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Sample records for superdarn radar located

  1. SuperDARN scalar radar equations

    CERN Document Server

    Berngardt, O I; Potekhin, A P

    2016-01-01

    The quadratic scalar radar equations are obtained for SuperDARN radars that are suitable for the analysis and interpretation of experimental data. The paper is based on a unified approach to the obtaining radar equations for the monostatic and bistatic sounding with use of hamiltonian optics and ray representation of scalar Green's function and without taking into account the polarization effects. The radar equation obtained is the sum of several terms corresponding to the propagation and scattering over the different kinds of trajectories, depending on their smoothness and the possibility of reflection from the ionosphere. It is shown that the monostatic sounding in the media with significant refraction, unlike the case of refraction-free media, should be analyzed as a combination of monostatic and bistatic scattering. This leads to strong dependence of scattering amplitude on background ionospheric density due to focusing mechanism and appearance of new (bistatic) areas of effective scattering with signific...

  2. A long-term comparison of wind and tide measurements in the upper mesosphere recorded with an imaging Doppler interferometer and SuperDARN radar at Halley, Antarctica

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    R. E. Hibbins

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from a near co-located imaging Doppler interferometer (IDI and SuperDARN radar recorded since 1996 have been analysed in a consistent manner to compare the derived mean winds and tides in the upper mesosphere. By comparing only days when both techniques were recording good quality meridional wind data it is shown that the SuperDARN radar winds and tides correlate best with the IDI height bin 90–95 km. On timescales of one hour the winds derived from the IDI have a much greater associated variance and correlate poorly with the SuperDARN winds. Regression analysis reveals that the observed SuperDARN daily mean meridional wind strength is approximately 65% that recorded by the IDI, in good quantitative agreement with previous studies which have shown contamination to SuperDARN derived winds due to the significant back lobe of the radar radiation pattern. Climatologically the two techniques observe similar monthly mean winds with the SuperDARN meridional winds suppressed compared to the IDI which tends to record winds more poleward than those derived by the SuperDARN radar during the summer months, and to be slightly more equatorward during the winter. The 12-h tidal amplitude and phase derived from both techniques are in good agreement, whereas the 24-h tides are seen much more strongly in the SuperDARN radar, especially in wintertime, with poor phase agreement. Long term comparison of the two techniques reveals a tendency for the IDI meridional winds to be more poleward during solar maximum especially during summer time; an effect which is not reproduced in the meridional winds derived from the SuperDARN radar. These results are discussed in the context of previous studies to independently determine the veracity of each technique, and to highlight the circumstances where data derived from these two techniques can be used to draw reliable conclusions from comparative studies based on geographically distributed pairs of instruments.

  3. Comparison of D-region Doppler drift winds measured by the SuperDARN Finland HF radar over an annual cycle using the Kiruna VHF meteor radar

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    N. F. Arnold

    Full Text Available The SuperDARN chain of oblique HF radars has provided an opportunity to generate a unique climatology of horizontal winds near the mesopause at a number of high latitude locations, via the Doppler shifted echoes from sources of ionisation in the D-region. Ablating meteor trails form the bulk of these targets, but other phenomena also contribute to the observations. Due to the poor vertical resolution of the radars, care must be taken to reduce possible biases from sporadic-E layers and Polar Mesospheric Summer echoes that can affect the effective altitude of the geophysical parameters being observed. Second, there is strong theoretical and observational evidence to suggest that the radars are picking up echoes from the backward looking direction that will tend to reduce the measured wind strengths. The effect is strongly frequency dependent, resulting in a 20% reduction at 12 MHz and a 50% reduction at 10 MHz. A comparison of the climatologies observed by the Super-DARN Finland radar between September 1999 and September 2000 and that obtained from the adjacent VHF meteor radar located at Kiruna is also presented. The agreement between the two instruments was very good. Extending the analysis to the SuperDARN Iceland East radar indicated that the principles outlined above could be applied successfully to the rest of the SuperDARN network.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; instruments and techniques – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  4. Mapping ionospheric backscatter measured by the SuperDARN HF radars – Part 1: A new empirical virtual height model

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    T. K. Yeoman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurately mapping the location of ionospheric backscatter targets (density irregularities identified by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radars can be a major problem, particularly at far ranges for which the radio propagation paths are longer and more uncertain. Assessing and increasing the accuracy of the mapping of scattering locations is crucial for the measurement of two-dimensional velocity structures on the small and meso-scale, for which overlapping velocity measurements from two radars need to be combined, and for studies in which SuperDARN data are used in conjunction with measurements from other instruments. The co-ordinates of scattering locations are presently estimated using a combination of the measured range and a model virtual height, assuming a straight line virtual propagation path. By studying elevation angle of arrival information of backscatterred signals from 5 years of data (1997–2001 from the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar we have determined the actual distribution of the backscatter target locations in range-virtual height space. This has allowed the derivation of a new empirical virtual height model that allows for a more accurate mapping of the locations of backscatter targets.

  5. Sources and Characteristics of Medium Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances Observed by SuperDARN Radars in the North American Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frissell, N. A.; Baker, J. B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Gerrard, A. J.; Miller, E. S.; West, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Medium Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTIDs) are wave-like perturbations of the F-region ionosphere with horizontal wavelengths on the order of several hundred kilometers, and periods between 15 - 60 min. In SuperDARN radar data, MSTID signatures are manifested as quasi-periodic enhancements of ground backscatter (i.e. skip focusing) which propagate through the radar field-of-view. At high latitudes, SuperDARN observations of MSTIDs have generally been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) launched by auroral sources (e.g. Joule heating). However, recent studies with newer mid-latitude radars have shown MSTIDs are routinely observed in the subauroral ionosphere as well. To develop a more complete picture of MSTID activity, we have surveyed observations from four high latitude and six mid latitude SuperDARN radars located in the North American sector collected between 2011 and 2015 during the months of November to May. Consistent with previous SuperDARN MSTID studies, all radars observed MSTIDs with horizontal wavelengths between ~250 - 500 km and horizontal velocities between ~100 - 250 m/s. The majority of the MSTIDs were observed to propagate in a predominantly southward direction, with bearings ranging from ~135 ̊ - 250 ̊ geographic azimuth. This is highly suggestive of high latitude auroral sources; however, no apparent correlation with geomagnetic or space weather activity could be identified. Rather, comparison of the SuperDARN MSTID time-series data with northern hemisphere geopotential data from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) operational model reveals a strong correlation of MSTID activity with dynamics in the polar vortex structure on two primary time scales. First, a seasonal effect manifests as enhanced MSTID activity from November through January, followed by a depressed period from February to May. This appears to correspond with the seasonal development and later decay of the polar vortex. A

  6. On determining the noon polar cap boundary from SuperDARN HF radar backscatter characteristics

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    M. Pinnock

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that ionospheric HF radar backscatter in the noon sector can be used to locate the footprint of the magnetospheric cusp particle precipitation. This has enabled the radar data to be used as a proxy for the location of the polar cap boundary, and hence measure the flow of plasma across it to derive the reconnection electric field in the ionosphere. This work used only single radar data sets with a field of view limited to ~2 h of local time. In this case study using four of the SuperDARN radars, we examine the boundary determined over 6 h of magnetic local time around the noon sector and its relationship to the convection pattern. The variation with longitude of the latitude of the radar scatter with cusp characteristics shows a bay-like feature. It is shown that this feature is shaped by the variation with longitude of the poleward flow component of the ionospheric plasma and may be understood in terms of cusp ion time-of-flight effects. Using this interpretation, we derive the time-of-flight of the cusp ions and find that it is consistent with approximately 1 keV ions injected from a subsolar reconnection site. A method for deriving a more accurate estimate of the location of the open-closed field line boundary from HF radar data is described.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; plasma convection · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers

  7. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Olakunle Ogunjobi; Venkataraman Sivakumar; Judy Ann Elizabeth Stephenson; and William Tafon Sivla

    2015-01-01

    We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition) IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds...

  8. SuperDARN CUTLASS Finland radar observations of high-latitude magnetic reconnections under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG QingHe; LIU RuiYuan; YANG HuiGen; HU HongQiao; ZHANG BeiChen; DUNLOP Malcolm; LESTER Mark; BOGDANOVA Yulia; WALSH Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A number of backscatter power enhancement events with “equatorward-moving radar auroral forms” in the high-latitude ionosphere were observed by SuperDARN CUTLASS Finland radar when the IMF was northward during 09:00 -10:00 UT on 26 March 2004.These events were also associated with sunward flow enhancements at each location in the Northern Hemisphere which were shown in ionospheric convections measured by the SuperDARN radars.These are typical features of high-latitude (lobe) magnetic reconnections.The durations of the velocity enhancements imply that the evolution time of the lobe reconnections is about 8-16 min from their origin at the reconnection site to their addition to the magnetotail lobe again.In additional,the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft was moving from magnetosheath into magnetosphere,and crossing the magnetopause near the subsolar region during this interval,and observed typical low-latitude magnetic reconnection signatures.This infers that the dayside high- and low-latitude reconnections may occur simultaneously.

  9. Studies of medium scale travelling ionospheric disturbances using TIGER SuperDARN radar sea echo observations

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    L.-S. He

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Seasonal and diurnal variations in the direction of propagation of medium-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs have been investigated by analyzing sea echo returns detected by the TIGER SuperDARN radar located in Tasmania (43.4° S, 147.2° E geographic; –54.6°Λ. A strong dependency on local time was found, as well as significant seasonal variations. Generally, the propagation direction has a northward (i.e. equatorward component. In the early morning hours the direction of propagation is quite variable throughout the year. It then becomes predominantly northwest and changes to northeast around 09:00 LT. In late fall and winter it changes back to north/northwest around 15:00 LT. During the other seasons, northward propagation is very obvious near dawn and dusk, but no significant northward propagation is observed at noon.

    It is suggested that the variable propagation direction in the morning is related to irregular magnetic disturbances that occur at this local time. The changes in the MSTID propagation directions near dawn and dusk are generally consistent with changes in ionospheric electric fields occurring at these times and is consistent with dayside MSTIDs being generated by the Lorentz force.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances; wave propagation; ionospheric irregularities; signal processing

  10. First observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes by SuperDARN Zhongshan radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. X.; Hu, H. Q.; Hosokawa, K.; Liu, R. Y.; Wu, Z. S.; Xing, Z. Y.

    2013-11-01

    We report the first observations of PMSE by SuperDARN Zhongshan radar in Antarctica and present a statistical analysis of PMSE from 2010 to 2012. The seasonal variations of occurrence are consistent with those before, with an obvious enhancement at the beginning of summer and a maximum several days after summer solstice. The special features of diurnal variations were observed because of high geomagnetic latitude of Zhongshan Station, which is that the maximum is near local midnight and the secondary maximum appears 1-2 h after the local noon. The results proved that the auroral particle precipitation plays a fairly important role in the PMSE occurrence.

  11. PMSE long term observations using SuperDARN SANAE HF radar measurements

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    Olakunle Ogunjobi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the presence of nanometre-scale ice particles and neutral air turbulence in the Polar summer mesosphere modify the D-region plasma, resulting in strong backscatter. These strong backscatters are referred to as Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE. Although studies on PMSE have been ongoing for over three decades, aspects revealed by various instruments are still the subject of discussion. As a sequel to the paper by Ogunjobi et al. (2015, we report on the long term trends and variations in PMSE occurrence probability from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN high frequency (HF radar measurements over the South African National Antarctic Expedition IV (SANAE IV. In this current paper, a simple multiple-filter technique is employed to obtain the occurrence probability rate for SuperDARN-PMSE during the summer periods for the years 1998 - 2007. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate in relation to geomagnetic activity is examined. The mesospheric neutral winds and temperature trends during these periods, are further studied and presented in this paper. Both the monthly and diurnal variations in occurrence are consistent with previous reports, confirming the presence of PMSE from SuperDARN SANAE IV radar measurements and the influence of pole to pole mesospheric transport circulation. The special mesospheric mean flow observed prior to the year 2002 is ascribed to the influence of solar activity. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability peaks with lowered geomagnetic activity. These present results support the hypothesis that the particle precipitation also plays an important role in SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence.

  12. Investigation of Third Gyro-harmonic Heating at HAARP Using Stimulated Radio Emissions, the MUIR and SuperDARN Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Bernhardt, Paul; Ruohoniemi, J. Michael; Isham, Brett; Watkins, Brenton; Scales, Wayne

    2016-07-01

    Use of high frequency (HF) heating experiments has been extended in recent years as a useful methodology for plasma physicists wishing to remotely study the properties and behavior of the ionosphere as well as nonlinear plasma processes. Our recent work using high latitude heating experiments has lead to several important discoveries that have enabled assessment of active geomagnetic conditions, determination of minor ion species and their densities, ion mass spectrometry, electron temperature measurements in the heating ionosphere, as well a deeper understanding of physical processes associated with electron acceleration and formation of field aligned irregularities. The data recorded during two campaigns at HAARP in 2011 and 2012 will be presented. Several diagnostic instruments have been used to detect HAARP heater-generated ionospheric irregularities and plasma waves. These diagnostics include an ionosonde, MUIR (Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar at 446 MHz), SuperDARN HF backscatter radar and ground-based SEE receivers. Variation of the wideband/ narrowband SEE features, SuperDARN echoes, and enhanced ion lines were studied with pump power variation, pump frequency stepping near 3fce as well as changing beam angle relative to the magnetic zenith. In particular, formation of field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) and upper hybrid (UH) waves through oscillating two-stream instability (OSTI) and resonance instability is studied. During heating, Narrowband SEE (NSEE) showed enhancements that correlated with the enhanced MUIR radar ion lines. IA MSBS (Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scatter) lines are much narrower than Wideband SEE (WSEE) lines and as a result electron temperature calculated using NSEE line offset has potential to be more accurate. This technique may therefore complement the electron temperature calculation using ISR spectra. Strength of IA MSBS lines correlate with EHIL in the MUIR spectrum during HF pump frequency variation near 3fce. Therefore, NSEE

  13. Evidence of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes Observed by SuperDARN SANAE HF Radar in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakunle Ogunjobi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE occurrence probability over SANAE (South African National Antarctic Expedition IV, for the first time. A matching coincidence method is described and implemented for PMSE extraction from SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network HF radar. Several SuperDARN-PMSE characteristics are studied during the summer period from years 2005 - 2007. The seasonal and interannual SuperDARN-PMSE variations in relation to the mesospheric neutral winds are studied and presented in this paper. The occurrence probability of SuperDARN-PMSE on the day-to-day scale show, predominantly, diurnal variation, with a broader peak between 12 - 14 LT and distinct minimum of 22 LT. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate is high in the summer solstice. Seasonal variations show a connection between the SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate and mesospheric temperature from SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry. The seasonal trend for both meridional and zonal winds is very stable year-to-year. Analysis of the neutral wind variations indicates the importance of pole-to-pole circulations in SuperDARN-PMSE generation.

  14. PCN magnetic index and average convection velocity in the polar cap inferred from SuperDARN radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, R. A. D.; Koustov, A. V.; Boteler, D.; Makarevich, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between the polar cap north (PCN) magnetic index and the average convection velocity of the plasma flow across the polar cap is investigated using data from both the Rankin Inlet (RKN) polar cap Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar and the entire SuperDARN network. Correlation between the PCN index and the average velocity, determined from the median RKN line of sight (LOS) velocity, maximizes near magnetic noon and midnight when the radar field of view is roughly aligned with the noon-midnight meridian. For observations between 1000 and 1100 MLT, a roughly linear increase of the average velocity was found for a PCN index between 0 and 2, but the rate of increase is ˜2 times faster than in previous publications in which the average velocity was estimated from DMSP ion drift measurements. Comparisons between the PCN index with the cross-polar cap velocity estimated from (1) SuperDARN convection maps and (2) median RKN LOS velocities show similar trends. Both the average cross-polar cap velocity (estimated by two methods) and the cross-polar cap potential show a tendency for saturation at PCN > 2. No significant seasonal change in the nature of the relationships was found.

  15. Statistical characteristics of Doppler spectral width as observed by the conjugate SuperDARN radars

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    K. Hosokawa

    Full Text Available We performed a statistical analysis of the occurrence distribution of Doppler spectral width around the day-side high-latitude ionosphere using data from the conjugate radar pair composed of the CUTLASS Iceland-East radar in the Northern Hemisphere and the SENSU Syowa-East radar in the Southern Hemisphere. Three types of spectral width distribution were identified: (1 an exponential-like distribution in the lower magnetic latitudes (below 72°, (2 a Gaussian-like distribution around a few degrees magnetic latitude, centered on 78°, and (3 another type of distribution in the higher magnetic latitudes (above 80°. The first two are considered to represent the geophysical regimes such as the LLBL and the cusp, respectively, because they are similar to the spectral width distributions within the LLBL and the cusp, as classified by Baker et al. (1995. The distribution found above 80° magnetic latitude has been clarified for the first time in this study. This distribution has similarities to the exponential-like distribution in the lower latitude part, although clear differences also exist in their characteristics. These three spectral width distributions are commonly identified in conjugate hemispheres. The latitudinal transition from one distribution to another exhibits basically the same trend between two hemispheres. There is, however, an interhemispheric difference in the form of the distribution around the cusp latitudes, such that spectral width values obtained from Syowa-East are larger than those from Iceland-East. On the basis of the spectral width characteristics, the average locations of the cusp and the open/closed field line boundary are estimated statistically.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere inter-actions; plasma convection – Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers

  16. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-basedlidar and SuperDARN HF radar over Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Ogawa, Tadahiko; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Sessai Yukimatu, Akira; Abo, Makoto

    2012-07-01

    A Rayleigh-Raman lidar system had been installed by the 52nd JapaneseAntarctic Research Expedition on February, 2011 at Syowa Station Antarctica(69.0°S, 39.5°E). Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) was detected by the lidar at22:30UT (+3hr for LT) on Feb 4th, 2011, the first day of a routineoperation. This event is the first time to detect PMC over Syowa Station bya lidar. In the same night, SuperDARN HF radar with oblique incidence beamsalso detected Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) during 21:30UT to23:00UT. Although these signals were detected at different times andlocations, PMC motion estimated using horizontal wind velocities obtained bya collocated MF radar strongly suggests that they have a common origin (i.e.ice particle). We consider that this event occurred in the end of PMCactivity period at Syowa Station in the austral summer season (2010-2011),since the lidar did not detected any PMC signals on other days in February,2011. This is consistent with satellite-born PMC observations by AIM/CIPSand atmospheric temperature observations by AURA/MLS instruments.

  17. Real-Time Ionospheric Plasma Density Estimates in the Polar Cap using Simultaneous Dual Frequency Doppler Measurements at the SuperDARN McMurdo Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaleta, J.; Bristow, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    SuperDARN radars estimate plasma drift velocities from the Doppler shift observed on signals scattered from field-aligned density irregularities. The radars operate in the range of 8 MHz to 20 MHz and have ray paths covering a wide range of elevation angles, in order to maximize the range over which the scattering conditions are satisfied. Upward-propagating electromagnetic signals in this frequency range can be significantly refracted by the ionospheric plasma. The propagation paths of the refracted signals are bent earthward and at some point along this refracted path propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and scatter on the field-aligned density irregularities. The refraction results from gradients of the index of refraction in the ionospheric plasma. The index inside the ionosphere is lower than its free-space value, which depresses the measured line of sight velocity relative to the actual velocity of the plasma. One way to account for the depression of the measured velocity is to estimate the index of refraction in the scattering region by making multiple velocities measurements at different operating frequencies. Together with the appropriate plasma dispersion relations, multiple frequency measurements can be used to construct relations for the index of refraction, plasma density and the line of sight velocity correction factor as functions of frequency weighted measured velocity differences. Recent studies have used frequency-switching events spanning many days during traditional SuperDARN radar operation to build a statistical estimate for index of refraction, which is insensitive to the real-time spatial dynamics of the ionosphere. This statistical approach has motivated the development of a new mode of radar operation that provides simultaneous dual frequency measurements in order to resolve the temporal and spatial dynamics of the index of refraction calculations. Newly-developed multi-channel capabilities available in the SuperDARN radar

  18. Direct determination of IMF B-Y-related cusp current systems, using SuperDARN radar and multiple ground magnetometer data: A link to theory on cusp current origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amm, O.; Engebretson, M.J.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    We analyze an ionospheric "enhanced convection event" in the cusp on November 13, 1996, at 1900 UT, by using data of the SuperDARN radar, and of the IMAGE, Greenland, MACCS and CANOPUS magnetometer arrays; and from other magnetometer stations. The event occurs similar to 20 minutes after a transi......We analyze an ionospheric "enhanced convection event" in the cusp on November 13, 1996, at 1900 UT, by using data of the SuperDARN radar, and of the IMAGE, Greenland, MACCS and CANOPUS magnetometer arrays; and from other magnetometer stations. The event occurs similar to 20 minutes after...

  19. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Suzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Rayleigh–Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E. Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT −3 h on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010–2011, since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward. This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  20. Simultaneous PMC and PMSE observations with a ground-based lidar and SuperDARN HF radar at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M. K.; Ogawa, T.; Tsutsumi, M.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T. D.; Tomikawa, Y.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Sato, N.

    2013-10-01

    A Rayleigh-Raman lidar system was installed in January 2011 at Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, 39.6° E). Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) were detected by lidar at around 22:30 UTC (LT -3 h) on 4 February 2011, which was the first day of observation. This was the first detection of PMCs over Syowa Station by lidar. On the same day, a Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radar with oblique-incidence beams detected polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) between 21:30 and 23:00 UTC. This event is regarded as the last PMC activity around Syowa Station during the austral summer season (2010-2011), since no other PMC signals were detected by lidar in February 2011. This is consistent with results of PMC and mesopause temperature observations by satellite-born instruments of AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)/CIPS (Cloud Imaging and Particle Size) and AURA/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and horizontal wind measurements taken by a separate MF radar. Doppler velocity of PMSE observed by the HF radar showed motion toward Syowa Station (westward). This westward motion is consistent with the wind velocities obtained by the MF radar. However, the PMSE region showed horizontal motion from a north-to-south direction during the PMC event. This event indicates that the apparent horizontal motion of the PMSE region can deviate from neutral wind directions and observed Doppler velocities.

  1. A Statistical study of the Doppler spectral width of high-latitude ionospheric F-region echoes recorded with SuperDARN coherent HF radars

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    J.-P. Villain

    Full Text Available The HF radars of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provide measurements of the E × B drift of ionospheric plasma over extended regions of the high-latitude ionosphere. We have conducted a statistical study of the associated Doppler spectral width of ionospheric F-region echoes. The study has been conducted with all available radars from the Northern Hemisphere for 2 specific periods of time. Period 1 corresponds to the winter months of 1994, while period 2 covers October 1996 to March 1997. The distributions of data points and average spectral width are presented as a function of Magnetic Latitude and Magnetic Local Time. The databases are very consistent and exhibit the same features. The most stringent features are: a region of very high spectral width, collocated with the ionospheric LLBL/cusp/mantle region; an oval shaped region of high spectral width, whose equator-ward boundary matches the poleward limit of the Holzworth and Meng auroral oval. A simulation has been conducted to evaluate the geometrical and instrumental effects on the spectral width. It shows that these effects cannot account for the observed spectral features. It is then concluded that these specific spectral width characteristics are the signature of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling phenomena.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  2. Observations of storm time midlatitude ion-neutral coupling using SuperDARN radars and NATION Fabry-Perot interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, P. P.; H. Baker, J. B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Makela, J. J.; Fisher, D. J.; Harding, B. J.; Frissell, N. A.; Thomas, E. G.

    2015-10-01

    Ion drag is known to play an important role in driving neutral thermosphere circulation at auroral latitudes, especially during the main phase of geomagnetic storms. During the recovery phase, the neutrals are known to drive the ions and generate ionospheric electric fields and currents via the disturbance dynamo mechanism. At midlatitudes, the precise interplay between ions and neutrals is less understood largely because of the paucity of measurements that have been available. In this work, we investigate ion-neutral coupling at middle latitudes using colocated ion drift velocity measurements obtained from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars and neutral wind velocity and temperature measurements obtained from the North American Thermosphere Ionosphere Observing Network (NATION) Fabry-Perot interferometers. We examine one recent storm period on 2-3 October 2013 during both the main phase and late recovery phase. By using ion-neutral momentum exchange theory and a time-lagged correlation analysis, we analyze the coupling time scales and dominant driving mechanisms. We observe that during the main phase the neutrals respond to the ion convection on a time scale of ˜84 min which is significantly faster than what would be expected from local ion drag momentum forcing alone. This suggests that other storm time influences are important for driving the neutrals during the main phase, such as Joule heating. During the late recovery phase, the neutrals are observed to drive the ion convection without any significant time delay, consistent with the so-called "neutral fly wheel effect" or disturbance dynamo persisting well into the late recovery phase.

  3. The accuracy of using the spectral width boundary measured in off-meridional SuperDARN HF radar beams as a proxy for the open-closed field line boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisham, G.; Freeman, M. P.; Sotirelis, T.; Greenwald, R. A.

    2005-10-01

    Determining reliable proxies for the ionospheric signature of the open-closed field line boundary (OCB) is crucial for making accurate measurements of magnetic reconnection. This study compares the latitudes of spectral width boundaries (SWBs) measured by different beams of the Goose Bay radar of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), with the latitudes of OCBs determined using the low-altitude Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, in order to determine whether the accuracy of the SWB as a proxy for the ionospheric projection of the OCB depends on the line-of-sight direction of the radar beam. The latitudes of SWBs and OCBs were identified using automated algorithms applied to 5 years (1997 2001) of data measured in the 1000 1400 magnetic local time (MLT) range. Six different Goose Bay radar beams were used, ranging from those aligned in the geomagnetic meridional direction to those aligned in an almost zonal direction. The results show that the SWB is a good proxy for the OCB in near-meridionally-aligned beams but becomes progressively more unreliable for beams greater than 4 beams away from the meridional direction. We propose that SWBs are identified at latitudes lower than the OCB in the off-meridional beams due to the presence of high spectral width values that result from changes in the orientation of the beams with respect to the gradient in the large-scale ionospheric convection pattern. Keywords. Ionosphere (Instruments and techniques; Plasma convection) Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers)

  4. SuperDARN convection and Sondrestrom plasma drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Xu

    Full Text Available Plasma convection measurements by the Goose Bay and Stokkseyri SuperDARN radar pair and the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar are compared in three different ways, by looking at the line-of-sight (l-o-s velocities, by comparing the SuperDARN vectors and corresponding Sondrestrom l-o-s velocities and by comparing the end products of the instruments, the convection maps. All three comparisons show overall reasonable agreement of the convection measurements though the data spread is significant and for some points a strong disagreement is obvious. The convection map comparison shows a tendency for the SuperDARN velocities to be often less than the Sondrestrom drifts for strong flows (velocities > 1000 m/s and larger for weak flows (velocities < 500 m/s. On average, both effects do not exceed 35%. Data indicate that inconsistencies between the two data sets occur largely at times of fast temporal variations of the plasma drift and for strongly irregular flow ac-cording to the SuperDARN convection maps. These facts indicate that the observed discrepancies are in many cases a result of the different spatial and temporal resolutions of the instruments.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma convection; polar ionosphere

  5. First results of HF radio science with e-POP RRI and SuperDARN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G. W.; James, H. G.; Gillies, R. G.; Howarth, A.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.; White, A.; Yau, A. W.

    2017-01-01

    The first results from coordinated experiments between the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) Saskatoon high frequency (HF) radar are examined for a conjunction on 8 July 2014. e-POP, a payload on the CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer spacecraft, was located at 380 km altitude, approximately 10° north (geographic) and 2° west of Saskatoon, Canada, moving in a southeast direction. We use a matched filter technique to extract individual received SuperDARN pulses from the RRI data stream. The pulses show characteristics of propagation through the F region ionosphere: they are heavily dispersed, they show significant pulse-to-pulse variability in magnitude, and there is clear evidence that they experienced multipath propagation. We calculate the polarization parameters of the pulses and use them to identify magnetoionic phenomena such as mode-splitting and single-mode fading. These first RRI results provide compelling insight into HF radio wave propagation and show RRI's potential to significantly advance radio science.

  6. First SuperDARN polar mesosphere summer echoes observed at SANAE IV, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjobi, Olakunle; Sivakumar, Venkataraman; Judy; Stephenson, A. E.

    For over 3 decades studies on Polar mesosphere summer echo (PMSE) is ongoing. Its causative mechanism in the Antarctic and Arctic mesopause altitude is yet to be completely understood and is partly due to few observations from Antarctica. Also important were the varied influencing factors across the observable locations. For the first time, we report the PMSE occurrence probability rates over South African National Antarctic Expedition IV (SANAE IV). A comparison is made with observation from SANAE IV magnetic conjugate vicinity, Goose Bay in Arctic region. Here, a new matching coincidence method allowing filtration of possible contaminating echoes is described and implemented for extraction of PMSE during the 2005-2007 summers. In this method, Riometer and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) measurements from SANAE IV location are matched to obtain PMSE occurrence probability rate. Whereas the seasonal and diurnal variations followed the known features of PMSE, the percentage difference in probability occurrence rate is found to be remarkable. The SANAE IV probability rate is found to be high for the summer months reaching about 50% peak around the summer solstice. When the coincidence algorithm is relaxed, we found a substantial 30% increase in PMSE occurrence rate at SANAE IV. At this time, about 100% peak is found for Goose Bay. The contribution from the ionospheric D region electron density enhancements to SuperDARN PMSE occurrence rates at locations under auroral regions will be presented.

  7. Comparison of DMSP cross-track ion drifts and SuperDARN line-of-sight velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Drayton

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Cross-track ion drifts measured by the DMSP satellites are compared with line-of-sight SuperDARN HF velocities in approximately the same directions. Good overall agreement is found for a data set comprising of 209 satellite passes over the field of view of nine SuperDARN radars in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The slope of the best linear fit line relating the SuperDARN and DMSP velocities is of the order of 0.7 with a tendency for SuperDARN velocities to be smaller. The agreement implies that the satellite and radar data can be merged into a common set provided that spatial and temporal variations of the velocity as measured by both instruments are smooth.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Plasma convection; Auroral ionosphere

  8. Stakeholder needs for ground penetrating radar utility location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A. M.; Rogers, C. D. F.; Chapman, D. N.; Metje, N.; Castle, J.

    2009-04-01

    In the UK alone there are millions of miles of underground utilities with often inaccurate, incomplete, or non-existent location records that cause significant health and safety problems for maintenance personnel, together with the potential for large, unnecessary, social and financial costs for their upkeep and repair. This has led to increasing use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) for utility location, but without detailed consideration of the degree of location accuracy required by stakeholders — i.e. all those directly involved in streetworks ranging from utility owners to contractors and surveyors and government departments. In order to ensure that stakeholder requirements are incorporated into a major new UK study, entitled Mapping the Underworld, a questionnaire has been used to determine the current and future utility location accuracy requirements. The resulting data indicate that stakeholders generally require location tolerances better than 100 mm at depths usually extending down to 3 m, and more occasionally to 5 m, below surface level, providing significant challenges to GPR if their needs are to be met in all ground conditions. As well as providing much useful data on stakeholder needs, these data are also providing a methodology for assessment of GPR utility location in terms of the factor most important to them — the degree to which the equipment provides location within their own accuracy requirements.

  9. High Frequency Radar Locations in the United States as of February 2016.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset show the point locations of High Frequency (HF) radar systems across the US. HF radars measure the speed and direction of ocean surface currents in near...

  10. Detection of Transionospheric SuperDARN HF Waves by the Radio Receiver Instrument on the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, R. G.; Yau, A. W.; James, H. G.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) Canadian small-satellite was launched in September 2013. Included in this suite of eight scientific instruments is the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI). The RRI has been used to measure VLF and HF radio waves from various ground and spontaneous ionospheric sources. The first dedicated ground transmission that was detected by RRI was from the Saskatoon Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar on Nov. 7, 2013 at 14 MHz. Several other passes over the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar have been recorded since then. Ground transmissions have also been observed from other radars, such as the SPEAR, HAARP, and SURA ionospheric heaters. However, the focus of this study will be on the results obtained from the SuperDARN passes. An analysis of the signal recorded by the RRI provides estimates of signal power, Doppler shift, polarization, absolute time delay, differential mode delay, and angle of arrival. By comparing these parameters to similar parameters derived from ray tracing simulations, ionospheric electron density structures may be detected and measured. Further analysis of the results from the other ground transmitters and future SuperDARN passes will be used to refine these results.

  11. Subsurface radar location of the putative ocean on Ganymede: Numerical simulation of the surface terrain impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2014-03-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jupiter's icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Radar is in fact the only sounding technique which is able to penetrate their icy mantles, which can be many kilometers thick. Surface clutter, i.e. scattering of the radio waves on the rough surface, is known to be one of the most important problems of subsurface radar probing. Adequate numerical modeling of this scattering is required on all stages of subsurface radar experiment, including design of an instrument, operational strategy planning and data interpretation. In the present paper, a computer simulation technique for numerical simulations of radar sounding of rough surfaces is formulated in general form. Subsurface radar location of the ocean beneath Ganymedian ice with chirp radar signals has been simulated.

  12. Ultra-Wideband Harmonic Radar for Locating Radio-Frequency Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-Wideband Harmonic Radar for Locating Radio- Frequency Electronics by Gregory J Mazzaro, Kyle A Gallagher, Albert R Owens, Kelly D...Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. Citation of manufacturer’s or trade names does not constitute an...Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1138 ARL-TR-7256 March 2015 Ultra-Wideband Harmonic Radar for Locating Radio- Frequency Electronics

  13. Temporal and spatial resolved SuperDARN line of sight velocity measurements corrected for plasma index of refraction using Bayesian inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaleta, J.; Bristow, W. A.; Klein, J.

    2015-04-01

    Recent work by Gillies et al. (2012, 2009, 2010) has sought an explanation for the SuperDARN line-of-sight velocity underestimate of ionospheric plasma velocity. The reason for the underestimation is thought to be from the modification of the measured Doppler shift of the backscattered signal due to phase refractive index of the ionospheric plasma in the scattering region. Presented here is an analysis technique to estimate the plasma drift velocity, correcting for the index of the refraction of the scattering medium. The technique requires dual frequency SuperDARN observations and calculates velocity from the phase of the SuperDARN autocorrelation function (ACF). Both plasma velocity and plasma density are treated as independent unknowns, and self-consistent error estimates are generated for each. This new technique was employed at the McMurdo radar, resulting in estimates of plasma velocity on scales relevant to existing SuperDARN data products. The McMurdo dual frequency analysis also provides a new SuperDARN data product, an estimate for the plasma density in the ionospheric region derived wholly from SuperDARN backscatter.

  14. Location of Agricultural Drainage Pipes and Assessment of Agricultural Drainage Pipe Conditions Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods are needed to not only locate buried agricultural drainage pipe, but to also determine if the pipes are functioning properly with respect to water delivery. The primary focus of this research project was to confirm the ability of ground penetrating radar (GPR) to locate buried drainage pipe ...

  15. Notch Filter Analysis and Its Application in Passive Coherent Location Radar (in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ji-chuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Normalized Least-Mean-Squares (NLMS algorithm is widely used to cancel the direct and multiple path interferences in Passive Coherent Location (PCL radar systems. This study proposes that the interference cancelation using the NLMS algorithm and the calculation of the radar Cross Ambiguity Function (CAF can be modeled as a notch filter, with the notch located at zero Doppler frequency in the surface of the radar CAF. The analysis shows that the notch’s width and depth are closely related to the step size of the NLMS algorithm. Subsequently, the effect of the notch in PCL radar target detection is analyzed. The results suggest that the detection performance of the PCL radar deteriorates because of the wide notch. Furthermore, the Nonuniform NLMS (NNLMS algorithm is proposed for removing the clutter with the Doppler frequency by using notch filtering. A step-size matrix is adopted to mitigate the low Doppler frequency clutter and lower the floor of the radar CAF. With the step-size matrix, can be obtained notches of different depths and widths in different range units of the CAF, which can filter the low Doppler frequency clutter. In addition, the convergence rate of the NNLMS algorithm is better than that of the traditional NLMS algorithm. The validity of the NNLMS algorithm is verified by experimental results.

  16. On the SuperDARN cross polar cap potential saturation effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Koustov

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Variation of the cross polar cap potential (CPCP with the interplanetary electric field (IEF, the merging electric field EKL, the Polar Cap North (PCN magnetic index, and the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function EC of Newell et al. (2007 is investigated by considering convection data collected by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN in the Northern Hemisphere. Winter and summer observations are considered separately. All variations considered show close to linear trend at small values of the parameters and tendency for the saturation at large values. The threshold values starting from which the non-linearity was evident were estimated to be IEF*~EKL*~3 mV/m, PCN*~3–4, and EC*~1.5×104. The data indicate that saturation starts at larger values of the above parameters and reaches larger (up to 10 kV saturation levels during summer. Conclusions are supported by a limited data set of simultaneous SuperDARN observations in the Northern (summer and Southern (winter Hemispheres. It is argued that the SuperDARN CPCP saturation levels and the thresholds for the non-linearity to be seen are affected by the method of the CPCP estimates.

  17. Magnetic local time, substorm, and particle precipitation-related variations in the behaviour of SuperDARN Doppler spectral widths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (DARN radars often detect a distinct transition in line-of-sight Doppler velocity spread, or spectral width, from <50ms–1 at lower latitude to >200ms–1 at higher latitude. They also detect a similar boundary, namely the range at which ionospheric scatter with large spectral width suddenly commences (i.e. without preceding scatter with low spectral width. The location and behaviour of the spectral width boundary (SWB (and scatter boundary and the open-closed magnetic field line boundary (OCB are thought to be closely related. The location of the nightside OCB can be inferred from the poleward edge of the auroral oval determined using energy spectra of precipitating particles measured on board Defence Meteorology Satellite Program (DMSP satellites. Observations made with the Halley SuperDARN radar (75.5° S, 26.6° W, geographic; –62.0°Λ and the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER (43.4° S, 147.2° E; –54.5°Λ are used to compare the location of the SWB with the DMSP-inferred OCB during 08:00 to 22:00 UT on 1 April 2000. This study interval was chosen because it includes several moderate substorms, whilst the Halley radar provided almost continuous high-time resolution measurements of the dayside SWB location and shape, and TIGER provided the same in the nightside ionosphere. The behaviour of the day- and nightside SWB can be understood in terms of the expanding/contracting polar cap model of high-latitude convection change, and the behaviour of the nightside SWB can also be organised according to substorm phase. Previous comparisons with DMSP OCBs have proven that the radar SWB is often a reasonable proxy for the OCB from dusk to just past midnight (Chisham et al., 2004. However, the present case study actually suggests that the nightside SWB is often a better proxy for the poleward edge of Pedersen conductance enhanced by hot particle precipitation in the

  18. Direct determination of IMF B-Y-related cusp current systems, using SuperDARN radar and multiple ground magnetometer data: A link to theory on cusp current origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amm, O.; Engebretson, M.J.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    , respectively, with magnitudes of around 0.5 A/km(2). The geometry of the current system resembles a DPY current system [Friis-Christensen and Wilhjelm, 1975]. Using our results, we test alternative theories on cusp current origin that lead to different predictions of the relative location of the cusp current...... system with respect to the open-closed field line boundary. The location of this boundary is inferred from DMSP F10 satellite data. The center of our resulting current system is located clearly poleward of the open-closed field line boundary, thus favoring the idea of Lee et al. [1985] that the cusp FACs...... are caused by a rotational discontinuity of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. In contrast, the idea of Clauer and Banks [1986] that a mapping of the solar wind E-z component to the ionosphere is responsible for the cusp current system is not supported....

  19. Indoor locating and inventory management based on RFID-Radar detecting data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. C.; Lou, P. C.; Hsieh, Y. G.

    2012-03-01

    The new generation RFID-Radar system provides the function of detecting the targets' locations with the measurements of range and angle using a reader and an antenna array to transmit and receive the RF signals. It enhances the application value for RFID when combined with the geospatial information. In this study, an information system embedded with a plan coordinate detection function was developed using the spatial data provided by the RFID-Radar system, to expand the application of indoor locating and meet the inventory management requirements. The in-house developed management system can work for processing the measurements detected by the RFID-Radar system, calculating the target's location, checking the target's status and analyzing the target's movement occurring between the two detecting epochs through a designed GUI (graphical user interface). The system has been tested to show an internal precision of 0.76 m for locating, based on the stability test of the range and angle measurements, and effectively demonstrates the functions for detecting the target's movement and archiving the inventory's management information with a database.

  20. Cramer-Rao bound of joint estimation of target location and velocity for coherent MIMO radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peilin Sun; Jun Tang; Shuang Wan

    2014-01-01

    The optimal estimation performance of target parame-ters is studied. First, the general form of Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) for joint estimation of target location and velocity is derived for co-herent multiple input multiple output (MIMO) radars. To gain some insight into the behavior of the CRB, the CRB with a set of given orthogonal waveforms is studied as a specific case. Second, a maximum likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm is proposed. The mean square error (MSE) of the ML estimation of target location and velocity is obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and it ap-proaches CRB in the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region.

  1. Calibration of the Z-R equation for a polarimetric radar located in Sabancuy, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe Paredes-Victoria, Pedro; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel Angel; Pedrozo-Acuña, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall estimation using weather radar has been the keystone in several hydrometeorological applications (Bringi & Chandrasekar, 2001) such as flood forecasting and water balance analysis. Additionally, in large spatiotemporal scales, an integrated network of weather radars provide an invaluable quantity of measured data to be applied to regional studies (Kitchen et al., 1994; Westrick et al., 1999). However, each radar must be individually analysed because the characteristics of calibration and local issues are unique and, therefore require further research (Krajewski and Smith, 1991). For instance, the rainfall rate R and the radar reflectivity Z are represented for the total number of a finite number of drops in a volume of scan and it has been demonstrated that these variables can be expressed into a nonlinear representation Z-R (Marshall & Palmer, 1948) and this relationship is unique and depends on the study region and the type of precipitation. In this study we used data from the Sabancuy-radar located in Campeche, Mexico (Latitude +18.9724, Longitude -91.1726) to estimate rainfall distributions into the convective contour in the Gulf of Mexico. This area counts with a long history of tropical storms and hurricanes which produce extreme rainfall causing flood events and important socioeconomic damages into this region. Therefore, the weather radar calibration and Z-R relationship was achieved applying current methodologies (e.g. Probability Matching Method, PMM) and using raingauges in two different temporal scales (daily and each 10 minutes). Thus, rainfall estimations using weather radar can be used to quantitative evaluate the accuracy of parametrizations of atmospheric models and also the results are particularly useful for error analysis in hydrometeorological modelling (Smith et al., 1975; Sun & Crook., 1997). Finally, a better estimation of rainfall in time and space (and forecasting: in short and long term) is a valuable source of information (Jones

  2. Radar Determination of Fault Slip and Location in Partially Decorrelated Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Stough, Timothy; Pierce, Marlon; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Faced with the challenge of thousands of frames of radar interferometric images, automated feature extraction promises to spur data understanding and highlight geophysically active land regions for further study. We have developed techniques for automatically determining surface fault slip and location using deformation images from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), which is similar to satellite-based SAR but has more mission flexibility and higher resolution (pixels are approximately 7 m). This radar interferometry provides a highly sensitive method, clearly indicating faults slipping at levels of 10 mm or less. But interferometric images are subject to decorrelation between revisit times, creating spots of bad data in the image. Our method begins with freely available data products from the UAVSAR mission, chiefly unwrapped interferograms, coherence images, and flight metadata. The computer vision techniques we use assume no data gaps or holes; so a preliminary step detects and removes spots of bad data and fills these holes by interpolation and blurring. Detected and partially validated surface fractures from earthquake main shocks, aftershocks, and aseismic-induced slip are shown for faults in California, including El Mayor-Cucapah (M7.2, 2010), the Ocotillo aftershock (M5.7, 2010), and South Napa (M6.0, 2014). Aseismic slip is detected on the San Andreas Fault from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, in regions of highly patterned partial decorrelation. Validation is performed by comparing slip estimates from two interferograms with published ground truth measurements.

  3. Radar Determination of Fault Slip and Location in Partially Decorrelated Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Stough, Timothy; Pierce, Marlon; Wang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Faced with the challenge of thousands of frames of radar interferometric images, automated feature extraction promises to spur data understanding and highlight geophysically active land regions for further study. We have developed techniques for automatically determining surface fault slip and location using deformation images from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), which is similar to satellite-based SAR but has more mission flexibility and higher resolution (pixels are approximately 7 m). This radar interferometry provides a highly sensitive method, clearly indicating faults slipping at levels of 10 mm or less. But interferometric images are subject to decorrelation between revisit times, creating spots of bad data in the image. Our method begins with freely available data products from the UAVSAR mission, chiefly unwrapped interferograms, coherence images, and flight metadata. The computer vision techniques we use assume no data gaps or holes; so a preliminary step detects and removes spots of bad data and fills these holes by interpolation and blurring. Detected and partially validated surface fractures from earthquake main shocks, aftershocks, and aseismic-induced slip are shown for faults in California, including El Mayor-Cucapah (M7.2, 2010), the Ocotillo aftershock (M5.7, 2010), and South Napa (M6.0, 2014). Aseismic slip is detected on the San Andreas Fault from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, in regions of highly patterned partial decorrelation. Validation is performed by comparing slip estimates from two interferograms with published ground truth measurements.

  4. Location Detection and Tracking of Moving Targets by a 2D IR-UWB Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van-Han Nguyen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking.

  5. High-latitude poynting flux from combined Iridium and SuperDARN data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Waters

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned currents convey stress between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, and the associated low altitude magnetic and electric fields reflect the flow of electromagnetic energy to the polar ionosphere. We introduce a new technique to measure the global distribution of high latitude Poynting flux, S||, by combining electric field estimates from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN with magnetic perturbations derived using magnetometer data from the Iridium satellite constellation. Spherical harmonic methods are used to merge the data sets and calculate S|| for any magnetic local time (MLT from the pole to 60° magnetic latitude (MLAT. The effective spatial resolutions are 2° MLAT, 2h MLT, and the time resolution is about one hour due to the telemetry rate of the Iridium magnetometer data. The technique allows for the assessment of high-latitude net S|| and its spatial distribution on one hour time scales with two key advantages: (1 it yields the net S|| including the contribution of neutral winds; and (2 the results are obtained without recourse to estimates of ionosphere conductivity. We present two examples, 23 November 1999, 14:00-15:00 UT, and 11 March 2000, 16:00-17:00 UT, to test the accuracy of the technique and to illustrate the distributions of S|| that it gives. Comparisons with in-situ S|| estimates from DMSP satellites show agreement to a few mW/m2 and in the locations of S|| enhancements to within the technique's resolution. The total electromagnetic energy flux was 50GW for these events. At auroral latitudes, S|| tends to maximize in the morning and afternoon in regions less than 5° in MLAT by two hours in MLT having S||=10 to 20mW/m2 and total power up to 10GW. The power poleward of the Region 1 currents is about one

  6. USING GROUND PENETRATING RADAR TO DETERMINE THE TUNNEL LOCATION BURIED UNDER THE GLACIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deryuga Andrey Mikhaylovich

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The works were carried out with the help of ground penetrating radar “Grot-10”. Doublet broadband antennas with the central frequency of 100 MHz were used. Georadar measures the speed of EM waves v in ice-saturated soil and then the value ε′ is calculated. The radargrams received as a result of georadar survey, which represents stacked data (the two-way time is indicated on vertical scale, were transformed into depth sections, which reflect the space structure located below ground. The distance between the bottom landing and buried mountain road near the north tunnel portal is 78,5 m (profile # 1, and the distance from the upper landing is 84,5 m (profile no. 2. Later, in the April 2003 during the hole boring with the diameter 1,2 m the vertical distance between the upper landing, where ground penetrating works were carried out, and the carpet road of the tunnel was calculated. This distance appeared to be 83 m, that means, the discrepancy between boring and georadar data (84,5 m was only 1,5 m. Thus, the results of ground penetrating investigations helped the workers of glacier to make the correct conclusion on time about the location and burial depth of the tunnel.

  7. Antenna array characterisation and signal processing for an FM radio-based passive coherent location radar system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.; Monni, S.; Rossum, W.L. van; Hoogeboom, P.

    2012-01-01

    The design of passive coherent location radar, which exploits broadcasting transmitters of opportunity in the very high frequency (VHF) radio bandwidth, is presented. Here, the authors primarily focus on the system set-up and on the digital pre-processing steps. Emphasis is given to the antenna sect

  8. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    Full Text Available Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105–250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80–100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20°–60°. Echo power (< 16 dB, Doppler velocity (between –30 and + 30 ms-1 and spectral width (< 60 ms-1 fluctuate with periods of several to 20 min, perhaps due to short–period atmospheric gravity waves. When the HF radar detected the echoes, a vertical incidence MST radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site, observed polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at altitudes of 80–90 km. This fact suggests that the near range HF echoes are PMSE at HF band, although both radars did not probe a common volume. With increasing radar frequency, HF echo ranges are closer to the radar site and echo power becomes weaker. Possible mechanisms to explain these features are discussed.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques

  9. Life detection and location methods using UWB impulse radar in a coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jiping; Li Ming

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-wideband impulse radar was studied for the detection of buried life in coal mines.An improved Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method based on a cross-correlation filter was proposed for reduction of multipath and noise interference.Multipath interference was first removed by cross-correlation filtering.Then the delays of each pulse in every echo were summed.An EMD algorithm was used for noise reduction for the total delay of each echo.The corresponding EMD results of every echo were then summed and averaged.Finally,evidence for the existence of buried life and their position were obtained from amplitude-frequency curves of the averaged EMD results.Detailed simulation experiments are presented to validate the effectiveness of this proposed method.The experimental results show that this method can efficiently eliminate multipath interference and reduce noise interference in echoes,which makes detection and location of buried life in coal mines more accurate.

  10. Application of ground-penetrating radar technique to evaluate the waterfront location in hardened concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Abad, Isabel; Klysz, Gilles; Martínez-Sala, Rosa; Balayssac, Jean Paul; Mené-Aparicio, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    The long-term performance of concrete structures is directly tied to two factors: concrete durability and strength. When assessing the durability of concrete structures, the study of the water penetration is paramount, because almost all reactions like corrosion, alkali-silica, sulfate, etc., which produce their deterioration, require the presence of water. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has shown to be very sensitive to water variations. On this basis, the objective of this experimental study is, firstly, to analyze the correlation between the water penetration depth in concrete samples and the GPR wave parameters. To do this, the samples were immersed into water for different time intervals and the wave parameters were obtained from signals registered when the antenna was placed on the immersed surface of the samples. Secondly, a procedure has been developed to be able to determine, from those signals, the reliability in the detection and location of waterfront depths. The results have revealed that GPR may have an enormous potential in this field, because excellent agreements were found between the correlated variables. In addition, when comparing the waterfront depths calculated from GPR measurements and those visually registered after breaking the samples, we observed that they totally agreed when the waterfront was more than 4 cm depth.

  11. VHF radar observation of atmospheric winds, associated shears and C2n at a tropical location: interdependence and seasonal pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jain

    Full Text Available The turbulence refractivity structure constant (C2n is an important parameter of the atmosphere. VHF radars have been used extensively for the measurements of C2n. Presently, most of such observations are from mid and high latitudes and only very limited observations are available for equatorial and tropical latitudes. Indian MST radar is an excellent tool for making high-resolution measurements of atmospheric winds, associated shears and turbulence refractivity structure constant (C2n. This radar is located at Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, a tropical station in India. The objective of this paper is to bring out the height structure of C2n for different seasons using the long series of data (September 1995 – August 1999 from Indian MST radar. An attempt is also made to understand such changes in the height structure of C2n in relation to background atmospheric parameters such as horizontal winds and associated shears. The height structure of C2n, during the summer monsoon and post-monsoon season, shows specific height features that are found to be related to Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ winds. It is important to examine the nature of the radar back-scatterers and also to understand the causative mechanism of such scatterers. Aspect sensitivity of the received radar echo is examined for this purpose. It is observed that radar back-scatterers at the upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric heights are more anisotropic, with horizontal correlation length of 10–20 m, as compared to those observed at lower and middle tropospheric heights.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology; tropical meteorology; turbulence

  12. QUADRI-THRESHOLD ALGORITHM OF CO-LOCATED RADAR-TO-ESM CORRELATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A quadri-threshold radar-to-ESM correlation algorithm is presented and the corresponding four thresholds (high threshold, middle threshold, low threshold, and threshold margin) are given. The proposed algorithm is especially suited for the scenarios where each radar track is specified by different numbers of measurements. Using a simple and effective discriminant function based on the fuzzy synthesis function, the proposed quadri-threshold radar-to-ESM correlation algorithm first selects the two most likely radar tracks and then makes the soft decision based on the selected two tracks. The introduction of the threshold margin in the presented algorithm can further reduce mis-classification errors. Simulation results show the feasibility of the algorithm.

  13. On the Statistical Errors of RADAR Location Sensor Networks with Built-In Wi-Fi Gaussian Linear Fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Tian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The expected errors of RADAR sensor networks with linear probabilistic location fingerprints inside buildings with varying Wi-Fi Gaussian strength are discussed. As far as we know, the statistical errors of equal and unequal-weighted RADAR networks have been suggested as a better way to evaluate the behavior of different system parameters and the deployment of reference points (RPs. However, up to now, there is still not enough related work on the relations between the statistical errors, system parameters, number and interval of the RPs, let alone calculating the correlated analytical expressions of concern. Therefore, in response to this compelling problem, under a simple linear distribution model, much attention will be paid to the mathematical relations of the linear expected errors, number of neighbors, number and interval of RPs, parameters in logarithmic attenuation model and variations of radio signal strength (RSS at the test point (TP with the purpose of constructing more practical and reliable RADAR location sensor networks (RLSNs and also guaranteeing the accuracy requirements for the location based services in future ubiquitous context-awareness environments. Moreover, the numerical results and some real experimental evaluations of the error theories addressed in this paper will also be presented for our future extended analysis.

  14. Origin of the SuperDARN broad Doppler spectra:simultaneous observation with Oersted satellite magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hosokawa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform a case study of a favorable conjunction of an overpass of the Oersted satellite with the field-of-view of the SuperDARN Syowa East radar during an interval of the southward IMF Bz. At the time, the radar observed an L-shell aligned boundary in the spectral width around the dayside ionosphere. Simultaneously, high-frequency (0.2–5Hz magnetic field fluctuations were observed by the Oersted satellite's high-time resolution magnetometer. These magnetic field fluctuations are considered to be Alfvén waves possibly associated with the particle which precipitates into the dayside high-latitude ionosphere when magnetic reconnection occurs. It has been theoretically predicted that the time-varying electric field is the dominant physical process to expand the broad HF radar Doppler spectra. Our observation clearly demonstrates that the boundary between narrow and broad spectral widths is corresponding well to the boundary in the level of the fluctuations, which supports the previous theoretical prediction. A close relationship between electric and magnetic field fluctuations and particle precipitations during southward IMF conditions has been confirmed by many authors. The present observation allows us to suggest that the boundary between narrow and broad Doppler spectral widths observed in the dayside ionosphere is connected with the signature of the open/closed field line boundary, such as the cusp particle precipitations via electric and magnetic field fluctuations for the case of the negative IMF Bz conditions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma convection. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers

  15. A statistical approach for identifying the ionospheric footprint of magnetospheric boundaries from SuperDARN observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lointier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and tracking the projection of magnetospheric regions on the high-latitude ionosphere is of primary importance for studying the Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system and for space weather applications. By its unique spatial coverage and temporal resolution, the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provides key parameters, such as the Doppler spectral width, which allows the monitoring of the ionospheric footprint of some magnetospheric boundaries in near real-time. In this study, we present the first results of a statistical approach for monitoring these magnetospheric boundaries. The singular value decomposition is used as a data reduction tool to describe the backscattered echoes with a small set of parameters. One of these is strongly correlated with the Doppler spectral width, and can thus be used as a proxy for it. Based on this, we propose a Bayesian classifier for identifying the spectral width boundary, which is classically associated with the Polar Cap boundary. The results are in good agreement with previous studies. Two advantages of the method are: the possibility to apply it in near real-time, and its capacity to select the appropriate threshold level for the boundary detection.

  16. Columbia Glacier stake location, mass balance, glacier surface altitude, and ice radar data, 1978 measurement year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L.R.; Trabant, D.C.; March, Rod; Haeberli, Wilfried

    1979-01-01

    A 1 year data-collection program on Columbia Glacier, Alaska has produced a data set consisting of near-surface ice kinematics, mass balance, and altitude change at 57 points and 34 ice radar soundings. These data presented in two tables, are part of the basic data required for glacier dynamic analysis, computer models, and predictions of the number and size of icebergs which Columbia Glacier will calve into shipping lanes of eastern Prince William Sound. A metric, sea-level coordinate system was developed for use in surveying throughout the basin. Its use is explained and monument coordinates listed. A series of seven integrated programs for calculators were used in both the field and office to reduce the surveying data. These programs are thoroughly documented and explained in the report. (Kosco-USGS)

  17. The effectiveness of ground-penetrating radar surveys in the location of unmarked burial sites in modern cemeteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Sabine; Illich, Bernhard; Berger, Jochen; Graw, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    Ground-penetration radar (GPR) is a geophysical method that is commonly used in archaeological and forensic investigations, including the determination of the exact location of graves. Whilst the method is rapid and does not involve disturbance of the graves, the interpretation of GPR profiles is nevertheless difficult and often leads to incorrect results. Incorrect identifications could hinder criminal investigations and complicate burials in cemeteries that have no information on the location of previously existing graves. In order to increase the number of unmarked graves that are identified, the GPR results need to be verified by comparing them with the soil and vegetation properties of the sites examined. We used a modern cemetery to assess the results obtained with GPR which we then compared with previously obtained tachymetric data and with an excavation of the graves where doubt existed. Certain soil conditions tended to make the application of GPR difficult on occasions, but a rough estimation of the location of the graves was always possible. The two different methods, GPR survey and tachymetry, both proved suitable for correctly determining the exact location of the majority of graves. The present study thus shows that GPR is a reliable method for determining the exact location of unmarked graves in modern cemeteries. However, the method did not allow statements to be made on the stage of decay of the bodies. Such information would assist in deciding what should be done with graves where ineffective degradation creates a problem for reusing graves following the standard resting time of 25 years.

  18. Radar Configuration Research of Double Station Cross Location%双站交叉定位雷达布站方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兴民; 李国君; 李健; 曲长文

    2011-01-01

    Passive radar doesn't radiate any electromagnetic energy, which can safe itself efficiently. Double station cross location belonging to passive location technology has been widely used in military region. The article examines the theory of double station cross location. And then the relations between location error and radar configuration is studied when the radar angle and base line precision are given. The maths model of location error and radar configuration is proposed. The simulation results present the principle of location error and radar configuration. It is valuable to analyze the radar configuration in theory and application.%无源定位雷达系统本身不辐射电磁信号,因此能够有效地保护己方的安全.双站交叉定位技术是一种准实时的无源定位技术,在军事领域应用非常广泛.首先研究了双站交叉定位的定位原理,分析了在雷达测角精度、基线测量精度一定的情况下定位误差与雷达布站的关系.给出了定位误差与雷达布站的数学模型,对不同条件下的定位误差进行了仿真,在分析仿真结果的基础上,得到了定位误差与雷达布站的基本规律,为雷达布站问题提供了理论参考,具有一定的工程应用价值.

  19. A Preliminary Comparison Between SuperDARN Flow Vectors and Equivalent Ionospheric Currents From the GIMA, Greenland, MACCS, THEMIS, CARISMA, and CANMOS Ground Magnetometer Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Amm, O.; Weygand, J. M.; Bristow, W. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Beheshti, B.; Steinmetz, E. S.; Engebretson, M. J.; Murr, D.; Viljanen, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Gleisner, H.; Mann, I.; Russell, C.

    2009-12-01

    With data from the GIMA, Greenland, MACCs, CARISMA, and CANMOS, and THEMIS ground magnetometer arrays, we obtain maps of equivalent ionospheric currents (EIC) over North America using the state-of-art technique based on SECS (spherical elementary currents systems) developed by Amm and Viljanen [1999] . The EIC maps can be calculated with the same time resolution as the magnetometer data, which is 10 sec. The results thus show in detail the dynamic evolution of the currents over the whole THEMIS ground network. The EIC maps can further be compared and quantitatively combined with near simultaneous images of the THEMIS all sky imager mosaics, SuperDARN RADAR data, and THEMIS spacecraft data. We find using 5 full days of SuperDARN flow vector data obtained during the northern hemisphere winter that the flows, in general, are antiparallel to the EICs. The largest differences from the antiparallel direction appear to occur during moderate to quiet geomagnetic conditions in the midnight sector. These differences are most likely the result of non-uniform conductivity in the ionosphere that influences the EIC direction.

  20. First Results of the VLBI Experiment on Radar Location of the Asteroid 2012 DA14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, M.; Antipenko, A.; Bezrukov, D.; Bezrukovs, Vl.; Dementjev, A.; Dugin, N.; Jekabsons, N.; Khutornoy, R.; Klapers, M.; Konovalenko, A.; Kulishenko, V.; Nabatov, A.; Nesteruk, V.; Pupillo, G.; Reznichenko, A.; Salerno, E.; Shmeld, I.; Skirmante, K.; Tikhomirov, Yu.; Voytyuk, V.

    An international VLBI experiment on radio location of the asteroid 2012 DA14 was organized on 2013 February 15--16, during its flyby close to Earth. The purpose of observations was to investigate and specify orbital parameters of the asteroid, as well as to evaluate its rotation period and other characteristics. The irradiation of the asteroid was performed by the RT-70 transmitter at Evpatoria (Crimea, Ukraine), while the reflected signals were successfully accepted by the two 32 m radio telescopes at Medicina (Bologna, Italy) and Irbene (Ventspils, Latvia). Processing and interpretation of the data were performed both in the Radiophysical Research Institute and in the Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Center. The first results of this experiment are presented and discussed.

  1. The WISDOM Radar: Unveiling the Subsurface Beneath the ExoMars Rover and Identifying the Best Locations for Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarletti, Valérie; Clifford, Stephen; Plettemeier, Dirk; Le Gall, Alice; Hervé, Yann; Dorizon, Sophie; Quantin-Nataf, Cathy; Benedix, Wolf-Stefan; Schwenzer, Susanne; Pettinelli, Elena; Heggy, Essam; Herique, Alain; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Kofman, Wlodek; Vago, Jorge L.; Hamran, Svein-Erik; WISDOM Team

    2017-07-01

    The search for evidence of past or present life on Mars is the principal objective of the 2020 ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars Rover mission. If such evidence is to be found anywhere, it will most likely be in the subsurface, where organic molecules are shielded from the destructive effects of ionizing radiation and atmospheric oxidants. For this reason, the ExoMars Rover mission has been optimized to investigate the subsurface to identify, understand, and sample those locations where conditions for the preservation of evidence of past life are most likely to be found. The Water Ice Subsurface Deposit Observation on Mars (WISDOM) ground-penetrating radar has been designed to provide information about the nature of the shallow subsurface over depth ranging from 3 to 10 m (with a vertical resolution of up to 3 cm), depending on the dielectric properties of the regolith. This depth range is critical to understanding the geologic evolution stratigraphy and distribution and state of subsurface H2O, which provide important clues in the search for life and the identification of optimal drilling sites for investigation and sampling by the Rover's 2-m drill. WISDOM will help ensure the safety and success of drilling operations by identification of potential hazards that might interfere with retrieval of subsurface samples.

  2. The Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) With Applications for Laser Imaging and Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    HF facilities such as HAARP in Alaska, EISCAT in Norway, and Arecibo in Puerto Rico; (3) the chain of high latitude SuperDARN radars used for auroral...DF arrays, ground HF transmitters such as the Navy relocatable over the horizon radar (ROTHR) and the Air Force/Navy HAARP system would be employed...United States and Australia; (2) high power HF facilities such as HAARP in Alaska, EISCAT in Norway, and Arecibo in Puerto Rico; (3) the chain of high

  3. Radar prediction of absolute rain fade distributions for earth-satellite paths and general methods for extrapolation of fade statistics to other locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1982-01-01

    The first absolute rain fade distribution method described establishes absolute fade statistics at a given site by means of a sampled radar data base. The second method extrapolates absolute fade statistics from one location to another, given simultaneously measured fade and rain rate statistics at the former. Both methods employ similar conditional fade statistic concepts and long term rain rate distributions. Probability deviations in the 2-19% range, with an 11% average, were obtained upon comparison of measured and predicted levels at given attenuations. The extrapolation of fade distributions to other locations at 28 GHz showed very good agreement with measured data at three sites located in the continental temperate region.

  4. GIS在雷达站选址中的应用%Application of GIS in the Location Selection of Radar Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦清嫄; 王龙波

    2012-01-01

    论述了利用GIS(地理信息系统)技术进行航空雷达站选址的步骤和方法,并介绍利用ArcGIS 9.3空间分析功能协助某空管中心进行航空雷达站选址的体会和经验.%The paper discusses the steps and methods to select radar station location by using GIS technology and introduces the experiences of aviation management and controlling center in location selection through the spatial analysis of ArcGIS 9. 3.

  5. SuperDARN studies of the ionospheric convection response to a northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    Full Text Available The response of the dayside ionospheric flow to a sharp change in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF measured by the WIND spacecraft from negative Bz and positive By, to positive Bz and small By, has been studied using SuperDARN radar, DMSP satellite, and ground magnetometer data. In response to the IMF change, the flow underwent a transition from a distorted twin-cell flow involving antisunward flow over the polar cap, to a multi-cell flow involving a region of sunward flow at high latitudes near noon. The radar data have been studied at the highest time resolution available (~2 min to determine how this transition took place. It is found that the dayside flow responded promptly to the change in the IMF, with changes in radar and magnetic data starting within a few minutes of the estimated time at which the effects could first have reached the dayside ionosphere. The data also indicate that sunward flows appeared promptly at the start of the flow change (within ~2 min, localised initially in a small region near noon at the equatorward edge of the radar backscatter band. Subsequently the region occupied by these flows expanded rapidly east-west and poleward, over intervals of ~7 and ~14 min respectively, to cover a region at least 2 h wide in local time and 5° in latitude, before rapid evolution ceased in the noon sector. In the lower latitude dusk sector the evolution extended for a further ~6 min before quasi-steady conditions again prevailed within the field-of-view. Overall, these observations are shown to be in close conformity with expectations based on prior theoretical discussion, except for the very prompt appearance of sunward flows after the onset of the flow change.

    Key words. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere · Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; Magnetosphere · ionosphere interaction

  6. Joint inference of dominant scatterer locations and motion parameters of an extended target in high range-resolution radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Freitas, A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A target of interest measured by a high range resolution radar may be modelled by multiple dominant points of reflections referred to as dominant scatterers. In this study a non-linear state space setting is used to model the states and measurements...

  7. Refractive index effects on the scatter volume location and Doppler velocity estimates of ionospheric HF backscatter echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ponomarenko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric E×B plasma drift velocities derived from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN Doppler data exhibit systematically smaller (by 20–30% magnitudes than those measured by the Defence Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP satellites. A part of the disagreement was previously attributed to the change in the E/B ratio due to the altitude difference between the satellite orbit and the location of the effective scatter volume for the radar signals. Another important factor arises from the free-space propagation assumption used in converting the measured Doppler frequency shift into the line-of-sight velocity. In this work, we have applied numerical ray-tracing to identify the location of the effective scattering volume of the ionosphere and to estimate the ionospheric refractive index. The simulations show that the major contribution to the radar echoes should be provided by the Pedersen and/or escaping rays that are scattered in the vicinity of the F-layer maximum. This conclusion is supported by a statistical analysis of the experimental elevation angle data, which have a signature consistent with scattering from the F-region peak. A detailed analysis of the simulations has allowed us to propose a simple velocity correction procedure, which we have successfully tested against the SuperDARN/DMSP comparison data set.

  8. PMSE long term observations using SuperDARN SANAE HF radar measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olakunle Ogunjobi; Venkataraman Sivakumar; Judy Ann Elizabeth Stephenson; Zolile Mtumela

    2017-01-01

    .... These strong backscatters are referred to as Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE). Although studies on PMSE have been ongoing for over three decades, aspects revealed by various instruments are still the subject of discussion...

  9. Low complexity joint estimation of reflection coefficient, spatial location, and Doppler shift for MIMO-radar by exploiting 2D-FFT

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2014-10-01

    In multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar, to estimate the reflection coefficient, spatial location, and Doppler shift of a target, maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation yields the best performance. For this problem, the ML estimation requires the joint estimation of spatial location and Doppler shift, which is a two dimensional search problem. Therefore, the computational complexity of ML estimation is prohibitively high. In this work, to estimate the parameters of a target, a reduced complexity optimum performance algorithm is proposed, which allow two dimensional fast Fourier transform to jointly estimate the spatial location and Doppler shift. To asses the performances of the proposed estimators, the Cramér-Rao-lower-bound (CRLB) is derived. Simulation results show that the mean square estimation error of the proposed estimators achieve the CRLB. © 2014 IEEE.

  10. Comparative study of MLT mean winds using MF radars located at 16.8° N and 8.7°N

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Sharma; M V Rokade; R Kondala Rao; S Gurubaran; P T Patil

    2010-08-01

    The main aim of the paper is to describe mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) wind field observed between June 2000 and May 2002 by medium frequency (MF) radars at two locations near the equatorial region and at tropical latitude. We have presented and compared observations of mean horizontal winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region over Kolhapur (16.8°N, 74.2°E) and Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E). Our analysis reveals annual oscillation in the zonal wind and semi-annual oscillation in the meridional wind over Kolhapur. On the other hand, results over Tirunelveli reveal semi-annual oscillation (SAO) in the zonal wind and annual oscillation in the meridional wind. Also we have observed enhanced magnitude of wind speed in spring equinox period of 2002 exhibiting the signatures of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) over Tirunelveli.

  11. HF radar transmissions that deviate from great-circle paths: new insight from e-POP RRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; James, H. G.; Howarth, A. D.; St-Maurice, J. P.; Yau, A. W.

    2016-12-01

    Significant deviations of SuperDARN radar transmissions from their expected great-circle paths have been detected at ionospheric altitudes using the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP). Experiments between SuperDARN Rankin Inlet and e-POP RRI were conducted at similar local times over consecutive days. Customized experiment modes which incorporated the agile frequency switching capabilities of each system were used. The RRI measurements show deviations of radar transmissions from their expected paths by as much as 2 or 3 SuperDARN beam widths, equivalent to 6° - 10° in bearing from Rankin Inlet. The deviations displayed a dependence on the radar carrier frequency and a day-to-day variability, suggesting that the deviations were transient in nature. We will discuss the deviations in the context of 3D ray trace modeling and measurements from the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar - North (RISR-N). The latter provided diagnostic information of the ionosphere along the ray path between RRI and Rankin Inlet during the experiments.

  12. Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Ground Penetrating Radar for locating buried petrified wood sites: a case study in the natural monument of the Petrified Forest of Evros, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargemezis, George; Diamanti, Nectaria; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Fikos, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    A geophysical survey was carried out in the Petrified Forest of Evros, the northernmost regional unit of Greece. This collection of petrified wood has an age of approximately 35 million years and it is the oldest in Greece (i.e., older than the well-known Petrified Forest of Lesvos island located in the North Aegean Sea and which is possibly the largest of the petrified forests worldwide). Protection, development and maintenance projects still need to be carried out at the area despite all fears regarding the forest's fate since many petrified logs remain exposed both in weather conditions - leading to erosion - and to the public. This survey was conducted as part of a more extensive framework regarding the development and protection of this natural monument. Geophysical surveying has been chosen as a non-destructive investigation method since the area of application is both a natural ecosystem and part of cultural heritage. Along with electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys have been carried out for investigating possible locations of buried fossilized tree trunks. The geoelectrical sections derived from ERT data in combination with the GPR profiles provided a broad view of the subsurface. Two and three dimensional subsurface geophysical images of the surveyed area have been constructed, pointing out probable locations of petrified logs. Regarding ERT, petrified trunks have been detected as high resistive bodies, while lower resistivity values were more related to the surrounding geological materials. GPR surveying has also indicated buried petrified log locations. As these two geophysical methods are affected in different ways by the subsurface conditions, the combined use of both techniques enhanced our ability to produce more reliable interpretations of the subsurface. After the completion of the geophysical investigations of this first stage, petrified trunks were revealed after a subsequent excavation at indicated

  13. Network radar countermeasure systems integrating radar and radar countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Qiuxi

    2016-01-01

    This is the very first book to present the network radar countermeasure system. It explains in detail the systematic concept of combining radar and radar countermeasures from the perspective of the information acquisition of target location, the optimization of the reconnaissance and detection, the integrated attack of the signals and facilities, and technological and legal developments concerning the networked system. It achieves the integration of the initiative and passivity, detection and jamming. The book explains how the system locates targets, completes target identification, tracks targets and compiles the data.

  14. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 8 -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 8 (ASR-8) is a short-range (60 nautical mile (nmi)), analog radar system used to detect and report the presence and location of...

  15. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 7 -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 7 (ASR-7) is a short-range (60 nautical miles (nmi)) analog radar system used to detect and report the presence and location of...

  16. Search for an artificially buried karst cave entrance using ground penetrating radar: a successful case of locating the S-19 Cave in the Mt. Kanin massif (NW Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Gosar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The S-19 Cave was with its explored depth of 177 m one of the most important caves of the Mt. Kanin massif, but after its discovery in 1974, a huge snow avalanche protection dyke was constructed across the cave entrance. To excavate the buried cave, the accurate location of the cave had to be determined first. Since the entrance coordinates were incorrect and no markers were available, application of geophysical techniques was necessary to do this. A Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR with special 50 MHz rough terrain antennas was selected as the single suitable geophysical method for the given conditions where thick debris overlay a rugged limestone surface. Nevertheless, it was not possible to directly detect the relatively narrow cave entrance itself due to data resolution limits. However, a historical photo of the area showed that the cave entrance was located in a local depression, which therefore represented the main target of the GPR survey. Seven GPR profiles were measured across the rough and steep surface causing difficulties in traversing the area with sensitive research equipment. In all recorded radargrams a small depression was clearly imaged under debris, and recognized as a topographic feature with the cave entrance. Based on the GPR data interpretation, the exact location for digging was determined and the thickness of debris assessed at 6.5–7 m. A massive excavation by a dredger resulted in a successful opening of the cave entrance, confirming both its geophysically determined location and its estimated depth. The application of an advanced geophysical method was therefore proven successful in providing a solution to this specific case in karst exploration and an important cave was saved.

  17. First direct evidence of meso-scale variability on ion-neutral dynamics using co-located tristatic FPIs and EISCAT radar in Northern Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Aruliah

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first direct empirical evidence that mesoscale variations in ion velocities must be taken into consideration when calculating Joule heating and relating it to changes in ion temperatures and momentum transfer to the neutral gas. The data come from the first tristatic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI measurements of the neutral atmosphere co-located with tristatic measurements of the ionosphere made by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT radar which were carried out during the nights of 27-28 February 2003 and 28 February until 1 March 2003. Tristatic measurements mean that there are no assumptions of uniform wind fields and ion drifts, nor zero vertical winds. The independent, tristatic, thermospheric measurements presented here should provide unambiguous vector wind information, and hence reduce the need to supplement observations with information obtained from models of the neutral atmosphere, or with estimates of neutral parameters derived from ionospheric measurements. These new data can also test the assumptions used in models and in ion-neutral interactions. The FPIs are located close to the 3 radars of the EISCAT configuration in northern Scandinavia, which is a region well covered by a network of complementary instruments. These provide a larger scale context within which to interpret our observations of mesoscale variations on the scales of tens of kilometres spatially and minutes temporally. Initial studies indicate that the thermosphere is more dynamic and responsive to ionospheric forcing than expected. Calculations using the tristatic volume measurements show that the magnitude of the neutral wind dynamo contribution was on average 29% of Joule heating during the first night of observation. At times it either enhanced or reduced the effective electric field by up to several tens of percent. The tristatic experiment also presents the first validation of absolute temperature measurements from a common

  18. Direction-of-arrival estimation for co-located multiple-input multiple-output radar using structural sparsity Bayesian learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fang-Qing; Zhang, Gong; Ben, De

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the direction of arrival (DOA) estimation problem for the co-located multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar with random arrays. The spatially distributed sparsity of the targets in the background makes compressive sensing (CS) desirable for DOA estimation. A spatial CS framework is presented, which links the DOA estimation problem to support recovery from a known over-complete dictionary. A modified statistical model is developed to accurately represent the intra-block correlation of the received signal. A structural sparsity Bayesian learning algorithm is proposed for the sparse recovery problem. The proposed algorithm, which exploits intra-signal correlation, is capable being applied to limited data support and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) scene. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm has less computation load compared to the classical Bayesian algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a more accurate DOA estimation than the traditional multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm and other CS recovery algorithms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61071163, 61271327, and 61471191), the Funding for Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation in Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China (Grant No. BCXJ14-08), the Funding of Innovation Program for Graduate Education of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX 0277), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 3082015NP2015504), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PADA), China.

  19. Direction-of-arrival estimation for co-located multiple-input multiple-output radar using structural sparsity Bayesian learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文方青; 张弓; 贲德

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the direction of arrival (DOA) estimation problem for the co-located multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar with random arrays. The spatially distributed sparsity of the targets in the background makes com-pressive sensing (CS) desirable for DOA estimation. A spatial CS framework is presented, which links the DOA estimation problem to support recovery from a known over-complete dictionary. A modified statistical model is developed to ac-curately represent the intra-block correlation of the received signal. A structural sparsity Bayesian learning algorithm is proposed for the sparse recovery problem. The proposed algorithm, which exploits intra-signal correlation, is capable being applied to limited data support and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) scene. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm has less computation load compared to the classical Bayesian algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a more accurate DOA estimation than the traditional multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm and other CS recovery algorithms.

  20. Observations on Stratospheric-Mesospheric-Thermospheric temperatures using Indian MST radar and co-located LIDAR during Leonid Meteor Shower (LMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Selvamurugan

    Full Text Available The temporal and height statistics of the occurrence of meteor trails during the Leonid meteor shower revealed the capability of the Indian MST radar to record large numbers of meteor trails. The distribution of radio meteor trails due to a Leonid meteor shower in space and time provided a unique opportunity to construct the height profiles of lower thermospheric temperatures and winds, with good time and height resolution. There was a four-fold increase in the meteor trails observed during the LMS compared to a typical non-shower day. The temperatures were found to be in excellent continuity with the temperature profiles below the radio meteor region derived from the co-located Nd-Yag LIDAR and the maximum height of the temperature profile was extended from the LIDAR to ~110 km. There are, how-ever, some significant differences between the observed profiles and the CIRA-86 model profiles. The first results on the meteor statistics and neutral temperature are presented and discussed below. 

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pres-sure, density, and temperature History of geophysics (at-mospheric sciences Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  1. Pulsed flows at the high-altitude cusp poleward boundary, and associated ionospheric convection and particle signatures, during a Cluster - FAST - SuperDARN- Søndrestrøm conjunction under a southwest IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle and magnetic field observations during a magnetic conjunction Cluster 1-FAST-Søndrestrøm within the field of view of SuperDARN radars on 21 January 2001 allow us to draw a detailed, comprehensive and self-consistent picture at three heights of signatures associated with transient reconnection under a steady south-westerly IMF (clock angle ≈130°. Cluster 1 was outbound through the high altitude (~12RE exterior northern cusp tailward of the bifurcation line (geomagnetic Bx>0 when a solar wind dynamic pressure release shifted the spacecraft into a boundary layer downstream of the cusp. The centerpiece of the investigation is a series of flow bursts observed there by the spacecraft, which were accompanied by strong field perturbations and tailward flow deflections. Analysis shows these to be Alfvén waves. We interpret these flow events as being due to a sequence of reconnected flux tubes, with field-aligned currents in the associated Alfvén waves carrying stresses to the underlying ionosphere, a view strengthened by the other observations. At the magnetic footprint of the region of Cluster flow bursts, FAST observed an ion energy-latitude disperison of the stepped cusp type, with individual cusp ion steps corresponding to individual flow bursts. Simultaneously, the SuperDARN Stokkseyri radar observed very strong poleward-moving radar auroral forms (PMRAFs which were conjugate to the flow bursts at Cluster. FAST was traversing these PMRAFs when it observed the cusp ion steps. The Søndrestrøm radar observed pulsed ionospheric flows (PIFs just poleward of the convection reversal boundary. As at Cluster, the flow was eastward (tailward, implying a coherent eastward (tailward motion of the hypothesized open flux tubes. The joint Søndrestrøm and FAST observations indicate that the open/closed field line boundary was equatorward of the convection reversal boundary by ~2°. The unprecedented accuracy

  2. The location of the open-closed magnetic field line boundary in the dawn sector auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Wild

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available As a measure of the degree of coupling between the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere systems, the rate at which the size of the polar cap (the region corresponding to ionospheric termini of open magnetic flux tubes varies is of prime importance. However, a reliable technique by which the extent of the polar cap might be routinely monitored has yet to be developed. Current techniques provide particularly ambiguous indications of the polar cap boundary in the dawn sector. We present a case study of space- and ground-based observations of the dawn-sector auroral zone and attempt to determine the location of the polar cap boundary using multi-wavelength observations of the ultraviolet aurora (made by the IMAGE FUV imager, precipitating particle measurements (recorded by the FAST, DMSP, and Cluster 1 and 3 satellites, and SuperDARN HF radar observations of the ionospheric Doppler spectral width boundary. We conclude that in the dawn sector, during the interval presented, neither the poleward edge of the wideband auroral UV emission (140-180nm nor the Doppler spectral width boundary were trustworthy indicators of the polar cap boundary location, while narrow band UV emissions in the range 130-140nm appear to be much more reliable.

  3. Arctic and Antarctic polar mesosphere summer echoes observed with oblique incidence HF radars: analysis using simultaneous MF and VHF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSEs have been well studied using vertical incidence VHF radars at northern high-latitudes. In this paper, two PMSE events detected with the oblique incidence SuperDARN HF radars at Hankasalmi, Finland (62.3° N and Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, are analyzed, together with simultaneous VHF and medium-frequency (MF radar data. Altitude resolutions of the HF radars in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere are too poor to know exact PMSE altitudes. However, a comparison of Doppler velocity from the HF radar and neutral wind velocity from the MF radar shows that PMSEs at the HF band appeared at altitudes within 80-90km, which are consistent with those from previous vertical incidence HF-VHF radar results. The HF-VHF PMSE occurrences exhibit a semidiurnal behavior, as observed by other researchers. It is found that in one event, PMSEs occurred when westward semidiurnal winds with large amplitude at 85-88km altitudes attained a maximum. When the HF-VHF PMSEs were observed at distances beyond 180km from MF radar sites, the MF radars detected no appreciable signatures of echo enhancement.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  4. 自卫式干扰火控雷达网测向交叉定位精度分析%Performance Analysis of Direction-Finding Location Oriented to Self-Defense Jamming in Fire-Control Radar Net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宏; 韩壮志; 何强; 尚朝轩; 张西红

    2011-01-01

    针对自卫式干扰条件下火控雷达网的目标定位问题,依据测向交叉定位原理,建立了火控雷达网测向交叉三维定位模型,分析了影响测向交叉定位性能的各种误差源,在此基础上,建立了火控雷达网测向交叉三维定位精度模型,以此对自卫式干扰下火控雷达网的定位精度进行仿真分析,验证了在自卫式干扰条件下,火控雷达网采用测向交叉定位方法可以有效地对目标干扰源进行定位.%Based on direction-finding location method, an efficient solution for self-defense jammer location by two spatially distributed radar stations in fire-control radar net is presented.Extraordinarily,the radar station location error is referred, and especially the system time synchronization error is originally discussed here.An innovative mathematics model of the jammer location precision is presented and facilitates the system location performance analysis, and formulae are provided for the modeling.Performance evaluation results are presented for various conditions, and indicate that the method is available for effective jammer location.

  5. Location, location, location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, S.P.; Goeree, J.K.; Ramer, R.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the canonical location-then-price duopoly game with general log- concave consumer densities. A unique pure-strategy equilibrium to the two-stage game exists if the density is not "too asymmetric" and not "too concave." These criteria are satisfied by many commonly used densities. Equilibr

  6. Collection, processing, and interpretation of ground-penetrating radar data to determine sediment thickness at selected locations in Deep Creek Lake, Garrett County, Maryland, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William S.L.; Johnson, Carole D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected geophysical data in Deep Creek Lake in Garrett County, Maryland, between September 17 through October 4, 2007 to assist the Maryland Department of Natural Resources to better manage resources of the Lake. The objectives of the geophysical surveys were to provide estimates of sediment thickness in shallow areas around the Lake and to test the usefulness of three geophysical methods in this setting. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR), continuous seismic-reflection profiling (CSP), and continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) were attempted. Nearly 90 miles of GPR radar data and over 70 miles of CSP data were collected throughout the study area. During field deployment and testing, CRP was determined not to be practical and was not used on a large scale. Sediment accumulation generally could be observed in the radar profiles in the shallow coves. In some seismic profiles, a thin layer of sediment could be observed at the water bottom. The radar profiles appeared to be better than the seismic profiles for the determination of sediment thickness. Although only selected data profiles were processed, all data were archived for future interpretation.

  7. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  8. Determination of radar MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  9. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  10. NOAA NEXt-Generation RADar (NEXRAD) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  11. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  12. Radar network communication through sensing of frequency hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowla, Farid; Nekoogar, Faranak

    2013-05-28

    In one embodiment, a radar communication system includes a plurality of radars having a communication range and being capable of operating at a sensing frequency and a reporting frequency, wherein the reporting frequency is different than the sensing frequency, each radar is adapted for operating at the sensing frequency until an event is detected, each radar in the plurality of radars has an identification/location frequency for reporting information different from the sensing frequency, a first radar of the radars which senses the event sends a reporting frequency corresponding to its identification/location frequency when the event is detected, and all other radars in the plurality of radars switch their reporting frequencies to match the reporting frequency of the first radar upon detecting the reporting frequency switch of a radar within the communication range. In another embodiment, a method is presented for communicating information in a radar system.

  13. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  14. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  15. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  16. Investigation of third gyro-harmonic heating at HAARP using stimulated radio emissions and the MUIR and Kodiak radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.; Watkins, B. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Isham, B.; Vega-Cancel, O.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents data from two campaigns at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility (HAARP) in 2011 and 2012. The measurements of stimulated radio emissions (often called stimulated electromagnetic emissions or SEE) were conducted 15 km from the HAARP site. The potential of Narrowband SEE (NSEE) as a new diagnostic tool to monitor artificial irregularities excited during HF-pump heating of the ionosphere is the main goal of this paper. This has been investigated using well established diagnostics including the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) and Kodiak SuperDARN radars as well as Wideband SEE (WSEE). The measured data using these three diagnostics were compared to characterize the ionospheric parameters and study the plasma irregularities generated in the interaction region. Variation of the wideband/narrowband SEE features, SuperDARN echoes, and HF-enhanced ion lines (EHIL) were studied with pump power variation, pump frequency stepping near the third electron gyro-frequency (3fce) as well as changing beam angle relative to the magnetic zenith. In particular, electrostatic plasma waves and associated irregularities excited near the reflection resonance layer as well as the upper-hybrid resonance layer are investigated. The time evolution and growth rate of these irregularities are studied using the experimental observations. Close alignment of narrowband SEE (NSEE) with wideband SEE (WSEE) and EHIL was observed. SuperDARN radar echoes and WSEE also showed alignment as in previous investigations. Correlations between these three measurements underscore potential diagnostics by utilizing the NSEE spectrum to estimate ionospheric parameters such as electron temperature.

  17. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  18. 一种 PRI 变化的雷达信号无源定位方法%A Passive Location Method of The Radar Signal with Variational PRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓威; 李彦志; 张国毅

    2016-01-01

    目前脉冲重复间隔(PRI)恒定的雷达信号已经越来越少,取而代之的是PRI变化的雷达信号。传统的相位差变化率定位法均假设PRI恒定,没有考虑因PRI变化引起的相位差变化率测量误差和定位误差。提出了一种利用插值法重新构造相位差数据的方法,提取了相位差变化率并进行了定位解算。仿真结果表明采用该相位差数据重构方法能够实现快速高精度的无源定位。%Currently ,radar signal with constant pulse repetition interval (PRI) is less and less ,in-stead of this is radar signal with variational PRI .Traditional location method of phase difference change rate almost supposes that PRI is constant ,hasn't considered the measuring error of phase difference rate and position error due to the change of PRI .This paper puts forward a kind of meth-od to reconstruct phase difference data by means of interpolation method ,abstracts the phase difference rate and performs location calculation .T he simulation results show that the method to reconstruct phase difference data can quickly achieve passive location with high accuracy .

  19. Comparison of sea-level measurements between microwave radar and subsurface pressure gauge deployed at select locations along the coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.; VijayKumar, K.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Luis, R.; Nadaf, L.

    Sea-level data are obtained from several remote and coastal locations using absolute pressure gauges deployed at known level, known as chart datum. However, to yield correct sea-level measurements from absolute pressure measurements, it is necessary...

  20. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  1. Validation of the CUTLASS HF radar gravity wave observing capability using EISCAT CP-1 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Arnold

    Full Text Available Quasi-periodic fluctuations in the returned ground-scatter power from the SuperDARN HF radars have been linked to the passage of medium-scale gravity waves. We have applied a technique that extracts the first radar range returns from the F-region to study the spatial extent and characteristics of these waves in the CUTLASS field-of-view. Some ray tracing was carried out to test the applicability of this method. The EISCAT radar facility at Tromsø is well within the CUTLASS field-of-view for these waves and provides a unique opportunity to assess independently the ability of the HF radars to derive gravity wave information. Results from 1st March, 1995, where the EISCAT UHF radar was operating in its CP-1 mode, demonstrate that the radars were in good agreement, especially if one selects the electron density variations measured by EISCAT at around 235 km. CUTLASS and EISCAT gravity wave observations complement each other; the former extends the spatial field of view considerably, whilst the latter provides detailed vertical information about a range of ionospheric parameters.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere – atmosphere interactions · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics · Radio science (ionospheric propagations

  2. First simultaneous observations of flux transfer events at the high-latitude magnetopause by the Cluster spacecraft and pulsed radar signatures in the conjugate ionosphere by the CUTLASS and EISCAT radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Wild

    Full Text Available Cluster magnetic field data are studied during an outbound pass through the post-noon high-latitude magnetopause region on 14 February 2001. The onset of several minute perturbations in the magnetospheric field was observed in conjunction with a southward turn of the interplanetary magnetic field observed upstream by the ACE spacecraft and lagged to the subsolar magnetopause. These perturbations culminated in the observation of four clear magnetospheric flux transfer events (FTEs adjacent to the magnetopause, together with a highly-structured magnetopause boundary layer containing related field features. Furthermore, clear FTEs were observed later in the magnetosheath. The magnetospheric FTEs were of essentially the same form as the original "flux erosion events" observed in HEOS-2 data at a similar location and under similar interplanetary conditions by Haerendel et al. (1978. We show that the nature of the magnetic perturbations in these events is consistent with the formation of open flux tubes connected to the northern polar ionosphere via pulsed reconnection in the dusk sector magnetopause. The magnetic footprint of the Cluster spacecraft during the boundary passage is shown to map centrally within the fields-of-view of the CUTLASS SuperDARN radars, and to pass across the field-aligned beam of the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR system. It is shown that both the ionospheric flow and the backscatter power in the CUTLASS data pulse are in synchrony with the magnetospheric FTEs and boundary layer structures at the latitude of the Cluster footprint. These flow and power features are subsequently found to propagate poleward, forming classic "pulsed ionospheric flow" and "poleward-moving radar auroral form" structures at higher latitudes. The combined Cluster-CUTLASS observations thus represent a direct demonstration of the coupling of momentum and energy into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system via pulsed magnetopause reconnection. The ESR

  3. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W [Albuquerque, NM; Jordan, Jay D [Albuquerque, NM; Kim, Theodore J [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  4. Development of buried cable location survey system by underground rader for power distribution cables under pavements. Haiden chichuka no tame no chika radar ni yoru maisetsukan tansa system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Kitano, K.

    1990-06-01

    To execute construction work for power distribution cables under pavements reasonably, it is important to develop a technology capable of non-destructive detection of the location of existing buried cables from the ground surface. This study is to clarify the principle, measurement method, effectiveness, and limitation of the underground radar system which is at present considered as the most effective survey method for buried cables. In this system, accuracy in measuring the depth of underground cable location by a separated type antenna has been improved, software to improve resolution by a migration process has been developed, and a compact survey system which can analyze the data on the site has been realized. As aresult of the survey at city areas, all pipes buried less than 1m in depth with the resistivity value of more than 100 {Omega} m were detected as well as those less than 2m in depth with more than some 100 {Omega} m. However, non-metal pipes buried deeper than 1m in the ground of less than 100 {Omega} m were not detected. Consequently, improvement of the system is necessary in future. 7 refs., 23 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Asymmetric distribution of the ionospheric electric potential in the opposite hemispheres as inferred from the SuperDARN observations and FAC-based convection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukianova, R.; Hanuise, C.; Christiansen, Freddy

    2008-01-01

    -altitude satellites. Both the solar and auroral precipitation contributions are included in order to derive the ionospheric conductance. Taking into account the electrodynamic coupling of the opposite hemispheres, the model allows one to obtain the convection patterns developed simultaneously in both hemispheres......We compare the SuperDARN convection patterns with the predictions of a new numerical model of the global distribution of ionospheric electric potentials. The model utilizes high-precision statistical maps of field-aligned currents (FAC) derived from measurements made by polar-orbiting low...... for given input parameters. SuperDARN, with its database containing global northern and southern convection maps, provides the unique opportunity to compare the model predictions of electric fields with observations. In the present study we focus on the effect of significant interhemispheric asymmetry...

  6. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level III Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  7. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level II Base Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level II weather radar data collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii,...

  8. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  9. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  10. Artifacts in Radar Imaging of Moving Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    leads to the wrong object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a moving target’s physical location varies throughout the imaging...Imaging, Synthetic Aperture Radar, Bistatic Radar, Multistatic Radar, Moving Targets, Backprojection 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 133 16. PRICE CODE 17...broadening and range errors were introduced by target motion. This leads to incorrect object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a

  11. Radar detection

    CERN Document Server

    DiFranco, Julius

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive tutorial exposition of radar detection using the methods and techniques of mathematical statistics. The material presented is as current and useful to today's engineers as when the book was first published by Prentice-Hall in 1968 and then republished by Artech House in 1980. The book is divided into six parts.

  12. Integration and Validation of Avian Radars (IVAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    elected to locate the Ra serve as the destination for streaming, storing, and redistributing data applications, including the Radar Fusion Engine (RFE...from a study location documented targets being tracked throughout a full, 360° field-of-view. Methods We elected to use the SEA AR-1 radar located...which are less than 10 m from the cart, are there to warn pedestrians of the obstruction on the sidewalk . 267 268 Figure 6-126. eBirdRad

  13. Flux closure during a substorm observed by Cluster, Double Star, IMAGE FUV, SuperDARN, and Greenland magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We examine magnetic flux closure during an extended substorm interval on 29 August 2004 involving a two-stage onset and subsequent re-intensifications. Cluster and Double Star provide observations of magnetotail dynamics, while the corresponding auroral evolution, convection response, and substorm current wedge development are monitored by IMAGE FUV, SuperDARN, and the Greenland magnetometer chain, respectively. The first stage of onset is associated with the reconnection of closed flux in the plasma sheet; this is accompanied by a short-lived auroral intensification, a modest substorm current wedge magnetic bay, but no significant ionospheric convection enhancement. The second stage follows the progression of reconnection to the open field lines of the lobes; accompanied by prolonged auroral bulge and westward-travelling surge development, enhanced magnetic bays and convection. We find that the tail dynamics are highly influenced by ongoing dayside creation of open flux, leading to flux pile-up in the near-tail and a step-wise down-tail motion of the tail reconnection site. In all, 5 dipolarizations are observed, each associated with the closure of ~0.1 GWb of flux. Very simple calculations indicate that the X-line should progress down-tail at a speed of 20 km s-1, or 6 RE between each dipolarization.

  14. Limitations of Radar Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Lusanna, Luca; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a radar coordinate system about the world line of an observer is discussed. Radar coordinates for a hyperbolic observer as well as a uniformly rotating observer are described in detail. The utility of the notion of radar distance and the admissibility of radar coordinates are investigated. Our results provide a critical assessment of the physical significance of radar coordinates.

  15. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145743)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  16. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0151726)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  17. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  18. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  19. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0154389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  20. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0148078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  1. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  2. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138488)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  3. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0141105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  4. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during March 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  5. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  6. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during January 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  7. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131908)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  8. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0154390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  9. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145802)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  10. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0144289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  11. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  12. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131956)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  13. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0144286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  14. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0141107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  15. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  16. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138948)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  17. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  18. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0151734)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  19. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  20. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  1. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  2. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  3. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  4. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during February 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  5. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138671)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  6. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138776)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  7. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0148080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  8. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  9. Towards the azimuthal characteristics of ionospheric and seismic effects of "Chelyabinsk" meteorite fall according to the data from coherent radar, GPS and seismic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Berngardt, O I; Kutelev, K A; Zherebtsov, G A; Dobrynina, A A; Shestakov, N V; Zagretdinov, R V; Bakhtiyarov, V F; Kusonsky, O A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the azimuthal characteristics of ionospheric and seismic effects of the meteorite 'Chelyabinsk', based on the data from the network of GPS receivers, coherent decameter radar EKB SuperDARN and network of seismic stations. It is shown, that 6-14 minutes after the bolide explosion, GPS network observed the cone-shaped wavefront of TIDs that is interpreted as a ballistic acoustic wave. The typical TIDs propagation velocity were observed 661+/-256m/s, which corresponds to the expected acoustic wave speed for 240km height. 14 minutes after the bolide explosion, at distances of 200km we observed the emergence and propagation of a TID with spherical wavefront, that is interpreted as gravitational mode of internal acoustic waves. The propagation velocity of this TID was 337+/-89m/s which corresponds to the propagation velocity of these waves in similar situations. At EKB SuperDARN radar, we observed TIDs in the sector of azimuthal angles close to the perpendicular to the meteorite...

  10. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  11. Nordic Snow Radar Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmetyinen, Juha; Kontu, Anna; Pulliainen, Jouni; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Wiesmann, Andreas; Mätzler, Christian; Werner, Charles; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx) campaign was to provide a continuous time series of active and passive microwave observations of snow cover at a representative location of the Arctic boreal forest area, covering a whole winter season. The activity was a part of Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate mission CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory). The NoSREx campaign, conducted at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC) in Sodankylä, Finland, hosted a frequency scanning scatterometer operating at frequencies from X- to Ku-band. The radar observations were complemented by a microwave dual-polarization radiometer system operating from X- to W-bands. In situ measurements consisted of manual snow pit measurements at the main test site as well as extensive automated measurements on snow, ground and meteorological parameters. This study provides a summary of the obtained data, detailing measurement protocols for each microwave instrument and in situ reference data. A first analysis of the microwave signatures against snow parameters is given, also comparing observed radar backscattering and microwave emission to predictions of an active/passive forward model. All data, including the raw data observations, are available for research purposes through the European Space Agency and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. A consolidated dataset of observations, comprising the key microwave and in situ observations, is provided through the ESA campaign data portal to enable easy access to the data.

  12. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  13. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  14. Radar-to-Radar Interference Suppression for Distributed Radar Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Qin Wang; Huaizong Shao

    2014-01-01

    Radar sensor networks, including bi- and multi-static radars, provide several operational advantages, like reduced vulnerability, good system flexibility and an increased radar cross-section. However, radar-to-radar interference suppression is a major problem in distributed radar sensor networks. In this paper, we present a cross-matched filtering-based radar-to-radar interference suppression algorithm. This algorithm first uses an iterative filtering algorithm to suppress the radar-to-radar ...

  15. A Parallel, High-Fidelity Radar Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, M.; Fasenfest, B.

    2010-09-01

    Accurate modeling of Space Surveillance sensors is necessary for a variety of applications. Accurate models can be used to perform trade studies on sensor designs, locations, and scheduling. In addition, they can be used to predict system-level performance of the Space Surveillance Network to a collision or satellite break-up event. A high fidelity physics-based radar simulator has been developed for Space Surveillance applications. This simulator is designed in a modular fashion, where each module describes a particular physical process or radar function (radio wave propagation & scattering, waveform generation, noise sources, etc.) involved in simulating the radar and its environment. For each of these modules, multiple versions are available in order to meet the end-users needs and requirements. For instance, the radar simulator supports different atmospheric models in order to facilitate different methods of simulating refraction of the radar beam. The radar model also has the capability to use highly accurate radar cross sections generated by the method of moments, accelerated by the fast multipole method. To accelerate this computationally expensive model, it is parallelized using MPI. As a testing framework for the radar model, it is incorporated into the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA). TESSA is based on a flexible, scalable architecture, designed to exploit high-performance computing resources and allow physics-based simulation of the SSA enterprise. In addition to the radar models, TESSA includes hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, optical brightness calculations, optical system models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, simulation analysis and visualization tools. Within this framework, observations and tracks generated by the new radar model are compared to results from a phenomenological radar model. In particular, the new model will be

  16. Kharkiv Meteor Radar System (the XX Age)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiyets, S. V.

    2012-09-01

    Kharkiv meteor radar research are of historic value (Kolomiyets and Sidorov 2007). Kharkiv radar observations of meteors proved internationally as the best in the world, it was noted at the IAU General Assembly in 1958. In the 1970s Kharkiv meteor automated radar system (MARS) was recommended at the international level as a successful prototype for wide distribution. Until now, this radar system is one of the most sensitive instruments of meteor radars in the world for astronomical observations. In 2004 Kharkiv meteor radar system is included in the list of objects which compose the national property of Ukraine. Kharkiv meteor radar system has acquired the status of the important historical astronomical instrument in world history. Meteor Centre for researching meteors in Kharkiv is a analogue of the observatory and performs the same functions of a generator and a battery of special knowledge and skills (the world-famous studio). Kharkiv and the location of the instrument were brand points on the globe, as the place where the world-class meteor radar studies were carried out. They are inscribed in the history of meteor astronomy, in large letters and should be immortalized on a world-wide level.

  17. Joint observations of a traveling ionospheric disturbance with the Paratunka OMTI camera and the Hokkaido HF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Koustov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available On 10 September 2007 between 10:00 and 14:00 UT, the OMTI all-sky imager at Paratunka (Kamchatka, Russia, GLAT~52° observed the onset and south-western progression of a localized depletion region in the airglow intensity. The perturbation, while being stretched in the NW-SE direction, crossed the entire field of view of the camera. During the event, the Hokkaido SuperDARN HF radar was monitoring echoes in the Paratunka longitudinal sector. It was detecting a localized band of ground scatter echoes progressing equatorward synchronously with the motion of the optical perturbation. It is suggested that both features resulted from the onset and south-western progression of a localized region with enhanced electric field that influenced the distribution of the plasma density in the ionosphere. Modeling of the HF ground scatter dynamics based on numerical ray tracing demonstrated qualitative consistency with the observations.

  18. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  19. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  20. On detection performance and system configuration of MIMO radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; WU Yong; PENG YingNing; WANG XiuTan

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar is a new concept with some new characteristics, such as multiple orthogonal waveforms and omnidirectional coverage. Based on Stein's lemma, we use relative entropy as a precise and general measure of error exponent to study detection performance for both MIMO radar and phased array radar. And based on derived analytical results, we further study the system configuration problem of Bistatic MIMO radar systems, where transmitters and receivers are located in different positions. Some interesting results are presented. For phased array radar, when the total numbers of transmitters and receivers are fixed, we should always make the number of transmitters equal to the number of receivers. For MIMO radar, we should use a small number of transmitters in low signal noise ratio (SNR) region, and make the number of transmitters equal to the number of receivers in high SNR region. These results are instructive for deployment of bistatic MIMO radar systems in the future.

  1. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  2. Passive MIMO Radar Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    cumulative distribution function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 CORA COvert RAdar...PaRaDe), developed by the Insti- tute of Electronic Systems at the Warsaw University of Technology [59, 60]; COvert RAdar ( CORA ), developed by the German

  3. Weather Radar Impact Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent an inventory of the national impacts of wind turbine interference with NEXRAD radar stations. This inventory was developed by the NOAA Radar...

  4. Digital LPI Radar Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Peng Ghee; Teng, Haw Kiad

    2001-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The function of a Low Probability ofIntercept (LPI) radar is to prevent its interception by an Electronic Support (ES) receiver. This objective is generally achieved through the use of a radar waveform that is mismatched to those waveforms for which an ES receiver is tuned. This allows the radar to achieve a processing gain, with respect to the ES receiver, that is equal to the time-bandwidth product ofthe radar waveform. This...

  5. Neutrino Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, P K

    2002-01-01

    We point out that with improving our present knowledge of experimental neutrino physics it will be possible to locate nuclear powered vehicles like submarines, aircraft carriers and UFOs and detect nuclear testing. Since neutrinos cannot be shielded, it will not be possible to escape these detection. In these detectors it will also be possible to perform neutrino oscillation experiments during any nuclear testing.

  6. Deep Stochastic Radar Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Tim Allan; Holder, Martin; Winner, Hermann; Kochenderfer, Mykel

    2017-01-01

    Accurate simulation and validation of advanced driver assistance systems requires accurate sensor models. Modeling automotive radar is complicated by effects such as multipath reflections, interference, reflective surfaces, discrete cells, and attenuation. Detailed radar simulations based on physical principles exist but are computationally intractable for realistic automotive scenes. This paper describes a methodology for the construction of stochastic automotive radar models based on deep l...

  7. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  8. Radar and wind turbines; Radar en windturbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Doorn, H.

    2010-03-15

    In the last years the developments of wind parks were hampered because of their possible effect on the radar for observation of air traffic. Work is currently being done on a new assessment model for wind turbines under the auspices of the steering group National Security for the military radar systems. Air traffic control Netherlands (LVNL) will look at the options for civil radars to join in. [Dutch] In de afgelopen jaren zijn windparkontwikkelingen onder meer belemmerd vanwege mogelijke effecten op radar voor de waarneming van luchtverkeer. Onder auspicien van de stuurgroep Nationale Veiligheid voor de militaire radarsystemen op land wordt gewerkt aan een nieuw beoordelingsmodel voor windturbines. De Luchtverkeersleiding Nederland (LVNL) zal bezien in hoeverre de civiele radars hierbij kunnen aansluiten.

  9. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  10. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  11. Multidimensional radar picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  12. Fusion of Radar and EO-sensors for Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, L.J.H.M.; Theil, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fusion of radar and EO-sensors is investigated for the purpose of surveillance in littoral waters is. All sensors are considered to be co-located with respect to the distance, typically 1 to 10 km, of the area under surveillance. The sensor suite is a coherent polarimetric radar in combination with

  13. Fusion of Radar and EO-sensors for Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, L.J.H.M.; Theil, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fusion of radar and EO-sensors is investigated for the purpose of surveillance in littoral waters is. All sensors are considered to be co-located with respect to the distance, typically 1 to 10 km, of the area under surveillance. The sensor suite is a coherent polarimetric radar in combination with

  14. MIMO Radar Using Compressive Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2009-01-01

    A MIMO radar system is proposed for obtaining angle and Doppler information on potential targets. Transmitters and receivers are nodes of a small scale wireless network and are assumed to be randomly scattered on a disk. The transmit nodes transmit uncorrelated waveforms. Each receive node applies compressive sampling to the received signal to obtain a small number of samples, which the node subsequently forwards to a fusion center. Assuming that the targets are sparsely located in the angle- Doppler space, based on the samples forwarded by the receive nodes the fusion center formulates an l1-optimization problem, the solution of which yields target angle and Doppler information. The proposed approach achieves the superior resolution of MIMO radar with far fewer samples than required by other approaches. This implies power savings during the communication phase between the receive nodes and the fusion center. Performance in the presence of a jammer is analyzed for the case of slowly moving targets. Issues rel...

  15. Probabilistic forecasts based on radar rainfall uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, S.; Rico-Ramirez, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    The potential advantages resulting from integrating weather radar rainfall estimates in hydro-meteorological forecasting systems is limited by the inherent uncertainty affecting radar rainfall measurements, which is due to various sources of error [1-3]. The improvement of quality control and correction techniques is recognized to play a role for the future improvement of radar-based flow predictions. However, the knowledge of the uncertainty affecting radar rainfall data can also be effectively used to build a hydro-meteorological forecasting system in a probabilistic framework. This work discusses the results of the implementation of a novel probabilistic forecasting system developed to improve ensemble predictions over a small urban area located in the North of England. An ensemble of radar rainfall fields can be determined as the sum of a deterministic component and a perturbation field, the latter being informed by the knowledge of the spatial-temporal characteristics of the radar error assessed with reference to rain-gauges measurements. This approach is similar to the REAL system [4] developed for use in the Southern-Alps. The radar uncertainty estimate can then be propagated with a nowcasting model, used to extrapolate an ensemble of radar rainfall forecasts, which can ultimately drive hydrological ensemble predictions. A radar ensemble generator has been calibrated using radar rainfall data made available from the UK Met Office after applying post-processing and corrections algorithms [5-6]. One hour rainfall accumulations from 235 rain gauges recorded for the year 2007 have provided the reference to determine the radar error. Statistics describing the spatial characteristics of the error (i.e. mean and covariance) have been computed off-line at gauges location, along with the parameters describing the error temporal correlation. A system has then been set up to impose the space-time error properties to stochastic perturbations, generated in real-time at

  16. A Comparison of the Radar Ray Path Equations and Approximations for Use in Radar Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The radar ray path equations are used to determine the physical location of each radar measurement.These equations are necessary for mapping radar data to computational grids for diagnosis, display and numerical weather prediction (NWP). They are also used to determine the forward operators for assimilation of radar data into forecast models. In this paper, a stepwise ray tracing method is developed. The influence of the atmospheric refractive index on the ray path equations at different locations related to an intense cold front is examined against the ray path derived from the new tracing method. It is shown that the radar ray path is not very sensitive to sharp vertical gradients of refractive index caused by the strong temperature inversion and large moisture gradient in this case. In the paper, the errors caused by using the simplified straight ray path equations are also examined. It is found that there will be significant errors in the physical location of radar measurements if the earth's curvature is not considered, especially at lower elevation angles. A reduced form of the equation for beam height calculation is derived using Taylor series expansion. It is computationally more efficient and also avoids the need to use double precision variables to mitigate the small difference between two large terms in the original form. The accuracy of this reduced form is found to be sufficient for modeling use.

  17. Updating river basin models with radar altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailovsky, Claire Irene B.

    response of a catchment to meteorological forcing. While river discharge cannot be directly measured from space, radar altimetry (RA) can measure water level variations in rivers at the locations where the satellite ground track and river network intersect called virtual stations or VS. In this PhD study...... been between 10 and 35 days for altimetry missions until now. The location of the VS is also not necessarily the point at which measurements are needed. On the other hand, one of the main strengths of the dataset is its availability in near-real time. These characteristics make radar altimetry ideally...... suited for use in data assimilation frameworks which combine the information content from models and current observations to produce improved forecasts and reduce prediction uncertainty. The focus of the second and third papers of this thesis was therefore the use of radar altimetry as update data...

  18. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  19. Radar efficiency and the calculation of decade-long PMSE backscatter cross-section for the Resolute Bay VHF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Swarnalingam

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Resolute Bay VHF radar, located in Nunavut, Canada (75.0° N, 95.0° W and operating at 51.5 MHz, has been used to investigate Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE since 1997. PMSE are a unique form of strong coherent radar echoes, and their understanding has been a challenge to the scientific community since their discovery more than three decades ago. While other high latitude radars have recorded strong levels of PMSE activities, the Resolute Bay radar has observed relatively lower levels of PMSE strengths. In order to derive absolute measurements of PMSE strength at this site, a technique is developed to determine the radar efficiency using cosmic (sky noise variations along with the help of a calibrated noise source. VHF radars are only rarely calibrated, but determination of efficiency is even less common. Here we emphasize the importance of efficiency for determination of cross-section measurements. The significant advantage of this method is that it can be directly applied to any MST radar system anywhere in the world as long as the sky noise variations are known. The radar efficiencies for two on-site radars at Resolute Bay are determined. PMSE backscatter cross-section is estimated, and decade-long PMSE strength variations at this location are investigated. It was noticed that the median of the backscatter cross-section distribution remains relatively unchanged, but over the years a great level of variability occurs in the high power tail of the distribution.

  20. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  1. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  2. Assessing collision risk for birds and bats : radar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet, R. [Genivar SEC, Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described some of the inventories and instrumentation available for monitoring winged fauna in and around wind farms. In addition to visual observations, bird calls and songs can be recorded to determine the amount and different types of birds located at wind farm sites. Radio-telemetry devices are also used to evaluate bird activities, and nest searches are conducted to determine the amount of eggs or young birds that will soon add to the bird population. Between 90 and 100 percent of birds and bats migrate at night. Acoustic radar, Doppler radar, and maritime surveillance radar instruments are used to monitor night-time activities in wind farm locations. Doppler radar is also used to detect bird and bat migration corridors. Screen-shots of various radar interfaces were presented. tabs., figs.

  3. The Southern Argentine Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53 S) in May 2008. SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large number of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars. In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions. The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source, of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables detailed study of showers at high southern latitudes (e.g July Phoenicids or Puppids complex). Finally, SAAMER is ideal for the deployment of complementary instrumentation in both, permanent

  4. Combined radar and telemetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  5. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    class of radars, because it accounts for the large variability of hydrometeors reflectivity and vertical hydrometeors positioning (echo-top), which is strongly influenced by the high location of the radar. The ARCOM procedure is in addition embedded in a multistep quality control framework, which also includes the calibration on raingauge observations, and can be summarized as follow: 1) correction of both LAWR and raingauge observations for known errors (e.g. magnetron decay and heated-related water loss) 2) evaluation of the local Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) as estimator of the linear correlation between raingauge and LAWR observations (logarithmic receiver); 3) computation of the local ACF in the form of the local linear regression coefficient between raingauge and LAWR observations; 4) calibration of the ARCOM, i.e. definition of the parametrization able to reproduce the spatial variability of ACF as function of the local sP, being the PCCs used as weight in the calibration procedure. The resulting calibrated ARCOM finally allows, in any ungauged mountain spot, to convert LAWR observations into precipitation rate. The temporal and the spatial transferability of the ARCOM are evaluated via split-sample and a take-one-out cross validation. The results revealed good spatial transferability and a seasonal bias within 7%, thus opening new opportunities for local range distributed measurements of precipitation in mountain regions.

  6. Radar illusion via metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results.

  7. Aspects of Radar Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lüneburg, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    This contribution is a tutorial introduction to the phenomenological theory of radar polarimetry for the coherent scatter case emphasizing monostatic backscattering and forward scattering (transmission). Characteristic similarities and differences between radar polarimetry and optical polarimetry and the role of linear and antilinear operators (time-reversal) are pointed out and typical polarimetric invariants are identified.

  8. The Cloud Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Improvement in our understanding of the radiative impact of clouds on the climate system requires a comprehensive view of clouds including their physical dimensions, dynamical generation processes, and detailed microphysical properties. To this end, millimeter vave radar is a powerful tool by which clouds can be remotely sensed. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Cloud Radar System (CRS). CRS is a highly sensitive 94 GHz (W-band) pulsed-Doppler polarimetric radar that is designed to fly on board the NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. The instrument is currently the only millimeter wave radar capable of cloud and precipitation measurements from above most all clouds. Because it operates from high-altitude, the CRS provides a unique measurement perspective for cirrus cloud studies. The CRS emulates a satellite view of clouds and precipitation systems thus providing valuable measurements for the implementation and algorithm validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that is designed to measure ice cloud distributions on the global scale using a spaceborne 94 GHz radar. This paper describes the CRS instrument and preliminary data from the recent Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). The radar design is discussed. Characteristics of the radar are given. A block diagram illustrating functional components of the radar is shown. The performance of the CRS during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign is discussed.

  9. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  10. Principles of modern radar radar applications

    CERN Document Server

    Scheer, James A

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Radar Applications is the third of the three-volume seriesof what was originally designed to be accomplished in one volume. As the final volumeof the set, it finishes the original vision of a complete yet bounded reference for radartechnology. This volume describes fifteen different system applications or class ofapplications in more detail than can be found in Volumes I or II.As different as the applications described, there is a difference in how these topicsare treated by the authors. Whereas in Volumes I and II there is strict adherence tochapter format and leve

  11. Feasibility of mitigating the effects of windfarms on primary radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.M.; Johnson, D.A.

    2003-07-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the feasibility of modifying civil and military radars to mitigate the effects from wind turbines, to provide costings for implementing changes to the radar and to produce guidelines for planning wind farms in the vicinity of radars. The effect of wind turbines on radar signals, assessed through computer modelling, is summarised. The key aspects of turbine design that can be modified to minimise these effects are described. A key issue is the fact that no two radar installations are alike, with settings being customised for local requirements. As a consequence, a detailed understanding of the design and features of each individual radar would be required in order to assess the impact of a wind farm proposal. The costs of a programme of modifications to the civil ATC (air traffic control) radar base will depend on many factors. An estimate of costs is provided, based on the assumption that only 30 of the UK radars would need modification and that a range of modifications from very simple to very complex will be required. A number of other approaches, outside of modification of the radar system, may require investigation during a windfarm planning application, such as layout and location of the wind farm or changing air traffic routes in the vicinity of the wind farm.

  12. Location Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    With rapid development of sensor and wireless mobile devices, it is easy to access mobile users' location information anytime and anywhere. On one hand, LBS is becoming more and more valuable and important. On the other hand, location privacy issues raised by such applications have also gained more attention. However, due to the specificity of location information, traditional privacy-preserving techniques in data publishing cannot be used. In this chapter, we will introduce location privacy, and analyze the challenges of location privacy-preserving, and give a survey of existing work including the system architecture, location anonymity and query processing.

  13. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  14. Analytic radar micro-Doppler signatures classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Beom-Seok; Gu, Zhaoning; Wang, Guan; Toh, Kar-Ann; Lin, Zhiping

    2017-06-01

    Due to its capability of capturing the kinematic properties of a target object, radar micro-Doppler signatures (m-DS) play an important role in radar target classification. This is particularly evident from the remarkable number of research papers published every year on m-DS for various applications. However, most of these works rely on the support vector machine (SVM) for target classification. It is well known that training an SVM is computationally expensive due to its nature of search to locate the supporting vectors. In this paper, the classifier learning problem is addressed by a total error rate (TER) minimization where an analytic solution is available. This largely reduces the search time in the learning phase. The analytically obtained TER solution is globally optimal with respect to the classification total error count rate. Moreover, our empirical results show that TER outperforms SVM in terms of classification accuracy and computational efficiency on a five-category radar classification problem.

  15. Radar cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Knott, Gene; Tuley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the second edition of the first and foremost book on this subject for self-study, training, and course work. Radar cross section (RCS) is a comparison of two radar signal strengths. One is the strength of the radar beam sweeping over a target, the other is the strength of the reflected echo sensed by the receiver. This book shows how the RCS ?gauge? can be predicted for theoretical objects and how it can be measured for real targets. Predicting RCS is not easy, even for simple objects like spheres or cylinders, but this book explains the two ?exact? forms of theory so well that even a

  16. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  17. Analysis of Self Screening Jammer Parameters with RADAR Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Surendra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available RADARs are mainly used to detect and locate the position of objects. The power received at the radar depends on the radiating power, object size, target material, shape of the target and channel noises due to atmosphere and external induced devices. In the war fields it is very important that the target identity is masked so that the enemy attacks can be overcome. In order to mask the targets and create the false identity jammers are very useful. There are various types of jammers and self screening jammers are the most protecting jammers. Hence we have analysed all the parameters related to self screening jammers. By calculating the range between target and the radar and observing the power transmitted by the source station and power received at the radar we have estimated the Cross over range. The variation of this cross over range with respect to jammer peak power, RADAR peak power, attenuation are analysed using matlab in this paper.

  18. High Resolution Software Defined Radar System for Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Software Radio Peripheral USRP NI2920, a software defined transceiver so far mainly used in Software Defined Radio applications, is adopted in this work to design a high resolution L-Band Software Defined Radar system. The enhanced available bandwidth, due to the Gigabit Ethernet interface, is exploited to obtain a higher slant-range resolution with respect to the existing Software Defined Radar implementations. A specific LabVIEW application, performing radar operations, is discussed, and successful validations are presented to demonstrate the accurate target detection capability of the proposed software radar architecture. In particular, outdoor and indoor test are performed by adopting a metal plate as reference structure located at different distances from the designed radar system, and results obtained from the measured echo are successfully processed to accurately reveal the correct target position, with the predicted slant-range resolution equal to 6 m.

  19. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  20. Imaging Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanZyl, J. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art in imaging radar polarimetry, examine current developments in sensor technology and implementation for recording polarimetric measurements, and describe techniques and areas of application for the new remote sensing data.

  1. Radar Landmass Simulation Computer Programming (Interim Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    RADAR SCANNING, TERRAIN), (*NAVAL TRAINING, RADAR OPERATORS), (*FLIGHT SIMULATORS, TERRAIN AVOIDANCE), (* COMPUTER PROGRAMMING , INSTRUCTION MANUALS), PLAN POSITION INDICATORS, REAL TIME, DISPLAY SYSTEMS, RADAR IMAGES, SIMULATION

  2. Downhole pulse radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  3. Mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buler, Jeffrey J; Randall, Lori A; Fleskes, Joseph P; Barrow, Wylie C; Bogart, Tianna; Kluver, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The current network of weather surveillance radars within the United States readily detects flying birds and has proven to be a useful remote-sensing tool for ornithological study. Radar reflectivity measures serve as an index to bird density and have been used to quantitatively map landbird distributions during migratory stopover by sampling birds aloft at the onset of nocturnal migratory flights. Our objective was to further develop and validate a similar approach for mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar observations at the onset of evening flights. We evaluated data from the Sacramento, CA radar (KDAX) during winters 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. We determined an optimal sampling time by evaluating the accuracy and precision of radar observations at different times during the onset of evening flight relative to observed diurnal distributions of radio-marked birds on the ground. The mean time of evening flight initiation occurred 23 min after sunset with the strongest correlations between reflectivity and waterfowl density on the ground occurring almost immediately after flight initiation. Radar measures became more spatially homogeneous as evening flight progressed because birds dispersed from their departure locations. Radars effectively detected birds to a mean maximum range of 83 km during the first 20 min of evening flight. Using a sun elevation angle of -5° (28 min after sunset) as our optimal sampling time, we validated our approach using KDAX data and additional data from the Beale Air Force Base, CA (KBBX) radar during winter 1998-1999. Bias-adjusted radar reflectivity of waterfowl aloft was positively related to the observed diurnal density of radio-marked waterfowl locations on the ground. Thus, weather radars provide accurate measures of relative wintering waterfowl density that can be used to comprehensively map their distributions over large spatial extents.

  4. Mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buler, Jeffrey J.; Randall, Lori A.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Barrow, Wylie C.; Bogart, Tianna; Kluver, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The current network of weather surveillance radars within the United States readily detects flying birds and has proven to be a useful remote-sensing tool for ornithological study. Radar reflectivity measures serve as an index to bird density and have been used to quantitatively map landbird distributions during migratory stopover by sampling birds aloft at the onset of nocturnal migratory flights. Our objective was to further develop and validate a similar approach for mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar observations at the onset of evening flights. We evaluated data from the Sacramento, CA radar (KDAX) during winters 1998–1999 and 1999–2000. We determined an optimal sampling time by evaluating the accuracy and precision of radar observations at different times during the onset of evening flight relative to observed diurnal distributions of radio-marked birds on the ground. The mean time of evening flight initiation occurred 23 min after sunset with the strongest correlations between reflectivity and waterfowl density on the ground occurring almost immediately after flight initiation. Radar measures became more spatially homogeneous as evening flight progressed because birds dispersed from their departure locations. Radars effectively detected birds to a mean maximum range of 83 km during the first 20 min of evening flight. Using a sun elevation angle of -5° (28 min after sunset) as our optimal sampling time, we validated our approach using KDAX data and additional data from the Beale Air Force Base, CA (KBBX) radar during winter 1998–1999. Bias-adjusted radar reflectivity of waterfowl aloft was positively related to the observed diurnal density of radio-marked waterfowl locations on the ground. Thus, weather radars provide accurate measures of relative wintering waterfowl density that can be used to comprehensively map their distributions over large spatial extents.

  5. Advanced Meteor radar at Tirupati: System details and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Eethamakula, Kosalendra; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    An advanced meteor radar viz., Enhanced Meteor Detection Radar (EMDR) operating at 35.25 MHz is installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India, in the month of August 2013. Present communication describes the need for the meteor radar at present location, system description, its measurement techniques, its variables and comparison of measured mean winds with contemporary radars over the Indian region. The present radar site is selected to fill the blind region of Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) MST radar, which covers mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region (70-110 km). By modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements, this radar is capable of providing accurate wind information between 70 and 110 km unlike other similar radars. Height covering region is extended by increasing the meteor counting capacity by modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements and hence its wind estimation limits extended below and above of 80 and 100 km, respectively. In the present study, we also made comparison of horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region including the model (HWM 07) data sets. The comparison showed a very good agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well as that of meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed. This new radar is expected to play important role in understanding the vertical and lateral coupling by forming a unique local network.

  6. GIS Based Stereoscopic Visualization Technique for Weather Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S.; Jang, B. J.; Lee, K. H.; Lee, C.; Kim, W.

    2014-12-01

    As rainfall characteristic is more quixotic and localized, it is important to provide a prompt and accurate warning for public. To monitor localized heavy rainfall, a reliable disaster monitoring system with advanced remote observation technology and high-precision display system is needed. To advance even more accurate weather monitoring using weather radar, there have been growing concerns regarding the real-time changes of mapping radar observations on geographical coordinate systems along with the visualization and display methods of radar data based on spatial interpolation techniques and geographical information system (GIS). Currently, the method of simultaneously displaying GIS and radar data is widely used to synchronize the radar and ground systems accurately, and the method of displaying radar data in the 2D GIS coordinate system has been extensively used as the display method for providing weather information from weather radar. This paper proposes a realistic 3D weather radar data display technique with higher spatiotemporal resolution, which is based on the integration of 3D image processing and GIS interaction. This method is focused on stereoscopic visualization, while conventional radar image display works are based on flat or two-dimensional interpretation. Furthermore, using the proposed technique, the atmospheric change at each moment can be observed three-dimensionally at various geological locations simultaneously. Simulation results indicate that 3D display of weather radar data can be performed in real time. One merit of the proposed technique is that it can provide intuitive understanding of the influence of beam blockage by topography. Through an exact matching each 3D modeled radar beam with 3D GIS map, we can find out the terrain masked areas and accordingly it facilitates the precipitation correction from QPE underestimation caused by ground clutter filtering. It can also be expected that more accurate short-term forecasting will be

  7. Motion measurement for synthetic aperture radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3-D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  9. Library Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh locations including address, coordinates, phone number, square footage, and standard operating hours.

  10. Using TRMM and GPM precipitation radar for calibration of weather radars in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisologo, Irene; Bookhagen, Bodo; Smith, Taylor; Heistermann, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Torrential and sustained rainfall from tropical cyclones, monsoons, and thunderstorms frequently impact the Philippines. In order to predict, assess, and measure storm impact, it is imperative to have a reliable and accurate monitoring system in place. In 2011, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) established a weather radar network of ten radar devices, eight of which are single-polarization S-band radars and two dual-polarization C-band radars. Because of a low-density hydrometeorological monitoring networks in the Philippines, calibration of weather radars becomes a challenging, but important task. In this study, we explore the potential of scrutinizing the calibration of ground radars by using the observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). For this purpose, we compare different TRMM level 1 and 2 orbital products from overpasses over the Philippines, and compare these products to reflectivities observed by the Philippine ground radars. Differences in spatial resolution are addressed by computing adequate zonal statistics of the local radar bins located within the corresponding TRMM cell in space and time. The wradlib package (Heistermann et al. 2013; Heistermann et al. 2015) is used to process the data from the Subic S-band single-polarization weather radar. These data will be analyzed in conjunction with TRMM data for June to August 2012, three months of the wet season. This period includes the enhanced monsoon of 2012, locally called Habagat 2012, which brought sustained intense rainfall and massive floods in several parts of the country including the most populated city of Metro Manila. References Heistermann, M., Jacobi, S., Pfaff, T. (2013): Technical Note: An open source library for processing weather radar data (wradlib). Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 17, 863-871, doi: 10.5194/hess-17-863-2013. Heistermann, M., S. Collis, M. J. Dixon, S. Giangrande, J. J. Helmus, B. Kelley, J

  11. Three-dimensional mosaicking of the South Korean radar network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Marc; Sempere-Torres, Daniel; Lee, GyuWon

    2016-04-01

    Dense radar networks offer the possibility of improved Quantitative Precipitation Estimation thanks to the additional information collected in the overlapping areas, which allows mitigating errors associated with the Vertical Profile of Reflectivity or path attenuation by intense rain. With this aim, Roca-Sancho et al. (2014) proposed a technique to generate 3-D reflectivity mosaics from the multiple radars of a network. The technique is based on an inverse method that simulates the radar sampling of the atmosphere considering the characteristics (location, frequency and scanning protocol) of each individual radar. This technique has been applied to mosaic the observations of the radar network of South Korea (composed of 14 S-band radars), and integrate the observations of the small X-band network which to be installed near Seoul in the framework of a project funded by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA). The evaluation of the generated 3-D mosaics has been done by comparison with point measurements (i.e. rain gauges and disdrometers) and with the observations of independent radars. Reference: Roca-Sancho, J., M. Berenguer, and D. Sempere-Torres (2014), An inverse method to retrieve 3D radar reflectivity composites, Journal of Hydrology, 519, 947-965, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2014.07.039.

  12. Experimental uses of short pulse radar in coal seams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coon, J.B.; Fowler, J.C.; Schafers, C.J.

    1980-04-01

    Radar tests in coal mines conducted by the Mining Research Division of Conoco and Ensco, Inc. are presented. The purpose was to determine penetration distances and reflection ranges which are obtainable with currently available short pulse radar. The tests were conducted in mines operated by Consolidation Coal Co. during 1977 and 1978. The first test examined penetration distances, velocity of propagation, and attenuation versus frequency for a large coal pillar. These tests also showed the definite polarization effects which had previously been measured in coal. The second series of tests was designed to show maximum reflection distances for a radar with a centre frequency of 100 MHz. Using common-depth-point reflection techniques, a ten-fold CDP line obtained reflections from distances in excess of 50 ft. This was the first time such techniques have been used with short pulse radar. The final series of tests was conducted to locate a six-inch borehole within a coal pillar. The radar system located the hole quickly and easily even though it was 20 ft into the pillar. These tests show it is possible to use short pulse radar as a hazard detection device in coal mines. The major limitations with a current equipment are that it cannot be used in return air and it is not easily transported in the mine. As a result of these tests, Conoco and Ensco have started a development program to build and test a truly portable mine radar system capable of operation in return air.

  13. Radar Sensing for Intelligent Vehicles in Urban Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Reina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Radar overcomes the shortcomings of laser, stereovision, and sonar because it can operate successfully in dusty, foggy, blizzard-blinding, and poorly lit scenarios. This paper presents a novel method for ground and obstacle segmentation based on radar sensing. The algorithm operates directly in the sensor frame, without the need for a separate synchronised navigation source, calibration parameters describing the location of the radar in the vehicle frame, or the geometric restrictions made in the previous main method in the field. Experimental results are presented in various urban scenarios to validate this approach, showing its potential applicability for advanced driving assistance systems and autonomous vehicle operations.

  14. Application of Two Migration Methods for Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Jing; Chen Shu-zhen; Zou Lian; Xiao Bo-xun

    2004-01-01

    This paper begins with the basic principles of finite-difference migration and diffraction scan migration, and then compares the processing results of the practical ground penetrating radar GPR data with these two migration methods. It is illustrated that migration can refocus the reflecting points in radar record to their true spatial location and provide the foundation for interpretation, thus improving precision of interpretation of (GPR) profiles.

  15. A barrier radar concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Ball, C.; Weissman, I.

    A description is given of a low power, light-weight radar that can be quickly set up and operated on batteries for extended periods of time to detect airborne intruders. With low equipment and operating costs, it becomes practical to employ a multiplicity of such radars to provide an unbroken intrusion fence over the desired perimeter. Each radar establishes a single transmitted fan beam extending vertically from horizon to horizon. The beam is generated by a two-face array antenna built in an A-frame configuration and is shaped, through phasing of the array elements, to concentrate the transmitter power in a manner consistent with the expected operating altitude ceiling of the targets of interest. The angular width of this beam in the dimension transverse to the fan depends on the radar transmission frequency and the antenna aperture dimension, but is typically wide enough so that a target at the maximum altitude or range will require tens of seconds to pass through the beam. A large number of independent samples of radar data will thus be available to provide many opportunities for target detection.

  16. Radar for tracer particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Felix; Huang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a radar system capable of tracking a $5$mm spherical target continuously in three dimensions. The $10$GHz (X-band) radar system has a transmission power of $1$W and operates in the near field of the horn antennae. By comparing the phase shift of the electromagnetic wave traveling through the free space with an IQ-Mixer, we obtain the relative movement of the target with respect to the antennae. From the azimuth and inclination angles of the receiving antennae obtained in the calibration, we reconstruct the target trajectory in a three-dimensional Cartesian system. Finally, we test the tracking algorithm with target moving in circular as well as in pendulum motions, and discuss the capability of the radar system.

  17. Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    ing Ground-Penetrating Radar (LGPR) uses very high frequency (VHF) radar reflections of underground features to generate base- line maps and then...Innovative ground- penetrating radar that maps underground geological features provides autonomous vehicles with real-time localization. Localizing...NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  18. Mode S Baseline Radar Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    range units and 20 azimuth units) overlaying the position of the beacon reports. In the cases analyzed where beacon reports were not radar reinforced ...82/53 j~ C ~ 7 C _ _ _ _ _ _ 4. Title end Su.btitle 5. Neget at. November 1982 MDDE S BASELINE RADAR TRACKIN4G 6. Poelin Orgeuianti.. Cede ACT-100...Ground Clutter 33 Mode S/ARTS III 100-Scan False Radar Track Summary 74 34 Percent Beacon Radar Reinforcement 77 vii INTRODUCTION PURPOSE. The purpose of

  19. Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Webster

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The radar system described here (CMOR comprises a basic 5-element receiving system, co-located with a pulsed transmitter, specifically designed to observe meteor echoes and to determine their position in space with an angular resolution of ~1° and a radial resolution of ~3 km. Two secondary receiving sites, a few km distant and arranged to form approximately a right angle with the base station, allow the determination of the velocity (speed and direction of the meteor that, together with the time of occurrence, lead to an estimate of the orbit of the original meteoroid. Some equipment details are presented along with a method used to determine the orbits. Representative echoes are shown and observations on the 2002 Leonid shower presented.

  20. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  1. Noise Radar Technology Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    poursuite, estimation Doppler, polarimétrie, interférométrie, sondage du sol ou profilage de la sous- surface , détection, imagerie SAR (radar à synthèse...mesure de distance et d’estimation Doppler. Deux récepteurs de traitement cohérent, soit le récepteur de corrélation et le récep- teur de traitement DSP... traitement spectral double) des échos radar sont décrits et une estimation de leur portée est présentée. Les capacités LPI (faible probabilité

  2. Ground penetrating radar

    CERN Document Server

    Daniels, David J

    2004-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar has come to public attention in recent criminal investigations, but has actually been a developing and maturing remote sensing field for some time. In the light of recent expansion of the technique to a wide range of applications, the need for an up-to-date reference has become pressing. This fully revised and expanded edition of the best-selling Surface-Penetrating Radar (IEE, 1996) presents, for the non-specialist user or engineer, all the key elements of this technique, which span several disciplines including electromagnetics, geophysics and signal processing. The

  3. Human walking estimation with radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radar can be used to observe humans that are obscured by objects such as walls. These humans cannot be visually observed. The radar measurements are used to animate an obscured human in virtual reality. This requires detailed information about the motion. The radar measurements give detailed informa

  4. Radar Test Range Design Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-29

    radar cross section associated with dihedral and trihedral corner reflectors is highly dependent upon the squareness or alignment of the...slightly misaligned. We now show how the radar cross section for dihedral and trihedral corner reflectors depends upon their surface misalignment. All...coefficients, p and q, for the dihedral corner reflector , one must consider the radar cross section

  5. Status Of Imaging Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Report pulls together information on imaging radar polarimetry from a variety of sources. Topics include theory, equipment, and experimental data. Reviews state of the art, examines current applicable developments in radar equipment, describes recording and processing of radar polarimetric measurements, and discusses interpretation and application of resulting polarimetric images.

  6. Human walking estimation with radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radar can be used to observe humans that are obscured by objects such as walls. These humans cannot be visually observed. The radar measurements are used to animate an obscured human in virtual reality. This requires detailed information about the motion. The radar measurements give detailed

  7. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after ...

  8. A New Method for Radar Rainfall Estimation Using Merged Radar and Gauge Derived Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. M.; Sharma, A.; Johnson, F.; Mariethoz, G.; Seed, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimation of rainfall is critical for any hydrological analysis. The advantage of radar rainfall measurements is their ability to cover large areas. However, the uncertainties in the parameters of the power law, that links reflectivity to rainfall intensity, have to date precluded the widespread use of radars for quantitative rainfall estimates for hydrological studies. There is therefore considerable interest in methods that can combine the strengths of radar and gauge measurements by merging the two data sources. In this work, we propose two new developments to advance this area of research. The first contribution is a non-parametric radar rainfall estimation method (NPZR) which is based on kernel density estimation. Instead of using a traditional Z-R relationship, the NPZR accounts for the uncertainty in the relationship between reflectivity and rainfall intensity. More importantly, this uncertainty can vary for different values of reflectivity. The NPZR method reduces the Mean Square Error (MSE) of the estimated rainfall by 16 % compared to a traditionally fitted Z-R relation. Rainfall estimates are improved at 90% of the gauge locations when the method is applied to the densely gauged Sydney Terrey Hills radar region. A copula based spatial interpolation method (SIR) is used to estimate rainfall from gauge observations at the radar pixel locations. The gauge-based SIR estimates have low uncertainty in areas with good gauge density, whilst the NPZR method provides more reliable rainfall estimates than the SIR method, particularly in the areas of low gauge density. The second contribution of the work is to merge the radar rainfall field with spatially interpolated gauge rainfall estimates. The two rainfall fields are combined using a temporally and spatially varying weighting scheme that can account for the strengths of each method. The weight for each time period at each location is calculated based on the expected estimation error of each method

  9. Different responses of northern and southern high latitude ionospheric convection to IMF rotations: a case study based on SuperDARN observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ambrosino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We use SuperDARN data to study high-latitude ionospheric convection over a three hour period (starting at 22:00 UT on 2 January 2003, during which the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF flipped between two states, one with By>>|Bz| and one with Bz>0, both with negative Bx. We find, as expected from previous works, that day side ionospheric convection is controlled by the IMF in both hemispheres. For strongly northward IMF, we observed signatures of two reverse cells, both in the Northern Hemisphere (NH and in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, due to lobe reconnection. On one occasion, we also observed in the NH two viscous cells at the sides of the reverse cell pair. For duskward IMF, we observed in the NH a large dusk clockwise cell, accompanied by a smaller dawn cell, and the signature of a corresponding pattern in the SH. On two occasions, a three cell pattern, composed of a large clockwise cell and two viscous cells, was observed in the NH. As regards the timings of the NH and SH convection reconfigurations, we find that the convection reconfiguration from a positive Bz dominated to a positive By dominated pattern occurred almost simultaneously (i.e. within a few minutes in the two hemispheres. On the contrary, the reconfiguration from a By dominated to a northward IMF pattern started in the NH 8–13 min earlier than in the SH. We suggest that part of such a delay can be due to the following mechanism: as IMF Bx<0, the northward-tailward magnetosheath magnetic field reconnects with the magnetospheric field first tailward of the northern cusp and later on tailward of the southern cusp, due to the IMF draping around the magnetopause.

  10. Adaptations and Analysis of the AFIT Noise Radar Network for Indoor Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Position, Location and Navigation Symposium, 2008 IEEE/ION, 624 –632. may 2008. [5] Hardin, J. Information Encoding on a Pseudo - random Noise Radar ...7 2.1.1 Continuous Random Noise Waveform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.1.2 Noise Radar Hardware...capable of producing bistatic/multistatic radar images. NTR is unique because it utilizes amplified random thermal noise as its transmission waveform

  11. Space Radar Image of Bahia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    limited by the nearly continuous cloud cover in the region and heavy rainfall, which occurs more than 150 days each year. The ability of the shuttle radars to 'see' through the forest canopy to the cultivated cacao below -- independent of weather or sunlight conditions --will allow researchers to distinguish forest from cabruca in unprecedented detail. This SIR-C/X-SAR image was produced by assigning red to the L-band, green to the C-band and blue to the X-band. The Una Reserve is located in the middle of the image west of the coastline and slightly northwest of Comandatuba River. The reserve's primary forests are easily detected by the pink areas in the image. The intensity of red in these areas is due to the high density of forest vegetation (biomass) detected by the radar's L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) channel. Secondary forest is visible along the reserve's eastern border. The Serrado Mar mountain range is located in the top left portion of the image. Cabruca forest to the west of Una Reserve has a different texture and a yellow color. The removal of understory in cabruca forest reduces its biomass relative to primary forest, which changes the L-band and C-band penetration depth and returns, and produces a different texture and color in the image. The region along the Atlantic is mainly mangrove swamp, agricultural fields and urban areas. The high intensity of blue in this region is a result of increasing X-band return in areas covered with swamp and low vegetation. The image clearly separates the mangrove region (east of coastal Highway 001, shown in blue) from the taller and dryer forest west of the highway. The high resolution capability of SIR-C/X-SAR imaging and the sensitivity of its frequency and polarization channels to various land covers will be used for monitoring and mapping areas of importance for conservation. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth

  12. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  13. Sniper bullet detection by millimeter-wave radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Uri; Lefevre, Russell J.; Mann, John; Avent, Randy K.; Deo, Naresh

    1999-01-01

    Law enforcement and military operations would clearly benefit from a capability to locate snipers by backtracking the sniper's bullet trajectory. Achieving sufficient backtracking accuracy for bullets is a demanding radar design, requiring good measurement accuracy, high update rate, and detection of very low cross-section objects. In addition, reasonable cost is a driving requirement for law enforcement use. These divergent design requirements are addressed in an experimental millimeter-wave focal plane array radar that uses integrated millimeter-wave receiver technology. The radar is being built for DARPA by Technology Service Corporation, with assistance from M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory and QuinStar Technology. The key element in the radar is a 35-GHz focal plane array receiver. The receiving antenna lens focuses radar signals from a wide field of view onto an array of receivers, each receiver processing a separate element of the field of view. Receiver detections are then combined in a tracking processor. An FM-CW waveform is used to provide high average power, good range resolution, and stationary clutter rejection. TSC will be testing the sniper detection radar, using radar environment simulator technology developed at Lincoln Laboratory. The simulator will retransmit the received signal with the range delay, Doppler shift, and ERP for various simulated bullet trajectories.

  14. The Newcastle meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Colin

    1987-01-01

    A brief history and development of the Newcastle Meteor Radar system is given. Also described are its geographical coordinates and its method of operation. The initial objective when the project was commenced was to develop an entirely digital analyzer capable of recognizing meteor echo signals and recording as many of their parameters as possible. This objective was achieved.

  15. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate Messag

  16. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Mess

  17. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  18. Spaceborne Radar Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-28

    via either the oomm beam or the omnichannel . Satellite instrumentation data are sent to the ground station following every radar signal transmission...If comm beam contact is lost, the instrumentation data are sent via the omnichannel transmitter on command of the ground station. There are six ways

  19. Radar hazard detection in a coal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennen, R.S.; Stroud, W.P. (US Bureau of Mines, Denver, CO (USA). Denver Research Center)

    1991-04-01

    A ground penetrating synthetic pulse radar system has been used by the US Bureau of Mines to probe into a coal pillar to locate hidden structures or anomalies. Direct matrix inversion was used to obtain a velocity image of the interior of the pillar. The reconstructed image showed the existence and location of a relatively low velocity material within the pillar. Core samples were taken from the pillar in a region surrounding the low velocity material. Analysis of the cores showed the presence of a clay vein coinciding with the low velocity material imaged in the tomogram. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Radar Observations of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, S. J.

    2003-05-01

    During the past 25 years, radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of more than 200 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler positional measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Radar astrometry can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. These observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  1. Doppler radar fall activity detection using the wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo Yu; Ho, K C; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-03-01

    We propose in this paper the use of Wavelet transform (WT) to detect human falls using a ceiling mounted Doppler range control radar. The radar senses any motions from falls as well as nonfalls due to the Doppler effect. The WT is very effective in distinguishing the falls from other activities, making it a promising technique for radar fall detection in nonobtrusive inhome elder care applications. The proposed radar fall detector consists of two stages. The prescreen stage uses the coefficients of wavelet decomposition at a given scale to identify the time locations in which fall activities may have occurred. The classification stage extracts the time-frequency content from the wavelet coefficients at many scales to form a feature vector for fall versus nonfall classification. The selection of different wavelet functions is examined to achieve better performance. Experimental results using the data from the laboratory and real inhome environments validate the promising and robust performance of the proposed detector.

  2. The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER): Platform for comprehensive meteor radar observations and studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J.; Pifko, S.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D.; Brunini, C.; Close, S.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53^oS) in May 2008 (Janches et al., 2013,2014). SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large numbers of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars (Janches et al., 2014). In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions (Pifko et al., 2014). The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, the SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source (Pifko et al., 2014), of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables to survey (Janches et al., 2013). It can effectively observe radiants from the ecliptic south

  3. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  4. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  5. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  6. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138228)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  7. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156623)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  8. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  9. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137285)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  10. Detection of space debris with VLBI radar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotov, I.; Konovalenko, A.; Agapov, V.; Sochilina, A.; Lipatov, B.; Molotov, E.; Gorshenkov, Y.

    The possibility of Evpatoria RT-70 planetary radar application for space debris research was tested in two trial experiments for targets at geostationary (GEO) and high-elliptic (HEO) orbits in 2001. The RT-70 has the 200 kW continuous power transmitter at 6-cm wavelength, which was used for radio location of planets. Therefore the bistatic radar system only may be realized for orbital object measurements. The receiving antennas (Bear Lakes RT-64, Svetloe RT-32, Noto RT- 32, Torun RT-32 and Urumqi RT-25) used the standard VLBI equipment for recording of echo-signals, because they have not specialized radar apparatus. Such multi-antennas configuration allows to add the classic radar data with VLBI measurements: radar has the resolution for range and radial velocity, VLBI provides the angle and angular rate. Moreover the VLBI radar may be a tool for 3D- measurements: combination of radar map and VLBI image can result the "radio holography" picture of investigated object. Seven GEO objects were detected in May session and four GEO + two HEO objects - in December session. The uncontrolled axial rotation with 5 - 20 s period was fixed for GEO targets. The first results of processing that carry out at Russia and Canada are presented. It is planned to finally adjust the VLBI radar method and t o start the regular observations under the international program of optical and radar monitoring of the near-Earth space environment that will be partially supported by INTAS-01-0669, RFBR-02-02- 17568 and RFBR-02-02-3108.

  11. Investigation of the temperature gradient instability as the source of midlatitude quiet time decameter-scale ionospheric irregularities: 2. Linear analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltrass, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.; de Larquier, S.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.; Greenwald, R. A.; Erickson, P. J.

    2014-06-01

    Previous joint measurements by the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radar located at Wallops Island, Virginia, have identified the presence of opposed meridional electron density and temperature gradients in the region of decameter-scale electron density irregularities that have been proposed to be responsible for low-velocity Sub-Auroral Ionospheric Scatter observed by SuperDARN radars. The temperature gradient instability (TGI) and the gradient drift instability (GDI) have been extended into the kinetic regime appropriate for SuperDARN radar frequencies and investigated as the causes of these irregularities. A time series for the growth rate of both TGI and GDI has been developed for midlatitude ionospheric irregularities observed by SuperDARN Greenwald et al. (2006). The time series is computed for both perpendicular and meridional density and temperature gradients. This growth rate comparison shows that the TGI is the most likely generation mechanism for the irregularities observed during the experiment and the GDI is expected to play a relatively minor role in irregularity generation.

  12. A Scattering Model for Detection of Tunnels Using Video Pulse Radar Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    obtained if a general underground radar system design is to be achieved. In a previous report (91 we have discussed the means of obtaining the propagation...Detector," U. S. Patent 3,967,282, June 29, 1976. [2) J. D. Young, "A Transient Underground Radar for Buried Pipe Location," USNC/URSI Meeting, Boulder

  13. Locating the LCROSS Impact Craters

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, William; Moratto, Zachary; Colaprete, Anthony; Neumann, Gregory; Smith, David; Hensley, Scott; Wilson, Barbara; Slade, Martin; Kennedy, Brian; Gurrola, Eric; Harcke, Leif; 10.1007/s11214-011-9765-0

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observations and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket stage into a permanently shadowed region near the lunar south pole. The Sheperding Spacecraft (SSC) separated \\sim9 hours before impact and performed a small braking maneuver in order to observe the Centaur impact plume, looking for evidence of water and other volatiles, before impacting itself. This paper describes the registration of imagery of the LCROSS impact region from the mid- and near-infrared cameras onboard the SSC, as well as from the Goldstone radar. We compare the Centaur impact features, positively identified in the first two, and with a consistent feature in the third, which are interpreted as a 20 m diameter crater surrounded by a 160 m diameter ejecta region. The images are registered to Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter (LRO) topographical data which allows determination of the impact location. This location is compared with the impact location derived from ground-based tracking and propagation of...

  14. An MSK Radar Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater

  15. Extended radar observations with the frequency radar domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Crochet, M.

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we present high-resolution observations obtained with the Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan, /34.85°N, /136.10°E) using the frequency radar domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique. This technique has recently been introduced for improving the range resolution capabilities of the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars which are limited by their minimum pulse length. The Fourier-based imaging, the Capon method have been performed with 5 equally spaced frequencies between 46.25 and 46.75MHz and with an initial range resolution of 300m. These results have been compared firstly to results obtained using the frequency domain interferometry (FDI) technique with Δf=0.5MHz and, secondly, to results from a classical Doppler beam swinging (DBS) mode applied with a range resolution of 150m. Thin echoing structures could be tracked owing to the improved radar range resolution and some complex structures possibly related to Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities have been detected. Indeed, these structures appeared within the core of a wind shear and were associated with intense vertical wind fluctuations. Moreover, a well-defined thin echo layer was found in an altitude range located below the height of the wind shear. The radar observations have not been fully interpreted yet because the radar configuration was not adapted for this kind of study and because of the lack of complementary information provided by other techniques when the interesting echoing phenomena occurred. However, the results confirm the high potentialities of the FII technique for the study of atmospheric dynamics at small scales.

  16. Localization of an air target by means of GNSS-based multistatic radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Daulet Sh.; Raskaliyev, Almat S.

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of utilizing transmitters of opportunity for target detection, tracking and positioning is of great interest to the radar community. In particular the optional use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has lately triggered scientific research that has purpose to take advantage of this source of signal generation for passive radar. Number of studies have been conducted previously on development of GNSS-based bistatic and multistatic radars for detection and range estimation to the object located in the close atmosphere. To further enrich research in this area, we present a novel method for coordinate determination of the air target by means of the GNSS-based multistatic radar.

  17. Reduction of snapshots for MIMO radar detection by block/group orthogonal matching pursuit

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Hussain El Hosiny

    2014-10-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar works on the principle of transmission of independent waveforms at each element of its antenna array and is widely used for surveillance purposes. In this work, we investigate MIMO radar target localization problem with compressive sensing. Specifically, we try to solve the problem of estimation of target location in MIMO radar by group and block sparsity algorithms. It will lead us to a reduced number of snapshots required and also we can achieve better radar resolution. We will use group orthogonal matching pursuit (GOMP) and block orthogonal matching pursuit (BOMP) for our problem. © 2014 IEEE.

  18. Radar cross-sectional study using noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    A noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar cross-section (RCS) of targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 50 GHz. The noise radar RCS measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-5000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used.

  19. Netted LPI RADARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    easier and, since they cover most of the space around the antenna, can expose it easily at various bearings ). Typical sidelobe levels for conventional...modern radar systems results in an electro- magnetic environment where the receiver should expect very few pulses. Staggered PRF and frequency agility...detector, a logarithmic amplitude compressor , and a signal encoder. All subunits are digitally controlled by computer as to frequency, sweep rate, and

  20. The Radar Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 25 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c...ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 25 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE...object bistatic radars. The former allows high resolution without the use of pulse compression techniques and the latter promises cheaper systems by

  1. Radar Investigations of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, S.

    2004-05-01

    Radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of about 230 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Such astrometric measurements can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. The observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  2. The science case for the EISCAT_3D radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Ian; Aikio, Anita; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Belova, Evgenia; Buchert, Stephan; Clilverd, Mark; Engler, Norbert; Gustavsson, Björn; Heinselman, Craig; Kero, Johan; Kosch, Mike; Lamy, Hervé; Leyser, Thomas; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Pitout, Frederic; Rapp, Markus; Stanislawska, Iwona; Vierinen, Juha

    2015-12-01

    The EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATer) Scientific Association has provided versatile incoherent scatter (IS) radar facilities on the mainland of northern Scandinavia (the EISCAT UHF and VHF radar systems) and on Svalbard (the electronically scanning radar ESR (EISCAT Svalbard Radar) for studies of the high-latitude ionised upper atmosphere (the ionosphere). The mainland radars were constructed about 30 years ago, based on technological solutions of that time. The science drivers of today, however, require a more flexible instrument, which allows measurements to be made from the troposphere to the topside ionosphere and gives the measured parameters in three dimensions, not just along a single radar beam. The possibility for continuous operation is also an essential feature. To facilitatefuture science work with a world-leading IS radar facility, planning of a new radar system started first with an EU-funded Design Study (2005-2009) and has continued with a follow-up EU FP7 EISCAT_3D Preparatory Phase project (2010-2014). The radar facility will be realised by using phased arrays, and a key aspect is the use of advanced software and data processing techniques. This type of software radar will act as a pathfinder for other facilities worldwide. The new radar facility will enable the EISCAT_3D science community to address new, significant science questions as well as to serve society, which is increasingly dependent on space-based technology and issues related to space weather. The location of the radar within the auroral oval and at the edge of the stratospheric polar vortex is also ideal for studies of the long-term variability in the atmosphere and global change. This paper is a summary of the EISCAT_3D science case, which was prepared as part of the EU-funded Preparatory Phase project for the new facility. Three science working groups, drawn from the EISCAT user community, participated in preparing this document. In addition to these working group members, who

  3. Radar clutter classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehwien, Wolfgang

    1989-11-01

    The problem of classifying radar clutter as found on air traffic control radar systems is studied. An algorithm based on Bayes decision theory and the parametric maximum a posteriori probability classifier is developed to perform this classification automatically. This classifier employs a quadratic discriminant function and is optimum for feature vectors that are distributed according to the multivariate normal density. Separable clutter classes are most likely to arise from the analysis of the Doppler spectrum. Specifically, a feature set based on the complex reflection coefficients of the lattice prediction error filter is proposed. The classifier is tested using data recorded from L-band air traffic control radars. The Doppler spectra of these data are examined; the properties of the feature set computed using these data are studied in terms of both the marginal and multivariate statistics. Several strategies involving different numbers of features, class assignments, and data set pretesting according to Doppler frequency and signal to noise ratio were evaluated before settling on a workable algorithm. Final results are presented in terms of experimental misclassification rates and simulated and classified plane position indicator displays.

  4. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality....... Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised...... and precipitating and non-precipitating clouds. Another method uses the difference in the motion field of clutter and precipitation measured between two radar images. Furthermore, the direction of the wind field extracted from a weather model is used. The third method uses information about the refractive index...

  5. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an FMCW radar operating in the 25.7 - 26.6 GHz range with a repetition rate of 500 sweeps per second. The radar is able to track the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance of 1 meter. The experiments have utilized a 50 second recording window...... to accurately track the breathing rate. The radar utilizes a saw tooth modulation format and a low latency receiver. A breath tracking radar is useful both in medical scenarios, diagnosing disorders such as sleep apnea, and for home use where the user can monitor its health. Breathing is a central part of every...... radar chip which, through the use of a simple modulation scheme, is able to measure the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance. A high frequency output makes sure that the radar cannot penetrate solid obstacles which is a wanted feature in private homes where people therefore cannot measure...

  6. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  7. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  8. Simultaneous optical and radar observations of meteor head-echoes utilizing SAAMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, R. G.; Janches, D.; Samara, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Brunini, C.; Bibbo, I.

    2015-12-01

    We present simultaneous optical and radar observations of meteors observed with the Southern Argentine Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER). Although such observations were performed in the past using High Power and Large Aperture radars, the focus here is on meteors that produced head echoes that can be detected by a significantly less sensitive but more accessible radar system. An observational campaign was conducted in August of 2011, where an optical imager was operated near the radar site in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Six head echo events out of 150 total detections were identified where simultaneous optical meteors could also be clearly seen within the main radar beam. The location of the meteors derived from the radar interferometry agreed very well with the optical location, verifying the accuracy of the radar interferometry technique. The meteor speeds and origin directions calculated from the radar data were accurate-compared with the optics-for the 2 meteors that had radar signal-to-noise ratios above 2.5. The optical meteors that produced the head echoes had horizontal velocities in the range of 29-91 km/s. These comparisons with optical observations improve the accuracy of the radar detection and analysis techniques, such that, when applied over longer periods of time, will improve the statistics of southern hemisphere meteor observations. Mass estimates were derived using both the optical and radar data and the resulting masses agreed well with each other. All were within an order of magnitude and in most cases, the agreement was within a factor of two.

  9. Locating voids beneath pavement using pulsed electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinway, W. J.; Echard, J. D.; Luke, C. M.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using pulsed electromagnetic wave technology for locating and sizing voids beneath reinforced and nonreinforced portland cement concrete pavements is determined. The data processing techniques developed can be implemented to provide information for void depth and sizing to + or - 1/2 in. and spatial location within + or - 6 in. A very short pulse radar directly connected to a microcomputer was chosen as the equipment necessary to obtain measurements. This equipment has the required accuracy and reliability, and is a cost effective solution for the void locating problem. The radar provides a signal return from voids that has unique characteristics that can be examined to provide information regarding the location, depth, and shape of the void. The microcomputer provides a means of real time processing to extract the information from the radar signal return and record the results. Theoretical modeling of signal returns from voids led to suitable techniques for locating and sizing voids beneath the pavement. Analysis and application of these techniques to radar measurements verified the theoretical predictions that radar can be used to determine the location, size, and shape of actual voids.

  10. Multifrequency and Multistatic Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar, with Application to FM Passive Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginolhac Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the imaging of a moving target using a multifrequency and multistatic radar consisting in one receiver and several narrowband transmitters. Considering two hypotheses about the studied target, we derive two multistatic inverse synthetic aperture radar processors: the first one, which models the target as a set of isotropic points, performs a coherent sum of bistatic images; the second one, which models the target as a set of nonisotropic points, performs an incoherent sum of bistatic images. Numerical simulations are done, which demonstrate the efficiency of the second processor. We also apply both processors to a multistatic passive radar scenario for which the transmitters are FM stations located in a realistic configuration. We study the system performance in terms of resolution and sidelobe levels as a function of the number of transmitters and of the integration time. Both processors are applied to similar complex targets for which the scattered fields are simulated by a numerical electromagnetic code. The resulting multistatic radar images show interesting characteristics that might be used by classification algorithms in future work.

  11. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  12. Space radar image of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the Mauna Loa volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii shows the capability of imaging radar to map lava flows and other volcanic structures. Mauna Loa has erupted more than 35 times since the island was first visited by westerners in the early 1800s. The large summit crater, called Mokuaweoweo Caldera, is clearly visible near the center of the image. Leading away from the caldera (towards top right and lower center) are the two main rift zones shown here in orange. Rift zones are areas of weakness within the upper part of the volcano that are often ripped open as new magma (molten rock) approaches the surface at the start of an eruption. The most recent eruption of Mauna Loa was in March and April 1984, when segments of the northeast rift zones were active. If the height of the volcano was measured from its base on the ocean floor instead of from sea level, Mauna Loa would be the tallest mountain on Earth. Its peak (center of the image) rises more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) above the ocean floor. The South Kona District, known for cultivation of macadamia nuts and coffee, can be seen in the lower left as white and blue areas along the coast. North is toward the upper left. The area shown is 41.5 by 75 kilometers (25.7 by 46.5 miles), centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.6 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 36th orbit on October 2, 1994. The radar illumination is from the left of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). The resulting color combinations in this radar image are caused by differences in surface roughness of the lava flows. Smoother flows

  13. Ground Penetrating Radar Technologies in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochanin, Gennadiy P.; Masalov, Sergey A.

    2014-05-01

    Transient electromagnetic fields are of great interest in Ukraine. The following topics are studied by research teams, with high-level achievements all over the world: (i) Ultra-Wide Band/Short-pulse radar techniques (IRE and LLC "Transient Technologies", for more information please visit http://applied.ire.kharkov.ua/radar%20systems_their%20components%20and%20relevant%20technologies_e.html and http://viy.ua); (ii) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) with stepped frequency sounding signals (IRE); (iii) Continuous-Wave (CW) radar with phase-shift keying signals (IRE); and (iv) Radio-wave interference investigation (Scientific and Technical Centre of The Subsurface Investigation, http://geophysics.ua). GPR applications are mainly in search works, for example GPR is often used to search for treasures. It is also used to identify leaks and diffusion of petroleum in soil, in storage areas, as well as for fault location of pipelines. Furthermore, GPR is used for the localization of underground utilities and for diagnostics of the technical state of hydro dams. Deeper GPR probing was performed to identify landslides in Crimea. Rescue radar with CW signal was designed in IRE to search for living people trapped under the rubble of collapsed buildings. The fourth version of this radar has been recently created, showing higher stability and noise immunity. Radio-wave interference investigation allows studying the soil down to tens of meters. It is possible to identify areas with increased conductivity (moisture) of the soil. LLC "Transient Technologies" is currently working with Shevchenko Kyiv University on a cooperation program in which the construction of a test site is one of the planned tasks. In the framework of this program, a GPR with a 300 MHz antenna was handed to the geological Faculty of the University. Employees of "Transient Technologies" held introductory lectures with a practical demonstration for students majoring in geophysics. The authors participated to GPR

  14. Radar foundations for imaging and advanced concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Through courses internally taught at IDA, Dr. Roger Sullivan has devised a book that brings readers fully up to speed on the most essential quantitave aspects of general radar in order to introduce study of the most exciting and relevant applications to radar imaging and advanced concepts: Synthetic Aperture Radar (4 chapters), Space-time Adaptive Processing, moving target indication (MTI), bistatic radar, low probability of intercept (LPI) radar, weather radar, and ground-penetrating radar. Whether you're a radar novice or experienced professional, this is an essential refer

  15. Antenna Array Signal Processing for Multistatic Radar Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.

    2013-01-01

    The introductions of Digital Beam Forming (DBF), original signal exploitation and waveform multiplexing techniques have led to the design of novel radar concepts. Passive Coherent Locator (PCL) and Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) sensors are two examples of innovative approaches. Beside the

  16. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuenschel, E. [Mirage Systems, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the development of a system known as 3-D SISAR. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments at DOE storage sites.

  17. Fusion of Radar and EO-sensors for Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, L.J.H.M.; Theil, A.

    2000-01-01

    Fusion of radar and EO-sensors for the purpose of surveillance is investigated. All sensors are considered to be co-located with respect to the distance of the area under surveillance. More specifically, the applicability for such multi-sensor systems is examined for surveillance in littoral

  18. Antenna Array Signal Processing for Multistatic Radar Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.

    2013-01-01

    The introductions of Digital Beam Forming (DBF), original signal exploitation and waveform multiplexing techniques have led to the design of novel radar concepts. Passive Coherent Locator (PCL) and Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) sensors are two examples of innovative approaches. Beside the in

  19. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondéjar, Albert; Benveniste, Jérôme; Naeije, Marc; Escolà, Roger; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Études Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  20. A Real-Time Nowcast/Forecast System for Radar Electrojet Clutter Driven by Global Assimilative Models of the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrano, C. S.; Alcala, C. M.; Liang, P.; Groves, K. M.; Donatelli, D. E.; Daniell, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    -region. This deficiency is particularly pronounced during geomagnetic storm activity, when the ionospheric response deviates most from climatological behavior. The latest version of the SBR-IES tool can accept, as input, real-time specifications of the ionosphere provided by global assimilative models (e.g. PRISM or GAIM) that are currently or soon to be in operational use at AFWA. Forecasts of radar clutter can be generated using forecasts of the ionospheric state provided by the Ionospheric Forecast Model (IFM), for example. In the near future we plan to include the high resolution specification of the electric field provided by the real-time incoherent scatter radars of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). It is expected that the use of data assimilative models to provide the background ionospheric densities, temperatures, and electric field will lead to substantially more accurate and high resolution predictions of radar electrojet clutter. Moreover, these improvements can be made without sacrificing real-time impact assessment requirements.

  1. Weather Radar Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-15

    Preparation). MISCELLANEOUS Donaldson Jr, R.J., 1987: "Significance of the 40th Anniversary Conference." Address at the Battan Memorial and 40th Anni - versary...Bergen and Albers (1987). They have achieved -37 -29 -25 -6 4 7 magnificent results for reducing general -35 -28 -19 -7 -3 4 ambiguity. 283 284 285 3.2... Albers , 1988: Two- and the National Severe Storms Laboratory S-band three-dimensional de-aliasing of Doppler radar in Norman, Oklahoma. For three

  2. Operational reservoir inflow forecasting with radar altimetry: The Zambezi case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailovsky, Claire Irene B.; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    cannot be measured from space, radar altimetry can track surface water level variations at crossing locations between the satellite ground track and the river system called virtual stations (VS). Use of radar altimetry versus traditional monitoring in operational settings is complicated by the low...... temporal resolution of the data (between 10 and 35 days revisit time at a VS depending on the satellite) as well as the fact that the location of the measurements is not necessarily at the point of interest. However, combining radar altimetry from multiple VS with hydrological models can help overcome...

  3. Solution of distributive problems with synthesis of radar information fields parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. В. Нестеров

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Considered is the approach to solution of the problems of synthesis of radar and information fields parameters. It is proposed that, as the result of the synthesis, the structure of location of ground radar components should be determined. The optimal location of radar and information system is supposed to be determined by the results of the solution of the distribution problems. Considered are three sets of problems: method of linear programming, method of non-linear programming, method of scanning theory. Described are the distinctive features of each method, their advantages and disadvantages also the groups of determining parameters; an advice is given as to the use of particular approach

  4. Terahertz radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    We perform angle- and frequency-resolved radar cross section (RCS) measurements on objects at terahertz frequencies. Our RCS measurements are performed on a scale model aircraft of size 5-10 cm in polar and azimuthal configurations, and correspond closely to RCS measurements with conventional radar...

  5. Performance indicators modern surveillance radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooij, P.N.C.; Theil, A.

    2014-01-01

    Blake chart computations are widely employed to rank detection coverage capabilities of competitive search radar systems. Developed for comparable 2D radar systems with a mechanically rotating reflector antenna, it was not necessary to regard update rate and plot quality in Blake's chart. To

  6. Measuring human behaviour with radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents human motion measurements with the experimental Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave(FMCW) radar at TNO-FEL. The aim of these measurements is to analyse the Doppler velocity spectrum of humans. These analysis give insight in measuring human behaviour with radar for security applica

  7. Behavior Subtraction applied to radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Caro Cuenca, M.

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm developed for optical images has been applied to radar data. The algorithm, Behavior Subtraction, is based on capturing the dynamics of a scene and detecting anomalous behavior. The radar application is the detection of small surface targets at sea. The sea surface yields the expected s

  8. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  9. Performance indicators modern surveillance radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooij, P.N.C.; Theil, A.

    2014-01-01

    Blake chart computations are widely employed to rank detection coverage capabilities of competitive search radar systems. Developed for comparable 2D radar systems with a mechanically rotating reflector antenna, it was not necessary to regard update rate and plot quality in Blake's chart. To charact

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rosner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  11. Radar image registration and rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, M.; Stromberg, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Two techniques for radar image registration and rectification are presented. In the registration method, a general 2-D polynomial transform is defined to accomplish the geometric mapping from one image into the other. The degree and coefficients of the polynomial are obtained using an a priori found tiepoint data set. In the second part of the paper, a rectification procedure is developed that models the distortion present in the radar image in terms of the radar sensor's platform parameters and the topographic variations of the imaged scene. This model, the ephemeris data and the digital topographic data are then used in rectifying the radar image. The two techniques are then used in registering and rectifying two examples of radar imagery. Each method is discussed as to its benefits, shortcomings and registration accuracy.

  12. A radar image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberl, F.; Fuchs, H.; Ford, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A set of ten side-looking radar images of a mining area in Arizona that were aquired over a period of 14 yr are studied to demonstrate the photogrammetric differential-rectification technique applied to radar images and to examine changes that occurred in the area over time. Five of the images are rectified by using ground control points and a digital height model taken from a map. Residual coordinate errors in ground control are reduced from several hundred meters in all cases to + or - 19 to 70 m. The contents of the radar images are compared with a Landsat image and with aerial photographs. Effects of radar system parameters on radar images are briefly reviewed.

  13. Temporal Stability of Soil Moisture and Radar Backscatter Observed by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Pathe, Carsten; Doubkova, Marcela; Sabel, Daniel; Bartsch, Annett; Hasenauer, Stefan; Blöschl, Günter; Scipal, Klaus; Martínez-Fernández, José; Löw, Alexander

    2008-02-21

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture is the result of atmosphericforcing and redistribution processes related to terrain, soil, and vegetation characteristics.Despite this high variability, many field studies have shown that in the temporal domainsoil moisture measured at specific locations is correlated to the mean soil moisture contentover an area. Since the measurements taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)instruments are very sensitive to soil moisture it is hypothesized that the temporally stablesoil moisture patterns are reflected in the radar backscatter measurements. To verify this hypothesis 73 Wide Swath (WS) images have been acquired by the ENVISAT AdvancedSynthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) over the REMEDHUS soil moisture network located inthe Duero basin, Spain. It is found that a time-invariant linear relationship is well suited forrelating local scale (pixel) and regional scale (50 km) backscatter. The observed linearmodel coefficients can be estimated by considering the scattering properties of the terrainand vegetation and the soil moisture scaling properties. For both linear model coefficients,the relative error between observed and modelled values is less than 5 % and thecoefficient of determination (R²) is 86 %. The results are of relevance for interpreting anddownscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data retrieved from active (METOP ASCAT)and passive (SMOS, AMSR-E) instruments.

  14. 100 years of radar

    CERN Document Server

    Galati, Gaspare

    2016-01-01

    This book offers fascinating insights into the key technical and scientific developments in the history of radar, from the first patent, taken out by Hülsmeyer in 1904, through to the present day. Landmark events are highlighted and fascinating insights provided into the exceptional people who made possible the progress in the field, including the scientists and technologists who worked independently and under strict secrecy in various countries across the world in the 1930s and the big businessmen who played an important role after World War II. The book encourages multiple levels of reading. The author is a leading radar researcher who is ideally placed to offer a technical/scientific perspective as well as a historical one. He has taken care to structure and write the book in such a way as to appeal to both non-specialists and experts. The book is not sponsored by any company or body, either formally or informally, and is therefore entirely unbiased. The text is enriched by approximately three hundred ima...

  15. Analysis of long term trends of precipitation estimates acquired using radar network in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugrul Yilmaz, M.; Yucel, Ismail; Kamil Yilmaz, Koray

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation estimates, a vital input in many hydrological and agricultural studies, can be obtained using many different platforms (ground station-, radar-, model-, satellite-based). Satellite- and model-based estimates are spatially continuous datasets, however they lack the high resolution information many applications often require. Station-based values are actual precipitation observations, however they suffer from their nature that they are point data. These datasets may be interpolated however such end-products may have large errors over remote locations with different climate/topography/etc than the areas stations are installed. Radars have the particular advantage of having high spatial resolution information over land even though accuracy of radar-based precipitation estimates depends on the Z-R relationship, mountain blockage, target distance from the radar, spurious echoes resulting from anomalous propagation of the radar beam, bright band contamination and ground clutter. A viable method to obtain spatially and temporally high resolution consistent precipitation information is merging radar and station data to take advantage of each retrieval platform. An optimally merged product is particularly important in Turkey where complex topography exerts strong controls on the precipitation regime and in turn hampers observation efforts. There are currently 10 (additional 7 are planned) weather radars over Turkey obtaining precipitation information since 2007. This study aims to optimally merge radar precipitation data with station based observations to introduce a station-radar blended precipitation product. This study was supported by TUBITAK fund # 114Y676.

  16. Fiber-based swept-source terahertz radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Kuo, Chung-Chiu; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate an all-terahertz swept-source imaging radar operated at room temperature by using terahertz fibers for radiation delivery and with a terahertz-fiber directional coupler acting as a Michelson interferometer. By taking advantage of the high water reflection contrast in the low terahertz regime and by electrically sweeping at a high speed a terahertz source combined with a fast rotating mirror, we obtained the living object's distance information with a high image frame rate. Our experiment showed that this fiber-based swept-source terahertz radar could be used in real time to locate concealed moving live objects with high stability.

  17. Traitement du signal pour les radars MIMO : Détection en environnement gaussien et non gaussien et application au STAP

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Chin Yuan

    2011-01-01

    A Multiple-Input Multiple Output (MIMO) radar can be broadly defined as a radar system employing multiple transmit waveforms and having the ability to jointly process signals received at multiple receive antennas. In terms of configurations, the antennas can be widely separated or co-located. The first part of the thesis is on detection under Gaussian and non-Gaussian environments using a MIMO radar which contains several widely separated subarrays with one or more elements each. Two differen...

  18. Radar signature acquisition using an indigenously designed noise radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.; Thayaparan, T.

    2011-06-01

    A new design of a noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar signature of various targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 30 GHz. The noise radar signature measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-3000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used. The measured results of the target signatures were verified with the simulation results.

  19. The use of radar for bathymetry assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardoom, J.H.; Greidanus, H.S.F.

    1998-01-01

    The bottom topography in shallow seas can be observed by air- and spaceborne imaging radar. Bathymetric information derived from radar data is limited in accuracy, but radar has a good spatial coverage. The accuracy can be increased by assimilating the radar imagery into existing or insitu gathered

  20. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R. (Editor); Wolf, W. (Editor); Klassen, W. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  1. The use of radar for bathymetry assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardoom, J.H.; Greidanus, H.S.F.

    1998-01-01

    The bottom topography in shallow seas can be observed by air- and spaceborne imaging radar. Bathymetric information derived from radar data is limited in accuracy, but radar has a good spatial coverage. The accuracy can be increased by assimilating the radar imagery into existing or insitu gathered

  2. Radar signal analysis and processing using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Mahafza, Bassem R

    2008-01-01

    Offering radar-related software for the analysis and design of radar waveform and signal processing, this book provides comprehensive coverage of radar signals and signal processing techniques and algorithms. It contains numerous graphical plots, common radar-related functions, table format outputs, and end-of-chapter problems. The complete set of MATLAB[registered] functions and routines are available for download online.

  3. Large phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, Eli, Dr.

    1988-12-01

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  4. Impact of merging methods on radar based nowcasting of rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehu, Bora; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Radar data with high spatial and temporal resolution are commonly used to track and predict rainfall patterns that serve as input for hydrological applications. To mitigate the high errors associated with the radar, many merging methods employing ground measurements have been developed. However these methods have been investigated mainly for simulation purposes, while for nowcasting they are limited to the application of the mean field bias correction. Therefore this study aims to investigate the impact of different merging methods on the nowcasting of the rainfall volumes regarding urban floods. Radar bias correction based on mean fields and quantile mapping are analyzed individually and also are implemented in conditional merging. Special attention is given to the impact of spatial and temporal filters on the predictive skill of all methods. The relevance of the radar merging techniques is demonstrated by comparing the performance of the forecasted rainfall field from the radar tracking algorithm HyRaTrac for both raw and merged radar data. For this purpose several extreme events are selected and the respective performance is evaluated by cross validation of the continuous criteria (bias and rmse) and categorical criteria (POD, FAR and GSS) for lead times up to 2 hours. The study area is located within the 128 km radius of Hannover radar in Lower Saxony, Germany and the data set constitutes of 80 recording stations in 5 min time steps for the period 2000-2012. The results reveal how the choice of merging method and the implementation of filters impacts the performance of the forecast algorithm.

  5. Passive Acoustic Radar for Detecting Supersonic Cruise Missile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; XIAO Hui

    2005-01-01

    A Passive Acoustic Radar is presented as a necessary complement to electromagnetic wave radar, which will be expected to be an effective means for detecting cruise missiles. Acoustic characteristics of supersonic flying projectiles with diverse shapes are expounded via experiment. It is pointed out that simulation experiment could be implemented using bullet or shell instead of cruise missile. Based on theoretical analysis and experiment, the "acoustic fingerprint" character of cruise missile is illustrated to identify it in a strong noise environment. After establishing a locating mathematical model,the technique of acoustic embattling is utilized to resolve a problem of confirming the time of early-warning, considering the fact that velocity of sound is much slower than that of light. Thereby, a whole system of passive acoustic radar for detecting supersonic cruise missile is formed.

  6. Optimized Radar Remote Sensing for Levee Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cathleen E.

    2013-01-01

    Radar remote sensing offers great potential for high resolution monitoring of ground surface changes over large areas at one time to detect movement on and near levees and for location of seepage through levees. Our NASA-funded projects to monitor levees in the Sacramento Delta and the Mississippi River have developed and demonstrated methods to use radar remote sensing to measure quantities relevant to levee health and of great value to emergency response. The DHS-funded project will enable us is to define how to optimally monitor levees in this new way and set the stage for transition to using satellite SAR (synthetic aperture radar) imaging for better temporal and spatial coverage at lower cost to the end users.

  7. Multitarget Identification and Localization Using Bistatic MIMO Radar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guisheng Liao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A scheme for multitarget identification and localization using bistatic MIMO radar systems is proposed. Multitarget can be distinguished by Capon method, as well as the targets angles with respect to transmitter and receiver can be synthesized using the received signals. Thus, the locations of the multiple targets are obtained and spatial synchronization problem in traditional bistatic radars is avoided. The maximum number of targets that can be uniquely identified by proposed method is also analyzed. It is indicated that the product of the numbers of receive and transmit elements minus-one targets can be identified by exploiting the fluctuating of the radar cross section (RCS of the targets. Cramer-Rao bounds (CRB are derived to obtain more insights of this scheme. Simulation results demonstrate the performances of the proposed method using Swerling II target model in various scenarios.

  8. Radar measurements of melt zones on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, Kenneth C.; Gogineni, Prasad; Shanableh, M.

    1994-01-01

    Surface-based microwave radar measurements were performed at a location on the western flank of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Here, firn metamorphasis is dominated by seasonal melt, which leads to marked contrasts in the vertical structure of winter and summer firn. This snow regime is also one of the brightest radar targets on Earth with an average backscatter coefficient of 0 dB at 5.3 GHz and an incidence angle of 25 deg. By combining detailed observations of firn physical properties with ranging radar measurements we find that the glaciological mechanism associated with this strong electromagnetic response is summer ice lens formation within the previous winter's snow pack. This observation has important implications for monitoring and understanding changes in ice sheet volume using spaceborne microwave sensors.

  9. Ultra-wideband noise radar based on optical waveform generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodensky, Daniel; Kravitz, Daniel; Zadok, Avi

    2012-06-01

    A microwave-photonic, ultra-wideband (UWB) noise radar system is proposed and demonstrated. The system brings together photonic generation of UWB waveforms and fiber-optic distribution. The use of UWB noise provides high ranging resolution and better immunity to interception and jamming. Distribution over fibers allows for the separation the radar-operating personnel and equipment from the location of the front-end. The noise waveforms are generated using the amplified spontaneous emission that is associated with stimulated Brillouin scattering in a standard optical fiber, or with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. Our experiments demonstrate a proof of concept for an integrated radar system, driven by optically generated UWB noise waveforms of more than 1 GHz bandwidth that are distributed over 10 km distance. The detection of concealed metallic object and the resolving of two targets with the anticipated ranging resolution are reported.

  10. Air and spaceborne radar systems an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Lacomme, Philippe; Hardange, Jean-Philippe; Normant, Eric

    2001-01-01

    A practical tool on radar systems that will be of major help to technicians, student engineers and engineers working in industry and in radar research and development. The many users of radar as well as systems engineers and designers will also find it highly useful. Also of interest to pilots and flight engineers and military command personnel and military contractors. """"This introduction to the field of radar is intended for actual users of radar. It focuses on the history, main principles, functions, modes, properties and specific nature of modern airborne radar. The book examines radar's

  11. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  12. Under the Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, WM

    2010-01-01

    This is the biography of Ruby Payne-Scott (1912 to 1981). As the first female radio astronomer (and one of the first people in the world to consider radio astronomy), she made classic contributions to solar radio physics. She also played a major role in the design of the Australian government's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research radars, which were in turn of vital importance in the Southwest Pacific Theatre in World War II and were used by Australian, US and New Zealand personnel. From a sociological perspective, her career also offers many examples of the perils of being a female academic in the first half of the 20th century. Written in an engaging style and complemented by many historical photographs this book gives a fascinating insight into the beginning of radio astronomy and the role of a pioneering woman in astronomy.

  13. Gyroklystron-Powered WARLOC Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, B. G.; Cheung, W. J.; Gregers-Hansen, V.; Linde, G.; Ngo, M.

    2003-12-01

    A high-power, coherent, W-band (94 GHz) millimeter-wave radar has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. This radar, named WARLOC, employs a 100 kW peak power, 10 kW average power gyro-klystron as the final power amplifier, an overmoded transmission line system, and a quasi-optical duplexer, together with a high gain antenna, four-channel receiver, and state-of-the-art signal processing. The gyro-amplifiers and the implementation in the WARLOC radar will be described.

  14. 77 HHz radar for automobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Lyashuk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern requirements to safety and comfort of drivers and passengers of a car cause continuous development of corresponding technical facilities. Technologies that provide implementation of these requirements are on the first place for the developers of cars. One of the most important requirement is an analysis of road situation, where various sensors are used. One of them is radar. Principle of action, basic parameters and application of radar RS-200 is considered in this article. Radar is used in modern cars of brand Mersedes Benz and works on frequency 77 HHz. It uses the LFM (linear frequency modulation with the programmatic setting of resolution for distance.

  15. Introduction to radar target recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Tait, P

    2006-01-01

    This new text provides an overview of the radar target recognition process and covers the key techniques being developed for operational systems. It is based on the fundamental scientific principles of high resolution radar, and explains how the techniques can be used in real systems, taking into account the characteristics of practical radar system designs and component limitations. It also addresses operational aspects, such as how high resolution modes would fit in with other functions such as detection and tracking. Mathematics is kept to a minimum and the complex techniques and issues are

  16. Space noise synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof S.

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents limitations of space borne synthetic aperture radars, caused by range and Doppler velocity ambiguities, and the concept of usage of the noise radar technology for creation of high-resolution space SAR images. The noise SAR is free from limitation caused by the periodicity of pulse waveform ambiguity function, and therefore this technology can be used in the future space missions. The basic concept of noise SAR image formation is also presented. The image formation algorithm has been verified using the simulated data produced by Raw Radar Data Simulator.

  17. Coupling Between Doppler Radar Signatures and Tornado Damage Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Carey, Lawrence; Carcione, Brian; Smith, Matthew; Schultz, Elise V.; Schultz, Christopher; Lafontaine, Frank

    2011-01-01

    On April 27, 2011, the southeastern United States was raked with several episodes of severe weather. Numerous tornadoes caused extensive damage, and tragically, the deaths of over 300 people. In Alabama alone, there were 61 confirmed tornados, 4 of them produced EF5 damage, and several were on the ground an hour or more with continuous damage tracks exceeding 80km. The use of Doppler radars covering the region provided reflectivity and velocity signatures that allowed forecasters to monitors the severe storms from beginning to end issuing hundreds of severe weather warnings throughout the day. Meteorologists from the the NWS performed extensive surveys to assess the intensity, duration, and ground track of tornadoes reported during the event. Survey activities included site visits to the affected locations, analysis of radar and satellite data, aerial surveys, and interviews with eyewitnesses. Satellite data from NASA's MODIS and ASTER instruments played a helpful role in determining the location of tornado damage paths and in the assessment. High resolution multispectral and temporal composites helped forecasters corroborate their damage assessments, determine starting and ending points for tornado touchdowns, and helped to provide forecasters with a better big-picture view of the damage region. The imagery also helped to separate damage from the April 27th tornados from severe weather that occurred earlier that month. In a post analysis of the outbreak, tornado damage path signatures observed in the NASA satellite data have been correlated to "debris ball" signatures in the NWS Doppler radars and a special ARMOR dual-polarization radar operated by the University of Alabama Huntsville during the event. The Doppler radar data indicates a circular enhanced reflectivity signal and rotational couplet in the radial velocity likely associated with the tornado that is spatially correlated with the damage tracks in the observed satellite data. An algorithm to detect and

  18. Design of a Radar Based Space Situational Awareness System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschwager, T.; Neff, T.; Suess, I. H.; Foerstner, I. R.

    2013-09-01

    Existing SSA-Networks in most cases consist of sensors which originally were not designed for the purpose of detecting or tracking space debris and active satellites. Furthermore there are different kinds of sensors in use which makes it even more complicated to handle all generated data. Therefore it is reasonable to create a network consisting of homogenous sensors, which means sensors of the same type (like radar or optical) and with the same output format of the data. Technologies that are available for detection and tracking of objects (e.g. optical sensors or radar) will be discussed. Focal point will be on operational availability, reliability and obtainable accuracy. It will be shown that Phased Array Radars are the most reasonable technology to be used while creating a sensor network consisting of homogenous sensors. This paper entails to present a proposal for a network of Phased Array Radars configured for this purpose. The system is intended to detect and track objects that are at least as small as objects that can currently be found in the US SSN catalogue. Furthermore potential hazards in different orbits will be evaluated and discussed to optimize the system on these areas. The system is supposed to be able to create an own object catalogue. Therefore perseverative tracking and required capacity will also be considered. On the basis of these considerations the paper shows how to lay-up such a radar-system starting from scratch. Criteria for detection and tracking of objects will be determined. This part of the work contains aspects like choosing the frequency band or tracking-frequencies for different sizes of objects. In the next step the locations for the sensors will be chosen. Based on thoughts about infrastructure it is plausible to place the radar systems on existing observation sites. By analyzing simulations with different numbers of sensors and / or locations several feasible approaches for such a Space Situational Awareness Network will be

  19. Coordinated Radar Resource Management for Networked Phased Array Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    computed, and the detection of a target is determined based on a Monte Carlo test. For each successful target confirmation, a measurement report is...detection based on Monte Carlo test • add appropriate random perturbations to detec- tion measurements Radar Targets Environment Input Parameters... Fuente and J.R. Casar-Corredera. Optimal radar pulse scheduling using a neural network. In IEEE Int. Conf. Neural Networks, volume 7, pages 4558–4591

  20. Locating the LCROSS Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William; Shirley, Mark; Moratto, Zachary; Colaprete, Anthony; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Hensley, Scott; Wilson, Barbara; Slade, Martin; Kennedy, Brian; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observations and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket stage into a permanently shadowed region near the lunar south pole. The Sheperding Spacecraft (SSC) separated approx. 9 hours before impact and performed a small braking maneuver in order to observe the Centaur impact plume, looking for evidence of water and other volatiles, before impacting itself. This paper describes the registration of imagery of the LCROSS impact region from the mid- and near-infrared cameras onboard the SSC, as well as from the Goldstone radar. We compare the Centaur impact features, positively identified in the first two, and with a consistent feature in the third, which are interpreted as a 20 m diameter crater surrounded by a 160 m diameter ejecta region. The images are registered to Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter (LRO) topographical data which allows determination of the impact location. This location is compared with the impact location derived from ground-based tracking and propagation of the spacecraft's trajectory and with locations derived from two hybrid imagery/trajectory methods. The four methods give a weighted average Centaur impact location of -84.6796 deg, -48.7093 deg, with a 1s uncertainty of 115 m along latitude, and 44 m along longitude, just 146 m from the target impact site. Meanwhile, the trajectory-derived SSC impact location is -84.719 deg, -49.61 deg, with a 1 alpha uncertainty of 3 m along the Earth vector and 75 m orthogonal to that, 766 m from the target location and 2.803 km south-west of the Centaur impact. We also detail the Centaur impact angle and SSC instrument pointing errors. Six high-level LCROSS mission requirements are shown to be met by wide margins. We hope that these results facilitate further analyses of the LCROSS experiment data and follow-up observations of the impact region

  1. The Geminid meteor shower during the ECOMA sounding rocket campaign: specular and head echo radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The ECOMA (Existence of Charge state Of meteoric smoke particles in the Middle Atmosphere sounding rocket campaign was conducted during the Geminid meteor shower in December 2010 in order to explore whether there is a change of the properties of meteoric smoke particles due to the stream. In parallel to the rocket flights, three radars monitored the Geminid activity located at the launch site in Northern Norway and in Northern Germany to gain information about the meteor flux into the atmosphere. The results presented here are based on specular meteor radar observations measuring the radiant position, the velocity and the meteor flux into the atmosphere during the Geminids. Further, the MAARSY (Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System radar was operated to conduct meteor head echo experiments. The interferometric capabilities of MAARSY permit measuring the meteor trajectories within the radar beam and to determine the source radiant and geocentric meteor velocity, as well as to compute the meteor orbit.

  2. Compressive Sensing for MIMO Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems have been shown to achieve superior resolution as compared to traditional radar systems with the same number of transmit and receive antennas. This paper considers a distributed MIMO radar scenario, in which each transmit element is a node in a wireless network, and investigates the use of compressive sampling for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. According to the theory of compressive sampling, a signal that is sparse in some domain can be recovered based on far fewer samples than required by the Nyquist sampling theorem. The DOA of targets form a sparse vector in the angle space, and therefore, compressive sampling can be applied for DOA estimation. The proposed approach achieves the superior resolution of MIMO radar with far fewer samples than other approaches. This is particularly useful in a distributed scenario, in which the results at each receive node need to be transmitted to a fusion center for further processing.

  3. Air Defense Radar Operations Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of laboratories, experimental test equipment including state-of-theart test bed radar, and test ranges. The facilities are used to design, develop,...

  4. Air Defense Radar Operations Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of laboratories, experimental test equipment including state-of-theart test bed radar, and test ranges. The facilities are used to design, develop,...

  5. Haystack Ultrawideband Satellite Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    enable long-range imaging. In 2013, a major upgrade to the facility was completed, adding a millimeter - wave W-band radar capability to Haystack’s X...diameter antenna was completely rebuilt to provide a 100 μm root-mean-square (rms) surface accuracy to support operation at the 3 mm wave - length (W...electromagnetic wave propagation through the troposphere. − The signal processing system lev- eraged Lincoln Laboratory‘s Radar Open Systems

  6. Alternatives for Military Space Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Because the characteristics and performance of Discov- erer II’s radar are well documented, CBO based the design of its notional Space Radar on that of...2005, report to accompany H.R. 4613, Report 108-553 (June 18, 2004). 13. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, “Fact Sheet: Discov- erer II...360-degree coverage in GMTI mode. See Federation of American Scientists, Space Policy Project, “Discov- erer II STARLITE” (January 24, 2000

  7. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. L.; Vierinen, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products, such as wind fields. This type of a radar would also be useful for over-the-horizon radar, ionosondes, and observations of field-aligned-irregularities.

  8. Radar Imaging and Target Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-09

    Methods in Wave Propagation, Vaxjo, Swe- den. • February 19, 2008, "Radar Imaging", math colloquium, Brigham- Young University. • January 31, 2008...manuscript, namely "Radar detection using sparsely distributed 19 apertures in urban environments", Ling Wang, II- Young Son, Trond Varslot, C. Evren...Coinmun. COM- 20, pp. 774-780, 1972. [24] M. Tomlinson, "New automatic equalizer employing modulo arithmetic," Electron. Lett. 7, pp. 138-139, 1971

  9. Model-Based Radar Power Calculations for Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    performance in complex scenarios. Among these scenarios are ground penetrating radar and forward-looking radar for landmine and improvised explosive...Model-Based Radar Power Calculations for Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) by Traian Dogaru ARL-TN-0548 June 2013...2013 Model-Based Radar Power Calculations for Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Traian Dogaru Sensors and Electron

  10. A quantitative analysis of the impact of wind turbines on operational Doppler weather radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Norin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In many countries wind turbines are rapidly growing in numbers as the demand for energy from renewable sources increases. The continued deployment of wind turbines can, however, be problematic for many radar systems, which are easily disturbed by turbines located in radar line-of-sight. Wind turbines situated in the vicinity of Doppler weather radars can lead to erroneous precipitation estimates as well as to inaccurate wind- and turbulence measurements. This paper presents a quantitative analysis of the impact of a wind farm, located in southeastern Sweden, on measurements from a nearby Doppler weather radar. The analysis is based on six years of operational radar data. In order to evaluate the impact of the wind farm, average values of all three spectral moments (the radar reflectivity factor, absolute radial velocity, and spectrum width of the nearby Doppler weather radar were calculated, using data before and after the construction of the wind farm. It is shown that all spectral moments, from a large area at and downrange from the wind farm, were impacted by the wind turbines. It was also found that data from radar cells far above the wind farm (near 3 km altitude were affected by the wind farm. We show that this is partly explained by changes in the atmospheric refractive index, bending the radar beams closer to the ground. In a detailed analysis, using data from a single radar cell, frequency distributions of all spectral moments were used to study the competition between the weather signal and wind turbine clutter. We show that when weather echoes give rise to higher reflectivity values than that of the wind farm, the negative impact of the wind turbines disappears for all spectral moments.

  11. Simulation of radar rainfall errors and their propagation into rainfall-runoff processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghakouchak, A.; Habib, E.

    2008-05-01

    Radar rainfall data compared with rain gauge measurements provide higher spatial and temporal resolution. However, radar data obtained form reflectivity patterns are subject to various errors such as errors in Z-R relationship, vertical profile of reflectivity, spatial and temporal sampling, etc. Characterization of such uncertainties in radar data and their effects on hydrologic simulations (e.g., streamflow estimation) is a challenging issue. This study aims to analyze radar rainfall error characteristics empirically to gain information on prosperities of random error representativeness and its temporal and spatial dependency. To empirically analyze error characteristics, high resolution and accurate rain gauge measurements are required. The Goodwin Creek watershed located in the north part of Mississippi is selected for this study due to availability of a dense rain gauge network. A total of 30 rain gauge measurement stations within Goodwin Creak watershed and the NWS Level II radar reflectivity data obtained from the WSR-88dD Memphis radar station with temporal resolution of 5min and spatial resolution of 1 km2 are used in this study. Radar data and rain gauge measurements comparisons are used to estimate overall bias, and statistical characteristics and spatio-temporal dependency of radar rainfall error fields. This information is then used to simulate realizations of radar error patterns with multiple correlated variables using Monte Calro method and the Cholesky decomposition. The generated error fields are then imposed on radar rainfall fields to obtain statistical realizations of input rainfall fields. Each simulated realization is then fed as input to a distributed physically based hydrological model resulting in an ensemble of predicted runoff hydrographs. The study analyzes the propagation of radar errors on the simulation of different rainfall-runoff processes such as streamflow, soil moisture, infiltration, and over-land flooding.

  12. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  13. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  14. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  15. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  16. Improved radar data processing algorithms for quantitative rainfall estimation in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, S; Verworn, H R

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a new methodology to process C-band radar data for direct use as rainfall input to hydrologic and hydrodynamic models and in real time control of urban drainage systems. In contrast to the adjustment of radar data with the help of rain gauges, the new approach accounts for the microphysical properties of current rainfall. In a first step radar data are corrected for attenuation. This phenomenon has been identified as the main cause for the general underestimation of radar rainfall. Systematic variation of the attenuation coefficients within predefined bounds allows robust reflectivity profiling. Secondly, event specific R-Z relations are applied to the corrected radar reflectivity data in order to generate quantitative reliable radar rainfall estimates. The results of the methodology are validated by a network of 37 rain gauges located in the Emscher and Lippe river basins. Finally, the relevance of the correction methodology for radar rainfall forecasts is demonstrated. It has become clearly obvious, that the new methodology significantly improves the radar rainfall estimation and rainfall forecasts. The algorithms are applicable in real time.

  17. Space Radar Image of Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mt. Vesuvius, one of the best known volcanoes in the world primarily for the eruption that buried the Roman city of Pompeii, is shown in the center of this radar image. The central cone of Vesuvius is the dark purple feature in the center of the volcano. This cone is surrounded on the northern and eastern sides by the old crater rim, called Mt. Somma. Recent lava flows are the pale yellow areas on the southern and western sides of the cone. Vesuvius is part of a large volcanic zone which includes the Phalagrean Fields, the cluster of craters seen along the left side of the image. The Bay of Naples, on the left side of the image, is separated from the Gulf of Salerno, in the lower left, by the Sorrento Peninsula. Dense urban settlement can be seen around the volcano. The city of Naples is above and to the left of Vesuvius; the seaport of the city can be seen in the top of the bay. Pompeii is located just below the volcano on this image. The rapid eruption in 79 A.D. buried the victims and buildings of Pompeii under several meters of debris and killed more than 2,000 people. Due to the violent eruptive style and proximity to populated areas, Vesuvius has been named by the international scientific community as one of fifteen Decade Volcanoes which are being intensively studied during the 1990s. The image is centered at 40.83 degrees North latitude, 14.53 degrees East longitude. It shows an area 100 kilometers by 55 kilometers (62 miles by 34 miles.) This image was acquired on April 15, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  18. Radar automatic target recognition (ATR) and non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR)

    CERN Document Server

    Blacknell, David

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect and locate targets by day or night, over wide areas, regardless of weather conditions has long made radar a key sensor in many military and civil applications. However, the ability to automatically and reliably distinguish different targets represents a difficult challenge. Radar Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) and Non-Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR) captures material presented in the NATO SET-172 lecture series to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art and continuing challenges of radar target recognition. Topics covered include the problem as applied to th

  19. HPRF pulse Doppler stepped frequency radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Teng; REN LiXiang

    2009-01-01

    Stepped frequency radar Is a well known scheme to generate high range resolution profile (HRRP) of targets. Through appropriate radar parameter design, the radar enables both unambiguous velocity measurement and high resolution ranging within a single dwell in a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) mode. This paper analyzes in detail the design principle of the HPRF stepped frequency radar system, the solution to its ambiguity issue, as well as its signal processing method. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the proposed radar scheme can work independently to solve the problem of motion compensation, and is therefore highly applicable to many new types of radar.

  20. Adaptive filters applied on radar signals

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This master thesis has been performed at SAAB AB in Järfälla, Sweden.A radar warning receiver must alert the user when someone highlights it with radarsignals. Radar signals used today varies and has a wide frequency band. In order todetect all possible radar signals the radar warning receiver must have a widebandwidth. This results in that the noise power will be high in the radar warningreceiver and weak radar signals will be hard to detect or even undetected.The aim of the thesis work was ...

  1. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fukao; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-01-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam obs...

  2. Growth of a young pingo in the Canadian Arctic observed by RADARSAT-2 interferometric satellite radar

    OpenAIRE

    Samsonov, Sergey V.; Lantz, Trevor C.; Kokelj, Steven V; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in radar technology are increasing our ability to detect Earth surface deformation in permafrost environments. In this paper we use satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) to describe the growth of a large, relatively young pingo in the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands. High-resolution RADARSAT-2 imagery (2011–2014) analyzed with the Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) DInSAR revealed a maximum 2.7 cm yr−1 of domed uplift locate...

  3. Dual-band Planar Bowtie Monopole for a Fall-Detection Radar and Telemetry System

    OpenAIRE

    Soh, Ping Jack; Mercuri, Marco; Pandey, Gokarna; Vandenbosch, Guy; Schreurs, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    A dual-band planar bowtie monopole for a fall-detection telemetry radar system is presented. Unidirectionality is successfully enabled by a full ground plane. A compact radiator footprint is achieved by closely spacing two bowtie elements for transmit-receive operation, combined with a simple and effective technique for mutual-coupling reduction. The radar antenna shows target location and speed detection capabilities of up to 4 m with resolution of 30 cm and fall detection success rate of 95...

  4. Tsunami Arrival Detection with High Frequency (HF Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Barrick

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative real-time observations of a tsunami have been limited to deep-water, pressure-sensor observations of changes in the sea surface elevation and observations of sea level fluctuations at the coast, which are essentially point measurements. Constrained by these data, models have been used for predictions and warning of the arrival of a tsunami, but to date no system exists for local detection of an actual incoming wave with a significant warning capability. Networks of coastal high frequency (HF-radars are now routinely observing surface currents in many countries. We report here on an empirical method for the detection of the initial arrival of a tsunami, and demonstrate its use with results from data measured by fourteen HF radar sites in Japan and USA following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake off Sendai, Japan, on 11 March 2011. The distance offshore at which the tsunami can be detected, and hence the warning time provided, depends on the bathymetry: the wider the shallow continental shelf, the greater this time. We compare arrival times at the radars with those measured by neighboring tide gauges. Arrival times measured by the radars preceded those at neighboring tide gauges by an average of 19 min (Japan and 15 min (USA The initial water-height increase due to the tsunami as measured by the tide gauges was moderate, ranging from 0.3 to 2 m. Thus it appears possible to detect even moderate tsunamis using this method. Larger tsunamis could obviously be detected further from the coast. We find that tsunami arrival within the radar coverage area can be announced 8 min (i.e., twice the radar spectral time resolution after its first appearance. This can provide advance warning of the tsunami approach to the coastline locations.

  5. Reconstruction of cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, F.; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2015-06-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground-based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be crucially improved with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of model clouds based on a large eddy simulation (LES), the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality, a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds change quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  6. Calibration of weather radar using region probability matching method (RPMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayat, Hooman; Reza Kavianpour, M.; Moazami, Saber; Hong, Yang; Ghaemi, Esmail

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to develop a novel method named region probability matching method (RPMM) for calibrating the Amir-Abad weather radar located in the north of Iran. This approach also can overcome the limitations of probability matching method (PMM), window probability matching method (WPMM), and window correlation matching method (WCMM). The employing of these methods for calibrating the radars in light precipitation is associated with many errors. Additionally, in developing countries like Iran where ground stations have low temporal resolution, these methods cannot be benefited from. In these circumstances, RPMM by utilizing 18 synoptic stations with a temporal resolution of 6 h and radar data with a temporal resolution of 15 min has indicated an accurate estimation of cumulative precipitation over the entire study area in a specific period. Through a comparison of the two methods (RPMM and traditional matching method (TMM)) on March 22, 2014, the obtained correlation coefficients for TMM and RPMM were 0.13 and 0.95, respectively. It is noted that the cumulative precipitation of the whole rain gauges and the calibrated radar precipitation at the same pixels were 38.5 and 36.9 mm, respectively. Therefore, the obtained results prove the inefficiency of TMM and the capability of RPMM in the calibration process of the Amir-Abad weather radar. Besides, in determining the uncertainty associated with the calculated values of A and B in the Z e -R relation, a sensitivity analysis method was employed during the estimation of cumulative light precipitation for the period from 2014 to 2015. The results expressed that in the worst conditions, 69% of radar data are converted to R values by a maximum error less than 30%.

  7. Multistatic synthetic aperture radar image formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V; Swoboda, J; Yarman, C E; Yazici, B

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a multistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging scenario where a swarm of airborne antennas, some of which are transmitting, receiving or both, are traversing arbitrary flight trajectories and transmitting arbitrary waveforms without any form of multiplexing. The received signal at each receiving antenna may be interfered by the scattered signal due to multiple transmitters and additive thermal noise at the receiver. In this scenario, standard bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithms result in artifacts in reconstructed images due to these interferences. In this paper, we use microlocal analysis in a statistical setting to develop a filtered-backprojection (FBP) type analytic image formation method that suppresses artifacts due to interference while preserving the location and orientation of edges of the scene in the reconstructed image. Our FBP-type algorithm exploits the second-order statistics of the target and noise to suppress the artifacts due to interference in a mean-square sense. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate the performance of our multistatic SAR image formation algorithm with the FBP-type bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithm. While we mainly focus on radar applications, our image formation method is also applicable to other problems arising in fields such as acoustic, geophysical and medical imaging.

  8. Space Debris Radar Experiments at the Medicina VLBI Dish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, G.; Montebugnoli, S.; Di Martino, M.; Salerno, E.; Bartolini, M.; Pluchino, S.; Schilliro, F.; Anselmo, L.; Portelli, C.; Konovalenko, A.; Nabatov, A.

    2009-03-01

    In 2007 three space debris detection tests were performed in the framework of a monitoring program carried out by the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica - INAF - in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency - ASI. The observations were made by using the bistatic radar technique. The INAF 32 m radiotelescope located at Medicina (Bologna, Italy) was used as receiver whereas the Ukrainian 70 m parabolic antenna located at Evpatoria was utilized as transmitter. The aim of the experiment was to test the sensitivity of the Medicina-Evpatoria radar system in space debris detection, and to validate and optimize the hardware setup. Measurements were mainly carried out on inactive satellites and catalogued space debris. However the search for new fragments in LEO was also performed during the campaign. This paper reports on results of these observations.

  9. The rotational dynamics of Titan from Cassini RADAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggiola, Rachele; Iess, Luciano; Stiles, Bryan. W.; Lunine, Jonathan. I.; Mitri, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Between 2004 and 2009 the RADAR instrument of the Cassini mission provided 31 SAR images of Titan. We tracked the position of 160 surface landmarks as a function of time in order to monitor the rotational dynamics of Titan. We generated and processed RADAR observables using a least squares fit to determine the updated values of the rotational parameters. We provide a new rotational model of Titan, which includes updated values for spin pole location, spin rate, precession and nutation terms. The estimated pole location is compatible with the occupancy of a Cassini state 1. We found a synchronous value of the spin rate (22.57693 deg/day), compatible at a 3-σ level with IAU predictions. The estimated obliquity is equal to 0.31°, incompatible with the assumption of a rigid body with fully-damped pole and a moment of inertia factor of 0.34, as determined by gravity measurements.

  10. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vierinen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs; continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  11. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, J.; Chau, J. L.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  12. Study on the Detectability of the Sky-Surface Wave Hybrid Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Chengyu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Working in the HF (high-frequency band and the transmitter and receiver locating separately, the sky-surface wave hybrid radar both has the capabilities of the OTHR (over-the-horizon radar and the advantage of the bistatic radar. As the electromagnetic wave will be disturbed by the ionosphere, interfered by the sea clutter and attenuated by the sea surface, the detectability of this radar system is more complex. So, in this paper, we will discuss the problem detailedly. First of all, the radar equation is deduced based on the propagation of the electromagnetic wave. Then, how to calculate the effect of the ionosphere and the propagation loss is discussed. And an example based on the radar equation is given. At last, the ambiguity function is used to analyze the range and velocity resolution. From the result, we find that the resolution has relation with the location of the target and the height of reflection point of the ionosphere. But compared with the location, the effect of the ionospheric height can be ignored.

  13. High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers within the polar cap ionosphere using a new incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    Full Text Available High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers using a new experiment with the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter Svalbard radar (ESR are presented. The observations were made by means of a new type of hardware, which was connected in parallel with the standard receiver. The radar beam was aligned with the geomagnetic field. The experiment applies a new modulation principle. Two phase codes, one with 22 bits and the other with 5 bits, were transmitted at separate frequencies. Each bit was further modulated by a 5-bit Barker code. The basic bit length of both transmissions was 6 µs. Instead of storing the lagged products of the ionospheric echoes in the traditional way, samples of both the transmitted pulses and the ionospheric echoes were taken at intervals of 1 µs and stored on hard disk. The lagged products were calculated later in an off-line analysis. In the analysis a sidelobe-free Barker decoding technique was used. The experiment produces range ambiguities, which were removed by mathematical inversion. Sporadic-E layers were observed at 105–115 km altitudes, and they are displayed with a 150-m range resolution and a 10-s time resolution. The layers show sometimes complex shapes, including triple peaked structures. The thickness of these sublayers is of the order of 1–2 km and they may be separated by 5 km in range. While drifting downwards, the sublayers merge together to form a single layer. The plasma inside a layer is found to have a longer correlation length than that of the surrounding plasma. This may be an indication of heavy ions inside the layer. The field-aligned ion velocity is also calculated. It reveals shears in the meridional wind, which suggests that shears probably also exist in the zonal wind. Hence the wind shear mechanism is a possible generation mechanism of the layer. However, observations from the coherent SuperDARN radar indicate the presence of an ionospheric electric field pointing in the sector between

  14. Space Radar Image of Colombian Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of a little known volcano in northern Colombia. The image was acquired on orbit 80 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The volcano near the center of the image is located at 5.6 degrees north latitude, 75.0 degrees west longitude, about 100 kilometers (65 miles) southeast of Medellin, Colombia. The conspicuous dark spot is a lake at the bottom of an approximately 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) volcanic collapse depression or caldera. A cone-shaped peak on the bottom left (northeast rim) of the caldera appears to have been the source for a flow of material into the caldera. This is the northern-most known volcano in South America and because of its youthful appearance, should be considered dormant rather than extinct. The volcano's existence confirms a fracture zone proposed in 1985 as the northern boundary of volcanism in the Andes. The SIR-C/X-SAR image reveals another, older caldera further south in Colombia, along another proposed fracture zone. Although relatively conspicuous, these volcanoes have escaped widespread recognition because of frequent cloud cover that hinders remote sensing imaging in visible wavelengths. Four separate volcanoes in the Northern Andes nations ofColombia and Ecuador have been active during the last 10 years, killing more than 25,000 people, including scientists who were monitoring the volcanic activity. Detection and monitoring of volcanoes from space provides a safe way to investigate volcanism. The recognition of previously unknown volcanoes is important for hazard evaluations because a number of major eruptions this century have occurred at mountains that were not previously recognized as volcanoes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of

  15. Space Radar Image of Karisoke & Virunga Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color composite of Central Africa, showing the Virunga volcano chain along the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. This area is home to the endangered mountain gorillas. The image was acquired on October 3, 1994, on orbit 58 of the space shuttle Endeavour by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). In this image red is the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received) polarization; green is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization; and blue is the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The area is centered at about 2.4 degrees south latitude and 30.8 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area 56 kilometers by 70 kilometers (35 miles by 43 miles). The dark area at the top of the image is Lake Kivu, which forms the border between Zaire (to the right) and Rwanda (to the left). In the center of the image is the steep cone of Nyiragongo volcano, rising 3,465 meters (11,369 feet) high, with its central crater now occupied by a lava lake. To the left are three volcanoes, Mount Karisimbi, rising 4,500 meters (14,800 feet) high; Mount Sabinyo, rising 3,600 meters (12,000 feet) high; and Mount Muhavura, rising 4,100 meters (13,500 feet) high. To their right is Nyamuragira volcano, which is 3,053 meters (10,017 feet) tall, with radiating lava flows dating from the 1950s to the late 1980s. These active volcanoes constitute a hazard to the towns of Goma, Zaire and the nearby Rwandan refugee camps, located on the shore of Lake Kivu at the top left. This radar image highlights subtle differences in the vegetation of the region. The green patch to the center left of the image in the foothills of Karisimbi is a bamboo forest where the mountain gorillas live. The vegetation types in this area are an important factor in the habitat of mountain gorillas. Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund in London will use this data to produce

  16. Fpga based L-band pulse doppler radar design and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savci, Kubilay

    As its name implies RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging) is an electromagnetic sensor used for detection and locating targets from their return signals. Radar systems propagate electromagnetic energy, from the antenna which is in part intercepted by an object. Objects reradiate a portion of energy which is captured by the radar receiver. The received signal is then processed for information extraction. Radar systems are widely used for surveillance, air security, navigation, weather hazard detection, as well as remote sensing applications. In this work, an FPGA based L-band Pulse Doppler radar prototype, which is used for target detection, localization and velocity calculation has been built and a general-purpose Pulse Doppler radar processor has been developed. This radar is a ground based stationary monopulse radar, which transmits a short pulse with a certain pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Return signals from the target are processed and information about their location and velocity is extracted. Discrete components are used for the transmitter and receiver chain. The hardware solution is based on Xilinx Virtex-6 ML605 FPGA board, responsible for the control of the radar system and the digital signal processing of the received signal, which involves Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detection and Pulse Doppler processing. The algorithm is implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK using the Xilinx System Generator for DSP tool. The field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) implementation of the radar system provides the flexibility of changing parameters such as the PRF and pulse length therefore it can be used with different radar configurations as well. A VHDL design has been developed for 1Gbit Ethernet connection to transfer digitized return signal and detection results to PC. An A-Scope software has been developed with C# programming language to display time domain radar signals and detection results on PC. Data are processed both in FPGA chip and on PC. FPGA uses fixed

  17. Deflating British Radar Myths of World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    this interference was well enough known for scientists to theorize how to use this interference. In 1900, Nikola Tesla suggested a wireless system...which would use reflected radio waves to locate objects and even to measure their distance. Tesla explained the concept of radar as, “When we raise...of a moving object such as a vessel at sea.” Unfortunately, Tesla was considered an anarchist and was never given funding for his ideas. His ideas

  18. Improving Weather Radar Precipitation Estimates by Combining two Types of Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    the two radar types achieves a radar product with both long range and high temporal resolution. It is validated that the blended radar product performs better than the individual radars based on ground observations from laser disdrometers. However, the data combination is challenged by lower performance...

  19. MST radar data-base management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwar, V. B.

    1983-01-01

    Data management for Mesospheric-Stratospheric-Tropospheric, (MST) radars is addressed. An incoherent-scatter radar data base is discussed in terms of purpose, centralization, scope, and nature of the data base management system.

  20. Design of multi-frequency CW radars

    CERN Document Server

    Jankiraman, Mohinder

    2007-01-01

    This book deals with the basic theory for design and analysis of Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) radar systems. The design of one such multi-frequency high resolution LPI radar, PANDORA, is covered.

  1. A multi-source precipitation approach to fill gaps over a radar precipitation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfagiorgis, K. B.; Mahani, S. E.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite Precipitation Estimates (SPEs) may be the only available source of information for operational hydrologic and flash flood prediction due to spatial limitations of radar and gauge products. The present work develops an approach to seamlessly blend satellite, radar, climatological and gauge precipitation products to fill gaps over ground-based radar precipitation fields. To mix different precipitation products, the bias of any of the products relative to each other should be removed. For bias correction, the study used an ensemble-based method which aims to estimate spatially varying multiplicative biases in SPEs using a radar rainfall product. Bias factors were calculated for a randomly selected sample of rainy pixels in the study area. Spatial fields of estimated bias were generated taking into account spatial variation and random errors in the sampled values. A weighted Successive Correction Method (SCM) is proposed to make the merging between error corrected satellite and radar rainfall estimates. In addition to SCM, we use a Bayesian spatial method for merging the gap free radar with rain gauges, climatological rainfall sources and SPEs. We demonstrate the method using SPE Hydro-Estimator (HE), radar- based Stage-II, a climatological product PRISM and rain gauge dataset for several rain events from 2006 to 2008 over three different geographical locations of the United States. Results show that: the SCM method in combination with the Bayesian spatial model produced a precipitation product in good agreement with independent measurements. The study implies that using the available radar pixels surrounding the gap area, rain gauge, PRISM and satellite products, a radar like product is achievable over radar gap areas that benefits the scientific community.

  2. SMAP RADAR Processing and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission uses L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This presentation will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation. To obtain the desired high spatial resolution the level 1 radar ground processor employs synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging techniques. Part of the challenge of the SMAP data processing comes from doing SAR imaging on a conically scanned system with rapidly varying squint angles. The radar echo energy will be divided into range/Doppler bins using time domain processing algorithms that can easily follow the varying squint angle. For SMAP, projected range resolution is about 250 meters, while azimuth resolution varies from 400 meters to 1.2 km. Radiometric calibration of the SMAP radar means measuring, characterizing, and where necessary correcting the gain and noise contributions from every part of the system from the antenna radiation pattern all the way to the ground processing algorithms. The SMAP antenna pattern will be computed using an accurate antenna model, and then validated post-launch using homogeneous external targets such as the Amazon rain forest to look for uncorrected gain variation. Noise subtraction is applied after image processing using measurements from a noise only channel. Variations of the internal electronics are tracked by a loopback measurement which will capture most of the time and temperature variations of the transmit power and receiver gain. Long-term variations of system performance due to component aging will be tracked and corrected using stable external reference

  3. Radar Observation of Insects - Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, E.; Downing, J.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted at several sites over the coastal lowlands of New Jersey and over a region of high plains and low mountains in Oklahoma. In one area, a salt marsh in New Jersey, extensive ground tests were combined with laboratory data on expected insect backscatter to arrive at an extremely convincing model of the insect origin of most Dot Angels. A great deal of insight was studied from radar on the buildup and dispersal of insect swarms, since radar can follow where other means of trapping and observation cannot. Data on large-scale behavior as a function of wind and topography are presented. Displayed techniques which show individual or small swarm motion within some larger cloud or mass, or which can show the overall motion over great distances were developed. The influence of wind and terrain on insect motion and dispersal is determined from radar data.

  4. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  5. Pressure Transducer Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Files are located here, defining the locations of the pressure transducers on the HIRENASD model. These locations also correspond to the locations that analysts...

  6. A study on WRF radar data assimilation for hydrological rainfall prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP models are gaining more attention in providing high-resolution rainfall forecasts at the catchment scale for real-time flood forecasting. The model accuracy is however negatively affected by the "spin-up" effect and errors in the initial and lateral boundary conditions. Synoptic studies in the meteorological area have shown that the assimilation of operational observations, especially the weather radar data, can improve the reliability of the rainfall forecasts from the NWP models. This study aims at investigating the potential of radar data assimilation in improving the NWP rainfall forecasts that have direct benefits for hydrological applications. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is adopted to generate 10 km rainfall forecasts for a 24 h storm event in the Brue catchment (135.2 km2 located in southwest England. Radar reflectivity from the lowest scan elevation of a C-band weather radar is assimilated by using the three-dimensional variational (3D-Var data-assimilation technique. Considering the unsatisfactory quality of radar data compared to the rain gauge observations, the radar data are assimilated in both the original form and an improved form based on a real-time correction ratio developed according to the rain gauge observations. Traditional meteorological observations including the surface and upper-air measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed are also assimilated as a bench mark to better evaluate and test the potential of radar data assimilation. Four modes of data assimilation are thus carried out on different types/combinations of observations: (1 traditional meteorological data; (2 radar reflectivity; (3 corrected radar reflectivity; (4 a combination of the original reflectivity and meteorological data; and (5 a combination of the corrected reflectivity and meteorological data. The WRF rainfall forecasts before and after different modes of data

  7. A study on weather radar data assimilation for numerical rainfall prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale NWP model is gaining more attention in providing high-resolution rainfall forecasts at the catchment scale for real-time flood forecasting. The model accuracy is however negatively affected by the "spin-up" effect and errors in the initial and lateral boundary conditions. Synoptic studies in the meteorological area have shown that the assimilation of operational observations especially the weather radar data can improve the reliability of the rainfall forecasts from the NWP models. This study aims at investigating the potential of radar data assimilation in improving the NWP rainfall forecasts that have direct benefits for hydrological applications. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is adopted to generate 10 km rainfall forecasts for a 24 h storm event in the Brue catchment (135.2 km2 located in Southwest England. Radar reflectivity from the lowest scan elevation of a C-band weather radar is assimilated by using the three dimensional variational (3D-Var data assimilation technique. Considering the unsatisfactory quality of radar data compared to the rain gauges, the radar data is assimilated in both the original form and an improved form based on a real-time correction ratio developed according to the rain gauge observations. Traditional meteorological observations including the surface and upper-air measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed are also assimilated as a bench mark to better evaluate and test the potential of radar data assimilation. Four modes of data assimilation are thus carried out on different types or combinations of observations: (1 traditional meteorological data; (2 radar reflectivity; (3 corrected radar reflectivity; (4 a combination of the original reflectivity and meteorological data; and (5 a combination of the corrected reflectivity and meteorological data. The WRF rainfall forecasts before and after different modes of data assimilation is evaluated by examining

  8. Analysis of the inversion monitoring capabilities of a monostatic acoustic radar in complex terrain. [Tennessee River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepf, D.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative interpretation of the records from a monostatic acoustic radar is presented. This is achieved with the aid of airplane, helicopter, and rawinsonde temperature soundings. The diurnal structure of a mountain valley circulation pattern is studied with the use of two acoustic radars, one located in the valley and one on the downwind ridge. The monostatic acoustic radar was found to be sufficiently accurate in locating the heights of the inversions and the mixed layer depth to warrant use by industry even in complex terrain.

  9. Radar research at The Pennsylvania State University Radar and Communications Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-05-01

    The Radar and Communications Laboratory (RCL) at The Pennsylvania State University is at the forefront of radar technology and is engaged in cutting edge research in all aspects of radar, including modeling and simulation studies of novel radar paradigms, design and development of new types of radar architectures, and extensive field measurements in realistic scenarios. This paper summarizes the research at The Pennsylvania State University's Radar and Communications Laboratory and relevant collaborative research with several groups over the past 15 years in the field of radar and related technologies, including communications, radio frequency identification (RFID), and spectrum sensing.

  10. Radar operation in a hostile electromagnetic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-03-01

    Radar ISR does not always involve cooperative or even friendly targets. An adversary has numerous techniques available to him to counter the effectiveness of a radar ISR sensor. These generally fall under the banner of jamming, spoofing, or otherwise interfering with the EM signals required by the radar sensor. Consequently mitigation techniques are prudent to retain efficacy of the radar sensor. We discuss in general terms a number of mitigation techniques.

  11. An MSK Waveform for Radar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a minimum shift keying (MSK) waveform developed for use in radar applications. This waveform is characterized in terms of its spectrum, autocorrelation, and ambiguity function, and is compared with the conventionally used bi-phase coded (BPC) radar signal. It is shown that the MSK waveform has several advantages when compared with the BPC waveform, and is a better candidate for deep-space radar imaging systems such as NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar.

  12. An automated radar-signature measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Juergen

    The design and operation of an automated measurement facility permitting determination of radar cross sections and location and characterization of scattering centers on aircraft models up to 4.5 m in length are described and illustrated with diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. The facility comprises a 15 x 5.8 x 3.8-m measurement chamber, a rotating platform with maximum load 270 kg and elevation range from -5 to +35 deg (precision 0.1 deg), a tunable broadband 2-18-GHz transmitter, a phase-sensitive receiver, and control and data-processing computers. The analytical techniques employed to correct for measurement errors and to resolve scattering centers both longitudinally and transversely (two-dimensional representation) are explained and demonstrated. The facility is currently being used to develop and evaluate stealth-type aircraft designs.

  13. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash emissions in the atmosphere are hazardous to aviation while ash fallout affects people and human activities and may cause damage to infrastructures and economic losses. In the framework of the French Government Laboratory of Excellence ClerVolc initiative, an experiment was carried out on Stromboli volcano (Italy), between 28 September and 4 October 2015. The aim was to retrieve various physical properties of the ash plumes, especially the mass loading parameters which are critical for the modelling of ash dispersal. We used a complementary set of cutting edge techniques recording in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The innovative instrument setup consisted in three radars, hyperspectral thermal infrared and dual-band UV cameras, a mini DOAS-Flyspec and a multigas sensor. A drone equipped with differential GPS was flown near the ash plumes with several sensors including SO2, CO2 and particle counter. We mainly focus on radar measurements of over 200 ash plumes and present some preliminary comparisons at three frequencies. The BASTA Doppler radar at 95 GHz, originally designed for atmospheric studies, was deployed at about 2.2 km in slant distance from the eruptive craters. It was configured to observe volumes above one of the active craters with a spatio-temporal resolution of 12.5 m and 1 s. From the same location, a 1.2 GHz volcano Doppler radar (VOLDORAD) was recording the signature of ballistics and small lapilli at 0.15 s in 60 m-deep volumes. In addition, a commercial 24 GHz micro rain Doppler radar (MRR) simultaneously recorded activity from the Rochette station, at 400 to 650 m from the active craters with a sampling rate of 10 s and a resolution of 25 m. The latter was pointing almost perpendicularly to the other radar beams. Reflectivity factors were measured inside the ash plume above the source vent by the BASTA radar (3 mm wavelength) spanning -9 to +21 dBZ. Fallout could sometimes be tracked during several minutes within

  14. Wind Turbine Radar Cross Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jenn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The radar cross section (RCS of a wind turbine is a figure of merit for assessing its effect on the performance of electronic systems. In this paper, the fundamental equations for estimating the wind turbine clutter signal in radar and communication systems are presented. Methods of RCS prediction are summarized, citing their advantages and disadvantages. Bistatic and monostatic RCS patterns for two wind turbine configurations, a horizontal axis three-blade design and a vertical axis helical design, are shown. The unique electromagnetic scattering features, the effect of materials, and methods of mitigating wind turbine clutter are also discussed.

  15. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  16. Comparison of mimo radar concepts: Detection performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Huizing, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, four different array radar concepts are compared: pencil beam, floodlight, monostatic MIMO, and multistatic MIMO. The array radar concepts show an increase in complexity accompanied by an increase in diversity. The comparison between the radar concepts is made by investigating the

  17. Comparison of mimo radar concepts: Detection performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Huizing, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, four different array radar concepts are compared: pencil beam, floodlight, monostatic MIMO, and multistatic MIMO. The array radar concepts show an increase in complexity accompanied by an increase in diversity. The comparison between the radar concepts is made by investigating the det

  18. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in the required complement of deck officers, including... endorsement as radar observer. (b) Each person who is employed or serves as pilot in accordance with...

  19. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480 Shipping COAST... ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains the requirements that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter specifies...

  20. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse. ...

  1. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping COAST GUARD... Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and (b) Facilities on the...

  2. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for plotting...

  3. Efficient Ways to Learn Weather Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Yeary, M. B.; Zhang, Guifu

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. weather radar network is currently being upgraded with dual-polarization capability. Weather radar polarimetry is an interdisciplinary area of engineering and meteorology. This paper presents efficient ways to learn weather radar polarimetry through several basic and practical topics. These topics include: 1) hydrometeor scattering model…

  4. Principles of modern radar advanced techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Melvin, William

    2012-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Advanced Techniques is a professional reference for practicing engineers that provides a stepping stone to advanced practice with in-depth discussions of the most commonly used advanced techniques for radar design. It will also serve advanced radar academic and training courses with a complete set of problems for students as well as solutions for instructors.

  5. Comparison of mimo radar concepts: Detection performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Huizing, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, four different array radar concepts are compared: pencil beam, floodlight, monostatic MIMO, and multistatic MIMO. The array radar concepts show an increase in complexity accompanied by an increase in diversity. The comparison between the radar concepts is made by investigating the det

  6. FMCW Radar with Broadband Communication Capability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrenechea, P.; Elferink, F.H.; Janssen, J.A.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The use of amplitude modulation to encode information onto an FMCW radar signal is proposed in this paper. This new technique, that has been named AM-FMCW communicating radar, provides a new channel for broadband communication by reusing the radar frequencies and without introducing any distortion i

  7. Efficient Ways to Learn Weather Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Yeary, M. B.; Zhang, Guifu

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. weather radar network is currently being upgraded with dual-polarization capability. Weather radar polarimetry is an interdisciplinary area of engineering and meteorology. This paper presents efficient ways to learn weather radar polarimetry through several basic and practical topics. These topics include: 1) hydrometeor scattering model…

  8. Image quality improvement for underground radar by block migration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gwangsu; Kawanaka, Akira; Takagi, Mikio

    1993-11-01

    Techniques have been developed which have been imaging optically opaque regions using an electromagnetic wave radar in order to estimate the location of the objects in those regions. One important application of these techniques is the detection of buried pipes and cables. In the case of underground radar, its image quality often becomes low because the nature of the soil is not uniform and an electromagnetic wave is attenuated in soil. Hence, the method which improves the quality of the radar images is required. In this paper, we point out that the quality of underground images can be improved significantly by means of the block migration method. In this method LOT (Lapped Orthogonal Transform) was applied. LOT is a new block transform method in which basis functions overlap in adjacent blocks, and it has a fast computation algorithm. In addition to above, we propose a method of estimating dielectric constant in soil using the processed images. The result of applying the block migration method to the underground radar images are presented. It points out the good capability for the image quality improvement and the application of LOT can improve the influence by blocking and the processing time. Also the dielectric constant in each block can be estimated accurately.

  9. Multi-radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes during the PHOCUS campaign on 20-22 July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.; Latteck, R.; Zecha, M.; Pinedo, H.; Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.

    2014-10-01

    During the PHOCUS rocket campaign, on 20-22 July 2011, the observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) were made by three mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radars, operating at about 50 MHz. One radar, ESRAD is located at Esrange in Sweden, where the rocket was launched, two other radars, MAARSY and MORRO, are located 250 km north-west and 200 km north of the ESRAD, respectively, on the other side of the Scandinavian mountain ridge. We compared PMSE as measured by these three radars in terms of their strength, spectral width and wave modulation. Time-altitude maps of PMSE strength look very similar for all three radars. Cross-correlations with maximum values 0.5-0.6 were found between the signal powers over the three days of observations for each pair of radars. By using cross-spectrum analysis of PMSE signals, we show that some waves with periods of a few hours were observed by all three radars. Unlike the strengths, simultaneous values of PMSE spectral width, which is related to turbulence, sometimes differ significantly between the radars. For interpretation of the results we suggested that large-scale fields of neutral temperature, ice particles and electron density, which are more or less uniform over 150-250 km horizontal extent were ‘modulated’ by waves and smaller patches of turbulence.

  10. A 35-GHz Polarimetric Doppler Radar and Its Application for Observing Clouds Associated with Typhoon Nuri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Lingzhi; LIU Liping; FENG Sheng; GE Runsheng; ZHANG Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter-wavelength radar has proved to be an effective instrument for cloud observation and research.In this study, 8-mm-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) with Doppler and polarization capabilities was used to investigate cloud dynamics in China for the first time. Its design, system specifications, calibration,and application in measuring clouds associated with typhoon are discussed in this article. The cloud radar measurements of radar refiectivity (Z), Doppler velocity (Vr), velocity spectrum width (Sw) and the depolarization ratio (LDR) at vertical incidence were used to analyze the microphysical and dynamic processes of the cloud system and precipitation associated with Typhoon Nuri, which occurred in southern China in August 2008. The results show the refiectivity observed using MMCR to be consistent with the echo height and the melting-layer location data obtained by the nearby China S-band new-generation weather radar (SA),but the Ka-band MMCR provided more detailed structural information about clouds and weak precipitation data than did the SA radar. The variation of radar refiectivity and LDR in vertical structure reveals the transformation of particle phase from ice to water. The vertical velocity and velocity spectrum width of MMCR observations indicate an updraft and strong turbulence in the stratiform cloud layer. MMCR provides a valuable new technology for meteorological research in China.

  11. APPLICATION OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL WAVELET TRANSFORM IN NEAR-SHORE X-BAND RADAR IMAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiang-bo; YAN Yi-xin; ZHANG Wei

    2011-01-01

    Among existing remote sensing applications, land-based X-band radar is an effective technique to monitor the wave fields,and spatial wave information could be obtained from the radar images.Two-dimensional Fourier Transform (2-D FT) is the common algorithm to derive the spectra of radar images.However, the wave field in the nearshore area is highly non-homogeneous due to wave refraction, shoaling, and other coastal mechanisms.When applied in nearshore radar images, 2-D FT would lead to ambiguity of wave characteristics in wave number domain.In this article, we introduce two-dimensional Wavelet Transform (2-D WT) to capture the non-homogeneity of wave fields from nearshore radar images.The results show that wave number spectra by 2-D WT at six parallel space locations in the given image clearly present the shoaling of nearshore waves.Wave number of the peak wave energy is increasing along the inshore direction, and dominant direction of the spectra changes from South South West (SSW) to West South West (WSW).To verify the results of2-D WT, wave shoaling in radar images is calculated based on dispersion relation.The theoretical calculation results agree with the results of 2-D WT on the whole.The encouraging performance of 2-D WT indicates its strong capability of revealing the non-homogeneity of wave fields in nearshore X-band radar images.

  12. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  13. Mars Radar Opens a Planet's Third Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Radar sounder instruments orbiting Mars have looked beneath the Martian surface and opened up the third dimension for planetary exploration. The technique's success is prompting scientists to think of all the other places in the Solar System where they would like to use radar sounders. The first radar sounder at Mars was the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on the European Space Agency's Mars Express Orbiter. It has been joined by the complementary Shallow Subsurface Radar (SHARAD), operating at a different wavelength aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The data in this animation are from SHARAD.

  14. Radar for Mapping Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barath, F. T.; Jordan, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    X-band system has 100-m2 resolution. Wide swath imaging radar of synthetic aperature type transmits signal to ground station for subsequent processing into imagery. Concept meets functional requirements for continuously mapping sea ice in north and south polar regions.

  15. Measurements of radar ground returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, G.P. de

    1974-01-01

    The ground based measurement techniques for the determination of the radar back-scatter of vegetation and soils as used in The Netherlands will be described. Two techniques are employed: one covering a large sample area (> 1000 m2) but working at low grazing angels only and one (short range) coverin

  16. Wind Retrieval using Marine Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Interaction (HiRes) DRI the NATO Undersea Research Center ( NURC ) wants to develop and validate methodologies to retrieve wind field parameters from X-band...marine radar. The main parameters NURC will focus on are the mean surface wind vector as well as the wind gusts in vicinity of the measurement platform

  17. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    30 September 1986 Los Angeles Air Force Station 13. NUMBER OF PAGES Los Angeles, Calif. 90009-2960 36 74. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If...TREE PLMUT ",-20 -CUTLIASS DumpER SED AN... TREE TRUNK, -0 - MERC BUMPER f - 40 H!-I -50 iI Fig. 7. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar View of

  18. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  19. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to

  20. Status and Prospects of Radar Polarimetry Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuesong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Radar polarimetry is an applied fundamental science field that is focused on understanding interaction processes between radar waves and targets and disclosing their mechanisms. Radar polarimetry has significant application prospects in the fields of microwave remote sensing, earth observation, meteorological measurement, battlefield reconnaissance, anti-interference, target recognition, and so on. This study briefly reviews the development history of radar polarization theory and technology. Next, the state of the art of several key technologies within radar polarimetry, including the precise acquisition of radar polarization information, polarization-sensitive array signal processing, target polarization characteristics, polarization antiinterference, and target polarization classification and recognition, is summarized. Finally, the future developments of radar polarization technology are considered.

  1. All-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Weiwen; Long, Xin; Zhang, Siteng; Cui, Yuanjun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Radar has been widely used in military, security, and rescue. Metamaterial cloak is employed in stealth targets to evade radar detection. Hence modern radar should be reconfigurable at multi-bands for detecting stealth targets, which might be realized based on microwave photonics. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar architecture. It is a coherent system utilizing one mode-locked laser for both signal generation and reception. Heterodyning of two individually filtered optical pulses that are pre-chirped via wavelength-to-time mapping generates wideband linearly-chirped radar signal. The working bands can be flexibly tailored with desired bandwidth at user-preferred carrier frequency. After modulated onto the pre-chirped optical pulse, radar echoes are time-stretched and frequency-compressed by several times. The digitization becomes much easier without loss of detection ability. We believe that the demonstration can innovate the radar's architecture with ultra-high range resolution.

  2. Radar research at the University of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Shannon D.; Allen, Christopher; Arnold, Emily; Hale, Richard; Hui, Rongqing; Keshmiri, Shahriar; Leuschen, Carlton; Li, Jilu; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Salandrino, Alessandro; Stiles, James

    2017-05-01

    Radar research has been synonymous with the University of Kansas (KU) for over half a century. As part of this special session organized to highlight significant radar programs in academia, this paper surveys recent and ongoing work at KU. This work encompasses a wide breadth of sensing applications including the remote sensing of ice sheets, autonomous navigation methods for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), novel laser radar capabilities, detection of highenergy cosmic rays using bistatic radar, different forms of waveform diversity such as MIMO radar and pulse agility, and various radar-embedded communication methods. The results of these efforts impact our understanding of the changing nature of the environment, address the proliferation of unmanned systems in the US airspace, realize new sensing modalities enabled by the joint consideration of electromagnetics and signal processing, and greater facilitate radar operation in an increasingly congested and contested spectrum.

  3. Characteristics of mesosphere echoes over Antarctica obtained using PANSY and MF radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Masaki; Nakamura, Takuji; Sato, Toru; Nishimura, Koji; Sato, Kaoru; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Kohma, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    In the polar region characteristic radar echoes are observed from the mesosphere by using a VHF system. The nature of the echoes is distinctively different between summer and winter and those echoes are called Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) and Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes (PMWEs), respectively. Since the PMSEs are usually very strong and can be easily measured with a small radar system, their nature is relatively well understood. On the other hand PMWEs are much weaker and they are still only poorly understood. The PANSY radar (47MHz) at Syowa station (69S) is the only large aperture atmospheric radar in the Antarctic, and can continuously survey the dynamics of the middle atmosphere with high time and height resolutions [Sato et al., 2014]. Nishiyama et al [2014] reported the first study of PMWEs using PANSY radar and showed a seasonal and local time dependence of these echoes. An MF radar system (2.4MHz) is co-located at Syowa, and has been operating for mesosphere and lower thermosphere observations. Although the MF radar has only a much poorer height resolution and is incapable of vertical wind measurement, it can almost continuously measure mesosphere day and night. In this study the nature of the mesosphere echoes, mainly PMWEs, are being studied using the two radars based on the observation made in 2015. These radars are operated using largely different radio frequencies and can provide complementary information with each other such as wind velocities and also echo scattering mechanisms. Horizontal wind velocities have been compared between the two radars with a great care mostly in the MF radar winds in order to avoid possible biases inherent in the correlation analysis technique employed for the MF radar wind measurement. A careful analysis has shown that the horizontal wind velocities agree well between the two systems with a high correlation coefficient around 0.8 throughout the height region of 65-85km. Aspect sensitivities estimated using

  4. On the use of borehole radar measurements for 3D assessment of structures in rock volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiren, S.A. [GEOSIGMA AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    Construction of a three-dimensional model of an area, for example a site for radioactive waste disposal, requires subsurface extrapolation of surface data and interpolation of subsurface and surface data. Such structural interpretation is based on local information in the perspective of the regional structural setting of the site. The SKB borehole radar, which can detect structures within a radius of 15 to 25 m around the borehole, is one of the most important sources of geometrical information from boreholes. Directional borehole radar measurements produce information on the angle ({alpha}) at which a feature intersects the borehole and the location (azimuth) relative to the borehole. Although the azimuthal information is important for the subsequent interpretation, the critical parameter that determines whether the feature is detected by the radar appears to be the {alpha}-angle. In this paper, the performance of the radar tool concerning {alpha}-angles is studied. The reason for undertaking the study was that predicted low angle intersections between boreholes and structures were not identified. This suggests that the relationship between the sampled population and the target population needs to be investigated. The analysed data sets comprise 307 reflectors from the Romuvaara site in Finland and 307 reflectors from the cored boreholes in the Hard Rock Laboratory at Aespoe. In the Aespoe bedrock, the shape of the frequency histogram displaying the {alpha}-angles is very consistent throughout the area. A brief comparison of amplitudes and reflectivity shows that the shape of the frequency histogram is tool-dependent rather than depending on the physical properties of the zones. The potential of the borehole radar to detect structures intersecting the borehole at very high angles is low due to the transmitter-receiver configuration of the tool. In the Aespoe radar data, the range of the borehole radar appears to be narrower than expected, with very few radar

  5. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox & Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Benveniste, Jerome; Breebaart, Leo; Bronner, Emilie; Dinardo, Salvatore; Earith, Didier; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Niejmeier, Sander; Picot, Nicolas

    2010-12-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the last mission launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. Nearly 1200 people downloaded it (as of end of June 2010), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2. Others are ongoing, some are in discussion. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason- 1, Envisat, Jason- 2, CryoSat and also the future Saral and Sentinel 3 missions, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: - as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL - as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode - as an educational and a quick-look tool both, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data, additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. BRAT is developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info and http://earth.esa.int/brat/

  6. Multistatic Wireless Fidelity Network Based Radar – Results of the Chrcynno Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rzewuski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theory and experimental result of passive radar using WIFI transmitters as illuminators of opportunity. As a result of experiments conducted on 17th August 2013 at airfield Chrcynno a Cessna C208 airplane was detected and tracked using multistatic passive radar system based on low power signal from WIFI network nodes, which were acting as non cooperative illuminators of opportunity. In the experiment 3 wireless access points were communicating with each other and illuminating the radar scene (airfield. The direct reference and reflected (surveillance signals have been acquired and processed using specially developed algorithm presented in the paper. After signal processing using Passive Coherent Location methods target has been detected. This paper describes in details the algorithms and the results of the experiment for the multistatic passive radar based on the WIFI signal.

  7. Evaluation of the value of radar QPE data and rain gauge data for hydrological modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Xin; Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Refsgaard, Jens Christian

    2013-01-01

    Weather radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is in principle superior to the areal precipitation estimated by using rain gauge data only, and therefore has become increasingly popular in applications such as hydrological modeling. The present study investigates the potential...... rainfall and subsequently the simulated hydrological responses. A headwater catchment located in western Denmark is chosen as the study site. Two hydrological models are built using the MIKE SHE code, where they have identical model structures expect for the rainfall forcing: one model is based on rain...... gauge interpolated rainfall, while the other is based on radar QPE which is a combination of both radar and rain gauge information. The two hydrological models are inversely calibrated and then validated against field observations. The model results show that the improvement introduced by using radar...

  8. Characterization of micro-Doppler radar signature of commercial wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanxing; Zhang, Yan; Palmer, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The large utility-scale wind turbines are reported to have negative impact on nearby radars due to complex scattering mechanisms, which is usually referred to as the radar Wind Turbine Clutter (WTC). Extremely complicated time-varying Doppler spectrum have been observed. Conventional ground clutter filter techniques thus have failed in mitigating the non-stationary components in the frequency domain. Rotation of the blades is a micro-motion as the wind turbine always stays at the same location. The time-evolving spectrum associated with the blade rotation is therefore a Micro-Doppler signature, which is important in characterizing radar WTC. This paper will disclose some latest findings from our recent studies in characterizing the Micro-Doppler radar signatures of wind turbine through electromagnetic modeling.

  9. Novel Analytic Method for Determining Micro-Doppler Measurement Sensitivity in Life-detection Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a new non-contact life detecting device has been developed, known as life-detection radar, which can measure bodily movement and locate human subjects. Typically, the amplitude of the vibration being measured is quite small, so the measurement is easily contaminated by noise in the radar system. To date, there is no effective index for judging the influence of noise on the vibration measurements in this radar system. To solve this problem, in this paper, we define the micro-Doppler measurement sensitivity to analyze the influence of noise on the measurement. We then perform a simulation to generate a performance curve for the radar system.

  10. Non-contact physiological signal detection using continuous wave Doppler radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Dengyu; He, Tan; Hu, Boping; Li, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show non-contact physiological signal monitoring system based on continuous-wave (CW) Doppler radar, which is becoming highly attractive in the field of health care monitoring of elderly people. Two radar signal processing methods were introduced in this paper: one to extract respiration and heart rates of a single person and the other to separate mixed respiration signals. To verify the validity of the methods, physiological signal is obtained from stationary human subjects using a CW Doppler radar unit. The sensor operating at 24 GHz is located 0.5 meter away from the subject. The simulation results show that the respiration and heart rates are clearly extracted, and the mixed respiration signals are successfully separated. Finally, reference respiration and heart rate signals are measured by an ECG monitor and compared with the results tracked by the CW Doppler radar monitoring system.

  11. Characterizing detection thresholds using extreme value theory in compressive noise radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Mahesh C.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2013-05-01

    An important outcome of radar signal processing is the detection of the presence or absence of target reflections at each pixel location in a radar image. In this paper, we propose a technique based on extreme value theory for characterizing target detection in the context of compressive sensing. In order to accurately characterize target detection in radar systems, we need to relate detection thresholds and probabilities of false alarm. However, when convex optimization algorithms are used for compressive radar imaging, the recovered signal may have unknown and arbitrary probability distributions. In such cases, we resort to Monte Carlo simulations to construct empirical distributions. Computationally, this approach is impractical for computing thresholds for low probabilities of false alarm. We propose to circumvent this problem by using results from extreme-value theory.

  12. Application of Multi-Scale Tracking Radar Echoes Scheme in Quantitative Precipitation Nowcasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gaili; WONG Waikin; LIU Liping; WANG Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    A new radar echo tracking algorithm known as multi-scale tracking radar echoes by cross-correlation (MTREC) was developed in this study to analyze movements of radar echoes at different spatial scales.Movement of radar echoes,particularly associated with convective storms,exhibits different characteristics at various spatial scales as a result of complex interactions among meteorological systems leading to the formation of convective storms.For the null echo region,the usual correlation technique produces zero or a very small magnitude of motion vectors.To mitigate these constraints,MTREC uses the tracking radar echoes by correlation (TREC) technique with a large "box" to determine the systematic movement driven by steering wind,and MTREC applies the TREC technique with a small "box" to estimate small-scale internal motion vectors.Eventually,the MTREC vectors are obtained by synthesizing the systematic motion and the small scale internal motion.Performance of the MTREC technique was compared with TREC technique using case studies:the Khanun typhoon on 11 September 2005 observed by Wenzhou radar and a squall-line system on 23 June 2011 detected by Beijing radar.The results demonstrate that more spatially smoothed and continuous vector fields can be generated by the MTREC technique,which leads to improvements in tracking the entire radar reflectivity pattern.The new multi-scale tracking scheme was applied to study its impact on the performance of quantitative precipitation nowcasting.The location and intensity of heavy precipitation at a 1-h lead time was more consistent with quantitative precipitation estimates using radar and rain gauges.

  13. Development of the Application techniques for KMA dual-pol. radar network in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Mi-Kyung; Nam, Kyung-Yeub; Jung, Sung-A.; Ko, Jeong-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Korea is located between the Eurasian continent and Northwestern pacific. So East Asian Monsoon affects the country every season and every year with the rainy season (Chang-ma front), convective stroms, snow storms, and sometimes typhoons. Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) has been operating many kinds of meteorological observation networks, including 10 operational radars and 1 testbed radar. Weather Radar Center (WRC) of Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) performs a task of development and application of cross governmental dual-pol. radar harmonization for the effective use of the national resources from 2013 since the tri-agencies (KMA, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, Ministry of National Defense) singed the MOU for the co-utilization of cross governmental dual-pol. radar. This task develops the techniques of the high-quality data processing, the support of the forecasting, etc. The techniques of the high-quality data processing are the quality control for the removal of non-meteorological echoes, the classification of the hydrometeors. The techniques for support of the forecasting are the computation and verification of the rainfall estimation of dual-pol. and single-pol. radars, etc. And it is developed the application techniques by using Yong-In Testbed dual-pol. radar, the merged rainfall field of the radars and the satellites, etc. Further works are the computation of the high-resolution 3-dimensional wind field, the quantitative precipitation forecasting, the development of the application and the information service techniques for the hydrology, climate, industry, aviation for the prevention techniques against the severe weather by using multi-wavelengths ( X, C, S-band radars) of the cross governments, etc.

  14. Characterization of Non-Specular Meteor Trail Radar Detections from Non-Field-Aligned Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarano, A. M.; Close, S.; Janches, D.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere and are detected by radars as they ablate between 140 and 70 km altitude in the E-region of the ionosphere. The radar returns are classified as head echoes, the plasma surrounding the meteoroids, and trails, the expanding plasma column left in the meteoroid's wake. In addition, plasma trails are categorized by the angle between the meteoroid's trajectory and the radar beam. One type is the specular trail, which occurs when the meteoroid travels quasi-perpendicular to the beam. The second type, non-specular trail, is independent of trajectory but, according to our current understanding, the radar beam must be perpendicular to the Earth's magnetic field in order to reflect from field-aligned irregularities (FAI) after the onset of plasma turbulence. However, the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) has surprisingly detected 25 cases of non-specular trails over a period of 12 days in 2011. At the radar's location, the geomagnetic field is about 51 degrees with respect to the radar beam, which suggests that our present theory of the physics behind non-specular trail formation is lacking. We present interferometric results from the observations performed using SAAMER in order to demonstrate that the non-specular trails detected are due to reflections from non-FAI. We examine the detected trail duration dependence on altitude, meteoroid velocity, time of day, and various geometric relationships to establish that the plasma turbulence mainly arises from gradient drift and wind driven instabilities. Moreover, the latter parameters are compared to traditional non-specular trail observations from an equatorial high-power large aperture radar, ARPA Long-Range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar (ALTAIR), to contextualize the detections accomplished by SAAMER.

  15. Localization Capability of Cooperative Anti-Intruder Radar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Montanari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available System aspects of an anti-intruder multistatic radar based on impulse radio ultrawideband (UWB technology are addressed. The investigated system is composed of one transmitting node and at least three receiving nodes, positioned in the surveillance area with the aim of detecting and locating a human intruder (target that moves inside the area. Such systems, referred to also as UWB radar sensor networks, must satisfy severe power constraints worldwide imposed by, for example, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC and by the European Commission (EC power spectral density masks. A single transmitter-receiver pair (bistatic radar is considered at first. Given the available transmitted power and the capability of the receiving node to resolve the UWB pulses in the time domain, the surveillance area regions where the target is detectable, and those where it is not, are obtained. Moreover, the range estimation error for the transmitter-receiver pair is discussed. By employing this analysis, a multistatic system is then considered, composed of one transmitter and three or four cooperating receivers. For this multistatic system, the impact of the nodes location on area coverage, necessary transmitted power and localization uncertainty is studied, assuming a circular surveillance area. It is highlighted how area coverage and transmitted power, on one side, and localization uncertainty, on the other side, require opposite criteria of nodes placement. Consequently, the need for a system compromising between these factors is shown. Finally, a simple and effective criterion for placing the transmitter and the receivers is drawn.

  16. On the collocation between dayside auroral activity and coherent HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    Full Text Available The 2D morphology of coherent HF radar and optical cusp aurora has been studied for conditions of predominantly southward IMF conditions, which favours low-latitude boundary layer reconnection. Despite the variability in shape of radar cusp Doppler spectra, the spectral width criterion of > 220 m s–1 proves to be a robust cusp discriminator. For extended periods of well-developed radar backscatter echoes, the equatorward boundary of the > 220 m s–1 spectral width enhancement lines up remarkably well with the equatorward boundary of the optical cusp aurora. The spectral width boundary is however poorly determined during development and fading of radar cusp backscatter. Closer inspection of radar Doppler profile characteristics suggests that a combination of spectral width and shape may advance boundary layer identification by HF radar. For the two December days studied the onset of radar cusp backscatter occurred within pre-existing 630.0 nm cusp auroral activity and appear to be initiated by sunrise, i.e. favourable radio wave propagation conditions had to develop. Better methods are put forward for analysing optical data, and for physical interpretation of HF radar data, and for combining these data, as applied to detection, tracking, and better understanding of dayside aurora. The broader motivation of this work is to develop wider use by the scientific community, of results of these techniques, to accelerate understanding of dynamic high-latitude boundary-processes. The contributions in this work are: (1 improved techniques of analysis of observational data, yielding meaningfully enhanced accuracy for deduced cusp locations; (2 a correspondingly more pronounced validation of correlation of boundary locations derived from the observational data set; and (3 a firmer physical rationale as to why the good correlation observed should theoretically be expected.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionospheric

  17. A Radar-Based Climatology of Thunderstorm Days across New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Phillip D.

    1984-07-01

    Archived radar reports, derived from the National Weather Service radar network, were used to estimate the average annual frequencies of thunderstorm days across New York State for the period 1978-81. The archival records consist of manually-digitized radar (MDR) data, available on magnetic tapes and arranged as hourly, digitally-encoded radar reflectivity values within a high-resolution grid of reporting blocks, each 45 × 45 km. Analyses of these data made use of an experimentally-derived relationship between radar reflectivities and the presence and intensities of thunderstorms. The radar-based thunderstorm day climatology generally agreed to within 15% of conventional, surface-based thunderstorm day statistics reported for the same period by National Weather Service (NWS) offices located within range of two or more network radars in the State. Poorest agreement between annual totals was found at selected NWS offices in the Greater New York City Metropolitan Area and northward into the lower Hudson River Valley, in far western New York and over far northern New York. Where redundant, near-continuous network radar coverage was available, a northwest-to-southeast increase of thunderstorm days, approaching an annual maximum of 45 in downstate New York was revealed. This gradient in thunderstorm day activity is significantly different from that depicted on isokeraunic maps derived from conventional thunder observing protocol. Because the MDR data are archived on a high-resolution grid of reporting blocks, local thunderstorm maxima on a scale of tens of kilometers may be resolved. Analyses further revealed that 5-25% of all thunderstorm days contained sufficiently vigorous storms to be characterized as `intense'. The greatest frequency of intense thunderstorm days, approaching 8 annually, was located in the highly-populated region of the State along the New York-New Jersey borders, northwest of the Greater New York City Metropolitan Area.

  18. Spatial Correlation of Rain Drop Size Distribution from Polarimetric Radar and 2D-Video Disdrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurai, Merhala; Bringi, Viswanathan; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walter Arthur; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial correlations of two of the main rain drop-size distribution (DSD) parameters - namely the median-volume diameter (Do) and the normalized intercept parameter (Nw) - as well as rainfall rate (R) are determined from polarimetric radar measurements, with added information from 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) data. Two cases have been considered, (i) a widespread, long-duration rain event in Huntsville, Alabama, and (ii) an event with localized intense rain-cells within a convection line which occurred during the MC3E campaign. For the first case, data from a C-band polarimetric radar (ARMOR) were utilized, with two 2DVDs acting as ground-truth , both being located at the same site 15 km from the radar. The radar was operated in a special near-dwelling mode over the 2DVDs. In the second case, data from an S-band polarimetric radar (NPOL) data were utilized, with at least five 2DVDs located between 20 and 30 km from the radar. In both rain event cases, comparisons of Do, log10(Nw) and R were made between radar derived estimates and 2DVD-based measurements, and were found to be in good agreement, and in both cases, the radar data were subsequently used to determine the spatial correlations For the first case, the spatial decorrelation distance was found to be smallest for R (4.5 km), and largest fo Do (8.2 km). For log10(Nw) it was 7.2 km (Fig. 1). For the second case, the corresponding decorrelation distances were somewhat smaller but had a directional dependence. In Fig. 2, we show an example of Do comparisons between NPOL based estimates and 1-minute DSD based estimates from one of the five 2DVDs.

  19. A Location Privacy Aware Friend Locator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Thomsen, Jeppe Rishede; Saltenis, Simonas

    2009-01-01

    to trade their location privacy for quality of service, limiting the attractiveness of the services. The challenge is to develop a communication-efficient solution such that (i) it detects proximity between a user and the user’s friends, (ii) any other party is not allowed to infer the location of the user...

  20. Radar Image with Color as Height, Ancharn Kuy, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Ancharn Kuy, Cambodia, was taken by NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). The image depicts an area northwest of Angkor Wat. The radar has highlighted a number of circular village mounds in this region, many of which have a circular pattern of rice fields surrounding the slightly elevated site. Most of them have evidence of what seems to be pre-Angkor occupation, such as stone tools and potsherds. Most of them also have a group of five spirit posts, a pattern not found in other parts of Cambodia. The shape of the mound, the location in the midst of a ring of rice fields, the stone tools and the current practice of spirit veneration have revealed themselves through a unique 'marriage' of radar imaging, archaeological investigation, and anthropology.Ancharn Kuy is a small village adjacent to the road, with just this combination of features. The region gets slowly higher in elevation, something seen in the shift of color from yellow to blue as you move to the top of the image.The small dark rectangles are typical of the smaller water control devices employed in this area. While many of these in the center of Angkor are linked to temples of the 9th to 14th Century A.D., we cannot be sure of the construction date of these small village tanks. They may pre-date the temple complex, or they may have just been dug ten years ago!The image dimensions are approximately 4.75 by 4.3 kilometers (3 by 2.7 miles) with a pixel spacing of 5 meters (16.4 feet). North is at top. Image brightness is from the C-band (5.6 centimeters, or 2.2 inches) wavelength radar backscatter, which is a measure of how much energy the surface reflects back toward the radar. Color is used to represent elevation contours. One cycle of color; that is going from blue to red to yellow to green and back to blue again; corresponds to 10 meters (32.8 feet) of elevation change.AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. In the TOPSAR

  1. MST radar and polarization lidar observations of tropical cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bhavani Kumar

    Full Text Available Significant gaps in our understanding of global cirrus effects on the climate system involve the role of frequently occurring tropical cirrus. Much of the cirrus in the atmosphere is largely due to frequent cumulus and convective activity in the tropics. In the Indian sub-tropical region, the deep convective activity is very prominent from April to December, which is a favorable period for the formation of deep cumulus clouds. The fibrous anvils of these clouds, laden with ice crystals, are one of the source mechanisms for much of the cirrus in the atmosphere. In the present study, several passages of tropical cirrus were investigated by simultaneously operating MST radar and a co-located polarization lidar at the National MST Radar Facility (NMRF, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, India to understand its structure, the background wind field and the microphysics at the cloud boundaries. The lidar system used is capable of measuring the degree of depolarization in the laser backscatter. It has identified several different cirrus structures with a peak linear depolarization ratio (LDR in the range of 0.1 to 0.32. Simultaneous observations of tropical cirrus by the VHF Doppler radar indicated a clear enhancement of reflectivity detected in the vicinity of the cloud boundaries, as revealed by the lidar and are strongly dependent on observed cloud LDR. An inter-comparison of radar reflectivity observed for vertical and oblique beams reveals that the radar-enhanced reflectivity at the cloud boundaries is also accompanied by significant aspect sensitivity. These observations indicate the presence of anisotropic turbulence at the cloud boundaries. Radar velocity measurements show that boundaries of cirrus are associated with enhanced horizontal winds, significant vertical shear in the horizontal winds and reduced vertical velocity. Therefore, these measurements indicate that a circulation at the cloud boundaries suggest an entrainment taking place close to

  2. Space Radar Image of Niya ruins, Taklamakan desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image is of an area thought to contain the ruins of the ancient settlement of Niya. It is located in the southwestern corner of the Taklamakan Desert in China's Sinjiang Province. This oasis was part of the famous Silk Road, an ancient trade route from one of China's earliest capitols, Xian, to the West. The image shows a white linear feature trending diagonally from the upper left to the lower right. Scientists believe this newly discovered feature is a man-made canal which presumably diverted river waters toward the settlement of Niya for irrigation purposes. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 106th orbit on April 16, 1994, and is centered at 37.78 degrees north latitude and 82.41 degrees east longitude. The false-color radar image was created by displaying the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red, the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in green, and the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in blue. Areas in mottled white and purple are low-lying floodplains of the Niya River. Dark green and black areas between river courses are higher ridges or dunes confining the water flow. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by

  3. PMSE Observations With the Tri-Static EISCAT VHF Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I.; Tjulin, A.; Häggström, I.

    2013-12-01

    The polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are generated in the ionosphere at roughly 80 to 90 altitude by electron irregularities in the presence of charged solid particles and PMSE are most likely observed when ice particles form onto nanodust. PMSE formation is an important part in understanding mesospheric processes, but is also an interesting example for dusty plasma phenomena occurring in space. To investigate the phenomena that lead to formation of PMSE it is helpful to study the radar reflectivity of the mesosphere at different angles. PMSE were previously studied at different aspect angles in order to better understand the scattering process. Another way is observing PMSE from multiple sites simultaneously. During this summer the EISCAT radars that are located in Northern Scandinavia could for the first time be used for tri-static observations in the VHF band and we carried out observations during three subsequent days in June 2013. The radar signal was transmitted in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø (69.59 deg N, 19.23 deg E) and the scattered signal was measured from Tromsø, Kiruna (67.86 deg N, 20.44 deg E) and Sodankylä (67.36 deg N, 26.63 deg E). Zenith observations were simultaneously carried out with the Tromsø UHF radar (933 MHz). Other groups have previously reported the observations of PMSE simultaneously with the EISCAT VHF and UHF radars, but with a much lower occurrence rate for the UHF. UHF observations made during this campaign are dominated by incoherent scatter. The VHF system in Tromsø detected PMSE for a large fraction of the observation time. The VHF receivers in Kiruna and Sodankylä were pointed at typical PMSE heights above the Tromsø transmitter and detected radar reflections at the same time and altitude as the Tromsø radar. These observations are among the first tri-static observations of PMSE. Preliminary results from the campaign will be presented and discussed.

  4. Advances in Ice Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Radars have been employed for ice remote sensing since the mid-twentieth century. The original application in radioglaciology was to obtain ice thickness: an essential parameter in ice flux calculations and boundary condition in ice flow models. Later, radars were used to estimate basal conditions and track laterally persistent features in the ice. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheet's recent hardware advances include multichannel systems and radar suites covering the usable frequency spectrum. These advances coupled with increased interest in the polar regions result in a concomitant exponential growth in data. We focus on a few results that have come from these changes. Multichannel radar systems improved clutter rejection and enabled 3D imaging. Using computer vision algorithms, we have automated the process of extracting the ice bottom surface in 3D imagery for complex topographies including narrow glacier channels where the ice surface and ice bottom merge together within the 3D images. We present results of wide swath imaging which have enabled narrow, 2-3 km wide, glacier channels to be fully imaged in a single pass. When radar data are available across the frequency spectrum, we have the ability to enhance target detection and measure frequency dependent properties. For example, we can couple HF sounder measurements in warmer ice where scattering attenuates and hides the signal of interest with VHF sounder measurements in cooler ice which have much improved resolution from a single flight line. We present examples of improved bed detection with coupled HF and VHF imagery in a temperate to cold ice transition that show the strong frequency dependence of englacial scattering. To handle the increased data rate, we developed a standard processing chain and data product for CReSIS radar systems, including legacy systems. Application specific GIS tools are an essential part and enable us to merge other data products during data analysis. By using imagery

  5. Radar polarimeter measures orientation of calibration corner reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Norikane, Lynne

    1987-01-01

    Radar polarimeter signals from a set of trihedral corner reflectors located in the Goldstone Dry Lake in California were analyzed, and three types of scattering behavior were observed: (1) Bragg-like slightly rough surface scattering that represents the background signal from the dry lake, (2) trihedral corner reflector scattering that returns the incident polarization, and (3) two-bounce corner reflector scattering resulting from a particular alignment of a trihedral reflector. A radar calibration approach using trihedral corner reflectors should be designed such that precise alignment of the reflectors is ensured, as three-bounce and two-bounce geometries lead to very different cross sections and hence very different inferred calibration factors.

  6. Passive synthetic aperture radar imaging of ground moving targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacks, Steven; Yazici, Birsen

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we present a method for imaging ground moving targets using passive synthetic aperture radar. A passive radar imaging system uses small, mobile receivers that do not radiate any energy. For these reasons, passive imaging systems result in signicant cost, manufacturing, and stealth advantages. The received signals are obtained by multiple airborne receivers collecting scattered waves due to illuminating sources of opportunity such as commercial television, radio, and cell phone towers. We describe a novel forward model and a corresponding ltered-backprojection type image reconstruction method combined with entropy optimization. Our method determines the location and velocity of multiple targets moving at dierent velocities. Furthermore, it can accommodate arbitrary imaging geometries. we present numerical simulations to verify the imaging method.

  7. Closed form fourier-based transmit beamforming for MIMO radar

    KAUST Repository

    Lipor, John J.

    2014-05-01

    In multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar setting, it is often desirable to design correlated waveforms such that power is transmitted only to a given set of locations, a process known as beampattern design. To design desired beam-pattern, current research uses iterative algorithms, first to synthesize the waveform covariance matrix, R, then to design the actual waveforms to realize R. In contrast to this, we present a closed form method to design R that exploits discrete Fourier transform and Toeplitz matrix. The resulting covariance matrix fulfills the practical constraints and performance is similar to that of iterative methods. Next, we present a radar architecture for the desired beampattern that does not require the synthesis of covariance matrix nor the design of correlated waveforms. © 2014 IEEE.

  8. Mars Express Bistatic Radar Observations 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andert, Tom; Simpson, Richard A.; Pätzold, Martin; Kahan, Daniel S.; Remus, Stefan; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2017-04-01

    One objective of the Mars Express Radio Science Experiment (MaRS) is to address the dielectric properties and surface roughness of Mars, which can be determined by means of a surface scattering experiment, also known as bistatic radar (BSR). The radio subsystem transmitter located on board the Mars Express spacecraft beams right circularly polarized (RCP) radio signals at two wavelengths - 3.6 cm (X-Band) and 13 cm (S-Band) - toward Mars' surface. Part of the impinging radiation is then scattered toward a receiver at a ground station on Earth and both the right and left circularly polarized echo components (RCP and LCP, respectively) are recorded. The dielectric constant can be derived in this configuration from the RCP-to-LCP power ratio. This approach eliminates the need for absolute end-to-end calibration in favor of relative calibration of the RCP and LCP ground receiver channels. Nonetheless, accurate relative calibration of the two receiving channels remains challenging. The most favorable configuration for bistatic radar experiments is around Earth-Mars opposition, which occurs approximately every two years. In 2016 the minimum distance of about 0.5 AU was reached on May 30th; eleven BSR experiments were successfully conducted between the end of April and mid-June. The specular point tracks during two experiments over the Syrtis Major region were very similar on April 27th and June 2nd, and the data were collected using the same Earth-based antenna. The separation in time and the different observing angles provide an opportunity to check reproducibility of the calibrations and analysis methods. The paper will illustrate the general spacecraft-to-ground BSR observation technique and describe in detail the calibration procedures at the ground station needed to perform the relative calibration of the two receiving channels. Results from the calibrations and the surface observations will be shown for the two MaRS experiments over Syrtis Major.

  9. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  10. A comparison of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo observations from locations in the Arctic and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, Ralph; Sato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Koji; Renkwitz, Toralf

    2017-04-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) are observed with 50-MHz VHF radars at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere for more than 20 years. Continuous and homogeneous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian island Andøya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) from 1999 until 2009 using the ALWIN radar and since 2011 using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) at the same location. In 2011 the PANSY radar - a Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scattering (MST/IS) radar - was installed at Syowa Station, Antartica (69.0°S, 39.4°E) and continues observation of PMSE were started in the austral summer period 2013/2014. Since both MAARSY and PANSY are high-power-large aperture radars mesospheric echoes are observed almost continuously during the summer seasons in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere now. We present a first comparison of PMSE observations obtained at both radar sites during a period of 6 boreal summers (Andøya, NH) and 3 austral summers (Syowa, SH) and discuss similarities and differences of seasonal and diurnal variations of PMSE occurrence frequencies and echo intensity.

  11. The potentialities of ground-penetrating radar in the engineering geology using the radars GROT-12 and GROT-12E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkomirskaya, Liudmila; Gulevich, Oxana; Musalev, Dmitri

    2013-04-01

    The potentialities of ground-penetrating radar in the engineering geology using the radars GROT-12 and GROT-12E L.B. Volkomirskaya(1,2), O.A. Gulevich(1,2), D.N. Musalev(3) 1. IZMIRAN, 142190, Russia, Moscow, Troitsk, Kalugskoe 4 2. ZAO Timer, 142190, Russia, Moscow, Troitsk, Lesnaya str. 4B 3. OAO Belgorchemprom, Republic of Belarus, Minsk, Masherov str. 17 The article presents the potentialities of ground-penetrating radar in the engineering geology on the basis of the latest modifications of the GPR "GROT": the low-frequency GPR GROT-12 and the high-frequency GPR GROT-12E. The article gives technical specifications of the GPRs GROT-12 and GROT-12E and their particular characteristics that define them from analogues. The solutions of direct problems of ground penetrating radar on the basis of Maxwell's equations in general formulation with given wide-band signal source are confronted to experimental data received from different fields of the engineering geology, for example: 1. To secure mining in salt mines the method was adapted to locate in the working layers the investigating boreholes, fault lines, borders of displacement and blowout of productive layers, as well as working pits without access. 2. To monitor the reinforced concrete structures of airport runways the technology was worked out to collect and process GPR data so as to locate communications under the runways and examine basement condition. 3. To carry out the reconstruction of buildings and pre-project engineering geological works the GPR shooting technology was improved to process the examinations of the bearing capacity of soils and to locate lost communications. 4. To perform ecological monitoring of abandoned mines the technology of the GPR data collecting and processing was developed to assess the conditions of stowage materials in mouths of destroyed vertical mine shafts, the location of inclined mine shafts, the determination of hollow spaces and thinning zones, the localization of ground

  12. Detecting and classifying low probability of intercept radar

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Philip E

    2008-01-01

    This revised and expanded second edition brings you to the cutting edge with new chapters on LPI radar design, including over-the-horizon radar, random noise radar, and netted LPI radar. You also discover critical LPI detection techniques, parameter extraction signal processing techniques, and anti-radiation missile design strategies to counter LPI radar.

  13. Array radars solve communication jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. D.

    1982-04-01

    The possibilities of incorporating mobile radar units as slave stations in communications relay applications during times of disrupted communications is examined. The limitations on uses of search, tracking, and multifunction radars are examined, noting that employment of the mobile system entails some tracking by the master phased-arrays to keep the mobile units in focus. The tracking patterns and dwell times are outlined, and the possibility of 700-1000 dwell times of 1220 microsec duration/sec is mentioned as opening the opportunity for high quality data transmissions. Signal-to-noise ratios are formulated for jamming situations, with offsetting tactical features for the jamming including the directivity and gain of the master antenna, the master station's power aperture product, on-axis to off-axis gain ratio, and antenna positioning ability. A slave station must be equipped with a transponder for communications, which are best achieved with pseudo-random coded waveforms.

  14. Locative Inversion in Cantonese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Sui-Sang

    This study investigates the phenomenon of "Locative Inversion" in Cantonese. The term "Locative Inversion" indicates that the locative phrase (LP) syntactic process in Cantonese and the appears at the sentence-initial position and its logical subject occurs postverbally. It is demonstrated that this Locative Inversion is a…

  15. An attempt to calibrate the UHF strato-tropospheric radar at Arecibo using NexRad radar and disdrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kafando

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to present a methodology to calibrate the reflectivity of the UHF Strato-Tropospheric (ST radar located at NAIC in Puerto Rico. The UHF lower relevant altitude is at 5.9km, the melting layer being at around 4.8km. The data used for the calibration came from the observations of clouds, carried out with Strato-Tropospheric dual-wavelength (UHF and VHF radars and a disdrometer; those instruments being located on the NAIC site in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The National Weather Service operates other instruments like the radiosondes and the NexRad Radar in other sites.

    The proposed method proceeds in two steps. The first consists of the comparison between the NexRad reflectivity and the reflectivity computed from the drop size distributions measured by the disdrometer for one day with a noticeable rainfall rate. In spite of the distance of both instruments, the agreement between the reflectivities of both instruments is enough good to be used as a reference for the UHF ST radar. The errors relative at each data set is found to be 2.75dB for the disdrometer and 4dB for the NexRad radar, following the approach of Hocking et al. (2001. The inadequacy between the two sampled volume is an important contribution in the errors.

    The second step consists of the comparison between the NexRad radar reflectivity and the UHF non-calibrated reflectivity at the 4 altitudes of common observations during one event on 15 October 1998. Similar features are observed and a coefficient is deduced. An offset around 4.7dB is observed and the correlation factor lies between 0.628 and 0.730. According to the errors of the data sets, the precision on the calibration is of the order of 2dB. This method works only when there are precipitation hydrometeors above the NAIC site. However, the result of the calibration could be applied to other data obtained during the campaign, the only

  16. Reliability of Naval Radar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    CONFIDENTIAL (THIS PACE IS UNCUIASSFIED) CONFIDENTIAL (U) For airborne radars, 3-M’(Maintenance and Material Management )and RISE (Readiness Improvement...of the 3-M Program reports (3-M from Maintenance and Material Management ) as well as Naval Air Systems Command RISE (Readi-. ness Improvement Summary...TRANSIT PULSE LE11CTR (;As): 12.8 ANTENNA UEIGHr (k 1058 (2331 lbs.) excluding pedestal COMPRESSED PLUE LENGTH (.is): 0.2 BEAN POSITIObiNG TECNIQUES : H)RZ

  17. Radar Control Optimal Resource Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-13

    Campaign as shown in Figure 7. This radar is an experimental frequency agile, high-resolution originally developed for the purpose of iceberg detection...Information Theory , Under Review 2015. [24] A. Pezeshki, A. Calderbank, W. Moran, and S. Howard, “Doppler resilient golay complemn- tary waveforms...IEEE Transactions on Information Theory , vol. 54, no. 9, pp. 4254–4266, 2008. [25] W. Dang, A. Pezeshki, S. Howard, B. Moran, and R. Calderbank

  18. Radar based autonomous sensor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Most surveillance systems combine camera sensors with other detection sensors that trigger an alert to a human operator when an object is detected. The detection sensors typically require careful installation and configuration for each application and there is a significant burden on the operator to react to each alert by viewing camera video feeds. A demonstration system known as Sensing for Asset Protection with Integrated Electronic Networked Technology (SAPIENT) has been developed to address these issues using Autonomous Sensor Modules (ASM) and a central High Level Decision Making Module (HLDMM) that can fuse the detections from multiple sensors. This paper describes the 24 GHz radar based ASM, which provides an all-weather, low power and license exempt solution to the problem of wide area surveillance. The radar module autonomously configures itself in response to tasks provided by the HLDMM, steering the transmit beam and setting range resolution and power levels for optimum performance. The results show the detection and classification performance for pedestrians and vehicles in an area of interest, which can be modified by the HLDMM without physical adjustment. The module uses range-Doppler processing for reliable detection of moving objects and combines Radar Cross Section and micro-Doppler characteristics for object classification. Objects are classified as pedestrian or vehicle, with vehicle sub classes based on size. Detections are reported only if the object is detected in a task coverage area and it is classified as an object of interest. The system was shown in a perimeter protection scenario using multiple radar ASMs, laser scanners, thermal cameras and visible band cameras. This combination of sensors enabled the HLDMM to generate reliable alerts with improved discrimination of objects and behaviours of interest.

  19. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  20. Radar scattering of linear dunes and mega-yardangs: Application to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillou, Philippe; Seignovert, Benoît; Radebaugh, Jani; Wall, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    The Ku-band (13.8 GHz - 2.2 cm) RADAR instrument onboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has revealed the richness of the surface of Titan, as numerous seas, lakes, rivers, cryo-volcanic flows and vast dune fields have been discovered. Linear dunes are a major geomorphological feature present on Titan, covering up to 17% of its surface, mainly in equatorial regions. However, the resolution of the RADAR instrument is not good enough to allow a detailed study of the morphology of these features. In addition, other linear wind-related landforms, such as mega-yardangs (linear wind-abraded ridges formed in cohesive rocks), are likely to present a comparable radar signature that could be confused with the one of dunes. We conducted a comparative study of the radar radiometry of both linear dunes and mega-yardangs, based on representative terrestrial analogues: the linear dunes located in the Great Sand Sea in western Egypt and in the Namib Desert in Namibia, and the mega-yardangs observed in the Lut Desert in eastern Iran and in the Borkou Desert in northern Chad. We analysed the radar scattering of both terrestrial linear dunes and mega-yardangs, using high-resolution radar images acquired by the X-band (9.6 GHz - 3.1 cm) sensor of the TerraSAR-X satellite. Variations seen in the radar response of dunes are the result of a contrast between the dune and interdune scattering, while for mega-yardangs these variations are the result of a contrast between ridges and erosion valleys. We tested a simple surface scattering model, with parameters derived from the local topography and surface roughness estimates, to accurately reproduce the radar signal variations for both landforms. It appears that we can discriminate between two types of dunes - bare interdunes as in Egypt and sand-covered interdunes as in Namibia, and between two types of mega-yardangs - young yardangs as in Iran and older ones as in Chad. We applied our understanding of the radar scattering to the analysis of

  1. Automotive Radar Sensors in Silicon Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Vipul

    2013-01-01

    This book presents architectures and design techniques for mm-wave automotive radar transceivers. Several fully-integrated transceivers and receivers operating at 22-29 GHz and 77-81 GHz are demonstrated in both CMOS and SiGe BiCMOS technologies. Excellent performance is achieved indicating the suitability of silicon technologies for automotive radar sensors.  This book bridges an existing gap between information available on dependable system/architecture design and circuit design.  It provides the background of the field and detailed description of recent research and development of silicon-based radar sensors.  System-level requirements and circuit topologies for radar transceivers are described in detail. Holistic approaches towards designing radar sensors are validated with several examples of highly-integrated radar ICs in silicon technologies. Circuit techniques to design millimeter-wave circuits in silicon technologies are discussed in depth.  Describes concepts and fundamentals of automotive rada...

  2. DBS imaging and GMTI in a wideband airborne mechanic scanning radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-ping; XING Meng-dao; BAO Zheng

    2006-01-01

    A principle for choosing the coherent integration number and an improved Doppler beam sharpening (DBS)imaging algorithm for mechanic scanning radar are presented in this paper.By compensating the range migration in wideband airborne mechanic scanning radar,the proposed DBS imaging algorithm can efficiently improve the resolution of a DBS image.In addition,based on the characteristic that the echo from the moving target will be modulated by the antenna pattern,a novel method used to locate the moving target is also presented,which begins with the sub-aperture moving target detection followed by the sliding window detection.Proper location can be achieved by using this method.Finally,the results on real radar data are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of these proposed methods.

  3. Signal Processing for Radar with Array Antennas and for Radar with Micro-Doppler Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Svante

    2017-01-01

    Radar (RAdio Detection And Ranging) uses radio waves to detect the presence of a target and measure its position and other properties. This sensor has found many civilian and military applications due to advantages such as possible large surveillance areas and operation day and night and in all weather. The contributions of this thesis are within applied signal processing for radar in two somewhat separate research areas: 1) radar with array antennas and 2) radar with micro-Doppler measuremen...

  4. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Forward Scattering Radar (FSR) is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS), FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology u...

  5. Fully Adaptive Radar Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Organization (NATO) Sensors Electronics Technology (SET)-227 Panel on Cognitive Radar. The FAR M&S architecture developed in Phase I allows for...Air Force’s previously developed radar M&S tools. This report is organized as follows. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the FAR framework...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0074 FULLY ADAPTIVE RADAR MODELING AND SIMULATION DEVELOPMENT Kristine L. Bell and Anthony Kellems Metron, Inc

  6. Intra-Pulse Radar-Embedded Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    Blunt, E. Mokole, R. Schneible, and M. Wicks, SciTech Publishing, 2010. 3. S.D. Blunt, T. Higgins, A.K. Shackelford , and K. Gerlach, “Multistatic... Shackelford , “Multi-dimensional Adaptive Processing for Angle-Dependent Radar Waveforms,” in preparation for IET Radar, Sonar & Navigation. 8. H... Shackelford , “Time-Range Adaptive Processing for Pulse Agile Radar,” 5 th International Waveform Diversity & Design Conference, Niagara Falls, Canada

  7. Preliminary results of noise radar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanowski, Mateusz; Contartese, Clara; Maslikowski, Lukasz; Baczyk, Marcin; Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes the first results of noise radar experiments carried out at Warsaw University of Technology. The radar system was built with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components: log-periodic antennas, an arbitrary waveform generator and a two-channel spectrum analyzer. The radar operated in the continuous-wave mode, and the aim was to detect moving targets in the received signal. The paper shows the system setup as well as the numerical results obtained from the recorded signals.

  8. Ground Penetrating Radar: Ultra-wideband radars for improvised explosive devices and landmine detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarovoy, A.

    2008-01-01

    For last two decades Ultra-Wideband Ground Penetrating Radars seemed to be a useful tool for detection and classification of landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). However limitations of radar technology considerably limited operational use of these radars. Recent research at TU Delft so

  9. Ground Penetrating Radar: Ultra-wideband radars for improvised explosive devices and landmine detection

    OpenAIRE

    Yarovoy, A.

    2008-01-01

    For last two decades Ultra-Wideband Ground Penetrating Radars seemed to be a useful tool for detection and classification of landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). However limitations of radar technology considerably limited operational use of these radars. Recent research at TU Delft solves the bottleneck problems.

  10. Radar hydrology principles, models, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    ""This is the first book on radar hydrology written by hydrologists. Whereas the excellent knowledge of radar technology by the authors permits an adequate coverage of the principles of rainfall rate estimation by radar, their hydrological background allows them to provide a unique message on the benefits (and on the remaining challenges) in exploiting radar techniques in hydrology. … In a clear and concise manner, the book combines topics from different scientific disciplines into a unified approach aiming to guide the reader through the requirements, strengths, and pitfalls of the applica

  11. Search Radar ECM/EA Simulator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Tests the effectiveness of electronic countermeasures/electronic attack (ECM/EA) equipment and techniques for jamming airborne search and targeting radars....

  12. Future of phased array radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassyouni, Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    This paper spots the light on the future progress of phased array radar systems, presenting two innovative examples on the directions of development. The first example starts with the classic radar range equation to develop the topology of what is called a "Mobile Adaptive Digital Array Radar" (MADAR) system. The second example discusses the possibility to achieve what is called "Entangled Photonic Radar" (EPR) system. The EPR quantum range equation is derived and compared to the classic one to compare the performance. Block diagrams and analysis for both proposed systems are presented.

  13. Radar reflection off extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the possibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique. Considering a bistatic radar system and different shower geometries, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the static plasma produced by the shower in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for radio wave reflection, we obtain the time evolution of the signal received by the antennas. The frequency upshift of the radar echo and the power received are studied to verify the feasibility of the radar detection technique.

  14. Recent advances in geologic mapping by radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative techniques are available which allow the analysis of SAR images for the derivation of geological surface and process data. In conjunction with calibrated radar sensors operating at several incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations, the compilation of multiparameter radar signatures of lithological and geomorphic units can accordingly proceed for geological mapping in unknown areas. While radar image tone can be used in arid zones to derive surface micromorphology, heavily vegetated tropical regions require the analysis of radar image texture by means of Fourier techniques which decompose the image into bandpasses that represent different scales of texture.

  15. Resonance and aspect matched adaptive radar (RAMAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Terence William

    2012-01-01

    The book describes a new form of radar for which the target response is frequency, i.e., resonance-dependent. The book provides both prototype designs and empirical results collected from a variety of targets. The new form of radar, called RAMAR (Resonance and Aspect Matched Adaptive Radar) advances radar - mere ranging and detection - to the level of RF spectroscopy, and permits an advance of spectroscopic methods from optical, through infra-red and into the RF spectral range. The book will describe how a target's response can be a function of frequency components in the transmitted signal's

  16. Mid-latitude E-region bulk motions inferred from digital ionosonde and HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delloue

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-latitude E-region there is now evidence suggesting that neutral winds play a significant role in driving the local plasma instabilities and electrodynamics inside sporadicE layers. Neutral winds can be inferred from coherent radar backscatter measurements of the range-/azimuth-time-intensity (RTI/ATI striations of quasi-periodic (QP echoes, or from radar interferometer/imaging observations. In addition, neutral winds in the E-region can be estimated from angle-of-arrival ionosonde measurements of sporadic-E layers. In the present paper we analyse concurrent ionosonde and HF coherent backscatter observations obtained when a Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI was operated under a portion of the field-of-view of the Valensole high frequency (HF radar. The Valensole radar, a mid-latitude radar located in the south of France with a large azimuthal scanning capability of 82° (24° E to 58° W, was used to deduce zonal bulk motions of QP echoing regions using ATI analysis. The CADI was used to measure angle-of-arrival information in two orthogonal horizontal directions and thus derive the motion of sporadic-E patches drifting with the neutral wind. This paper compares the neutral wind drifts of the unstable sporadic-E patches as determined by the two instruments. The CADI measurements show a predominantly westward aligned motion, but the measured zonal drifts are underestimated relative to those observed with the Valensole radar.

  17. HFRAD hindcast: An OTH-B radar and model comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, T. J.; Providakes, J.

    1991-12-01

    Hindcast analysis of OTH radar data differs from purely predictive (or forecast) analysis in that it is made 'after the fact' of radar measurement, permitting the removal of a substantial part of the random variability inherent in forecasting radar performance. In this paper, hindcast analysis is used to verify the performance of the MITRE OTH radar performance model, HFRAD. Data was collected during November and December of 1990 with the AN/FPS-118 East Coast Radar System (ECRS), and during January and February of 1991 with the West Coast Radar System (WCRS). This data was analyzed and compared to hindcast estimates of performance using a new version (V507g) of HFRAD that incorporates a new and improved, clutter model. Performance was analyzed in terms of target signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), both for the aggregate data set and for the data as a function of azimuth (because of its location near the auroral oval, the ECRS is known to exhibit a strong dependence of performance on azimuth). In addition, these internal model components were analyzed in the same way: subclutter visibility (SCV), surface clutter peak, background noise (i.e., noise measured with transmitter operating), noise measured with transmitter off (ambient noise), and the ratio of background noise to ambient noise. As anticipated, the comparison is generally in good agreement, although notable discrepancies still exist, particularly near the auroral oval. Suggestions for further improvements to HFRAD are presented.

  18. Numerical simulation and inversion of offshore area depth based on x-band microwave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; WU Xiongbin; PI Xiaoshan; MA Ketao; LIU Jianfei; TIAN Yun

    2015-01-01

    A detection method of offshore area depth utilizing the x-band microwave radar is proposed. The method is based on the sea clutter imaging mechanism of microwave radar, and combined with dispersion equation of the liner wave theorem and least square method (LSM), consequently get the inversion results of water depth in the detected region. The wave monitoring system OSMAR-X exploited by the Ocean State Laborato-ry, Wuhan University, based on a microwave radar has proven to be a powerful tool to monitor ocean waves in time and space. Numerical simulation and inversion of offshore area depth are carried out here; since JONSWAP model can give description of stormy waves in different growth phase, it is suitable for simulation. Besides, some results from measured data detected by OSMAR-X x-band radar located at Longhai of Fujian Province, China, validates this method. The tendency of the average water depths inferred from the radar images is in good agreement with the tide level detected by Xiamen tide station. These promising results suggest the possibility of using OSMAR-X to monitor operationally morphodynamics in coastal zones. This method can be applied to both shore-based and shipborne x-band microwave radar.

  19. The NASA radar entomology program at Wallops Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    NASA contribution to radar entomology is presented. Wallops Flight Center is described in terms of its radar systems. Radar tracking of birds and insects was recorded from helicopters for airspeed and vertical speed.

  20. Life-Long Radar Tracking of Bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ka S.; Reynolds, Andrew M.; Chittka, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Insect pollinators such as bumblebees play a vital role in many ecosystems, so it is important to understand their foraging movements on a landscape scale. We used harmonic radar to record the natural foraging behaviour of Bombus terrestris audax workers over their entire foraging career. Every flight ever made outside the nest by four foragers was recorded. Our data reveal where the bees flew and how their behaviour changed with experience, at an unprecedented level of detail. We identified how each bee’s flights fit into two categories—which we named exploration and exploitation flights—examining the differences between the two types of flight and how their occurrence changed over the course of the bees’ foraging careers. Exploitation of learned resources takes place during efficient, straight trips, usually to a single foraging location, and is seldom combined with exploration of other areas. Exploration of the landscape typically occurs in the first few flights made by each bee, but our data show that further exploration flights can be made throughout the bee’s foraging career. Bees showed striking levels of variation in how they explored their environment, their fidelity to particular patches, ratio of exploration to exploitation, duration and frequency of their foraging bouts. One bee developed a straight route to a forage patch within four flights and followed this route exclusively for six days before abandoning it entirely for a closer location; this second location had not been visited since her first exploratory flight nine days prior. Another bee made only rare exploitation flights and continued to explore widely throughout its life; two other bees showed more frequent switches between exploration and exploitation. Our data shed light on the way bumblebees balance exploration of the environment with exploitation of resources and reveal extreme levels of variation between individuals. PMID:27490662

  1. Drake Antarctic Agile Meteor Radar first results: Configuration and comparison of mean and tidal wind and gravity wave momentum flux measurements with Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Iimura, H.; Hocking, W. K.; Bageston, J. V.; Leme, N. M. P.

    2012-01-01

    A new generation meteor radar was installed at the Brazilian Antarctic Comandante Ferraz Base (62.1°S) in March 2010. This paper describes the motivations for the radar location, its measurement capabilities, and comparisons of measured mean winds, tides, and gravity wave momentum fluxes from April to June of 2010 and 2011 with those by a similar radar on Tierra del Fuego (53.8°S). Motivations for the radars include the “hotspot” of small-scale gravity wave activity extending from the troposphere into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) centered over the Drake Passage, the maximum of the semidiurnal tide at these latitudes, and the lack of other MLT wind measurements in this latitude band. Mean winds are seen to be strongly modulated at planetary wave and longer periods and to exhibit strong coherence over the two radars at shorter time scales as well as systematic seasonal variations. The semidiurnal tide contributes most to the large-scale winds over both radars, with maximum tidal amplitudes during May and maxima at the highest altitudes varying from ˜20 to >70 ms-1. In contrast, the diurnal tide and various planetary waves achieve maximum winds of ˜10 to 20 ms-1. Monthly mean gravity wave momentum fluxes appear to reflect the occurrence of significant sources at lower altitudes, with relatively small zonal fluxes over both radars, but with significant, and opposite, meridional momentum fluxes below ˜85 km. These suggest gravity waves propagating away from the Drake Passage at both sites, and may indicate an important source region accounting in part for this “hotspot.”

  2. Bats avoid radar installations: could electromagnetic fields deter bats from colliding with wind turbines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Nicholls

    Full Text Available Large numbers of bats are killed by collisions with wind turbines, and there is at present no direct method of reducing or preventing this mortality. We therefore determine whether the electromagnetic radiation associated with radar installations can elicit an aversive behavioural response in foraging bats. Four civil air traffic control (ATC radar stations, three military ATC radars and three weather radars were selected, each surrounded by heterogeneous habitat. Three sampling points matched for habitat type and structure, dominant vegetation species, altitude and surrounding land class were located at increasing distances from each station. A portable electromagnetic field meter measured the field strength of the radar at three distances from the source: in close proximity (2 volts/metre, an intermediate point within line of sight of the radar (200-400 m and with an EMF strength 400 m and registering an EMF of zero v/m. At each radar station bat activity was recorded three times with three independent sampling points monitored on each occasion, resulting in a total of 90 samples, 30 of which were obtained within each field strength category. At these sampling points, bat activity was recorded using an automatic bat recording station, operated from sunset to sunrise. Bat activity was significantly reduced in habitats exposed to an EMF strength of greater than 2 v/m when compared to matched sites registering EMF levels of zero. The reduction in bat activity was not significantly different at lower levels of EMF strength within 400 m of the radar. We predict that the reduction in bat activity within habitats exposed to electromagnetic radiation may be a result of thermal induction and an increased risk of hyperthermia.

  3. Effects of Stress Activated Positive-Hole Charge Carriers on Radar Reflectance of Gabbro-Diorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Dahlgren, R.; Cherukupally, A.; Freund, F. T.

    2011-12-01

    When load is applied to igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks, trapped electron vacancy defects are activated and become mobile positive-hole charge carriers. These mobile charge carriers repel each other through Coulomb interactions and move outward from the stressed region. As large numbers of positive-holes reach the surface of the rock, this surface charge may cause an observable change in radar reflectance. In this experiment, a series of holes is drilled into a large gabbro-diorite boulder from the A.R. Wilson Quarry in Aromas, CA. Bustar, an expansive, non-explosive demolition agent, is poured into the holes while a 1.2 GHz radar system measures the amplitude of radar waves reflected from the rock's surface. Over the course of the experiment, the radar antenna is swept repeatedly across one face of the rock, pausing in one of twelve positions to collect data before moving to the next position. At the end of each sweep, the radar is calibrated against both a corner reflector and a flat-plate reflector. This sampling method is employed to detect and assign a cause to transient effects observed at any one location. An initial analysis of the radar data shows a high level of agreement between readings from the flat-plate and corner reflectors, supporting the use of flat-plate reflectors as a calibration source for this omnidirectional radar system. Fitting a trend to the amplitude of the wave reflected from the rock's surface is complicated by the presence of unexpected outliers and noise artifacts from the radar system itself. It appears that such a trend, if present, would likely indicate a change in amplitude of the reflected signal of less than 5 percent over the course of the experiment.

  4. Law Enforcement Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Law Enforcement Locations in Kansas Any location where sworn officers of a law enforcement agency are regularly based or stationed. Law enforcement agencies "are...

  5. Cloud radar deployment for Indian Monsoon observations: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, K.; Kalapureddy, M.; Pa, M.; Deshpandy, S.; Das, S.; Pandithurai, G.; Prabhakaran, T.; Chandrasekar, C. V.; Goswami, B.

    2013-12-01

    Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM)'s acquired Ka-band radar for the Study of the interaction between Cloud and Environment for formation of Precipitation. Main objective of it is to make simultaneous high resolution measurements on dynamical, cloud microphysical and precipitation parameters pertain to monsoon system probably at diverse locations. The goal is to understand the interplay between cloud processes and environment that not only allow understanding the fundamental cloud-environment interactions but also precipitation formation mechanisms and further to estimate cloud contribution to the re-distribution of energy and water in climate system. For this, Polarimetric weather Doppler Radar at higher frequencies (9.5 and 35 GHz) can be a potential tool to gain knowledge on this scientific as well as societal application oriented programme. IITM's Polarimetric scanning Ka-band (cloud) radar operations started recently during May 2013. Mobile Ka-band Scanning Polarimetric Doppler Radar (KaSPR) is a cloud radar operating at wavelength of 8.5 mm with average powers of 110 W. KaSPR incorporates a conduction cooled Extended Interaction Klystron Amplifier. It is having four foot diameter Ka-band cassegrain antenna. Liquid cooled air-sealed RF unit provides excellent temperature stability. Antenna on the top of RF unit is mounted on the Elevation over azimuth pedestal which is designed to rotate continuously in the azimuth axis and a full 180 degrees in the elevation axis (horizon to horizon) with a maximum velocity of 200/sec and maximum acceleration of 120/s2. KaSPR uses dual channel 16-bit digital receiver having dynamic range of more than 80 dB with bandwidths 10 MHz. Arbitrary waveform generator capable of generating any user-defined waveform of up to 16K samples in length. It is having sensitivity of the order -45 dBZ at 5 km. KaSPR has been providing high sensitivity versatile measurements of cloud and precipitation at tropical site (Manderdev, 18

  6. Hurricane Rita Track Radar Image with Topographic Overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Animation About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Galveston and portions of south Houston was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by a 17-foot sea wall against storm surges, flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes remains a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments. About the image: The Gulf Coast from the Mississippi Delta through the Texas coast is shown in this satellite image from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) overlain with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and the predicted storm track for Hurricane Rita. The prediction from the National Weather Service was published Sept. 22 at 4 p.m. Central Time, and shows the expected track center in black with the lighter shaded area indicating the range of potential tracks the storm could take. Low-lying terrain along the coast has been highlighted using the SRTM elevation data, with areas within 15 feet of sea level shown in red, and within 30 feet in yellow. These areas are more at risk for flooding and the destructive effects of storm surge and high waves. Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Geospatial

  7. Dual HF radar study of the subauroral polarization stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The dual HF radars comprising the Tasman International Geophysical Environment Radar (TIGER system often observe localized high-velocity F-region plasma flows (≥1500 m/s in the midnight sector (20:00–02:00 MLT at magnetic latitudes as low as Λ=60° S. The flow channels exhibit large variability in the latitudinal extent and electric field strength, and are similar to the subauroral polarization stream or SAPS, a plasma convection feature thought to be related to the polarization electric field due to the charge separation during substorm and storm development. In this study, the 2-D plasma drift velocity within the channel is derived for each of the two TIGER radars from the maximum velocities measured in all 16 radar beams within the latitudinally narrow channel, and the time variation of the subauroral electric field is examined near substorm onset. It is demonstrated that the flow channel often does not have a clear onset, rather it manifests differently in different phases of its evolution and can persist for at least two substorm cycles. During the growth phase the electric fields within the flow channel are difficult to distinguish from those of the background auroral convection but they start to increase near substorm onset and peak during the recovery phase, in contrast to what has been reported previously for auroral convection which peaks just before the substorm onset and falls sharply at the substorm onset. The response times to substorm onset range from −5 to +40 min and show some dependence on the substorm location with longer delays observed for substorms eastward of the radars' viewing area. The propagation velocity of the high-velocity region is also investigated by comparing the observations from the two closely-spaced TIGER radars. The observations are consistent with the notion that the polarization electric field is established with the energetic ions drifting westward and equatorward from the initial substorm

  8. Space Radar Image of Kilauea, Hawaii in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    erupted travels the 8 kilometers (5 miles) from the Pu'u O'o crater (the active vent) just outside this image to the coast through a series of lava tubes, but in the past there have been many large lava flows that have traveled this distance, destroying houses and parts of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This SIR-C/X-SAR image shows two types of lava flows that are common to Hawaiian volcanoes. Pahoehoe lava flows are relatively smooth, and appear very dark blue because much of the radar energy is reflected away from the radar. In contrast other lava flows are relatively rough and bounce much of the radar energy back to the radar, making that part of the image bright blue. This radar image is valuable because it allows scientists to study an evolving lava flow field from the Pu'u O'o vent. Much of the area on the northeast side (right) of the volcano is covered with tropical rain forest, and because trees reflect a lot of the radar energy, the forest appears bright in this radar scene. The linear feature running from Kilauea Crater to the right of the image is Highway 11leading to the city of Hilo which is located just beyond the right edge of this image. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio

  9. Cognitive MIMO Frequency Diverse Array Radar with High LPI Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency diverse array (FDA has its unique advantage in realizing low probability of intercept (LPI technology for its dependent beam pattern. In this paper, we proposed a cognitive radar based on the frequency diverse array multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO. To implement LPI of FDA MIMO transmit signals, a scheme for array weighting design is proposed, which is to minimize the energy of the target location and maximize the energy of the receiver. This is based on the range dependent characteristics of the frequency diverse array transmit beam pattern. To realize the objective problem, the algorithm is proposed as follows: the second-order nonconvex optimization problem is converted into a convex problem and solved by the bisection method and convex optimization. To get the information of target, the FDA MIMO radar is proposed to estimate the target parameters. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective in decreasing the detection probability of radar with lossless detection performance of the receive signal.

  10. Onderzoek location based marketing: Mobile = location = effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisbergen, M.S. van; Huhn, A.E.; Khan, V.J.; Ketelaar, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Onderzoekers van de NHTV (Internationaa Hoger Onderwijs Breda, Radboud Universiteit, DVJ Insights en Popai Benelux lieten consumenten in een virtuele supermarkt advertenties via de smartphone ontvangen wanneer men langs het geadverteerde product liep. De uitkomsten laten zien dat 'location based adv

  11. Onderzoek location based marketing: Mobile = location = effect

    OpenAIRE

    Gisbergen, M.S. van; Huhn, A.E.; Khan, V.J.; Ketelaar, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Onderzoekers van de NHTV (Internationaa Hoger Onderwijs Breda, Radboud Universiteit, DVJ Insights en Popai Benelux lieten consumenten in een virtuele supermarkt advertenties via de smartphone ontvangen wanneer men langs het geadverteerde product liep. De uitkomsten laten zien dat 'location based advertising' effectief is.

  12. Locatives in Kpelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuha, Mai

    This paper examines the differences between locative expressions in Kpelle and English, based on the dialect of one native speaker of Kpelle. It discusses the crucial role of the reference object in defining the meaning of locatives in Kpelle, in contrast to English, where the characteristics of the object to be located are less important. An…

  13. Pocket radar guide key facts, equations, and data

    CERN Document Server

    Curry, G Richard

    2010-01-01

    ThePocket Radar Guideis a concise collection of key radar facts and important radar data that provides you with necessary radar information when you are away from your office or references. It includes statements and comments on radar design, operation, and performance; equations describing the characteristics and performance of radar systems and their components; and tables with data on radar characteristics and key performance issues.It is intended to supplement other radar information sources by providing a pocket companion to refresh memory and provide details whenever you need them such a

  14. Stepped-Frequency Ground-Penetrating Radar for Detection of Small Non-metallic Buried Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Nymann, Ole

    1997-01-01

    A monostatic amplitude and phase stepped-frequency radar approach have been proposed to detect small non-metallic buried anti-personnel (AP) mines. An M-56 AP-mine with a diameter of 54 mm and height of 40 mm, only, has been successfully detected and located in addition to small metallic mine...

  15. Design of an ultra-wideband ground-penetrating radar system using impulse radiating antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, J.B.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.; Giri, D.V.

    1999-01-01

    At TNO-FEL, one of the research programs is to explore the use of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic fields in a bi-static ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system for the detection, location and identification of buried items of unexploded ordnance (e.g. land mines). In the present paper we describe

  16. Design of an ultra-wideband ground-penetrating radar system using impulse radiating antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, J.B.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.; Giri, D.V.

    1998-01-01

    At TNO-FEL, one of the research programs is to explore the use of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic fields in a bi-static ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system for the detection, location and identification of buried items of unexploded ordnance (e.g. land mines). In the present paper we describe

  17. Extraction of Building Features from Stand-Off Measured Through-Wall Radar Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, J.J.M. de; Rossum, W.L. van

    2016-01-01

    Automated extraction of building features is a great aid in synthesizing building maps from radar data. In this paper, a model-based method is described to detect and classify canonical scatters, such as corners and planar walls, inside a building. Once corners and walls have been located, a buildin

  18. Development of ground-penetrating radar equipment for detecting pavement condition for preventive maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. S.; Scuillion, T.

    1993-10-01

    The report documents the development of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) system for locating potential maintenance problems in highway pavements. The report illustrates how GPR has the potential to detect four defects in pavements: stripping in an asphalt layer; moisture in base layer; voids or loss of support under rigid pavements; and overlay delamination.

  19. Array-Based Ultrawideband through-Wall Radar: Prediction and Assessment of Real Radar Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Maaref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new through-the-wall (TTW radar demonstrator for the detection and the localisation of people in a room (in a noncooperative way with the radar situated outside but in the vicinity of the first wall. After modelling the propagation through various walls and quantifying the backscattering by the human body, an analysis of the technical considerations which aims at defining the radar design is presented. Finally, an ultrawideband (UWB frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW radar is proposed, designed, and implemented. Some representative trials show that this radar is able to localise and track moving people behind a wall in real time.

  20. Combination of radar and daily precipitation data to estimate meaningful sub-daily point precipitation extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárdossy, András; Pegram, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    The use of radar measurements for the space time estimation of precipitation has for many decades been a central topic in hydro-meteorology. In this paper we are interested specifically in daily and sub-daily extreme values of precipitation at gauged or ungauged locations which are important for design. The purpose of the paper is to develop a methodology to combine daily precipitation observations and radar measurements to estimate sub-daily extremes at point locations. Radar data corrected using precipitation-reflectivity relationships lead to biased estimations of extremes. Different possibilities of correcting systematic errors using the daily observations are investigated. Observed gauged daily amounts are interpolated to unsampled points and subsequently disaggregated using the sub-daily values obtained by the radar. Different corrections based on the spatial variability and the subdaily entropy of scaled rainfall distributions are used to provide unbiased corrections of short duration extremes. Additionally a statistical procedure not based on a matching day by day correction is tested. In this last procedure as we are only interested in rare extremes, low to medium values of rainfall depth were neglected leaving a small number of L days of ranked daily maxima in each set per year, whose sum typically comprises about 50% of each annual rainfall total. The sum of these L day maxima is first iterpolated using a Kriging procedure. Subsequently this sum is disaggregated to daily values using a nearest neighbour procedure. The daily sums are then disaggregated by using the relative values of the biggest L radar based days. Of course, the timings of radar and gauge maxima can be different, so the method presented here uses radar for disaggregating daily gauge totals down to 15 min intervals in order to extract the maxima of sub-hourly through to daily rainfall. The methodologies were tested in South Africa, where an S-band radar operated relatively continuously at

  1. Arecibo radar imagery of Mars: II. Chryse-Xanthe, polar caps, and other regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    We conclude our radar imaging survey of Mars, which maps spatial variations in depolarized radar reflectivity using Arecibo S-band (λ12.6 cm) observations from 2005-2012. Whereas our earlier paper (Harmon et al., 2012, Arecibo radar imagery of Mars: the major volcanic provinces. Icarus 220, 990-1030) covered the volcanic regions of Tharsis, Elysium, and Amazonis, this paper includes non-volcanic regions where hydrologic and impact processes can be the dominant resurfacing agents affecting radar backscatter. Many of the more prominent and interesting radar-bright features outside the major volcanic provinces are located in and around Chryse Planitia and Xanthe Terra. These features are identified with: a basin in northeast Lunae Planum containing the combined deposits from Maja Vallis and Ganges Catena outflows; channel outwash plains in western and southern Chryse basin; plateaus bordering chasma/chaos zones, where surface modification may have resulted from hydrologic action associated with incipient chaos formation; and some bright-ejecta craters in Chryse basin, of a type otherwise rare on Mars. Dark-halo craters have also been identified in Chryse and elsewhere that are similar to those seen in the volcanic provinces. Although the cratered highlands are relatively radar-bland, they do exhibit some bright depolarized features; these include eroded crater rims, several unusual ejecta flows and impact melts, and terrain-softened plains. The rims of large impact basins (Hellas, Argyre, Isidis) show a variety of radar-bright features provisionally identified with massif slopes, erosion sediments, eroded pyroclastics, impact melts, and glacial deposits. The interiors of these basins are largely radar-dark, which is consistent with coverage by rock-free sediments. Tempe Terra and Acheron Fossae show bright features possibly associated with rift volcanism or eroded tectonic structures, and northwest Tempe Terra shows one very bright feature associated with glacial or

  2. Assessment of C-band Polarimetric Radar Rainfall Measurements During Strong Attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Victoria, P. N.; Rico-Ramirez, M. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the modern hydrological modelling and their applications on flood forecasting systems and climate modelling, reliable spatiotemporal rainfall measurements are the keystone. Raingauges are the foundation in hydrology to collect rainfall data, however they are prone to errors (e.g. systematic, malfunctioning, and instrumental errors). Moreover rainfall data from gauges is often used to calibrate and validate weather radar rainfall, which is distributed in space. Therefore, it is important to apply techniques to control the quality of the raingauge data in order to guarantee a high level of confidence in rainfall measurements for radar calibration and numerical weather modelling. Also, the reliability of radar data is often limited because of the errors in the radar signal (e.g. clutter, variation of the vertical reflectivity profile, beam blockage, attenuation, etc) which need to be corrected in order to increase the accuracy of the radar rainfall estimation. This paper presents a method for raingauge-measurement quality-control correction based on the inverse distance weighted as a function of correlated climatology (i.e. performed by using the reflectivity from weather radar). Also a Clutter Mitigation Decision (CMD) algorithm is applied for clutter filtering process, finally three algorithms based on differential phase measurements are applied for radar signal attenuation correction. The quality-control method proves that correlated climatology is very sensitive in the first 100 kilometres for this area. The results also showed that ground clutter affects slightly the radar measurements due to the low gradient of the terrain in the area. However, strong radar signal attenuation is often found in this data set due to the heavy storms that take place in this region and the differential phase measurements are crucial to correct for attenuation at C-band frequencies. The study area is located in Sabancuy-Campeche, Mexico (Latitude 18.97 N, Longitude 91.17º W) and

  3. ESTIMATION OF TROPICAL FOREST STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS FROM FUSION OF RADAR AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Dubayah, R.; Clark, D. B.; Chazdon, R.

    2009-12-01

    geometry and pixel locations. Keywords: Amazon, Biomass, Carbon, Forest Structure, Tropical forests, Radar, Polarimetry, Interferometry, Lidar This work is performed partially at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract from National Aeronautic and Space Administration.

  4. Noise Source Location Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed O’Keefe

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method to determine locations of noise sources that minimize modal coupling in complex acoustic volumes. Using the acoustic source scattering capabilities of the boundary element method, predictions are made of mode shape and pressure levels due to various source locations. Combining knowledge of the pressure field with a multivariable function minimization technique, the source location generating minimum pressure levels can be determined. The analysis also allows for an objective comparison of “best/worst” locations. The technique was implemented on a personal computer for the U.S. Space Station, predicting 5–10 dB noise reduction using optimum source locations.

  5. Smartphones as locative media

    CERN Document Server

    Frith, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone adoption has surpassed 50% of the population in more than 15 countries, and there are now more than one million mobile applications people can download to their phones. Many of these applications take advantage of smartphones as locative media, which is what allows smartphones to be located in physical space. Applications that take advantage of people's location are called location-based services, and they are the focus of this book. Smartphones as locative media raise important questions about how we understand the complicated relationship between the Internet and physical space

  6. Radar interferometry persistent scatterer technique

    CERN Document Server

    Kampes, Bert M

    2006-01-01

    Only book on Permanent Scatterer technique of radar interferometryExplains the Permanent Scatterer technique in detail, possible pitfalls, and details a newly developed stochastic model and estimator algorithm to cope with possible problems for the application of the PS techniqueThe use of Permanent Scatterer allows very precise measurements of the displacement of hundreds of points per square kilometerDescribes the only technique currently able to perform displacement measurements in the past, utilizing the ERS satellite data archive using data acquired from 1992-prese

  7. Imaging radar polarimetry - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a tutorial review of the broad sweep of topics relating to imaging radar polarimetry, ranging from mathematical foundations to hardware and from implementation approaches to signal processing and calibration. The authors examine current developments in sensor technology and implementation for recording polarimetric measurements, and describe techniques and areas of application for this form of remotely sensed data. Those aspects of ground signal processing and calibration peculiar to the polarimetric signals are addressed. Several of the currently operating instruments and some of the implementations planned for future use are discussed.

  8. Multiple frequency atmospheric radar techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, Gary Richard

    The use of multiple frequency coding to improve the vertical resolution of pulsed-Doppler very high frequency atmospheric radars, especially with regards to the two-frequency techniques known as frequency domain interferometry (FDI), is presented. This technique consists of transmitting alternate pulses on two distinct carrier frequencies. The two resulting time series are used to evaluate the normalized cross-correlation function, whose magnitude and phase are related to the thickness and position of a scattering layer. These same time series are also used to evaluate cross-spectra, which yield magnitude and phase values for each Doppler frequency component of the return signal.

  9. Radar Methods in Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0344 Radar Methods in Urban Environments Arye Nehorai WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY THE Final Report 10/26/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...Methods in Urban Environments 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-11-1-0210 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Arye Nehorai 5d...Methods in Urban Environments Grant No. FA9550-11-1-0210 Final Report August 2011 – July 2016 Arye Nehorai Department of Electrical and Systems

  10. Electromagnetic energy deposition rate in the polar upper thermosphere derived from the EISCAT Svalbard radar and CUTLASS Finland radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available From simultaneous observations of the European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR and the Cooperative UK Twin Located Auroral Sounding System (CUTLASS Finland radar on 9 March 1999, we have derived the height distributions of the thermospheric heating rate at the F region height in association with electromagnetic energy inputs into the dayside polar cap/cusp region. The ESR and CUTLASS radar observations provide the ionospheric parameters with fine time-resolutions of a few minutes. Although the geomagnetic activity was rather moderate (Kp=3+~4, the electric field obtained from the ESR data sometimes shows values exceeding 40 mV/m. The estimated passive energy deposition rates are also larger than 150 W/kg in the upper thermosphere over the ESR site during the period of the enhanced electric field. In addition, enhancements of the Pedersen conductivity also contribute to heating the upper thermosphere, while there is only a small contribution for thermospheric heating from the direct particle heating due to soft particle precipitation in the dayside polar cap/cusp region. In the same period, the CUTLASS observations of the ion drift show the signature of poleward moving pulsed ionospheric flows with a recurrence rate of about 10–20 min. The estimated electromagnetic energy deposition rate shows the existence of the strong heat source in the dayside polar cap/cusp region of the upper thermosphere in association with the dayside magnetospheric phenomena of reconnections and flux transfer events.

  11. Influence of radar radiation on breeding biology of tits (Parus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejt, L; Mazgajski, T; Kubacki, R; Kieliszek, J; Sobiczewska, E; Szmigielski, S

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to observe the influence of long-term exposure to radar radiation on breeding biology of tits (Parus sp.), living and building nests around a military radar station, emitting pulse-modulated microwave radiation of 1,200-3,000 MHz. Two series of 36 nest-boxes each were located on the radar station area. Measurements of exposure were performed separately for each nest-box. Average power density (P(av), W/m(2)) and dose of exposure (W/m(2) x h) were recorded for each nest-box during 45 days. Control nest-boxes (N = 42) were located in other part of the same forests, free from radar radiation. The assessment of effects of radar exposure on breeding biology of tits included number of inhabited nest-boxes, number of eggs, and nestlings in the nest (Why not chick mortality?). Experimental nest-boxes were either exposed to relatively high levels of radiation (2.0-5.0 W/m(2), mean 3.41 +/- 1.38 W/m(2)) or an intermediate level of radiation that ranged from 0.1-2.0 W/m(2) (mean 1.12 +/- 0.84 W/m(2)). For control nest-boxes the exposure ranged from 0.001-0.01 W/m(2) (mean 0.0062 +/- 0.0007 W/m(2)). Only blue or great tits occupied all nest-boxes, used in the experiment. The number of nesting blue tits was higher in nest-boxes located on the radar station area than in the control boxes. In contrast, control nest-boxes were inhabited mainly by great tits. On the radar station area, blue tits nested in high exposed nest-boxes (67,0%) and great tit occupied mainly these boxes, which were exposed to low-level radiation (62,5%), the difference being statistically significant (p tits occupying exposed and control nest boxes. Results of the present study show that radar radiation generally does not lead to decrease of number of nesting tits, but may cause shifts in tits species living around the radar station. (But is the microhabitat, apart from the radiation level, around each nest box more likely to attract one species of tit or another?).

  12. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  13. Wind energy applications of synthetic aperture radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete

    Synthetic aperture radars (SAR), mounted on satellites or aircraft, have proven useful for ocean wind mapping. Wind speeds at the height 10 m may be retrieved from measurements of radar backscatter using empirical model functions. The resulting windfields are valuable in offshore wind energy...

  14. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Abstract: Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30...

  15. Integration and Validation of Avian Radars (IVAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    operations; 1-year visual census; multiple eBirdRad radars; fiber- optic wired LAN (planned) NAS Patuxent River, MD X B X Medium-sized air station...introduced a multibeam avian radar antenna that purports to double the beam width (from 4° to 8°), while at the same time increasing the precision of the

  16. Watchdog for ARM Radar Network Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-07-28

    WARNO is a software system designed to monitor the radars in the ARM Radar Network. It allows real time monitoring and tracking of instrument state and condition. It provides a web portal on the front end to interact with users, a REST API webpoint for interactions with third party systems, and an internal distributed architecture to allow it to be deployed at multiple sites.

  17. VAMPIRA - Radar and Infrared Propagation Synergism Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In a coastal environment simultaneous exploitation of radar and infrared sensors and multisensor fusion can overcome the difficulties imposed by the atmospheric conditions with respect to target detection/recognition/classification by the individual sensors. To investigate the so-called radar and

  18. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30 September - 11...

  19. High-precision positioning of radar scatterers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dheenathayalan, P.; Small, D.; Schubert, A.; Hanssen, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing radar satellites cover wide areas and provide spatially dense measurements, with millions of scatterers. Knowledge of the precise position of each radar scatterer is essential to identify the corresponding object and interpret the estimated deformation. The absolute position accuracy

  20. Classification of Agricultural Crops in Radar Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.

    1983-01-01

    For the past few years an accurate X-band SLAR system with digital recording has been available in The Netherlands. The images of this system are corrected to indicate radar backscatter coefficients (gamma) instead of arbitrary greytones. In 1980 a radar measurement campaign was organized in the