate innovation and research in energy. The organization's strategic goals are to maintain a competitive energy supply, take advantage of the shift in energy systems and put Canada at the forefront of integration between energy systems. EnergyINet's value-added approach is to develop an integrated strategy that results in better industry participation and technology transfer while reducing the risk of costly investment in technology. Current innovation programs focus on oil sands upgrading; clean coal technology with carbon sequestration; enhanced recovery; alternate and renewable energy; water management and carbon dioxide management. The organization's cross-cutting initiatives include capacity building; global intelligence; strategic communications and technology commercialization. EnergyINet's objective is develop energy resources that reduce dependence of fossil fuels while better utilizing existing energy sources to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The strategy is to catalyze research and development to achieve an effective and environmentally suitable mix or alternate and renewable energy technologies. This presentation included graphs depicting Canadian energy sector growth from 1985 to the present; conversion of the Canadian economy to impure hydrogen for heating and transportation; an impure hydrogen value hierarchy; impure hydrogen implementation; and, hydrogen option examples such as wind electric power, hydrogen by electrolysis, electric power generation by hydrocarbon gasification, and distributed power generation with combined heat and power. It was noted that regulations and infrastructure are the key challenges facing hydrogen technology options in terms of production, transportation and applications. The action plan is to expand the

  10. Promoting functional foods as acceptable alternatives to doping: potential for information-based social marketing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petróczi Andrea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substances with performance enhancing properties appear on a continuum, ranging from prohibited performance enhancing drugs (PED through dietary supplements to functional foods (FF. Anti-doping messages designed to dissuade athletes from using PEDs have been typically based on moralising sport competition and/or employing scare campaigns with focus on the negative consequences. Campaigns offering comparable and acceptable alternatives are nonexistent, nor are athletes helped in finding these for themselves. It is timely that social marketing strategies for anti-doping prevention and intervention incorporate media messages that complement the existing approaches by promoting comparable and acceptable alternatives to doping. To facilitate this process, the aim of this study was to ascertain whether a single exposure knowledge-based information intervention led to increased knowledge and subsequently result in changes in beliefs and automatic associations regarding performance enhancements. Methods In a repeated measure design, 115 male recreational gym users were recruited and provided with a brief information pamphlet on nitrite/nitrate and erythropoietin as a comparison. Measures of knowledge, beliefs and automatic associations were taken before and after the intervention with at least 24 hours between the two assessments. The psychological tests included explicit measures of beliefs and cognitive attitudes toward FF and PED using a self-reported questionnaire and computerised assessments of automatic associations using the modified and shortened version of the Implicit Association Test. Results The information based intervention significantly increased knowledge (p p p Conclusion Evidence was found that even a single exposure to a persuasive positive message can lead to belief change and can create new or alter existing associations - but only in the specific domain. Interventions to change outcome expectations in a positive

  11. Pharmacoinformatics approach for investigation of alternative potential hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza MU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Usman Mirza,1 Noor-Ul-Huda Ghori,2 Nazia Ikram,3 Abdur Rehman Adil,4 Sadia Manzoor3 1Centre for Research in Molecular Medicine (CRiMM, The University of Lahore, Lahore, 2Atta-ur-Rehman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad, 3Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan; 4Centre for Excellence in Molecular Biology (CEMB, The University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the major viruses affecting the world today. It is a highly variable virus, having a rapid reproduction and evolution rate. The variability of genomes is due to hasty replication catalyzed by nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B which is also a potential target site for the development of anti-HCV agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved sofosbuvir as a novel oral NS5B inhibitor for the treatment of HCV. Unfortunately, it is much highlighted for its pricing issues. Hence, there is an urgent need to scrutinize alternate therapies against HCV that are available at affordable price and do not have associated side effects. Such a need is crucial especially in underdeveloped countries. The search for various new bioactive compounds from plants is a key part of pharmaceutical research. In the current study, we applied a pharmacoinformatics-based approach for the identification of active plant-derived compounds against NS5B. The results were compared to docking results of sofosbuvir. The lead compounds with high-binding ligands were further analyzed for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters based on in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET profile. The results showed the potential alternative lead compounds that can be developed into commercial drugs having high binding energy and promising ADMET properties. Keywords: hepatitis C, NS5B inhibitors, molecular docking, Auto

  12. The West Central Alberta Woodland Caribou Landscape Plan: Using a Modeling Approach to Develop Alternative Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hubbs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus are classified as threatened in Alberta. In support of Canada's Species at Risk Act, a Recovery Plan for Woodland Caribou in Alberta was completed in 2004 which required local implementation plans to be completed within 5 areas of the province. The West Central Alberta Caribou Landscape Plan (WCCLP is the first of these to be initiated and it addresses the recovery strategies for 4 herds. Two aspatial computer models built on the STELLA© modelling platform (ISee Systems, 2007 were used to assist the planning team in evaluating cumulative effects and alternative scenarios for caribou conservation. The ALCES© (Forem Technologies 2008 modelling tool was used to forecast potential changes in the west central Alberta landscape over time. Yearly landscape condition outputs from ALCES© were then exported into a caribou-specific population model, REMUS© (Weclaw, 2004, that was used to project potential population responses by woodland caribou, other primary prey species [moose (Alces alces, elk (Cervus elaphus and deer (Odocoileus sp.] and wolves (Canis lupus (Weclaw & Hudson, 2004. Simulated habitat management strategies that resulted in the highest likelihood of caribou recovery included the maintenance of a high proportion of old forest, the aggregation of industrial footprints and the reclamation of historic seismic lines (although the latter took decades to provide real dividends. Sharing of industrial roads, protection of fragments of old-growth, and expanding an already aggressive fire control strategy in Alberta had little additional effect on caribou recovery. Simulated population management strategies that were successful all involved decades of intensive wolf control, either directly or indirectly through intensive primary prey control (with the exception of woodland caribou until old-growth forests recovered to densities that provided caribou habitat and decreased alternate prey of wolves. Although

  13. SUPERFUND GROUND WATER ISSUE - ACCURACY OF DEPTH TO WATER MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accuracy of depth to water measurements is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers as they attempt to determine directions of ground-water flow, areas of recharge of discharge, the hydraulic characteristics of aquifers, or the effects of manmade...

  14. Combined transcranial alternating current stimulation and continuous theta burst stimulation: a novel approach for neuroplasticity induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsworthy, Mitchell R; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Yang, Ruiting; Pitcher, Julia B; Ridding, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation can induce functionally relevant plasticity in the human cortex, making it potentially useful as a therapeutic tool. However, the induced changes are highly variable between individuals, potentially limiting research and clinical utility. One factor that might contribute to this variability is the level of cortical inhibition at the time of stimulation. The alpha rhythm (~ 8-13 Hz) recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to reflect pulsatile cortical inhibition; therefore, targeting non-invasive brain stimulation to particular phases of the alpha rhythm may provide an approach to enhance plasticity induction. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been shown to entrain cortical oscillations in a frequency-specific manner. We investigated whether the neuroplastic response to continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) was enhanced by timing bursts of stimuli to the peak or the trough of a tACS-imposed alpha rhythm. While motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were unaffected when cTBS was applied in-phase with the peak of the tACS-imposed oscillation, MEP depression was enhanced when cTBS was applied in-phase with the trough. This enhanced MEP depression was dependent on the individual peak frequency of the endogenous alpha rhythm recorded with EEG prior to stimulation, and was strongest in those participants classified as non-responders to standard cTBS. These findings suggest that tACS may be used in combination with cTBS to enhance the plasticity response. Furthermore, the peak frequency of endogenous alpha, as measured with EEG, may be used as a simple marker to pre-select those individuals likely to benefit from this approach.

  15. Transradial artery intervention: an alternative approach for renal artery stent implantation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jian-fang; WANG Hui-yong; HUANG Wen-hui; LIU Yuan; LI Guang; ZHOU Ying-ling; CHEN Ji-yan

    2012-01-01

    Background Transfemoral artery access is the main approach for the interventional treatment of renal artery stenosis (RAS).This study aimed to investigate the technical feasibility of a transradial interventional (TRI) treatment of renal artery stenosis.Methods A series of 23 patients who underwent transradial renal artery stenting from October 2010 to October 2011 were studied.Radial sheath system (Terumo,Japan) was used to get access to the radial artery.Radial tourniquet (Terumo) was used to stop bleeding.A 5Fr MPA (COOK,USA) was used to perform selective renal arteriography.Percutaneous renal artery stent systems were used to perform renal artery stenting.Results Renal artery angiography showed that 15 patients had unilateral renal artery stenosis and eight patients had bilateral renal artery stenosis.The descending aorta could not be catheterized in one patient because of the type Ⅲ aortic arch.Twenty-two patients successfully underwent transradial renal artery angiography and the technical success rate was 95.7%.There was no puncture site hematoma or pseudoaneurysm.Mean procedure time was (38.4±7.2) minutes,the mean amount of contrast agent used was (93.2±6.3) ml,and the mean postprocedure bleeding time was (3.2±1.9) minutes.Conclusion Transradial renal artery intervention is technically reliable with less invasion,rapid recovery,fewer complications and may become an alternative intervention approach for the treatment of renal artery stenosis.

  16. An Alternative Approach for Acetylation of Amine Terminated Polyamidoamine (PAMAM Dendrimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Prakash Gautam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimers inherent properties have made it the nanocarrier of choice in the current era of innovation. Dendrimer based products are growing and mushrooming like anything in the current time. Although it suffer from hemolytic toxicity which could be reduced by protecting free amino group. Methods: In the present work alternate acetylated method for PAMAM dendrimers was discussed. 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide Linker was used for acetylation. The acetylated conjugate was evaluated for color reaction, Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, Differential scanning calorimetric, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra studies. Results: The PAMAM dendrimers were synthesized using divergent approach and further acetylated. Change in λmax values from 282.0 to 282.5 nm was observed for acetylated dendrimers. Characteristic peak of N-H stretch of primary amine at 3284.16 cm-1 was disappeared due to conversion of primary amine to secondary amine. A new peak of -(CO-NH stretch was obtained at 1640.28 cm-1 (medium which shows attachment of acetic acid surface group. The changes in Endothermic peak from 120.56 to 110.40ºC were observed which shows the PAMAM dendrimers surface modifications The peak of -NH2 at 2.99 ppm was replaced by (-NHCOCH3 at 2.42 ppm further supports the proof of acetylation. Conclusions: The spectral data clearly revealed that this approach for acetylation gives considerable amount of acetylation in less time duration with elimination of organic solvent. This method could be employed for regular acetylation of amine terminated nanocarriers. EDC linker mediated capping of amine groups opened a new avenue for acetylation of amine terminated protein/peptides.

  17. Acute toxicity testing of chemicals-Opportunities to avoid redundant testing and use alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creton, Stuart; Dewhurst, Ian C; Earl, Lesley K; Gehen, Sean C; Guest, Robert L; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Indans, Ian; Woolhiser, Michael R; Billington, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the acute systemic oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicities, skin and eye irritancy, and skin sensitisation potential of chemicals is required under regulatory schemes worldwide. In vivo studies conducted to assess these endpoints can sometimes be associated with substantial adverse effects in the test animals, and their use should always be scientifically justified. It has been argued that while information obtained from such acute tests provides data needed to meet classification and labelling regulations, it is of limited value for hazard and risk assessments. Inconsistent application of in vitro replacements, protocol requirements across regions, and bridging principles also contribute to unnecessary and redundant animal testing. Assessment of data from acute oral and dermal toxicity testing demonstrates that acute dermal testing rarely provides value for hazard assessment purposes when an acute oral study has been conducted. Options to waive requirements for acute oral and inhalation toxicity testing should be employed to avoid unnecessary in vivo studies. In vitro irritation models should receive wider adoption and be used to meet regulatory needs. Global requirements for sensitisation testing need continued harmonisation for both substance and mixture assessments. This paper highlights where alternative approaches or elimination of tests can reduce and refine animal use for acute toxicity requirements.

  18. Alternative Approaches in Evaluating the EU SME Policy: Answers to the Question of Impact and Legitimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. GRUENWALD

    2014-08-01

    Findings:  OECD  and  EU  evaluations  do  not  determine  causal  relationships  between funding allocation and effects. The evaluations of the KfW and the German Ministry of Economics  use  an  empirical  quantitative  approach  and  determine  direct  causal relations. In  order to fulfil the requirements of legitimizing functions  for  the  SME  policy,  it  is  recommended  to  further  develop  the  EU  funding policy  and  evaluation  according  to  the  “German  model”  both  in  terms  of  the institutional  framework  and  in  terms  of  the  evaluation  of  impacts  through  funding policy measures. Definition  of  minimum  requirements  and  alternative possibilities  for  EU  SME  policy  evaluation  in  order  to  close  the  legitimisation  gap between the allocation of tax money and impact proof (cost-benefit ratio.

  19. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Identification of problems and alternative approaches. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multi-disciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The final phase of the project focused on identification of the most significant human factors problems with respect to safe and effective operation of the teletherapy system and an identification and assessment of alternative approaches for resolving the problems. This report presents the findings of this final phase.

  20. Alternative approach to the regularization of odd-dimensional AdS gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Pablo [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Igua 4225, Montevideo (Uruguay)]. E-mail: pablmora@gmail.com

    2007-07-16

    In this paper I present an action principle for odd-dimensional AdS gravity which consists of introducing another manifold with the same boundary and a very specific boundary term. This new action allows and alternative approach to the regularization of the theory, yielding a finite Euclidean action and finite conserved charges. The choice of the boundary term is justified on the grounds that an enhanced 'almost off-shell' local AdS/Conformal symmetry arises for that very special choice. One may say that the boundary term is dictated by a guiding symmetry principle. Two sets of boundary conditions are considered, which yield regularization procedures analogous to (but different from) the standard 'background subtraction' and 'counterterms' regularization methods. The Noether charges are constructed in general. As an application it is shown that for Schwarzschild-AdS black holes the charge associated to the time-like Killing vector is finite and is indeed the mass. The Euclidean action for Schwarzschild-AdS black holes is computed, and it turns out to be finite, and to yield the right thermodynamics. The previous sentence may be interpreted in the sense that the boundary term dictated by the symmetry principle is the one that correctly regularizes the action.

  1. An alternative approach to measure similarity between two deterministic transient signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kihong

    2016-06-01

    In many practical engineering applications, it is often required to measure the similarity of two signals to gain insight into the conditions of a system. For example, an application that monitors machinery can regularly measure the signal of the vibration and compare it to a healthy reference signal in order to monitor whether or not any fault symptom is developing. Also in modal analysis, a frequency response function (FRF) from a finite element model (FEM) is often compared with an FRF from experimental modal analysis. Many different similarity measures are applicable in such cases, and correlation-based similarity measures may be most frequently used among these such as in the case where the correlation coefficient in the time domain and the frequency response assurance criterion (FRAC) in the frequency domain are used. Although correlation-based similarity measures may be particularly useful for random signals because they are based on probability and statistics, we frequently deal with signals that are largely deterministic and transient. Thus, it may be useful to develop another similarity measure that takes the characteristics of the deterministic transient signal properly into account. In this paper, an alternative approach to measure the similarity between two deterministic transient signals is proposed. This newly proposed similarity measure is based on the fictitious system frequency response function, and it consists of the magnitude similarity and the shape similarity. Finally, a few examples are presented to demonstrate the use of the proposed similarity measure.

  2. Allosteric Modulation: An Alternate Approach Targeting the Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy; Li, Jun-Xu; Thomas, Brian F; Wiley, Jenny L; Kenakin, Terry P; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-11-23

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is a G protein coupled receptor and plays an important role in many biological processes and physiological functions. A variety of CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists, including endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids, have been discovered or developed over the past 20 years. In 2005, it was discovered that the CB1 receptor contains allosteric site(s) that can be recognized by small molecules or allosteric modulators. A number of CB1 receptor allosteric modulators, both positive and negative, have since been reported and importantly, they display pharmacological characteristics that are distinct from those of orthosteric agonists and antagonists. Given the psychoactive effects commonly associated with CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists/inverse agonists, allosteric modulation may offer an alternate approach to attain potential therapeutic benefits while avoiding inherent side effects of orthosteric ligands. This review details the complex pharmacological profiles of these allosteric modulators, their structure-activity relationships, and efforts in elucidating binding modes and mechanisms of actions of reported CB1 allosteric modulators. The ultimate development of CB1 receptor allosteric ligands could potentially lead to improved therapies for CB1-mediated neurological disorders.

  3. Covert video surveillance of parents suspected of child abuse: the British experience and alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Keith A

    2004-01-01

    One million cases of child maltreatment and twelve hundred child deaths due to abuse and neglect occur per year. But since many cases of abuse and neglect remain either unreported or unsubstantiated due to insufficient evidence, the number of children who are abused, neglected, and killed at the hands of family caregivers is probably higher. One approach to combat child abuse in the U.K. has been the employment of hospital-based covert video surveillance (CVS) to monitor parents suspected of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP). The use of CVS, however, raises concerns about voluntary informed consent, research on human subjects, privacy, and the appropriateness of healthcare providers to conduct CVS. More broadly, the use of CVS raises concerns about the ethical life of healthcare institutions and their moral obligations to the families and communities they serve. The U.K. protocol for CVS is examined in light of these concerns. Three alternative CVS protocols and two procedures for selecting a protocol are then proposed for use in the U.S. The paper concludes that any CVS protocol selected for use by hospitals ought to be selected by means of open and democratic processes that permit community input and, subsequently, the possibility of a consensus on the moral status and scope of CVS.

  4. An alternative approach for reusing slags from a plasma vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Y.-M. [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, 89, Wenhwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 71703, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: yiming@mail.hwai.edu.tw; Tseng, H.-J. [Department of Foundry Engineering, National Tainan Industrial Vocational High School, Tainan 71075, Taiwan (China); Chang, J.-E. [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Wang, J.-W.; Wang, C.-T. [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, 89, Wenhwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 71703, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.-T. [Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2008-08-15

    Vitrification is widely applied to transform hazardous materials into inert slags. Raising the value of the recycled slag is an important issue from an economic point of view. In this study, an alternative approach for mixing a plasma slag with unsaturated polyester resin for making the dough-like molding composites is proposed. Physical properties, including ultimate tensile strength, Rockwell hardness, and the elongation at break, were measured to evaluate the characteristics of the composites. A scanning electron microscope and an X-ray diffractometer were used to examine the micro characteristics of the specimens. The chemical stability of the composites was estimated using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and a hot water bathing process. In an optimal slag loading (mass ratio of slag to unsaturated polyester resin) ranged from 0.1 to 0.2, the slag powder improved the physical properties of the composites. With an increased slag loading, excess slag powder weakened the structure of the resin, reducing the ultimate tensile strength and Rockwell hardness. The acid and water bathing tests indicated that the resin is decomposed in a hot environment. However, the slag was not destructed nor were the hazardous metals leached out. The results show that the molding method is an effective technology to recycle the slag.

  5. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO MEET BEEF SELF-SUFFICIENCY IN WEST PAPUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartono

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to present an alternative approach to meet beef self-sufficiency in West Papua, Indonesia. It mainly focuses on calculating the needed number of productive cows to enhance beef production in the province. Out of the total farmer households in Manokwari, Indonesia, 189 farmer-respondents were selected as samples of the study. Selection of the sample was based on the number of cattle kept in every age group (less than one (2 years old and the number of productive cows. Secondary data came from the time series data of the number of slaughtered cattle vis-à-vis the population of all districts in West Papua Province from 1980-2008. Data were analyzed using the Partial Adjustment Model (PAM and Ordinary Least Square (OLS method. Results of the study showed that beef self-sufficiency in West Papua depend on the availability of the number of productive cows to produce ready-slaughtered-bull in the previous year. Particularly for West Papua, to produce one unit of bull in the tth –year, with the assumption that cattle mortality is 4.92%, a number of 2.38 animal units AU of productive cows must be provided in the previous two (2 years.

  6. Alternative technological approach for synthesis of ceramic pigments by waste materials recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doynov, M.; Dimitrov, T.; Kozhukharov, S.

    2016-05-01

    Alternative technological approach is proposed enabling utilization of raw materials from an oil refinery, such as waste guard layers from reactors. Reagent grade and purified MgO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), were used as additional precursors. The homogeneous mixtures obtained were formed into pellets and sintered at different temperatures. The main phase was proved by X-ray phase analysis (XRD) and compared to ICPDS database. The main phase in the ceramics synthesized was solid solution of spinel MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnesiochromite. These minerals are classified as chromspinelide MgCr{sub 1}.2Al{sub 0}.4Fe{sub 0}.4O{sub 4} and alumochromite MgCr{sub 1}.6Al{sub 0}.4O{sub 4}. Additional SEM observations, combined with EDX analysis were performed, evincing agglomeration at lower temperatures, followed by agglomerate crumbling, at elevated calcination temperature. The complete transformation of initial precursors into the final ceramic compounds was found to occur at 800 degree centigrade 1 h. The ceramic samples synthesized had high density of 1.72-1.93 g/cm{sup 3} and large absorption area - 32.93% which is probably due to the high porosity of the sample. (Author)

  7. Considering ERP difference scores as individual difference measures: Issues with subtraction and alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Alexandria; Lerner, Matthew D; De Los Reyes, Andres; Laird, Robert D; Hajcak, Greg

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in psychophysiological and neural correlates of psychopathology, personality, and other individual differences. Many studies correlate a criterion individual difference variable (e.g., anxiety) with a psychophysiological measurement derived by subtracting scores taken from two within-subject conditions. These subtraction-based difference scores are intended to increase specificity by isolating variability of interest. Using data on the error-related negativity (ERN) and correct response negativity (CRN) in relation to generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), we highlight several conceptual and practical issues with subtraction-based difference scores and propose alternative approaches based on regression. We show that ERN and CRN are highly correlated, and that the ΔERN (i.e., ERN - CRN) is correlated in opposite directions both with ERN and CRN. Bivariate analyses indicate that GAD is related to ΔERN and ERN, but not CRN. We first show that, by using residualized scores, GAD relates both to a larger ERN and smaller CRN. Moreover, by probing the interaction of ERN and CRN, we show that the relationship between GAD and ERN varies by CRN. These latter findings are not evident when using traditional subtraction-based difference scores. We then completed follow-up analyses that suggested that an increased P300 in anxious individuals gave rise to the apparent anxiety/CRN relationship observed. These findings have important conceptual implications for facilitating the interpretability of results from individual difference studies of psychophysiology.

  8. Alternative socio-centric approach for model validation - a way forward for socio-hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Elshafei, Yasmina; Mahendran, Roobavannan; Kandasamy, Jaya; Pande, Saket; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2017-04-01

    one such avenue for validation, by using newspaper articles from the last 169 years to derive an index of economic development and environmental sustainability for the complete Murray-Darlin basin. Based on this alternative approach, the similar time periods as Kandasamy et al. (2014) were derived independently. Furthermore, their environmental sustainability index closely follows the parsimoniously modeled environmental awareness from Van Emmerik et al. (2014). Besides a direct validation of previous studies, this independent work provides credibility for the development and use of models such as those developed by Van Emmerik et al. (2014) and Elshafei et al. (2015). With this presentation, we aim to highlight how alternative sources of societal data can be used to independently validate and assess the realism of socio-hydrological models in spite of the fact that at least a significant part of the societal values has to remain endogenous, and only coupled socio-hydrological models of the Van Emmerik et al. (2014) and Elshafei et al. (2014, 2015) are indispensable for any generalization from highly monitored to unmonitored places, underpinned by general theories. References Elshafei, Y., et al. : "A prototype framework for models of socio-hydrology: identification of key feedback loops and parameterisation approach." HESS, 2014. Elshafei, Y., et al. : "A model of the socio-hydrologic dynamics in a semiarid catchment: Isolating feedbacks in the coupled human-hydrology system", WRR, 2015. Kandasamy, J., et al. : "Socio-hydrologic drivers of the pendulum swing between agricultural development and environmental health: a case study from Murrumbidgee River basin, Australia." HESS, 2014. Van Emmerik, T., et al. : "Socio-hydrologic modeling to understand and mediate the competition for water between agriculture development and environmental health: Murrumbidgee River basin, Australia." HESS, 2014. Wei, et al.: "Evolution of the societal value of water resources for

  9. Alternative therapies for metastatic breast cancer: multimodal approach targeting tumor cell heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambi M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Manpreet Sambi,1 Sabah Haq,1 Vanessa Samuel,1 Bessi Qorri,1 Fiona Haxho,1 Kelli Hill,1,2 William Harless,2 Myron R Szewczuk1 1Department of Biomedical and Medical Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada; 2ENCYT Technologies, Inc., Membertou, NS, Canada Abstract: One of the primary challenges in developing effective therapies for malignant tumors is the specific targeting of a heterogeneous cancer cell population within the tumor. The cancerous tumor is made up of a variety of distinct cells with specialized receptors and proteins that could potentially be viable targets for drugs. In addition, the diverse signals from the local microenvironment may also contribute to the induction of tumor growth and metastasis. Collectively, these factors must be strategically studied and targeted in order to develop an effective treatment protocol. Targeted multimodal approaches need to be strategically studied in order to develop a treatment protocol that is successful in controlling tumor growth and preventing metastatic burden. Breast cancer, in particular, presents a unique problem because of the variety of subtypes of cancer that can arise and the multiple drug targets that could be exploited. For example, the tumor stage and subtypes often dictate the appropriate treatment regimen. Alternate multimodal therapies should consider the importance of time-dependent drug administration, as well as targeting the local and systemic tumor environment. Many reviews and papers have briefly touched on the clinical implications of this cellular heterogeneity; however, there has been very little discussion on the development of study models that reflect this diversity and on multimodal therapies that could target these subpopulations. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the origins of intratumoral heterogeneity in breast cancer subtypes, and its implications for tumor progression, metastatic potential, and treatment regimens. We also discuss

  10. Analyzing initial geomorphologic processes and structures: An alternative remote sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, Werner; Raab, Thomas; Seiffert, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The initial phase of the ecosystem development is usually characterized by overall imbalances and, thus, a huge dynamic of the ongoing processes. Especially the formation of surface structures due to erosion and sedimentation processes alters both the morphology and behaviour of the system. However, the quantification of these processes is not trivial. Some methods like classical terrestrial erosion measurement techniques might have undesirable effects on the ecosystem itself. Others, like laser scanning techniques do not influence the system but are very cost-intensive. An alternative method might be the photogrammetric analysis of aerial photographs. This technique allows for the calculation of precise digital elevation models not only with a high spatial but also temporal resolution. The amount of erosion and sedimentation processes can be quantified if digital elevation models calculated for different moments are compared. A pilot study for an innovative and cost efficient approach was carried out to study the evolution of small-scaled landforms with special emphasis on erosion gullies. The test site for this technique was an approximately 1 ha sub-site of an artificial catchment which represents the initial stage of an establishing ecosystem with still ongoing erosive landform evolution processes. Due to the fact that the investigated catchment has been left to an unrestricted succession, disturbances by scientific measurements have to be minimized. Therefore, the comparatively cost efficient remote sensing tool was tested to overcome this methodological problem. The study was conducted in summer 2009, four years after final levelling of the catchments' surface. Aerial photographs were taken by a commercial digital camera using an innovative microdrone-based tool. The pictures were analysed using a commercial remote sensing software for digital photogrammetry to calculate digital elevation models of the site. The results of this pilot study are promising

  11. Alternative approach for the registration of peri-implant bone level changes at the remote rehabilitation period

    OpenAIRE

    Rusyn V.; Goncharuk-Khomyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Adaptive changes of residual peri-implant bone level occurring as the result of bone remodeling processes require clear objectification and categorization for the development of new methodological approach for evaluation the quality of dental implantation. Objective. To propose an alternative approach for the registration of peri-implant bone level changes with the use of specific geometric data analysis on the cone-beam computed tomography results; to evaluate the perspectives an...

  12. Traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine approaches to mental health care and psychological wellbeing in India and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Zhou, Liang; Kumar, Kishore; Gao, Jie; Vaid, Henna; Liu, Huiming; Hankey, Alex; Wang, Guojun; Gangadhar, Bangalore N; Nie, Jing-Bao; Nichter, Mark

    2016-07-01

    India and China face the same challenge of having too few trained psychiatric personnel to manage effectively the substantial burden of mental illness within their population. At the same time, both countries have many practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine who are a potential resource for delivery of mental health care. In our paper, part of The Lancet and Lancet Psychiatry's Series about the China-India Mental Health Alliance, we describe and compare types of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine in India and China. Further, we provide a systematic overview of evidence assessing the effectiveness of these alternative approaches for mental illness and discuss challenges in research. We suggest how practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine and mental health professionals might forge collaborative relationships to provide more accessible, affordable, and acceptable mental health care in India and China. A substantial proportion of individuals with mental illness use traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine, either exclusively or with biomedicine, for reasons ranging from faith and cultural congruence to accessibility, cost, and belief that these approaches are safe. Systematic reviews of the effectiveness of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine find several approaches to be promising for treatment of mental illness, but most clinical trials included in these systematic reviews have methodological limitations. Contemporary methods to establish efficacy and safety-typically through randomised controlled trials-need to be complemented by other means. The community of practice built on collaborative relationships between practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine and providers of mental health care holds promise in bridging the treatment gap in mental health care in India and China.

  13. EURL ECVAM Status Report on the Development, Validation and Regulatory Acceptance of Alternative Methods and Approaches (2016)

    OpenAIRE

    ZUANG Valerie; ASTURIOL BOFILL DAVID; VIEGAS BARROSO JOAO FILIPE; BELZ SUSANNE; BERGGREN ELISABET; Bernasconi, Camilla; BOPP Stephanie; BOSTROEM Ann-Charlotte; BOUHIFD Mounir; Casati, Silvia; Coecke, Sandra; Cole, Thomas; Corvi, Raffaella; HALDER MARIA ELISABETH; HOLLEY TRACEY

    2016-01-01

    Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal testing is anchored in EU legislation. Alternative non-animal approaches facilitate a shift away from animal testing. Cell-based methods and computational technologies are integrated to translate molecular mechanistic understanding of toxicity into safety testing strategies.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Kk of... - Data Quality Objective and Lower Confidence Limit Approaches for Alternative Capture Efficiency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Data Quality Objective and Lower Confidence Limit Approaches for Alternative Capture Efficiency Protocols and Test Methods A Appendix A to Subpart KK of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS...

  15. Parametric Optimization of Some Critical Operating System Functions--An Alternative Approach to the Study of Operating Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobh, Tarek M.; Tibrewal, Abhilasha

    2006-01-01

    Operating systems theory primarily concentrates on the optimal use of computing resources. This paper presents an alternative approach to teaching and studying operating systems design and concepts by way of parametrically optimizing critical operating system functions. Detailed examples of two critical operating systems functions using the…

  16. Using Comprehensive Video-Module Instruction as an Alternative Approach for Teaching IUD Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Juan Antonio; Donnon, Tyrone

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine clinicians and residents have increasing educational and work demands that have made it difficult to provide and access training on specific procedures such as IUD insertion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of video-module instruction could provide residents with the necessary knowledge and skills to perform an IUD insertion correctly when compared with the traditional form of instruction, which is a lecture-demonstration session provided by an academic gynecologist. Thirty-nine family medicine residents participated in the study during the induction period at the beginning of their residency program in July 2012 at the University of Calgary. A randomized, two group pretest/posttest experimental research design was used to compare the procedural knowledge and skills performance (posttest only) of residents trained using an alternative instructional intervention (video-module teaching) with the traditional lecture-demonstration approach to teaching IUD insertion. Both teaching methods were effective in providing procedural knowledge instruction, and the paired-samples t tests results were almost identical: t (37)=1.35. On the other hand, performance scores were significantly higher in the video-module group: t (37)=2.37, 95% CI (0.61, 8.00), with a mean difference in performance of 4.31. There were no significant differences in residents' satisfaction scores, and there was no correlation between the different scores and sex or age or between performance and level of satisfaction. This video-module instruction is an effective method to provide comprehensive IUD insertion training, and the psychomotor skills gain (performance component) was significantly higher than the traditional method of instruction.

  17. A chief of service rotation as an alternative approach to pediatric otolaryngology inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Eelam; Xiao, Roy; McGill, Trevor; Rahbar, Reza; Cunningham, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Maintaining an outpatient practice and providing high-quality inpatient care pose significant challenges to the traditional call team approach. To introduce a unique rotating hospitalist inpatient program and assess its clinical, educational, and financial impact. The chief of service (COS) program requires 1 attending physician to rotate weekly as chief of the inpatient service with no conflicting elective duties. This was a retrospective internal billing data review performed at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A total of 1241 patients were evaluated by the COS from October 2012 through October 2013. All patients were treated by the inpatient service under the supervision of the COS. A retrospective analysis of patient encounters and procedures, including International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, locations of service, clinicians, service dates, and average weekly relative value units (RVUs). Over the study period, the COS was involved in the care of 1241 patients, generating 2786 billable patient encounters. The COS averaged 11.2 patient encounters per day. The most common reasons for consultation were respiratory distress, dysphagia, and stridor. Of patient encounters, 63.0% resulted in a procedure; 82.8% of those procedures were performed in the operating room with the most common being lower airway endoscopy (340 [19.4%]). The average weekly RVUs for the COS (232) were comparable with those of the average weekly outpatient clinic and procedural RVUs of the other otolaryngology faculty in the group (240). The COS program was created to meet the clinical, educational, and organizational demands of a high-volume and high-acuity inpatient service. It is a financially sustainable model with unique advantages, particularly for the staff who maintain their outpatient practices without disruption and for the trainees who have the opportunity to work closely with the entire faculty. Patients are

  18. An alternative synthetic approach for efficient catalytic conversion of syngas to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hairong; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-05-20

    Ethanol is an attractive end product and a versatile feedstock because a widespread market exists for its commercial use as a fuel additive or a potential substitute for gasoline. Currently, ethanol is produced primarily by fermentation of biomass-derived sugars, particularly those containing six carbons, but coproducts 5-carbon sugars and lignin remain unusable. Another major process for commercial production of ethanol is hydration of ethylene over solid acidic catalysts, yet not sustainable considering the depletion of fossil fuels. Catalytic conversion of synthetic gas (CO + H2) could produce ethanol in large quantities. However, the direct catalytic conversion of synthetic gas to ethanol remains challenging, and no commercial process exists as of today although the research has been ongoing for the past 90 years, since such the process suffers from low yield and poor selectivity due to slow kinetics of the initial C-C bond formation and fast chain growth of the C2 intermediates. This Account describes recent developments in an alternative approach for the synthesis of ethanol via synthetic gas. This process is an integrated technology consisting of the coupling of CO with methanol to form dimethyl oxalate and the subsequent hydrogenation to yield ethanol. The byproduct of the second step (methanol) can be separated and used in circulation as the feedstock for the coupling step. The coupling reaction of carbon monoxide for producing dimethyl oxalate takes place under moderate reaction conditions with high selectivity (∼95%), which ideally leads to a self-closing, nonwaste, catalytic cycling process. This Account also summarizes the progress on the development of copper-based catalysts for the hydrogenation reaction with remarkable efficiencies and stability. The unique lamellar structure and the cooperative effect between surface Cu(0) and Cu(+) species are responsible for the activity of the catalyst with high yield of ethanol (∼91%). The understanding of

  19. Merging Alternate Remotely-Sensed Soil Moisture Retrievals Using a Non-Static Model Combination Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokhyeon Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is an important variable in the coupled hydrologic and climate system. In recent years, microwave-based soil moisture products have been shown to be a viable alternative to in situ measurements. A popular way to measure the performance of soil moisture products is to calculate the temporal correlation coefficient (R against in situ measurements or other appropriate reference datasets. In this study, an existing linear combination method improving R was modified to allow for a non-static or nonstationary model combination as the basis for improving remotely-sensed surface soil moisture. Previous research had noted that two soil moisture products retrieved using the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA and Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM algorithms from the same Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2 sensor are spatially complementary in terms of R against a suitable reference over a fixed period. Accordingly, a linear combination was proposed to maximize R using a set of spatially-varying, but temporally-fixed weights. Even though this approach showed promising results, there was room for further improvements, in particular using non-static or dynamic weights that take account of the time-varying nature of the combination algorithm being approximated. The dynamic weighting was achieved by using a moving window. A number of different window sizes was investigated. The optimal weighting factors were determined for the data lying within the moving window and then used to dynamically combine the two parent products. We show improved performance for the dynamically-combined product over the static linear combination. Generally, shorter time windows outperform the static approach, and a 60-day time window is suggested to be the optimum. Results were validated against in situ measurements collected from 124 stations over different continents. The mean R of the dynamically-combined products was found to be 0.57 and 0

  20. Alternative approaches of SiC & related wide bandgap materials in light emitting & solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmann, Peter; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-03-01

    Materials for optoelectronics give a fascinating variety of issues to consider. Increasingly important are white light emitting diode (LED) and solar cell materials. Profound energy savings can be done by addressing new materials. White light emitting diodes are becoming common in our lighting scene. There is a great energy saving in the transition from the light bulb to white light emitting diodes via a transition of fluorescent light tubes. However, the white LEDs still suffer from a variety of challenges in order to be in our daily use. Therefore there is a great interest in alternative lighting solutions that could be part of our daily life. All materials create challenges in fabrication. Defects reduce the efficiency of optical transitions involved in the light emitting diode materials. The donor-acceptor co-doped SiC is a potential light converter for a novel monolithic all-semiconductor white LED. In spite of considerable research, the internal quantum efficiency is far less than theoretically predicted and is likely a fascinating scientific field for studying materials growth, defects and optical transitions. Still, efficient Si-based light source represents an ongoing research field in photonics that requires high efficiency at room temperature, wavelength tuning in a wide wavelength range, and easy integration in silicon photonic devices. In some of these devices, rare earth doped materials is considered as a potential way to provide luminescence spanning in a wide wavelength range. Divalent and trivalent oxidation states of Eu provide emitting centers in the visible region. In consideration, the use of Eu in photonics requires Eu doped thin films that are compatible with CMOS technology but for example faces material science issues like a low Eu solid solubility in silica. Therefore approaches aim to obtain efficient light emission from silicon oxycarbide which has a luminescence in the visible range and can be a host material for rare earth ions. The

  1. The HOPE fixation technique - a promising alternative to common prostate cancer biobanking approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Martin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of well-annotated prostate tissue samples through biobanks is key for research. Whereas fresh-frozen tissue is well suited for a broad spectrum of molecular analyses, its storage and handling is complex and cost-intensive. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens (FFPE are easy to handle and economic to store, but their applicability for molecular methods is restricted. The recently introduced Hepes-glutamic acid-buffer mediated Organic solvent Protection Effect (HOPE is a promising alternative, which might have the potential to unite the benefits of FFPE and fresh-frozen specimen. Aim of the study was to compare HOPE-fixed, FFPE and fresh-frozen bio-specimens for their accessibility for diagnostic and research purposes. Methods 10 prostate cancer samples were each preserved with HOPE, formalin, and liquid nitrogen and studied with in-situ and molecular methods. Samples were H&E stained, and assessed by immunohistochemistry (i.e. PSA, GOLPH2, p63 and FISH (i.e. ERG rearrangement. We assessed DNA integrity by PCR, using control genes ranging from 100 to 600 bp amplicon size. RNA integrity was assessed through qRT-PCR on three housekeeping genes (TBP, GAPDH, β-actin. Protein expression was analysed by performing western blot analysis using GOLPH2 and PSA antibodies. Results Of the HOPE samples, morphologic quality of H&E sections, immunohistochemical staining, and the FISH assay was at least equal to FFPE tissue, and significantly better than the fresh-frozen specimens. DNA, RNA, and protein analysis of HOPE samples provided similar results as compared to fresh-frozen specimens. As expected, FFPE-samples were inferior for most of the molecular analyses. Conclusions This is the first study, comparatively assessing the suitability of these fixation methods for diagnostic and research utilization. Overall, HOPE-fixed bio-specimens combine the benefits of FFPE- and fresh-frozen samples. Results of this study

  2. Final Technical Report for Alternative Fuel Source Study-An Energy Efficient and Environmentally Friendly Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Ralph [Auburn University, AL (United States); Schindler, Anton [Auburn University, AL (United States); Duke, Steve [Auburn University, AL (United States); Burch, Thom [Auburn University, AL (United States); Bransby, David [Auburn University, AL (United States); Stafford, Don [Lafarge North America, Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

    2010-08-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct research to determine the feasibility of using alternate fuel sources for the production of cement. Successful completion of this project will also be beneficial to other commercial processes that are highly energy intensive. During this report period, we have completed all the subtasks in the preliminary survey. Literature searches focused on the types of alternative fuels currently used in the cement industry around the world. Information was obtained on the effects of particular alternative fuels on the clinker/cement product and on cement plant emissions. Federal regulations involving use of waste fuels were examined. Information was also obtained about the trace elements likely to be found in alternative fuels, coal, and raw feeds, as well as the effects of various trace elements introduced into system at the feed or fuel stage on the kiln process, the clinker/cement product, and concrete made from the cement. The experimental part of this project involves the feasibility of a variety of alternative materials mainly commercial wastes to substitute for coal in an industrial cement kiln in Lafarge NA and validation of the experimental results with energy conversion consideration.

  3. Selection of process alternatives for lignocellulosic bioethanol production using a MILP approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Felipe; Venturini, Fabrizio; Aroca, Germán; Conejeros, Raúl

    2013-11-01

    This work proposes a decision-making framework for the selection of processes and unit operations for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. Process alternatives are described by its capital and operating expenditures, its contribution to process yield and technological availability information. A case study in second generation ethanol production using Eucalyptus globulus as raw material is presented to test the developed process synthesis tool. Results indicate that production cost does not necessarily decrease when yield increases. Hence, optimal processes can be found at the inflexion point of total costs and yield. The developed process synthesis tool provides results with an affordable computational cost, existing optimization tools and an easy-to-upgrade description of the process alternatives. These features made this tool suitable for process screening when incomplete information regarding process alternatives is available.

  4. The DYNAMO Simulation Language--An Alternate Approach to Computer Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Suggests the use of computer simulation of continuous systems as a problem solving approach to computer languages. Outlines the procedures that the system dynamics approach employs in computer simulations. Explains the advantages of the special purpose language, DYNAMO. (ML)

  5. Alternate approach for terrain-aided navigation using parallel extended Kalman filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheives, T.C.; Andreas, R.D.

    1979-12-01

    A new approach for applying SITAN (Sandia Inertial Terrain Aided Navigation) to applications involving large initial position errors is described and analyzed. The approach uses parallel Kalman filters in combination with a selection algorithm to estimate the errors in the reference navigation system. Monte Carlo simulation and covariance analysis results are presented which demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of the approach.

  6. An evaluation of alternative selection indexes for a non-linear profit trait approaching its economic optimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Collado, D; Byrne, T J; Visser, B; Amer, P R

    2016-12-01

    This study used simulation to evaluate the performance of alternative selection index configurations in the context of a breeding programme where a trait with a non-linear economic value is approaching an economic optimum. The simulation used a simple population structure that approximately mimics selection in dual purpose sheep flocks in New Zealand (NZ). In the NZ dual purpose sheep population, number of lambs born is a genetic trait that is approaching an economic optimum, while genetically correlated growth traits have linear economic values and are not approaching any optimum. The predominant view among theoretical livestock geneticists is that the optimal approach to select for nonlinear profit traits is to use a linear selection index and to update it regularly. However, there are some nonlinear index approaches that have not been evaluated. This study assessed the efficiency of the following four alternative selection index approaches in terms of genetic progress relative to each other: (i) a linear index, (ii) a linear index updated regularly, (iii) a nonlinear (quadratic) index, and (iv) a NLF index (nonlinear index below the optimum and then flat). The NLF approach does not reward or penalize animals for additional genetic merit beyond the trait optimum. It was found to be at least comparable in efficiency to the approach of regularly updating the linear index with short (15 year) and long (30 year) time frames. The relative efficiency of this approach was slightly reduced when the current average value of the nonlinear trait was close to the optimum. Finally, practical issues of industry application of indexes are considered and some potential practical benefits of efficient deployment of a NLF index in highly heterogeneous industries (breeds, flocks and production environments) such as in the NZ dual purpose sheep population are discussed.

  7. 77 FR 11533 - Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... AGENCY Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement... Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Anniston PCB Superfund Site... available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Anniston PCB by one of the...

  8. 75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina for publication. DATES... your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward...

  9. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake... EPA Region 4 contact Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Ward...

  10. INDOOR RADON REDUCTION IN CRAWL-SPACE HOUSES: A REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analysis has been completed of the performance, mechanisms, and costs of alternative technologies for preventing radon entry into the living areas of houses having crawl-space foundations. Sub-membrane depressurization (SMD) is consistently the most effective technique, often ...

  11. Communicative Competence Inventory for Students Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication: A Team Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Douglas, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Students who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) represent a heterogonous group with complex communication needs. AAC--including aided communication means (e.g., pictures, devices) and unaided (e.g., signs, gestures)--is often used to support students who have difficulties with speech production, language comprehension, and…

  12. INDOOR RADON REDUCTION IN CRAWL-SPACE HOUSES: A REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analysis has been completed of the performance, mechanisms, and costs of alternative technologies for preventing radon entry into the living areas of houses having crawl-space foundations. Sub-membrane depressurization (SMD) is consistently the most effective technique, often ...

  13. Ipsative measurement and the analysis of organizational values: an alternative approach for data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijnatten, F.M.; van der Ark, L.A.; Holloway, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis and test of ipsative data will be discussed, and some alternative methods will be suggested. Following a review of the literature about ipsative measurement, the Competing Values Framework will be presented as a major application in the field of organizational culture and

  14. Communicative Competence Inventory for Students Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication: A Team Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Douglas, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Students who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) represent a heterogonous group with complex communication needs. AAC--including aided communication means (e.g., pictures, devices) and unaided (e.g., signs, gestures)--is often used to support students who have difficulties with speech production, language comprehension, and…

  15. A study of the diffusion of alternative fuel vehicles : An agent-based modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ting; Gensler, Sonja; Garcia, Rosanna

    This paper demonstrates the use of an agent-based model (ABM) to investigate factors that can speed the diffusion of eco-innovations, namely alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). The ABM provides the opportunity to consider the interdependencies inherent between key participants in the automotive

  16. Essential oils: an alternative approach to management of powdery mildew diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena STURCHIO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been growing interest in the application of plant-derived substances in agriculture as alternatives to the use of pesticides, in order to obtain healthy crops and more environmentally sustainable crop production systems. The properties of some essential oils as natural fungicides were evaluated, to promote their use in alternative agriculture. Potentially detrimental effects caused by essential oil residues in soil were also assessed by mutagenicity assays to avoid possible adverse effects related to the use of these materials. Trials in a controlled environment were set up, using ‘Romanesco’ zucchini treated with essential oils, either exclusively or alternated with a synthetic fungicide. The treatments were applied when natural infection by Podosphaera xanthii appeared on test plants, and powdery mildew incidence and severity were assessed after six weeks. Preliminary results indicated that the alternation of natural materials with effective synthetic fungicide maintained effective disease control, and may also assist with management of pesticide resistance in P. xanthii. No relevant mutagenic effects of essential oil residues in soil were revealed, although an appropriate formulation useful under field conditions is required for effective application.

  17. Dropping the Other U: An Alternative Approach to U-Shaped Developmental Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce readers to an alternative way of applying U-shaped functions to understand development, especially cognitive development. In classical developmental applications, age is the abscissa; that is, in the fundamental equation B = f(A), some behavioral variable (B) plots as a U-shaped or inverted U-shaped function…

  18. An alternative database approach for management of SNOMED CT and improved patient data queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W Scott; Pedersen, Jay; McClay, James C; Rao, Praveen; Bastola, Dhundy; Campbell, James R

    2015-10-01

    statistics generated using the graph database were identical to those using validated methods. Patient queries produced identical patient count results to the Oracle RDBMS with comparable times. Database queries involving defining attributes of SNOMED CT concepts were possible with the graph DB. The same queries could not be directly performed with the Oracle RDBMS representation of the patient data and required the creation and use of external terminology services. Further, queries of undefined depth were successful in identifying unknown relationships between patient cohorts. The results of this study supported the hypothesis that a patient database built upon and around the semantic model of SNOMED CT was possible. The model supported queries that leveraged all aspects of the SNOMED CT logical model to produce clinically relevant query results. Logical disjunction and negation queries were possible using the data model, as well as, queries that extended beyond the structural IS_A hierarchy of SNOMED CT to include queries that employed defining attribute-values of SNOMED CT concepts as search parameters. As medical terminologies, such as SNOMED CT, continue to expand, they will become more complex and model consistency will be more difficult to assure. Simultaneously, consumers of data will increasingly demand improvements to query functionality to accommodate additional granularity of clinical concepts without sacrificing speed. This new line of research provides an alternative approach to instantiating and querying patient data represented using advanced computable clinical terminologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of recently developed density functional approaches for the evaluation of the bond length alternation in polyacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Denis; Perpète, Eric. A.; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo

    2005-04-01

    The bond length alternation (BLA) of increasingly long polyacetylene oligomers has been computed using various wavefunction methods of increasing accuracy and several DFT models, including standard GGA and the most-recent meta-GGA and hybrid functionals. Our results show the meta-GGA functionals do not offer any significant improvement with respect to the GGA approaches, both providing too small values for the BLA. More accurate results are obtained with hybrid approaches, where, instead, the percent of HF exchange rules the quantitative result. In particular, hybrids including 25% of HF exchange are the most accurate, whereas TPSSh, O3LYP, τ-HCTHh provide only poor estimates.

  20. Remediation System Evaluation, McCormick and Baxter Superfund SiteRemediation System Evaluation, McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    The McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company, Portland Plant, Superfund Site is located adjacent tothe Willamette River in Portland, Oregon and addresses contamination of soil, groundwater, and riversediments stemming from creosoting operations...

  1. Modeling alternation to synchrony with inhibitory coupling: a neuromorphic VLSI approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymbalyuk, G S; Patel, G N; Calabrese, R L; DeWeerth, S P; Cohen, A H

    2000-10-01

    We developed an analog very large-scale integrated system of two mutually inhibitory silicon neurons that display several different stable oscillations. For example, oscillations can be synchronous with weak inhibitory coupling and alternating with relatively strong inhibitory coupling. All oscillations observed experimentally were predicted by bifurcation analysis of a corresponding mathematical model. The synchronous oscillations do not require special synaptic properties and are apparently robust enough to survive the variability and constraints inherent in this physical system. In biological experiments with oscillatory neuronal networks, blockade of inhibitory synaptic coupling can sometimes lead to synchronous oscillations. An example of this phenomenon is the transition from alternating to synchronous bursting in the swimming central pattern generator of lamprey when synaptic inhibition is blocked by strychnine. Our results suggest a simple explanation for the observed oscillatory transitions in the lamprey central pattern generator network: that inhibitory connectivity alone is sufficient to produce the observed transition.

  2. Financial Management of Economic Entity from the Perspective of Alternative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Munteanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the study the financial management presented is divided into three directions, namely financial analysis, financial planning and financial strategy, focusing on increasing the quality of financial management conducted at the economic entity by identifying an easier possible use for a system of alternative decisions in order to increase the profitability. The study also aims to identify new meanings of financial accounting information system in performing the managerial act through alternative decisions, trying to highlight the need to create a management tool generator of variants possible to be adopted with an impact on their application in the economic entity as a whole. Based on qualitative research on the financial management act, it is revealed the importance of the financial management act manifested in the economic entity and also its quality improvement through simulations targeting the management through budget system.

  3. Promoting functional foods as acceptable alternatives to doping: potential for information-based social marketing approach

    OpenAIRE

    Petróczi Andrea; Naughton Declan P; James Ricky

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Substances with performance enhancing properties appear on a continuum, ranging from prohibited performance enhancing drugs (PED) through dietary supplements to functional foods (FF). Anti-doping messages designed to dissuade athletes from using PEDs have been typically based on moralising sport competition and/or employing scare campaigns with focus on the negative consequences. Campaigns offering comparable and acceptable alternatives are nonexistent, nor are athletes he...

  4. Management of intrusive luxation in the primary dentition by surgical repositioning: an alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, H V; Arangannal, P; Vishnurekha, C; Nichani, M H; Vijayaprabha, K

    2011-06-01

    Intrusive luxation is the most common trauma during early infancy which results in the displacement of the tooth into its alveolus. Depending on the severity of the intrusion, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends either extraction or spontaneous re-eruption for the primary tooth. This case report provides a brief insight into surgical repositioning as an alternative treatment option for the management of intruded primary tooth in a 4-year-old girl.

  5. Assessment of wastewater treatment alternatives for small communities: An analytic network process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos-Senante, María; Gómez, Trinidad; Caballero, Rafael; Hernández-Sancho, Francesc; Sala-Garrido, Ramón

    2015-11-01

    The selection of the most appropriate wastewater treatment (WWT) technology is a complex problem since many alternatives are available and many criteria are involved in the decision-making process. To deal with this challenge, the analytic network process (ANP) is applied for the first time to rank a set of seven WWT technology set-ups for secondary treatment in small communities. A major advantage of ANP is that it incorporates interdependent relationships between elements. Results illustrated that extensive technologies, constructed wetlands and pond systems are the most preferred alternatives by WWT experts. The sensitivity analysis performed verified that the ranking of WWT alternatives is very stable since constructed wetlands are almost always placed in the first position. This paper showed that ANP analysis is suitable to deal with complex decision-making problems, such as the selection of the most appropriate WWT system contributing to better understand the multiple interdependences among elements involved in the assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. TEACHING LISTENING THROUGH PHONOLOGY:AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR CHINESE TEACHERS OF ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FrancisDoogan; MariaBjorningGyde

    2004-01-01

    With very limited exposure to spoken English, teachers in China are presented with a number of challenges in their own proficiency and subsequent teaching of listening and speaking, ranging from the type of approach they take to the teaching of these skills to the quality of voice which they model for their learners. A common approach to teaching listening in China

  7. Resilience to Bullying: Towards an Alternative to the Anti-Bullying Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian; Woodcock, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Anti-bullying strategies are significant approaches addressing bullying in schools, however their capacity to produce a reduction in bullying behaviour is open to question. This article examined a resilience-based approach to bullying. One hundred and five primary and high school students were surveyed using several standardised instruments. The…

  8. A tiered approach to the use of alternatives to animal testing for the safety assessment of cosmetics: skin irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Martin; Jones, Penny; Goebel, Carsten; Dufour, Eric; Rowland, Joanna; Araki, Daisuke; Costabel-Farkas, Margit; Hewitt, Nicola J; Hibatallah, Jalila; Kirst, Annette; McNamee, Pauline; Schellauf, Florian; Scheel, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of the skin irritancy and corrosivity potential of an ingredient is a necessity in the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients. To date, there are two formally validated alternatives to the rabbit Draize test for skin corrosivity in place, namely the rat skin transcutaneous electrical resistance (TER) assay and the Human Skin Model Test using EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic reconstructed human epidermal equivalents. For skin irritation, EpiSkin, EpiDerm and SkinEthic are validated as stand-alone test replacements for the rabbit Draize test. Data from these tests are rarely considered in isolation and are evaluated in combination with other factors to establish the overall irritating or corrosive potential of an ingredient. In light of the deadlines established in the Cosmetics Directive for cessation of animal testing for cosmetic ingredients, a COLIPA scientific meeting was held in Brussels on 30th January, 2008 to review the use of alternative approaches and to set up a decision tree approach for their integration into tiered testing strategies for hazard and safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients and their use in products. In conclusion, the safety assessments for skin irritation/corrosion of new chemicals for use in cosmetics can be confidently accomplished using exclusively alternative methods.

  9. An integrated approach for detecting embryotoxicity and developmental toxicity of environmental contaminants using in vitro alternative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogorb, Miguel A; Pamies, David; de Lapuente, Joaquín; Estevan, Carmen; Estévez, Jorge; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2014-10-15

    The main available alternatives for testing embryotoxicity are cellular tests with stem cells and in vitro-ex vivo tests with embryos. In cellular tests, the most developed alternative is the embryonic stem cell test, while the most developed tests involving embryos are the zebrafish and whole embryo culture test. They are technically more complex than cellular tests, but offer the advantage of determining the expectable phenotypic alteration caused by the exposure. Many efforts are currently being made, basically through proteomic and genomic approaches, in order to obtain improvements in predictivity of these tests. Development is a very complex process, and it is highly unlikely that a single alternative test can yield satisfactory performance with all types of chemicals. We propose a step-wise approach where model complexity, and consequently technical skills and economical costs, gradually increase if needed. The first level would be run short cellular assays to detect effects in early differentiation stages. The second level would involve longer cellular embryotoxicity tests to search embryotoxicants that have an effect on late differentiation stages. The third stage would consider tests with embryos because they allow the determination of hazards based on molecular and morphological alterations, and not only on differentiating cells.

  10. Atmospheric emissions modeling of energetic biomass alternatives using system dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szarka, N. [University of Leoben (Austria). Chair of System Analysis and Environmental Engineering; University of Concepcion (Chile). Environmental Sciences Center; Kakucs, O.; Wolfbauer, J. [University of Leoben (Austria). Chair of System Analysis and Environmental Engineering; Bezama, A. [University of Concepcion (Chile). Environmental Sciences Center

    2008-01-15

    To simulate the quantitative effects of regional biomass alternatives for energetic purpose (BfE) on air pollutant emissions, a system dynamics model was developed and applied for the EuRegion Austrian-Hungarian cross-border area. The dynamic simulation program Vensim{sup R} was used to build an overall regional model with economic, social and environmental sectors. Within this model, the here-introduced regional air pollution sub-model (RegAir) includes the important human-made emissions of 10 pollutants resulting from all relevant source sectors within the region investigated. Emissions from activities related to biomass production, transport, conversion and final energy consumption were built in detail. After building and calibrating the RegAir model, seven quantitative test scenarios were defined and implemented into the world. Through the scenarios simulation, effects on air emissions were followed and compared over time. The results of these simulations show a significant reduction of CO{sub 2} emission, especially in cases where fossil fuel displacement in heating devices is achieved on the largest scale. On the contrary, traditional air pollutants increase by most BfE options. The results of the RegAir model simulations of BfE alternatives over two decades provide useful quantifications of various air emissions and identify the less pollutant BfE alternatives in the dynamic context of the relevant air pollution sources of the region. After minor structural modification and appropriate calibration, RegAir can be applied to other regions as well. However, it is stated that, to finally decide on the overall most-appropriate options at a regional level, other environmental as well as economic and social effects must be taken into consideration, being the latter the goal of the mentioned overall regional model which serves as a model frame to the RegAir tool. (author)

  11. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L; Becvar, Dorothy S

    2006-01-01

    Respondents to a mail survey of a random sample (N = 424) of Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy provided information about their contexts of practice, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and relationships with CAM providers. Consistent with both national trends and the experience of psychologists as reported in a similar survey, the results of this survey suggest that marriage and family therapists have been affected significantly by and have a growing awareness of CAM practices. Limitations of the study and implications for the field are discussed.

  12. An Alternative Approach to the Calculation and Analysis of Connectivity in the World City Network

    CERN Document Server

    Hennemann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Empirical research on world cities often draws on Taylor's (2001) notion of an 'interlocking network model', in which office networks of globalized service firms are assumed to shape the spatialities of urban networks. In spite of its many merits, this approach is limited because the resultant adjacency matrices are not really fit for network-analytic calculations. We therefore propose a fresh analytical approach using a primary linkage algorithm that produces a one-mode directed graph based on Taylor's two-mode city/firm network data. The procedure has the advantage of creating less dense networks when compared to the interlocking network model, while nonetheless retaining the network structure apparent in the initial dataset. We randomize the empirical network with a bootstrapping simulation approach, and compare the simulated parameters of this null-model with our empirical network parameter (i.e. betweenness centrality). We find that our approach produces results that are comparable to those of the standa...

  13. An information theoretic approach to select alternate subsets of predictors for data-driven hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, R.; Galelli, S.; Karakaya, G.; Ahipasaoglu, S. D.

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the uncertainty associated to the presence of multiple subsets of predictors yielding data-driven models with the same, or similar, predictive accuracy. To handle this uncertainty effectively, we introduce a novel input variable selection algorithm, called Wrapper for Quasi Equally Informative Subset Selection (W-QEISS), specifically conceived to identify all alternate subsets of predictors in a given dataset. The search process is based on a four-objective optimization problem that minimizes the number of selected predictors, maximizes the predictive accuracy of a data-driven model and optimizes two information theoretic metrics of relevance and redundancy, which guarantee that the selected subsets are highly informative and with little intra-subset similarity. The algorithm is first tested on two synthetic test problems and then demonstrated on a real-world streamflow prediction problem in the Yampa River catchment (US). Results show that complex hydro-meteorological datasets are characterized by a large number of alternate subsets of predictors, which provides useful insights on the underlying physical processes. Furthermore, the presence of multiple subsets of predictors-and associated models-helps find a better trade-off between different measures of predictive accuracy commonly adopted for hydrological modelling problems.

  14. Potential of MALDI-TOF MS as an alternative approach for capsular typing Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tatiana C. A.; Costa, Natalia S.; Castro, Luciana F. S.; Ribeiro, Rachel L.; Botelho, Ana Caroline N.; Neves, Felipe P. G.; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Teixeira, Lucia M.

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can be classified in more than 90 capsular types, as traditionally determined by serological methods and more recently by PCR-based techniques. Such methods, however, can be expensive, laborious or unable to accurately discriminate among certain serotypes. Therefore, determination of capsular types, although extremely important for epidemiological purposes and for estimating the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, is mainly restricted to research laboratories, being rarely performed in the clinical setting. In the present study, MALDI-TOF MS was evaluated as an alternative tool to characterize 416 pneumococcal isolates belonging to serotypes 6A, 6B, 6C, 9N, 9V or 14. For MALDI-TOF MS analysis, each isolate was submitted to an extraction protocol using formic acid and acetonitrile. Measurements were performed with a Bruker Microflex LT mass spectrometer using default parameters and generating spectra in the range of 2,000–20,000 m/z. Spectra were analyzed with the BioNumerics software v7.6. Isolates were mainly distributed according to the capsular type in a Neighbor Joining tree and serotypes investigated were successfully discriminated by the presence/absence of 14 selected biomarkers. The results suggest that MALDI-TOF MS is a promising alternative for typing pneumococcal strains, highlighting its usefulness for rapid and cost-effective routine application in clinical laboratories. PMID:28349999

  15. Vocational training for students with a drop out risk: An alternative educational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Rokkones

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A dropout discourse has emerged; highlighting the economic risk that leaving secondary school before graduation poses to those who drop out and to society as a whole. Many initiatives aim to reduce the dropout rate. One such project, “The Third Way”, was established in 2012 with the aim of reducing dropouts in one secondary school among students on a vocational track - particularly in the programs Restaurant and food-processing and Health care, childhood and youth development. We have followed this project for two years through classroom observation and interviews with teachers and school management. "The Third Way" works at the interfaces of students, teachers, schools, and in cooperation with workplaces connected to the students’ vocational training in practical studies. Based on our analyses we see that flexibility among all actors in alternative vocational education, both in school and workplace practice, is crucial for the reduction of dropout rates. By adapting the curriculum within these alternative structures, we see that at-risk students have an increased likelihood of finishing their secondary education.

  16. Alternating minimal energy approach to ODEs and conservation laws in tensor product formats

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for solution of high-dimensional evolutionary equations (ODEs and discretized time-dependent PDEs) in tensor product formats. The solution must admit an approximation in a low-rank separation of variables framework, and the right-hand side of the ODE (for example, a matrix) must be computable in the same low-rank format at a given time point. The time derivative is discretized via the Chebyshev spectral scheme, and the solution is sought simultaneously for all time points from the global space-time linear system. To compute the solution adaptively in the tensor format, we employ the Alternating Minimal Energy algorithm, the DMRG-flavored alternating iterative technique. Besides, we address the problem of maintaining system invariants inside the approximate tensor product scheme. We show how the conservation of a linear function, defined by a vector given in the low-rank format, or the second norm of the solution may be accurately and elegantly incorporated into the tensor product metho...

  17. Motivation and Dispositions: Alternative Approaches to Explain the Performance of Critical Thinking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Valenzuela

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking depends on the mastery degrees of some skills and on the will to activate them when reasoning. Traditionally, this second aspect has been focused from a disposition approach (Facione, 1990. However, this perspective demonstrates problems in theoretical as in practical level to explain and to develop critical thinking. For this, it is proposed to approach the problem from the Motivation perspective (Eccles and Wigfield, 2002. In this context, our research deals with the evaluation of the convenience to choose one perspective or another to explain the performance of critical thinking, both theoretically and in its predictive capacity. Thus, along with theoretically analyze the strengths and weaknesses of both approaches and it was compared measures of dispositions (CCTDI, motivation (EMPC and critical thinking (CCTST in a sample of Spanish university students. The results show that the variability in critical thinking performance is better explained by the motivation than by dispositional approach. Finally, the theoretical and practical convenience of motivational approach in this matter is discussed.

  18. A chemical-biological similarity-based grouping of complex substances as a prototype approach for evaluating chemical alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Fabian A; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Sirenko, Oksana; Chappell, Grace A; Wright, Fred A; Reif, David M; Braisted, John; Gerhold, David L; Yeakley, Joanne M; Shepard, Peter; Seligmann, Bruce; Roy, Tim; Boogaard, Peter J; Ketelslegers, Hans B; Rohde, Arlean M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-08-21

    Comparative assessment of potential human health impacts is a critical step in evaluating both chemical alternatives and existing products on the market. Most alternatives assessments are conducted on a chemical-by-chemical basis and it is seldom acknowledged that humans are exposed to complex products, not individual substances. Indeed, substances of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products, and Biological materials (UVCBs) are ubiquitous in commerce yet they present a major challenge for registration and health assessments. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and computational approach to categorize UVCBs according to global similarities in their bioactivity using a suite of in vitro models. We used petroleum substances, an important group of UVCBs which are grouped for regulatory approval and read-across primarily on physico-chemical properties and the manufacturing process, and only partially based on toxicity data, as a case study. We exposed induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes to DMSO-soluble extracts of 21 petroleum substances from five product groups. Concentration-response data from high-content imaging in cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes, as well as targeted high-throughput transcriptomic analysis of the hepatocytes, revealed distinct groups of petroleum substances. Data integration showed that bioactivity profiling affords clustering of petroleum substances in a manner similar to the manufacturing process-based categories. Moreover, we observed a high degree of correlation between bioactivity profiles and physico-chemical properties, as well as improved groupings when chemical and biological data were combined. Altogether, we demonstrate how novel in vitro screening approaches can be effectively utilized in combination with physico-chemical characteristics to group complex substances and enable read-across. This approach allows for rapid and scientifically-informed evaluation of health impacts of

  19. Exploration of Alternative Approaches for Estimation of Single Sensor Error Statistics Using the MODIS Aqua Matchup Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, K. A.; Podesta, G. P.; Kumar, C.; Minnett, P. J.; Williams, E.; Walsh, S.

    2016-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is a fundamental quantity to understand weather and climate dynamics. Modern ocean observing systems monitor SST using multiple platforms and instruments - including satellite-borne sensors. The integration of observations from multiple sources, however, requires that SSTs from each instrument or measurement system have associated estimates of systematic errors (bias) and variability (dispersion). Guidance on how to derive meaningful error properties, however, is still being developed. A single pair of bias and dispersion values for the entire globe is not adequate, as satellite SSTs clearly show error patterns that vary in space and time, and that may even partially cancel each other when an overall statistic is calculated. Alternatively, a `hypercube' approach was proposed for SST retrievals from the MODIS infrared radiometers on the Terra and Aqua EOS satellites. Retrieval uncertainty was estimated separately for `hypercube bins' defined by the combination of season, latitude, viewing geometry, surface temperature, and "wet" or "dry" atmospheres. A disadvantage was the appearance of obvious spatial discontinuities in mapped uncertainty fields. Recently, Petrenko et al. (J. of Atmospheric & Oceanic Technology 33: 345-358, 2016) proposed an alternative approach, in which SST retrieval errors are instead segmented based on the values of regressors, i.e., the terms (excluding offsets) in the statistical algorithm used to estimate SST. This approach sought to characterize SST errors with a limited number of arguments, regardless of how many physical variables influence the values of algorithm terms. Using co-located MODIS-Aqua observations and in situ SST measurements in the MODIS Matchup Database (2002 to mid-2016) we explore both segmentation approaches. An initial finding is that, in both approaches, only a small portion of the multivariate space is occupied by MODIS matchups determined to be cloud-free. Another finding was that it

  20. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO LOW FREQUENCY RF ACCELERATORS AND POWER SOURCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2001-06-18

    The Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory projects require low frequency rf cavities because the size and emittance of the muon beam is much larger than is usual for electron or proton beams. The range of 30 MHz to 200 MHz is of special interest. However, the size of an accelerator with low frequency will be impractically large if it is simply scaled up from usual designs. In addition, to get very high peak power in this range is difficult. Presented in this paper is an alternative structure that employs a quasi-lumped inductance that can significantly reduce the transverse size while keeping high gradient. Also addressed is a power compression scheme with a thyratron. This gives a possible solution to provide very high peak power.

  1. Structural and morphological approach of Co-Cr dental alloys processed by alternative manufacturing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Sorin; Bîrdeanu, Mihaela; Savencu, Cristina; Porojan, Liliana

    2017-08-01

    The integration of digitalized processing technologies in traditional dental restorations manufacturing is an emerging application. The objective of this study was to identify the different structural and morphological characteristics of Co-Cr dental alloys processed by alternative manufacturing techniques in order to understand the influence of microstructure on restorations properties and their clinical behavior. Metallic specimens made of Co-Cr dental alloys were prepared using traditional casting (CST), and computerized milling (MIL), selective laser sintering (SLS) and selective laser melting (SLM). The structural information of the samples was obtained by X-ray diffraction, the morphology and the topography of the samples were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscope. Given that the microstructure was significantly different, further differences in the clinical behavior of prosthetic restorations manufactured using additive techniques are anticipated.

  2. An Alternative Approach to Monitoring Fish and Fish Habitat in the Inland Northwest, 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, James T.

    1999-09-01

    The development of efficient and effective monitoring protocols will depend, in part, upon successfully incorporating multiple research and management goals across several disciplines. Decision analysis has these abilities and can be used to examine the potential effects of alternative management activities, identify candidate monitoring variables, and estimate the value of monitoring or conducting additional studies. The author demonstrates the utility of decision analysis for monitoring and adaptive (i.e., experimental) management with an example of a timber harvest decision. Example models were generated using previously reported relationships and Monte Carlo simulation and the value of sampling (e.g., monitoring) was estimated via Baye's Rule. He concludes that the decision analysis can be a powerful tool for developing a future effectiveness monitoring protocols and should be considered by natural resource managers prior to adopting a monitoring strategy.

  3. Valuation of imaging centers: alternative methods and detailed description of the discounted cash flow approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Medical imaging centers are an increasingly integral part of the medical services landscape in America. There are many instances in which owners and potential buyers of these enterprises want to ascertain the value of the businesses. There is an industry of professionals who provide expert valuation services for many types of businesses using various recognized alternative methods, some of which are more appropriate than others when valuing an imaging center. The federal government has prescribed parameters for all valuations if they lead to transactions in which fair market value is mandated, and it also expects transactions to adhere to more generalized laws relating to entities that provide services to Medicare patients. Radiologists who own, or who are contemplating ownership of, imaging center operations need to understand the principles of valuation, specifically the factors that are involved in a discounted cash flow determination of fair market value.

  4. Computational Approaches to Understand Transcriptional Regulation and Alternative Promoter Usage in Mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette

    erent aspects of transcriptional regulation. In the rst study we develop a machine learning framework to predict mRNA production, stalling and elongation of RNA polymerase II using publicly available histone modi cation data. The study reveals new pieces of information about the histone code. Besides...... study of the impact of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to mice lungs. Besides gaining new insight into the e ects of nanotubes the data is also used to explore the role of alternative promoter usage and enhancers in response to external stimuli....... understand and cure diseases. The focus of this thesis is transcriptional regulation. The main aim was to gain new insight into transcriptional regulation but a secondary goal was to develop new bioinformatic methods to facilitate future research. Three di erent studies are presented each focusing on di...

  5. Stable Drosophila Cell Lines: An Alternative Approach to Exogenous Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backovic, Marija; Krey, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production has become an indispensable tool for various research directions and biotechnological applications in the past decades. Among the numerous reported expression systems, insect cells provide the possibility to produce complex target proteins that require posttranslational modifications. Stable expression in Drosophila S2 cells represents an attractive alternative to the widely used baculovirus expression system, offering important advantages in particular for difficult-to-express proteins, e.g., membrane proteins or heavily glycosylated multi-domain proteins that are stabilized by a complex disulfide pattern. Here we present the methodology that is required for the generation of stable Drosophila S2 cell transfectants and for production of recombinant proteins using those transfectants.

  6. A finite volume alternate direction implicit approach to modeling selective laser melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Mohanty, Sankhya

    2013-01-01

    is proposed for modeling single-layer and few-layers selective laser melting processes. The ADI technique is implemented and applied for two cases involving constant material properties and non-linear material behavior. The ADI FV method consume less time while having comparable accuracy with respect to 3D...... to accurately simulate the process, are constrained by either the size or scale of the model domain. A second challenging aspect involves the inclusion of non-linear material behavior into the 3D implicit FE models. An alternating direction implicit (ADI) method based on a finite volume (FV) formulation......Over the last decade, several studies have attempted to develop thermal models for analyzing the selective laser melting process with a vision to predict thermal stresses, microstructures and resulting mechanical properties of manufactured products. While a holistic model addressing all involved...

  7. Lifeline electric rates and alternative approaches to the problems of low-income ratepayers. Ten case studies of implemented programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Program summaries, issue developments, governmental processes, and impacts are discussed for 10 case studies dealing with lifeline electric rates and alternative approaches to the problems of low-income ratepayers, namely; the Boston Edison rate freeze; the California lifeline; Florida Power and Light conservation rate; the Iowa-Illinois Gas and Electric small-use rate; the Maine demonstration lifeline program; the Massachusetts Electric Company A-65 rate; the Michigan optional senior citizen rate; the Narragansett Electric Company A-65 SSI rate; the Northern States Power Company conservation rate break; and the Potomac Electric Power Company rate freeze. (MCW)

  8. Transformation of theoretical-methodological approaches and methodical tools of the individual and territory welfare diagnostics. Part 1. From spreading to the alternative diagnostics approaches (background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Anatolyevich Kuklin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an evolution of theoretical and methodological approaches to the welfare study. Existing theories of wellbeing are grouped according to accounted method of goods and resources distribution among society members. As a welfare future as a category we highlight objective (measured and subjective (estimated components. Based on the analysis of scientific literature we determine the ratio of individual and social welfare. The main differences between the categories of “ welfare” and “wealth” are given. The main difference consists in multidirectional changes of welfare and wealth for an increase (decrease in income of the individual (country. In this article we present an analysis of modern approaches to the definition of welfare: state, institutional and expendable approach. The welfare level estimation is complicated due to the need to consider the subjective component. The article provides an analysis of existing approaches to quantitative welfare evaluation ranging from the most common techniques (HDI, GDP to alternative techniques (Happy Planet Index.Methodological devices are structured by levels of welfare assessment objects (world, country, region, people. Based on the analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of methods we can conclude that the most reliable method is a comprehensive approach, which includes economic, environmental, social, vital and infrastructure indicators. The author’s approach to the formation of a complex methodological tool for individual and territory welfare estimation is presented in this article.

  9. An alternative to the standard spatial econometric approaches in hedonic house price models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Graevenitz, Kathrine; Panduro, Toke Emil

    2015-01-01

    Omitted, misspecified, or mismeasured spatially varying characteristics are a cause for concern in hedonic house price models. Spatial econometrics or spatial fixed effects have become popular ways of addressing these concerns. We discuss the limitations of standard spatial approaches to hedonic...

  10. Alternative Approaches to Treating Children and Families Who Exhibit Behavior Problems: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Richard C.

    The author describes the phenomena of increased disturbing behaviors shown by children (6 to 12 years old) and the cost of such behaviors in terms of dollars and human misery. It is suggested that certain diseconomies exist in the traditional approach to dealing with the phenomena and that perhaps innovation is indicated. (SBH)

  11. The Process Genre Writing Approach; An Alternative Option for the Modern Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Emma

    2017-01-01

    "Writing involves knowledge about the language, the context in which writing happens and skills in using language. Writing development happens by drawing out the learners' potential and providing input to which learners respond" (Badger & White, 2000.) Taking this in to account, the Process Genre Approach in writing classes can be…

  12. The Dutch IOR approach to organizational design : An alternative to business process re-engineering?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijnatten, FM; van der Zwaan, AH

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the current Dutch sociotechnical design approach to integral organizational renewal in a contextual way. Both its design theory and intervention processes are reviewed and some aggregated empirical evidence is presented. Next, the paper compares the ideas developed in the Dutch a

  13. Words as Species: An Alternative Approach to Estimating Productive Vocabulary Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meara, Paul M.; Alcoy, Juan Carlos Olmos

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of how we might be able to assess productive vocabulary size in second language learners. It discusses some previous attempts to develop measures of this sort, and argues that a fresh approach is needed in order to overcome some persistent problems that dog research in this area. The paper argues that there might be…

  14. A Partnership Model for Evaluation: Considering an Alternate Approach to the Internal-External Evaluation Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Menestrel, Suzanne M.; Walahoski, Jill S.; Mielke, Monica B.

    2014-01-01

    The 4-H youth development organization is a complex public--private partnership between the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the nation's Cooperative Extension system and National 4-H Council, a private, nonprofit partner. The current article is focused on a partnership approach to the…

  15. The Dutch IOR approach to organizational design : An alternative to business process re-engineering?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijnatten, FM; van der Zwaan, AH

    This paper presents the current Dutch sociotechnical design approach to integral organizational renewal in a contextual way. Both its design theory and intervention processes are reviewed and some aggregated empirical evidence is presented. Next, the paper compares the ideas developed in the Dutch

  16. An Alternative Approach for MBA Mentor Programs: Empower the Protégé

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artis, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to maximize the benefits of mentor relationships between master of business administration (MBA) students and executives by empowering students to select and recruit their own mentors, and then be responsible for managing those relationships. This mentor program is designed to be short but intensive. First-year MBA…

  17. An Alternative Paradigm for Evidence-Based Medicine: Revisiting Lawrence Weed, MD’s Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukor, Ali Rafik

    2017-01-01

    Lawrence Weed, MD, is renowned for being the father of the Problem-Oriented Medical Record (POMR), the medical care standard for collecting, managing, and contextualizing patient data in medical records. What have been consistently overlooked are his teachings on knowledge coupling, which refers to matching patient data with associated medical knowledge. Together, the POMR standard and knowledge coupling are meant to form the basis of a systems approach that enables individualized evidence-based decision making within the context of multimorbidity and patient complexity. The POMR and knowledge coupling tools operationalize a problem-oriented model that reflects a sophisticated general systems theoretical approach to knowledge. This paradigm transcends reductionist approaches to knowledge by depicting how the meaning of specific entities (eg, disease constructs) and their associated probabilities can only be understood within their respective spatiotemporal and biopsychosocial relational contexts. Rigorous POMRs therefore require knowledge inputs from a network of interconnections among specific entities, which Dr Weed enabled through development of the Knowledge Net standard. The Knowledge Net’s relational structure determines the applicability of knowledge within specific patient contexts. To enable the linkage of unique combinations of data in individual patient POMRs with existing medical knowledge structured in Knowledge Nets, Dr Weed developed the Knowledge Coupling standard. Dr Weed’s standards for record keeping and knowledge coupling form the basis of a combinatorial approach to evidence-based medicine that fulfills Stange’s call for a science of connectedness. Ensuing individualized processes of care become the dynamo powering a learning health care system that enables a co-construction of health premised on empowerment and intelligent human decision making, rather than promoting the artificial intelligence of tools. If the value of Engel

  18. Reflections on human Pavlovian decelerative heart-rate conditioning with negative tilt as US: alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, J J

    1992-01-01

    The negative-tilt preparation that has been reported since the late seventies is a specific form of Pavlovian conditioning that is of scientific interest and has potential applications. In this paper I reflect on the usefulness, to the development of this preparation, of two approaches to Pavlovian conditioning. One approach is the older S-R learning, stimulus-substitution paradigm exemplified by learning texts of the sixties. The other is the modern, Tolman-like view, according to which the phenomenon of Pavlovian conditioning is "now described as the learning of relations among events so as to allow the organism to represent its environment." The three assumptions encapsulated by this approach are: (a) that only CS-US contingency relations are learned; (b) that teleological modes of explanations are adequate; (c) that the representational theory of knowledge is sound. Concerning Pavlovian conditioning in general, questions been raised in the literature for all three assumptions; they have not been adequately answered. Regarding the specific problem of developing the human Pavlovian heart-rate decelerative conditioning with negative tilt as the US, I suggest that the cognitive approach has been much less helpful than the older, S-R, stimulus-substitution paradigm. Nevertheless, other literature clearly indicates that the cognitive, S-S approach has generated considerable interest and research, especially in preparations like the conditioned emotional response (CER), which are CS-IR ones in the sense that the effects on the CR are assessed indirectly through measuring an indicator or instrumental response (IR).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Alternative Forms of Resilience. A typology of approaches for the study of Citizen Collective Responses in Hard Economic Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kousis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A variety of theoretical and conceptual perspectives have been applied to studying collective citizen initiatives arising in response to hard economic times, such as solidarity-based exchanges and networks, cooperative structures, barter clubs, credit unions, ethical banks, time banks, alternative social currency, citizens' self-help groups, neighbourhood assemblies and social enterprises. Since the global financial crisis of 2008, scholarly attention on novel, alternative, resilient structures has increased, especially in regions that have been most affected. A comprehensive literature review is therefore needed on these initiatives which usually aim to meet basic needs such as food, shelter, health and education at the community level, or build and envision autonomous communities. This paper has four aims. First, it proposes a new, all-encompassing conceptual framework, alternative forms of resilience, to embrace all issues and groups related to such initiatives, during the new millennium and its economic and political challenges, while taking into account the impact of the 2008 crisis. Secondly, it offers a comprehensive literature review on collective citizen initiatives studied through different theoretical, methodological and conceptual understandings. Thirdly, it provides a new typology of several approaches on novel, collective and solidarity-oriented critical resilience initiatives which take into account political issues, be they policy or social-movement related. Finally, it points to future research areas which would aim to systematically address the political and non-political features of citizen-collective responses.

  20. An alternative approach for a distance inequality associated with the second-order cone and the circular cone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-He Miao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well known that the second-order cone and the circular cone have many analogous properties. In particular, there exists an important distance inequality associated with the second-order cone and the circular cone. The inequality indicates that the distances of arbitrary points to the second-order cone and the circular cone are equivalent, which is crucial in analyzing the tangent cone and normal cone for the circular cone. In this paper, we provide an alternative approach to achieve the aforementioned inequality. Although the proof is a bit longer than the existing one, the new approach offers a way to clarify when the equality holds. Such a clarification is helpful for further study of the relationship between the second-order cone programming problems and the circular cone programming problems.

  1. Alternative approach for fire suppression of class A, B and C fires in gloveboxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberger, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tsiagkouris, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-02-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Orders and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards require fire suppression in gloveboxes. Several potential solutions have been and are currently being considered at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective is to provide reliable, minimally invasive, and seismically robust fire suppression capable of extinguishing Class A, B, and C fires; achieve compliance with DOE and NFPA requirements; and provide value-added improvements to fire safety in gloveboxes. This report provides a brief summary of current approaches and also documents the successful fire tests conducted to prove that one approach, specifically Fire Foe{trademark} tubes, is capable of achieving the requirement to provide reliable fire protection in gloveboxes in a cost-effective manner.

  2. To the Right of Constructive Engagement: An Alternative Approach toward South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-05

    relationship of the United States with the South African government. It was decided that a new approach was in order, and after several months the...now focus more closely on our relationship with South Africa and the issue of apartheid. First, what has been the opinion of the American public...provide fresh drinking water, sanitation and roads. Laws prohibiting interracial sex and marriage have been repealed. Black labor unions are not only

  3. A pilot study evaluating alternative approaches of academic detailing in rural family practice clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartung Daniel M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Academic detailing is an interactive, convenient, and user-friendly approach to delivering non-commercial education to healthcare clinicians. While evidence suggests academic detailing is associated with improvements in prescribing behavior, uncertainty exists about generalizability and scalability in diverse settings. Our study evaluates different models of delivering academic detailing in a rural family medicine setting. Methods We conducted a pilot project to assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and satisfaction with academic detailing delivered face-to-face as compared to a modified approach using distance-learning technology. The recipients were four family medicine clinics within the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN. Two clinics were allocated to receive face-to-face detailing and two received outreach through video conferencing or asynchronous web-based outreach. Surveys at midpoint and completion were used to assess effectiveness and satisfaction. Results Each clinic received four outreach visits over an eight month period. Topics included treatment-resistant depression, management of atypical antipsychotics, drugs for insomnia, and benzodiazepine tapering. Overall, 90% of participating clinicians were satisfied with the program. Respondents who received in person detailing reported a higher likelihood of changing their behavior compared to respondents in the distance detailing group for five of seven content areas. While 90%-100% of respondents indicated they would continue to participate if the program were continued, the likelihood of participation declined if only distance approaches were offered. Conclusions We found strong support and satisfaction for the program among participating clinicians. Participants favored in-person approaches to distance interactions. Future efforts will be directed at quantitative methods for evaluating the economic and clinical effectiveness of detailing in rural

  4. Alternative Approach Strategies For Buyer-Seller Relations With The Peoples Republic Of China

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines the issues involved in buyer-seller relations for industrial product sales in the People's Republic of China. The need is genuine in many product categories including plant technology, high technology, and infrastructure. The problem is that buying policies and procedures for foreign firms are still emerging, and therefore, unclear and confusing. Three approach strategies for buyer-seller relations with China are presented: the authorized "buying group," the "agency" repre...

  5. Shear-wave velocity profiling according to three alternative approaches: A comparative case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Moro, G.; Keller, L.; Al-Arifi, N. S.; Moustafa, S. S. R.

    2016-11-01

    The paper intends to compare three different methodologies which can be used to analyze surface-wave propagation, thus eventually obtaining the vertical shear-wave velocity (VS) profile. The three presented methods (currently still quite unconventional) are characterized by different field procedures and data processing. The first methodology is a sort of evolution of the classical Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) here accomplished by jointly considering Rayleigh and Love waves (analyzed according to the Full Velocity Spectrum approach) and the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR). The second method is based on the joint analysis of the HVSR curve together with the Rayleigh-wave dispersion determined via Miniature Array Analysis of Microtremors (MAAM), a passive methodology that relies on a small number (4 to 6) of vertical geophones deployed along a small circle (for the common near-surface application the radius usually ranges from 0.6 to 5 m). Finally, the third considered approach is based on the active data acquired by a single 3-component geophone and relies on the joint inversion of the group-velocity spectra of the radial and vertical components of the Rayleigh waves, together with the Radial-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (RVSR). The results of the analyses performed while considering these approaches (completely different both in terms of field procedures and data analysis) appear extremely consistent thus mutually validating their performances. Pros and cons of each approach are summarized both in terms of computational aspects as well as with respect to practical considerations regarding the specific character of the pertinent field procedures.

  6. An alternative approach to calculate the posterior probability of GNSS integer ambiguity resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianwen; Wang, Jinling; Gao, Wang

    2017-03-01

    When precise positioning is carried out via GNSS carrier phases, it is important to make use of the property that every ambiguity should be an integer. With the known float solution, any integer vector, which has the same degree of freedom as the ambiguity vector, is the ambiguity vector in probability. For both integer aperture estimation and integer equivariant estimation, it is of great significance to know the posterior probabilities. However, to calculate the posterior probability, we have to face the thorny problem that the equation involves an infinite number of integer vectors. In this paper, using the float solution of ambiguity and its variance matrix, a new approach to rapidly and accurately calculate the posterior probability is proposed. The proposed approach consists of four steps. First, the ambiguity vector is transformed via decorrelation. Second, the range of the adopted integer of every component is directly obtained via formulas, and a finite number of integer vectors are obtained via combination. Third, using the integer vectors, the principal value of posterior probability and the correction factor are worked out. Finally, the posterior probability of every integer vector and its error upper bound can be obtained. In the paper, the detailed process to calculate the posterior probability and the derivations of the formulas are presented. The theory and numerical examples indicate that the proposed approach has the advantages of small amount of computations, high calculation accuracy and strong adaptability.

  7. An alternative approach to field-aligned coordinates for plasma turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ottaviani, M A

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence simulation codes can exploit the flute-like nature of plasma turbulence to reduce the effective number of degrees of freedom necessary to represent fluctuations. This can be achieved by employing magnetic coordinates of which one is aligned along the magnetic field. This work presents an approach in which the position along the field lines is identified by the toroidal angle, rather than the most commonly used poloidal angle. It will be shown that this approach has several advantages. Among these, periodicity in both angles is retained. This property allows moving to an equivalent representation in Fourier space with a reduced number of toroidal components. It will be shown how this duality can be exploited to transform conventional codes that use a spectral representation on the magnetic surface into codes with a field-aligned coordinate. It is also shown that the new approach can be generalised to get rid of magnetic coordinates in the poloidal plane altogether, for a large class of models. Tests...

  8. An alternative approach to calculate the posterior probability of GNSS integer ambiguity resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianwen; Wang, Jinling; Gao, Wang

    2016-10-01

    When precise positioning is carried out via GNSS carrier phases, it is important to make use of the property that every ambiguity should be an integer. With the known float solution, any integer vector, which has the same degree of freedom as the ambiguity vector, is the ambiguity vector in probability. For both integer aperture estimation and integer equivariant estimation, it is of great significance to know the posterior probabilities. However, to calculate the posterior probability, we have to face the thorny problem that the equation involves an infinite number of integer vectors. In this paper, using the float solution of ambiguity and its variance matrix, a new approach to rapidly and accurately calculate the posterior probability is proposed. The proposed approach consists of four steps. First, the ambiguity vector is transformed via decorrelation. Second, the range of the adopted integer of every component is directly obtained via formulas, and a finite number of integer vectors are obtained via combination. Third, using the integer vectors, the principal value of posterior probability and the correction factor are worked out. Finally, the posterior probability of every integer vector and its error upper bound can be obtained. In the paper, the detailed process to calculate the posterior probability and the derivations of the formulas are presented. The theory and numerical examples indicate that the proposed approach has the advantages of small amount of computations, high calculation accuracy and strong adaptability.

  9. Alternatives to relational databases in precision medicine: Comparison of NoSQL approaches for big data storage using supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Enrique Israel

    Improvements in medical and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the production of electronic data over the last decade. As a result, data management is rapidly becoming a major determinant, and urgent challenge, for the development of Precision Medicine. Although successful data management is achievable using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), exponential data growth is a significant contributor to failure scenarios. Growing amounts of data can also be observed in other sectors, such as economics and business, which, together with the previous facts, suggests that alternate database approaches (NoSQL) may soon be required for efficient storage and management of big databases. However, this hypothesis has been difficult to test in the Precision Medicine field since alternate database architectures are complex to assess and means to integrate heterogeneous electronic health records (EHR) with dynamic genomic data are not easily available. In this dissertation, we present a novel set of experiments for identifying NoSQL database approaches that enable effective data storage and management in Precision Medicine using patients' clinical and genomic information from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). The first experiment draws on performance and scalability from biologically meaningful queries with differing complexity and database sizes. The second experiment measures performance and scalability in database updates without schema changes. The third experiment assesses performance and scalability in database updates with schema modifications due dynamic data. We have identified two NoSQL approach, based on Cassandra and Redis, which seems to be the ideal database management systems for our precision medicine queries in terms of performance and scalability. We present NoSQL approaches and show how they can be used to manage clinical and genomic big data. Our research is relevant to the public health since we are focusing on one of the main

  10. Alternative approaches to electronic damage by ion-beam irradiation: Exciton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo-Lopez, F.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    The paper briefly describes the main features of the damage produced by swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. After a short revision of the widely used thermal spike concept, it focuses on cumulative mechanisms of track formation which are alternative to those based on lattice melting (thermal spike models). These cumulative mechanisms rely on the production of point defects around the ion trajectory, and their accumulation up to a final lattice collapse or amorphization. As to the formation of point defects, the paper considers those mechanisms relying on direct local conversion of the excitation energy into atomic displacements (exciton models). A particular attention is given to processes based on the non-radiative recombination of excitons that have become self-trapped as a consequence of a strong electron-phonon interaction (STEs). These mechanisms, although operative under purely ionizing radiation in some dielectric materials, have been rarely invoked, so far, to discuss SHI damage. They are discussed in this paper together with relevant examples to materials such as Cu{sub 3}N, alkali halides, SiO{sub 2}, and LiNbO{sub 3}. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Development of a healthy biscuit: an alternative approach to biscuit manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Obesity (BMI >30 and related health problems, including coronary heart disease (CHD, is without question a public health concern. The purpose of this study was to modify a traditional biscuit by the addition of vitamin B6, vitamin B12, Folic Acid, Vitamin C and Prebiotic fibre, while reducing salt and sugar. Design Development and commercial manufacture of the functional biscuit was carried out in collaboration with a well known and respected biscuit manufacturer of International reputation. The raw materials traditionally referred to as essential in biscuit manufacture, i.e. sugar and fat, were targeted for removal or reduction. In addition, salt was completely removed from the recipe. Participants University students of both sexes (n = 25 agreed to act as subjects for the study. Ethical approval for the study was granted by the University ethics committee. The test was conducted as a single blind crossover design, and the modified and traditional biscuits were presented to the subjects under the same experimental conditions in a random fashion. Results No difference was observed between the original and the modified product for taste and consistency (P > 0.05. The modified biscuit was acceptable to the consumer in terms of eating quality, flavour and colour. Commercial acceptability was therefore established. Conclusion This study has confirmed that traditional high-fat and high-sugar biscuits which are not associated with healthy diets by most consumers can be modified to produce a healthy alternative that can be manufactured under strict commercial conditions.

  12. Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: AComparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P.; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-02-15

    Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is one of the most common naturally occurring minerals that is present in many subsurface environments. It plays an important role in the genesis of enriched ore deposits through weathering reactions, is the most abundant sulfide mineral in many mine tailings, and is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. The pyrite oxidation reaction serves as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications. Mathematical modeling of these processes is extremely challenging because aqueous concentrations of key species vary over an enormous range, oxygen inventory and supply are typically small in comparison to pyrite inventory, and chemical reactions are complex, involving kinetic control and microbial catalysis. We present the mathematical formulation of a general multi-phase advective-diffusive reactive transport model for redox processes. Two alternative implementations were made in the TOUGHREACT and TOUGH2-CHEM simulation codes which use sequential iteration and simultaneous solution, respectively. The simulators are applied to reactive consumption of pyrite in (1) saturated flow of oxidizing water, and (2) saturated-unsaturated flow in which oxygen transport occurs in both aqueous and gas phases. Geochemical evolutions predicted from different process models are compared, and issues of numerical accuracy and efficiency are discussed.

  13. The Journal Impact Factor: Moving Toward an Alternative and Combined Scientometric Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Nurmashev, Bekaidar; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Udovik, Elena E; Baryshnikov, Aleksandr A; Kitas, George D

    2017-02-01

    The Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is a single citation metric, which is widely employed for ranking journals and choosing target journals, but is also misused as the proxy of the quality of individual articles and academic achievements of authors. This article analyzes Scopus-based publication activity on the JIF and overviews some of the numerous misuses of the JIF, global initiatives to overcome the 'obsession' with impact factors, and emerging strategies to revise the concept of the scholarly impact. The growing number of articles on the JIF, most of which are in English, reflects interest of experts in journal editing and scientometrics toward its uses, misuses, and options to overcome related problems. Solely displaying values of the JIFs on the journal websites is criticized by experts as these average metrics do not reflect skewness of citation distribution of individual articles. Emerging strategies suggest to complement the JIFs with citation plots and alternative metrics, reflecting uses of individual articles in terms of downloads and distribution of related information through social media and networking platforms. It is also proposed to revise the original formula of the JIF calculation and embrace the concept of the impact and importance of individual articles. The latter is largely dependent on ethical soundness of the journal instructions, proper editing and structuring of articles, efforts to promote related information through social media, and endorsements of professional societies.

  14. An Alternative Approach to Vacuum Energy, Dark Matter and Gravitational Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, HongSheng

    2008-01-01

    Various TeVeS-like and f(R)-like theories of gravity have added an interesting twist to the search for dark matter and vacuum energy, modifying the landscape of astrophysics day by day. A common thread of various theories is a non-uniform vector field fluid in the vacuum (see an up-to-date summary of relations between various theories by Halle, Zhao & Li, arXiv0711.0958 \\cite{Halle}). These "alternative" theories are in fact in the standard GR framework except that the cosmological "constant" is replaced by a non-trivial non-uniform vacuum energy. Built initially bottom-up rather than top-down as most gravity theories, TeVeS-like theories are healthily rooted on empirical facts. Here I attempt a review of some sanity checks of these fast-developing theories from galaxy rotation curves, solar system constraints, and gravitational lensing. I will also discuss some theoretical aspects of the theories related to the vacuum energy, and point out some analogies with electromagnetism and the Casimir effect.

  15. Selection Methodology Approach to Preferable and Alternative Sites for the First NPP Project in Yemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassim, Moath [Kyunghe Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kessel, David S. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly present the methodology and results of the first siting study for the first nuclear power plant (NPP) in Yemen. In this study it has been demonstrated that there are suitable sites for specific unit/units power of 1000 MWt (about 300 MWe) nuclear power plant. To perform the site selection, a systematic selection method was developed. The method uses site-specific data gathered by literature review and expert judgement to identify the most important site selection criteria. A two-step site selection process was used. Candidate sites were chosen that meet a subset of the selection criteria that form the most important system constraints. These candidate sites were then evaluated against the full set of selection criteria using the Analytical Hierarchy Process Method (AHP). Candidate sites underwent a set of more specific siting criteria weighted by expert judgment to select preferable sites and alternatives using AHP method again. Expert Judgment method was used to rank and weight the importance of each criteria, then AHP method used to evaluate and weight the relation between criterion to criterion and between all criteria against the global weight. Then logical decision software was used to rank sites upon their weighting value.

  16. Computed Tomography-guided Pericardiocentesis: An alternative approach for accessing the pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvan, John Nicholas; Madden, David; Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob

    2016-07-01

    Pericardial effusions compress the heart, decrease cardiac output, and lead to haemodynamic collapse. Ultrasound (US)-guided pericardiocentesis is the gold standard for treating pericardial effusions. Recently, the incorporation of computed tomography (CT) guidance has increased patient safety while entering the pericardium. Despite the superior performance of CT-guided pericardiocentesis in smaller, complex effusions, this procedure is not routinely performed by cardiologists and surgeons. Unlike those with an intact pericardium, patients with mediastinal trauma, pericardial adhesions, temporary pacing wires, and vascular conduits are high risk for pericardiocentesis. Tamponade physiology also increases patient susceptibility to the hypotensive effects of anaesthesia during surgical drainage. Here we illustrate the technique of CT-guided pericardiocentesis and demonstrate its application in specific clinical scenarios. We conclude that CT-guided pericardiocentesis provides a useful, alternative strategy for treating cardiac tamponade in high risk patients. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hassk. leaf extract: An alternative approach for the treatment of staphylococcal bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordmuang, Auemphon; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic residues in dairy products as well as emergence of antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens have been recognized as global public health concerns. The present work was aimed to study a potent antibacterial extract from natural product as an alternative treatment for staphylococcal bovine mastitis. Staphylococcal isolates (n=44) were isolated from milk samples freshly squeezed from individual cows. All staphylococcal isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin, penicillin, except vancomycin. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf ethanolic extract was accessed for its antibacterial activity and anti-inflammatory potential. The extract exhibited profound antibacterial activity against all of staphylococcal isolates with MIC and MBC values ranged from 16-64 μg/ml and 64->128 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, the extract also exerted anti-protein denaturation and human red blood cell membrane stabilizing activity. The results support the use of R. tomentosa extract that could be applied to cure bovine mastitis and to reduce inflammatory injury caused by the bacterial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Baby unplugged: a novel, market-based approach to reducing screen time and promoting healthy alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, John S

    2013-01-01

    The issue of electronic media use by young children is increasingly important in pediatrics, a major risk factor for numerous chronic conditions. Despite guidelines in place since 1999, screen time is on the rise, aided by new formats removing practically all barriers of use. Key drivers are technological allure, confusion about developmental readiness, and perception of educational value, fueled by potent marketing. This article describes the development of Baby Unplugged, a series of children's board books celebrating "old-school," screen-free childhood. Written by a pediatrician who also owns a children's bookstore, the books were inspired and informed by advocacy projects in the areas of media use and early literacy as a pediatric resident. They reinforce AAP Electronic Media Guidelines, notably discouraging screen-based media under 2 years old, largely by encouraging healthy, fun alternatives. Examples include Pets, Book, and Yard. Multi-sensorial exploration and parent-child engagement are emphasized in a non-prescriptive way, featuring gender and ethnic diversity and activities that are accessible and inexpensive. The author describes challenges faced by pediatricians providing anticipatory guidance for media use, given limited time and resources and the perception that we are out of touch. This is heightened by oft-deceptive marketing of screen-based products more likely to be perceived as "cool." Reach Out and Read is cited as an example of a successful, "cool" intervention, though limited to select populations. Baby Unplugged takes advocacy to the marketplace, where the screen time battle is being lost.

  19. Panels Manufactured from Vegetable Fibers: An Alternative Approach for Controlling Noises in Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Pacheco Bastos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise control devices such as panels and barriers, when of high efficiency, generally are of difficult acquisition due to high costs turning in many cases their use impracticable, mainly for limited budget small-sized companies. There is a huge requirement for new acoustic materials that have satisfactory performance, not only under acoustic aspect but also other relevant ones and are of low cost. Vegetable fibers are an alternative solution when used as panels since they promise satisfactory acoustic absorption, according to previous researches, exist in abundance, and derive from renewable sources. This paper, therefore, reports on the development of panels made from vegetable fibers (coconut, palm, sisal, and açaí, assesses their applicability by various experimental (flammability, odor, fungal growth, and ageing tests, and characterize them acoustically in terms of their sound absorption coefficients on a scale model reverberant chamber. Acoustic results point out that the aforementioned fiber panels play pretty well the role of a noise control device since they have compatible, and in some cases, higher performance when compared to commercially available conventional materials.

  20. Butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty: An alternative approach for management of small- and medium-sized perforations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Maurya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty for small- and medium-sized central perforations and compare it with temporalis fascia tympanoplasty. Materials and Methods: A prospective, comparative study was conducted on 110 patients, divided into two groups. Patients of tubotympanic type of chronic suppurative otitis media with 2–6 mm size perforation were included in the study. Fifty-five patients were operated by temporalis fascia Type I tympanoplasty and rest 55 by butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty (transcanal technique under local anesthesia. Results were compared in terms of pre- and post-operative air-bone gap improvement and success rates. Results: In our study, in terms of outcomes, both techniques had similar results. The success rate was 93.7% in butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty and 96.3% in temporalis fascia group. However, in terms of time taken, butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty took less time (about 30 min than temporalis fascia (about 55 min. Conclusion: Transcanal butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty is a very good alternative in small- and medium-sized perforations for conventional temporalis fascia tympanoplasty as it is simple, takes less time, day care procedure, on table hearing improvement, cosmetically no postoperative scar, no need of post aural preparation, and patient can go home within hours.

  1. Cloud Computing as an Alternative IT Solution for SMEs: A System Dynamic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Arief Abdillah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Small medium enterprises (SMEs play a big role for GDP in Indonesia. In 2012, SMEs made contribution 59,08 % for GDP Indonesia. The amount of SMEs in Indonesia is 99,99 % from total company in Indonesia. From that data, we know that SMEs is very big market in Indonesia. However, despite many big contributions that SMEs gave, SMEs also have challenges for themselves. The limitation of capital is one of challenges that SMEs have to face. The limit of capital make SMEs spend their capital wisely. They have to think very carefully how to expand their business. Is it profitable or not. In this paper we want to understand about the phenomenon why SMEs are hard to implement information and system technology. We used observation and secondary data to construct the variables. After that, we use the variables to build the model using system dynamics. And then we simulate it to know the impact implementation of information technology to flow business of SMEs. To propose new alternative technology (cloud computing, we modified the variables in the model and simulated it. We compared the result between own information technology and cloud computing. The result shows that cloud computing is suitable to be implemented in SMEs.Keywords : Cloud computing, SME, System Dynamic, Information Technology, Model

  2. Debt Shifting and Thin-Capitalization Rules – German Experience and Alternative Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruf Martin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the general design of thin-capitalization rules and summarizes the economic effects of such rules as identified in theoretical models. We review empirical studies providing evidence on the experience with (German thin-capitalization rules as well as on the adjustment of German multinationals to foreign thin-capitalization rules. Special emphasis is given to the development in Germany, because Germany went a long way in limiting interest deductibility by enacting a drastic change in its thin-capitalization rules in 2008, and because superb German data on multinational finance allows for testing several aspects consistently. We then discuss the experience of the Nordic countries with thin-capitalization rules. Briefly reviewing potential alternatives as well, we believe that the arm’s-length principle is administratively too costly and impracticable, whereas we argue that controlled-foreign-company rules might be another promising avenue for limiting internal debt shifting. Fundamental tax reforms towards a system with either "allowance for corporate equity" (ACE or a "comprehensive business income tax" (CBIT should also eliminate any thin-capitalization incentive.

  3. Studying the effects of genistein on gene expression of fish embryos as an alternative testing approach for endocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Viktoria; Wichmann, Arne; Kriehuber, Ralf; Muth-Köhne, Elke; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Fenske, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of endocrine disruption currently relies on testing strategies involving adult vertebrates. In order to minimize the use of animal tests according to the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement, we propose a transcriptomics and fish embryo based approach as an alternative to identify and analyze an estrogenic activity of environmental chemicals. For this purpose, the suitability of 48 h and 7 days post-fertilization zebrafish and medaka embryos to test for estrogenic disruption was evaluated. The embryos were exposed to the phytoestrogen genistein and subsequently analyzed by microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR. The functional analysis showed that the genes affected related to multiple metabolic and signaling pathways in the early fish embryo, which reflect the known components of genistein's mode of actions, like apoptosis, estrogenic response, hox gene expression and steroid hormone synthesis. Moreover, the transcriptomic data also suggested a thyroidal mode of action and disruption of the nervous system development. The parallel testing of two fish species provided complementary data on the effects of genistein at gene expression level and facilitated the separation of common from species-dependent effects. Overall, the study demonstrated that combining fish embryo testing with transcriptomics can deliver abundant information about the mechanistic effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals, rendering this strategy a promising alternative approach to test for endocrine disruption in a whole organism in-vitro scale system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An alternative approach to determine oral bioavailability of drugs that follow Michaelis-Menten elimination: a case study with voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlindo de Araujo, Bibiana; Farias da Silva, Cristófer; Costa, Teresa Dalla

    2010-01-01

    the determination of oral bioavailability of drugs which follow nonlinear pharmacokinetics is difficult and few methods are available. In this work, an alternative approach to determine oral bioavailability of voriconazole (VRC), used as a model drug, is presented. VRC pharmacokinetics was investigated in Wistar rats after p.o. (40 mg/kg) and i.v. administration (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg). VRC elimination showed saturation in all doses investigated, except the lower i.v. dose in which case a 3-compartment model with linear elimination adequately fitted the data. Data for the 2 higher i.v. doses were best described by a 3-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination. A 1-compartment disposition with a saturable metabolic elimination model described the oral profile. VRC absolute oral bioavailability was determined by simultaneous fitting of the i.v. and oral profiles. the Michaelis constant and the maximum velocity estimated after 5 and 10 mg/kg i.v. dosing were 0.54 +/- 0.25 microg/ml and 2.53 +/- 0.54 microg/h, and 0.62 +/- 0.12 microg/ml and 2.74 +/- 0.84 microg/h, respectively. VRC oral bioavailability was determined to be 82.8%. the approach presented is an alternative for determining the bioavailability of drugs with similar nonlinear behavior. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Laminin Receptor-Avid Nanotherapeutic EGCg-AuNPs as a Potential Alternative Therapeutic Approach to Prevent Restenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menka Khoobchandani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In our efforts to develop new approaches to treat and prevent human vascular diseases, we report herein our results on the proliferation and migration of human smooth muscles cells (SMCs and endothelial cells (ECs using epigallocatechin-3-gallate conjugated gold nanoparticles (EGCg-AuNPs as possible alternatives to drug coated stents. Detailed in vitro stability studies of EGCg-AuNPs in various biological fluids, affinity and selectivity towards SMCs and ECs have been investigated. The EGCg-AuNPs showed selective inhibitory efficacy toward the migration of SMCs. However, the endothelial cells remained unaffected under similar experimental conditions. The cellular internalization studies have indicated that EGCg-AuNPs internalize into the SMCs and ECs within short periods of time through laminin receptor mediated endocytosis mode. Favorable toxicity profiles and selective affinity toward SMCs and ECs suggest that EGCg-AuNPs may provide attractive alternatives to drug coated stents and therefore offer new therapeutic approaches in treating cardiovascular diseases.

  6. An alternative clinical approach to achieve greater anterior than posterior maxillary expansion in cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dauro Douglas; Bartolomeo, Flávia Uchôa Costa; Cardinal, Lucas; Figueiredo, Daniel Santos Fonseca; Palomo, Juan Martin; Andrade, Ildeu

    2014-11-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients commonly present maxillary constriction, particularly in the anterior region. The aim of this case report was to describe an alternative clinical approach that used a smaller Hyrax screw unconventionally positioned to achieve greater anterior than posterior expansion in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. The idea presented here is to take advantage of a reduced dimension screw to position it anteriorly. When only anterior expansion was needed (patient 1), the appliance was soldered to the first premolar bands and associated to a transpalatal arch cemented to the first molars. However, when overall expansion was required (patient 2), the screw was positioned anteriorly, but soldered to the first molar bands. Intercanine, premolar, and first molar widths were measured on dental casts with a digital caliper. Pre-expansion and postexpansion radiographs and tomographies were also evaluated. A significant anterior expansion and no intermolar width increase were registered in the first patient. Although patient 2 also presented a greater anterior than posterior expansion, a noteworthy expansion occurred at the molar region. The alternative approach to expand the maxilla in cleft patients reported here caused greater anterior than posterior expansion when the Mini-Hyrax was associated to a transpalatal arch, and its reduced dimension also minimized discomfort and facilitated hygiene.

  7. SMART Layers: A Simple and Robust Alternative to PML Approaches for Elastodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tago Pacheco, J.; Metivier, L.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-01

    Absorbing boundary conditions are required for elastodynamic simulations in finite domains. The Perfectly Matched Layers (PML) have become the state-of-the-art method since its introduction (Berenger 1994). PML approaches have been proved to be very efficient and easy to implement. However, sometimes numerical instabilities originated in the PML layers can appear, even for isotropic media. For anisotropic media, it has been proven that PML have an amplifying behaviour, i.e. numerical instabilities (Becache et al. 2003). For delaying the appearance of these PML instabilities, different pragmatic approaches has been proposed (Meza-Fajarado & Papageorgiou 2008; Martin et al. 2008; Etienne et al. 2010). Yet, there are no guarantee for long-term stabilities and one can observe less efficient absorptions for these adhoc approaches. Recently, a new method, called SMART-layer method, has been proposed and has been shown theoretically to be stable even for anisotropic media (Halpern et al. 2011; Metivier et al. 2013). The SMART-layer method is a robust and simple to design method. However boundary conditions are not perfectly matched even for the continuous case for the SMART-layer method while it is for the PML method. Therefore, stronger reflections are observed at the interface between the domain of interest and the absorbing layers.. We implement this absorbing boundary conditions for the elastodynamics equations in a discontinuous Galerkin scheme and we will show that this numerical implementation does not exhibit numerical instabilities when using different mesh designs while the PML method does for the same simulation of wave propagation in isotropic medium. We finally show how SMART-layer method is competitive with respect to the PML method in terms of efficiency and computational cost, opening roads for systematic implementation of such absorbing boundary conditions in available seismic wave propagation tools.

  8. An Alternative and Validated Injection Method for Accessing the Subretinal Space via a Transcleral Posterior Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sachin; Le, Andrew; Davenport, Julian; Gorin, Michael B; Nusinowitz, Steven; Matynia, Anna

    2016-12-07

    Subretinal injections have been successfully used in both humans and rodents to deliver therapeutic interventions of proteins, viral agents, and cells to the interphotoreceptor/subretinal compartment that has direct exposure to photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Subretinal injections of plasminogen as well as recent preclinical and clinical trials have demonstrated safety and/or efficacy of delivering viral vectors and stem cells to individuals with advanced retinal disease. Mouse models of retinal disease, particularly hereditary retinal dystrophies, are essential for testing these therapies. The most common injection procedure in rodents is to use small transcorneal or transcleral incisions with an anterior approach to the retina. With this approach, the injection needle penetrates the neurosensory retina disrupting the underlying RPE and on insertion can easily nick the lens, causing lens opacification and impairment of noninvasive imaging. Accessing the subretinal space via a transcleral, posterior approach avoids these problems: the needle crosses the sclera approximately 0.5 mm from the optic nerve, without retinal penetration and avoids disrupting the vitreous. Collateral damage is limited to that associated with the focal sclerotomy and the effects of a transient, serous retinal detachment. The simplicity of the method minimizes ocular injury, ensures rapid retinal reattachment and recovery, and has a low failure rate. The minimal damage to the retina and RPE allows for clear assessment of the efficacy and direct effects of the therapeutic agents themselves. This manuscript describes a novel subretinal injection technique that can be used to target viral vectors, pharmacological agents, stem cells or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to the subretinal space in mice with high efficacy, minimal damage, and fast recovery.

  9. Orotracheal Intubation Using the Retromolar Space: A Reliable Alternative Intubation Approach to Prevent Dental Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh T. Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in airway management, perianesthetic dental injury remains one of the most common anesthesia-related adverse events and cause for malpractice litigation against anesthesia providers. Recommended precautions for prevention of dental damage may not always be effective because these techniques involve contact and pressure exerted on vulnerable teeth. We describe a novel approach using the retromolar space to insert a flexible fiberscope for tracheal tube placement as a reliable method to achieve atraumatic tracheal intubation. Written consent for publication has been obtained from the patient.

  10. Alternative Approach to the Provision of the High-field Dipole for FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)435046

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a possible approach to reducing the complexity and cost of the high field dipole magnets. In addition the cooling of the winding could be improved in the proposed design, with a consequent reduction in the shielding requirements. The correction of multipoles is also addressed: this feature may impact on the dynamic range of operation of the magnets. Noting that it would be possible to add a small gradient component to the dipole, it is suggested that a (partially) combined function lattice should be considered. The proposals lead to a brief re-appraisal of how best to apply superconductivity to magnets for large accelerators.

  11. Splenic artery embolization: An alternative approach in a critically ill patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Durusu Tanrıöver

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of general health status and hematological parameters usually precedes the use of invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in critically ill patients. Angiography can be effective and safe as a substitute for major surgical procedures, or as a bridging therapy in such cases. We present a critically ill patient with hemolytic anemia that underwent splenic artery embolization as a bridging therapy. We aimed to emphasize that minimally invasive approaches and multidisciplinary care can be utilized in the treatment of critically ill patients with accompanying hematological disease.

  12. Monogamy versus Consensual Non-Monogamy: Alternative Approaches to Pursuing a Strategically Pluralistic Mating Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilski, Justin K; Memering, Stacy L; Welling, Lisa L M; Shackelford, Todd K

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the frequency of partner-directed mate retention behaviors and several self- and partner-rated romantic relationship evaluations (i.e., sociosexuality, relationship satisfaction, mate value, and partner ideal measures) within monogamous and consensually non-monogamous (CNM) relationships. Measures were compared (1) between monogamous and CNM participants and (2) between two concurrent partners within each CNM relationship (i.e., primary and secondary partners). We found that individuals in currently monogamous relationships (n = 123) performed more mate retention behaviors compared to those currently in CNM relationships (n = 76). Within CNM relationships, participants reported engaging in more mate retention behaviors with primary partners compared to secondary partners. Likewise, CNM participants reported talking about their extra-dyadic sexual experiences and downplaying these sexual experiences more often with their primary partner compared to their secondary partner. There were no significant differences between ratings of monogamous and primary partners in participants' overall relationship satisfaction. However, monogamous participants reported less satisfaction with the amount of communication and openness they had with their partner compared to CNM participants' reports of their primary partner, but not secondary partner. By comparison, CNM participants reported higher overall relationship satisfaction with primary compared to secondary partners and considered their primary partner to be more desirable as a long-term mate than their secondary partner. We interpret these results within the context of previous research on monogamous and CNM relationships and hypothesize that these relationship configurations are alternative strategies for pursuing a strategically pluralistic mating strategy.

  13. An alternative medical approach for the neuroprotective therapy to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroyama, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the core symptoms such as bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity and postural instability. Currently, pharmacotherapy and surgical approaches for the treatments of PD can only improve the neurological symptoms. Therefore, to search neuroprotective therapies using pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches could be important to delay the progression of pathogenesis in PD. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a component of the electron transport chain as well as an important antioxidant in mitochondrial and lipid membranes. The central role of CoQ10 in two areas implicated in the pathogenesis of PD, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damages, suggest that it may be useful for treatment to slow the progression of PD. The neuroprotective effect of CoQ10 has been reported in several in vivo and in vitro models of neurodegenerative disorders. Although CoQ10 attenuated the toxin-induced reduction of dopamine content and tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the striatum of the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model, it is still unknown how this nutrition affects the mitochondrial function. We demonstrated that oral administration of CoQ10 significantly attenuated the loss of dopaminergic nerve terminals induced by MPTP treatment. Furthermore, our experimental data indicate that an inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release is one of the primary targets for CoQ10 and may lead to a potent neuroprotection.

  14. Hotspots identification and ranking for road safety improvement: an alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Bronagh; Moutari, Salissou; Marshall, Adele H

    2013-10-01

    During the last decade, the concept of composite performance index, brought from economic and business statistics, has become a popular practice in the field of road safety, namely for the identification and classification of worst performing areas or time slots also known as hotspots. The overall quality of a composite index depends upon the complexity of phenomena of interest as well as the relevance of the methodological approach used to aggregate the various indicators into a single composite index. However, current aggregation methods used to estimate the composite road safety performance index suffer from various deficiencies at both the theoretical and operational level; these include the correlation and compensability between indicators, the weighting of the indicators as well as their high "degree of freedom" which enables one to readily manipulate them to produce desired outcomes (Munda and Nardo, 2003, 2005, 2009). The objective of this study is to contribute to the ongoing research effort on the estimation of road safety composite index for hotspots' identification and ranking. The aggregation method for constructing the composite road safety performance index introduced in this paper, strives to minimize the aforementioned deficiencies of the current approaches. Furthermore, this new method can be viewed as an intelligent decision support system for road safety performance evaluation, in order to prioritize interventions for road safety improvement.

  15. An alternative approach to the growth of single crystal gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, Neville

    1993-06-01

    This project has been primarily concerned with investigating a new approach to the synthesis of epitaxial layers of high purity gallium nitride. The new approach involves the use of hydrazoic acid, HN3, a previously untried precursor as the source of active nitrogen. A new, all-stainless steel apparatus which is UHV compatible, has been constructed. It has been designed to allow growth studies to be made by the chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) technique or by low pressure metal organic vapour phase deposition (LPMOCVD) at pressures up to ca. 1 mbar. During the grant period, the apparatus has been constructed, tested, and modified. Experiments have been carried out which show that gallium nitride and aluminium nitride can be made from the reaction of hydrazoic acid with trimethyl gallium and trimethyl aluminium respectively, at a hot substrate surface. In-situ RHEED patterns and ex-situ Auger spectra and x-ray diffraction data have been obtained. Systematic studies aimed at producing high quality single crystal films have been made. The results are promising and uniform, golden yellow films of gallium nitride can now be produced. RHEED data show that the films are composed of highly orientated crystals. The x-ray results support this, with crystal sizes being at least 1000 A with the crystals strongly orientated along the c-axis.

  16. Alternative theoretical and methodological approaches for exploring higher education in Art and Crafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Sørebø Gulliksen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and discusses approaches for exploring higher education in Art and Crafts. The concepts exploring versus research and the different foci in an insider perspective versus an outsider perspective introduces the theme. An insider perspective is said to be a useful starting point for inquiry, referring to Frayling’s trichotomy research into, research on and research through from 1993. The field of higher education in Art and Crafts education is shortly presented as comprising two main areas of knowledge: knowledge of education, and knowledge about the different subject areas within Art and Crafts. Both theory and practice are a part of these areas of knowledge. As higher education in Art and Crafts is a making profession, the most prominent challenge when exploring this today is thus said to be to develop research based knowledge on Education in Art and Crafts as a making discipline.  Two keywords are deemed to be useful in approaching this theme: Mode 2 knowledge production and transdisciplinarity. The article concludes with describing specific ways of doing this today from within the context of application. Two examples of large research projects in Scandinavia are presented as examples of such projects.

  17. Hybrid approaches to clinical trial monitoring: Practical alternatives to 100% source data verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For years, a vast majority of clinical trial industry has followed the tenet of 100% source data verification (SDV. This has been driven partly by the overcautious approach to linking quality of data to the extent of monitoring and SDV and partly by being on the safer side of regulations. The regulations however, do not state any upper or lower limits of SDV. What it expects from researchers and the sponsors is methodologies which ensure data quality. How the industry does it is open to innovation and application of statistical methods, targeted and remote monitoring, real time reporting, adaptive monitoring schedules, etc. In short, hybrid approaches to monitoring. Coupled with concepts of optimum monitoring and SDV at site and off-site monitoring techniques, it should be possible to save time required to conduct SDV leading to more available time for other productive activities. Organizations stand to gain directly or indirectly from such savings, whether by diverting the funds back to the R&D pipeline; investing more in technology infrastructure to support large trials; or simply increasing sample size of trials. Whether it also affects the work-life balance of monitors who may then need to travel with a less hectic schedule for the same level of quality and productivity can be predicted only when there is more evidence from field.

  18. Alternative Diffuse Lighting and Specular Reflection Approach Using YIQ Color Space for 3D Scene Visualization Using Programmable HLSL Shaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kotsarenko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work an alternative approach for diffuse lighting and specular reflections is presented that uses YIQ color spaceinstead of traditional RGB color space. The classical illumination algorithms that rely on RGB color space may lead tounrealistic results either due to the fact that they cannot make the original color brighter (inherent limitation imposedby using the RGB color space or produce incorrect shades when viewed from certain angles because in thecalculation of the specular reflection the original texture color is not taken into account.The approach proposed in this work gets around the problem by applying illumination in YIQ color space using its“luma” component (Y. In this novel approach the diffuse lighting is capable of increasing the perceived brightness ofthe source texture and the resulting color is always dependant on the surface’s texture and produces reasonablyrealistic results when viewed from any possible angle. The algorithm and its HLSL shader code are described in thiswork along with the experiments that illustrate the problem and the solution. The performance benchmarks are alsoprovided, showing that the proposed approach is a viable and realistic solution for applications running in real-time.

  19. Action Research for Curriculum Development: An Alternative Approach in the Algerian Centralised Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas GHERZOULI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Literature in the field of curriculum is debating the extent to which teachers should or could participate in the developmental process of the curriculum they enact. Being the practitioners, teachers are the ones who transmit theory into practice. However, they are not only consumers of curriculum knowledge, but also significant producers of it. Thus, teachers’ active participation as primary stakeholders in the curriculum development process is a necessity. The paper outlines one approach for teacher participation in curriculum development, which is action research. The main aim of this paper is twofold; first: it explores literature about ‘curriculum’, ‘curriculum development’ and ‘action research’; and second, it emphasizes the prominence of teachers’ involvement and research in curriculum development, paying specific attention to the Algerian secondary school educational reform, which is highly controlled and centralised.

  20. An alternative approach to assessing feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfimov Valeriy Ivanovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective parameters on feasibility of sediment flushing through reservoirs include hydrological, hydraulic, and topographic properties of the reservoirs. In this study, the performances of the Decision tree forest (DTF and Group method of data handling (GMDH for assessing feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs, were investigated. In this way, Decision tree Forest, that combines multiple Decision tree, used to evaluate the relative importance of factors affecting flushing sediment. At the second step, GMDH deployed to predict the feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs. Results indicate that these models, as an efficient novel approach with an acceptable range of error, can be used successfully for assessing feasibility of flushing sediment from reservoirs.

  1. Permeability estimation for heavy oil reservoir: an alternative approach to avoid misleading tendencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L. [PDVSA (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    In oil production, characterization of the reservoir has to be undertaken in order to optimize the hydrocarbon production rate. Permeability is one of the most important parameters of a reservoir but estimation is difficult in heavy oil reservoirs and requires the use of multiple techniques. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the results of implementing a multi-scale permeability estimation method. Scale support effect and the physics of the measurements were looked into through a study which was conducted in Venezuela on two of PDVSA's fields, the Cerro Negro Field and the Morichal Field. Results showed that the proposed methodology captured efficiently the influence of parameters on permeability production and was successful in removing the local bias from the permeability data. The multi scale permeability estimation methodology was shown to address the issues encountered with a unique approach and to provide excellent results.

  2. Alternative to consensus scoring--a new approach toward the qualitative combination of docking algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Antje; Zimmermann, Marc; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Since the development of the first docking algorithm in the early 1980s a variety of different docking approaches and tools has been created in order to solve the docking problem. Subsequent studies have shown that the docking performance of most tools strongly depends on the considered target. Thus it is hard to choose the best algorithm in the situation at hand. The docking tools FlexX and AutoDock are among the most popular programs for docking flexible ligands into target proteins. Their analysis, comparison, and combination are the topics of this study. In contrast to standard consensus scoring techniques which integrate different scoring algorithms usually only by their rank, we focus on a more general approach. Our new combined docking workflow-AutoxX-unifies the interaction models of AutoDock and FlexX rather than combining the scores afterward which allows interpretability of the results. The performance of FlexX, AutoDock, and the combined algorithm AutoxX was evaluated on the basis of a test set of 204 structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AutoDock and FlexX show a highly diverse redocking accuracy at the different complexes which assures again the usefulness of taking several docking algorithms into account. With the combined docking the number of complexes reproduced below an rmsd of 2.5 A could be raised by 10. AutoxX had a strong positive effect on several targets. The highest performance increase could be found when redocking 20 protein-ligand complexes of alpha-thrombin, plasmepsin, neuraminidase, and d-xylose isomerase. A decrease was found for gamma-chymotrypsin. The results show that--applied to the right target-AutoxX can improve the docking performance compared to AutoDock and FlexX alone.

  3. An alternative management approach to paranasal sinus fibro-osseous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Eng H; Glicksman, Jordan T; Vescan, Allan D; Witterick, Ian J

    2011-01-01

    Fibro-osseous lesions of the paranasal sinuses are an uncommon heterogeneous group of lesions with variable clinical presentation. It is unclear whether these lesions directly cause symptoms or secondarily obstruct the sinuses with resultant rhinosinusitis. We have used an expectant management approach in selected patients that includes observation with serial scans or endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) to improve the outflow tract of the affected sinus without resection of the lesion. The purpose of this work is to review our experience with management of paranasal sinus fibro-osseous lesions. Retrospective chart review from 1997 to 2009. A total of 44 patients were identified in this study. There were 19 (43%) osteoma and 25 (57%) fibrous dysplasia cases. The presenting symptoms were mainly sinonasal with headaches (36%), pain/pressure (19%), and nasal obstruction (17%). Two patients (4.5%) presented with proptosis and diplopia. Five (11%) patients had associated nasal polyps. The diagnosis was an incidental finding in seventeen (38%) cases. Twenty-two (50%) patients were managed conservatively with serial computed tomography (CT) scans to monitor for interval growth over a mean interval of 41.8 months (range, 13-130 months). There were 2 patients in the observation group with CT scan evidence of interval growth with an increase in size of 1 mm and 9 mm over 130 and 36 months, respectively. Twelve symptomatic patients (27%) underwent ESS without resection of the lesion, with symptomatic improvement in 11 patients (92%). Four patients (9%) underwent endoscopic biopsy to attain histological diagnosis. Six (13%) patients in this study had resection of their lesion with 5 of the patients having symptomatic improvement following resection. In patients with fibro-osseous lesions, we support an expectant management approach of asymptomatic patients with observation and serial imaging, treating selected symptomatic patients with ESS and resection of the lesion in patients

  4. Total endoscopic and anal irrigation management approach to noncompliant neuropathic bladder in children: a good alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Khalid F

    2010-07-01

    We prospectively evaluated the efficacy and durability of combined intradetrusor botulinum-A toxin and endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux with anal irrigation as a total endoscopic and anal irrigation management approach. This minimally invasive protocol is used to manage myelomeningocele and noncompliant bladder in children who do not respond to standard conservative therapy and have urine and stool incontinence. Ten females and 3 males with a mean +/- SD age of 5.3 +/- 2.5 years with myelomeningocele and vesicoureteral reflux who did not respond to standard conservative treatment were prospectively included in this study. All had at least 1 year of followup. All patients received a cystoscopic intradetrusor injection of 12 U/kg (maximum 300 U) botulinum-A toxin into an infection-free bladder. Vesicoureteral reflux in a total of 20 refluxing ureters, including bilateral vesicoureteral reflux in 7 patients, showed no resolution on pretreatment voiding cystourethrogram. Thus, we administered a submucosal Deflux injection. Since most patients were still diaper dependent due to stool incontinence, we extended management to include complete bowel rehabilitation with the new Peristeen anal irrigation system to manage stool incontinence. Mean maximum bladder capacity increased significantly from 75 +/- 35 to 150 +/- 45 ml after 1 month (p management approach is a comprehensive, minimally invasive, safe, simple, effective way to achieve most goals when treating these patients by protecting the upper tract, maintaining the bladder at safe pressure and providing a satisfactory social life with satisfactory urine and stool continence. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. New opportunities and proven approaches in complementary and alternative medicine research at the National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlan, W R

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes some of the issues that arise when applying the clinical-trial approach of conventional medicine to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. Conventional medicine has been making the evolution to using an evidence base and to making recommendations only when the evidence is strong. The National Center for Complementary Medicine (NCCAM), one of twenty-five Institutes or Centers of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is working to hold CAM to the same high standards, not by rejecting previous CAM research, but by building on that strong evidence base of what works and what is safe. The process for conventional drug and device development follows an orderly process of preclinical studies (usually on animals), phase I, phase II, and phase III studies (with the large human clinical trial phase taking place in phase III). Today, the randomized controlled trial is recognized as providing the highest level of scientific evidence. This conventional medicine approach to development is now being used to develop complementary and alternative therapies. For instance, the discovery and development of Taxol (Bristol-Meyers Squibb, New York, NY), an extract from the bark of the Pacific yew tree that is now a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, followed the conventional pathway to approval and marketing. But for most CAM products, the pathway is not so straightforward. Most CAM therapies are traditional therapies or new products that are already available to the public. Most of what is known about these therapies is of an anecdotal nature. There has been little isolation of the active principals from the crude product and there has usually been no preclinical testing. This presentation details various approaches and programs that address how to plan and conduct a rigorous clinical trial of a CAM product. And, while it takes a good deal of persistence and a strong focus on what are the critical principals in a trial, I conclude that

  6. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Federal facilities that are also Superfund sites, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Federal facilities are properties owned by the federal government. This data layer provides access to Federal facilities that are Superfund sites as part of the CIMC...

  7. Letter to Silverton and San Juan County Regarding Potential Superfund Listing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feb. 12, 2016 Update: EPA added a letter to the Town of Silverton and San Juan County regarding the agency’s commitment to the Town and County’s involvement during a potential Superfund listing process.

  8. Grain Handling Facility at Freeman, Washington Proposed to Superfund Cleanup List

    Science.gov (United States)

    (March 24, 2015 - Seattle) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to add the Grain Handling Facility at Freeman, in Spokane County, Washington, to the Superfund National Priorities List. The proposed listing includes a 60-day public comment

  9. Preliminary estimate of natural resource damage : Rocky Mountain Arsenal Superfund Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a preliminary estimate of natural resource damages associated with uncontrolled release of hazardous materials at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Superfund Site...

  10. Remediation System Evaluation, Streamlined Remediation System Evaluation (RSE-Lite), Circuitron Corporation Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Circuitron Corporation Superfund Site is located at 82 Milbar Boulevard, East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, New York. The site is situated on a 1-acre lot in an industrial/commercial area that is surrounded by similar small manufacturers...

  11. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Superfund Sites, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Superfund Sites as part of the CIMC web service. EPA works with DoD to facilitate the reuse...

  12. EPA, 12 Private Entities Agree to Remove Contamination and Conduct Study at Metro Container Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    PHILADELPHIA (October 21, 2015) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and 12 private entities have agreed to settle on actions that will lead to increased environmental protection at the Metro Container Superfund Site in Trainer, Delaware Co.,

  13. Report: EPA’s Distribution of Superfund Human Resources Does Not Support Current Regional Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #17-P-0397, September 19, 2017. Due to insufficient human resources to cover all Superfund site work, some regions have had to slow down or discontinue their efforts to protect human health and the environment.

  14. Microbial Diversity and Metal Speciation Changes in Mine Tailings Following Compost-Assisted Direct Planting: A Four-Year Superfund Site Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, R. M.; Gil-Loaiza, J.; Honeker, L. K.; Hottenstein, J. D.; Valentin-Vargas, A.; Jennings, L. L.; Hammond, C.; Neilson, J. W.; Root, R. A.; Chorover, J.

    2015-12-01

    EPA estimates that future mine tailings remediation costs will exceed US $50 billion using present technologies based on constructing an inert or biological cap on the tailings. Both approaches require large amounts of capping materials that can be difficult and expensive to obtain especially for sites several thousand hectares in size. An alternative technology is direct planting into tailings. However, direct planting alone is not feasible for many legacy sites due to extreme acidity and high metal content which prevent plant germination and growth. Therefore the process must be "assisted" through the addition of amendments such as compost. Here we present results from the first four years of a field study at the Iron King Mine and Humboldt Smelter Superfund site demonstrating the feasibility of compost-assisted direct planting. Parameters measured during the field study included: canopy cover, pH, nutrient content, plant metal uptake, metal(loid) speciation, mineral analysis, microbiome analysis, and plant root-metal-microbe interactions. Integrated analysis of these parameters suggests that even in this "worst-case scenario" mine tailings site (pH 2.5; As and Pb each exceeding 2 g kg-1), we have created a sustainable system. In this system, phyto-catalyzed stabilization of inorganic contaminants in the root zone is driven by plant root exudates and the associated rhizosphere microbial community. The results of this research will be put into context of a larger topic- that of ecological engineering of mine tailings sites - a technique being proposed to prevent creation of acidic conditions and metal(loid) mobilization in the first place.

  15. Truncated conformal space approach in d dimensions a Cheap Alternative to the Lattice?

    CERN Document Server

    Hogervorst, Matthijs; van Rees, Balt C

    2015-01-01

    We show how to perform accurate, nonperturbative and controlled calculations in quantum field theory in d dimensions. We use the Truncated Conformal Space Approach (TCSA), a Hamiltonian method which exploits the conformal structure of the UV fixed point. The theory is regulated in the IR by putting it on a sphere of a large finite radius. The QFT Hamiltonian is expressed as a matrix in the Hilbert space of CFT states. After restricting ourselves to energies below a certain UV cutoff, an approximation to the spectrum is obtained by numerical diagonalization of the resulting finite-dimensional matrix. The cutoff dependence of the results can be computed and efficiently reduced via a renormalization procedure. We work out the details of the method for the phi^4 theory in d dimensions with d not necessarily integer. A numerical analysis is then performed for the specific case d = 2.5, a value chosen in the range where UV divergences are absent. By going from weak to intermediate to strong coupling, we are able to...

  16. Education and microfinance: an alternative approach to the empowerment of the poor people in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Rizali; Wahyudin, Uyu; Ardiwinata, Jajat S; Abdu, Wamaungo Juma

    2015-01-01

    There is good reason to combine education with microcredit for poverty alleviation in the poor communities of the developing world, including in Indonesia. Poverty is dangerous, it deprives people of their right to education, their right to good health, their right to freedom of speech, their right to democracy, their right to financial services and of course their right to knowledge enhancement, which are all crucial to living a better life. We must therefore, provide services beyond, credits for the poor. In this case, education should be included to each and every development agenda for the poor since it is key to any positive change and sustainable development of people. If well planned and well integrated within the microcredit services, education can serve a good purpose in poverty alleviation. This paper describes how education and microfinance have been used in combination to alleviate poverty in Indonesia, especially in the areas studied. The study uses a multi-cases approach to examine the purposively selected baitul maal tamwil (BMTs) organisations, which are sharia based semiformal microfinance institutions regarded to be among those few integrating education with their financial services.

  17. Alternatives to relational database: comparison of NoSQL and XML approaches for clinical data storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ken Ka-Yin; Tang, Wai-Choi; Choi, Kup-Sze

    2013-04-01

    Clinical data are dynamic in nature, often arranged hierarchically and stored as free text and numbers. Effective management of clinical data and the transformation of the data into structured format for data analysis are therefore challenging issues in electronic health records development. Despite the popularity of relational databases, the scalability of the NoSQL database model and the document-centric data structure of XML databases appear to be promising features for effective clinical data management. In this paper, three database approaches--NoSQL, XML-enabled and native XML--are investigated to evaluate their suitability for structured clinical data. The database query performance is reported, together with our experience in the databases development. The results show that NoSQL database is the best choice for query speed, whereas XML databases are advantageous in terms of scalability, flexibility and extensibility, which are essential to cope with the characteristics of clinical data. While NoSQL and XML technologies are relatively new compared to the conventional relational database, both of them demonstrate potential to become a key database technology for clinical data management as the technology further advances.

  18. Modeling noise-induced resonance in an excitable system: an alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurujjaman, Md

    2010-03-01

    Recently, it has been observed [Md. Nurujjaman, Phy. Rev. E 80, 015201(R) (2009)] that in an excitable system, one can maintain noise-induced coherency in the coherence resonance by blocking the destructive effect of the noise on the system at higher noise level. This phenomenon of constant coherence resonance (CCR) cannot be explained by the existing way of simulation of the model equations of an excitable system with added noise. In this paper, we have proposed a general model which explains the noise-induced resonance phenomenon CCR as well as coherence resonance (CR) and stochastic resonance (SR). The simulation has been carried out considering the basic mechanism of noise-induced resonance phenomena: noise only perturbs the system control parameter to excite coherent oscillations, taking proper precautions so that the destructive effect of noise does not affect the system. In this approach, the CR has been obtained from the interference between the system output and noise and the SR has been obtained by adding noise and a subthreshold signal. This also explains the observation of the frequency shift of coherent oscillations in the CCR with noise level.

  19. An alternative approach to analyze Ipsative data. Revisiting Experiential Learning Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Manuel eBatista-Foguet

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ritualistic use of statistical models regardless of the type of data actually available is a common practice across disciplines. Statistical models involve a series of assumptions whose existence is often neglected altogether, thus making the mentioned common practice even more pervasive. This paper illustrates the consequences of this ritualistic practice within Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory (ELT operationalized through its Learning Style Inventory (KLSI. We show how using a well-known methodology in other disciplines -compositional data analysis (CODA- KLSI data can be properly analyzed. In addition, a third dimension of the KLSI is unveiled providing room for future research. This third dimension describes an individual’s relative preference for learning by prehension rather than by transformation. Using a sample of European MBA students, we relate this dimension with another self-assessment instrument, the Philosophical Orientation Questionnaire (POQ, and with an observer-assessed instrument, the Emotional and Social Inventory (ESCI-U. Both show plausible statistical relationships. An intellectual operating philosophy is linked to a preference for prehension, whereas a pragmatic operating philosophy is linked to transformation. Self-management and social awareness competencies are linked to a learning preference for transforming knowledge, whereas relationship management and cognitive competencies are more related to approaching learning by prehension.

  20. The effects of antibiotics on the microbiome throughout development and alternative approaches for therapeutic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Amy; Crook, Nathan; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-04-13

    The widespread use of antibiotics in the past 80 years has saved millions of human lives, facilitated technological progress and killed incalculable numbers of microbes, both pathogenic and commensal. Human-associated microbes perform an array of important functions, and we are now just beginning to understand the ways in which antibiotics have reshaped their ecology and the functional consequences of these changes. Mounting evidence shows that antibiotics influence the function of the immune system, our ability to resist infection, and our capacity for processing food. Therefore, it is now more important than ever to revisit how we use antibiotics. This review summarizes current research on the short-term and long-term consequences of antibiotic use on the human microbiome, from early life to adulthood, and its effect on diseases such as malnutrition, obesity, diabetes, and Clostridium difficile infection. Motivated by the consequences of inappropriate antibiotic use, we explore recent progress in the development of antivirulence approaches for resisting infection while minimizing resistance to therapy. We close the article by discussing probiotics and fecal microbiota transplants, which promise to restore the microbiota after damage of the microbiome. Together, the results of studies in this field emphasize the importance of developing a mechanistic understanding of gut ecology to enable the development of new therapeutic strategies and to rationally limit the use of antibiotic compounds.

  1. An alternative approach for choice models in transportation: Use of possibility theory for comparison of utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell’orco Mauro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of human choice mechanism has been a topic of intense discussion in the transportation community for many years. The framework of modeling has been rooted in probability theory in which the analyst’s uncertainty about the integrity of the model is expressed in probability. In most choice situations, the decision-maker (traveler also experiences uncertainty because of the lack of complete information on the choices. In the traditional modeling framework, the uncertainty of the analyst and that of the decision-maker are both embedded in the same random term and not clearly separated. While the analyst's uncertainty may be represented by probability due to the statistical nature of events, that of the decision maker, however, is not always subjected to randomness; rather, it is the perceptive uncertainty. This paper proposes a modeling framework that attempts to account for the decision maker’s uncertainty by possibility theory and then the analyst's uncertainty by probability theory. The possibility to probability transformation is performed using the principle of uncertainty invariance. The proposed approach accounts for the quality of information on the changes in choice probability. The paper discusses the thought process, mathematics of possibility theory and probability transformation, and examples.

  2. Bioacoustics of human whistled languages: an alternative approach to the cognitive processes of language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Julien

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Whistled languages are a valuable heritage of human culture. This paper gives a first survey about a new multidisciplinary approach to these languages. Previous studies on whistled equivalents of languages have already documented that they can provide significant information about the role of rhythm and melody in language. To substantiate this, most whistles are represented by modulations of frequency, centered around 2000 Hz (±1000 Hz and often reach a loudness of about 130 dB (measured at 1m from the source. Their transmission range can reach up to 10 km (as verified in La Gomera, Canary Island, and the messages can remain understandable, even if the signal is deteriorated. In some cultures the use of whistled language is associated with some "talking musical instruments" (e.g. flutes, guitars, harps, gongs, drums, khens. Finally, whistles as a means of conveying information have some analogues in the animal kingdom (e.g. some birds, cetaceans, primates, providing opportunities to compare the acoustic characteristics of the respective signals. With such properties as a reference, the project reported here has two major tasks: to further elucidate the many facets of whistled language and, above all, help to immediately stop the process of its gradual disappearance.

  3. Bioacoustics of human whistled languages: an alternative approach to the cognitive processes of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Julien

    2004-06-01

    Whistled languages are a valuable heritage of human culture. This paper gives a first survey about a new multidisciplinary approach to these languages. Previous studies on whistled equivalents of languages have already documented that they can provide significant information about the role of rhythm and melody in language. To substantiate this, most whistles are represented by modulations of frequency, centered around 2000 Hz (+/- 1000 Hz) and often reach a loudness of about 130 dB (measured at 1m from the source). Their transmission range can reach up to 10 km (as verified in La Gomera, Canary Island), and the messages can remain understandable, even if the signal is deteriorated. In some cultures the use of whistled language is associated with some "talking musical instruments" (e.g. flutes, guitars, harps, gongs, drums, khens). Finally, whistles as a means of conveying information have some analogues in the animal kingdom (e.g. some birds, cetaceans, primates), providing opportunities to compare the acoustic characteristics of the respective signals. With such properties as a reference, the project reported here has two major tasks: to further elucidate the many facets of whistled language and, above all, help to immediately stop the process of its gradual disappearance.

  4. Management strategies to curb rhino poaching: Alternative options using a cost benefit approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam M. Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The combination of increasing demand and high black market prices for rhino horn in Asian markets has fueled an escalation in rhino poaching since 2007, particularly in South Africa. This situation has in turn resulted in greatly increased rhino protection costs, loss in confidence by the private sector in rhinos, loss of revenue to conservation authorities and reduced rhino population growth rates. Within current CITES processes, management responses to threats posed by poaching to rhino persistence fall within a mixture of reactive responses of increased protection and law enforcement and some pro-active responses such as demand reduction tactics, along with a parallel call for opening a legal trade in horn. These rhino management strategies carry different risks and benefits in meeting several conservation objectives. An expert-based risk-benefit analysis of five different rhino management strategies was undertaken to assess their potential for delivering upon agreed rhino conservation objectives. The outcomes indicated that benefits may exceed risks for those strategies that in some or other format legally provided horn for meeting demand. Expert risk-benefit approaches are suggested to offer a rational, inclusive and consensus generating means of addressing complex issues such as rhino poaching and augmenting the information used within the CITES decision-making processes.

  5. Art and architecture as experience: an alternative approach to bridging art history and the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Nina

    2012-08-01

    In 1972, Michael Baxandal characterizes the processes responsible for the cultural relativism of art experience as highly complex and unknown in their physiological detail. While art history still shows considerable interest in the brain sciences forty years later, most cross-disciplinary studies today are referring to the neurosciences in an attempt to seek scientific legitimization of variations of a generalized and largely deterministic model of perception, reducing interaction between a work of art and its observers to a set of biological automatisms. I will challenge such an approach and take up art theory's interest in the historico-cultural and situational dimensions of art experience. Looking at two examples of large-scale installation and sculptural post-war American art, I will explore instable perceptions of depth and changing experiences of space that indicate complex interactions between perceptual and higher cognitive processes. The argument will draw on recent theories describing neuronal processes underlying multistable phenomena, eye movement, visual attention and decision-making. As I will show a large number of neuroscientific studies provide theoretical models that help us analyse not the anthropological constants but the influence of cultural, individual and situational variables on aesthetic experience.

  6. Murine fundus fluorescein angiography: An alternative approach using a handheld camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Moshe; Ehrenberg, Scott; Schwob, Ouri; Benny, Ofra

    2016-07-01

    In today's modern pharmacologic approach to treating sight-threatening retinal vascular disorders, there is an increasing demand for a compact, mobile, lightweight and cost-effective fluorescein fundus camera to document the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mice and other experimental animals. We have adapted the use of the Kowa Genesis Df Camera to perform Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) in mice. The 1 kg, 28 cm high camera has built-in barrier and exciter filters to allow digital FFA recording to a Compact Flash memory card. Furthermore, this handheld unit has a steady Indirect Lens Holder that firmly attaches to the main unit, that securely holds a 90 diopter lens in position, in order to facilitate appropriate focus and stability, for photographing the delicate central murine fundus. This easily portable fundus fluorescein camera can effectively record exceptional central retinal vascular detail in murine laser-induced CNV, while readily allowing the investigator to adjust the camera's position according to the variable head and eye movements that can randomly occur while the mouse is optimally anesthetized. This movable image recording device, with efficiencies of space, time, cost, energy and personnel, has enabled us to accurately document the alterations in the central choroidal and retinal vasculature following induction of CNV, implemented by argon-green laser photocoagulation and disruption of Bruch's Membrane, in the experimental murine model of exudative macular degeneration.

  7. From Military to ‘Security Interventions’: An Alternative Approach to Contemporary Interventions

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    Mary Kaldor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In both academic and policy circles international interventions tend to mean ‘military’ interventions and debates tend to focus on whether such interventions are ‘good’ or ‘bad’ in general. This article aims to open up scholarly engagement on the topic of the thorny reality of interventions in different contexts by reconceptualising international interventions as ‘security interventions.’ The article draws attention to the ambiguous meaning of ‘security’ as both an objective (i.e. safety as well as a practice (military forces, police, intelligence agencies and their tactics, something that is reflected in the different approaches to be gleaned from the security studies literature. From this ambiguity, it derives two interlinked concepts: ‘security culture’ and ‘security gap,’ as analytical tools to grasp the complexity of international interventions. The concept of ‘security culture’ captures specific combinations of objectives and practices. The concept of ‘security gap’ captures the particular relationship or the distinct kind of ‘mismatch’ between objectives and practices as it occurs in a ‘security culture.’ This reading of international interventions through the concept of ‘security culture’ and the interlinked analytical tool ‘security gap’ allows an analysis and understanding that goes beyond simplistic assumptions both about traditional military capabilities and the role of the ‘international community’ as a unitary actor.

  8. An Alternative Approach to Analyze Ipsative Data. Revisiting Experiential Learning Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Foguet, Joan M; Ferrer-Rosell, Berta; Serlavós, Ricard; Coenders, Germà; Boyatzis, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    The ritualistic use of statistical models regardless of the type of data actually available is a common practice across disciplines which we dare to call type zero error. Statistical models involve a series of assumptions whose existence is often neglected altogether, this is specially the case with ipsative data. This paper illustrates the consequences of this ritualistic practice within Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory (ELT) operationalized through its Learning Style Inventory (KLSI). We show how using a well-known methodology in other disciplines-compositional data analysis (CODA) and log ratio transformations-KLSI data can be properly analyzed. In addition, the method has theoretical implications: a third dimension of the KLSI is unveiled providing room for future research. This third dimension describes an individual's relative preference for learning by prehension rather than by transformation. Using a sample of international MBA students, we relate this dimension with another self-assessment instrument, the Philosophical Orientation Questionnaire (POQ), and with an observer-assessed instrument, the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI-U). Both show plausible statistical relationships. An intellectual operating philosophy (IOP) is linked to a preference for prehension, whereas a pragmatic operating philosophy (POP) is linked to transformation. Self-management and social awareness competencies are linked to a learning preference for transforming knowledge, whereas relationship management and cognitive competencies are more related to approaching learning by prehension.

  9. Reflection on the possibility of alternative approach to the psychopathology of “functional” disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy W. Aleksandrowicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional short-term disorders provoked by extremely difficult life events – stresses – are entirely different from the chronic or recurrent ones: anxiety or other “neurotic” syndromes, eating, sexual and some other disorders, not being conditioned behavioral dysfunctions. Chronic/ recurrent disorders seems to have they causes in the particular personality traits and deficits. Some of them are revealed, described and could be measured by means of Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON 2006. In this approach, functional disorder is understood as structured systems of the particular nonverbal language (“parole” in which symptoms play a role of words while syndromes the role of sentences, expressing the current state of mind – mainly the need of bond with other people and its frustration. They are messages of looking attention, attachment. The use of such language seems to be the result of personality deficits making difficult or even impossible to fulfil the need of bond in the psychosocial field using common for done culture verbal and nonverbal language, “normal” means of communication. While in the acute and conditioned reactions on stress different forms of helping people (e.g. CBT seems to be adequate, in the chronic and recurrent functional disorders therapy is postulated to aiming rather at transformations of the communication, leading to the exchange of the messages’ language having the quality of disorder for common, mainly verbal one.

  10. Reducing Uncertainty In Ecosystem Structure Inventories From Spaceborne Lidar Using Alternate Spatial Sampling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefsky, M. A.; Ramond, T.; Weimer, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    Current and proposed spaceborne lidar sensors sample the land surface using observations along transects in which consecutive observations in the along-track dimension are either contiguous (e.g. VCL, DESDynI, Livex) or spaced (ICESat). These sampling patterns are inefficient because multiple observations are made of a spatially autocorrelated phenomenon (i.e. vegetation patches) while large areas of the landscape are left un-sampled. This results in higher uncertainty in estimates of average ecosystem structure than would be obtained using either random sampling or sampling in regular grids. We compared three sampling scenarios for spaceborne lidar: five transects spaced every 850 m across-track with contiguous 25m footprints along-track, the same number of footprints distributed randomly, and a hybrid approach that retains the central transect of contiguous 25m footprints and distributes the remainder of the footprints into a grid with 178 m spacing. We used simulated ground tracks at four latitudes for a realistic spaceborne lidar mission and calculated the amount of time required to achieve 150 m spacing between transects and the number of near-coincident observations for each scenario. We used four lidar height datasets collected using the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (La Selva, Costa Rica, Sierra Nevada, California, Duke Forest, North Carolina and Harvard Forest, Massachusetts) to calculate the standard error of estimates of landscape height for each scenario. We found that a hybrid sampling approach reduced the amount of time required to reach a transect spacing of 150 m by a factor of three at all four latitudes, and that the number of near-coincident observations was greater by a factor of five at the equator and at least equal throughout the range of latitudes sampled. The standard error of landscape height was between 2 and 2.5 times smaller using either hybrid or random sampling than using transect sampling. As the pulses generated by a spaceborne

  11. The ChemScreen project to design a pragmatic alternative approach to predict reproductive toxicity of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burg, Bart; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dietrich, Daniel R; Jaworska, Joanna; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Paune, Eduard; Schwarz, Michael; Piersma, Aldert H; Kroese, E Dinant

    2015-08-01

    There is a great need for rapid testing strategies for reproductive toxicity testing, avoiding animal use. The EU Framework program 7 project ChemScreen aimed to fill this gap in a pragmatic manner preferably using validated existing tools and place them in an innovative alternative testing strategy. In our approach we combined knowledge on critical processes affected by reproductive toxicants with knowledge on the mechanistic basis of such effects. We used in silico methods for prescreening chemicals for relevant toxic effects aiming at reduced testing needs. For those chemicals that need testing we have set up an in vitro screening panel that includes mechanistic high throughput methods and lower throughput assays that measure more integrative endpoints. In silico pharmacokinetic modules were developed for rapid exposure predictions via diverse exposure routes. These modules to match in vitro and in vivo exposure levels greatly improved predictivity of the in vitro tests. As a further step, we have generated examples how to predict reproductive toxicity of chemicals using available data. We have executed formal validations of panel constituents and also used more innovative manners to validate the test panel using mechanistic approaches. We are actively engaged in promoting regulatory acceptance of the tools developed as an essential step towards practical application, including case studies for read-across purposes. With this approach, a significant saving in animal use and associated costs seems very feasible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid-state fermentation and composting as alternatives to treat hair waste: A life-cycle assessment comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Eva; Komilis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Antoni

    2017-07-01

    One of the wastes associated with leather production in tannery industries is the hair residue generated during the dehairing process. Hair wastes are mainly dumped or managed through composting but recent studies propose the treatment of hair wastes through solid-state fermentation (SSF) to obtain proteases and compost. These enzymes are suitable for its use in an enzymatic dehairing process, as an alternative to the current chemical dehairing process. In the present work, two different scenarios for the valorization of the hair waste are proposed and assessed by means of life-cycle assessment: composting and SSF for protease production. Detailed data on hair waste composting and on SSF protease production are gathered from previous studies performed by our research group and from a literature survey. Background inventory data are mainly based on Ecoinvent version 3 from software SimaPro® 8. The main aim of this study was to identify which process results in the highest environmental impact. The SSF process was found to have lower environmental impacts than composting, due to the fact that the enzyme use in the dehairing process prevents the use of chemicals traditionally used in the dehairing process. This permits to reformulate an industrial process from the classical approach of waste management to a novel alternative based on circular economy.

  13. Remediation of the Wells G & H Superfund Site, Woburn, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, E Scott; Metheny, Maura A

    2002-01-01

    Remediation of ground water and soil contamination at the Wells G & H Superfund Site, Woburn, Massachusetts, uses technologies that reflect differences in hydrogeologic settings, concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and costs of treatment. The poorly permeable glacial materials that overlie fractured bedrock at the W.R. Grace property necessitate use of closely spaced recovery wells. Contaminated ground water is treated with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet (UV) oxidation. At UniFirst, a deep well completed in fractured bedrock removes contaminated ground water, which is treated by hydrogen peroxide, UV oxidation, and granular activated carbon (GAC). The remediation system at Wildwood integrates air sparging, soil-vapor extraction, and ground water pumping. Air stripping and GAC are used to treat contaminated water; GAC is used to treat contaminated air. New England Plastics (NEP) uses air sparging and soil-vapor extraction to remove VOCs from the unsaturated zone and shallow ground water. Contaminated air and water are treated using separate GAC systems. After nine years of operation at W.R. Grace and UniFirst, 30 and 786 kg, respectively, of VOCs have been removed. In three years of operation, 866 kg of VOCs have been removed at Wildwood. In 15 months of operation, 36 kg of VOCs were removed at NEP. Characterization work continues at the Olympia Nominee Trust, Whitney Barrel, Murphy Waste Oil, and Aberjona Auto Parts properties. Risk assessments are being finalized that address heavy metals in the floodplain sediments along the Aberjona River that are mobilized from the Industri-Plex Superfund Site located a few miles upstream.

  14. Assessing socioeconomic health care utilization inequity in Israel: impact of alternative approaches to morbidity adjustment

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    Balicer Ran D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The ability to accurately detect differential resource use between persons of different socioeconomic status relies on the accuracy of health-needs adjustment measures. This study tests different approaches to morbidity adjustment in explanation of health care utilization inequity. Methods A representative sample was selected of 10 percent (~270,000 adult enrolees of Clalit Health Services, Israel's largest health care organization. The Johns-Hopkins University Adjusted Clinical Groups® were used to assess each person's overall morbidity burden based on one year's (2009 diagnostic information. The odds of above average health care resource use (primary care visits, specialty visits, diagnostic tests, or hospitalizations were tested using multivariate logistic regression models, separately adjusting for levels of health-need using data on age and gender, comorbidity (using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, or morbidity burden (using the Adjusted Clinical Groups. Model fit was assessed using tests of the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve and the Akaike Information Criteria. Results Low socioeconomic status was associated with higher morbidity burden (1.5-fold difference. Adjusting for health needs using age and gender or the Charlson index, persons of low socioeconomic status had greater odds of above average resource use for all types of services examined (primary care and specialist visits, diagnostic tests, or hospitalizations. In contrast, after adjustment for overall morbidity burden (using Adjusted Clinical Groups, low socioeconomic status was no longer associated with greater odds of specialty care or diagnostic tests (OR: 0.95, CI: 0.94-0.99; and OR: 0.91, CI: 0.86-0.96, for specialty visits and diagnostic respectively. Tests of model fit showed that adjustment using the comprehensive morbidity burden measure provided a better fit than age and gender or the Charlson Index. Conclusions Identification of

  15. Environmental cost-benefit analysis of alternative timing strategies in greenhouse gas abatement. A data envelopment analysis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuosmanen, Timo [Economic Research Unit, MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Luutnantintie 13, 00410 Helsinki (Finland); Bijsterbosch, Neil [Environmental Economics and Natural Resources Group, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen (Netherlands); MWH B.V., Rijnsburgstraat 9-11, 1059 AT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dellink, Rob [Environmental Economics and Natural Resources Group, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen (Netherlands); Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-04-15

    Assessing the benefits of climate policies is complicated due to ancillary benefits: abatement of greenhouse gases also reduces local air pollution. The timing of the abatement measures influences both the economic costs and ancillary benefits. This paper conducts efficiency analysis of ten alternative timing strategies, taking into account the ancillary benefits. We apply the approach by Kuosmanen and Kortelainen [Valuing Environmental Factors in Cost-Benefit Analysis Using Data Envelopment Analysis, Ecological Economics 62 (2007), 56-65], which does not require prior valuation of the environmental impacts. The assessment is based on synthetic data from a dynamic applied general equilibrium model calibrated to The Netherlands. Our assessment shows that if one is only interested in GHG abatement at the lowest economic cost, then equal reduction of GHGs over time is preferred. If society is willing to pay a premium for higher ancillary benefits, an early mid-intensive reduction strategy is optimal. (author)

  16. Early impact of alternative thinning approaches on structure diversity and complexity at stand level in two beech forests in Italy

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    Claudia Becagli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stand structure, tree density as well as tree spatial pattern define natural dynamics and competition process. They are therefore parameters used to define any silvicultural management type. This work aims to report first data resulting from a silvicultural experiment in beech forests. The objective of the trial is testing the structure manipulation in terms of diversity and the reduction of inter-tree competition of different thinning approaches. Alternative thinning methods have been applied in two independent experimental sites located in the pre-Alps and Southern Apennines, in Italy. Specific goals were to: (i verify the impact early after thinning implementation on forest structure through a set of diversity and competition metrics resulting from a literature review; (ii the sensitivity of tested indexes to effectively detect thinning manipulation. Main result show the low sensitivity of stand structure indexes and the ability of competition metrics to detect thinning outcome.

  17. A new approach for volume reconstruction in TomoPIV with the alternating direction method of multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, Ioana; Herzet, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    We adapt and import into the TomoPIV scenery a fast algorithm for solving the volume reconstruction problem. Our approach is based on the reformulation of the volume reconstruction task as a constrained optimization problem and the resort to the ‘alternating directions method of multipliers’ (ADMM). The inherent primal-dual algorithm is summarized in this article to solve the optimization problem related to the TomoPIV. In particular, the general formulation of the volume reconstruction problem considered in this paper allows one to: (i) take explicitly into account the level of the noise affecting the data; (ii) account for both the nonnegativity and the sparsity of the solution. Experiments on a numerical TomoPIV benchmark show that the proposed framework is a serious contender for the state-of-the-art.

  18. An alternative to the traveling-wave approach for use in two-port descriptions of acoustic bores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, Eric

    2002-12-01

    For more than a decade, the digital waveguide model for musical instruments has been improved through the simulation of cylindrical and conical bores. But several difficulties remain, such as instabilities due to growing exponentials which appear when two conical bores are connected with decreasing taper. In this paper, an alternative overcoming these difficulties is proposed and can be extended to shapes other than cylinders, cones, and hyperbolic horns. A two-port model with more general state variables than usual traveling waves works efficiently for any shape without discontinuities in cross section. The equations for connecting separate elements at discontinuities make this two-port model appropriate for use in time domain simulation of the physical behavior of the wind instrument and its interactions with the player. The potential of this new approach is illustrated by several detailed examples.

  19. Reaction of Tosylmethyl Isocyanide with N-Heteroaryl Formamidines: an Alternative Approach to the Synthesis of N-Heteroaryl Tosylimidazoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomezgarcia, Omar; Salgadozamora, Hector; Reyesarellano, Aliciam; Camposaldrete, Elena; Peraltacruz, Javier [Departamento Quimica Organica, Colonia (Mexico)

    2013-09-15

    In conclusion, an alternative procedure was developed under mild conditions for the synthesis of 2-(4-tosylimidazo-1-yl)pyridines and pyrimidines by the reaction of TosMIC with the corresponding heteroaryl N,N'-dimethyl form-amidines. This approach does not involve a nucleophilic displacement of a leaving group and constitutes a further application of amidines, in which TosMIC acts as both a nucleophile and an electrophile on the heteroaryl formamidine. This process offers advantages over previously reported procedures. Tosyl methyl isocyanide (TosMIC), a multipurpose commercially available 3-unit synthon introduced by Van Leusen, reacts with a variety of groups to give heterocycles. It is important to emphasize that treatment of TosMIC with various functional groups leads to the formation of the imidazole nucleus, such as is the case with imines, imidoyl chlorides, isothiocyanates, nitrile and ethoxy methylene amino. However, only the latter group yields N-heterocycle imidazoles.

  20. A meta-analysis of red yeast rice: an effective and relatively safe alternative approach for dyslipidemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhua Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore whether red yeast rice is a safe and effective alternative approach for dyslipidemia. METHODS: Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, EBSCO host, Chinese VIP Information (VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, Wanfang Databases were searched for appropriate articles. Randomized trials of RYR (not including Xuezhikang and Zhibituo and placebo as control in patients with dyslipidemia were considered. Two authors read all papers and independently extracted all relevant information. The primary outcomes were serum total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, triglyceride (TG, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. The secondary outcomes were increased levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, creatinine and fasting blood glucose. RESULTS: A total of 13 randomized, placebo-controlled trials containing 804 participants were analyzed. Red yeast rice exhibited significant lowering effects on serum TC [WMD = -0.97 (95% CI: -1.13, -0.80 mmol/L, P<0.001], TG [WMD = -0.23 (95% CI: -0.31, -0.14 mmol/L, P<0.001], and LDL-C [WMD = -0.87 (95% CI: -1.03, -0.71 mmol/L, P<0.001] but no significant increasing effect on HDL-C [WMD = 0.08 (95% CI: -0.02, 0.19 mmol/L, P = 0.11] compared with placebo. No serious side effects were reported in all trials. CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis suggests that red yeast rice is an effective and relatively safe approach for dyslipidemia. However, further long-term, rigorously designed randomized controlled trials are still warranted before red yeast rice could be recommended to patients with dyslipidemia, especially as an alternative to statins.

  1. A meta-analysis of red yeast rice: an effective and relatively safe alternative approach for dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinhua; Jiang, Long; Jia, Zhangrong; Xin, Wei; Yang, Shiwei; Yang, Qiu; Wang, Luya

    2014-01-01

    To explore whether red yeast rice is a safe and effective alternative approach for dyslipidemia. Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, EBSCO host, Chinese VIP Information (VIP), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wanfang Databases were searched for appropriate articles. Randomized trials of RYR (not including Xuezhikang and Zhibituo) and placebo as control in patients with dyslipidemia were considered. Two authors read all papers and independently extracted all relevant information. The primary outcomes were serum total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The secondary outcomes were increased levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, creatinine and fasting blood glucose. A total of 13 randomized, placebo-controlled trials containing 804 participants were analyzed. Red yeast rice exhibited significant lowering effects on serum TC [WMD = -0.97 (95% CI: -1.13, -0.80) mmol/L, P<0.001], TG [WMD = -0.23 (95% CI: -0.31, -0.14) mmol/L, P<0.001], and LDL-C [WMD = -0.87 (95% CI: -1.03, -0.71) mmol/L, P<0.001] but no significant increasing effect on HDL-C [WMD = 0.08 (95% CI: -0.02, 0.19) mmol/L, P = 0.11] compared with placebo. No serious side effects were reported in all trials. The meta-analysis suggests that red yeast rice is an effective and relatively safe approach for dyslipidemia. However, further long-term, rigorously designed randomized controlled trials are still warranted before red yeast rice could be recommended to patients with dyslipidemia, especially as an alternative to statins.

  2. Understanding alternative fluxes/effluxes through comparative metabolic pathway analysis of phylum actinobacteria using a simplified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mansi; Lal, Devi; Saxena, Anjali; Anand, Shailly; Kaur, Jasvinder; Kaur, Jaspreet; Lal, Rup

    2013-12-01

    Actinobacteria are known for their diverse metabolism and physiology. Some are dreadful human pathogens whereas some constitute the natural flora for human gut. Therefore, the understanding of metabolic pathways is a key feature for targeting the pathogenic bacteria without disturbing the symbiotic ones. A big challenge faced today is multiple drug resistance by Mycobacterium and other pathogens that utilize alternative fluxes/effluxes. With the availability of genome sequence, it is now feasible to conduct the comparative in silico analysis. Here we present a simplified approach to compare metabolic pathways so that the species specific enzyme may be traced and engineered for future therapeutics. The analyses of four key carbohydrate metabolic pathways, i.e., glycolysis, pyruvate metabolism, tri carboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway suggest the presence of alternative fluxes. It was found that the upper pathway of glycolysis was highly variable in the actinobacterial genomes whereas lower glycolytic pathway was highly conserved. Likewise, pentose phosphate pathway was well conserved in contradiction to TCA cycle, which was found to be incomplete in majority of actinobacteria. The clustering based on presence and absence of genes of these metabolic pathways clearly revealed that members of different genera shared identical pathways and, therefore, provided an easy method to identify the metabolic similarities/differences between pathogenic and symbiotic organisms. The analyses could identify isoenzymes and some key enzymes that were found to be missing in some pathogenic actinobacteria. The present work defines a simple approach to explore the effluxes in four metabolic pathways within the phylum actinobacteria. The analysis clearly reflects that actinobacteria exhibit diverse routes for metabolizing substrates. The pathway comparison can help in finding the enzymes that can be used as drug targets for pathogens without effecting symbiotic organisms

  3. Measurement error adjustment in essential fatty acid intake from a food frequency questionnaire: alternative approaches and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satia Jessie A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed at assessing the degree of measurement error in essential fatty acid intakes from a food frequency questionnaire and the impact of correcting for such an error on precision and bias of odds ratios in logistic models. To assess these impacts, and for illustrative purposes, alternative approaches and methods were used with the binary outcome of cognitive decline in verbal fluency. Methods Using the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study, we conducted a sensitivity analysis. The error-prone exposure – visit 1 fatty acid intake (1987–89 – was available for 7,814 subjects 50 years or older at baseline with complete data on cognitive decline between visits 2 (1990–92 and 4 (1996–98. Our binary outcome of interest was clinically significant decline in verbal fluency. Point estimates and 95% confidence intervals were compared between naïve and measurement-error adjusted odds ratios of decline with every SD increase in fatty acid intake as % of energy. Two approaches were explored for adjustment: (A External validation against biomarkers (plasma fatty acids in cholesteryl esters and phospholipids and (B Internal repeat measurements at visits 2 and 3. The main difference between the two is that Approach B makes a stronger assumption regarding lack of error correlations in the structural model. Additionally, we compared results from regression calibration (RCAL to those from simulation extrapolation (SIMEX. Finally, using structural equations modeling, we estimated attenuation factors associated with each dietary exposure to assess degree of measurement error in a bivariate scenario for regression calibration of logistic regression model. Results and conclusion Attenuation factors for Approach A were smaller than B, suggesting a larger amount of measurement error in the dietary exposure. Replicate measures (Approach B unlike concentration biomarkers (Approach A may lead to imprecise odds ratios due to larger

  4. Language acquisition for deaf children: Reducing the harms of zero tolerance to the use of alternative approaches

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    Humphries Tom

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Children acquire language without instruction as long as they are regularly and meaningfully engaged with an accessible human language. Today, 80% of children born deaf in the developed world are implanted with cochlear devices that allow some of them access to sound in their early years, which helps them to develop speech. However, because of brain plasticity changes during early childhood, children who have not acquired a first language in the early years might never be completely fluent in any language. If they miss this critical period for exposure to a natural language, their subsequent development of the cognitive activities that rely on a solid first language might be underdeveloped, such as literacy, memory organization, and number manipulation. An alternative to speech-exclusive approaches to language acquisition exists in the use of sign languages such as American Sign Language (ASL, where acquiring a sign language is subject to the same time constraints of spoken language development. Unfortunately, so far, these alternatives are caught up in an "either - or" dilemma, leading to a highly polarized conflict about which system families should choose for their children, with little tolerance for alternatives by either side of the debate and widespread misinformation about the evidence and implications for or against either approach. The success rate with cochlear implants is highly variable. This issue is still debated, and as far as we know, there are no reliable predictors for success with implants. Yet families are often advised not to expose their child to sign language. Here absolute positions based on ideology create pressures for parents that might jeopardize the real developmental needs of deaf children. What we do know is that cochlear implants do not offer accessible language to many deaf children. By the time it is clear that the deaf child is not acquiring spoken language with cochlear devices, it might already be

  5. Evaluation of simulation alternatives for the brute-force ray-tracing approach used in backlight design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnijder, Karel; Hanselaer, Peter; Meuret, Youri

    2016-04-01

    A key requirement to obtain a uniform luminance for a side-lit LED backlight is the optimised spatial pattern of structures on the light guide that extract the light. The generation of such a scatter pattern is usually performed by applying an iterative approach. In each iteration, the luminance distribution of the backlight with a particular scatter pattern is analysed. This is typically performed with a brute-force ray-tracing algorithm, although this approach results in a time-consuming optimisation process. In this study, the Adding-Doubling method is explored as an alternative way for evaluating the luminance of a backlight. Due to the similarities between light propagating in a backlight with extraction structures and light scattering in a cloud of light scatterers, the Adding-Doubling method which is used to model the latter could also be used to model the light distribution in a backlight. The backlight problem is translated to a form upon which the Adding-Doubling method is directly applicable. The calculated luminance for a simple uniform extraction pattern with the Adding-Doubling method matches the luminance generated by a commercial raytracer very well. Although successful, no clear computational advantage over ray tracers is realised. However, the dynamics of light propagation in a light guide as used the Adding-Doubling method, also allow to enhance the efficiency of brute-force ray-tracing algorithms. The performance of this enhanced ray-tracing approach for the simulation of backlights is also evaluated against a typical brute-force ray-tracing approach.

  6. Spatial disparity in the distribution of superfund sites in South Carolina: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell-Naney, Kristen; Zhang, Hongmei; Samantapudi, Ashok; Jiang, Chengsheng; Dalemarre, Laura; Rice, LaShanta; Williams, Edith; Wilson, Sacoby

    2013-11-06

    According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund is a federal government program implemented to clean up uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Twenty-six sites in South Carolina (SC) have been included on the National Priorities List (NPL), which has serious human health and environmental implications. The purpose of this study was to assess spatial disparities in the distribution of Superfund sites in SC. The 2000 US census tract and block level data were used to generate population characteristics, which included race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), education, home ownership, and home built before 1950. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) were used to map Superfund facilities and develop choropleth maps based on the aforementioned sociodemographic variables. Spatial methods, including mean and median distance analysis, buffer analysis, and spatial approximation were employed to characterize burden disparities. Regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the number of Superfund facilities and population characteristics. Spatial coincidence results showed that of the 29.5% of Blacks living in SC, 55.9% live in Superfund host census tracts. Among all populations in SC living below poverty (14.2%), 57.2% were located in Superfund host census tracts. Buffer analyses results (0.5mi, 1.0mi, 5.0mi, 0.5km, 1.0km, and 5.0km) showed a higher percentage of Whites compared to Blacks hosting a Superfund facility. Conversely, a slightly higher percentage of Blacks hosted (30.2%) a Superfund facility than those not hosting (28.8%) while their White counterparts had more equivalent values (66.7% and 67.8%, respectively). Regression analyses in the reduced model (Adj. R2 = 0.038) only explained a small percentage of the variance. In addition, the mean distance for percent of Blacks in the 90th percentile for Superfund facilities was 0.48mi. Burden disparities exist in the distribution of Superfund facilities in SC at the block and

  7. A research approach to support the empowerment of alternatives to prison / Une approche de recherche pour soutenir le renforcement des mesures alternatives à l’incarcération

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregori Emilio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Il Progetto Europeo “Reducing prison population: advanced tools of justice in Europe” è stato finanziato dalla Commissione Europea al fine di migliorare la conoscenza e lo scambio di misure innovative di pratiche alternative alla detenzione, sia nella fase pre-processuale, sia in quella dell’esecuzione della pena. La progettazione delle linee guida per l'attuazione di alternative alla detenzione in tutti i paesi europei e del pacchetto formativo, indirizzato al personale che lavora nei servizi che si occupano di alternative alla prigione, è stata preceduta da diverse attività di ricerca svolte in sette paesi europei (Italia, Lettonia, Scozia, Francia, Bulgaria, Romania e Germania. Questo articolo descrive la metodologia utilizzata nelle attività di ricerca e la gestione di queste ultime, condotte in diversi paesi e indirizzate ad una popolazione complessa. Le projet européen « Reducing Prison Population: advanced tools of justice in Europe » a été financé par la Commission Européenne afin d’améliorer la connaissance et d’échanger les approches innovantes de mesures alternatives à l’incarcération, avant comme après le procès. La définition de lignes directrices pour la mise en ɶuvre des alternatives à l’incarcération dans chaque pays européen et du dossier de formation conçu à l’intention du personnel des services offrant des alternatives à la prison, a été précédé par des recherches menées dans sept pays européens (Italie, Lettonie, Écosse, France, Bulgarie, Roumanie et Allemagne. Cet article décrit la méthodologie de recherche utilisée dans ce projet et la gestion des différentes activités menées dans plusieurs pays et ciblées sur une population complexe. The European Project “Reducing prison population: advanced tools of justice in Europe” was funded by the European Commission in order to improve the knowledge and to exchange innovative measures of practices alternative to

  8. A multiobjective optimization approach for combating Aedes aegypti using chemical and biological alternated step-size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Weverton O; Wanner, Elizabeth F; Cardoso, Rodrigo T N

    2015-11-01

    Dengue epidemics, one of the most important viral disease worldwide, can be prevented by combating the transmission vector Aedes aegypti. In support of this aim, this article proposes to analyze the Dengue vector control problem in a multiobjective optimization approach, in which the intention is to minimize both social and economic costs, using a dynamic mathematical model representing the mosquitoes' population. It consists in finding optimal alternated step-size control policies combining chemical (via application of insecticides) and biological control (via insertion of sterile males produced by irradiation). All the optimal policies consists in apply insecticides just at the beginning of the season and, then, keep the mosquitoes in an acceptable level spreading into environment a few amount of sterile males. The optimization model analysis is driven by the use of genetic algorithms. Finally, it performs a statistic test showing that the multiobjective approach is effective in achieving the same effect of variations in the cost parameters. Then, using the proposed methodology, it is possible to find, in a single run, given a decision maker, the optimal number of days and the respective amounts in which each control strategy must be applied, according to the tradeoff between using more insecticide with less transmission mosquitoes or more sterile males with more transmission mosquitoes.

  9. An Alternative Approach for Registration of High-Resolution Satellite Optical Imagery and ICESat Laser Altimetry Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite optical images and altimetry data are two major data sources used in Antarctic research. The integration use of these two datasets is expected to provide more accurate and higher quality products, during which data registration is the first issue that needs to be solved. This paper presents an alternative approach for the registration of high-resolution satellite optical images and ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite laser altimetry data. Due to the sparse distribution characteristic of the ICESat laser point data, it is difficult and even impossible to find same-type conjugate features between ICESat data and satellite optical images. The method is implemented in a direct way to correct the point-to-line inconsistency in image space through 2D transformation between the projected terrain feature points and the corresponding 2D image lines, which is simpler than discrepancy correction in object space that requires stereo images for 3D model construction, and easier than the indirect way of image orientation correction via photogrammetric bundle adjustment. The correction parameters are further incorporated into imaging model through RPCs (Rational Polynomial Coefficients generation/regeneration for the convenience of photogrammetric applications. The experimental results by using the ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer images and ZY-3 (Ziyuan-3 satellite images for registration with ICESat data showed that sub-pixel level registration accuracies were achieved after registration, which have validated the feasibility and effectiveness of the presented approach.

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Approaches for Pediatric Pain: A Review of the State-of-the-science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in pediatric populations has increased considerably, especially for chronic conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and cystic fibrosis in which pain may be a significant problem. Despite the growing popularity of CAM approaches for pediatric pain, questions regarding the efficacy of these interventions remain. This review critically evaluates the existing empirical evidence for the efficacy of CAM interventions for pain symptoms in children. CAM modalities that possess a published literature, including controlled trials and/or multiple baseline studies, that focused on either chronic or acute, procedural pain were included in this review. The efficacy of the CAM interventions was evaluated according to the framework developed by the American Psychological Association (APA Division 12 Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. According to these criteria, only one CAM approach reviewed herein (self-hypnosis/guided imagery/relaxation for recurrent pediatric headache qualified as an empirically supported therapy (EST, although many may be considered possibly efficacious or promising treatments for pediatric pain. Several methodological limitations of the existing literature on CAM interventions for pain problems in children are highlighted and future avenues for research are outlined.

  11. MuSiC: a Multibunch and multiparticle Simulation Code with an alternative approach to wakefield effects

    CERN Document Server

    Migliorati, M

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of beam dynamics in presence of collective effects requires a strong computational effort to take into account, in a self consistent way, the wakefield acting on a given charge and produced by all the others. Generally this is done by means of a convolution integral or sum. Moreover, if the electromagnetic fields consist of resonant modes with high quality factors, responsible, for example, of coupled bunch instabilities, a charge is also affected by itself in previous turns, and a very long record of wakefield must be properly taken into account. In this paper we present a new simulation code for the longitudinal beam dynamics in a circular accelerator, which exploits an alternative approach to the currently used convolution sum, reducing the computing time and avoiding the issues related to the length of wakefield for coupled bunch instabilities. With this approach it is possible to simulate, without the need of a large computing power, simultaneously, the single and multi-bunch beam dynamics...

  12. Air-water exchange of PAHs and OPAHs at a superfund mega-site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, Lane G; Blair Paulik, L; Anderson, Kim A

    2017-12-15

    Chemical fate is a concern at environmentally contaminated sites, but characterizing that fate can be difficult. Identifying and quantifying the movement of chemicals at the air-water interface are important steps in characterizing chemical fate. Superfund sites are often suspected sources of air pollution due to legacy sediment and water contamination. A quantitative assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAH (OPAHs) diffusive flux in a river system that contains a Superfund Mega-site, and passes through residential, urban and agricultural land, has not been reported before. Here, passive sampling devices (PSDs) were used to measure 60 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 22 oxygenated PAH (OPAHs) in air and water. From these concentrations the magnitude and direction of contaminant flux between these two compartments was calculated. The magnitude of PAH flux was greater at sites near or within the Superfund Mega-site than outside of the Superfund Mega-site. The largest net individual PAH deposition at a single site was naphthalene at a rate of -14,200 (±5780) (ng/m(2))/day. The estimated one-year total flux of phenanthrene was -7.9×10(5) (ng/m(2))/year. Human health risk associated with inhalation of vapor phase PAHs and dermal exposure to PAHs in water were assessed by calculating benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentrations. Excess lifetime cancer risk estimates show potential increased risk associated with exposure to PAHs at sites within and in close proximity to the Superfund Mega-site. Specifically, estimated excess lifetime cancer risk associated with dermal exposure and inhalation of PAHs was above 1 in 1 million within the Superfund Mega-site. The predominant depositional flux profile observed in this study suggests that the river water in this Superfund site is largely a sink for airborne PAHs, rather than a source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An alternative approach for the use of water solubility of nonionic pesticides in the modeling of the soil sorption coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Ralpho Rinaldo; Sampaio, Silvio César; de Melo, Eduardo Borges

    2014-04-15

    The collection of data to study the damage caused by pesticides to the environment and its ecosystems is slowly acquired and costly. Large incentives have been established to encourage research projects aimed at building mathematical models for predicting physical, chemical or biological properties of environmental interest. The organic carbon normalized soil sorption coefficient (K(oc)) is an important physicochemical property used in environmental risk assessments for compounds released into the environment. Many models for predicting logK(oc) that have used the parameters logP or logS as descriptors have been published in recent decades. The strong correlation between these properties (logP and logS) prevents them from being used together in multiple linear regressions. Because the sorption of a chemical compound in soil depends on both its water solubility and its water/organic matter partitioning, we assume that models capable of combining these two properties can generate more realistic results. Therefore, the objective of this study was to propose an alternative approach for modeling logK(oc), using a simple descriptor of solubility, here designated as the logarithm of solubility corrected by octanol/water partitioning (logS(P)). Thus, different models were built with this descriptor and with the conventional descriptors logP and logS, alone or associated with other explanatory variables representing easy-to-interpret physicochemical properties. The obtained models were validated according to current recommendations in the literature, and they were compared with other previously published models. The results showed that the use of logS(p) instead of conventional descriptors led to simple models with greater statistical quality and predictive power than other more complex models found in the literature. Therefore, logS(P) can be a good alternative to consider for the modeling of logK(oc) and other properties that relate to both solubility and water

  14. Supplementary analysis of impacts of alternative approaches for the Certification/Enforcement Program for consumer-product energy-efficiency standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-04

    Vitro Laboratories Task 2 Report developed and qualitatively evaluated 4 alternative approaches for a DOE program for the certification and enforcement of consumer-product energy efficiency standards. This Task 5 report provides supplemental resource impact analyses of the four (a minimal governmental intervention approach, a strong certification control approach, a strong enforcement audit approach, and a mixed certification/enforcement approach) approaches. This analysis derives quantitative estimates of the impacts of these alternative approaches in terms of the five key decision variables defined in Task 2 (DOE staffing requirements, DOE program costs, test costs, indirect costs, and level of compliance). Definitions and assumptions of the resource-impact analyses of the four alternative certification and enforcement approaches are described for furnaces and boilers, water heaters, refrigerators and refrigerator/freezers, kitchen ranges and ovens (gas only), central air conditioners, and freezers. The next 5 chapters are dedicated to discussions of the five key decision variables. Results of the comparative evaluation are presented in the final chapter.

  15. IC50-based approaches as an alternative method for assessment of time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Howard J; Galetin, Aleksandra; Houston, J Brian

    2010-05-01

    The predictive utility of two in vitro methods (empirical IC(50)-based and mechanistic k(inact)/K(I)) for the assessment of time-dependent cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibition has been compared. IC(50) values were determined at multiple pre-incubation time points over 30 min for five CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibitors (verapamil, diltiazem, erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin). The ability of IC(50) data obtained following pre-incubation to predict k(inact)/K(I) parameters was investigated and its utility was assessed relative to the conventional k(inact)/K(I) model using 50 reported clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Models with either hepatic or hepatic with intestinal components were explored. For low/medium potency time-dependent inhibitors, 81% of the predicted k(inact)/K(I(unbound)) from IC(50) data were within an order of magnitude of the actual values, in contrast to 50% of potent inhibitors. An underprediction trend and > 50% of false-negatives were observed when IC(50) data were used in the DDI hepatic prediction model; incorporation of the intestine improved the prediction accuracy. On the contrary, 86% of the DDI studies were predicted within twofold using k(inact)/K(I) mechanistic approach and the combined hepatic and intestinal model. Use of the empirical IC(50) approach as an alternative to the mechanistic k(inact)/K(I) model for in vivo DDI prediction is limited and is best restricted to preliminary investigations.

  16. 76 FR 24479 - In the Matter of the Taylor Lumber and Treating Superfund Site, Sheridan, Oregon, Amendment to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... AGENCY In the Matter of the Taylor Lumber and Treating Superfund Site, Sheridan, Oregon, Amendment to... with PWPO provided a covenant not to sue for response costs at the Taylor Lumber and Treating Site... should reference the Taylor Lumber and Treating Superfund Site in Sheridan, Oregon, EPA Docket No....

  17. 78 FR 47317 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Herbert N. Francis concerning the Ore Knob Mine... comments by site name ``Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site'' by one of the following methods:...

  18. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: BDAT INCINERATION OF CERCLA SARMS AT THE JOHN ZINK COMPANY TEST FACILITY (FINAL PROJECT REPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents the results of a treatability study of rotary kiln incineration of a synthetic "Superfund soil" bearing a wide range of chemical contaminants typically occurring at Superfund sites. This surrogate soil is referred to as a synthetic analytical reference ...

  19. Comparative lifecycle assessment of alternatives for waste management in Rio de Janeiro - Investigating the influence of an attributional or consequential approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstad Saraiva, A; Souza, R G; Valle, R A B

    2017-10-01

    The environmental impacts from three management alternatives for organic fraction of municipal solid waste were compared using lifecycle assessment methodology. The alternatives (sanitary landfill, selective collection of organic waste for anaerobic digestion and anaerobic digestion after post-separation of organic waste) were modelled applying an attributional as well as consequential approach, in parallel with the aim of identifying if and how these approaches can affect results and conclusions. The marginal processes identified in the consequential modelling were in general associated with higher environmental impacts than average processes modelled with an attributional approach. As all investigated waste management alternatives result in net-substitution of energy and in some cases also materials, the consequential modelling resulted in lower absolute environmental impacts in five of the seven environmental impact categories assessed in the study. In three of these, the chosen modelling approach can alter the hierarchy between compared waste management alternatives. This indicates a risk of underestimating potential benefits from efficient energy recovery from waste when applying attributional modelling in contexts in which electricity provision historically has been dominated by technologies presenting rather low environmental impacts, but where projections point at increasing impacts from electricity provision in coming years. Thus, in the present case study, the chosen approach affects both absolute and relative results from the comparison. However, results were largely related to the processes identified as affected by investigated changes, and not merely the chosen modelling approach. The processes actually affected by future choices between different waste management alternatives are intrinsically uncertain. The study demonstrates the benefits of applying different assumptions regarding the processes affected by investigated choices - both for provision

  20. Report and recommendations of the international workshop "Retrieval approaches for information on alternative methods to animal experiments".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grune, Barbara; Fallon, Michael; Howard, Carol; Hudson, Vera; Kulpa-Eddy, Jodie A; Larson, Jean; Leary, Sue; Roi, Annett; van der Valk, Jan; Wood, Mary; Dörendahl, Antje; Köhler-Hahn, Dorothea; Box, Rainer; Spielmann, Horst

    2004-01-01

    In the member states of the EU and in the USA, scientists are obliged by animal welfare legislation not to conduct an animal experiment if another scientifically satisfactory method is reasonably and practicably available. To meet the regulatory obligation to use alternatives to animal experiments, scientists should consult literature and other relevant sources on alternatives prior to any experimental study on laboratory animals. It is the responsibility of the individual scientist to select the most appropriate database to obtain information on alternatives, which have been defined as methods that refine, reduce or replace animal experiments (the 3 Rs concept of Russell and Burch (1959)). Specialised information services provide support to scientists searching for publications on alternative methods. On occasion of a workshop in Berlin in November 2003, representatives of animal welfare information centres discussed currently available information sources on alternative methods, index terms for alternative methods, and search strategies based on index terms for alternative methods. ZEBET presented an investigation on the current status of indexing systems on alternative methods in established literature databases. The project analysed how the results of a search for publications on alternatives was influenced by the indexing procedure. The results of the study were exemplified by a typical search result. The results of the study indicated that the current indexing systems do not provide the required information, since not all of the relevant information is indexed under "alternative methods". The workshop participants developed recommendations for ad hoc working groups and research projects, e.g. development of suitable search strategies on alternative methods for scientists.

  1. Cat dissection and human cadaver prosection versus sculpting human structures from clay: A comparison of alternate approaches to human anatomy laboratory education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, John R.

    Dissection and vivisection are traditional approaches to biology laboratory education. In the case of human anatomy teaching laboratories, there is a long tradition of using human and animal cadaver specimens in the classroom. In a review of the literature comparing traditional dissection and vivisection lessons to alternative lessons designed to reduce the time spent dissecting or the numbers of animals used, we conclude that it is difficult to come to any conclusion regarding the efficacy of different approaches. An analysis of the literature is confounded because many studies have very low statistical power or other methodological weaknesses, and investigators rely on a wide variety of testing instruments to measure an equally varied number of course objectives. Additional well designed studies are necessary before educators can reach any informed conclusions about the efficacy of traditional versus alternative approaches to laboratory education. In our experiments, we compared a traditional cat dissection based undergraduate human anatomy lesson to an alternative where students sculpted human muscles onto plastic human skeletons. Students in the alternative treatment performed significantly better than their peers in the traditional treatment when answering both lower and higher order human anatomy questions. In a subsequent experiment with a similar design, we concluded that the superior performance of the students in the alternative treatment on anatomy exams was likely due to the similarity between the human anatomy representation studied in lab, and the human anatomy questions asked on the exams. When the anatomy questions were presented in the context of a cat specimen, students in the traditional cat dissection treatment outperformed their peers in the alternative treatment. In a final experiment where student performance on a human anatomy exam was compared between a traditional prosected human cadaver treatment and the alternative clay sculpting

  2. Alternative approaches for vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the 21st century: A review of developments over the last 2 decades and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessing chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate or...

  3. Alternative approaches for vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the 21st century: A review of developments over the last 2 decades and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessing chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate or...

  4. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasias, I.N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Thomaidis, N.S., E-mail: ntho@chem.uoa.gr; Piperaki, E.A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D{sub 2} background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg. - Highlights: • New approaches were developed to cope with interferences of B determination by ETAAS • Ge was used as internal standard for the determination of B by simultaneous ETAAS • Citric acid was used during

  5. Subcutaneous dissociative conscious sedation (sDCS an alternative method for airway regional blocks: a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Mihan J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicted difficult airway is a definite indication for awake intubation and spontaneous ventilation. Airway regional blocks which are commonly used to facilitate awake intubation are sometimes impossible or forbidden. On the other hand deep sedation could be life threatening in the case of compromised airway. The aim of this study is evaluating "Subcutaneous Dissociative Conscious Sedation" (sDCS as an alternative method to airway regional blocks for awake intubation. Methods In this prospective, non-randomized study, 30 patients with predicted difficult airway (laryngeal tumors, who were scheduled for direct laryngoscopic biopsy (DLB, underwent "Subcutaneous Dissociative Conscious Sedation" (sDCS exerted by intravenous fentanyl 3-4ug/kg and subcutaneous ketamine 0.6-0.7 mg/kg. The tongue and pharynx were anesthetized with lidocaine spray (4%. 10 minutes after a subcutaneous injection of ketamine direct laryngoscopy was performed. Extra doses of fentanyl 50-100 ug were administered if the patient wasn't cooperative enough for laryngoscopy. Patients were evaluated for hemodynamic stability (heart rate and blood pressure, oxygen saturation (Spo2, patient cooperation (obedient to open the mouth for laryngoscopy and the number of tries for laryngoscopy, patient comfort (remaining moveless, hallucination, nystagmus and salivation (need for aspiration before laryngoscopy. Results Direct laryngoscopy was performed successfully in all patients. One patient needed extra fentanyl and then laryngoscopy was performed successfully on the second try. All patients were cooperative enough during laryngoscopy. Hemodynamic changes more than 20% occurred in just one patient. Oxygen desaturation (spo2 Conclusions Subcutaneous Dissociative Conscious Sedation (sDCS as a new approach to airway is an acceptable and safe method for awake intubation and it can be suggested as a noninvasive substitute of low complication rate for regional airway

  6. The cytotoxicity of polycationic iron oxide nanoparticles: Common endpoint assays and alternative approaches for improved understanding of cellular response mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoskins Clare

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's have an increasing number of biomedical applications. As such in vitro characterisation is essential to ensure the bio-safety of these particles. Little is known on the cellular interaction or effect on membrane integrity upon exposure to these MNPs. Here we synthesised Fe3O4 and surface coated with poly(ethylenimine (PEI and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG to achieve particles of varying surface positive charges and used them as model MNP's to evaluate the relative utility and limitations of cellular assays commonly applied for nanotoxicity assessment. An alternative approach, atomic force microscopy (AFM, was explored for the analysis of membrane structure and cell morphology upon interacting with the MNPs. The particles were tested in vitro on human SH-SY5Y, MCF-7 and U937 cell lines for reactive oxygen species (ROS production and lipid peroxidation (LPO, LDH leakage and their overall cytotoxic effect. These results were compared with AFM topography imaging carried out on fixed cell lines. Results Successful particle synthesis and coating were characterised using FTIR, PCS, TEM and ICP. The particle size from TEM was 30 nm (−16.9 mV which increased to 40 nm (+55.6 mV upon coating with PEI and subsequently 50 nm (+31.2 mV with PEG coating. Both particles showed excellent stability not only at neutral pH but also in acidic environment of pH 4.6 in the presence of sodium citrate. The higher surface charge MNP-PEI resulted in increased cytotoxic effect and ROS production on all cell lines compared with the MNP-PEI-PEG. In general the effect on the cell membrane integrity was observed only in SH-SY5Y and MCF-7 cells by MNP-PEI determined by LDH leakage and LPO production. AFM topography images showed consistently that both the highly charged MNP-PEI and the less charged MNP-PEI-PEG caused cell morphology changes possibly due to membrane disruption and cytoskeleton remodelling. Conclusions

  7. Reexamination of "Combining an alternative multi-delivery policy into economic production lot size problem with partial rework" Using an Alternative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y-S. P. Chiu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A conventional approach for solving an economic production quantity (EPQ model with multi-delivery policy andquality assurance is to use mathematical modeling for deriving the system cost function and to employ differentialcalculus for proving convexity of the cost function before determining the optimal operating policy. This paperpresents a simplified solution procedure to reexamine a specific EPQ model [1] and demonstrates that both, theoptimal manufacturing lot size and the long-run cost function can be derived without derivatives. The proposedapproach may enable practitioners—with little knowledge of calculus—to understand such a real life vendor-buyerintegrated system with ease.

  8. Characterization of ecological risks at the Milltown Reservoir-Clark Fork River Sediments Superfund Site, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Gary A.; Blanchet, Richard J.; Linder, Greg L.; Palawski, Don; Brumbaugh, William G.; Canfield, Tim J.; Kemble, Nile E.; Ingersoll, Chris G.; Farag, Aïda M.; DalSoglio, Julie A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive field and laboratory approach to the ecological risk assessment for the Milltown Reservoir-Clark Fork River Sediments Site, a Superfund site in the Rocky Mountains of Montana, has been described in the preceding reports of this series. The risk assessment addresses concerns over the ecological impacts of upstream releases of mining wastes to fisheries of the upper Clark Fork River (CFR) and the benthic and terrestrial habitats further downstream in Milltown Reservoir. The risk characterization component of the process integrated results from a triad of information sources: (a) chemistry studies of environmental media to identify and quantify exposures of terrestrial and aquatic organisms to site-related contaminants; (b) ecological or population studies of terrestrial vegetation, birds, benthic communities, and fish; and (c) in situ and laboratory toxicity studies with terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates and plants, small mammals, amphibians, and fish exposed to contaminated surface water, sediments, wetland soils, and food sources. Trophic transfer studies were performed on waterfowl, mammals, and predatory birds using field measurement data on metals concentrations in environmental media and lower trophic food sources. Studies with sediment exposures were incorporated into the Sediment Quality Triad approach to evaluate risks to benthic ecology. Overall results of the wetland and terrestrial studies suggested that acute adverse biological effects were largely absent from the wetland; however, adverse effects to reproductive, growth, and physiological end points of various terrestrial and aquatic species were related to metals exposures in more highly contaminated depositional areas. Feeding studies with contaminated diet collected from the upper CFR indicated that trout are at high risk from elevated metals concentrations in surface water, sediment, and aquatic invertebrates. Integration of chemical analyses with toxicological and ecological

  9. Sustainable exposure prevention through innovative detection and remediation technologies from the NIEHS Superfund Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Heather F; Suk, William A

    2017-03-01

    Innovative devices and tools for exposure assessment and remediation play an integral role in preventing exposure to hazardous substances. New solutions for detecting and remediating organic, inorganic, and mixtures of contaminants can improve public health as a means of primary prevention. Using a public health prevention model, detection and remediation technologies contribute to primary prevention as tools to identify areas of high risk (e.g. contamination hotspots), to recognize hazards (bioassay tests), and to prevent exposure through contaminant cleanups. Primary prevention success is ultimately governed by the widespread acceptance of the prevention tool. And, in like fashion, detection and remediation technologies must convey technical and sustainability advantages to be adopted for use. Hence, sustainability - economic, environmental, and societal - drives innovation in detection and remediation technology. The National Institute of Health (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) is mandated to advance innovative detection, remediation, and toxicity screening technology development through grants to universities and small businesses. SRP recognizes the importance of fast, accurate, robust, and advanced detection technologies that allow for portable real-time, on-site characterization, monitoring, and assessment of contaminant concentration and/or toxicity. Advances in non-targeted screening, biological-based assays, passive sampling devices (PSDs), sophisticated modeling approaches, and precision-based analytical tools are making it easier to quickly identify hazardous "hotspots" and, therefore, prevent exposures. Innovation in sustainable remediation uses a variety of approaches: in situ remediation; harnessing the natural catalytic properties of biological processes (such as bioremediation and phytotechnologies); and application of novel materials science (such as nanotechnology, advanced

  10. Validation of analytical methods in GMP: the disposable Fast Read 102® device, an alternative practical approach for cell counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunetti Monica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality and safety of advanced therapy products must be maintained throughout their production and quality control cycle to ensure their final use in patients. We validated the cell count method according to the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use and European Pharmacopoeia, considering the tests’ accuracy, precision, repeatability, linearity and range. Methods As the cell count is a potency test, we checked accuracy, precision, and linearity, according to ICH Q2. Briefly our experimental approach was first to evaluate the accuracy of Fast Read 102® compared to the Bürker chamber. Once the accuracy of the alternative method was demonstrated, we checked the precision and linearity test only using Fast Read 102®. The data were statistically analyzed by average, standard deviation and coefficient of variation percentages inter and intra operator. Results All the tests performed met the established acceptance criteria of a coefficient of variation of less than ten percent. For the cell count, the precision reached by each operator had a coefficient of variation of less than ten percent (total cells and under five percent (viable cells. The best range of dilution, to obtain a slope line value very similar to 1, was between 1:8 and 1:128. Conclusions Our data demonstrated that the Fast Read 102® count method is accurate, precise and ensures the linearity of the results obtained in a range of cell dilution. Under our standard method procedures, this assay may thus be considered a good quality control method for the cell count as a batch release quality control test. Moreover, the Fast Read 102® chamber is a plastic, disposable device that allows a number of samples to be counted in the same chamber. Last but not least, it overcomes the problem of chamber washing after use and so allows a cell count in a clean environment such as that in a

  11. An Alternative Georoute: Approaching the Geological Heritage of the SE Part of Milos Island, Greece, via Hiking, Kayaking and Snorkeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogonatos, Constantinos; Galanopoulos, Evangelos; Anastasatou, Marianthi; Chadjimpaloglou, Petros; Xydous, Stamatios

    2015-04-01

    Milos Island is located at the southwest edge of the Cyclades island complex, in the central part of the Aegean archipelago. It is part of the modern South Aegean Volcanic Arc (SAVA), which belongs to the Hellenic subduction zone. This on-going process has resulted in the coexistence of complex geological formations and geodynamic phenomena with sceneries of incomparable natural beauty, in many areas along the arc. Among them, Milos Island is widely known to be a place of astonishing geological and natural wealth, combined with a cultural heritage that dates back to the 8th millennium BC. As geotourism has been rapidly evolving worldwide over the last years, Milos Island was among the first places in Greece that developed a network of geotrails and featured many sites of special interest in terms of geology, volcanology and geoarchaeology. This study proposes an original georoute through land and sea, which aims t? emerge both overland and underwater areas of special interest. It is a novel way to approach the geological and cultural wealth of Milos and focuses on the Aghia Kiriaki area, at the South part of the island. This alternative georoute includes hiking, kayaking and snorkeling, and anyone who follows it, can be guided to a significant number of important geological, volcanic, morphological and geoarcheological sites, in a relatively narrow area, combining athletic activities as well. The proposed georoute has a total length of 3,2 km and an estimated time of completion of about 4 hours. It starts from Aghia Kiriaki area, where visitors can see remnants of one of the island's collapsed calderic domes in a panoramic view towards the East. In the same site, volcanic emanations create impressive scenery, which introduces the participants to aspects of the island's geologic and volcanic history. After about 800 meters of hiking, throughout an area that is dominated by products of phreatic eruptions, Aghia Kiriaki beach is the next stop. Impressive findings of

  12. EPA Proposes to Remove Most of Fulton, Oswego County, New York Site from Superfund List

    Science.gov (United States)

    (New York, N.Y) After cleaning up more than 10,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil and approximately 9 million gallons of contaminated groundwater, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to remove a portion of the Fulton Terminals Superfund

  13. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Ormet Corporation, Hannibal, OH, September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-12

    The Record of Decision presents the selected remedy for the Ormet Corporation Superfund Site. The purpose of this remedy is to eliminate or reduce contamination in soils, sediments and ground water, and to reduce the risks associated with exposure to contaminated materials. This is the first and final remedy planned for the Site.

  14. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perhac, R.M. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  15. Superfund: Interagency Agreements and Improved Project Management Needed to Achieve Cleanup Progress at Key Defense Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Superfund completing the remedial investigation, which would include a human and ecological risk assessment , feasibility study, proposed plan...EPA said that a human and ecological risk assessment —which would estimate how threatening a hazardous waste site is to human health and the

  16. A General Chemistry Assignment Analyzing Environmental Contamination for the Depue, IL, National Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A.; Faurie-Wisniewski, Danielle; Parsa, Arlen; Spitz, Jeff; Spitz, Jennifer Amdur; Loeb, Nancy C.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-01-01

    The classroom exercise outlined here is a self-directed assignment that connects students to the environmental contamination problem surrounding the DePue Superfund site. By connecting chemistry knowledge gained in the classroom with a real-world problem, students are encouraged to personally connect with the problem while simultaneously…

  17. 75 FR 68788 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Doc No: 2010-28260] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [Docket EPA-RO4-SFUND-2010-0893, FRL-9223-8] Ore... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Ore..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-0893 or Site name Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site by one of...

  18. 77 FR 16548 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... entered into four (4) settlements for past response costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum...

  19. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: CERCLA BDAT SARM PREPARATION AND RESULTS OF PHYSICAL SOILS WASHING EXPERIMENTS (FINAL REPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports on the results of work preparing 30,000 Ibs of SARM or synthetic analytical reference matrix, a surrogate Superfund soil containing a vide range of contaminants. It also reports the results ©f bench scale treatability experiments designed to simulate the EP...

  20. A General Chemistry Assignment Analyzing Environmental Contamination for the Depue, IL, National Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A.; Faurie-Wisniewski, Danielle; Parsa, Arlen; Spitz, Jeff; Spitz, Jennifer Amdur; Loeb, Nancy C.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-01-01

    The classroom exercise outlined here is a self-directed assignment that connects students to the environmental contamination problem surrounding the DePue Superfund site. By connecting chemistry knowledge gained in the classroom with a real-world problem, students are encouraged to personally connect with the problem while simultaneously…

  1. Grain Handling Facility at Freeman, Washington Added to Superfund Cleanup List

    Science.gov (United States)

    (September 28, 2015 - Seattle) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has added the Grain Handling Facility at Freeman, in Spokane County, Washington, to the Superfund National Priorities List. The site was added to the NPL after EPA considered input rec

  2. 77 FR 2981 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Constitution Road...

  3. An Alternative Approach to the Extraction of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic e-p Scattering at 5 to 20 GeV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Ghahramany; M. Nouri

    2003-01-01

    Two structure functions W1(x,Q2) and W2(x,Q2) are determined by using the cross sections measured in the deep inelastic electron-proton scattering experiments at Stanford Linac in the energy range of 5 to 20 GeV. In this paper an alternative mathematical approach have been used in such determination, resulting in a larger number of points in the graphs of the structure functions.

  4. Using Alternative Approaches to Prioritize Testing for the Universe of Chemicals with Potential for Human Exposure (WC9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    One use of alternative methods is to target animal use at only those chemicals and tests that are absolutely necessary. We discuss prioritization of testing based on high-throughput screening assays (HTS), QSAR modeling, high-throughput toxicokinetics (HTTK), and exposure modelin...

  5. A Behavioral Perspective of Childhood Trauma and Attachment Issues: Toward Alternative Treatment Approaches for Children with a History of Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Walter; Golden, Jeannie A.

    2009-01-01

    Attachment theory provides a useful conceptual framework for understanding trauma and the treatment of children who have been abused. This article examines childhood trauma and attachment issues from the perspective of behavior analysis, and provides a theoretical basis for two alternative treatment models for previously abused children and their…

  6. High-Throughput Predictive Approaches to Evaluating Chemicals in Food Contact Materials: Migration, Exposure, and Alternatives Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation describing CSS research on HT predictive methods to modeling exposure and predicting functional substitutes. It will be presented at a forum co-sponsored by the State of California and UC Berekeley on evaluation of chemical alternatives for food contact ch...

  7. A quantitative screening-level approach to incorporate chemical exposure and risk/safety into alternative assessment evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Scott M; Greggs, Bill; Goyak, Katy O; Landenberger, Bryce D; Mason, Ann M; Howard, Brett; Zaleski, Rosemary; Howard, Brett; Zaleski, Rosemary T

    2017-03-10

    As the general public and retailers ask for disclosure of chemical ingredients in the marketplace, a number of hazard screening tools were developed to evaluate the so called "greenness" of individual chemical ingredients and/or formulations. The majority of these tools focus only on hazard, often using chemical lists, ignoring the other part of the risk equation: exposure. Using a hazard-only focus can result in regrettable substitutions, changing one chemical ingredient for another that turns out to be more hazardous or shifts the toxicity burden to others. To minimize the incidents of regrettable substitutions, BizNGO describes 'Common Principles' to frame a process for informed substitution. Two of the six principles state reduce hazard and minimize exposure. A number of frameworks have emerged to evaluate and assess alternatives. One framework developed by leading experts under the auspices of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences recommended that hazard and exposure be specifically addressed in the same step when assessing candidate alternatives. For the alternative assessment community, this paper serves as an informational resource for considering exposure in an alternatives assessment using elements of problem formulation; product identity, use, and composition; hazard analysis; exposure analysis; and risk characterization. These conceptual elements build upon practices from government, academia, and industry and are exemplified through two hypothetical case studies demonstrating the questions asked and decisions faced in new product development. These two case studies - inhalation exposure to a generic paint product and environmental exposure to a shampoo rinsed down the drain - demonstrate the criteria, considerations, and methods required to combine exposure models addressing human health and environmental impacts to provide a screening level hazard/exposure (risk) analysis. This paper informs practices for these elements within a comparative risk

  8. Report: Independent Ground Water Sampling Generally Confirms EPA’s Data at Wheeler Pit Superfund Site in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #10-P-0218, September 8, 2010. With minimal exceptions, our independent sampling results at the Wheeler Pit Superfund Site were consistent with the sampling results that EPA Region 5 has obtained historically.

  9. Issuance of Final Guidance: Ecological Risk Assessment and Risk Management Principles for Superfund Sites, October 7, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guidance is intended to help Superfund risk managers make ecological risk management decisions that are based on sound science, consistent across Regions, and present a characterization of site risks that is transparent to the public.

  10. Teacher Beliefs toward Using Alternative Teaching Approaches in Science and Mathematics Classes Related to Experience in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiksal-Bostan, Mine; Sahin, Elvan; Ertepinar, Hamide

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among Turkish classroom, science and mathematics teachers' beliefs toward using inquiry-based approaches, traditional teaching approaches, and technology in their mathematics and science classrooms; their efficacy beliefs in teaching those subjects; and years of experience in teaching in…

  11. Alternative approaches to vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the 21st century: A review of developments over the last 2 decades and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillicrap, Adam; Belanger, Scott; Burden, Natalie; Du Pasquier, David; Embry, Michelle; Halder, Marlies; Lampi, Mark; Lee, Lucy; Norberg-King, Teresa J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Schirmer, Kristin; Thomas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessment of chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate organisms is minimized wherever possible. For some regulatory purposes, the use of vertebrate organisms for environmental risk assessments has been banned; in other situations, the number of organisms tested has been dramatically reduced or the severity of the procedure refined. However, there is still a long way to go to achieve a complete replacement of vertebrate organisms to generate environmental hazard data. The development of animal alternatives is based not just on ethical considerations but also on reducing the cost of performing vertebrate ecotoxicity tests and in some cases on providing better information aimed at improving environmental risk assessments. The present Focus article provides an overview of the considerable advances that have been made toward alternative approaches for ecotoxicity assessments over the last few decades.

  12. Alternative approaches to vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the 21st century: A review of developments over the last 2 decades and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillicrap, Adam; Belanger, Scott; Burden, Natalie; Pasquier, David Du; Embry, Michelle R; Halder, Marlies; Lampi, Mark A; Lee, Lucy; Norberg-King, Teresa; Rattner, Barnett A; Schirmer, Kristin; Thomas, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessment of chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate organisms is minimized wherever possible. For some regulatory purposes, the use of vertebrate organisms for environmental risk assessments has been banned; in other situations, the number of organisms tested has been dramatically reduced or the severity of the procedure refined. However, there is still a long way to go to achieve a complete replacement of vertebrate organisms to generate environmental hazard data. The development of animal alternatives is based not just on ethical considerations but also on reducing the cost of performing vertebrate ecotoxicity tests and in some cases on providing better information aimed at improving environmental risk assessments. The present Focus article provides an overview of the considerable advances that have been made toward alternative approaches for ecotoxicity assessments over the last few decades. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2637-2646. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. The ChemScreen project to design a pragmatic alternative approach to predict reproductive toxicity of chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Burg, Bart; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dietrich, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    There is a great need for rapid testing strategies for reproductive toxicity testing, avoiding animal use. The EU Framework program 7 project ChemScreen aimed to fill this gap in a pragmatic manner preferably using validated existing tools and place them in an innovative alternative testing...... in vitro and in vivo exposure levels greatly improved predictivity of the in vitro tests. As a further step, we have generated examples how to predict reproductive toxicity of chemicals using available data. We have executed formal validations of panel constituents and also used more innovative manners...

  14. EPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement of Work for Inorganic Superfund Methods Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration ISM02.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains analytical methods for the analysis of metals and cyanide in environmental samples. It also contains contractual requirements for laboratories participating in Superfund's Contract Laboratory Program.

  15. EPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement of Work for Inorganic Superfund Methods Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration ISM02.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document contains analytical methods for the analysis of metals and cyanide in environmental samples. It also contains contractual requirements for laboratories participating in Superfund's Contract Laboratory Program.

  16. A Hybrid Approach Using ISM For Leveling Agile Criteria And Fuzzy AHP To Determine The Relative Weights Of Evaluation Criteria And Fuzzy TOPSIS To Rank The Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Karbasian1

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In today’s organizations, performance measurement comes more to the foreground with the advancement in the high technology. Supplier selection is an important issue in supply chain management. In recent years, determining the best supplier in the supply chain has become a key strategic consideration. However, these decisions usually involve several objectives or criteria, and it is often necessary to compromise among possibly conflicting factors. Thus, the multiple criteria decision making (MCDM becomes a useful approach to solve this kind of problem. In order to use the conceptual framework for measuring performance supplier, a methodology that takes into account both quantitative and qualitative factors and the interrelations between them should be utilized. for leveling an integrated approach of analytic hierarchy process AHP and fuzzy TOPSIS method is proposed to obtain final ranking. The interactions among the criteria are also analyzed before arriving at a decision for the selection of supplier from among six alternatives. Linguistic values are used to assess the ratings and weights for criterion. These linguistic ratings can be expressed in triangular fuzzy numbers. Then, a hierarchy multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM model based on fuzzy-sets theory including FAHP and FTOPSIS are applied. There are two approaches for aggregating values including relative importance of evaluation criteria with respect to the overall objective and rating of alternatives with respect to each criterion in fuzzy group TOPSIS: First aggregation and Last aggregation. In first aggregation approach weight of each criterion and rating of alternatives with respect to each criterion gained from decision makers are aggregated at first and TOPSIS method then apply to these aggregate values. In last aggregation approach weight of each criterion and rating of alternatives with respect to each criterion gained from decision makers are used in TOPSIS method

  17. Real-Time and Delayed Analysis of Tree and Shrub Cores as Indicators of Subsurface Volatile Organic Compound Contamination, Durham Meadows Superfund Site, Durham, Connecticut, August 29, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Willey, Richard E.; Clifford, Scott; Murphy, James J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined volatile organic compound concentrations in cores from trees and shrubs for use as indicators of vadose-zone contamination or potential vapor intrusion by volatile organic compounds into buildings at the Durham Meadows Superfund Site, Durham, Connecticut. The study used both (1) real-time tree- and shrub-core analysis, which involved field heating the core samples for 5 to 10 minutes prior to field analysis, and (2) delayed analysis, which involved allowing the gases in the cores to equilibrate with the headspace gas in the sample vials unheated for 1 to 2 days prior to analysis. General correspondence was found between the two approaches, indicating that preheating and field analysis of vegetation cores is a viable approach to real-time monitoring of subsurface volatile organic compounds. In most cases, volatile organic compounds in cores from trees and shrubs at the Merriam Manufacturing Company property showed a general correspondence to the distribution of volatile organic compounds detected in a soil-gas survey, despite the fact that most of the soil-gas survey data in close proximity to the relevant trees were collected about 3 years prior to the tree-core collection. Most of the trees cored at the Durham Meadows Superfund Site, outside of the Merriam Manufacturing Company property, contained no volatile organic compounds and were in areas where indoor air sampling and soil-gas sampling showed little or no volatile organic compound concentrations. An exception was tree DM11, which contained barely detectable concentrations of trichloroethene near a house where previous investigations found low concentrations of trichloroethene (0.13 to 1.2 parts per billion by volume) in indoor air and 7.7 micrograms per liter of trichloroethene in the ground water. The barely detectable concentration of trichloroethene in tree DM11 and the lack of volatile organic compound detection in nearby tree DM10 (adjacent to the well having 7.7 micrograms of

  18. An alternative approach to the Army Physical Fitness Test two-mile run using critical velocity and isoperformance curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, David H; Smith, Abbie E; Kendall, Kristina L; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of critical velocity (CV) and isoperformance curves as an alternative to the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) two-mile running test. Seventy-eight men and women (mean +/- SE; age: 22.1 +/- 0.34 years; VO2(MAX): 46.1 +/- 0.82 mL/kg/min) volunteered to participate in this study. A VO2(MAX) test and four treadmill running bouts to exhaustion at varying intensities were completed. The relationship between total distance and time-to-exhaustion was tracked for each exhaustive run to determine CV and anaerobic running capacity. A VO2(MAX) prediction equation (Coefficient of determination: 0.805; Standard error of the estimate: 3.2377 mL/kg/min) was developed using these variables. Isoperformance curves were constructed for men and women to correspond with two-mile run times from APFT standards. Individual CV and anaerobic running capacity values were plotted and compared to isoperformance curves for APFT 2-mile run scores. Fifty-four individuals were determined to receive passing scores from this assessment. Physiological profiles identified from this procedure can be used to assess specific aerobic or anaerobic training needs. With the use of time-to-exhaustion as opposed to a time-trial format used in the two-mile run test, pacing strategies may be limited. The combination of variables from the CV test and isoperformance curves provides an alternative to standardized time-trial testing.

  19. Biomonitoring for metal contamination near two Superfund sites in Woburn, Massachusetts, using phytochelatins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawel, James E.; Hemond, Harold F

    2004-09-01

    Characterizing the spatial extent of groundwater metal contamination traditionally requires installing sampling wells, an expensive and time-consuming process in urban areas. Moreover, extrapolating biotic effects from metal concentrations alone is problematic, making ecological risk assessment difficult. Our study is the first to examine the use of phytochelatin measurements in tree leaves for delimiting biological metal stress in shallow, metal-contaminated groundwater systems. Three tree species (Rhamnus frangula, Acer platanoides, and Betula populifolia) growing above the shallow groundwater aquifer of the Aberjona River watershed in Woburn, Massachusetts, display a pattern of phytochelatin production consistent with known sources of metal contamination and groundwater flow direction near the Industri-Plex Superfund site. Results also suggest the existence of a second area of contaminated groundwater and elevated metal stress near the Wells G and H Superfund site downstream, in agreement with a recent EPA ecological risk assessment. Possible contamination pathways at this site are discussed.

  20. Analysis of the proposed EU regulation concerning biocide products and its opportunities for alternative approaches and a toxicology for the 21st century (t4 report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Daniele; Rabbit, Richard R

    2012-01-01

    On June 12, 2009, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a Regulation concerning the placement on the market and use of biocidal products, which, when it enters into force on January 1, 2013, will repeal and replace Directive 98/8/EC. The main reason for the revision of the current Directive was to promote best practices for environmental and human health protection, along with implementation of current developments in safety testing in order to create safer biocides. Moreover, the proposed Regulation aims to take into consideration the newest legislation on chemicals. This article evaluates the proposed Regulation in comparison to Directive 98/8/EC. Although the new proposal requires the sharing of vertebrate animal test data, both for product authorization and for newly developed active substances, it misses - in contrast to REACH - the opportunity to recognize the accelerating development of alternative approaches to animal testing, most recently with new momentum provided by "Toxicity Testing for the 21st Century", and to support the evolution of toxicology towards a new approach to testing. The new methods promise not only to decrease animal pain and suffering, but also to provide faster results and better prediction for human risk assessment compared to traditional methods. Unfortunately, methods mandated for human risk assessment in the proposal are still mainly based on traditional animal study extrapolation. We put forward and discuss possible alternative strategies, such as in vitro testing, integrated testing strategies, toxicokinetics, "omics", systems biology, bioinformatics, and computational modeling, all of which could be more encouraged by the proposal. Current opportunities to improve our tools for biocide risk assessment are discussed, delineating advantages, limitations, and development needs. It is suggested to open the proposed Regulation to alternative approaches that are based on human biology more than on extrapolation from animals

  1. Defined PEG smears as an alternative approach to enhance the search for crystallization conditions and crystal-quality improvement in reduced screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaikuad, Apirat, E-mail: apirat.chaikuad@sgc.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Knapp, Stefan [University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Building N240 Room 3.03, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Delft, Frank von, E-mail: apirat.chaikuad@sgc.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-28

    An alternative strategy for PEG sampling is suggested through the use of four newly defined PEG smears to enhance chemical space in reduced screens with a benefit towards protein crystallization. The quest for an optimal limited set of effective crystallization conditions remains a challenge in macromolecular crystallography, an issue that is complicated by the large number of chemicals which have been deemed to be suitable for promoting crystal growth. The lack of rational approaches towards the selection of successful chemical space and representative combinations has led to significant overlapping conditions, which are currently present in a multitude of commercially available crystallization screens. Here, an alternative approach to the sampling of widely used PEG precipitants is suggested through the use of PEG smears, which are mixtures of different PEGs with a requirement of either neutral or cooperatively positive effects of each component on crystal growth. Four newly defined smears were classified by molecular-weight groups and enabled the preservation of specific properties related to different polymer sizes. These smears not only allowed a wide coverage of properties of these polymers, but also reduced PEG variables, enabling greater sampling of other parameters such as buffers and additives. The efficiency of the smear-based screens was evaluated on more than 220 diverse recombinant human proteins, which overall revealed a good initial crystallization success rate of nearly 50%. In addition, in several cases successful crystallizations were only obtained using PEG smears, while various commercial screens failed to yield crystals. The defined smears therefore offer an alternative approach towards PEG sampling, which will benefit the design of crystallization screens sampling a wide chemical space of this key precipitant.

  2. Alternative energies; Energies alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, J.; Rossetti, P

    2007-07-01

    The earth took millions years to made the petroleum, the gas the coal and the uranium. Only a few centuries will be needed to exhaust these fossil fuels and some years to reach expensive prices. Will the wold continue on this way of energy compulsive consumption? The renewable energies and some citizen attitudes are sufficient to break this spiral. This book proposes to discuss these alternative energies. It shows that this attitude must be supported by the government. It takes stock on the more recent information concerning the renewable energies. it develops three main points: the electricity storage, the housing and the transports. (A.L.B.)

  3. Seven competing ways to recover the Michaelis-Menten equation reveal the alternative approaches to steady state modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction is sufficient to perceive many subtleties of network modeling, including the concentration and time scales separations, the formal equivalence between bulk phase and single-molecule approaches, or the relationships between single-cycle transient probabilities and steady state rates. Seven methods proposed by different authors and yielding the same famous Michaelis-Menten equation, are selected here to illustrate the kinetic and probabilistic use of rate constants and to review basic techniques for handling them. Finally, the general rate of an ordered multistep reaction, of which the Michaelis-Menten reaction is a particular case, is deduced from a Markovian approach.

  4. An alternative discourse of productive aging: A self-restrained approach in older Chinese people in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Minxia; Chui, Ernest Wing-Tak

    2016-08-01

    While Western discourses regarding productive aging emphasize individuals' contributions to economic productivity, the Confucian cultural heritage of the Chinese community may provide an alternative perspective. This qualitative study explores interpretations of what constitutes productive aging, based on a series of in-depth interviews with older Chinese people in Hong Kong. It shows that some of these individuals adopted a passive and indirect interpretation of productive aging, distinct from that found in Western countries. The Confucianism-based, collectivist, normative order underpinning Hong Kong society disposed these older people to adopting a self-restrained attitude with the aim of avoiding becoming a burden to others, especially family members. Such a tendency toward self-restraint or avoidance also encompassed a compromise between ideals and reality, with the older people opting to compromise their expectations of the younger generation as a whole, their adult children in particular, in terms of respect and reciprocity.

  5. Reconciling alternate methods for the determination of charge distributions: A probabilistic approach to high-dimensional least-squares approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Champagnat, Nicolas; Faou, Erwan

    2010-01-01

    We propose extensions and improvements of the statistical analysis of distributed multipoles (SADM) algorithm put forth by Chipot et al. in [6] for the derivation of distributed atomic multipoles from the quantum-mechanical electrostatic potential. The method is mathematically extended to general least-squares problems and provides an alternative approximation method in cases where the original least-squares problem is computationally not tractable, either because of its ill-posedness or its high-dimensionality. The solution is approximated employing a Monte Carlo method that takes the average of a random variable defined as the solutions of random small least-squares problems drawn as subsystems of the original problem. The conditions that ensure convergence and consistency of the method are discussed, along with an analysis of the computational cost in specific instances.

  6. SplicePie: a novel analytical approach for the detection of alternative, non-sequential and recursive splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulyakhina, Irina; Gazzoli, Isabella; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Verwey, Nisha; den Dunnen, Johan T; den Dunnen, Johan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Laros, Jeroen F J

    2015-07-13

    Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism present in eukaryotic cells to obtain a wide range of transcripts and protein isoforms from a relatively small number of genes. The mechanisms regulating (alternative) splicing and the paradigm of consecutive splicing have recently been challenged, especially for genes with a large number of introns. RNA-Seq, a powerful technology using deep sequencing in order to determine transcript structure and expression levels, is usually performed on mature mRNA, therefore not allowing detailed analysis of splicing progression. Sequencing pre-mRNA at different stages of splicing potentially provides insight into mRNA maturation. Although the number of tools that analyze total and cytoplasmic RNA in order to elucidate the transcriptome composition is rapidly growing, there are no tools specifically designed for the analysis of nuclear RNA (which contains mixtures of pre- and mature mRNA). We developed dedicated algorithms to investigate the splicing process. In this paper, we present a new classification of RNA-Seq reads based on three major stages of splicing: pre-, intermediate- and post-splicing. Applying this novel classification we demonstrate the possibility to analyze the order of splicing. Furthermore, we uncover the potential to investigate the multi-step nature of splicing, assessing various types of recursive splicing events. We provide the data that gives biological insight into the order of splicing, show that non-sequential splicing of certain introns is reproducible and coinciding in multiple cell lines. We validated our observations with independent experimental technologies and showed the reliability of our method. The pipeline, named SplicePie, is freely available at: https://github.com/pulyakhina/splicing_analysis_pipeline. The example data can be found at: https://barmsijs.lumc.nl/HG/irina/example_data.tar.gz.

  7. A green analytical chemistry approach for lipid extraction: computation methods in the selection of green solvents as alternative to hexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascant, Mari Merce; Breil, Cassandra; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne Silvie; Chemat, Farid

    2017-05-01

    There is a great interest in finding alternatives and green solvents in extraction processes to replace petroleum based solvents. In order to investigate these possibilities, computational methods, as Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) and conductor-like screening model for real solvent (COSMO-RS), were used in this work to predict the solvation power of a series of solvents in salmon fish lipids. Additionally, experimental studies were used to evaluate the performance in lipids extraction using 2-methyltetrahydrofurane, cyclopentyl methyl ether, dimethyl carbonate, isopropanol, ethanol, ethyl acetate, p-cymene and d-limonene compared with hexane. Lipid classes of extracts were obtained by using high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), whereas gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID) technique was employed to obtain fatty acid profiles. Some differences between theoretical and experimental results were observed, especially regarding the behavior of p-cymene and d-limonene, which separate from the predicted capability. Results obtained from HPTLC indicated that p-cymene and d-limonene extract triglycerides (TAGs) and diglycerides (DAGs) at levels of 73 and 19%, respectively, whereas the other studied extracts contain between 75 and 76% of TAGs and between 16 and 17% of DAGs. Fatty acid profiles, obtained by using GC-FID, indicated that saturated fatty acids (SFAs) between 19.5 and 19.9% of extracted oil, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in the range between 43.5 and 44.9%, and PUFAs between 31.2 and 34.6% were extracted. p-Cymene and limonene extracts contained lower percentages than the other studied solvents of some PUFAs due probably to the fact that these unsaturated fatty acids are more susceptible to oxidative degradation than MUFAs. Ethyl acetate has been found to be the best alternative solvent to hexane for the extraction of salmon oil lipids. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Electrochemical peroxidation of PCBs and VOCs in superfund site water and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrudato, R.J.; Chiarenzelli, J.R. [SUNY, Oswego, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An electrochemical peroxidation (ECP) process has been developed and used to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and volatile organic compounds (VOC)-contaminated water, sludge, and sediments at a New York State Federal and State Superfund Site. The process involves passing an oscillating low-amperage (<10 amps) current through steel electrodes immersed in an acidified water or sediment slurry into which hydrogen peroxide (<1,000 ppm) is added. The generated free radicals attack organic compounds, including organo-metallic complexes and refractory compounds including PCBs. PCB degradation ranged from about 30% to 80% in experiments involving Federal Superfund Site sediments; total PCBs were reduced by {approximately}97% to 68%, respectively, in water and slurry collected from a State Superfund subsurface storage tank. VOC bench-scale experiments involved chloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and acetone and after a 3-min ECP treatment, degradation ranged from >94% to about 99.9%. Results indicate the ECP is a viable process to degrade organic contaminants in water and sediment suspensions. Because the treated water suspensions are acidified, select trace metal sorbed to the particulates is solubilized and therefore can be segregated from the particulates, offering a process that simultaneously degrades organic contaminants and separates trace metals. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. A simple 2D non-parametric resampling statistical approach to assess confidence in species identification in DNA barcoding--an alternative to likelihood and bayesian approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qian; He, Li-Jun; Zhang, Ai-Bing

    2012-01-01

    In the recent worldwide campaign for the global biodiversity inventory via DNA barcoding, a simple and easily used measure of confidence for assigning sequences to species in DNA barcoding has not been established so far, although the likelihood ratio test and the bayesian approach had been proposed to address this issue from a statistical point of view. The TDR (Two Dimensional non-parametric Resampling) measure newly proposed in this study offers users a simple and easy approach to evaluate the confidence of species membership in DNA barcoding projects. We assessed the validity and robustness of the TDR approach using datasets simulated under coalescent models, and an empirical dataset, and found that TDR measure is very robust in assessing species membership of DNA barcoding. In contrast to the likelihood ratio test and bayesian approach, the TDR method stands out due to simplicity in both concepts and calculations, with little in the way of restrictive population genetic assumptions. To implement this approach we have developed a computer program package (TDR1.0beta) freely available from ftp://202.204.209.200/education/video/TDR1.0beta.rar.

  10. An Alternative Evaluation Approach for the Problem-Solving Training Program: A Utilization-Focused Evaluation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1984-01-01

    A utilization-focused approach in evaluating a problem-solving skills training program (see TM 510 179) would have placed more emphasis on identifying evaluation users, their information needs, and likely use of findings. Other methods options are also discussed, along with how to prepare decision makers for utilization. (Author/BW)

  11. Alternatives for Mixed-Effects Meta-Regression Models in the Reliability Generalization Approach: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, José Antonio; Botella, Juan; Sánchez-Meca, Julio; Marín-Martínez, Fulgencio

    2013-01-01

    Since heterogeneity between reliability coefficients is usually found in reliability generalization studies, moderator analyses constitute a crucial step for that meta-analytic approach. In this study, different procedures for conducting mixed-effects meta-regression analyses were compared. Specifically, four transformation methods for the…

  12. One-Tube-Only Standardized Site-Directed Mutagenesis: An Alternative Approach to Generate Amino Acid Substitution Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingo, J.; Erramuzpe, A.; Luna, S.; Aurtenetxe, O.; Amo, L.; Diez, I.; Schepens, J.T.G.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Cortes, J.M.; Pulido, R.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) is a powerful tool to create defined collections of protein variants for experimental and clinical purposes, but effectiveness is compromised when a large number of mutations is required. We present here a one-tube-only standardized SDM approach that generates compreh

  13. Measuring population health: costs of alternative survey approaches in the Nouna Health and Demographic Surveillance System in rural Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Lietz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 40 Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS sites in 19 different countries. The running costs of HDSS sites are high. The financing of HDSS activities is of major importance, and adding external health surveys to the HDSS is challenging. To investigate the ways of improving data quality and collection efficiency in the Nouna HDSS in Burkina Faso, the stand-alone data collection activities of the HDSS and the Household Morbidity Survey (HMS were integrated, and the paper-based questionnaires were consolidated into a single tablet-based questionnaire, the Comprehensive Disease Assessment (CDA. Objective: The aims of this study are to estimate and compare the implementation costs of the two different survey approaches for measuring population health. Design: All financial costs of stand-alone (HDSS and HMS and integrated (CDA surveys were estimated from the perspective of the implementing agency. Fixed and variable costs of survey implementation and key cost drivers were identified. The costs per household visit were calculated for both survey approaches. Results: While fixed costs of survey implementation were similar for the two survey approaches, there were considerable variations in variable costs, resulting in an estimated annual cost saving of about US$45,000 under the integrated survey approach. This was primarily because the costs of data management for the tablet-based CDA survey were considerably lower than for the paper-based stand-alone surveys. The cost per household visit from the integrated survey approach was US$21 compared with US$25 from the stand-alone surveys for collecting the same amount of information from 10,000 HDSS households. Conclusions: The CDA tablet-based survey method appears to be feasible and efficient for collecting health and demographic data in the Nouna HDSS in rural Burkina Faso. The possibility of using the tablet-based data collection platform to improve the quality

  14. The influence of expert opinions on the selection of wastewater treatment alternatives: a group decision-making approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbar, Pradip P; Karmakar, Subhankar; Asolekar, Shyam R

    2013-10-15

    The application of multiple-attribute decision-making (MADM) to real life decision problems suggests that avoiding the loss of information through scenario-based approaches and including expert opinions in the decision-making process are two major challenges that require more research efforts. Recently, a wastewater treatment technology selection effort has been made with a 'scenario-based' method of MADM. This paper focuses on a novel approach to incorporate expert opinions into the scenario-based decision-making process, as expert opinions play a major role in the selection of treatment technologies. The sets of criteria and the indicators that are used consist of both qualitative and quantitative criteria. The group decision-making (GDM) approach that is implemented for aggregating expert opinions is based on an analytical hierarchy process (AHP), which is the most widely used MADM method. The pairwise comparison matrices (PCMs) for qualitative criteria are formed based on expert opinions, whereas, a novel approach is proposed for generating PCMs for quantitative criteria. It has been determined that the experts largely prefer natural treatment systems because they are more sustainable in any scenario. However, PCMs based on expert opinions suggest that advanced technologies such as the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) can also be appropriate for a given decision scenario. The proposed GDM approach is a rationalized process that will be more appropriate in realistic scenarios where multiple stakeholders with local and regional societal priorities are involved in the selection of treatment technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The play approach to learning in the context of families and schools: an alternative paradigm for nutrition and fitness education in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, K A; Gallahue, D L; Gruen, G E; Tridle, M; Bewley, N; Steele, K

    1995-10-01

    An alternative paradigm for nutrition and fitness education centers on understanding and developing skill in implementing a play approach to learning about healthful eating and promoting active play in the context of the child, the family, and the school. The play approach is defined as a process for learning that is intrinsically motivated, enjoyable, freely chosen, nonliteral, safe, and actively engaged in by young learners. Making choices, assuming responsibility for one's decisions and actions, and having fun are inherent components of the play approach to learning. In this approach, internal cognitive transactions and intrinsic motivation are the primary forces that ultimately determine healthful choices and life habits. Theoretical models of children's learning--the dynamic systems theory and the cognitive-developmental theory of Jean Piaget--provide a theoretical basis for nutrition and fitness education in the 21st century. The ultimate goal is to develop partnerships of children, families, and schools in ways that promote the well-being of children and translate into healthful life habits. The play approach is an ongoing process of learning that is applicable to learners of all ages.

  16. Alternative additives; Alternative additiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-15

    In this project a number of industrial and agricultural waste products have been characterised and evaluated in terms of alkali-getter performance. The intended use is for biomass-fired power stations aiming at reducing corrosion or slagging related problems. The following products have been obtained, characterised and evaluated: 1) Brewery draff 2) Danish de-gassed manure 3) Paper sludge 4) Moulding sand 5) Spent bleaching earth 6) Anorthosite 7) Sand 8) Clay-sludge. Most of the above alternative additive candidates are deemed unsuitable due to insufficient chemical effect and/or expensive requirements for pre-treatment (such as drying and transportation). 3 products were selected for full-scale testing: de-gassed manure, spent bleaching earth and clay slugde. The full scale tests were undertaken at the biomass-fired power stations in Koege, Slagelse and Ensted. Spent bleaching earth (SBE) and clay sludge were the only tested additive candidates that had a proven ability to react with KCl, to thereby reduce Cl-concentrations in deposits, and reduce the deposit flux to superheater tubes. Their performance was shown to nearly as good as commercial additives. De-gassed manure, however, did not evaluate positively due to inhibiting effects of Ca in the manure. Furthermore, de-gassed manure has a high concentration of heavy metals, which imposes a financial burden with regard to proper disposal of the ash by-products. Clay-sludge is a wet clay slurring, and drying and transportation of this product entails substantial costs. Spent bleaching does not require much pre-treatment and is therefore the most promising alternative additive. On the other hand, bleaching earth contains residual plant oil which means that a range of legislation relating to waste combustion comes into play. Not least a waste combustion fee of 330 DKK/tonne. For all alternative (and commercial) additives disposal costs of the increase ash by-products represents a significant cost. This is

  17. An alternative approach to Michaelis-Menten kinetics that is based on the Renormalization Group: Comparison with the perturbation expansion beyond the sQSSA

    CERN Document Server

    Coluzzi, Barbara; Bersani, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    We recall the perturbation expansion for Michaelis-Menten kinetics, beyond the standard quasi-steady-state approximation (sQSSA). Against this background, we are able to appropriately apply the alternative approach to the study of singularly perturbed differential equations that is based on the renormalization group (SPDERG), by clarifying similarities and differences. In the present demanding situation, we directly renormalize the bare initial condition value for the substrate. Our main results are: i) the 2nd order SPDERG uniform approximations to the correct solutions contain, up to 1st order, the same outer components as the known perturbation expansion ones; ii) the differential equation to be solved for the derivation of the 1st order outer substrate component is simpler within the SPDERG approach; iii) the approximations better reproduce the numerical solutions of the original problem in a region encompassing the matching one, because of the 2nd order terms in the inner components, calculated here for ...

  18. A novel mask-based approach to improve low-k1 corner and angle definition in alternating-aperture phase-shift mask structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kent H.; Siefers, David; MacDonald, Susan; Buck, Peter D.

    2005-05-01

    A novel approach to improve the imaging of the critical magnetic pole structure in the disk drive read head is introduced. A 90-degree sub-resolution opening is added to an alternating aperture phase shift mask to reduce a strong proximity effect in the non-Manhattan tapered section, while maintaining the enhanced printability of the linear segment of the pole region.. Simulation indicates that this opening provides a method to correct the observed distortion in the printed edge without reducing the effectiveness of the altPSM character of the pole itself. We have designed test patterns with this concept and built photomasks to evaluate mask manufacturability and to empirically test the impact of the 90-degree window on final pattern fidelity on wafer. Preliminary results indicate positive correction effects, as well as some potential issues which may be resolved using additional, established correction approaches.

  19. Seven competing ways to recover the Michaelis-Menten equation reveal the alternative approaches to steady state modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Denis; Ruelle, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction is sufficient to perceive many subtleties of network modeling, including the concentration and time scales separations, the formal equivalence between bulk phase and single-molecule approaches, or the relationships between single-cycle transient probabilities and steady state rates. Seven methods proposed by different authors and yielding the same famous Michaelis-Menten equation, are selected here to illustrate the kinetic and p...

  20. ALTERNATIVE APPROACH IN THE TREATMENT OF A GINGIVAL CLEFT ASSOCIATED WITH LABIAL FRENULUM. A 3-YEAR FOLLOW-UP. (Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The term Gingival cleft refers to a fissure in the gingival tissues and is usually caused by traumatic oral hygiene, abnormal frenula, trauma from occlusion, orthodontic, or pierce related trauma. Gingival clefts are classified depending on the extent of the inclusion of the gingival thickness into red and white. The recommended treatment approach for the incomplete white clefts is the gingivectomy of the affected keratinized tissue followed by a coronally advanced flap for the root coveradge, while the complete white clefts are treated with a laterally moved, coronally advanced flap, or a free gingival graft procedure. OBJECTIVE: This report presents a case with a spontaneous healing of an incomplete gingival cleft associated with a maxillary labial frenulum after an alternative frenuloectomy approach. METHODS: M.G. (45 with a localized chronic periodontitis, an abnormal papillary maxillary frenulum and an incomplete white cleft on the marginal gingiva of the left central incisor. An alternative frenuloectomy approach combined with a free gingival graft was selected for the correction of the abnormal frenulum. RESULTS:On the sixth month after the surgical procedure an almost complete recovery of the gingival margin was observed.The result at the third year demonstrates a stable gingival margin with a complete tissue recovery. CONCLUSION: The applied combined surgical approach led to a complete gingival recovery of the incomplete white gingival cleft without the commonly used gingivectomy and CAF. Further research is recommended to clarify the adjunctive benefits of the FGG in patients with gingival clefts associated with abnormal frenula.

  1. Two-stage bottom-up tiered approach combining several alternatives for identification of eye irritation potential of chemicals including insoluble or volatile substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Mori, Taeko; Abo, Takayuki; Ooshima, Kenichi; Hayashi, Takumi; Komano, Tomoko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Takatsu, Akihiko; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2012-10-01

    For the assessment of eye irritation, one alternative test may not completely replace the rabbit Draize test. In the present study, we examined the predictive potential of a tiered approach analyzing the results from several alternatives (i.e., the Short Time Exposure (STE) test, the EpiOcular assay, the Hen's Egg Test-Chorioallantoic Membrane (HET-CAM) assay and the Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) assay) for assessing Globally Harmonized System (GHS) eye irritation categories. Fifty-six chemicals including alcohols, surfactants, and esters were selected with a balanced GHS category and a wide range of chemical classes. From a standpoint of both assessable sample numbers and predictive accuracy, the more favorable tiered approach was considered to be the two-stage bottom-up tiered approach combining the STE test, the EpiOcular assay followed by the BCOP assay (accuracy 69.6%, under prediction rate 8.9%). Moreover, a more favorable predictive capacity (accuracy 71.4%, under prediction rate 3.6%) was obtained when high volatile alcohols/esters with vapor pressures >6 kilopascal (kPa) at 25°C were evaluated with EpiOcular assay instead of the STE test. From these results, the two-stage bottom-up tiered approach combining the STE test, the EpiOcular assay followed by the BCOP assay might be a promising method for the classification of GHS eye irritation category (Not classified (NC), Category 2 (Cat. 2), and Category 1 (Cat. 1)) for a wide range of test chemicals regardless of solubility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Crafting a neo-Vygotskian approach to adult education in Portugal: Collaborative project work in an alternative curriculum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courela C.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative project work facilitates social interactions among peers and between them and their teachers. It allows students to work in their zone of proximal development (ZPD, promoting their knowledge appropriation. It empowers adult students, allowing them to express their voices and their cultures. Inter-empowerment mechanisms are part of this process, facilitating the internalization of intra-empowerment mechanisms. Both of them shape students’ life trajectories of participation (César, 2013a. This work is part of the Interaction and Knowledge (IK project. During 12 years (1994/1995–2005/2006 we studied and promoted social interactions in formal educational scenarios. We assumed an interpretative paradigm and developed an action-research project (three-year alternative curriculum, 7th–9th grades and a 10-year follow up. The participants were the seven students who completed this course, their teachers, and other educational and social agents. Data collecting instruments included observation, interviews, informal conversations, tasks inspired by projective techniques, students’ protocols, and documents. Data treatment and analysis were based on a narrative content analysis. The results are mainly focused on one student: Ernesto. His legitimate participation in this course facilitated his inclusion in school and in society. It promoted his socio-cognitive and emotional development and allowed him to internalize intra-empowerment mechanisms. This enabled him to improve his life trajectory of participation.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for angiosarcoma of scalp as alternative approach for surgical treatment in patient with severe co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Yaroslavtseva-Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of successful photodynamic therapy in patient of 86 y.o. with diagnosis: angiosarcoma of right temporal-parietal region stage IIA (Т2вN0M0 is reported. The tumor was as soft tissue round shape lesion with tuberous contours 3.4х3.4х1.1 cm in size, located in subcutaneous tissue in right parietal region with no scull bone invasion. The patient was refused to surgical treatment with general anesthesia due to severe cardiovascular co-morbidity. The patient underwent a course of photodynamic therapy with Photolon. The photosensitizer was intravenousely introduced for 3 h before irradiation at dose of 1 mg/kg body weight. The parameters of irradiation were as follows: output power – 0.8 W, light dose – 150 J/cm2, 4 irradiation fields 2.5 cm in diameter. During the irradiation there were moderate pain which did not require drug management. After PDT complete regression of the tumor was achieved. For nowadays (11 months after treatment the patient is observed with no recurrence. The reported case shows that photodynamic therapy may be successfully used for alternative treatment of soft tissue angiosarcoma in patients with no ability for surgical treatment. 

  4. Evaluating environmental impacts of alternative construction waste management approaches using supply-chain-linked life-cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukvar, Murat; Egilmez, Gokhan; Tatari, Omer

    2014-06-01

    Waste management in construction is critical for the sustainable treatment of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) waste materials, and recycling of these wastes has been considered as one of the best strategies in minimization of C&D debris. However, recycling of C&D materials may not always be a feasible strategy for every waste type and therefore recycling and other waste treatment strategies should be supported by robust decision-making models. With the aim of assessing the net carbon, energy, and water footprints of C&D recycling and other waste management alternatives, a comprehensive economic input-output-based hybrid life-cycle assessment model is developed by tracing all of the economy-wide supply-chain impacts of three waste management strategies: recycling, landfilling, and incineration. Analysis results showed that only the recycling of construction materials provided positive environmental footprint savings in terms of carbon, energy, and water footprints. Incineration is a better option as a secondary strategy after recycling for water and energy footprint categories, whereas landfilling is found to be as slightly better strategy when carbon footprint is considered as the main focus of comparison. In terms of construction materials' environmental footprint, nonferrous metals are found to have a significant environmental footprint reduction potential if recycled.

  5. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm by Trachyspermum ammi seeds: an approach of alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rosina; Adil, Mohd; Danishuddin, Mohd; Verma, Praveen K; Khan, Asad U

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the crude and active solvent fraction of Trachyspermum ammi on S. mutans cariogenicity, effect on expression of genes involved in biofilm formation and caries development in rats. GC-MS was carried out to identify the major components present in the crude and the active fraction of T. ammi. The crude extract and the solvent fraction exhibiting least MIC were selected for further experiments. Scanning electron microscopy was carried out to observe the effect of the extracts on S. mutans biofilm. Comparative gene expression analysis was carried out for nine selected genes. 2-Isopropyl-5-methyl-phenol was found as major compound in crude and the active fraction. Binding site of this compound within the proteins involved in biofilm formation, was mapped with the help of docking studies. Real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed significant suppression of the genes involved in biofilm formation. All the test groups showed reduction in caries (smooth surface as well as sulcal surface caries) in rats. Moreover, it also provides new insight to understand the mechanism influencing biofilm formation in S. mutans. Furthermore, the data suggest the putative cariostatic properties of T. Ammi and hence can be used as an alternative medicine to prevent caries infection.

  6. Promoting Community-based Extension Agents as an Alternative Approach to Formal Agricultural Extension Service Delivery in Northern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Z. Bonye

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The CBEA concept is an alternative to community-based extension intervention aimed at addressing the inadequacy of formal extension services provision to rural poor farmers of the Northern Regions of Ghana. The study sought to find out the extent to which the Community-Based Extension Agent has improved access to extension services to rural farmers. The study used qualitative and quantitative methods such as, Focus Group Discussions, Key Informants, In-depth interviews, Household and Institutional Questionnaires to collect and analyses data. The findings are that: there are vibrant Community Based Extension Agents established providing extension services in crop, livestock and environmental issues in the study District; farmers groups are linked to external agents and other stakeholders for access to credit facilities; the CBEAs were found to be the main link between the community and external agents; the most dominant extension services delivery carried out by the CBEAs in the entire study district were in crop production, livestock production and bushfire management; there are well established criteria for selecting Community Based Extension Agents, and community Based Extension Agents were least motivated. The study recommends among others that: motivation packages such as bicycles would facilitate the movement CBEAs to reach out to majority of the farmers. There is also the need to link CBEAs to relevant institutions/organizations for support and establishment of mechanisms to generate funds to support activities. Finally, stakeholders and organization need to intensify community sensitization and awareness creation on activities of CBEAs.

  7. Promoting Community-Based Extension Agents as an Alternative Approach to Formal Agricultural Extension Service Delivery in Northern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Z. Bonye

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The CBEA concept is an alternative to community-based extension intervention aimed at addressing the inadequacy of formal extension services provision to rural poor farmers of the Northern Regions of Ghana. The study sought to find out the extent to which the Community-Based Extension Agent has improved access to extension services to rural farmers. The study used qualitative and quantitative methods such as, Focus Group Discussions, Key Informants, In-depth interviews, Household and Institutional Questionnaires to collect and analyses data. The findings are that: there are vibrant Community Based Extension Agents established providing extension services in crop, livestock and environmental issues in the study District; farmers groups are linked to external agents and other stakeholders for access to credit facilities; the CBEAs were found to be the main link between the community and external agents; the most dominant extension services delivery carried out by the CBEAs in the entire study district were in crop production, livestock production and bushfire management; there are well established criteria for selecting Community Based Extension Agents, and community Based Extension Agents were least motivated. The study recommends among others that: motivation packages such as bicycles would facilitate the movement CBEAs to reach out to majority of the farmers. There is also the need to link CBEAs to relevant institutions/organizations for support and establishment of mechanisms to generate funds to support activities. Finally, stakeholders and organization need to intensify community sensitization and awareness creation on activities of CBEAs.

  8. Antioxidant agents: a future alternative approach in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Cuba, Letícia; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently employed for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). It destroys tumor cells, but it is not selective, also affecting healthy tissues and producing adverse effects. One that stands out is oral mucositis because of the morbidity that it is capable of causing. This lesion is characterized by the presence of erythema, ulcerations, pain, opportunistic infections, and weight loss. These side effects can lead to serious situations that require the interruption of the antineoplastic treatment and can result in hospitalization and even death. The complex mechanisms linked to the pathogenesis of oral mucositis were recently established, and since then, the control of oxidative stress (OS) has been tied to the prevention and management of this disease. The authors have carried out a review of the literature about the use of antioxidant agents in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis, using the PubMed database. This review has shown that the research on use of antioxidants (AOX) has proved insufficient to justify suggesting the products in treatment protocols. Results are promising, however, and AOX may represent a future alternative in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis.

  9. Toward an Alternative Therapeutic Approach for Skin Infections: Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacilli Against Antibiotic-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mohamed M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Zaki, Noha M

    2013-09-01

    The wide spread of antimicrobial resistance has urged the need of alternative therapeutic approach. In this context, probiotic lactobacilli have been reported for the prevention and treatment of many gastrointestinal and urogenital infections. However, very little is known about their antagonistic activity against skin pathogens. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the potential of lactobacilli to interfere with pathogenesis features of two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens, namely methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multiple-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 49 lactobacilli were recovered, identified and tested for their antagonistic activities against the aforementioned pathogens. Of these, eight isolates were capable of blocking the adherence of pathogens to mammalian cells independent of the skin pathogen tested or model adopted. Moreover, three Lactobacillus isolates (LRA4, LC2 and LR5) effectively prevented the pathogen internalization into epithelial cells in addition to potentiating phagocyte-mediated pathogen killing. Interestingly, the lactobacilli LC2, LF9 and LRA4 markedly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates in coculture experiments. Besides, the lactobacilli LRA4, LC2, LR5 and LF9 have counteracted pathogen cytotoxicity. Taken together, the present study revealed some inhibitory activities of lactobacilli against two antibiotic-resistant skin pathogens. Moreover, it revealed two lactobacilli, namely LC2 and LRA4, with antagonistic capacity against different virulence determinants of skin pathogens. These lactobacilli are considered promising probiotic candidates that may represent an alternative therapeutic approach for skin infections.

  10. An alternative approach to approximate entropy threshold value (r) selection: application to heart rate variability and systolic blood pressure variability under postural challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A; Saini, B S; Singh, D

    2016-05-01

    This study presents an alternative approach to approximate entropy (ApEn) threshold value (r) selection. There are two limitations of traditional ApEn algorithm: (1) the occurrence of undefined conditional probability (CPu) where no template match is found and (2) use of a crisp tolerance (radius) threshold 'r'. To overcome these limitations, CPu is substituted with optimum bias setting ɛ opt which is found by varying ɛ from (1/N - m) to 1 in the increments of 0.05, where N is the length of the series and m is the embedding dimension. Furthermore, an alternative approach for selection of r based on binning the distance values obtained by template matching to calculate ApEnbin is presented. It is observed that ApEnmax, ApEnchon and ApEnbin converge for ɛ opt = 0.6 in 50 realizations (n = 50) of random number series of N = 300. Similar analysis suggests ɛ opt = 0.65 and ɛ opt = 0.45 for 50 realizations each of fractional Brownian motion and MIX(P) series (Lu et al. in J Clin Monit Comput 22(1):23-29, 2008). ɛ opt = 0.5 is suggested for heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) signals obtained from 50 young healthy subjects under supine and upright position. It is observed that (1) ApEnbin of HRV is lower than SBPV, (2) ApEnbin of HRV increases from supine to upright due to vagal inhibition and (3) ApEnbin of BPV decreases from supine to upright due to sympathetic activation. Moreover, merit of ApEnbin is that it provides an alternative to the cumbersome ApEnmax procedure.

  11. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Is It a Plausible Alternative to the Traditional Four-Port Laparoscopic Approach?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Arroyo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current standard-of-care for treatment of cholecystectomy is the four port laparoscopic approach. The development of single incision/laparoendoscopic single site surgery (SILC/LESS has now led to the development of new techniques for removal of the gallbladder. The use of SILC/LESS is now currently being evaluated as the next step in treatment of cholecystectomy. This review is an attempt to consolidate the current knowledge and analyze the feasibility of world-wide implementation of SILC/LESS.

  12. Cost benefit indicators associated with the integration of alternative energy sources: A systems approach for Carinthia, Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlgemuth, N.

    1999-01-01

    , over the horizon to 2020, the technical and market penetration potentials of AES in the context of the Carinthian energy system. Apart from market penetration rates, cost benefit indicators are also computed to support the decision making process in the local energy and environmental policy....... These indicators comprise import dependency, employment effects, capital expenditure, carbon dioxide emissions and government revenues. The systems approach adopted, the simultaneous consideration of not only market penetration rates but also of the associated economic indicators, gives a more complete picture...

  13. The clinical effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy and an alternative medicine approach in reducing symptoms of depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhandeh, Mansoureh; Talib, Mansor Abu; Hunt, Caroline Jane

    2016-05-30

    The main aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of two psychotherapeutic approaches, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and a complementary medicine method Reiki, in reducing depression scores in adolescents. We recruited 188 adolescent patients who were 12-17 years old. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT, Reiki or wait-list. Depression scores were assessed before and after the 12 week interventions or wait-list. CBT showed a significantly greater decrease in Child Depression Inventory (CDI) scores across treatment than both Reiki (pReiki also showed greater decreases in CDI scores across treatment relative to the wait-list control condition (p=.031). The analyses indicated a significant interaction between gender, condition and change in CDI scores, such that male participants showed a smaller treatment effect for Reiki than did female participants. Both CBT and Reiki were effective in reducing the symptoms of depression over the treatment period, with effect for CBT greater than Reiki. These findings highlight the importance of early intervention for treatment of depression using both cognitive and complementary medicine approaches. However, research that tests complementary therapies over a follow-up period and against a placebo treatment is required.

  14. Lean systems approaches to health technology assessment: a patient-focused alternative to cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, John F P

    2006-12-01

    Many countries now use health technology assessment (HTA) to review new and emerging technologies, especially with regard to reimbursement, pricing and/or clinical guidelines. One of the common, but not universal, features of these systems is the use of economic evaluation, normally cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA), to confirm that new technologies offer value for money. Many have criticised these systems as primarily being concerned with cost containment, rather than advancing the interests of patients or innovators. This paper calls into question the underlying principles of CEA by arguing that value in the healthcare system may in fact be unconstrained. It is suggested that 'lean management principles' can be used not only to trim waste from the health system, but as a method of creating real incentives for innovation and value creation. Following the lean paradigm, this value must be defined purely from the patients' perspective, and the entire health system needs to work towards the creation of such value. This paper offers as a practical example a lean approach to HTA, arguing that such an approach would lead to better incentives for innovation in health, as well as more patient-friendly outcomes in the long run.

  15. An Alternative Humans to Mars Approach: Reducing Mission Mass with Multiple Mars Flyby Trajectories and Minimal Capability Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Ryan J.; Jedrey, Richard; Landau, Damon; Ocampo, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Mars flyby trajectories and Earth return trajectories have the potential to enable lower- cost and sustainable human exploration of Mars. Flyby and return trajectories are true minimum energy paths with low to zero post-Earth departure maneuvers. By emplacing the large crew vehicles required for human transit on these paths, the total fuel cost can be reduced. The traditional full-up repeating Earth-Mars-Earth cycler concept requires significant infrastructure, but a Mars only flyby approach minimizes mission mass and maximizes opportunities to build-up missions in a stepwise manner. In this paper multiple strategies for sending a crew of 4 to Mars orbit and back are examined. With pre-emplaced assets in Mars orbit, a transit habitat and a minimally functional Mars taxi, a complete Mars mission can be accomplished in 3 SLS launches and 2 Mars Flyby's, including Orion. While some years are better than others, ample opportunities exist within a given 15-year Earth-Mars alignment cycle. Building up a mission cadence over time, this approach can translate to Mars surface access. Risk reduction, which is always a concern for human missions, is mitigated by the use of flybys with Earth return (some of which are true free returns) capability.

  16. Combinatorial peptide libraries as an alternative approach to the identification of ligands for tumor-reactive cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, C; Rubio-Godoy, V; Dutoit, V; Guillaume, P; Simon, R; Zhao, Y; Houghten, R A; Cerottini, J C; Romero, P; Valmori, D

    2001-07-01

    The recent identification of molecularly defined human tumor antigens recognized by autologous CTLs has opened new opportunities for the development of antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Despite extensive work, however, the number of CTL-defined tumor antigens that are suitable targets for generic vaccination of cancer patients is still limited, mostly because of the painstaking and lengthy nature of the procedures currently used for their identification. A novel approach is based on the combined use of combinatorial peptide libraries in positional scanning format (positional scanning synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries, PS-SCLs) and tumor-reactive CTL clones. To validate this approach, we herein analyzed in detail the recognition of PS-SCLs by Melan-A-specific CTL clones. Our results indicate that, at least for some clones, most of the amino acids composing the native antigenic peptide can be identified through the use of PS-SCLs. Interestingly, this analysis also allowed the identification of peptide analogues with increased antigenic activity as well as agonist peptides containing multiple amino-acid substitutions. In addition, biometrical analysis of the data generated by PS-SCL screening allowed the identification of the native ligand in a public database. Overall, these data demonstrate the successful use of PS-SCLs for the identification and optimization of tumor-associated CTL epitopes.

  17. Economic hardship in childhood and adult health trajectories: An alternative approach to investigating life-course processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Kim M; Willson, Andrea E

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we advance existing research on health as a life course process by conceptualizing and measuring both childhood disadvantage and health as dynamic processes in order to investigate the relationship between trajectories of early life socioeconomic conditions and trajectories of health in midlife. We utilize a trajectory-based analysis that takes a disaggregated, person-centered approach to understand dynamic trajectories of health as latent variables that reflect the timing, duration and change in health conditions experienced by respondents over a period of 10 years in midlife as a function of stability and change in exposure to economic hardship in early life. Results from repeated-measures latent class analysis of longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics indicate that economic hardship in childhood has long-term, negative consequences for health both among individuals beginning life and remaining in poverty as well as those moving into poverty. In contrast, adults with more advantaged early life experiences, or who moved out of poverty during the period of observation, were at a lower risk of experiencing health trajectories characterized by the early onset or increasing risk of disease. We argue that a person-centered, disaggregated approach to the study of the relationship between socioeconomic status and health across the life course holds potential for the study of health inequality and that a greater focus on trajectory-based analysis is needed.

  18. The neurovestibular challenges of astronauts and balance patients: some past countermeasures and two alternative approaches to elicitation, assessment and mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Lawson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Astronauts and vestibular patients face analogous challenges to orientation function due to adaptive exogenous (weightlessness-induced or endogenous (pathology-induced alterations in the processing of acceleration stimuli. Given some neurovestibular similarities between these challenges, both affected groups may benefit from shared research approaches and adaptation measurement/improvement strategies. This paper reviews various past strategies and introduces two plausible ground-based approaches, the first of which is a method for eliciting and assessing vestibular adaptation-induced imbalance. Second, we review a strategy for mitigating imbalance associated with vestibular pathology and fostering readaptation. In discussing the first strategy (for imbalance assessment, we review a pilot study wherein imbalance was elicited (among healthy subjects via an adaptive challenge that caused a temporary/reversible disruption. The surrogate vestibular deficit was caused by a brief period of movement-induced adaptation to an altered (rotating gravitoinertial frame of reference. This elicited adaptation and caused imbalance when head movements were made after reentry into the normal (non-rotating frame of reference. We also review a strategy for fall mitigation, viz., a prototype tactile sway feedback device for aiding balance/recovery after disruptions caused by vestibular pathology. We introduce the device and review a preliminary exploration of its effectiveness in aiding clinical balance rehabilitation (discussing the implications for healthy astronauts. Both strategies reviewed in this paper represent cross-disciplinary research spin-offs: the ground-based vestibular challenge and tactile cueing display were derived from aeromedical research to benefit military aviators suffering from flight simulator-relevant aftereffects or inflight spatial disorientation, respectively. These strategies merit further evaluation using clinical and astronaut

  19. A pilot study into the use of FDG-mNP as an alternative approach in neuroblastoma cell hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Mahendran; Pearce, Gillian; Guldu, Ozge; Tekin, Volkan; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Aras, Omer; Unak, Perihan

    2016-07-07

    Herein, we present a pilot study concerning the use of fluorodeoxy glucose conjugated magnetite nanoparticles (FDG-mNP ) as a potential agent in magnetic nanoparticle mediated neuroblastoma cancer cell hyperthermia. This approach makes use of the 'Warburg effect', utilising the fact that cancer cells have a higher metabolic rate than normal cells. FDG-mNP were synthesized, then applied to the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cancer cell line and exposed to an AC magnetic field. 3D Calorimetry was performed on the FDG-mNP compound. Simulations were performed using SEMCAD X software using Thelonious, (an anatomically correct male child model) in order to understand more about the end requirements with respect to cancer cell destruction. We investigated FDG-mNP mediated neuroblastoma cytotoxicity in conjunction with AC magnetic field exposure. Results are presented for 3D FDG-mNP SAR mnp (10.86 ± 0.99 W/g of particles) using a therapeutic dose of 0.83 mg/ mL. Human model simulations suggest that 43 W/ kg SAR Theo would be required to obtain 42 ºC within the centre of a liver tumour (Tumour size, bounding box x = 64, y = 61, z = 65 [mm]), and that the temperature distribution is inhomogeneous within the tumour. Our study suggests that this approach could potentially be used to increase the temperature within cells that would result in cancer cell death due to hyperthermia. Further development of this research will also involve using whole tumours removed from living organisms in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography.

  20. Alternating current multi-circuit electric machines a new approach to the steady-state parameter determination

    CERN Document Server

    Asanbayev, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This book details an approach for realization of the field decomposition concept. The book presents the  methods as well as techniques and procedures for establishing electric machine circuit-loops and determining their parameters. The methods developed have been realized using the models of machines with laminated and solid rotor having classical structure. The use of such models are well recognized and simplifies practical implementation of the obtained results. This book also: ·         Includes methods for a construction of electric machine equivalent circuits that allows the replacement of the field models of the machine with simple circuit models ·         Demonstrates the practical implementation of the proposed techniques and procedures ·         Presents parameters of the circuit-loops in the form most convenient for practical implementation ·         Uses methods based on machine models widely used in practice

  1. From cellular to chemical approach for acute neural and alternative options for age-induced functional diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonin; Bukovsky

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous "stem cell niche"(SCN) accompanying vessels contains immune system components which in vivo determine differentiation of multi potent stem cells toward proper cell types in given tissue. Combinations of sex steroids may represent novel chemical approach for neuronal areas of regenerative medicine,since they cause transformation of vascular smooth muscle stem cells into differentiating neuronal cells. Circulating sex steroids are present during pregnancy and can be utilized where needed,when various embryonic/fetal tissues develop from their stem cells. Utilization of induced regeneration of tissues(regenerative medicine) is expected being more effective in sudden failures of younger individuals carrying intact SCN,as compared to established chronic disorders caused by SCN alteration. An essential component of SCN are monocyte-derived cells exhibiting tissue-specific "stop effect"(SE) preventing,for instance,an aging of neuronal cells. Its alteration causes that implantation of neuronal stem cells will also result in their differentiation toward aging cells. When we repair the SE by supply of circulating mononuclear cells from young healthy individuals,we may be able to provide novel regenerative treatments of age-induced neural diseases by sex steroid combinations. Questions regarding some age-induced body alterations are also addressed.

  2. Exposure versus Susceptibility as Alternative Bases for New Approaches to Surveillance for Schistosoma japonicum in Low Transmission Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, schistosomiasis in China provides an excellent example of many of the challenges of moving from low transmission to the elimination of transmission for infectious diseases generally. In response to the surveillance dimension of these challenges, we here explore two strategic approaches to inform priorities for the development of improved methods addressed specifically to schistosomiasis in the low transmission environment. We utilize an individually-based model and the exposure data used earlier to explore surveillance strategies, one focused on exposure assessment and the second on our estimates of variability in individual susceptibility in the practical context of the current situation in China and the theoretical context of the behavior of transmission dynamics near the zero state. Our findings suggest that individual susceptibility is the major single determinant of infection intensity in both the low and medium risk environments. We conclude that there is considerable motivation to search for a biomarker of susceptibility to infection in humans, but that there would also be value in a method for monitoring surface waters for the free-swimming forms of the parasite in endemic or formerly endemic environments as an early warning of infection risk.

  3. Online tuning of impedance matching circuit for long pulse inductively coupled plasma source operation--an alternate approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Kraus, W; Gahlaut, A; Bansal, G; Chakraborty, A

    2014-01-01

    Impedance matching circuit between radio frequency (RF) generator and the plasma load, placed between them, determines the RF power transfer from RF generator to the plasma load. The impedance of plasma load depends on the plasma parameters through skin depth and plasma conductivity or resistivity. Therefore, for long pulse operation of inductively coupled plasmas, particularly for high power (∼100 kW or more) where plasma load condition may vary due to different reasons (e.g., pressure, power, and thermal), online tuning of impedance matching circuit is necessary through feedback. In fusion grade ion source operation, such online methodology through feedback is not present but offline remote tuning by adjusting the matching circuit capacitors and tuning the driving frequency of the RF generator between the ion source operation pulses is envisaged. The present model is an approach for remote impedance tuning methodology for long pulse operation and corresponding online impedance matching algorithm based on RF coil antenna current measurement or coil antenna calorimetric measurement may be useful in this regard.

  4. Single-stage repair of adult aortic coarctation and concomitant cardiovascular pathologies: a new alternative surgical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Davit

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coarctation of the aorta in the adulthood is sometimes associated with additional cardiovascular pathologies that require intervention. Ideal approach in such patients is uncertain. Anatomic left-sided short aortic bypass from the arcus aorta to descending aorta via median sternotomy allows simultaneuos repair of both complex aortic coarctation and concomitant cardiac operation. Materials Four adult patients were underwent Anatomic left-sided short aortic bypass operation for complex aortic coarctation through median sternotomy using deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Concomitant cardiac operations were Bentall procedure for annuloaortic ectasia in one patient, coronary artery bypass grafting for three vessel disease in two patient, and patch closure of ventricular septal defect in one patient. Results All patients survived the operation and were alive with patent bypass at a mean follow-up of 36 months. No graft-related complications occurred, and there were no instances of stroke or paraplegia. Conclusion We conclude that single-stage repair of adult aortic coarctation with concomitant cardiovascular lesions can be performed safely using this newest technique.

  5. Front-end genomics: using an alternative approach for the recovery of high-quality DNA from core needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Wilfrido D; Hou, Tieying; Sykes, Don; Dey-Rao, Rama

    2017-06-01

    Determine whether a simple prewash step will provide adequate amounts of high-quality DNA from core needle biopsies for molecular sequencing studies. The quantitative and qualitative metrics of DNA recovered from core needle biopsies processed either by 1) formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE), 2) cells recovered after the core needle biopsy was washed, and 3) frozen sections of the core needle biopsy tissue were evaluated and compared to one another. Fairly equivalent amounts of DNA can be obtained from cells recovered from a prewash step relative to the FFPE and frozen section samples. The number of amplifiable DNA in the wash sample was greater than that from the FFPE samples. The average molecular size of DNA in the wash sample was greater than that of both the FFPE and frozen samples. Although more starting material in terms of the number of cells was present in both the FFPE and frozen section samples than the wash samples, equivalent to better results were obtained from the latter with regard to quality. This approach may be a means to better aliquot the diminutive amounts of tissue associated with core needle biopsies, allowing dissociated cells to be dedicated for molecular studies while keeping the tissue intact for morphological studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. An Alternative Approach to "Identification of Unknowns": Designing a Protocol to Verify the Identities of Nitrogen Fixing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M; Denny, Roxanne; Young, Nevin D; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Microbiology courses often include a laboratory activity on the identification of unknown microbes. This activity consists of providing students with microbial cultures and running biochemical assays to identify the organisms. This approach lacks molecular techniques such as sequencing of genes encoding 16S rRNA, which is currently the method of choice for identification of unknown bacteria. A laboratory activity was developed to teach students how to identify microorganisms using 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and validate microbial identities using biochemical techniques. We hypothesized that designing an experimental protocol to confirm the identity of a bacterium would improve students' knowledge of microbial identification techniques and the physiological characteristics of bacterial species. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were isolated from the root nodules of Medicago truncatula and prepared for 16S rRNA PCR analysis. Once DNA sequencing revealed the identity of the organisms, the students designed experimental protocols to verify the identity of rhizobia. An assessment was conducted by analyzing pre- and posttest scores and by grading students' verification protocols and presentations. Posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.001. Normalized learning gains (G) showed an improvement of students' knowledge of microbial identification methods (LO4, G = 0.46), biochemical properties of nitrogen-fixing bacteria (LO3, G = 0.45), and the events leading to the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbioses (LO1&2, G = 0.51, G = 0.37). An evaluation of verification protocols also showed significant improvement with a p value of less than 0.001.

  7. Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Alternative Medicine en Español email Send this article to a ... Dr. Yvonne Ou on Lifestyle Modifications and Glaucoma Alternative medicine may be defined as non-standard, unconventional treatments ...

  8. Using the Small Ruminant Nutrition System to develop and evaluate an alternative approach to estimating the dry matter intake of goats when accounting for ruminal fiber stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadas Filho, J G L; Tedeschi, L O; Cannas, A; Vieira, R A M; Rodrigues, M T

    2014-11-01

    The first objective of this research was to assess the ability of the Small Ruminant Nutrition System (SRNS) mechanistic model to predict metabolizable energy intake (MEI) and milk yield (MY) when using a heterogeneous fiber pool scenario (GnG1), compared with a traditional, homogeneous scenario (G1). The second objective was to evaluate an alternative approach to estimating the dry matter intake (DMI) of goats to be used in the SRNS model. The GnG1 scenario considers an age-dependent fractional transference rate for fiber particles from the first ruminal fiber pool (raft) to an escapable pool (λr), and that this second ruminal fiber pool (i.e., escapable pool) follows an age-independent fractional escape rate for fiber particles (ke). Scenario G1 adopted only a single fractional passage rate (kp). All parameters were estimated individually by using equations published in the literature, except for 2 passage rate equations in the G1 scenario: 1 developed with sheep data (G1-S) and another developed with goat data (G1-G). The alternative approach to estimating DMI was based on an optimization process using a series of dietary constraints. The DMI, MEI, and MY estimated for the GnG1 and G1 scenarios were compared with the results of an independent dataset (n=327) that contained information regarding DMI, MEI, MY, and milk and dietary compositions. The evaluation of the scenarios was performed using the coefficient of determination (R(2)) between the observed and predicted values, mean bias (MB), bias correction factor (Cb), and concordance correlation coefficient. The MEI estimated by the GnG1 scenario yielded precise and accurate values (R(2) = 082; MB = 0.21 Mcal/d; Cb = 0.98) similar to those of the G1-S (R(2) = 0.85; MB = 0.10 Mcal/d; Cb=0.99) and G1-G (R(2) = 0.84; MB = 0.18 Mcal/d; Cb = 0.98) scenarios. The results were also similar for the MY, but a substantial MB was found as follows: GnG1 (R(2) = 0.74; MB = 0.70 kg/d; Cb = 0.79), G1-S (R(2) = 0.71; MB = 0

  9. From monocausality to systems thinking: a complementary and alternative conceptual approach for better understanding the development and prevention of sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Adam; Finch, Caroline F

    The science of sports injury control, including both its cause and prevention, has largely been informed by a biomedical and mechanistic model of health. Traditional scientific practice in sports injury research has routinely involved collapsing the broader socioecological landscape down in order to analyse individual-level determinants of injury - whether biomechanical and/or behavioural. This approach has made key gains for sports injury prevention research and should be further encouraged and allowed to evolve naturally. However, the public health, Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, and injury epidemiological literature more broadly, has accepted the value of a socioecological paradigm for better understanding disease and injury processes, and sports injury research will fall further behind unless it does the same. A complementary and alternative conceptual approach towards injury control known as systems thinking that builds on socioecological science, both methodologically and analytically, is readily available and fast developing in other research areas. This review outlines the historical progression of causal concepts in the field of epidemiology over the course of the modern scientific era. From here, causal concepts in injury epidemiology, and models of aetiology as found in the context of sports injury research are presented. The paper finishes by proposing a new research agenda that considers the potential for a systems thinking approach to further enhance sports injury aetiological understanding. A complementary systems paradigm, however, will require that sports injury epidemiologists bring their knowledge and skillsets forwards in an attempt to use, adapt, and even refine existing systems-based approaches. Alongside the natural development of conventional scientific methodologies and analyses in sports injury research, progressing forwards to a systems paradigm is now required.

  10. Aquatic assessment of the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Vershire, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert R.; Kiah, Richard G.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Besser, John M.; Coles, James F.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Argue, Denise M.; Levitan, Denise M.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    The Ely Mine, which operated from 1821 to 1905, and its area of downstream impact constitute the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site. The site was placed on the National Priorities List in 2001. The mine comprises underground workings, foundations from historical structures, several waste-rock piles, roast beds associated with the smelting operation, and slag piles resulting from the smelting. The mine site is drained by Ely Brook, which includes several tributaries, one of which drains a series of six ponds. Ely Brook empties into Schoolhouse Brook, which flows 3.3 kilometers and joins the Ompompanoosuc River.

  11. Geophysical logging at the Cristex Drum National Priorities List Superfund Site near Oxford, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolino, Dominick J.

    2017-01-01

    The collection of borehole geophysical logs data was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center in the vicinity of the Cristex Drum National Priorities List Superfund Site near Oxford, North Carolina, during January through March 2016. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, borehole geophysical log and image data collection, which included the delineation of more than 150 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 3 open borehole wells.

  12. Alternative Approaches to Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1992-01-01

    Reexamines the notion of "teaching." Drawing on data from a range of classrooms, as well as from recently published teaching texts, particular attention is focused on the question: "What do we mean by teaching/instruction?" (eight references) (Author/JL)

  13. Alternative Approaches to Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1992-01-01

    Reexamines the notion of "teaching." Drawing on data from a range of classrooms, as well as from recently published teaching texts, particular attention is focused on the question: "What do we mean by teaching/instruction?" (eight references) (Author/JL)

  14. Seeking an Alternative Modality to the Management of Nigeria's Fertilizer Subsidy Scheme-An Empirical Approach to the Case Study of Ondo State (1976-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Asekunowo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of Nigeria’s fertilizer subsidy scheme was to make inorganic fertilizers readily available to farmers at affordable prices in order to boost food production in the country. Shortly into the scheme, farmers complained that fertilizers were not received at the time of need and in sufficient quantities. Approach: Using Ondo State, Nigeria as a case study, to determine; inter alia, if the farmers’ complaints were founded and if so, to design alternative ways of administering the scheme such that the lofty goals for which it was established could be realized. Methodology: Primary data were collected from 596 farmers randomly selected from the state. Secondary data were collected from purposively selected NAFCON, AISC, ADP, FPDD (now FFD and a published book source. The primary data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics such as percentages and means. The secondary data were analyzed with the use of OLS and TLS regression methods. Results: The descriptive analyses showed that farmers in Ondo State did not receive their fertilizer supplies in sufficient quantities and at the time of need, despite the fact that supply surpassed adoption (demand for most years of the study period. The inferential analyses showed that a subsidy introduced into NAFCON and other producing firms’ production processes would engender increased output and induce fertilizer prices to fall in Ondo State. Conclusion: These results showed that farmers in Ondo State did not receive their fertilizer supplies at the time of need and in sufficient quantities due to leakages and diversion of the substance from the vast bureaucratic distribution channels. As an alternative, if subsidy was administered through the producing firms’ production processes, output of fertilizers would have increased making the market supply curve of fertilizers to shift to the right. This would have also caused the price of fertilizer to

  15. Environmental Asbestos Assessment Manual Superfund Method for the Determination of Asbestos in Ambient Air Part 2: Technical Background Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sampling and analysis method for the determination of asbestos in air is presented in Part 1 of this report, under separate cover. This method is designed specifically to provide results suitable for supporting risk assessments at Superfund sites, although it is applicable t...

  16. ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION IN HOMES NEAR THE RAYMARK SUPERFUND SITE USING BASEMENT AND SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the results of an investigation conducted to assist EPA’s New England Regional Office in evaluating vapor intrusion at 15 homes and one commercial building near the Raymark Superfund Site in Stratford, Connecticut. Methods were developed to sample sub-slab ...

  17. Alternative wastewatersystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyck-Madsen, Søren; Hoffmann, Birgitte; Gabriel, Søren

    1999-01-01

    The report:-  Communicates experiences from Swedish buildings from the establishment and running of alternative wastewater systems. Communicates pictures of alternative buildings and wastewater systems in Sweden. Gives a short evaluation of the performance and the sustainability of the systems....

  18. Mining-related sediment and soil contamination in a large Superfund site: Characterization, habitat implications, and remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Drake, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Historical mining activity (1850–1970) in the now inactive Tri-State Mining District provided an ongoing source of lead and zinc to the environment including the US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site located in Cherokee County, southeast Kansas, USA. The resultant contamination adversely affected biota and caused human health problems and risks. Remediation in the Superfund site requires an understanding of the magnitude and extent of contamination. To provide some of the required information, a series of sediment and soil investigations were conducted in and near the Superfund site to characterize lead and zinc contamination in the aquatic and floodplain environments along the main-stem Spring River and its major tributaries. In the Superfund site, the most pronounced lead and zinc contamination, with concentrations that far exceed sediment quality guidelines associated with potential adverse biological effects, was measured for streambed sediments and floodplain soils located within or downstream from the most intensive mining-affected areas. Tributary streambeds and floodplains in affected areas are heavily contaminated with some sites having lead and zinc concentrations that are an order of magnitude (or more) greater than the sediment quality guidelines. For the main-stem Spring River, the streambed is contaminated but the floodplain is mostly uncontaminated. Measured lead and zinc concentrations in streambed sediments, lakebed sediments, and floodplain soils documented a persistence of the post-mining contamination on a decadal timescale. These results provide a basis for the prioritization, development, and implementation of plans to remediate contamination in the affected aquatic and floodplain environments within the Superfund site.

  19. Mining-Related Sediment and Soil Contamination in a Large Superfund Site: Characterization, Habitat Implications, and Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, K E; Drake, K D

    2016-10-01

    Historical mining activity (1850-1970) in the now inactive Tri-State Mining District provided an ongoing source of lead and zinc to the environment including the US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site located in Cherokee County, southeast Kansas, USA. The resultant contamination adversely affected biota and caused human health problems and risks. Remediation in the Superfund site requires an understanding of the magnitude and extent of contamination. To provide some of the required information, a series of sediment and soil investigations were conducted in and near the Superfund site to characterize lead and zinc contamination in the aquatic and floodplain environments along the main-stem Spring River and its major tributaries. In the Superfund site, the most pronounced lead and zinc contamination, with concentrations that far exceed sediment quality guidelines associated with potential adverse biological effects, was measured for streambed sediments and floodplain soils located within or downstream from the most intensive mining-affected areas. Tributary streambeds and floodplains in affected areas are heavily contaminated with some sites having lead and zinc concentrations that are an order of magnitude (or more) greater than the sediment quality guidelines. For the main-stem Spring River, the streambed is contaminated but the floodplain is mostly uncontaminated. Measured lead and zinc concentrations in streambed sediments, lakebed sediments, and floodplain soils documented a persistence of the post-mining contamination on a decadal timescale. These results provide a basis for the prioritization, development, and implementation of plans to remediate contamination in the affected aquatic and floodplain environments within the Superfund site.

  20. Mining-Related Sediment and Soil Contamination in a Large Superfund Site: Characterization, Habitat Implications, and Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, K. E.; Drake, K. D.

    2016-10-01

    Historical mining activity (1850-1970) in the now inactive Tri-State Mining District provided an ongoing source of lead and zinc to the environment including the US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site located in Cherokee County, southeast Kansas, USA. The resultant contamination adversely affected biota and caused human health problems and risks. Remediation in the Superfund site requires an understanding of the magnitude and extent of contamination. To provide some of the required information, a series of sediment and soil investigations were conducted in and near the Superfund site to characterize lead and zinc contamination in the aquatic and floodplain environments along the main-stem Spring River and its major tributaries. In the Superfund site, the most pronounced lead and zinc contamination, with concentrations that far exceed sediment quality guidelines associated with potential adverse biological effects, was measured for streambed sediments and floodplain soils located within or downstream from the most intensive mining-affected areas. Tributary streambeds and floodplains in affected areas are heavily contaminated with some sites having lead and zinc concentrations that are an order of magnitude (or more) greater than the sediment quality guidelines. For the main-stem Spring River, the streambed is contaminated but the floodplain is mostly uncontaminated. Measured lead and zinc concentrations in streambed sediments, lakebed sediments, and floodplain soils documented a persistence of the post-mining contamination on a decadal timescale. These results provide a basis for the prioritization, development, and implementation of plans to remediate contamination in the affected aquatic and floodplain environments within the Superfund site.

  1. Development and Preliminary Face and Content Validation of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments Are You Using?" (WHAT) Questionnaires Assessing Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Stinson, Jennifer; Boon, Heather; Duffy, Ciarán M; Huber, Adam M; Gibbon, Michele; Descarreaux, Martin; Spiegel, Lynn; Vohra, Sunita; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used by children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), yet no validated questionnaires assess that use. The objective of this study was to develop child self- and parent proxy-report questionnaires assessing CAM use and to determine the face and content validity of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments are you using?" (WHAT) questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology. A sequential phased mixed methods approach was used to develop the questionnaires. A Delphi Survey of 126 experts followed by an interdisciplinary consensus conference of 14 stakeholders in CAM, general pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology was held to develop consensus on the content of the questionnaires using a nominal group technique. To determine face and content validity of the questionnaires, two groups, including (a) a purposive sample of 22 children with JIA 8 to 18 years and their parents from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Hospital for Sick Children, and (b) 21 Canadian pediatric rheumatology experts, participated in interviews. Participants were independently asked about the goal, understandability and comprehensiveness of the WHAT questionnaires, as well as the relevance of items. Consensus was reached on 17 items of the WHAT questionnaires. The domains found to be relevant were child's CAM use, factors associated with CAM use, perceived impact of CAM use, and communication about CAM. A total of 15 items in the parent proxy-report questionnaire and 13 items in the child report questionnaire showed adequate content validity. Consensus was reached by experts on the content of a pediatric CAM questionnaire. Face and content validity testing and modifications made to the WHAT questionnaires have helped ensure adequate preliminary validity for use in pediatric rheumatology. This constitutes the basis for further testing of these questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology and for adaptation to other chronic

  2. A better approach to care of the dying. Catholic healthcare and the Catholic community can present an alternative to physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, R

    1998-01-01

    To combat physician-assisted suicide, Catholic healthcare and the Catholic community cannot solely focus on mounting campaigns and formulating policies. They must also demonstrate an alternative way to approach death and care of the dying, taking a leadership role in improving end-of-life care. To accomplish this, Catholic healthcare must foster a culture that recognizes death as the inevitable outcome of human life and makes care for the dying as important as care for those who may get well. The ministry must acknowledge the limits of human life, human abilities, human ingenuity, and medical technology; and respect decisions to forgo life-sustaining therapies. In addition, physicians must address advance directives with patients before hospitalization and must be willing to offer hospice care as an option to dying patients and their families. More effective pain management must be devised. Catholic facilities must develop palliative care policies and commit to ongoing education to provide such care. It is essential that they pay attention to the environment in which patients die; identify the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of family members; and use prayer and rituals in meaningful ways. With a clear focus on improving end-of-life care, Catholic healthcare--in partnership with other denominations--can eliminate some of the factors that can make physician-assisted suicide seem appealing to suffering people.

  3. Congressional Testimony: Statement of Wade T. Najjum Before the Subcommittee on Superfund and Environmental Health Committee on Environment and Public Works United States Senate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statement of Wade T. Najjum Assistant Inspector General for Program Evaluation U.S. EPA Office of Inspector General Before the Subcommittee on Superfund and Environmental Health Committee on Environment and Public Works United States Senate

  4. Environmental contaminants in fish and mussels from Meddybemps Lake, the Dennys River, and East Machias River - Eastern Surplus Superfund Site, Meddybemps, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — From 1946 to the early 1980s, the 3-acre Eastern Surplus Superfund Site in Meddybemps, Maine, was used for the disposal and storage of surplus military equipment and...

  5. Integrating Monitoring and Genetic Methods To Infer Historical Risks of PCBs and DDE to Common and Roseate Terns Nesting Near the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site (Massachusetts, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common and roseate terns are migratory piscivorous seabirds with major breeding colonies within feeding range of thepolychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated New Bedford Harbor (NBH, MA, USA) Superfund site. Our longitudinal study shows that before PCB discharges into NBH cease...

  6. Alternative metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    As the old 'publish or perish' adage is brought into question, additional research-impact indices, known as altmetrics, are offering new evaluation alternatives. But such metrics may need to adjust to the evolution of science publishing.

  7. Continued geophysical logging near the GMH Electronics National Priorities List Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-01-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center collected borehole geophysical logs and images and continuous water-level data near the GMH Electronics National Priorities List Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina, during December 2012 through July 2015. Previous work by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center at the site involved the collection of borehole geophysical log data in 15 wells, in addition to surface geologic mapping and passive diffusion bag sampling. In a continued effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in developing a conceptual groundwater model to assess current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, more than 900 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 10 open borehole wells were delineated and continuous water-level data information from 14 monitoring wells within close proximity of the initially drilled boreholes was collected to observe any induced water-level fluctuations during drilling operations

  8. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N

    2013-03-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination.

  9. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination.

  10. Surface geophysics and porewater evaluation at the Lower Darby Creek Area Superfund Site, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles W.; Degnan, James R.; Brayton, Michael J.; Cruz, Roberto M.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    In cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 3, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is participating in an ongoing study to aid in the identification of subsurface heterogeneities that may act as preferential pathways for contaminant transport in and around the Lower Darby Creek Area (LDCA) Superfund Site, Philadelphia Pa. Lower Darby Creek, which flows into the Delaware River, borders the western part of the former landfill site. In 2013, the USGS conducted surface geophysics measurements and stream porewater sampling to provide additional data for EPA’s site characterization. This report contains data collected from field measurements of direct current (DC) resistivity, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) surveys, and stream porewater specific conductance (SC).

  11. A pilot evaluation on a stress management programme using a combined approach of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hector W H; Cheung, W M; Chan, Alan H L; Fung, Kelvin M T; Leung, Ada Y; Au, Doreen W H

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the efficacy of implementing a stress management programme based on a combined approach using cognitive behavioural therapy and complementary and alternative medicine for elementary school teachers who experienced mild level of stress, anxiety and/or depressive symptoms in Hong Kong. A 12-h programme involving cognitive behavioural therapy, self-management, relaxation techniques (diaphragmatic breathing and progressive muscle relaxation), mindful exercises (qigong and yoga), aromatherapy and acupressure was conducted. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the intervention groups (n = 47) with the wait-list control groups (n = 46). The primary outcome measures were depression, anxiety and stress. Results indicated that the intervention group had significant reduction in depression [(F = 3.93; degrees of freedom (df) = 2.90; p = 0.023)], anxiety (F = 3.37; df = 2.90; p = 0.039) and stress (F = 3.63; df = 2.89; p = 0.031) when compared with the control group. Participants in both groups demonstrated lowered level of salivary cortisol at the post-assessment. The pilot results provided preliminary support to the multi-component stress management programme in relieving affective symptoms of teachers. The programme may be considered as an initial strategy to empower teachers with the abilities to cope with their affective symptoms. Further evaluation using a better designed randomized study with a larger sample size is warranted. (word: 198; max.: 200).

  12. Direct evaluation of radiobiological parameters from clinical data in the case of ion beam therapy: an alternative approach to the relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cometto, A; Russo, G; Bourhaleb, F; Milian, F M; Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Cirio, R; Attili, A

    2014-12-07

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) concept is commonly used in treatment planning for ion beam therapy. Whether models based on in vitro/in vivo RBE data can be used to predict human response to treatments is an open issue. In this work an alternative method, based on an effective radiobiological parameterization directly derived from clinical data, is presented. The method has been applied to the analysis of prostate cancer trials with protons and carbon ions.Prostate cancer trials with proton and carbon ion beams reporting 5 year-local control (LC5) and grade 2 (G2) or higher genitourinary toxicity rates (TOX) were selected from literature to test the method. Treatment simulations were performed on a representative subset of patients to produce dose and linear energy transfer distribution, which were used as explicative physical variables for the radiobiological modelling. Two models were taken into consideration: the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) and a linear model (LM). The radiobiological parameters of the LM and MKM were obtained by coupling them with the tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability models to fit the LC5 and TOX data through likelihood maximization. The model ranking was based on the Akaike information criterion.Results showed large confidence intervals due to the limited variety of available treatment schedules. RBE values, such as RBE = 1.1 for protons in the treated volume, were derived as a by-product of the method, showing a consistency with current approaches. Carbon ion RBE values were also derived, showing lower values than those assumed for the original treatment planning in the target region, whereas higher values were found in the bladder. Most importantly, this work shows the possibility to infer the radiobiological parametrization for proton and carbon ion treatment directly from clinical data.

  13. Early excision and grafting, an alternative approach to the surgical management of large body surface area levamisole-adulterated cocaine induced skin necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jason; Gruber, Paul; Perry, Travis L

    2015-05-01

    Levamisole-adulterated cocaine as a cause of retiform purpura progressing to full-thickness skin necrosis was first documented in 2003 and currently comprises over 200 reported cases. Whereas, its presentation, pathophysiology, and diagnostic workup have been reasonably well-defined, only one publication has significantly detailed its surgical management. For this reason there exists a relative absence of data in comparison to its reported incidence to suggest a preferred treatment strategy. In the case mentioned, treatment emphasized delayed surgical intervention while awaiting lesion demarcation and the monitoring of autoantibodies. At our institution we offer an alternative approach and present the case of a 34 year old female who presented with 49% TBSA, levamisole-induced skin necrosis managed with early surgical excision and skin grafting. The patient presented three days following cocaine exposure with painful, purpura involving the ears, nose, buttocks, and bilateral lower extremities which quickly progressed to areas of full-thickness necrosis. Lab analysis demonstrated elevated p-ANCA and c-ANCA, as well as leukopenia, decreased C4 complement, and urinalysis positive for levamisole, corroborating the diagnosis. Contrasting the most thoroughly documented case in which the patient underwent first surgical excision on hospital day 36 and underwent 18 total excisions, our patient underwent first excision on hospital day 10 and received only one primary excision prior to definitive autografting. To our knowledge, this is the largest surface area surgically treated that did not result in surgical amputation or autoamputation of limbs or appendages, respectively. We contend that early excision and grafting provides optimal surgical management of this syndrome while avoiding the morbidity seen with delayed intervention.

  14. The classification of motor neuron defects in the zebrafish embryo toxicity test (ZFET) as an animal alternative approach to assess developmental neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth-Köhne, Elke; Wichmann, Arne; Delov, Vera; Fenske, Martina

    2012-07-01

    Rodents are widely used to test the developmental neurotoxicity potential of chemical substances. The regulatory test procedures are elaborate and the requirement of numerous animals is ethically disputable. Therefore, non-animal alternatives are highly desirable, but appropriate test systems that meet regulatory demands are not yet available. Hence, we have developed a new developmental neurotoxicity assay based on specific whole-mount immunostainings of primary and secondary motor neurons (using the monoclonal antibodies znp1 and zn8) in zebrafish embryos. By classifying the motor neuron defects, we evaluated the severity of the neurotoxic damage to individual primary and secondary motor neurons caused by chemical exposure and determined the corresponding effect concentration values (EC₅₀). In a proof-of-principle study, we investigated the effects of three model compounds thiocyclam, cartap and disulfiram, which show some neurotoxicity-indicating effects in vertebrates, and the positive controls ethanol and nicotine and the negative controls 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and triclosan. As a quantitative measure of the neurotoxic potential of the test compounds, we calculated the ratios of the EC₅₀ values for motor neuron defects and the cumulative malformations, as determined in a zebrafish embryo toxicity test (zFET). Based on this index, disulfiram was classified as the most potent and thiocyclam as the least potent developmental neurotoxin. The index also confirmed the control compounds as positive and negative neurotoxicants. Our findings demonstrate that this index can be used to reliably distinguish between neurotoxic and non-neurotoxic chemicals and provide a sound estimate for the neurodevelopmental hazard potential of a chemical. The demonstrated method can be a feasible approach to reduce the number of animals used in developmental neurotoxicity evaluation procedures.

  15. Alternative Veier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Tove Elisabeth; Salamonsen, Anita

    reflektioner omkring patienters brug af og erfaringer med alternativ behandling. Patientorganisationer, organisatoner for alternative behandlere og organisationer for læger og medicinstuderende har læst bogens patienthistorier og deres perspektiver lægges frem. Til slut i bogen diskuteres betydningen af de...

  16. Growing Alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2014-01-01

    From 2014, Anhui Province will pilot a reform of the residential land market in China, thus integrating rural Anhui in the national housing market. In contrast, artist and activist Ou Ning has proposed the Bishan time money currency, intending to establish an alternative economic circuit in Bishan...

  17. Magnetostrictive Alternator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger; Bruder, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This innovation replaces the linear alternator presently used in Stirling engines with a continuous-gradient, impedance-matched, oscillating magnetostrictive transducer that eliminates all moving parts via compression, maintains high efficiency, costs less to manufacture, reduces mass, and eliminates the need for a bearing system. The key components of this new technology are the use of stacked magnetostrictive materials, such as Terfenol-D, under a biased magnetic and stress-induced compression, continuous-gradient impedance-matching material, coils, force-focusing metallic structure, and supports. The acoustic energy from the engine travels through an impedancematching layer that is physically connected to the magnetostrictive mass. Compression bolts keep the structure under compressive strain, allowing for the micron-scale compression of the magnetostrictive material and eliminating the need for bearings. The relatively large millimeter displacement of the pressure side of the impedance-matching material is reduced to micron motion, and undergoes stress amplification at the magnetostrictive interface. The alternating compression and expansion of the magnetostrictive material creates an alternating magnetic field that then induces an electric current in a coil that is wound around the stack. This produces electrical power from the acoustic pressure wave and, if the resonant frequency is tuned to match the engine, can replace the linear alternator that is commonly used.

  18. Alternative Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triglyceride (fat) produced by processing coconut oil or palm kernel oil. The body breaks down caprylic acid into substances called “ketone bodies.” The theory behind Axona is that the ketone bodies derived from caprylic acid may provide an alternative energy source for brain cells that have lost ...

  19. Aquatic assessment of the Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund site, Corinth, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Argue, Denise M.; Seal, Robert R.; Kiah, Richard G.; Besser, John M.; Coles, James F.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Levitan, Denise M.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    The Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund site in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont, includes the Eureka, Union, and Smith mines along with areas of downstream aquatic ecosystem impairment. The site was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2004. The mines, which operated from about 1847 to 1919, contain underground workings, foundations from historical structures, several waste-rock piles, and some flotation tailings. The mine site is drained to the northeast by Pike Hill Brook, which includes several wetland areas, and to the southeast by an unnamed tributary that flows to the south and enters Cookville Brook. Both brooks eventually drain into the Waits River, which flows into the Connecticut River. The aquatic ecosystem at the site was assessed using a variety of approaches that investigated surface-water quality, sediment quality, and various ecological indicators of stream-ecosystem health. The degradation of surface-water quality is caused by elevated concentrations of copper, and to a lesser extent cadmium, with localized effects caused by aluminum, iron, and zinc. Copper concentrations in surface waters reached or exceeded the USEPA national recommended chronic water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life in all of the Pike Hill Brook sampling locations except for the location farthest downstream, in half of the locations sampled in the tributary to Cookville Brook, and in about half of the locations in one wetland area located in Pike Hill Brook. Most of these same locations also contained concentrations of cadmium that exceeded the chronic water-quality criteria. In contrast, surface waters at background sampling locations were below these criteria for copper and cadmium. Comparison of hardness-based and Biotic Ligand Model (BLM)-based criteria for copper yields similar results with respect to the extent or number of stations impaired for surface waters in the affected area. However, the BLM

  20. New in situ capture quantitative (real-time) reverse transcription-PCR method as an alternative approach for determining inactivation of Tulane virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Xu, Shuxia; Yang, David; Young, Glenn M; Tian, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major cause of epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Although quantitative (real-time) reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) is widely used for detecting HuNoVs, it only detects the presence of viral RNA and does not indicate viral infectivity. Human blood group antigens (HBGAs) have been identified as receptors/co-receptors for both HuNoVs and Tulane virus (TV) and are crucial for viral infection. We propose that viral infectivity can be evaluated with a molecular assay based on receptor-captured viruses. In this study, we employed TV as an HuNoV surrogate to validate the HBGA-based capture qRT-PCR method against the 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) method. We employed type B HBGA on an immuno-well module to concentrate TV, followed by amplification of the captured viral genome by in situ qRT-PCR. We first demonstrated that this in situ capture qRT-PCR (ISC-qRT-PCR) method could effectively concentrate and detect TV. We then treated TV under either partial or full inactivation conditions and measured the remaining infectivity by ISC-qRT-PCR and a tissue culture-based amplification method (TCID50). We found that the ISC-qRT-PCR method could be used to evaluate virus inactivation deriving from damage to the capsid and study interactions between the capsid and viral receptor. Heat, chlorine, and ethanol treatment primarily affect the capsid structure, which in turns affects the ability of the capsid to bind to viral receptors. Inactivation of the virus by these methods could be reflected by the ISC-qRT-PCR method and confirmed by TCID50 assay. However, the loss of the infectivity caused by damage to the viral genome (such as that from UV irradiation) could not be effectively reflected by this method. Despite this limitation, the ISC-qRT-PCR provides an alternative approach to determine inactivation of Tulane virus. A particular advantage of the ISC-qRT-PCR method is that it is also a faster and easier method to effectively

  1. The health system and population health implications of large-scale diabetes screening in India: a microsimulation model of alternative approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Basu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Like a growing number of rapidly developing countries, India has begun to develop a system for large-scale community-based screening for diabetes. We sought to identify the implications of using alternative screening instruments to detect people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes among diverse populations across India.We developed and validated a microsimulation model that incorporated data from 58 studies from across the country into a nationally representative sample of Indians aged 25-65 y old. We estimated the diagnostic and health system implications of three major survey-based screening instruments and random glucometer-based screening. Of the 567 million Indians eligible for screening, depending on which of four screening approaches is utilized, between 158 and 306 million would be expected to screen as "high risk" for type 2 diabetes, and be referred for confirmatory testing. Between 26 million and 37 million of these people would be expected to meet international diagnostic criteria for diabetes, but between 126 million and 273 million would be "false positives." The ratio of false positives to true positives varied from 3.9 (when using random glucose screening to 8.2 (when using a survey-based screening instrument in our model. The cost per case found would be expected to be from US$5.28 (when using random glucose screening to US$17.06 (when using a survey-based screening instrument, presenting a total cost of between US$169 and US$567 million. The major limitation of our analysis is its dependence on published cohort studies that are unlikely fully to capture the poorest and most rural areas of the country. Because these areas are thought to have the lowest diabetes prevalence, this may result in overestimation of the efficacy and health benefits of screening.Large-scale community-based screening is anticipated to produce a large number of false-positive results, particularly if using currently available survey-based screening

  2. Superfund reform: US Environmental Protection Agency`s 30-day study and its implication for the US Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, M.R.; Friedman, J.R.; Neff, R.W.

    1993-03-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to reform and restructure the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAS) Superfund program, the EPA Administrator on October 21, 1991, announced several key programmatic reforms. These reforms are a result of the Superfund 30-Day Task Force Report (30-Day Study, EPA 1991a), an effort carried out by EPAs office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER). The EPA OSWER oversees environmental cleanup activities under a number of statutory authorities, including the Comprehensive Environmental response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). CERCLA and its implementing regulation, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), establish a regulatory framework to govern the cleanup of existing, and often abandoned, hazardous waste sites. The purposes of this report are to (1) review the background and recommendations of EPNs 30-Day Study, (2) identify and discuss the initiatives from the 30-Day Study that may impact DOE`s environmental restoration mission, (3) report on EPAs progress in implementing the selected priority initiatives, and (4) describe potentially related DOE activities.

  3. [Alternatives to animal testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Isabelle

    2009-11-01

    The use of alternative methods to animal testing are an integral part of the 3Rs concept (refine, reduce, replace) defined by Russel & Burch in 1959. These approaches include in silico methods (databases and computer models), in vitro physicochemical analysis, biological methods using bacteria or isolated cells, reconstructed enzyme systems, and reconstructed tissues. Emerging "omic" methods used in integrated approaches further help to reduce animal use, while stem cells offer promising approaches to toxicologic and pathophysiologic studies, along with organotypic cultures and bio-artificial organs. Only a few alternative methods can so far be used in stand-alone tests as substitutes for animal testing. The best way to use these methods is to integrate them in tiered testing strategies (ITS), in which animals are only used as a last resort.

  4. Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites, StateCERCLIS-This data set contains potential EPA Superfund sites. These locations represent sites, not contaminated areas., Published in 2008, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as...

  5. Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites, Point or polygon geo-location of federally designated superfund sites in Wisconsin. Usually geolocated via on screen digitizing against DOPs (could be geo-located via GPS). Source year of DOPs vary, Published in unknown, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR - Bureau of Remediation and Redevelopment.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of...

  6. Ordering alternatives in MCDM problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Baets, B. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science

    1994-12-31

    A new approach to the study of a set of alternatives in a multi-criteria decision making problem is presented. Alternatives are described by means of fuzzy sets in the set of criteria, expressing the degrees to which they fulfill the different criteria. The concept of a fuzzy inclusion is introduced and is discussed from an axiomatic point of view. To each implication operator corresponds a fuzzy inclusion. The fuzzy inclusion corresponding to the Goedel operator is used to measure the degree to which the scores of one alternative are contained in the scores of another one. Repeating this for all couples of alternatives yields a fuzzy quasi-order relation in a set of alternatives. The cuts of this fuzzy relation are then classical quasi-order relations: they express orderings of the alternatives, allowing alternatives to be indifferent or incomparable, corresponding to different degrees of confidence.

  7. TO "LIMITATIONS OF ROI TESTING FOR VENTING DESIGN: DESCRIPTION OF AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH BASED ON ATTAINMENT OF A CRITICAL PORE-GAS VELOCITY IN CONTAMINATED MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, we describe the limitations of radius of influence (ROI) evaluation for venting design in more detail than has been done previously and propose an alternative method based on specification and attainment of critical pore-gas velocities in contaminated subsurface me...

  8. Effects on Problem Behavior and Social Skills Associated with the Implementation of School Wide Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports Approach in an Alternative School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Erica

    2013-01-01

    In spite of research documenting the negative effects of punishment, most high schools and correctional facilities rely on punishment to establish order and compliance with rules and routines (Nelson, Sprague, Jolivette, Smith, & Tobin, 2009). One alternative to punitive consequences is School Wide Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports…

  9. Alternative treatment technology information center computer database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Alternative Treatment Technology Information Center (ATTIC) computer database system was developed pursuant to the 1986 Superfund law amendments. It provides up-to-date information on innovative treatment technologies to clean up hazardous waste sites. ATTIC v2.0 provides access to several independent databases as well as a mechanism for retrieving full-text documents of key literature. It can be accessed with a personal computer and modem 24 hours a day, and there are no user fees. ATTIC provides {open_quotes}one-stop shopping{close_quotes} for information on alternative treatment options by accessing several databases: (1) treatment technology database; this contains abstracts from the literature on all types of treatment technologies, including biological, chemical, physical, and thermal methods. The best literature as viewed by experts is highlighted. (2) treatability study database; this provides performance information on technologies to remove contaminants from wastewaters and soils. It is derived from treatability studies. This database is available through ATTIC or separately as a disk that can be mailed to you. (3) underground storage tank database; this presents information on underground storage tank corrective actions, surface spills, emergency response, and remedial actions. (4) oil/chemical spill database; this provides abstracts on treatment and disposal of spilled oil and chemicals. In addition to these separate databases, ATTIC allows immediate access to other disk-based systems such as the Vendor Information System for Innovative Treatment Technologies (VISITT) and the Bioremediation in the Field Search System (BFSS). The user may download these programs to their own PC via a high-speed modem. Also via modem, users are able to download entire documents through the ATTIC system. Currently, about fifty publications are available, including Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program documents.

  10. Phytoextraction of Pb and Cd from a superfund soil: effects of amendments and croppings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, T J; Pichtel, J; Brown, H J; Simmons, M

    2001-01-01

    In a growth chamber, maize (Zea mays) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) were grown over two croppings in soil from a Superfund site (PbTotal = 65,200 mg/kg and CdTotal = 52mg/kg). Soil treatments consisted of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium citrate and composted sewage sludge, each at two rates (EDTA .05%, EDTA .2%, citrate .05%, citrate .2%, CSS 5% and CSS 10%, respectively). In most cases, the EDTA and citrate treatments were superior in terms of solubilizing soil Pb for root uptake and translocation into above-ground biomass. In the first maize crop, the EDTA .2% treatment resulted in 2,435 and 9,389mg/kg Pb in shoot and root tissues, respectively. The CSS treatments typically resulted in lowest Pb and Cd removal efficiencies. Lead remaining in the soil after two croppings was mainly associated with the carbonate, organic, and residual fractions, which represent the less bioavailable forms. Soil Cd was generally more mobile for plant uptake than soil Pb. The EDTA .2% and citrate treatments were most successful in promoting Cd uptake by both maize and mustard. Although Pb concentrations (mg/kg tissue) were lower for maize than mustard, the former removed more total Pb (0.2 mg per pot, mean over all treatments), compared to mustard (0.03 mg), by virtue of its higher biomass production.

  11. Fishing a superfund site: Dissonance and risk perception of environmental hazards by fishermen in Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, J.; Gochfeld, M. (Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Risk perception studies show that individuals tend to underestimate significant risks, overestimate negligible ones, and distrust authorities. They also rely on a variety of strategies or heuristics to reach decisions regarding their risk-taking behavior. The authors report on a survey of fishermen and crabbers engaged in recreational and substance fishing in a Puerto Rican estuary (near Humacao), which has been declared a Superfund site because of suspected contamination by mercury, and at ecologically similar control sites. Nearly everyone interviewed at the Humacao site was aware of the mercury contamination, but either denied its importance, believed the contamination was restricted to a distant part of the estuary, or assumed that the estuary would be closed by the authorities if the threat was real. All site-users consumed the fish and crabs they caught. At Humacao, the average catch was 7 fish per fishermen (mostly tilapia, Tilapia mossambica, and tarpon, Megalops atlantica) and 13 crabs per crabber (all blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus). On average, the site-users returned to the lagoons about 3-4 times per month. At control sites, fewer fish were eaten. The worst case consumption of tarpon, a species which concentrated mercury at Eastern Puerto Rico, provided an exposure exceeding the EPA reference dose, whereas consumption of one tarpon per week did not entail excess exposure. Fortunately, few individuals caught tarpon exclusively. Unlike counterparts in the northeastern United States, they trusted authorities and indicated that they would have heeded warnings of mercury contamination posted where they fished.

  12. Interpretive Listening: An Alternative to Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John

    1983-01-01

    Outlines an alternative interpretive approach to listening which is grounded in the hermeneutic phenomenologies of Heidegger, Gadamer, and Ricoeur. Explains four features of this alternative: openness, linguisticality, play, and the fusion of horizons. Discusses conceptual and pedagogical implications. (PD)

  13. A Structural Approach to Performance Monitoring of Waste Sites: Obtaining Actionable Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, E. D.; Versteeg, R.; Ankeny, M.; Richardson, A.

    2005-05-01

    Both government and non-government agencies are faced with the challenge of long-term monitoring of waste sites and landfills. Such monitoring should provide actionable information on how these sites are evolving, including (but not limited to) information on the success of remedial treatment methods (either active or passive), compliance with regulatory standards, and evolution of system behavior associated with these sites. Current monitoring efforts suffer from the lack of integration between data collection, data management, information extraction and information use. An alternative to such efforts is the use of a structural approach to performance monitoring developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This approach has the following characteristics (1) tight integration between monitoring objectives and data collection efforts (2) well structured storage of all relevant monitoring data (3) establishment of transparent, reproducible procedures for translation of data to information (including coupling of data to models) (4) development of a web based interface to the monitoring system, providing easy access to data and results by multiple stakeholders. We will discuss several examples of the implementation of the INL monitoring system, including an EPA superfund site and several landfill sites.

  14. Alternative Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planting, A.; De saint Jacob, Y.; Verwijs, H.; Belin, H.; Preesman, L.

    2009-03-15

    In two articles, one interview and one column attention is paid to alternative energies. The article 'A new light on saving energy' discusses the option to save energy by modernising lighting systems in urban areas. The column 'View from Paris' focuses on investment decisions in France with regard to renewable energy and energy savings. The article 'Europe turns a blind eye to big battery' discusses developments in batteries to store energy. The interview concerns fuel cell expert and formerly President of UTC Power Jan van Dokkum. The last article gives a brief overview of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA) and the challenges this alliance will have to face with regard to climate change and energy security.

  15. Geochemical Characteristics of TP3 Mine Wastes at the Elizabeth Copper Mine Superfund Site, Orange County, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Briggs, Paul H.; Meier, Allen L.; Muzik, Timothy L.

    2003-01-01

    Remediation of the Elizabeth mine Superfund site in the Vermont copper belt poses challenges for balancing environmental restoration goals with issues of historic preservation while adopting cost-effective strategies for site cleanup and long-term maintenance. The waste-rock pile known as TP3, at the headwaters of Copperas Brook, is especially noteworthy in this regard because it is the worst source of surface- and ground-water contamination identified to date, while also being the area of greatest historical significance. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study of the historic mine-waste piles known as TP3 at the Elizabeth mine Superfund site near South Strafford, Orange County, VT. TP3 is a 12.3-acre (49,780 m2) subarea of the Elizabeth mine site. It is a focus area for historic preservation because it encompasses an early 19th century copperas works as well as waste from late 19th- and 20th century copper mining (Kierstead, 2001). Surface runoff and seeps from TP3 form the headwaters of Copperas Brook. The stream flows down a valley onto flotation tailings from 20th century copper mining operations and enters the West Branch of the Ompompanoosuc River approximately 1 kilometer downstream from the mine site. Shallow drinking water wells down gradient from TP3 exceed drinking water standards for copper and cadmium (Hathaway and others, 2001). The Elizabeth mine was listed as a Superfund site in 2001, mainly because of impacts of acid-mine drainage on the Ompompanoosuc River.

  16. 微积分中几个定理的另类处理%An Alternative Approach about Several Theorems in Calculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐际宏

    2006-01-01

    在本文中,我们转换视角考察微积分中几个重要定理之间的关系,给出这几个定理的非传统的另类证明和新的蕴涵关系以及彼此等价的结论.%In this paper we change the angle of view to consider the connections among several important theorems in Calculus, and give alternative proofs and new implications about these theorems.

  17. Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization with “Just-in-Time” Plerixafor Approach is a Cost Effective Alternative to Routine Plerixafor Use

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor results in superior CD34+ cell yield, when compared to mobilization with G-CSF alone in patients with myeloma and lymphoma. However, plerixafor-based approaches are associated with high costs. To circumvent this, several institutions use a so-called “just-in-time” plerixafor (JIT-P) approach, where plerixafor is only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF...

  18. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Helena Chemical Company, (Tampa Plant), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL, May 7, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The decision document (Record of Decision), presents the selected remedial action for the Helena Chemical Company Superfund Site, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. This action addresses soil, sediment, and ground water contamination at the site and calls for the implementation of response measures which will protect human health and the environment. The selected remedy includes biological treatment (i.e., bioremediation) of pesticides and other site related contaminants located in surface soil sand sediments to levels appropriate for future industrial use of the Site. In addition, the selected remedy includes ground water recovery and treatment to remove pesticides and other site related contaminants.

  19. Disadvantages of using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to assess imaging tests: A discussion and proposal for an alternative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Altman, Douglas G. [University of Oxford, Centre for Statistics in Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom); Mallett, Susan [University of Oxford, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    The objectives are to describe the disadvantages of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC) to measure diagnostic test performance and to propose an alternative based on net benefit. We use a narrative review supplemented by data from a study of computer-assisted detection for CT colonography. We identified problems with ROC AUC. Confidence scoring by readers was highly non-normal, and score distribution was bimodal. Consequently, ROC curves were highly extrapolated with AUC mostly dependent on areas without patient data. AUC depended on the method used for curve fitting. ROC AUC does not account for prevalence or different misclassification costs arising from false-negative and false-positive diagnoses. Change in ROC AUC has little direct clinical meaning for clinicians. An alternative analysis based on net benefit is proposed, based on the change in sensitivity and specificity at clinically relevant thresholds. Net benefit incorporates estimates of prevalence and misclassification costs, and it is clinically interpretable since it reflects changes in correct and incorrect diagnoses when a new diagnostic test is introduced. ROC AUC is most useful in the early stages of test assessment whereas methods based on net benefit are more useful to assess radiological tests where the clinical context is known. Net benefit is more useful for assessing clinical impact. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of geophysical logs, phase I, for Crossley Farms Superfund Site, Berks County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Randall W.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-one wells were drilled at Crossley Farms Superfund Site between December 15, 1987, and May 1, 1988, to define and monitor the horizontal and vertical distribution of ground-water contamination emanating from a suspected contaminant source area (Blackhead Hill). Eight well clusters were drilled on or near the Crossley Site and three well clusters were drilled at locations hydrologically down gradient from the site. Depths of wells range from 21 to 299 feet below land surface. These wells were installed in saprolite in shallow, intermediate, and deep water-producing zones of the fractured bedrock aquifer. Borehole-geophysical and video logging were conducted between April 24, 1997, and May 8, 1997, to determine the water-producing zones, water-receiving zones, zones of vertical flow, borehole depth, and casing integrity in each well. This data and interpretation will be used to determine the location of the well intake for the existing open-hole wells, which will be retrofitted to isolate and monitor water-producing zones and prevent further cross-contamination within each open borehole, and identify wells that may need rehabilitation or replacement. Caliper and video logs were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluid-temperature and fluidresistivity logs indicated possible fluid-bearing fractures, and flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video logs, and driller?s notes, all wells will be constructed so that water-level fluctuations can be monitored and discrete water samples collected from shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones in each well. Geophysical logs were run on seven bedrock and two deep bedrock wells. Gamma logs were run on 10 bedrock wells. Twenty-two wells were inspected visually with the borehole video camera for casing integrity.