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Sample records for supercritical hydrogen adsorption

  1. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purewal, J. J.; Kabbour, H.; Vajo, J. J.; Ahn, C. C.; Fultz, B.

    2009-05-01

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  2. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purewal, J J; Kabbour, H; Ahn, C C; Fultz, B; Vajo, J J

    2009-01-01

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H 2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H 2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H 2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  3. Hydrogen purification by periodic adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barg, Christian; Secchi, Argimiro R.; Trierweiler, Jorge O. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: cbarg@enq.ufrgs.br; arge@enq.ufrgs.br; jorge@enq.ufrgs.br

    2000-07-01

    The periodic adsorption processes have been widely used for industrial applications, mainly because it spends less energy than the usual gas separation processes, like the cryogenic distillation. The largest commercial application of periodic adsorption processes is the pressure swing adsorption (PSA) applied to hydrogen purification. Although its wide use in the chemical and petrochemical industry, there are no reports in the open literature about complete modeling studies of a complex commercial unit, with multiple adsorbents and multiple beds and several feed components. This study has as objective the modeling, optimization and dynamical analysis of an industrial PSA unit for hydrogen purification. (author)

  4. Hydrogen Adsorption on Nanoporous Biocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. B.; Burress, J. W.; Lapilli, C. M.; Pfeifer, P.; Shah, P. S.; Suppes, G. J.; Dillon, A. C.; Parilla, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    As a part of the Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology (http://all-craft.missouri.edu) we study activated carbons made from corncob, optimized for storing methane and hydrogen (H2) by physisorption at low pressure. We report here: (a) storage capacities of 73-91 g H2/kg carbon at 77 K and 47 bar, validated in three different laboratories (the 2010 DOE target is 60 g H2/kg system); (b) binding energies from H2 adsorption isotherms (c) temperature-programmed desorption data; (d) degree of graphitization of the carbon surface from Raman spectra; (e) pore structure of carbon from nitrogen and methane adsorption isotherms, and small-angle x-ray scattering. The structural analysis shows that the carbon is highly microporous and that the pore space is highly correlated (micropores do not scatter independently).

  5. Hydrogenation of diesel aromatic compounds in supercritical solvent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Martins

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactions under supercritical conditions have been employed in many processes. Furthermore, an increasing number of commercial reactions have been conducted under supercritical or near critical conditions. These reaction conditions offer several advantages when compared to conditions in conventional catalytic processes in liquid-phase, gas-liquid interface, or even some gas-phase reactions. Basically, a supercritical solvent can diminish the reactant’s transport resistance from the bulk region to the catalyst surface due to enhancement of liquid diffusivity values and better solubility than those in different phases. Another advantage is that supercritical solvents permit prompt and easy changes in intermolecular properties in order to modify reaction parameters, such as conversion or selectivity, or even proceed with the separation of reaction products. Diesel fractions from petroleum frequently have larger than desirable quantities of aromatic compounds. Diesel hydrogenation is intended to decrease these quantities, i.e., to increase the quantity of paraffin present in this petroleum fraction. In this work, the hydrogenation of tetralin was studied as a model reaction for the aromatic hydrogenation process. A conventional gas-liquid-solid catalytic process was compared with that of supercritical carbon dioxide substrate under similar conditions. Additionally, an equilibrium conversion diagram was calculated for this reaction in a wide range of temperature and reactant ratios, so as to optimize the operational conditions and improve the results of subsequent experiments. An increase in the rate of reaction at 493 K in supercritical fluid, as compared to that in the conventional process, was observed.

  6. Adsorption of molecular hydrogen on nanostructered surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranga Piña, Llinersy; Martínez Mesa, Aliezer; Seifert, Gotthard

    2015-01-01

    Were investigated the effect of the structural characteristics of model nanoporous environments on the adsorption of molecular hydrogen. The adsorption properties of the target nanostructures (graphene and ZnO sheets, carbon foams, metal-organic frameworks) are evaluated in a broad range of thermodynamic conditions. The study is carried out within the density functional theory for quantum fluids at finite temperature (QLDFT), which allows to account for the many-body and quantum delocalization effects in a single theoretical framework. The exchange-correlation (excess) functional is derived from the empirical equation of state of the homogeneous system. We focus on the evaluation of hydrogen storage capacities of the substrates and on the emergence of quantum effects triggered by the confinement imposed by the host structure. The approach provides accurate estimates of the hydrogen storage capacities for realistic adsorptive media. The relation between the microscopic structure of the hydrogen fluid and the calculated adsorption properties is also addressed. (full text)

  7. Hydrogen adsorption in new carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubizarreta, L.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Hydrogen physi-sorption on porous carbon materials is one among the different technologies which could be used for hydrogen storage. In addition hydrogen spillover on a carbon supports can enhance the hydrogen adsorption capacities obtained by physi-sorption. In this study two different carbon supports were synthesised: carbon gels and carbon microspheres. Carbon microspheres were doped with Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} to study the hydrogen spillover on carbon support. The texture of the materials was characterised by CO{sub 2} adsorption at 0 C and their hydrogen storage capacity was evaluated at -196 and 10 C with a Micromeritics Tristar 3000, and at room temperature with a high pressure gravimetric analyser. (authors)

  8. Hydrogen adsorption in new carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubizarreta, L.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen physi-sorption on porous carbon materials is one among the different technologies which could be used for hydrogen storage. In addition hydrogen spillover on a carbon supports can enhance the hydrogen adsorption capacities obtained by physi-sorption. In this study two different carbon supports were synthesised: carbon gels and carbon microspheres. Carbon microspheres were doped with Ni(NO 3 ) 2 to study the hydrogen spillover on carbon support. The texture of the materials was characterised by CO 2 adsorption at 0 C and their hydrogen storage capacity was evaluated at -196 and 10 C with a Micromeritics Tristar 3000, and at room temperature with a high pressure gravimetric analyser. (authors)

  9. Hydrogen adsorption on and solubility in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashenko, S.L.; Wampler, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on adsorption and solubility of hydrogen isotopes in graphite over a wide range of temperatures and pressures are reviewed. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are proposed for the hydrogen-graphite interaction. The entropy and enthalpy of adsorption are estimated, allowing for effects of relaxation of dangling sp 2 bonds. Three kinds of traps are proposed: edge carbon atoms of interstitial loops with an adsorption enthalpy relative to H 2 gas of -4.4 eV/H 2 (unrelaxed, Trap 1), edge carbon atoms at grain surfaces with an adsorption enthalpy of -2.3 eV/H 2 (relaxed, Trap 2), and basal plane adsorption sites with an enthalpy of +2.43 eV/H 2 (Trap 3). The adsorption capacity of different types of graphite depends on the concentration of traps which depends on the crystalline microstructure of the material. The number of potential sites for the 'true solubility' (Trap 3) is assumed to be about one site per carbon atom in all types of graphite, but the endothermic character of this solubility leads to a negligible H inventory compared to the concentration of hydrogen in type 1 and type 2 traps for temperatures and gas pressures used in the experiments. Irradiation with neutrons or carbon atoms increases the concentration of type 1 and type 2 traps from about 20 and 200 appm respectively for unirradiated (POCO AXF-5Q) graphite to about 1500 and 5000 appm, respectively, at damage levels above 1 dpa. (orig.)

  10. Hydrogen and helium adsorption on potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.; Mulders, N.; Hess, G.

    1995-01-01

    A previous quartz microbalance study of adsorption of helium on sodium indicates that the inert layer is surprisingly small. Similar experiments with hydrogen on sodium show layer by layer growth below a temperature of 7K. These results motivated the authors to extend the experiments to lower temperatures. A suitable apparatus, capable of reaching 0.45 K, while still enabling them to do in situ alkali evaporation, has been constructed. The authors will report on the results of microbalance adsorption experiments of helium and hydrogen on potassium

  11. Capacitive density measurement for supercritical hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Th; Haberstroh, Ch; Szoucsek, K.; Schott, S.; Kunze, K.

    2017-12-01

    A new approach for automotive hydrogen storage systems is the so-called cryo-compressed hydrogen storage (CcH2). It has a potential for increased energy densities and thus bigger hydrogen amounts onboard, which is the main attractiveness for car manufacturers such as BMW. This system has further advantages in terms of safety, refueling and cooling potential. The current filling level measurement by means of pressure and temperature measurement and subsequent density calculation faces challenges especially in terms of precision. A promising alternative is the capacitive gauge. This measuring principle can determine the filling level of the CcH2 tank with significantly smaller tolerances. The measuring principle is based on different dielectric constants of gaseous and liquid hydrogen. These differences are successfully leveraged in liquid hydrogen storage systems (LH2). The present theoretical analysis shows that the dielectric values of CcH2 in the relevant operating range are comparable to LH2, thus achieving similarly good accuracy. The present work discusses embodiments and implementations for such a sensor in the CcH2 tank.

  12. Hydrogen adsorption on partially oxidised microporous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J B Parra; C O Ania; C J Duran Valle; M L Sanchez; C Otero Arean

    2005-01-01

    The search for cost effective adsorbents for large scale gas separation, storage and transport constitutes a present day strategic issue in the energy sector, propelled mainly by the potential use of hydrogen as an energy vector in a sustainable (and cleaner) energy scenario. Both, activated carbons and carbon based nano-structured materials have been proposed as potential candidates for reversible hydrogen storage in cryogenically cooled vessels. For that purpose, surface modification so as to enhance the gas solid interaction energy is desirable. We report on hydrogen adsorption on microporous (active) carbons which have been partially oxidised with nitric acid and ammonium persulfate. From the corresponding hydrogen adsorption isotherms (Fig. 1) an isosteric heat of about 3 kJ mol -1 was derived. This value is in agreement with that of about 3 to 4 kJ mol -1 obtained by quantum chemical calculations on the interaction between the hydrogen molecule and simple model systems (Fig. 2) of both, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Further research is in progress with a view to further increases the gas solid interaction energy. However, the values so far obtained are significantly larger than the liquefaction enthalpy of hydrogen: 0.90 kJ mol -1 ; and this is relevant to both, hydrogen separation from gas mixtures and cryogenic hydrogen storage. (authors)

  13. Modeling of the thermal effects of hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, M.-A.; Chahine, R.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' Heat management is one of the most critical issues for the design of efficient adsorption-based storage of hydrogen. We present simulations of mass and energy balance for hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption on activated carbon over wide temperature and pressure ranges. First, the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) model is adapted to model excess hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at high pressures and supercritical temperatures assuming a constant microporous adsorption volume. The five parameter modified D-A adsorption model is shown to fit the experimental data over the temperature range (35 K-293 K) for hydrogen and (93 K-298 K) for nitrogen and pressure range (0-6 MPa) within the experimental uncertainties of the measurement system. We derive the thermodynamic properties of the adsorbed phase from this analytical expression of the measured data. The mass and energy rate balance equations in a microporous adsorbent/adsorbate system are then presented and validated with nitrogen desorption experiments. Finally, simulations of adiabatic and isothermal filling of adsorption-based hydrogen storage are presented and discussed. (author)

  14. Thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorption in MOF-177 at low temperatures: measurements and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Eric [College of Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dailly, Anne [Chemical and Environmental Sciences Laboratory, General Motors Corporation, Warren, MI 48090 (United States)], E-mail: poirierem@gmail.com, E-mail: anne.dailly@gm.com

    2009-05-20

    Hydrogen adsorption measurements and modelling for the Zn-based microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) Zn{sub 4}O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate){sub 2}, MOF-177, were performed over the 50-77 K and 0-40 bar ranges. The maximum excess adsorption measured under these conditions varies over about 105-70 mg g{sup -1}. An analysis of the isotherms near saturation shows that hydrogen is ultimately adsorbed in an incompressible phase whose density is comparable to that of the bulk liquid. These liquid state properties observed under supercritical conditions reveal a remarkable effect of nanoscale confinement. The entire set of adsorption isotherms can be well described using a micropore filling model. The latter is used, in particular, to determine the absolute amounts adsorbed and the adsorption enthalpy. When expressed in terms of absolute adsorption, the isotherms show considerable hydrogen storage capacities, reaching up to 125 mg g{sup -1} at 50 K and 25 bar. The adsorption enthalpies are calculated as a function of fractional filling and range from 3 to 5 kJ mol{sup -1} in magnitude, in accordance with physisorption. These results are discussed with respect to a similar analysis performed on another Zn-based MOF, Zn{sub 4}O(1,4-benzenedicarboxylate){sub 3}, IRMOF-1, presented recently. It is found that both materials adsorb hydrogen by similar mechanisms.

  15. Thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorption in MOF-177 at low temperatures: measurements and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, Eric; Dailly, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption measurements and modelling for the Zn-based microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) Zn 4 O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate) 2 , MOF-177, were performed over the 50-77 K and 0-40 bar ranges. The maximum excess adsorption measured under these conditions varies over about 105-70 mg g -1 . An analysis of the isotherms near saturation shows that hydrogen is ultimately adsorbed in an incompressible phase whose density is comparable to that of the bulk liquid. These liquid state properties observed under supercritical conditions reveal a remarkable effect of nanoscale confinement. The entire set of adsorption isotherms can be well described using a micropore filling model. The latter is used, in particular, to determine the absolute amounts adsorbed and the adsorption enthalpy. When expressed in terms of absolute adsorption, the isotherms show considerable hydrogen storage capacities, reaching up to 125 mg g -1 at 50 K and 25 bar. The adsorption enthalpies are calculated as a function of fractional filling and range from 3 to 5 kJ mol -1 in magnitude, in accordance with physisorption. These results are discussed with respect to a similar analysis performed on another Zn-based MOF, Zn 4 O(1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) 3 , IRMOF-1, presented recently. It is found that both materials adsorb hydrogen by similar mechanisms.

  16. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  17. Adsorption of hydrogen in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez R, T.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the absorption of hydrogen in titanium plates using a constant volume system has been realized. The changes of temperature and pressure were used to monitor the progress of the absorption. A stainless steel vacuum chamber with volume of 4,333 cm 3 was used. A titanium sample of 45 x 5.4 x 0.3 cm was located in the center of the chamber. The sample was heated by an electrical source connected to the system. The sample was preconditioned with a vacuum-thermal treatment at 10 -6 mbar and 800 Centigrade degrees for several days. Absorption was observed at room temperature and also at higher temperatures. The room temperature absorption was in the pressure range of 1.0 x 10 3 to 2.5 x 10 3 mbar, and other absorptions were from 180 to 630 Centigrade degrees at 3.5 x 10 -1 to 1.3 x 10 3 mbar. It was found that the gas absorbed was function of the vacuum-thermal pre-conditioned treatment, pressure and temperature. When the first absorption was developed, additional absorptions were realized in short time. We measured the electrical resistivity of the sample in the experiments but we could not see important changes due to the absorption. (Author)

  18. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; Jong, K.P. de; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam 'opened' SWNT are compared and shown to be similar. The storage capacity below 77 K of these materials correlates with the surface area of the material with the activated charcoal having the largest. SWNT and 'opened' SWNT have a relatively low accessible surface area due to bundling of the tubes. Pressure-temperature curves give the interaction potential, which was found to be ∼580 K or 50 meV in all samples, leading to significant adsorption below ∼50 K. Using the inelastic neutron scattering signal associated with rotation of the hydrogen molecule as a sensitive probe for the surroundings of the molecule, no difference was found between the hydrogen molecules adsorbed in the investigated materials. These combined spectroscopic and macroscopic results show that SWNT, nanofibers and activated carbons store molecular hydrogen due to their graphitic nature and not because they possess special morphologies. Results from a density functional theory computer calculation suggest molecular hydrogen bonding to an aromatic C-C bond of graphite, irrespective of the surface morphology farther away

  19. Hydrogen adsorption in doped porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L Balan; L Duclaux; S Los

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Hydrogen is a clean fuel that will be used in automotive transport when the problem of storage will be solved. The difficulties of H 2 storage (available space, security and performance, etc...) require a material that can store 5 weight % of hydrogen. Research is focused on new materials that can assume the constraints imposed by the automotive applications. Among these materials, the nano-structured carbons (nano-fibers and single walled carbon nano-tubes) were claimed to be promising by numerous authors [1-3]. The more promising carbon materials for hydrogen adsorption are those having micropores (i. e. single walled carbon nano-tubes and activated carbon), for which the energy of sorption of hydrogen molecules is theoretically higher [7-8]. Presently, the best performance of hydrogen adsorption was found in super-activated microporous carbons sorbing 5 weight % at 77 K, and almost 0.5 % at room temperature and 6 MPa [9]. Up to now, the performance of these materials can still be improved as the known mechanism of sorption in these carbon materials: physi-sorption controlled by Van der Waals attractive forces through London interaction is efficient at cryogenic temperatures (77 K) where the interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate becomes stronger. One way to improve the attractive interaction between adsorbent and molecule is to increase the forces due to the interaction of electrical field and induced dipole of the molecule. This can be theoretically tailored in carbon materials through the electron charge transfer by electron donors who can provide an increase in the electrical field at the surface of the adsorbent. Then, the doping of carbon substrates, appearing to be a promising method to increase the energy of adsorption has been proposed in recent papers as a solution to obtain good hydrogen adsorption properties at appropriate temperatures close to room temperatures [10-12]. Thus, we have studied the adsorption

  20. Hydrogen adsorption in doped porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, L.; Duchaux, L.; Los, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Hydrogen is a clean fuel that will be used in automotive transport when the problem of storage will be solved. The difficulties of H 2 storage (available space, security and performance, etc...) require a material that can store 5 weight % of hydrogen. Research is focused on new materials that can assume the constraints imposed by the automotive applications. Among these materials, the nano-structured carbons (nano-fibers and single walled carbon nano-tubes) were claimed to be promising by numerous authors [1-3]. The more promising carbon materials for hydrogen adsorption are those having micropores (i. e. single walled carbon nano-tubes and activated carbon), for which the energy of sorption of hydrogen molecules is theoretically higher [7- 8]. Presently, the best performance of hydrogen adsorption was found in super-activated micro-porous carbons sorbing 5 weight % at 77 K, and almost 0.5 % at room temperature and 6 MPa [9]. Up to now, the performance of these materials can still be improved as the known mechanism of sorption in these carbon materials: physisorption controlled by Van der Waals attractive forces through London interaction is efficient at cryogenic temperatures (77 K) where the interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate becomes stronger. One way to improve the attractive interaction between adsorbent and molecule is to increase the forces due to the interaction of electrical field and induced dipole of the molecule. This can be theoretically tailored in carbon materials through the electron charge transfer by electron donors who can provide an increase in the electrical field al the surface of the adsorbent. Then, the doping of carbon substrates, appearing to be a promising method to increase the energy of adsorption has been proposed in recent papers as a solution to obtain good hydrogen adsorption properties at appropriate temperatures close to room temperatures [10-12]. Thus, we have studied the adsorption

  1. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Technical University, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have recently received considerable attention because of their high specific micropore volume and the ability to store gas molecules exceeding the storage capacity of traditional adsorbents. A variety of differences in the MOFs structures makes it difficult to analyze the influence of different factors on hydrogen uptake capabilities in MOFs. We have investigated the influence of the minor structural changes of the MOFs on their hydrogen storage capacity. The influence of the incorporated metal was shown for following isostructural compounds: Cu{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2} (BTC=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) and Mo{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}; Zn{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}DABCO and Co{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}DABCO (BDC=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, DABCO=1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). Our research interest is directed also towards the discovery of new MOFs, as well as adjusting the pore dimensions of MOFs, using different building blocks, solvent and solvent mixtures, in order to improve gas uptake and adsorption properties. Magnesium-based MOFs were found with the same network topology, very small pore size and selective adsorption behaviour. They show a guest-induced reversible structure transformation due to the flexibility of the Mg{sub 3}-cluster and the organic linkers. This effect could be used for fitting the pore sizes and for the increase of gas sorption capability in Mg contained MOFs after all. The hydrogen adsorption was also studied in several Al-based IRMOFs.

  2. Adsorption methods for hydrogen isotope storage on zeolite sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, Ioana; Cristescu, Ion; Vasut, Felicia; Brad, Sebastian; Lazar, Alin

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption molecular sieves and activated carbon were used for hydrogen isotopes. The adsorption process proceeds at liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen temperatures. The synthetic zeolites have similar properties as natural zeolites, but they have a regular pore structure and affinity for molecules of different size with defined shapes. Experimental results obtained at liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen temperatures evidenced the efficient behavior of the activated carbon and zeolite sieves for hydrogen isotope temporary storage. (authors)

  3. Synthesis of alumina nano-sheets via supercritical fluid technology with high uranyl adsorptive capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Yu; Jun Wang; Zhanshuang Li; Qi Liu; Milin Zhang; Hongbin Bai; Caishan Jiao; Jun Wang; Lianhe Liu

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide is beneficial to the synthesis of superior ultrafine and uniform materials due to its high chemical stability, low viscosity, high diffusivity, and 'zero' surface tension. γ-Alumina nano-sheets were obtained by a simple hydrothermal route in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide. XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM and nitrogen sorption isotherm were employed to characterize the samples. Alumina as-prepared has a high specific surface area of up to 200 ± 6 m 2 g -1 , which presents a high adsorption capacity (4.66 ± 0.02 mg g -1 ) for uranyl ions from aqueous solution. Furthermore, the adsorption process was found to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature. (authors)

  4. Study of high-pressure adsorption from supercritical fluids by the potential theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monsalvo, Matias Alfonso; Shapiro, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The multicomponent potential theory of adsorption (MPTA), which has been previously used to study low-pressure adsorption of subcritical fluids, is extended to adsorption equilibria from supercritical fluids up to high pressures. The MPTA describes an adsorbed phase as an inhomogeneous fluid...... the adsorbed and the gas phases. We have also evaluated the performance of the classical Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) EoS. The fluid-solid interactions are described by simple Dubinin-Radushkevich-Astakhov (DRA) potentials. In addition, we test the performance of the 10-4-3 Steele potential. It is shown...... that application of sPC-SAFT slightly improves the performance of the MPTA and that in spite of its simplicity, the DRA model can be considered as an accurate potential, especially, for mixture adsorption. We show that, for the sets of experimental data considered in this work, the MPTA is capable of predicting...

  5. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption on bimetallic PdAu(111) surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takehiro, Naoki; Liu, Ping; Bergbreiter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen on structurally well defined PdAu-Pd(111) monolayer surface alloys was investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical study, aiming at a quantitative understanding of the adsorption and desorption properties of individual PdAu nanostructures. Combining...... the structural information obtained by high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in particular on the abundance of specific adsorption ensembles at different Pd surface concentrations, with information on the adsorption properties derived from temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopy...... and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) provides conclusions on the minimum ensemble size for dissociative adsorption of hydrogen and on the adsorption energies on different sites active for adsorption. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations give detailed insight...

  7. Systematic investigations of peak deformations due to co-solvent adsorption in preparative supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenne, Emelie; Leek, Hanna; Klarqvist, Magnus; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2017-05-05

    Strangely shaped overloaded bands were recently reported using a standard supercritical fluid chromatographic system comprising a diol column as the stationary phase and carbon dioxide with methanol as the mobile phase. Some of these overloaded elution profiles appeared strongly deformed and even had "anti-Langmuirian" shapes although their solute compounds had "Langmuirian" adsorption. To obtain a more complete understanding of the generality of these effects, the investigation was expanded to cover also other common co-solvents, such as ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile, as well as various stationary phase materials, such as silica, and 2-ethylpyridine. From this expanded study it could be confirmed that the effects of deformed overloaded solute band shapes, due to co-solvent adsorption, is general phenomena in supercritical fluid chromatographic. It could also be concluded that these effects as well as previously observed "solvent effects" or "plug effects" are entirely due to competition between the solute and solvent molecules for the adsorption sites on the stationary phase surface. Finally, guidelines were given for how to evaluate the risk of deformations occurring for a given solvent-column combination, based simply on testing retention times of solutes and co-solvent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, E.; Desquines, J.; Baietto, M.C.; Coret, M.; Wehling, F.; Blat-Yrieix, M.; Ambard, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in zirconium alloys is considered in many nuclear safety issues. Below 500 Celsius degrees, rather limited knowledge is available on the combined hydrogen adsorption at the sample surface and diffusion in the metal. A modeling of hydrogen gaseous charging has been established starting with a set of relevant laws and parameters derived from open literature. Simulating the hydrogen charging process requires simultaneous analysis of gaseous surface adsorption, hydrogen solid-solution diffusion and precipitation, when exceeding the material solubility limit. The modeling has been extended to reproduce the solid-gas exchange. Gaseous charging experiments have been performed at 420 C. degrees on Stress Relieved Annealed (SRA) Zircaloy-4 cladding samples to validate the model. The sample hydrogen content has been systematically measured after charging and compared to the calculated value thus providing a validation of the adsorption modeling. Complementary tests have been carried out on Recrystallized Annealed (RXA) Zircaloy-4 rods to characterize the combined diffusion and adsorption process. The hydrogen concentration distribution has been characterized using an inverse technique based on destructive analyses of the samples. This additional set of data was relevant for the validation of the hydrogen combined adsorption/diffusion modeling up to 420 C. degrees. (authors)

  9. Adsorption of hydrogen and deuterium on modified molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Shi Jinsong; Wu Erdong; Li Xiongwei; Peng Lixia

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of hydrogen isotopes on 5A, ZSM-5 and their modified molecular sieves were studied at liquid nitrogen temperature with volumetric method. The effects of modification methods such as transition metal salt loading and ball milling on the adsorption behavior were discussed. It is observed that the adsorption amounts on the modified molecular sieves are reduced. but some modifications contribute to the separation between H 2 and D 2 . (authors)

  10. A density functional study on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An all-electron scalar relativistic calculation on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule onto small copper clusters has been performed by using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) at PW91 level. Our results reveal that after adsorption of H2 molecule, the Cu-Cu interaction is ...

  11. Adsorption methods for hydrogen isotope storage on zeolitic sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, Ioana; Cristescu, Ion; Vasut, F.; Brad, S.; Lazar, A.

    2001-01-01

    For hydrogen isotope separation, adsorption molecular sieves and active carbon were used. Adsorption process proceeds at liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen temperatures. Commercial zeolites have the same proprieties with natural zeolites, but they have a regular pore structure. They also have affinity for molecules of different size with defined shapes. Experimental results obtained at liquid nitrogen temperature (77.4 K) and liquid hydrogen revealed the efficient behaviour of the active carbon and zeolitic sieves for hydrogen isotopes temporary storage. We study adsorption of the synthetic zeolites in a wide range of temperatures and pressures and we used the molecular sieves 4A, 5A and active carbon. The 4A and 5A zeolites have a tridimensional structure with 11.4 A diameter. When the hydration water is eliminated, the material keeps a porous structure. The porous volume represents 45% from the zeolite mass for 4A and 5A sieves. The activation temperature of the zeolite and the carbon is very important for obtaining a high adsorption capacity. If the temperature used for activation is low, the structural water will be not eliminated and the adsorption capacity will be low. The excessive temperature will destroy the porous structure. The adsorption capacity for the hydrogen isotopes was calculated with the relation: A = V ads /m (cm 3 /g). The adsorption capacity and efficiency for the adsorbent materials, are given. Physical adsorption process of the hydrogen isotopes was carried out at liquid nitrogen temperature. The flux gas used in the adsorption system is composed of dry deuterium and protium. This mixture is cooled in liquid nitrogen and then is passed to the adsorbent getter at the same temperature (77.4 K). The gas flux in the adsorbent getter is 5 and 72 l/h (which correspond to 0.008 and 0.134 discharge velocity, respectively). (authors)

  12. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Ciudad Universitaria, Codigo Postal 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, L.F., E-mail: fernando@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arellano, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco. Avenida San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas Codigo Postal 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-06

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H{sub 2}). Nitrogen coverage was C{sub 8}N.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio; Magana, L.F.; Arellano, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H 2 ). Nitrogen coverage was C 8 N.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  15. Hydrogen Adsorption in Zeolite Studied with Sievert and Thermogravimetric Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnicenoks, P; Sivars, A; Grinberga, L; Kleperis, J

    2012-01-01

    Natural clinoptilolite (mixture from clinoptilolite, quartz and muscovite) is activated with palladium and tested for hydrogen adsorption capability at temperatures RT - 200°C. Thermogravimetric and volumetric methods showed that zeolite activated with palladium (1.25%wt) shows markedly high hydrogen adsorption capacity - up to 3 wt%. Lower amount of adsorbed hydrogen (∼1.5 wt%) was found for raw zeolite and activated with higher amount of palladium sample. Hypothesis is proposed that the heating of zeolite in argon atmosphere forms and activates the pore structure in zeolite material, where hydrogen encapsulation (trapping) is believed to occur when cooling down to room temperature. An effect of catalyst (Pd) on hydrogen sorption capability is explained by spillover phenomena were less-porous fractions of natural clinoptilolite sample (quartz and muscovite) are involved.

  16. Hydrogen adsorption on skeletal rhodium-tantalum electrodes-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsinstevich, V.M.; Krejnina, N.M.

    1975-01-01

    Skeleton rhodium-tantalic catalyst electrodes with a tantalum mass percentage of 0 to 100 have been obtained by the methodology of Crupp and others. The hydrogen adsorption is studied through the method of removing the galvano-static and potentiodynamic curves of charging in sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. It has been discovered that the maximum adsorption ability relatively to the hydrogen can be observed in an alloy with a 5% tantalum contents. The energetic characteristics of the alloys are higher in alkali than in acid

  17. Effect of Heating Method on Hydrogen Production by Biomass Gasification in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhui Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose as a test sample of biomass is gasified in supercritical water with different heating methods driven by renewable solar energy. The performance comparisons of hydrogen production of glucose gasification are investigated. The relations between temperature raising speed of reactant fluid, variation of volume fraction, combustion enthalpy, and chemical exergy of H2 of the product gases with reactant solution concentration are presented, respectively. The results show that the energy quality of product gases with preheating process is higher than that with no preheating unit for hydrogen production. Hydrogen production quantity and gasification rate of glucose decrease obviously with the increase of concentration of material in no preheating system.

  18. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  19. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  20. Enhancement of the dissolution rate and bioavailability of fenofibrate by a melt-adsorption method using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha KH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kwang-Ho Cha,1,3 Kyung-Jin Cho,3 Min-Soo Kim,4 Jeong-Soo Kim,3 Hee Jun Park,1,3 Junsung Park,1,3 Wonkyung Cho,1,3 Jeong-Sook Park,3 Sung-Joo Hwang1,21Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2College of Pharmacy, Yonsei University, Incheon, Republic of Korea; 3College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae, Republic of KoreaBackground: The aim of this study was to enhance the bioavailability of fenofibrate, a poorly water-soluble drug, using a melt-adsorption method with supercritical CO2.Methods: Fenofibrate was loaded onto Neusilin® UFL2 at different weight ratios of fenofibrate to Neusilin UFL2 by melt-adsorption using supercritical CO2. For comparison, fenofibrate-loaded Neusilin UFL2 was prepared by solvent evaporation and hot melt-adsorption methods. The fenofibrate formulations prepared were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder x-ray diffractometry, specific surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability were also investigated.Results: Fenofibrate was distributed into the pores of Neusilin UFL2 and showed reduced crystal formation following adsorption. Supercritical CO2 facilitated the introduction of fenofibrate into the pores of Neusilin UFL2. Compared with raw fenofibrate, fenofibrate from the prepared powders showed a significantly increased dissolution rate and better bioavailability. In particular, the area under the drug concentration-time curve and maximal serum concentration of the powders prepared using supercritical CO2 were 4.62-fold and 4.52-fold greater than the corresponding values for raw fenofibrate.Conclusion: The results of this study highlight the usefulness of the melt-adsorption method using supercritical CO2 for improving the bioavailability of fenofibrate.Keywords: fenofibrate

  1. A model for the physical adsorption of atomic hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruch, L.W.; Ruijgrok, Th.W.

    1979-01-01

    The formation of the holding potential of physical adsorption is studied with a model in which a hydrogen atom interacts with a perfectly imaging substrate bounded by a sharp planar surface; the exclusion of the atomic electron from the substrate is an important boundary condition in the model. The

  2. Relationship between carbon microstructure, adsorption energy and hydrogen adsorption capacity at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacek Jagiello; Matthias Thommes

    2005-01-01

    Various microporous materials such as activated carbons, nano-tubes, synthetic microporous carbons as well as metal organic framework materials are being considered for hydrogen storage applications by means of physical adsorption. To develop materials of practical significance for hydrogen storage it is important to understand the relationships between pore sizes, adsorption energies and adsorption capacities. The pore size distribution (PSD) characterization is traditionally obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 K. However, a portion of the pores accessible to H 2 may not be accessible to N 2 at this temperature. Therefore, it was recently proposed to use the DFT analysis of H 2 adsorption isotherms to characterize pore structure of materials considered for hydrogen storage applications. In present work, adsorption isotherms of H 2 and N 2 at cryogenic temperatures are used for the characterization of carbon materials. Adsorption measurements were performed with Autosorb 1 MP (Quantachrome Instruments, Boynton Beach, Florida, USA). As an example, Fig 1 compares PSDs calculated for the activated carbon sample (F400, Calgon Carbon) using combined H 2 and N 2 data, and using N 2 isotherm only. The nitrogen derived PSD does not include certain amount of micropores which are accessible to H 2 but not to N 2 molecules. Obviously, the difference in the calculated PSDs by the two methods will depend on the actual content of small micropores in a given sample. Carbon adsorption properties can also be characterized by the isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, related to the adsorption energy and dependent on the carbon pore/surface structure. Fig 2 shows Qst data calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation from H 2 isotherms measured at 77 K and 87 K for the carbon molecular sieve CMS 5A (Takeda), oxidized single wall nano-tubes (SWNT), and graphitized carbon black (Supelco). The Qst values decrease with increasing pore sizes. The

  3. A closer study of methanol adsorption and its impact on solute retentions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenne, Emelie; Öhlén, Kristina; Leek, Hanna; Klarqvist, Magnus; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2016-04-15

    Surface excess adsorption isotherms of methanol on a diol silica adsorbent were measured in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) using a mixture of methanol and carbon dioxide as mobile phase. The tracer pulse method was used with deuterium labeled methanol as solute and the tracer peaks were detected using APCI-MS over the whole composition range from neat carbon dioxide to neat methanol. The results indicate that a monolayer (4Å) of methanol is formed on the stationary phase. Moreover, the importance of using the set or the actual methanol fractions and volumetric flows in SFC was investigated by measuring the mass flow respective pressure and by calculations of the actual volume fraction of methanol. The result revealed a significant difference between the value set and the actually delivered volumetric methanol flow rate, especially at low modifier fractions. If relying only on the set methanol fraction in the calculations, the methanol layer thickness should in this system be highly overestimated. Finally, retention times for a set of solutes were measured and related to the findings summarized above concerning methanol adsorption. A strongly non-linear relationship between the logarithms of the retention factors and the modifier fraction in the mobile phase was revealed, prior to the established monolayer. At modifier fractions above that required for establishment of the methanol monolayer, this relationship turns linear which explains why the solute retention factors are less sensitive to changes in modifier content in this region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Durable antimicrobial finishing of cellulose with QSA silicone by supercritical adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yong; Niu Mengqi; Yuan Shu; Teng Hongni

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CO 2 -philic QAS silicone was synthesized through hydrosilylation and quaternization. ► QAS silicone was coated on cotton by adsorption from scCO 2 . ► The coating procedure did not need covalently bonding tethering groups. ► The coating provided potent biocidal activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. ► Antibacterial coating was very stable toward washing and UV irradiation. - Abstract: This study demonstrated a generic and simple approach to generate durable antibacterial ability on cellulose without using covalently bonding tethering groups that limit the structure design. CO 2 -philic silicone with quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) pendants was synthesized through hydrosilylation reaction of poly(methylhydrosiloxane) (PMHS) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate in the presence of platinum-based catalyst and subsequent quaternization with 1-bromohexane. The resultant QAS silicone was deposited onto cellulose by adsorption from supercritical CO 2 (scCO 2 ) to provide potent biocidal activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Presented data also showed that the antibacterial layer was very stable toward washing and UV irradiation owning to the low surface tension and relatively high bond energy of the backbone of silicone. This procedure is applicable to substrates of other shape and chemistry.

  5. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of alkaline black liquor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Changqing; Guo, Liejin; Chen, Yunan; Lu, Youjun [Xi' an Jiatong Univ. (China)

    2010-07-01

    Black liquor was gasified continuously in supercritical water successfully and the main gaseous products were H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} with little amount of CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The increase of the temperature and the decrease of the flow rate and black liquor concentration enhanced SCWG of black liquor. The change of the system pressure had limited influence on the gasification effect. The maximal COD removal efficiency of 88.69 % was obtained at the temperature of 600 C. The pH values of the aqueous residue were all decreased to the range of 6.4{proportional_to}8 while the pH value of cooling effluence below 360 C increased to about 11 and the sodium content was much higher than that in the aqueous residue. The reaction rate for COD degradation in supercritical water was obtained by assuming pseudo first order reaction. And the activation energy and pre-exponential for COD removal in SCWG were 74.38kJ/mol and 1.11 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1} respectively. (orig.)

  6. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  7. Modeling of biomass to hydrogen via the supercritical water pyrolysis process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divilio, R.J. [Combustion Systems Inc., Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A heat transfer model has been developed to predict the temperature profile inside the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor. A series of heat transfer tests were conducted on the University of Hawaii`s apparatus to calibrate the model. Results of the model simulations are shown for several of the heat transfer tests. Tests with corn starch and wood pastes indicated that there are substantial differences between the thermal properties of the paste compared to pure water, particularly near the pseudo critical temperature. The assumption of constant thermal diffusivity in the temperature range of 250 to 450 C gave a reasonable prediction of the reactor temperatures when paste is being fed. A literature review is presented for pyrolysis of biomass in water at elevated temperatures up to the supercritical range. Based on this review, a global reaction mechanism is proposed. Equilibrium calculations were performed on the test results from the University of Hawaii`s Supercritical Water Reactor when corn starch and corn starch and wood pastes were being fed. The calculations indicate that the data from the reactor falls both below and above the equilibrium hydrogen concentrations depending on test conditions. The data also indicates that faster heating rates may be beneficial to the hydrogen yield. Equilibrium calculations were also performed to examine the impact of wood concentration on the gas mixtures produced. This calculation showed that increasing wood concentrations favors the formation of methane at the expense of hydrogen.

  8. Surface modification of chitin using ultrasound-assisted and supercritical CO{sub 2} technologies for cobalt adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotto, Guilherme L., E-mail: guilherme_dotto@yahoo.com.br; Cunha, Jeanine M., E-mail: jeaninecunha@gmail.com; Calgaro, Camila O., E-mail: camila.itepjr@gmail.com; Tanabe, Eduardo H., E-mail: edutanabe@yahoo.com.br; Bertuol, Daniel A., E-mail: dbertuol@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Chitin was modified by ultrasound-assisted (UA) and supercritical (SCO{sub 2}) technologies. • Chitin, UA-chitin and SCO{sub 2}-chitin were used as adsorbents for Co(II). • UA and SCO{sub 2} treatments provided increase of 20 and 3 times in chitin surface area. • The Co(II) adsorption capacity increased until 67.8%, using UA-chitin. - Abstract: Ultrasound-assisted (UA) and supercritical CO{sub 2} technologies (SCO{sub 2}) were used to modify the chitin surface and, improve its adsorption characteristics regarding to cobalt. Chitin, before and after the treatments, was characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms (BET), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Unmodified and surface modified chitins were used as adsorbents to remove cobalt from aqueous solutions. The adsorption study was performed by equilibrium isotherms and kinetic curves. The chitin particle characteristics, such as, surface area, pore volume and porosity were improved by the UA and SCO{sub 2} treatments. The crystallinity index decreased after the UA and SCO{sub 2} treatments, and also, intense surface modifications were observed. Langmuir and Freundlich models were adequate to represent the adsorption equilibrium. The maximum adsorption capacities were 50.03, 83.94 and 63.08 mg g{sup −1} for unmodified chitin, UA surface modified chitin and SCO{sub 2} surface modified chitin. The adsorption kinetic curves were well represented by the pseudo-second order model. UA and SCO{sub 2} technologies are alternatives to modify the chitin surface and improve its adsorption characteristics.

  9. A laboratory study of supercritical CO2 adsorption on cap rocks in the geological storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedli, Hedi; Jbara, Abdessalem; Hedfi, Hachem; Bouzgarrou, Souhail; Slimi, Khalifa

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, various cap rocks have been experimentally reacted in water with supercritical CO2 in geological storage conditions ( P = 8 × 106 Pa and T = 80 °C) for 25 days. To characterize the potential CO2-water-rock interactions, an experimental setup has been built to provide additional information concerning the effects of structure, thermal and surface characteristics changes due to CO2 injection with cap rocks. In addition, CO2 adsorption capacities of different materials (i.e., clay evaporate and sandstone) are measured. These samples were characterized by XRD technique. The BET specific surface area was determined by nitrogen isotherms. In addition, thermal characteristics of untreated adsorbents were analyzed via TGA method and topography surfaces are identified by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Taking into account pressure and temperature, the physical as well as chemical mechanisms of CO2 retention were determined. Isotherm change profiles of samples for relative pressure range indicate clearly that CO2 was adsorbed in different quantities. In accordance with the X-ray diffraction, a crystalline phase was formed due to the carbonic acid attack and precipitation of some carbonate.

  10. One-pot reduction of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural via hydrogen transfer from supercritical methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Søndergaard; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic conversion of HMF to valuable chemicals was achieved over a Cu-doped porous metal oxide in supercritical methanol. The hydrotalcite catalyst precursor is prepared following simple synthetic procedures, using inexpensive and earth-abundant starting materials in aqueous solutions. The hyd......Catalytic conversion of HMF to valuable chemicals was achieved over a Cu-doped porous metal oxide in supercritical methanol. The hydrotalcite catalyst precursor is prepared following simple synthetic procedures, using inexpensive and earth-abundant starting materials in aqueous solutions....... The hydrogen equivalents needed for the reductive deoxygenation of HMF originate from the solvent itself upon its reforming. Dimethylfuran, dimethyltetrahydrofuran and 2-hexanol were obtained in good yields. At milder reaction temperatures, a combined yield (DMF + DMTHF) of 58% was achieved. Notably...

  11. Non-catalytic transfer hydrogenation in supercritical CO2 for coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhussien, Hussien

    This thesis presents the results of the investigation on developing and evaluating a low temperature (coal dissolution in supercritical CO2. The main idea behind the thesis was that one hydrogen atom from water and one hydrogen atom from the hydrogen transfer agent (HTA) were used to hydrogenate the coal. The products of coal dissolution were non-polar and polar while the supercritical CO2, which enhanced the rates of hydrogenation and dissolution of the non-polar molecules and removal from the reaction site, was non-polar. The polar modifier (PM) for CO2 was added to the freed to aid in the dissolution and removal of the polar components. The addition of a phase transfer agent (PTA) allowed a seamless transport of the ions and by-product between the aqueous and organic phases. DDAB, used as the PTA, is an effective phase transfer catalyst and showed enhancement to the coal dissolution process. COAL + DH- +H 2O → COAL.H2 + DHO-- This process has a great feature due to the fact that the chemicals were obtained without requir-ing to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The experiments were conducted in a unique reactor set up that can be connected through two lines. one line to feed the reactor with supercritical CO 2 and the other connected to gas chromatograph. The use of the supercritical CO2 enhanced the solvent option due to the chemical extraction, in addition to the low environmental impact and energy cost. In this thesis the experiment were conducted at five different temperatures from atmos-pheric to 140°C, 3000 - 6000 psi with five component of feed mixture, namely water, HTA, PTA, coal, and PM in semi batch vessels reactor system with a volume of 100 mL. The results show that the chemicals were obtained without requiring to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The results show that the conversion was found to be 91.8% at opti-mum feed mixtures values of 3, 1.0 and 5.4 for water: PM

  12. Relationship between carbon microstructure, adsorption energy and hydrogen adsorption capacity at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagiello, J.; Thommes, M.

    2005-01-01

    Various microporous materials such as activated carbons, nano-tubes, synthetic micro-porous carbons as well as metal organic framework materials are being considered for hydrogen storage applications by means of physical adsorption. To develop materials of practical significance for hydrogen storage it is important to understand the relationships between pore sizes, adsorption energies and adsorption capacities. The pore size distribution (PSD) characterization is traditionally obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 K. However, a portion of the pores accessible to H 2 may not be accessible to N 2 at this temperature. Therefore, it was recently proposed to use the DFT analysis of H 2 adsorption isotherms to characterize pore structure of materials considered for hydrogen storage applications [1]. In present work, adsorption isotherms of H 2 and N 2 at cryogenic temperatures are used for the characterization of carbon materials. Adsorption measurements were performed with Autosorb 1 MP [Quantachrome Instruments, Boynton Beach, Florida, USA]. As an example, Fig 1 compares PSDs calculated for the activated carbon sample (F400, Calgon Carbon) using combined H 2 and N 2 data, and using N 2 isotherm only. The nitrogen derived PSD does not include certain amount of micro-pores which are accessible to H 2 but not to N 2 molecules. Obviously, the difference in the calculated PSDs by the two methods will depend on the actual content of small micro-pores in a given sample. Carbon adsorption properties can also be characterized by the isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, related to the adsorption energy and dependent on the carbon pore/surface structure. Fig 2 shows Qst data calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation from H 2 isotherms measured at 77 K and 87 K for the carbon molecular sieve CMS 5A (Takeda), oxidized single wall nano-tubes (SWNT) [2], and graphitized carbon black (Supelco). The Qst values decrease with increasing pore

  13. Effects of basic nitrogen poisoning on adsorption of hydrogen on a hydrotreatment catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entz, R.W.; Seapan, M.

    1985-01-01

    Activity of a hydrotreatment catalyst depends on the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the catalyst. In this work, the adsorption of hydrogen on a Ni-Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst (shell 324) has been studied using a TGA at 1 atm pressure and 200-400 0 C temperature. Hydrogen adsorption on a calcined catalyst was shown to be of activated type with a sudden increase in hydrogen adsorption around 350 0 C. When the catalyst is extracted with Tetrahydrofuran (THF), the hydrogen adsorption increases gradually as the temperature is increased, approaching a monolayer coverage of the catalyst surface. It is shown that solvent extraction of catalyst changes its hydrogen adsorption characteristics significantly. Indeed, at 400 0 C, an extracted catalyst adsorbs about four times more hydrogen than an unextracted catalyst. Adsorption of basic nitrogen compounds on the catalyst interferes with the hydrogen adsorption. The adsorption of pyridine, piperidine, n-pentylamine, and ammonia were studied at 400 0 C. It is shown that the strength of adsorption of piperidine and n-pentylamine are relatively similar, however their adsorption strength is higher than pyridine. Ammonia is the weakest adsorbing compound studied. These observations are in agreement with other studies

  14. Hydrogen production from high-moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Adschiri, T.; Ekbom, T. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming methane at elevated pressures. The goal of this research is to develop commercial processes for the catalytic steam reforming of biomass and other organic wastes at high pressures. This approach avoids the high cost of gas compression and takes advantage of the unique properties of water at high pressures. Prior to this year the authors reported the ability of carbon to catalyze the decomposition of biomass and related model compounds in supercritical water. The product gas consists of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and traces of higher hydrocarbons. During the past year the authors have: (a) developed a method to extend the catalyst life, (b) begun studies of the role of the shift reaction, (c) completed studies of carbon dioxide absorption from the product effluent by high pressure water, (d) measured the rate of carbon catalyst gasification in supercritical water, (e) discovered the pumpability of oil-biomass slurries, and (f) completed the design and begun fabrication of a flow reactor that will steam reform whole biomass feedstocks (i.e. sewage sludge) and produce a hydrogen rich synthesis gas at very high pressure (>22 MPa).

  15. Supercritical CO2 Assisted Synthesis of EDTA-Fe3O4 Nanocomposite with High Adsorption Capacity for Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Bisht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of EDTA functionalized nanoparticles in adsorption of chromium (VI from water was investigated in this study. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs were synthesized by a simple chemical coprecipitation route and EDTA coating onto IONPs was attained via supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc CO2, a technology with green sustainable properties. The obtained nanoparticles were then characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and vibrating magnetometric analysis (VSM. The synthesized nanoparticle and its modified variant were evaluated as adsorbent for chromium (VI removal from water through batch adsorption technique and the effect of analytic concentration; contact time and adsorbent concentration were studied at pH 2. The results showed higher removal efficiency for modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs (i.e., 99.9% than their nonmodified variant IONPs, that is, 34.06% for the same concentration after 18 hours of incubation. Also maximum adsorption capacity (qe = 452.26 mg/g of MIONPs attained can be related to their preparation in Sc CO2 as qe calculated from IONPs, that is, 170.33 mg/g, is lower than that of MIONPs. The adsorption data fit well with Freundlich isotherm equation while kinetic adsorption studies of chromium (VI were modeled by pseudo-second-order model.

  16. A green synthetic approach to graphene nanosheets for hydrogen adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Wenhui; Li Baoqing; Li Li

    2011-01-01

    A green and facile strategy of preparing graphene by reducing exfoliated graphite oxide (GO) with glucose was developed in this study. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM). The characterization results indicated that the graphene sheets (GS) were of high quality with smooth surface, rich pore structure and few layer graphene. The samples have a BET specific surface area of 1205.8 m 2 g -1 measured by N 2 adsorption at 77 K. The hydrogen storage capacity of 2.7 wt.% at 298 K and 25 bar demonstrated that the as-prepared graphene employing glucose as reductant is supposed to be a promising material with outstanding property for hydrogen storage.

  17. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of wastewater from food waste treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Gu [Korea Institute of Energy Research (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Korean food wastes have high moisture content (more than 85 wt%) and their major treatment processes such as drying or biological fermentations generate concentrated organic wastewater (CODs of about 100,000 mgO{sub 2}/L). For obtaining both wastewater treatment and hydrogen production from renewable resources, supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of the organic wastewater was carried out in this work. The effect of catalyst, reaction temperature, and reactor residence time on COD destruction and composition of gas products was examined. As a result, a SCWG of the wastewater over Ni- Y/activated charcoal at 700 C, 28 MPa yielded 99 % COD destruction and hydrogen-rich gas production (45 vol% H{sub 2}). A liquid-phase thermal pretreatment to destroy solid particles from the wastewater was proposed for more effective operation of the SCWG system. (orig.)

  18. Dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate-hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, A.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Direct dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) has been attempted. The effects of TBP concentration and pressure on the extraction of uranium have been studied. Addition of hydrogen peroxide in the modifier enhances the dissolution/extraction of uranium. (author)

  19. Adsorption removal of hydrogen sulfide gas. IV. Characteristics of adsorbents for the adsorption removal of hydrogen sulfide gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boki, K

    1974-10-25

    The amount of hydrogen sulfide gas adsorbed was affected by the surface properties (surface pH, acid strength, acid amount, and basic amount), the surface structure (pore volume), and the surface form (scanning electron microscopic observation) of 32 tested adsorbents. In general, the amount adsorption increased in the following order, amount of H/sub 2/S adsorbed on the silicate adsorbents, on the active carbon adsorbents, and on the zeolite adsorbents. The amount of H/sub 2/S adsorbed on magnesium silicate and silica gel adsorbents was mainly affected by the surface structure, and the amount adsorbed on the aluminum silicate adsorbents was affected by the distinctions on the surface forms of the adsorbents. The amount of H/sub 2/S adsorbed on 10 kinds of active carbon was determined by the surface properties and the surface structures of the adsorbents. The amount adsorbed on 12 kinds of zeolites was determined by either the surface properties or by the surface structures of the adsorbents. The amount of H/sub 2/S adsorbed on the silicate, active carbon, and zeolite adsorbents interacted with the heat of adsorption, and among the same kinds of adsorbents, the amount adsorbed was linearly related to the heat of adsorption.

  20. Kinetics of hydrogen adsorption on MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rather, Sami ullah, E-mail: rathersami@gmail.com; Taimoor, Aqeel Ahmad; Muhammad, Ayyaz; Alhamed, Yahia Abobakor; Zaman, Sharif Fakhruz; Ali, Arshid Mahmood

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption comparisons of commercial, milled, and MgH{sub 2} composite. • Hydrogen adsorption capacity and kinetics improves tremendously by CNT embedding. • Unsteady state modeling and simulation of adsorption kinetics. - Abstract: Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2})–carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite has been prepared by high-energy ball milling method and their experimental and kinetic hydrogen adsorption studies was assessed. Hydrogen adsorption studies were performed by Sievert’s volumetric apparatus and kinetic evaluation was conducted by surface chemistry and Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW) type mode. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were performed. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of commercial MgH{sub 2}, milled MgH{sub 2}, and MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite are found to be 0.04, 0.057, and 0.059 g (H{sub 2})/g (MgH{sub 2}) at 673 K and hydrogen pressure of 4.6 MPa. Addition of 5 wt% of CNTs to MgH{sub 2} proved to be very critical to enhance hydrogen adsorption as well as to improve its kinetics. It was observed that hydrogen adsorption is not in quasi-state equilibrium and is modeled using kinetic rate laws.

  1. Hydrogenation of Anthracene in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent Using Ni Supported on Hβ-Zeolite Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Aly Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of anthracene was studied over Ni supported on Hβ-zeolite catalyst under supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2 solvent. Hydrogenation of anthracene in sc-CO2 yielded 100% conversion at 100 °C, which is attributed to the reduced mass transfer limitations, and increased solubility of H2 and substrate in the reaction medium. The total pressure of 7 MPa was found to be optimum for high selectivity of octahydroanthracene (OHA. The conversion and selectivity for OHA increased with an increase in H2 partial pressure, which is attributed to higher concentration of hydrogen atoms at higher H2 pressures. The selectivity reduced the pressure below 7 MPa because of enhanced desorption of the tetrahydro-molecules and intermediates from Ni active sites, due to higher solubility of the surface species in sc-CO2. The selectivity of OHA increased with the increase in catalyst weight and reaction time. The rate of hydrogenation of anthracene was compared with that found for napthalene and phenanthrene. The use of acetonitrile as co-solvent or expanded liquid with CO2 decreased the catalytic activity.

  2. Benzene adsorption and hydrogenation on Pd-Ru alloy by pulse chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrokhotov, V.G.; Pavlova, L.F.; Gryaznov, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Pulse chromatography has been applied to investigate benzene adsorption and hydrogenation on the Walls of a capillary of the Pd-6% Ru alloy at different hydrogen contents in the alloy and various methods of hydrogen supply: as a mixture with benzene vapors or by diffusion through the walls of the capillary. It is stated that reversible adsorption of benzene vapors on the Pd-6% Ru alloy at 303 K under the conditions of the β-phase existence in the alloy-hydrogen system does not change whereas in the region of the α-phase existence it slightly increases with a growth of hydrogen pressure. Strongly adsorbed benzene occupies approximately 7% of the surface. Only strongly adsorbed benzene is hydrogenated on the α-phase of the alloy-hydrogen system. Hydrogen supply to the hydrogenation zone by diffusion throUgh the alloy results in supersaturation of the surface active in the reaction of benzene hydrogenation with a chemisorbed hydrogen form

  3. Effect of controlled deactivation on the thermochemical characteristics of hydrogen adsorption on skeletal nickel from sodium hydroxide-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozorov, D. A.; Lukin, M. V.; Ulitin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Differential heats of adsorption in a wide range of surface coverage and maximum amounts of adsorbed hydrogen are determined by adsorption calorimetry on partially deactivated skeletal nickel from aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide. The effect of the composition of solutions on the values of limiting adsorption and adsorption equilibria of individual forms of hydrogen is shown.

  4. Adsorption of ethyl acetate onto modified clays and its regeneration with supercritical CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Cavalcante

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Modified clays were used to remove ethyl acetate from aqueous solutions. These clays were regenerated using supercritical CO2. Structural changes in the montmorillonite clay after treatment with quaternary amines were studied. The surface properties of the modified clay changed from highly hydrophilic to highly organophilic. The clay was regenerated by percolation of a stream of CO2 through the porous montmorillonite matrix. Different pressures and temperatures were employed, resulting in different fluid conditions (gas, liquid, and supercritical. The experimental data was fitted with a simplified model. The best desorption result was found under supercritical conditions. A crossover effect was observed. The capacity of the modified clay as a pollutant attenuator remained almost unchanged after a regeneration cycle.

  5. Effect of nitrogen doping of graphene oxide on hydrogen and hydroxyl adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung [Daegu University, Kyungsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We investigate how nitrogen-doping affects the hydrogen (H) and the hydroxyl (OH) adsorption on graphene oxide (GO) and on nitrogen-doped GO (NGO) via pseudopotential plane wave density functional calculations within the local spin density approximation. We find that the nitrogen doping brings about drastic changes in the hydrogen and the hydroxyl adsorption energetics, but its effects depend sensitively on the nitrogen configuration in NGO. The H and the OH adsorption energies are comparable only for pyrrolic NGO. In GO and quarternary NGO, the H adsorption energy is greater than the OH adsorption energy while the trend is reversed in pyridinic NGO. Also, the OH adsorption process is less affected by nitrogen-doping than the H adsorption is.

  6. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen and power production by supercritical water reforming of glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galera, S.; Gutiérrez Ortiz, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The environmental performance of the supercritical water reforming (SCWR) of glycerol was assessed. • Biogenic CO 2 emissions allowed quantifying a realistic GHG inventory of 3.8 kg CO 2 -eq/kg H 2 . • The environmental profile of SCWR process was compared to those of other technologies. • A good environmental performance of H 2 and power production by SCWR of glycerol was obtained. - Abstract: The environmental performance of hydrogen and electricity production by supercritical water reforming (SCWR) of glycerol was evaluated following a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. The heat-integrated process was designed to be energy self-sufficient. Mass and energy balances needed for the study were performed using Aspen Plus 8.4, and the environmental assessment was carried out through SimaPro 8.0. CML 2000 was selected as the life cycle impact assessment method, considering as impact categories the global warming, ozone layer depletion, abiotic depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, eutrophication, acidification, and cumulative energy demand. A distinction between biogenic and fossil CO 2 emissions was done to quantify a more realistic GHG inventory of 3.77 kg CO 2 -eq per kg H 2 produced. Additionally, the environmental profile of SCWR process was compared to other H 2 production technologies such as steam methane reforming, carbon gasification, water electrolysis and dark fermentation among others. This way, it is shown that SCWR of glycerol allows reducing greenhouse gas emissions and obtaining a favorable positive life cycle energy balance, achieving a good environmental performance of H 2 and power production by SCWR of glycerol

  7. A DFT study of hydrogen adsorption on Be, Mg and Ca frameworks in erionite zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellah, Mehmet Ferdi, E-mail: mferdi.fellah@btu.edu.tr

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Mg-ERI and Ca-ERI clusters have much lower chemical potential and hardness. • Adsorption enthalpies for Mg- and Ca-ERI are importantly greater than the liquefaction enthalpy of hydrogen. • Mg-ERI and Ca-ERI clusters have much HOMO-LUMO gap indicating higher reactivity. • Ca- and Mg-ERI are potential cryoadsorbent materials for hydrogen storage. - Abstract: The molecular hydrogen adsorption was investigated on additional frameworks with earth alkaline metal atoms (Be, Mg and Ca) in 24T ERI zeolite cluster model by means of Density Functional Theory study. HOMO and LUMO energy values, chemical potential, chemical hardness, electronegativity, adsorption energy and adsorption enthalpy values have been calculated in this study. Mg-ERI and Ca-ERI clusters have much lower chemical potentials with much lower adsorption energy values when compared to the value of Be-ERI cluster. Additionally, they are softer than Be-ERI cluster with respect to their lower chemical hardness values. Hydrogen adsorption enthalpy values were computed as −3.6 and −3.9 kJ/mol on Mg-ERI and Ca-ERI clusters, respectively. These adsorption enthalpy values are significantly larger than the enthalpy value of liquefaction for hydrogen molecule. This consequently specifies that Mg-ERI and Ca-ERI zeolite structures which have higher chemical reactivity appear to be a promising candidate cryoadsorbent for hydrogen storage.

  8. Direct measurements of adsorption heats of hydrogen on nano-porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akihiko Matsumoto; Kazumasa Yamamoto; Tomoyuki Miyata

    2005-01-01

    Since a exciting report of hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nano-tubes by Dillon and his colleagues, nano-porous carbon materials, such as carbon nano-tubes, carbon nano-horns and micro-porous activated carbon, have attracted considerable attention as hydrogen storage materials. Adsorption plays a predominating role in the hydrogen storage process on solid surfaces. The adsorption is a spontaneous process, which is caused by interaction between gas molecules and surface, hence, it is always exothermic process and observed as adsorption heats. For this reason, direct measurement of the adsorption heats by adsorption micro-calorimetry would provide quantitative information on the strength of adsorption interaction and the adsorption mechanism. However, the adsorption amounts of hydrogen on carbon materials are far less than those of condensable vapors near room temperature due to low critical temperature of hydrogen (33.2 K), therefore, the adsorption heats can not be determined accurately at conventional measurement conditions near room temperature and the atmospheric pressure. This contribution reports the calorimetric characterization of hydrogen adsorption on nano-porous carbon materials at low temperature and high-pressure conditions. The high-pressure adsorption apparatus consists of a volumetric adsorption line connected to a twin-conduction type microcalorimeter. Activated carbon fibers (ACF, Ad'all Co.) of different micro-pore sizes (Table 1) were used as model adsorbents. Each ACF has slit-shaped micropores of uniform size. The adsorption isotherms and differential heats of adsorption at high-pressure region from 0 to 10 MPa were simultaneously measured at isothermal condition from 203 to 298 K. The adsorption isotherms on ACF were of Henry type regardless of adsorption temperature and pore width; the uptakes increased linearly with equilibrium pressure. The adsorption isotherm at lower sorption temperature tended to show higher sorptivity. The

  9. Direct measurements of adsorption heats of hydrogen on nano-porous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akihiko, Matsumoto; Kazumasa, Yamamoto; Tomoyuki, Miyata

    2005-01-01

    Since a exciting report of hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nano-tubes by Dillon and his colleagues [1], nano-porous carbon materials, such as carbon nano-tubes, carbon nano-horns and micro-porous activated carbon, have attracted considerable attention as hydrogen storage materials. Adsorption plays a predominating role in the hydrogen storage process on solid surfaces. The adsorption is a spontaneous process, which is caused by interaction between gas molecules and surface, hence, it is always exothermic process and observed as adsorption heats. For this reason, direct measurement of the adsorption heats by adsorption microcalorimetry would provide quantitative information on the strength of adsorption interaction and the adsorption mechanism. However, the adsorption amounts of hydrogen on carbon materials are far less than those of condensable vapors near room temperature due to low critical temperature of hydrogen (33.2 K), therefore, the adsorption heats can not be determined accurately at conventional measurement conditions near room temperature and the atmospheric pressure. This contribution reports the calorimetric characterization of hydrogen adsorption on nano-porous carbon materials at low temperature and high-pressure conditions. The high-pressure adsorption apparatus consists of a volumetric adsorption line connected to a twin-conduction type microcalorimeter. Activated carbon fibers (ACF, Ad'all Co.) of different micropore sizes (Table 1) were used as model adsorbents. Each ACF has slit-shaped micropores of uniform size [2]. The adsorption isotherms and differential heats of adsorption at high-pressure region from 0 to 10 MPa were simultaneously measured at isothermal condition from 203 to 298 K. The adsorption isotherms on ACF were of Henry type regardless of adsorption temperature and pore width; the uptakes increased linearly with equilibrium pressure. The adsorption isotherm at lower sorption temperature tended to show higher sorptivity

  10. Assessment of hydrogen bonding effect on ionization of water from ambient to supercritical region–MD simulation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiatla-Wojcik, D.; Mozumder, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based, strategy to analyze how the degree of hydrogen bonding may influence the ionization and dissociation of water upon heating from ambient to supercritical temperatures. Calculations show a negligible change in the ionization energy up to 200 °C. At higher temperatures the ionization energy increases due to the decreasing degree of hydrogen bonding. The influence of density (pressure) is pronounced in the supercritical region. The ionization is more energy consuming in the less dense fluid. We also show that high temperature and low density may promote dissociation of the electronically excited water molecules. Implications on the initial radiation chemical yields of the hydrated electron, hydrogen atom and hydroxyl radical are discussed. - Highlights: • Up to 200 °C changes in the vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials are negligible. • At higher temperatures ionization is more energy consuming. • Ionization potential increases with decreasing density of supercritical water. • High temperature and low density promote dissociation of the excited molecules

  11. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption in carbon nanotube systems and its mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, M.; Takenobu, T.; Ata, M. [Materials Laboratories, SONY Corporation, Shin-Sakuragaoka 2-1-1, Hodogaya-ku, 240-0036, Yokohama (Japan); Kataura, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, 192-0397, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-04-01

    The hydrogen physisorption properties in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based materials were characterized. The SWNTs were highly purified and three useful pores for hydrogen physisorption were activated. Hydrogen was physisorbed in intra-tube pores at room temperature and the capacity was estimated to be about 0.3-0.4 wt. % at room temperature. The adsorption capacity can be explained by the Langmuir model. The intra-tube pores have large adsorption potential and this induces hydrogen physisorption at comparatively higher temperatures. This fact indicates the importance of fabricating sub-nanometer ordered pores for this phenomena. (orig.)

  12. Atomic hydrogen and oxygen adsorptions in single-walled zigzag silicon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Haoliang; Ray, Asok K.

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been performed to study the electronic and geometric structure properties of zigzag silicon nanotubes. Full geometry and spin optimizations have been performed without any symmetry constraints with an all electron 3-21G* basis set and the B3LYP hybrid functional. The largest zigzag SiNT studied here, (12, 0), has a binding energy per atom of 3.584 eV. Atomic hydrogen and oxygen adsorptions on (9, 0) and (10, 0) nanotubes have also been studied by optimizing the distances of the adatoms from both inside and outside the tube. The adatom is initially placed in four adsorption sites-parallel bridge (PB), zigzag bridge (ZB), hollow, and on-top site. The on-top site is the most preferred site for hydrogen atom adsorbed on (9, 0), with an adsorption energy of 3.0 eV and an optimized distance of 1.49 Å from the adatom to the nearest silicon atom. For oxygen adsorption on (9, 0), the most preferred site is the ZB site, with an adsorption energy of 5.987 eV and an optimized distance of 1.72 Å. For atomic hydrogen adsorption on (10, 0), the most preferred site is also the on-top site with an adsorption energy of 3.174 eV and an optimized distance of 1.49 Å. For adsorption of atomic oxygen on (10, 0), the most preferred site is PB site, with an adsorption energy of 6.306 eV and an optimized distance of 1.71 Å. The HOMO–LUMO gaps of (9, 0) after adsorptions of hydrogen and oxygen atoms decrease while the HOMO–LUMO gaps of (10, 0) increase after adsorption of hydrogen and oxygen

  13. The effect of atomic hydrogen adsorption on single-walled carbon nano tubes properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, S.; Majidi, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the adsorption of hydrogen atoms on metallic single-walled carbon nano tubes using ab initio molecular dynamics method. It was found that the geometric structures and the electronic properties of hydrogenated SWNTs can be strongly changed by varying hydrogen coverage. The circular cross sections of the CNTs were changed with different hydrogen coverage. When hydrogen is chemisorbed on the surface of the carbon nano tube, the energy gap will be appeared. This is due to the degree of the Sp 3 hybridization, and the hydrogen coverage can control the band gap of the carbon nano tube

  14. A novel technique for hydrogen production from hog-manure in supercritical partial oxidation (SCWPO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youssef, Emhemmed A.; Charpentier, Paul [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Nakhla, George [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering; Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the catalytic hydrogen production from hog manure using supercritical water partial oxidation was investigated in a batch reactor at a temperature of 500 C, and pressure of 28 MPa using several metallic catalysts. Hog manure was characterized by a total and soluble chemical oxygen demand (TCOD, SCOD) of 57000 and 28000 mg/L, total and volatile suspended solids (TSS, VSS) of 25000, 19000, and ammonia of 2400 mg/L, respectively. The order of H{sub 2} production was the following: Pd/AC > Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Ru/AC > AC > NaOH. The order of COD reduction efficiency was as follows: NaOH > Ru/AC > AC > Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pd/AC. The behaviour of the volatile fatty acids (VFA's), ethanol, methanol, ammonia, H{sub 2}S, and Sulfate was investigated experimentally and discussed. A 35 % reduction in the H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} yields was observed in the sequential gasification partial oxidation (oxidant at an 80 % of theoretical requirement) experiments compared to the gasification experiments (catalyst only). Moreover, this reduction in gas yields was coincided with a 45 % reduction in the liquid effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), 60 % reduction of the ammonia concentration in the liquid effluent, and 20 % reduction in the H{sub 2}S concentration in the effluent gas. (orig.)

  15. Experimental Adsorption Isotherm of Methane onto Activated Carbon at Sub- and Supercritical Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Kazi Afzalur

    2010-11-11

    This paper presents the experimentally measured adsorption isotherm data for methane onto the pitch-based activated carbon type Maxsorb III for temperatures ranging from (120 to 220) K and pressures up to 1.4 MPa. These data are useful to study adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage systems when the low temperature natural gas regasified from the liquid phase is considered to charge in the storage chamber. Adsorption parameters were evaluated from the isotherm data using the Tóth and Dubinin-Astakhov models. The isosteric heat of adsorption, which is concentration- and temperature-dependent, is extracted from the data. The Henry\\'s law coefficients for the methane/Maxsorb III pairs are evaluated at various temperatures. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of hydrogen adsorption on aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mee Kyung [Bioinformatics and Molecular Design Research Center, B138A, Yonsei Engineering Research Complex, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); No, Kyoung Tai [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea)

    2009-03-15

    The hydrogen adsorption simulations were carried for several model AlPOs (VPI-5, AlPO-5, AlPO-11 and AlPO-25) employing the Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations at 77 K to investigate the effect of pore size and the pore volume on the hydrogen uptake. The adsorption capacity showed no relationship with the pore size, surface area and micropore volume of AlPOs. However, the adsorption capacity per unit micropore volume increased as the pore size decreases. The heat of adsorption also increased as the pore size decreases. For all model AlPOs, the hydrogen exists homogeneously near the oxygen atoms in the framework. (author)

  17. Adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate on granular activated carbon from date pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzougui, Z.; Nedjah, S.; Azoudj, Y.; Addoun, F. [Laboratoire d' etude physic-chimique des materiaux et application a l' environnement, Faculte de Chimie, USTHB (Algeria)], E-mail: zmerzougi@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Activated carbons, thanks to their versatility, are being used in the water treatment sector to absorb pollutants. Several factors influence the adsorption capacity of activated carbon and the aim of this study was to assess the effects of the porous texture and chemical nature of activated carbons on the adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate. Activated carbons used in this study were prepared from date pits with ZnCl2, KOH and H3PO4 by carbonization without adjuvant and adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate was conducted at 298K. Results showed that activated carbons prepared from date pits have a great potential for removing organic and inorganic pollutants from water and that the adsorption potential depends on the degree of activation of the activated carbons and on the compounds to absorb. This study highlighted that an increase of the carbon surface area and porosity results in a better adsorption capacity.

  18. Simulation of Oxygen Disintegration and Mixing With Hydrogen or Helium at Supercritical Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Taskinoglu, Ezgi

    2012-01-01

    The simulation of high-pressure turbulent flows, where the pressure, p, is larger than the critical value, p(sub c), for the species under consideration, is relevant to a wide array of propulsion systems, e.g. gas turbine, diesel, and liquid rocket engines. Most turbulence models, however, have been developed for atmospheric-p turbulent flows. The difference between atmospheric-p and supercritical-p turbulence is that, in the former situation, the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamics is moderate to negligible, but for the latter it is very significant, and can dominate the flow characteristics. The reason for this stems from the mathematical form of the equation of state (EOS), which is the perfect-gas EOS in the former case, and the real-gas EOS in the latter case. For flows at supercritical pressure, p, the large eddy simulation (LES) equations consist of the differential conservation equations coupled with a real-gas EOS. The equations use transport properties that depend on the thermodynamic variables. Compared to previous LES models, the differential equations contain not only the subgrid scale (SGS) fluxes, but also new SGS terms, each denoted as a correction. These additional terms, typically assumed null for atmospheric pressure flows, stem from filtering the differential governing equations, and represent differences between a filtered term and the same term computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In particular, the energy equation contains a heat-flux correction (q-correction) that is the difference between the filtered divergence of the heat flux and the divergence of the heat flux computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In a previous study, there was only partial success in modeling the q-correction term, but in this innovation, success has been achieved by using a different modeling approach. This analysis, based on a temporal mixing layer Direct Numerical Simulation database, shows that the focus in modeling the q

  19. Experimental Adsorption Isotherm of Methane onto Activated Carbon at Sub- and Supercritical Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Kazi Afzalur; Loh, Wai Soong; Yanagi, Hideharu; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Chun, Won Gee; Ng, Kim Choon

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the experimentally measured adsorption isotherm data for methane onto the pitch-based activated carbon type Maxsorb III for temperatures ranging from (120 to 220) K and pressures up to 1.4 MPa. These data are useful to study

  20. A density functional study on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tive adsorption of H2 onto the minimum energy copper clusters by using the density ... theoretical study of molecular oxygen and atomic oxy- gen adsorption onto small ...... the values for all singlet spin states are zero, indicating that no ...

  1. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetric differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydrogen adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will be helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using the fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type method. The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range, R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume. The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operating pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. High purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is between 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of the adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and other non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate the hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbon with a surface area of 644.87 m 2 /g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m 2 /g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption

  2. Adsorption of hydrogen in Scandium/Titanium decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananghaya, Michael, E-mail: mikemananghaya@gmail.com [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines); DOST-ASTHRDP, PCIEERD, Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan, Taguig City 1631 (Philippines); Belo, Lawrence Phoa; Beltran, Arnel [De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Ave, 0922, Manila (Philippines); DLSU STC Laguna Boulevard, LTI Spine Road Barangays Biñan and Malamig, Biñan City, Laguna (Philippines)

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen doped Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) that is decorated with Scandium and Titanium as potential hydrogen storage medium using the pseudo potential density functional method was investigated. Highly localized states near the Fermi level, which are derived from the nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings, which prevent metal aggregation and improve the material stability. A detailed Comparison of the Hydrogen adsorption capability with promising system-weight efficiency of Sc over Ti was elucidated when functionalized with 4ND-CN{sub x}NT. Finally, the (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT composite material has a thermodynamically favorable adsorption and consecutive adsorption energy for ideal reversible adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at room temperature such that it can hold at least 5.8 wt% hydrogen molecules at the LDA and GGA level. - Highlights: • Carbon Nanotube with divacancy (4ND-CN{sub x}NT) decorated with Sc and Ti. • Nitrogen defects, contribute to strong Sc and Ti bindings. • H{sub 2} and (Sc/4ND){sub 10}-CN{sub x}CNT has a favorable adsorption. • 5.8 wt% adsorption at the LDA and GGA level.

  3. Solvation in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, H.D.; Cummings, P.T.; Karaborni, S.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the solvation structure in supercritical water composed with that in ambient water and in simple supercritical solvents. Molecular dynamics studies have been undertaken of systems that model ionic sodium and chloride, atomic argon, and molecular methanol in supercritical aqueous solutions using the simple point charge model of Berendsen for water. Because of the strong interactions between water and ions, ionic solutes are strongly attractive in supercritical water, forming large clusters of water molecules around each ion. Methanol is found to be a weakly-attractive solute in supercritical water. The cluster of excess water molecules surrounding a dissolved ion or polar molecule in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to the solvent clusters surrounding attractive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. Likewise, the deficit of water molecules surrounding a dissolved argon atom in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to that surrounding repulsive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in supercritical water was found to be about one third the number in ambient water. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule surrounding a central particle in supercritical water was only mildly affected by the identify of the central particle--atom, molecule, or ion. These results should be helpful in developing a qualitative understanding of important processes that occur in supercritical water. 29 refs., 6 figs

  4. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-01

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetri differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydroge adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will b helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using th fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type metho The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range. R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operatin pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. Hig purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is betwee 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of th adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and oth non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate th hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbo with a surface area of 644.87 m2/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m2/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption significant at 77

  5. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons; Etude du stockage d'hydrogene par adsorption dans des carbones nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langohr, D

    2004-10-15

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  6. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons; Etude du stockage d'hydrogene par adsorption dans des carbones nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langohr, D

    2004-10-15

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  7. A theoretical study of hydrogen atoms adsorption and diffusion on PuO_2 (110) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.L.; Tang, T.; Zheng, S.T.; Shi, Y.; Qiu, R.Z.; Luo, W.H.; Meng, D.Q.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen atoms on the PuO_2 (110) surface are investigated by density functional theory corrected for onsite Coulombic interactions (GGA + U). In order to find out the energetically more favorable adsorption site and optimum diffusion path, adsorption energy of atomic H on various sites and the diffusion energy barrier are derived and compared. Our results show that both chemisorption and physisorption exist for H atoms adsorption configurations on PuO_2 (110) surface. Two processes for H diffusion are investigated using the climbing nudged-elastic-band (cNEB) approach. We have identified two diffusion mechanisms, leading to migration of atomic H on the surface and diffusion from surface to subsurface. The energy barriers indicate that it is energetically more favorable for H atom to be on the surface. Hydrogen permeation through purity PuO_2 surface is mainly inhibited from hydrogen atom diffusion from surface to subsurface. - Highlights: • H atoms adsorption on PuO_2 (110) surface are investigated by GGA + U. • Both chemisorption and physisorption exist for H atoms adsorption configurations. • H atoms migration into PuO_2 (100) surface are inhibited with the barrier of 2.15 eV. • H atoms diffusion on PuO_2 (110) surface are difficult at room temperature.

  8. Influence of surface treatments on micropore structure and hydrogen adsorption behavior of nanoporous carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Joo; Park, Soo-Jin

    2007-07-15

    The scope of this work was to control the pore sizes of porous carbons by various surface treatments and to investigate the relation between pore structures and hydrogen adsorption capacity. The effects of various surface treatments (i.e., gas-phase ozone, anodic oxidation, fluorination, and oxygen plasma) on the micropore structures of porous carbons were investigated by N(2)/77 K isothermal adsorption. The hydrogen adsorption capacity was measured by H(2) isothermal adsorption at 77 K. In the result, the specific surface area and micropore volume of all of the treated samples were slightly decreased due to the micropore filling or pore collapsing behaviors. It was also found that in F(2)-treated carbons the center of the pore size distribution was shifted to left side, meaning that the average size of the micropores decreased. The F(2)- and plasma-treated samples showed higher hydrogen storage capacities than did the other samples, the F(2)-treated one being the best, indicating that the micropore size of the porous carbons played a key role in the hydrogen adsorption at 77 K.

  9. Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.R.; Foger, K.; Breakspere, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts was studied with 0.9-3Vertical Bar3< platinum on silica gel, aerosil, sodium and lanthanum Y zeolites, and ..gamma..-alumina, and on aerosil-supported gold-platinum alloys containing 2, 10, 24, 33, and 85Vertical Bar3< gold. Surface enrichment with gold in the alloy systems, as derived from hydrogen adsorption data and predicted from surface enrichment theory and electron microscopic measurements of particle size, were in good agreement, which indicated that equilibrium was achieved by the thermal treatment (oxygen at 573/sup 0/K, hydrogen at 620/sup 0/K, repeated cycles) used. Hydrogen spillover to gold was observed at the higher hydrogen pressures tested on the alloys with high gold content, and to the zeolite supports. The temperature-programed desorption profiles were independent of gold content, which indicated that gold acts only as diluent, and that isolated surface platinum atoms become populated with hydrogen atoms either by hydrogen atom spillover from platinum ensembles to gold and from the gold to the isolated platinum, and/or by adsorption of a molecule directly on the isolated platinum and chemisorption of one H atom at an adjacent gold atom. The distribution of surface platinum ensembles was evaluated by a computer simulation method.

  10. Adsorption of hydrogen on clean and modified magnesium films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2006-01-01

    films at H/Mg ratios less than 2% is developed. The activation barrier for hydrogen dissociation is 72 +/- 15 kJ/mole H-2, and a stagnant hydrogen uptake is observed. For platinum-catalyzed films, the barrier is significantly reduced, and there is no stagnation in the uptake rate....

  11. A computational study on the hydrogen adsorption capacity of various lithium-doped boron hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sudip; Giri, Santanab; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2012-02-05

    An aromatic boron hydride B(3)H(3)(2-) and its various Li/Li(+) doped isomers have been studied at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and M06/6-311+G(d) levels of theory to assess their hydrogen storage potential. Different types of interaction energies, reaction enthalpies and reaction electrophilicities associated with the hydrogen adsorption process suggest that B(3)H(3)(2-) itself and some of its Li-decorated analogues may turn out to be effective hydrogen storage material. Nucleus independent chemical shift and conceptual density functional theory based reactivity descriptors lend additional support. The temperature-pressure phase diagram identifies the temperature-pressure zone where the reaction Gibbs free energy for the hydrogen adsorption is negative making it a thermodynamically feasible process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  13. Adsorption, hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of C2H on a CoCu bimetallic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Donghai; Yuan, Jinyun; Yang, Baocheng; Chen, Houyang

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, adsorption, hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of C2H on a single atomic layer of bimetallic CoCu were investigated using first-principles calculations. The CoCu bimetallic layer is formed by Cu replacement of partial Co atoms on the top layer of a Co(111) surface. Our adsorption and reaction results showed those sites, which have stronger adsorption energy of C2H, possess higher reactivity. The bimetallic layer possesses higher reactivity than either of the pure monometallic layer. A mechanism of higher reactivity of the bimetallic layer is proposed and identified, i.e. in the bimetallic catalyst, the catalytic performance of one component is promoted by the second component, and in our work, the catalytic performance of Co atoms in the bimetallic layer are improved by introducing Cu atoms, lowing the activation barrier of the reaction of C2H. The bimetallic layer could tune adsorption and reaction of C2H by modulating the ratio of Co and Cu. Results of adsorption energies and adsorption configurations reveal that C2H prefers to be adsorbed in parallel on both the pure Co metallic and CoCu bimetallic layers, and Co atoms in subsurface which support the metallic or bimetallic layer have little effect on C2H adsorption. For hydrogenation reactions, the products greatly depend on the concentration and initial positions of hydrogen atoms, and the C2H hydrogenation forming acetylene is more favorable than forming vinylidene in both thermodynamics and kinetics. This study would provide fundamental guidance for hydrocarbon reactions on Co-based and/or Cu-based bimetallic surface chemistry and for development of new bimetallic catalysts.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver

    2010-01-01

    strongly to Pd hydride than to Pd. The activation barrier for desorption at a H coverage of one mono layer is slightly lower on Pd hydride, whereas the activation energy for adsorption is similar on Pd and Pd hydride. It is concluded that the higher sticking probability on Pd hydride is most likely caused...

  15. Analysis of oxygen and hydrogen adsorption on Nb(100) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Bai; Wen, Mao; Fukuyama, Seiji; Yokogawa, Kiyoshi; Ichimura, Shingo; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2006-01-01

    The surface structure of Nb(100) under the condition of cleaning, oxidation and hydrogen adsorption is observed by STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). The results obtained are followings; (1) (3 x 1)-O→(4 x 1)-O→c(2 x 2)-O→clean(1 x 1)structure was observed by atom level, and these atomic models of structures and STM images were verified by the first-principles calculations, (2) when the clean(1 x 1) structure exposed to hydrogen, dissociative adsorption of hydrogen was observed and Nb hydride cluster formed on the surface at room temperature. It was heated at about 450 - 670 K in UHV, the cluster decomposed into hydrogen and (1 x 1) structure with linear defect was formed. The c(2 x 2)-O structure by oxygen adsorption transformed into (1 x 1)-H structure with OH and Nb hydride cluster under hydrogen gas at room temperature. When it was heated in UHV at 640 K, OH desorbed from the surface and (1 x 1) structure with linear defect was generated. The surface of (3 x 1)-O structure was not changed by hydrogen. (S.Y.)

  16. A study on hydrogen adsorption behaviors of open-tip carbon nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Mingliang

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption behaviors of single-walled open-tip (tip-truncated) carbon nanocones (CNCs) with apex angles of 19.2° at temperatures of 77 and 300 K were investigated by the molecular dynamics simulations. Four nanomaterials (including three CNCs with different dimensions and a reference CNT) were analyzed to examine the hydrogen adsorption behaviors and influences of cone sharpness on the behaviors of the CNCs. Physisorption of hydrogen molecules could be observed from the distribution pattern of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed on the nanomaterials. Because of the cone geometry effect, the open-tip CNCs could have larger storage weight percentage and less desorption of hydrogen molecules (caused by the temperature growth) on their outer surfaces, as compared with those of the reference CNT. The hydrogen molecules inside the CNCs and the reference CNT, however, were noted to have similar desorption behaviors owing to the confinement effects from the structures of the nanomaterials. In addition, the sharper CNC could have higher storage weight percentage but the cone sharpness does not have evident enhancement in the average adsorption energy of the CNC. Combination of confinement and repulsion effects existing near the tip region of the CNC would be responsible for the non-enhancement feature.

  17. Separation of hydrogen isotopes via single column pressure swing adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.W.; Hill, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Separation of hydrogen isotopes based on kinetic isotope effects was studied. The mixture separated was hydrogen containing a trace of tritium as HT and the hydride was vanadium monohydride. The separation was achieved using the single-column pressure swing process. Stage separation factors are larger and product cuts smaller than for a two-column pressure swing process operated in the same monohydride phase

  18. Supercritical CO2 Assisted Synthesis of EDTA-Fe3O4 Nano composite with High Adsorption Capacity for Hexavalent Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, G.; Neupane, S.; Makaju, R.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency of EDTA functionalized nanoparticles in adsorption of chromium (Vi) from water was investigated in this study. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized by a simple chemical coprecipitation route and EDTA coating onto IONPs was attained via supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc CO 2 ), a technology with green sustainable properties. The obtained nanoparticles were then characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and vibrating magnetometric analysis (VSM). The synthesized nanoparticle and its modified variant were evaluated as adsorbent for chromium (Vi) removal from water through batch adsorption technique and the effect of analytic concentration; contact time and adsorbent concentration were studied at ph 2. The results showed higher removal efficiency for modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs) (i.e., 99.9%) than their non modified variant IONPs, that is, 34.06% for the same concentration after 18 hours of incubation. Also maximum adsorption capacity (q e = 452.26 mg/g) of MIONPs attained can be related to their preparation in Sc CO 2 asq e calculated from IONPs, that is, 170.33 mg/g, is lower than that of MIONPs. The adsorption data fit well with Freundlich isotherm equation while kinetic adsorption studies of chromium (Vi) were modeled by pseudo-second-order model

  19. Improvement of soluble coffee aroma using an integrated process of supercritical CO2 extraction with selective removal of the pungent volatiles by adsorption on activates carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lucas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a two-step integrated process consisting of CO2 supercritical extraction of volatile coffee compounds (the most valuable from roasted and milled coffee, and a subsequent step of selective removal of pungent volatiles by adsorption on activated carbon is presented. Some experiments were carried out with key compounds from roasted coffee aroma in order to study the adsorption step: ethyl acetate as a desirable compound and furfural as a pungent component. Operational parameters such as adsorption pressure and temperature and CO2 flowrate were optimized. Experiments were conducted at adsorption pressures of 12-17 MPa, adsorption temperatures of 35-50ºC and a solvent flow rate of 3-5 kg/h. In all cases, the solute concentration and the activated particle size were kept constant. Results show that low pressures (12 MPa, low temperatures (35ºC and low CO2 flowrates (3 kg/h are suitable for removing the undesirable pungent and smell components (e.g. furfural and retaining the desirable aroma compounds (e.g. ethyl acetate. The later operation with real roasted coffee has corroborated the previous results obtained with the key compounds.

  20. Activity of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubovich, I A; Mikhaylov, V A; Migulina, N N [Yaroslavskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1976-06-01

    Experimental data for the activities of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide are considered and the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented. It is concluded that surface structures (complexes) may be formed and that micro-electronic feaures play a role in heterogeneous catalysis.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Benard, P.; Lafi, L.; Dorval-Douville, G.; Chandonia, P.-A. [Univ. du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: Lyubov.Lafi@uqtr.ca

    2006-07-01

    'Full text:' In recent years, several novel carbon-based microporous materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been proposed as promising adsorbents for hydrogen. Hydrogen adsorption measurements on Al-, Cr- and Zn-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are presented. The measurements were performed at temperatures ranging from 77 to 300K and pressures up to 50 atm using a volumetric approach. The maximum excess adsorption at 77K ranges from 2,8 to 3,9 wt % for the MOFs and from 1,5 to 2,5 wt % for the SWNTs. These values are reached at pressures below 40 atm. At room temperature and 40 atm, modest amounts of hydrogen are adsorbed (< 0,4 wt %). A Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) approach is used to investigate the measured adsorption isotherms and retrieve energetic and structural parameters. The adsorption enthalpy averaged over filling is found to be about 2,9 kJ/mol for the MOF-5 and about 3,6 - 4,2 kJ/mol for SWNTs. The uptake of hydrogen on SWNTs and MOF-5 appears to be due to physisorption and can be described, through the DA-model, by a traditional theory of micropore filling. (author)

  2. An enhanced hydrogen adsorption enthalpy for fluoride intercalated graphite compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hansong; Sha, Xianwei; Chen, Liang; Cooper, Alan C; Foo, Maw-Lin; Lau, Garret C; Bailey, Wade H; Pez, Guido P

    2009-12-16

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study on H(2) physisorption in partially fluorinated graphite. This material, first predicted computationally using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and subsequently synthesized and characterized experimentally, represents a novel class of "acceptor type" graphite intercalated compounds that exhibit significantly higher isosteric heat of adsorption for H(2) at near ambient temperatures than previously demonstrated for commonly available porous carbon-based materials. The unusually strong interaction arises from the semi-ionic nature of the C-F bonds. Although a high H(2) storage capacity (>4 wt %) at room temperature is predicted not to be feasible due to the low heat of adsorption, enhanced storage properties can be envisaged by doping the graphitic host with appropriate species to promote higher levels of charge transfer from graphene to F(-) anions.

  3. Hydrogen adsorption in the series of carbon nanostructures: Graphenes-graphene nanotubes-nanocrystallites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. P.; Kirichenko, A. N.; Tat'yanin, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    A comparative analysis of hydrogen absorption capability is performed for the first time for three types of carbon nanostructures: graphenes, oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs), and pyrocarbon nanocrystallites (PCNs) synthesized in the pores of TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with mean diameters ( D m) of 50 and 90 nm, using methane as the pyrolized gas. The morphology of the carbon nanostructures is studied by means of powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen adsorption is investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in combination with mass-spectrometry. It is shown that only OCNTGs can adsorb and store hydrogen, the desorption of which under atmospheric pressure occurs at a temperature of around 175°C. Hydrogen adsorption by OCNTGs is quantitatively determined and found to be about 1.5% of their mass. Applying certain assumptions, the relationship between the mass of carbon required for the formation of single-wall OCNTGs in membrane pores and the surface area of pores is established. Numerical factor Ψ = m dep/ m calc, where m dep is the actual mass of carbon deposited upon the formation of OCNTGs and mcalc is the calculated mass of carbon necessary for the formation of OCNTGs is introduced. It is found that the dependence of specific hydrogen adsorption on the magnitude of the factor has a maximum at Ψ = 1.2, and OCNTGs can adsorb and store hydrogen in the interval 0.4 to 0.6 hydrogen adsorption and its relationship to the structure of carbon nanoformations are examined.

  4. Supercritical water gasification of landfill leachate for hydrogen production in the presence and absence of alkali catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijin, Gong; Binbin, Li; Qingyu, Wang; Zuohua, Huang; Liang, Zhao

    2018-03-01

    Gasification of landfill leachate in supercritical water using batch-type reactor is investigated. Alkali such as NaOH, KOH, K 2 CO 3 , Na 2 CO 3 is used as catalyst. The effect of temperature (380-500 °C), retention time (5-25 min), landfill leachate concentration (1595 mg L -1 -15,225 mg L -1 ), catalyst adding amount (1-10 wt%) on hydrogen mole fraction, hydrogen yield, carbon gasification rate, COD, TOC, TN removal efficiency are investigated. The results showed that gaseous products mainly contained hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide without addition of catalyst. However, the main gaseous products are hydrogen and methane with addition of NaOH, KOH, K 2 CO 3 , Na 2 CO 3 . In the absence of alkali catalyst, the effect of temperature on landfill leachate gasification is positive. Hydrogen mole fraction, hydrogen yield, carbon gasification ratio increase with temperature, which maximum value being 55.6%, 107.15 mol kg -1 , 71.96% is obtained at 500 °C, respectively. Higher raw landfill leachate concentration leads to lower hydrogen production and carbon gasification rate. The suitable retention time is suggested to be 15 min for higher hydrogen production and carbon gasification rate. COD, TOC and TN removal efficiency also increase with increase of temperature, decrease of landfill leachate concentration. In the presence of catalyst, the hydrogen production is obviously promoted by addition of alkali catalyst. the effect of catalysts on hydrogen production is in the following order: NaOH > KOH > Na 2 CO 3  > K 2 CO 3 . The maximum hydrogen mole fraction and hydrogen yield being 74.40%, 70.05 mol kg -1 is obtained with adding amount of 5 wt% NaOH at 450 °C, 28 MPa, 15 min. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) assisted preparation of hydrogen-bonded interpolymer complexes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, Philip W

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of supercritical CO2 as medium in polymer processing eliminates many of disadvantages associated with other means of processing, i.e. high temperatures or toxic solvents. The “soft” processing conditions make CO2 specifically suitable...

  6. A comparative analysis of the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitpas, G [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benard, P [Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (Canada); Klebanoff, L E [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Xiao, J [Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (Canada); Aceves, S M [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    While conventional low-pressure LH₂ dewars have existed for decades, advanced methods of cryogenic hydrogen storage have recently been developed. These advanced methods are cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage, which operate best in the temperature range 30–100 K. We present a comparative analysis of both approaches for cryogenic hydrogen storage, examining how pressure and/or sorbent materials are used to effectively increase onboard H₂ density and dormancy. We start by reviewing some basic aspects of LH₂ properties and conventional means of storing it. From there we describe the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods, and then explore the relationship between them, clarifying the materials science and physics of the two approaches in trying to solve the same hydrogen storage task (~5–8 kg H₂, typical of light duty vehicles). Assuming that the balance of plant and the available volume for the storage system in the vehicle are identical for both approaches, the comparison focuses on how the respective storage capacities, vessel weight and dormancy vary as a function of temperature, pressure and type of cryo-adsorption material (especially, powder MOF-5 and MIL-101). By performing a comparative analysis, we clarify the science of each approach individually, identify the regimes where the attributes of each can be maximized, elucidate the properties of these systems during refueling, and probe the possible benefits of a combined “hybrid” system with both cryo-adsorption and cryo-compression phenomena operating at the same time. In addition the relationships found between onboard H₂ capacity, pressure vessel and/or sorbent mass and dormancy as a function of rated pressure, type of sorbent material and fueling conditions are useful as general designing guidelines in future engineering efforts using these two hydrogen storage approaches.

  7. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with in-source atmospheric pressure ionization hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for compound speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunju; Choi, Man-Ho; Kim, Byungjoo; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-04-29

    An experimental setup for the speciation of compounds by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) with atmospheric pressure ionization while performing chromatographic separation is presented. The proposed experimental setup combines the high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) system that can be readily used as an inlet for mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) HDX. This combination overcomes the limitation of an approach using conventional liquid chromatography (LC) by minimizing the amount of deuterium solvents used for separation. In the SFC separation, supercritical CO2 was used as a major component of the mobile phase, and methanol was used as a minor co-solvent. By using deuterated methanol (CH3OD), AP HDX was achieved during SFC separation. To prove the concept, thirty one nitrogen- and/or oxygen-containing standard compounds were analyzed by SFC-AP HDX MS. The compounds were successfully speciated from the obtained SFC-MS spectra. The exchange ions were observed with as low as 1% of CH3OD in the mobile phase, and separation could be performed within approximately 20min using approximately 0.24 mL of CH3OD. The results showed that SFC separation and APPI/APCI HDX could be successfully performed using the suggested method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of the secondary electron energy spectrum of clean aluminium modification during oxygen adsorption, hydrogen adsorption or carbon segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin, Francois

    1981-01-01

    The first part of this work is a review of both theoretical and experimental aspects of the fine structure appearing in the Secondary Electron Spectrum (SES) and in the electron energy loss spectrum. In the second part, we report the results of a study of the SES and ELS spectra of clean and gas covered aluminium. The use of very low primary electron energies (E p ≤ 30 eV) enables the detection of previously unobserved peaks in the ELS spectra of clean and oxygen covered aluminium. They are attributed to single electron excitations. Furthermore, a very large peak appears in the SES spectrum during oxygen or carbon adsorption on aluminium. It is interpreted in terms of interaction of the background electrons with the valence electrons of the surface. Molecular hydrogen adsorption is observed on Ta, Pt, Al 2 O 3 , Si. It is responsible for an ELS peak located 13 eV below the elastic peak. Furthermore, on silicon, the chemisorbed hydrogen form can be distinguished from the molecular form with the help of ELS. Finally, some examples are given of the application of these results to surface imaging. (author) [fr

  9. Dynamics of dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on Ni(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, A.V.; Madix, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Nearly monoenergetic beams of hydrogen and deuterium were used to determine dissociative sticking probabilities for H 2 and D 2 on Ni(100) at various energies. Variation of the surface temperature between 90 and 300 K had no effect on the dissociative sticking probability of H 2 at 3.6 and 5.8 kJ/mol incident beam energy, indicating a direct mechanism of dissociation. A four fold increase in the initial dissociative sticking probability for H 2 from 0.2 to 0.8 was observed by increasing the translational kinetic energy from 0.7 to 7.0 kJ/mol. The initial dissociative sticking probability for D 2 was slightly lower, increasing from 0.15 to 0.75 with increasing translational kinetic energy from 1.3 to 10.5 kJ/mol. The form of the increase with kinetic energy was explained by tunnelling through a low activation barrier, accounting as well for the high dissociation probability at low kinetic energies. The dissociative sticking probability decreased with hydrogen or deuterium adatom coverage at all energies. The decline in sticking probability with hydrogen coverage was fit to a s(theta) = s 0 (1 - a theta)/sup n/ functional form. From this relationship it was deduced that hydrogen adatoms block only single sites and that four vacant sites are needed for dissociation. The dissociative sticking probability for H 2 declined precipitously from 0.77 to 0.16 with oxygen adatom coverage from 0 to 5% of a monolayer at a translational energy of 9.6 kJ.mol. 36 references, 8 figures

  10. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide gas on several synthetic zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, T; Ise, Y; Boki, K; Tanada, S

    1974-07-01

    Ten kinds of synthetic zeolites were tested to determine the most suitable adsorbent for H/sub 2/S gas removal by a dry process. Specific surface area with argon gas and H/sub 2/S gas, surface pH, and thermodynamic data of adsorbents were measured. The amounts of H/sub 2/S gas adsorbed on synthetic zeolite adsorbents were affected in terms of the pore sizes of the adsorbents rather than the surface pH and the thermodynamic factors. The adsorbents No. 3, No. 7, and No. 8 showed higher adsorption of H/sub 2/S than the other adsorbents and were the most suitable for practical purposes.

  11. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langohr, D.

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  12. Design and synthesis of vanadium hydrazide gels for Kubas-type hydrogen adsorption: a new class of hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan K A; Webb, Michael I; Mai, Hung V; Hamaed, Ahmad; Walsby, Charles J; Trudeau, Michel; Antonelli, David M

    2010-08-25

    In this paper we demonstrate that the Kubas interaction, a nondissociative form of weak hydrogen chemisorption with binding enthalpies in the ideal 20-30 kJ/mol range for room-temperature hydrogen storage, can be exploited in the design of a new class of hydrogen storage materials which avoid the shortcomings of hydrides and physisorpion materials. This was accomplished through the synthesis of novel vanadium hydrazide gels that use low-coordinate V centers as the principal Kubas H(2) binding sites with only a negligible contribution from physisorption. Materials were synthesized at vanadium-to-hydrazine ratios of 4:3, 1:1, 1:1.5, and 1:2 and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The material with the highest capacity possesses an excess reversible storage of 4.04 wt % at 77 K and 85 bar, corresponding to a true volumetric adsorption of 80 kg H(2)/m(3) and an excess volumetric adsorption of 60.01 kg/m(3). These values are in the range of the ultimate U.S. Department of Energy goal for volumetric density (70 kg/m(3)) as well as the best physisorption material studied to date (49 kg H(2)/m(3) for MOF-177). This material also displays a surprisingly high volumetric density of 23.2 kg H(2)/m(3) at room temperature and 85 bar--roughly 3 times higher than that of compressed gas and approaching the DOE 2010 goal of 28 kg H(2)/m(3). These materials possess linear isotherms and enthalpies that rise on coverage and have little or no kinetic barrier to adsorption or desorption. In a practical system these materials would use pressure instead of temperature as a toggle and can thus be used in compressed gas tanks, currently employed in many hydrogen test vehicles, to dramatically increase the amount of hydrogen stored and therefore the range of any vehicle.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of hydrogen adsorptions on BC3 sheet and graphene: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Lin, Wen-Huan; Albao, Marvin A; Su, Wan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the effect of hydrogen adsorption on a single BC 3 sheet as well as graphene using first-principles calculations. Specifically, a comparative study of the energetically favorable atomic configurations for both H-adsorbed BC 3 sheets and graphene at different hydrogen concentrations ranging from 1/32 to 4/32 ML and 1/8 to 1 ML was undertaken. The preferred hydrogen arrangement on the single BC 3 sheet and graphene was found to have the same property as that of the adsorbed H atoms on the neighboring C atoms on the opposite sides of the sheet. Moreover, at low coverage of H, the pattern of hydrogen adsorption on the BC 3 shows a proclivity toward formation on the same ring, contrasting their behavior on graphene where they tend to form the elongated zigzag chains instead. Lastly, both the hydrogenated BC 3 sheet and graphene exhibit alternation of semiconducting and metallic properties as the H concentration is increased. These results suggest the possibility of manipulating the bandgaps in a single BC 3 sheet and graphene by controlling the H concentrations on the BC 3 sheet and graphene.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption properties of polymer-derived nanoporous SiC{sub x} fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Zengyong; He, Rongan; Zhang, Xiaobin; Cheng, Haifeng; Li, Xiaodong; Wang, Yingde [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2010-04-15

    In an effort to prepare new hydrogen storage materials, we successfully obtained three types of polymer-derived nanoporous SiC{sub x} (x = 5-7) fibers, whose specific surface areas (SSAs) are larger than 580 m{sup 2}/g. Their hydrogen adsorption properties were studied with a comparison of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The results reveal that micropores play a predominant role in hydrogen adsorptions at 77 K and at pressures below 0.5 MPa, and mesopores begin to take greater effect when the pressure increases beyond 0.5 MPa. The maximum hydrogen storage capacity (HSC), 0.33 wt% at 302 K and 4 MPa, was achieved for SiC{sub x}-KN fibers with SSA of 990 m{sup 2}/g, while the HSC of the MWCNTs is 0.09 wt% at the same conditions. For these new materials, this work demonstrates that small pore size, large micropore volume and large SSA are all beneficial for the high hydrogen uptake. It can also be deduced from the work that the HSC of the SiC{sub x} fibers could be further increased if the crystallinity and the composition are better controlled. (author)

  15. Effect of Hydrogen Adsorption on the Stone-Wales Transformation in Small-Diameter Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openov, L. A.; Podlivaev, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of hydrogenation of (4, 0) and (3, 0) carbon nanotubes on the Stone-Wales transformation is studied in the framework of the nonorthogonal tight-binding model. It is shown that the atomic hydrogen adsorption can lead to both a decrease and an increase in the barriers for the direct and inverse transformations depending on the orientation of a rotating C-C bond with respect to the nanotube axis. The characteristic times of formation and annealing the Stone-Wales defects have been estimated. The Young's moduli have been calculated.

  16. Multiscale Study of Hydrogen Adsorption on Six Designed Covalent Organic Frameworks Based on Porphyrazine, Cyclobutane and Scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Le-Le; Gao Teng-Fei; Zhang Ruan-Yu; Zhang Hong

    2014-01-01

    The first-principles method of hydrogen adsorption is used to investigate the interaction of H_2 with the scandium-porphyrazine (Sc-Pz) and porphyrazine (Pz) clusters. The result shows that the interaction of H_2 with Sc-Pz is stronger than with Pz. Then grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate hydrogen adsorption in six designed covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which are designed based on porphyrazine, cyclobutane and scandium. When the pressure is from 0.1 to 100 bar and the temperature is 298 K and 77 K, the hydrogen adsorption capacities of the six COFs are calculated. We further study the importance of Sc and fillers to improve the H_2 uptake in the modified COFs by analyzing the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  17. Nanotube Adsorption for the Capture and Re-liquefaction of Hydrogen Biol-Off During Tanker Transfer Operations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal discloses an innovative, economically feasible technique to capture and re-liquefy the hydrogen boil-off by using carbon nanotube adsorption prior to...

  18. FTIR spectroscopic and computational studies on hydrogen adsorption on the zeolite Li-FER

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nachtigall, Petr; Garrone, E.; Palomino, G. T.; Delgado, M. R.; Nachtigallová, Dana; Areán, C. O.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 19 (2006), s. 2286-2292 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/0324 Grant - others:UIB(ES) MAT-2005-05350; MIUR(IT) FISR2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : adsorption * hydrogen storage * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2006

  19. Hydrogen adsorption-mediated synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bang-An; Du, Jia-Huan; Sheng, Tian; Tian, Na; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Li; Xu, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts.Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of DFT calculation, SEM images of concave Pt nanocubes, mass activity and stability characterization of the catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02349e

  20. Strain effect on the adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation of hydrogen on Mg (0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Huaping; Wang, Caizhuang; Yao, Yongxin; Hupalo, Myron [Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Wang, Yangang [Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Supercomputing Center of Computer Network Information Center, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); McDougall, Dan; Tringides, Michael; Ho, Kaiming [Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    The adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation of hydrogen on the biaxially strained Mg (0001) surface have been systematically investigated by the first principle calculations based on density functional theory. When the strain changes from the compressive to tensile state, the adsorption energy of H atom linearly increases while its diffusion barrier linearly decreases oppositely. The dissociation barrier of H{sub 2} molecule linearly reduces in the tensile strain region. Through the chemical bonding analysis including the charge density difference, the projected density of states and the Mulliken population, the mechanism of the strain effect on the adsorption of H atom and the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule has been elucidated by an s-p charge transfer model. With the reduction of the orbital overlap between the surface Mg atoms upon the lattice expansion, the charge transfers from p to s states of Mg atoms, which enhances the hybridization of H s and Mg s orbitals. Therefore, the bonding interaction of H with Mg surface is strengthened and then the atomic diffusion and molecular dissociation barriers of hydrogen decrease accordingly. Our works will be helpful to understand and to estimate the influence of the lattice deformation on the performance of Mg-containing hydrogen storage materials.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials

  2. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etherton, B.P.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

  3. Hydrogen adsorption in HKUST-1: a combined inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Craig M; Liu Yun; Yildirim, Taner; Peterson, Vanessa K; Kepert, Cameron J

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in high surface area nanoporous coordination polymers has attracted a great deal of interest in recent years due to the potential applications in energy storage. Here we present combined inelastic neutron scattering measurements and detailed first-principles calculations aimed at unraveling the nature of hydrogen adsorption in HKUST-1 (Cu 3 (1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) 2 ), a metal-organic framework (MOF) with unsaturated metal centers. We reveal that, in this system, the major contribution to the overall binding comes from the classical Coulomb interaction which is not screened due to the open metal site; this explains the relatively high binding energies and short H 2 -metal distances observed in MOFs with exposed metal sites as compared to traditional ones. Despite the short distances, there is no indication of an elongation of the H-H bond for the bound H 2 molecule at the metal site. We find that both the phonon and rotational energy levels of the hydrogen molecule are closely similar, making the interpretation of the inelastic neutron scattering data difficult. Finally, we show that the orientation of H 2 has a surprisingly large effect on the binding potential, reducing the classical binding energy by almost 30%. The implication of these results for the development of MOF materials for better hydrogen storage is discussed.

  4. Hydrogen adsorption in HKUST-1: a combined inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Craig M; Liu Yun; Yildirim, Taner [National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Drive, MS 6102 (United States); Peterson, Vanessa K [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Kepert, Cameron J [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: craig.brown@nist.gov

    2009-05-20

    Hydrogen adsorption in high surface area nanoporous coordination polymers has attracted a great deal of interest in recent years due to the potential applications in energy storage. Here we present combined inelastic neutron scattering measurements and detailed first-principles calculations aimed at unraveling the nature of hydrogen adsorption in HKUST-1 (Cu{sub 3}(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate){sub 2}), a metal-organic framework (MOF) with unsaturated metal centers. We reveal that, in this system, the major contribution to the overall binding comes from the classical Coulomb interaction which is not screened due to the open metal site; this explains the relatively high binding energies and short H{sub 2}-metal distances observed in MOFs with exposed metal sites as compared to traditional ones. Despite the short distances, there is no indication of an elongation of the H-H bond for the bound H{sub 2} molecule at the metal site. We find that both the phonon and rotational energy levels of the hydrogen molecule are closely similar, making the interpretation of the inelastic neutron scattering data difficult. Finally, we show that the orientation of H{sub 2} has a surprisingly large effect on the binding potential, reducing the classical binding energy by almost 30%. The implication of these results for the development of MOF materials for better hydrogen storage is discussed.

  5. Hydrogen adsorption in HKUST-1: a combined inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig M.; Liu, Yun; Yildirim, Taner; Peterson, Vanessa K.; Kepert, Cameron J.

    2009-05-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in high surface area nanoporous coordination polymers has attracted a great deal of interest in recent years due to the potential applications in energy storage. Here we present combined inelastic neutron scattering measurements and detailed first-principles calculations aimed at unraveling the nature of hydrogen adsorption in HKUST-1 (Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2), a metal-organic framework (MOF) with unsaturated metal centers. We reveal that, in this system, the major contribution to the overall binding comes from the classical Coulomb interaction which is not screened due to the open metal site; this explains the relatively high binding energies and short H2-metal distances observed in MOFs with exposed metal sites as compared to traditional ones. Despite the short distances, there is no indication of an elongation of the H-H bond for the bound H2 molecule at the metal site. We find that both the phonon and rotational energy levels of the hydrogen molecule are closely similar, making the interpretation of the inelastic neutron scattering data difficult. Finally, we show that the orientation of H2 has a surprisingly large effect on the binding potential, reducing the classical binding energy by almost 30%. The implication of these results for the development of MOF materials for better hydrogen storage is discussed.

  6. Theoretical study of hydrogen adsorption of graphene and carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Corral, Ignacio; German, Estefania; Volpe, Maria A; Brizuela, Graciela; Juan, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have awakened great interest in materials science thanks to their extraordinary structural, electronic and mechanical properties which facilitate their application in many different areas. One of the most promising applications is the possibility of using CNT to store hydrogen for use in small scale fuel cells. Unfortunately, experimental studies performed some years ago have often led to controversial conclusions, causing a continuing debate that has still not been resolved. The most recent work suggests that the storage of hydrogen for practical purposes can be achieved with CNT decorated with transition metals, for example Pd. In this context, theoretical modeling methods have to be used for a detailed understanding of the influence and scope of this type of modification in the interaction of the nanotubes with atomic or molecular hydrogen. This work studied hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) doped with Pd atoms, using density functional theory (DFT) and semi-empirical methods. As a preliminary approximation to the system a graphene sheet was used, modeled with a 190 atom cluster of C in a hexagonal arrangement, on which a single Pd atom was placed in adsorption sites. Then C 190 clusters were used to simulate two different types of SWCNT: the zigzag SWCNT of quirality (10.0) and the armchair SWCNT of quirality (5.5), both decorated similarly on the graphene. Geometric optimization procedures for the system's different components were carried out with these models, and then the changes produced during the adsorption process in the electronic occupation of atomic orbitals and unions, for which crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) curves and overlap population (OP) values were evaluated. The results obtained with the graphene and nanotube approximations are in agreement and show that the SWCNT modified with Pd have more capacity to trap hydrogen than the non doped SWCNT. The

  7. Adsorption of cadmium ions on nickel surface skeleton catalysts and its effect on reaction of cathodic hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, N.V.; Udris, E.Ya.; Savel'eva, O.N.

    1986-01-01

    Cadmium adsorption from different concentration CdSO 4 solutions on nickel surface skeleton catalysts (Ni ssc ) is studied by recording of polarization and potentiodynamic curves using electron microscopy and X-ray spectrometry. Main regularities of cadmium adsorption on Ni ssc are shown to be similar to those on smooth and skeleton nickel. A conclusion is drawn that increase of catalytic activity in reaction of cathodic hydrogen evolution from alkali solutions of Ni ssc base electrodes after their treatment in solutions containing Cd 2+ ions is due to irreversible desorption of strongly and averagely bound hydrogen from electrode surface at cadmium adsorption on them

  8. Adsorption and diffusion characteristics of lithium on hydrogenated α- and β-silicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyikanat, Fadil; Kandemir, Ali; Bacaksiz, Cihan; Sahin, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate adsorption properties and the diffusion mechanism of a Li atom on hydrogenated single-layer α- and β-silicene on a Ag(111) surface. It is found that a Li atom binds strongly on the surfaces of both α- and β-silicene, and it forms an ionic bond through the transfer of charge from the adsorbed atom to the surface. The binding energies of a Li atom on these surfaces are very similar. However, the diffusion barrier of a Li atom on H-α-Si is much higher than that on H-β-Si. The energy surface calculations show that a Li atom does not prefer to bind in the vicinity of the hydrogenated upper-Si atoms. Strong interaction between Li atoms and hydrogenated silicene phases and low diffusion barriers show that α- and β-silicene are promising platforms for Li-storage applications.

  9. Adsorption and diffusion characteristics of lithium on hydrogenated α- and β-silicene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadil Iyikanat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate adsorption properties and the diffusion mechanism of a Li atom on hydrogenated single-layer α- and β-silicene on a Ag(111 surface. It is found that a Li atom binds strongly on the surfaces of both α- and β-silicene, and it forms an ionic bond through the transfer of charge from the adsorbed atom to the surface. The binding energies of a Li atom on these surfaces are very similar. However, the diffusion barrier of a Li atom on H-α-Si is much higher than that on H-β-Si. The energy surface calculations show that a Li atom does not prefer to bind in the vicinity of the hydrogenated upper-Si atoms. Strong interaction between Li atoms and hydrogenated silicene phases and low diffusion barriers show that α- and β-silicene are promising platforms for Li-storage applications.

  10. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Hydrogen Adsorption in Single-Wall Carbon Nano-Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Ahadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nano-cones are investigated in detail by Monte Carlo simulations. A great deal of our computational results show that the hydrogen storage capacity in single-walled carbon nano-cones is slightly smaller than the capacity of single-walled carbon nanotubes at any time at the same conditions. This indicates that the hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nano-cones is related to angles of carbon nano-cones. It seems that these type of nanotubes could not exceed the 2010 goal of 6 wt%, which is presented by the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, these results are discussed in theory.

  11. A Biomimetic Approach to New Adsorptive Hydrogen Storage Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hongcai J [Texas A& M University

    2015-08-12

    In the past decades, there has been an escalation of interest in the study of MOFs due to their fascinating structures and intriguing application potentials. Their exceptionally high surface areas, uniform yet tunable pore sizes, and well-defined adsorbate-MOF interaction sites make them suitable for hydrogen storage. Various strategies to increase the hydrogen capacity of MOFs, such as constructing pore sizes comparable to hydrogen molecules, increasing surface area and pore volume, utilizing catenation, and introducing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers (UMCs) have been widely explored to increase the hydrogen uptake of the MOFs. MOFs with hydrogen uptake approaching the DOE gravimetric storage goal under reasonable pressure but cryo- temperature (typically 77 K) were achieved. However, the weak interaction between hydrogen molecules and MOFs has been the major hurdle limiting the hydrogen uptake of MOFs at ambient temperature. Along the road, we have realized both high surface area and strong interaction between framework and hydrogen are equally essential for porous materials to be practically applicable in Hydrogen storage. Increasing the isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen through the introduction of active centers into the framework could have great potential on rendering the framework with strong interaction toward hydrogen. Approaches on increasing the surface areas and improving hydrogen affinity by optimizing size and structure of the pores and the alignment of active centers around the pores in frameworks have been pursued, for example: (a) the introduction of coordinatively UMC (represents a metal center missing multiple ligands) with potential capability of multiple dihydrogen-binding (Kubas type, non-dissociative) per UMC, (b) the design and synthesis of proton-rich MOFs in which a + H3 binds dihydrogen just like a metal ion does, and (c) the preparation of MOFs and PPNs with well aligned internal electric fields. We believe the

  12. High coverage hydrogen adsorption on the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaohu, E-mail: yuxiaohu950203@126.com [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China); State Key laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China); Zhang, Xuemei [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, Henan 455000 (China); Wang, Shengguang [State Key laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China); Synfuels China Co., Ltd., Huairou, Beijing 101407 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption on the A and B termination layers of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface at different coverage has been studied by DFT + U method. • The adsorption of hydrogen prefers surface oxygen atoms on both Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface layers. • The more stable A layer has stronger adsorption energy than the less stable B layer. • The saturation coverage has two dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the A layer, and one dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the B layer. - Abstract: Hydrogen adsorption on the A and B termination layers of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface at different coverage has been systematically studied by density functional theory calculations including an on-site Hubbard term (GGA + U). The adsorption of hydrogen prefers surface oxygen atoms on both layers. The more stable A layer has stronger adsorption energy than the less stable B layer. The saturation coverage has two dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the A layer, and one dissociatively adsorbed H{sub 2} on the B layer. The adsorption mechanism has been analyzed on the basis of projected density of states (PDOS).

  13. Molecular adsorption of hydrogen peroxide on N- and Fe-doped titania nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Afshan, E-mail: amohajeri@shirazu.ac.ir; Dashti, Nasimeh Lari

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The stability and electronic properties of N/Fe-doped (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters with n = 5,6 were studied. • The adsorption H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the surface of doped clusters has been investigated. • This is the first report of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} adsorption onto the (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} cluster in the presence of metal and non-metal dopants. • The effect of N and Fe dopants on interaction strength was studied. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (titania) nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for photocatalytic applications such as the decomposition and adsorption of pollutant and undesirable compound in air and waste water. In this context, the present article reports the molecular adsorption of hydrogen peroxide on the surface of doped titania clusters. Density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the structures and electronic properties of two nanoscale (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters (n = 5,6) modified by nitrogen and iron dopants. The relative stability of all possible N-doped and Fe-doped isomers has been compared with each other and with the parent cluster. It was found that the Fe-doped clusters are in general more stable than the N-doped counterparts. Moreover, after N/Fe doping an enhanced in the magnetization of the clusters is observed. In the second part, we have investigated different modes of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} adsorption on the lowest-energy isomers of doped clusters. In almost all the cases, the adsorptions on the doped clusters are found to be less exothermic than on the corresponding undoped parent cluster. Our results highlight the essential role of charge transfer into the interaction between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and doped (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters, especially for Fe-doped clusters.

  14. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.; Hellgardt, K.

    2015-01-01

    -MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production

  15. Cryogenic adsorption of low-concentration hydrogen on charcoal, 5A molecular sieve, sodalite, ZSM-5 and Wessalith DAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    The separation of low-concentration hydrogen isotopes from helium is a processing step that is required for ceramic lithium breeding blanket processing. Cryogenic adsorption is one method of effecting this separation. In this study live adsorbents were considered for this purpose: charcoal, 5A molecular sieve, UOP S-115, ZSM-5 and Wessalith DAY. The first two adsorbents exhibit good equilibrium loadings and are shown to be quite effective at adsorbing low-concentration hydrogen isotopes. The latter three adsorbents display considerably lower equilibrium loadings. This study concludes that by using either charcoal or 5A molecular sieve, cryogenic adsorption would be an effective means of separating hydrogen isotopes from helium

  16. Effect on hydrogen adsorption due to a lonely or a pair of carbon vacancies on the graphene layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2017-01-01

    The influence on the hydrogen molecule adsorption on a pristine and a defective graphene layer is compared. The different lengths for the C-C bonds on the graphene layer with one vacancy are visualized and compared respect to pristine graphene. The energy of formation of one vacancy is calculated and a comparison of the binding energy for the hydrogen molecule is presented when the molecule is adsorbed on pristine graphene or on the defective graphene layer. The adsorption is studied for a single vacancy and at least for two different pairs of carbon vacancies. The qualitative general result, and contrary to the expected effect of the carbon vacancies on the hydrogen adsorption is that the rearrangement of the carbon atoms on the defective graphene layer allows only a relatively small increase in the magnitude of the binding energy for the hydrogen molecule. (paper)

  17. Hydrogen Adsorption in Flame Synthesized and Lithium Intercalated Carbon Nanofibers--A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Vivek; Prasad, J Sarada; Rao, Venkateswer M; Kalluri, Sujith; Jain, Pawan Kumar; Sreedhar, B

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have been synthesized under partial combustion conditions in a flame reactor using different mixtures of hydrocarbon gases in the presence and absence of precursors. The hydrogen (H2) adsorption studies have been carried out using a high pressure Sievert's apparatus maintained at a constant temperature (24 degrees C). The flame synthesized CNFs showed high degree of H2 adsorption capacities at 100 atm pressure. The highest H2 capacities recorded have been 4.1 wt% [for CNF produced by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)-Air (E-17)], 3.7 wt% [for nano carbons produced by Methane-Acetylene-Air (EMAC-4)] and 5.04 wt% for [Lithium intercalated sample (Li-EMAC-4)] respectively.

  18. Ab initio study of hydrogen adsorption on benzenoid linkers in metal-organic framework materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yi; Zeng, X C

    2007-01-01

    We have computed the energies of adsorption of molecular hydrogen on a number of molecular linkers in metal-organic framework solid materials using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular orbital methods. We find that the hybrid B3LYP (Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr) DFT method gives a qualitatively incorrect prediction of the hydrogen binding with benzenoid molecular linkers. Both local-density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) DFT methods are inaccurate in predicting the values of hydrogen binding energies, but can give a qualitatively correct prediction of the hydrogen binding. When compared to the more accurate binding-energy results based on the ab initio Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) method, the LDA results may be viewed as an upper limit while the GGA results may be viewed as a lower limit. Since the MP2 calculation is impractical for realistic metal-organic framework systems, the combined LDA and GGA calculations provide a cost-effective way to assess the hydrogen binding capability of these systems

  19. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: (1) Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen; (2) Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure; (3) Hydrogen storage material made from activated PEEK

  20. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-07-11

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from

  1. Hydrogen production from palm kernel shell via integrated catalytic adsorption (ICA) steam gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Zakir; Yusup, Suzana; Ahmad, Murni Melati; Chin, Bridgid Lai Fui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents integrated catalytic adsorption (ICA) steam gasification for H 2 yield. • Effects of adsorbent to biomass, biomass particle size and fluidization velocity on H 2 yield are examined. • The present study produces higher H 2 yield as compared to that obtained in literatures. • The ICA provides enhancement of H 2 yield as compared to independent catalytic and CO 2 adsorption gasification systems. - Abstract: The present study investigates the integrated catalytic adsorption (ICA) steam gasification of palm kernel shell for hydrogen production in a pilot scale atmospheric fluidized bed gasifier. The biomass steam gasification is performed in the presence of an adsorbent and a catalyst in the system. The effect of adsorbent to biomass (A/B) ratio (0.5–1.5 wt/wt), fluidization velocity (0.15–0.26 m/s) and biomass particle size (0.355–2.0 mm) are studied at temperature of 675 °C, steam to biomass (S/B) ratio of 2.0 (wt/wt) and biomass to catalyst ratio of 0.1 (wt/wt). Hydrogen composition and yield, total gas yield, and lower product gas heating values (LHV gas ) increases with increasing A/B ratio, while particle size has no significant effect on hydrogen composition and yield, total gas and char yield, gasification and carbon conversion efficiency. However, gas heating values increased with increasing biomass particle size which is due to presence of high methane content in product gas. Meanwhile, medium fluidization velocity of 0.21 m/s favoured hydrogen composition and yield. The results showed that the maximum hydrogen composition and yield of 84.62 vol% and 91.11 g H 2 /kg biomass are observed at A/B ratio of 1.5, S/B ratio of 2.0, catalyst to biomass ratio of 0.1 and temperature of 675 °C. The product gas heating values are observed in the range of 10.92–17.02 MJ/N m 3 . Gasification and carbon conversion efficiency are observed in the range of 25.66–42.95% and 20.61–41.95%, respectively. These lower

  2. Textural development and hydrogen adsorption of carbon materials from PET waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.B.; Ania, C.O.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Palacios, J.M.; Pis, J.J

    2004-10-06

    Polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) has become one of the major post-consumer plastic wastes. PET products present a problem of considerable concern due to the huge amount of solid waste produced. The disposal of this waste, together with its low bio- and photo-degradability represents a serious challenge for industrial countries all over the world. Pyrolysis could provide an alternative and economically viable route for processing PET waste due to the potential uses of different by-products: energy from the pyrolysis gases (58% yield in this work), recovery of terephthalic acid and other subproducts (20%), and a solid residue (22%), which has shown a high textural development after activation. The pyrolysis of PET waste was performed in a quartz reactor (i.d. 35 mm) under an inert atmosphere. Further activation was carried out at a temperature of 925 deg. C, with a flow rate of 10 ml min{sup -1} of CO{sub 2}. A series of carbon materials with different burn-off degrees was obtained. Textural characterisation of the samples was carried out by performing N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at -196 deg. C. Changes in the morphological and structural properties of chars were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The carbons obtained were isotropic and highly microporous materials with apparent BET surface areas of up to 2500 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. The suitability of the samples for hydrogen storage was studied by performing H{sub 2} adsorption measurements in the 0-1 bar pressure range. Adsorption-desorption experiments showed that reversible physisorption takes place in all the samples. The hydrogen adsorption capacities of the activated PET waste compare favourably well with those attained with high-value carbon materials.

  3. Textural development and hydrogen adsorption of carbon materials from PET waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, J.B.; Ania, C.O.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Palacios, J.M.; Pis, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) has become one of the major post-consumer plastic wastes. PET products present a problem of considerable concern due to the huge amount of solid waste produced. The disposal of this waste, together with its low bio- and photo-degradability represents a serious challenge for industrial countries all over the world. Pyrolysis could provide an alternative and economically viable route for processing PET waste due to the potential uses of different by-products: energy from the pyrolysis gases (58% yield in this work), recovery of terephthalic acid and other subproducts (20%), and a solid residue (22%), which has shown a high textural development after activation. The pyrolysis of PET waste was performed in a quartz reactor (i.d. 35 mm) under an inert atmosphere. Further activation was carried out at a temperature of 925 deg. C, with a flow rate of 10 ml min -1 of CO 2 . A series of carbon materials with different burn-off degrees was obtained. Textural characterisation of the samples was carried out by performing N 2 adsorption isotherms at -196 deg. C. Changes in the morphological and structural properties of chars were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The carbons obtained were isotropic and highly microporous materials with apparent BET surface areas of up to 2500 m 2 g -1 . The suitability of the samples for hydrogen storage was studied by performing H 2 adsorption measurements in the 0-1 bar pressure range. Adsorption-desorption experiments showed that reversible physisorption takes place in all the samples. The hydrogen adsorption capacities of the activated PET waste compare favourably well with those attained with high-value carbon materials

  4. Excess Adsorption Isotherms of Hydrogen on Activated Carbons from Agricultural Waste Materials.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Cruz, G.J.F.; Jandová, Věra; Šolcová, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2017), s. 900-906 ISSN 0930-7516. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2016 and the 19th Conference PRES 2016 /22./. Prague, 27.08.2016-31.08.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14228S Grant - others:NUT(PE) 0722-2014/UNT-R Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : activated carbon * hydrogen * excess adsorption Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 2.051, year: 2016

  5. Novel alternating polymer adsorption/surface activation self-assembled film based on hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yongjun; Yang Shuguang; Guan Ying; Miao Xiaopeng; Cao Weixiao; Xu Jian

    2003-08-01

    By combining hydrogen bonding layer-by-layer self-assembly and the stepwise chemisorption method, a new alternating polymer adsorption/surface activation self-assembly method was developed. First a layer of diphenylamine-4-diazonium-formaldehyde resin (diazo resin or DR) is deposited on a substrate. In the following surface activation step, the diazonium groups on the surface couple with resorcin in the outside solution. The deposition of another layer of DR is feasible due to the formation of hydrogen bond between the diazonium group of DR and the hydroxy group of the resorcin moieties. The resulting film is photosensitive. After UV irradiation, the film becomes very stable towards polar organic solvents.

  6. Optimization Study of Hydrogen Gas Adsorption on Zig-zag Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Artificial Neural Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasruddin; Lestari, M.; Supriyadi; Sholahudin

    2018-03-01

    The use of hydrogen gas in fuel cell technology has a huge opportunity to be applied in upcoming vehicle technology. One of the most important problems in fuel cell technology is the hydrogen storage. The adsorption of hydrogen in carbon-based materials attracts a lot of attention because of its reliability. This study investigated the adsorption of hydrogen gas in Single-walled Carbon Nano Tubes (SWCNT) with chilarity of (0, 12), (0, 15), and (0, 18) to find the optimum chilarity. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) can be used to predict the hydrogen storage capacity at different pressure and temperature conditions appropriately, using simulated series of data. The Artificial Neural Network is modeled as a predictor of the hydrogen adsorption capacity which provides solutions to some deficiencies in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a previous study, ANN configurations have been developed for 77k, 233k, and 298k temperatures in hydrogen gas storage. To prepare this prediction, ANN is modeled to find out the configurations that exist in the set of training and validation of specified data selection, the distance between data, and the number of neurons that produce the smallest error. This configuration is needed to make an accurate artificial neural network. The configuration of neural network was then applied to this research. The neural network analysis results show that the best configuration of artificial neural network in hydrogen storage is at 233K temperature i.e. on SWCNT with chilarity of (0.12).

  7. Hydrogen-Induced Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on the Gold Dimer Cation: A Joint Experimental and DFT Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojkovic, Marin; Rayane, Driss; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Allouche, Abdul-Rahman; Mignon, Pierre; Dugourd, Philippe

    2017-06-15

    It is demonstrated, using tandem mass spectrometry and radio frequency ion trap, that the adsorption of a H atom on the gold dimer cation, Au 2 H + , prevents its dissociation and allows for adsorption of CO. Reaction kinetics are measured by employing a radio frequency ion trap, where Au 2 + and CO interact for a given reaction time. The effect of a hydrogen atom is evaluated by comparing reaction rate constants measured for Au 2 + and Au 2 H + . The theoretical results for the adsorption of CO molecules and their reaction characteristics with Au 2 + and Au 2 H + are found to agree with the experimental findings. The joint investigations provide insights into hydrogen atom adsorption effects and consequent reaction mechanisms.

  8. Substituent effects in heterogeneous catalysis--4. Adsorption estimations during competitive hydrogenation of cyclohexanone and its 2-alkyl derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chihara, T; Tanaka, K

    1979-02-01

    Adsorption estimations during competitive hydrogenation of cyclohexanone and its 2-alkyl derivatives alumina-supported ruthenium, rhodium, and platinum catalysts were obtained in a study to determine the relative contributions of the rate constants and the adsorption equilibrium constants to the substituent-dependent constant. The reaction rates obtained during competitive hydrogenation were in the order cyclohexanone (A) Vertical Bar3:Vertical Bar3: 2-methyl cyclohexanone (B) Vertical Bar3: 2-ethyl cyclohexanone (C) Vertical Bar3: 2-propyl cyclohexanone (D) for all catalysts, whereas the rates obtained during individual hydrogenation were in the order A Vertical Bar3: B approx. C approx. D. The adsorption equilibrium constants which were estimated by analyzing the kinetic data agreed well with the theoretical values derived from statistical mechanics by using a model in which the substrate ketones were immobilely adsorbed.

  9. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filali, Larbi, E-mail: larbifilali5@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Bouhekka, Ahmed [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Département de Physique, Université Hassiba Ben Bouali, 02000 Chlef (Algeria); Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of the surfaces had the effect of reducing the roughness by way of shadow etching. • Roughness was the driving factor affecting the wettability of the hydrogenated surfaces. • Bovine Serum Albumin proteins favored the surfaces with highest hydrogen content. • Surface modification induced secondary structure change of adsorbed proteins. - Abstract: We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1–3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  10. Direct observation and modelling of ordered hydrogen adsorption and catalyzed ortho-para conversion on ETS-10 titanosilicate material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Gribov, Evgueni N; Zecchina, Adriano

    2007-06-07

    Hydrogen physisorption on porous high surface materials is investigated for the purpose of hydrogen storage and hydrogen separation, because of its simplicity and intrinsic reversibility. For these purposes, the understanding of the binding of dihydrogen to materials, of the structure of the adsorbed phase and of the ortho-para conversion during thermal and pressure cycles are crucial for the development of new hydrogen adsorbents. We report the direct observation by IR spectroscopic methods of structured hydrogen adsorption on a porous titanosilicate (ETS-10), with resolution of the kinetics of the ortho-para transition, and an interpretation of the structure of the adsorbed phase based on classical atomistic simulations. Distinct infrared signals of o- and p-H2 in different adsorbed states are measured, and the conversion of o- to p-H2 is monitored over a timescale of hours, indicating the presence of a catalyzed reaction. Hydrogen adsorption occurs in three different regimes characterized by well separated IR manifestations: at low pressures ordered 1:1 adducts with Na and K ions exposed in the channels of the material are formed, which gradually convert into ordered 2:1 adducts. Further addition of H2 occurs only through the formation of a disordered condensed phase. The binding enthalpy of the Na+-H2 1:1 adduct is of -8.7+/-0.1 kJ mol(-1), as measured spectroscopically. Modeling of the weak interaction of H2 with the materials requires an accurate force field with a precise description of both dispersion and electrostatics. A novel three body force field for molecular hydrogen is presented, based on the fitting of an accurate PES for the H2-H2 interaction to the experimental dipole polarizability and quadrupole moment. Molecular mechanics simulations of hydrogen adsorption at different coverages confirm the three regimes of adsorption and the structure of the adsorbed phase.

  11. A DFT+U investigation of hydrogen adsorption on the LaFeO3(010) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boateng, Isaac W.; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans; Dzade, N.Y.; Catlow, C. Richard A.; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2017-01-01

    The ABO3 perovskite lanthanum ferrite (LaFeO3) is a technologically important electrode material for nickel–metal hydride batteries, energy storage and catalysis. However, the electrochemical hydrogen adsorption mechanism on LaFeO3 surfaces remains under debate. In the present study, we have

  12. Combined theoretical and FTIR spectroscopic studies on hydrogen adsorption on the zeolites Na-FER and K-FER

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Areán, C. O.; Palomino, G. T.; Garrone, E.; Nachtigallová, Dana; Nachtigall, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 1 (2006), s. 395-402 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : adsorption * hydrogen storage * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.115, year: 2006

  13. New template for metal decoration and hydrogen adsorption on graphene-like C3N4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yi; Sun Hong; Chen Changfeng

    2009-01-01

    From density functional theory calculations we identify a graphene-like C 3 N 4 (g-C 3 N 4 ) as an excellent template for stable and well dispersed decoration of alkali (Li) and 3d transition metal (TM) atoms. The porous sites of g-C 3 N 4 accommodate excessive N lone-pair electrons and promote hybridization between the orbitals of N and the metal atoms. The most stable TM decorations (Ti and Sc) on g-C 3 N 4 exhibit high capacities of hydrogen adsorption with binding energies suitable for mobile applications. These metal decorated g-C 3 N 4 may also prove useful in catalytic and sensing applications for their unique nanoscale structural features unavailable in conventional nano-clusters.

  14. Density functional study of manganese atom adsorption on hydrogen-terminated armchair boron nitride nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullahi, Yusuf Zuntu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kaduna State University, P.M.B. 2339, Kaduna State (Nigeria); Rahman, Md. Mahmudur, E-mail: mahmudur@upm.edu.my [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Shuaibu, Alhassan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nigerian Defence Academy, P.M.B 2109 Kaduna (Nigeria); Abubakar, Shamsu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yobe State University, P.M.B. 1144, Yobe State (Nigeria); Zainuddin, Hishamuddin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute for Mathematical Research, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Muhida, Rifki [Department of Physics-Energy Engineering, Surya University, Gedung 01 Scientia Business Park, Jl. Boulevard Gading Serpong Blok O/1, Summarecon Serpong, Tangerang 15810, Banten (Indonesia); Setiyanto, Henry [Analytical Chemistry Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-08-15

    In this paper, we have investigated stable structural, electric and magnetic properties of manganese (Mn) atom adsorption on armchair hydrogen edge-terminated boron nitride nanoribbon (A-BNNRs) using first principles method based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Calculation shows that Mn atom situated on the ribbons of A-BNNRs is the most stable configuration, where the bonding is more pronounced. The projected density of states (PDOS) of the favored configuration has also been computed. It has been found that the covalent bonding of boron (B), nitrogen (N) and Mn is mainly contributed by s, d like-orbitals of Mn and partially occupied by the 2p like-orbital of N. The difference in energy between the inner and the edge adsorption sites of A-BNNRs shows that Mn atoms prefer to concentrate at the edge sites. The electronic structures of the various configurations are wide, narrow-gap semiconducting and half-metallic, and the magnetic moment of Mn atoms are well preserved in all considered configurations. This has shown that the boron nitride (BN) sheet covered with Mn atoms demonstrates additional information on its usefulness in future spintronics, molecular magnet and nanoelectronics devices.

  15. Influence of metal doping of a MOF-74 framework on hydrogen adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botas, J.A.; Calleja, G.; Orcajo, M.G. [Rey Juan Carlos Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Energy Technology; Sanchez-Sanchez, M. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica

    2010-07-01

    Microporous Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) adsorbents are considered an interesting option for hydrogen storage. Due to their porous nature and unusually high surface areas, these materials show an exceptional H{sub 2} uptake. Unfortunately, their interaction with H{sub 2} molecules is weak, so cryogenic temperatures are required to reach competitive H{sub 2} storage capacities. In this sense, the presence of coordinatively unsaturated and exposed metal centers in some MOF frameworks could increase the affinity for H{sub 2} through stronger metal-H{sub 2} interactions. In this preliminary work, the effect of doping a Zn{sup 2+}-MOF-74 framework with Co{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} on its adsorption properties for H{sub 2} has been studied. Characterization studies suggest that the samples prepared have actually the MOF-74 structure, in which the different tested heteroatom ions have been successfully incorporated. The differences in H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K and 87 K between the MOF-74 samples doped with the mentioned divalent metal ions were discussed as a function of their free pore volume and amount of metal incorporation. (orig.)

  16. Density functional study of manganese atom adsorption on hydrogen-terminated armchair boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullahi, Yusuf Zuntu; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Shuaibu, Alhassan; Abubakar, Shamsu; Zainuddin, Hishamuddin; Muhida, Rifki; Setiyanto, Henry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated stable structural, electric and magnetic properties of manganese (Mn) atom adsorption on armchair hydrogen edge-terminated boron nitride nanoribbon (A-BNNRs) using first principles method based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Calculation shows that Mn atom situated on the ribbons of A-BNNRs is the most stable configuration, where the bonding is more pronounced. The projected density of states (PDOS) of the favored configuration has also been computed. It has been found that the covalent bonding of boron (B), nitrogen (N) and Mn is mainly contributed by s, d like-orbitals of Mn and partially occupied by the 2p like-orbital of N. The difference in energy between the inner and the edge adsorption sites of A-BNNRs shows that Mn atoms prefer to concentrate at the edge sites. The electronic structures of the various configurations are wide, narrow-gap semiconducting and half-metallic, and the magnetic moment of Mn atoms are well preserved in all considered configurations. This has shown that the boron nitride (BN) sheet covered with Mn atoms demonstrates additional information on its usefulness in future spintronics, molecular magnet and nanoelectronics devices.

  17. Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Banerjee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Application of saw dust for the removal of an anionic dye, tartrazine, from aqueous solutions has been investigated. The experiments were carried out in batch mode. Effect of the parameters such as pH, initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye was studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 70 min. Maximum adsorption of dye was achieved at pH 3. Removal percent was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum removal was found to be 97% at 1 mg/L of tartrazine. The removal increases from 71% to 97% when the initial concentration of dye solution decreases from 15 mg/L to 1 mg/L. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich isotherm models. The (Langmuir adsorption capacity of the adsorbent is found to be 4.71 mg/g at 318 K. Kinetic modeling of the process of removal was carried out and the process of removal was found to follow a pseudo second order model and the value of rate constant for adsorption process was calculated as 2.7 × 10−3 g mg−1 min−1 at 318 K. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (ΔG°, enthalpy (ΔH° and entropy (ΔS° were determined and the negative values of ΔG° indicated that the process of removal was spontaneous at all values of temperatures. Further, the values of ΔH° indicated the endothermic nature of the process of removal.

  18. Investigation of hydrogen adsorption centers on Y2O3 by IR-spectroscopy method in diffusive-scattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkov, S.A.; Borovkov, V.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Adsorption of hydrogen and carbon oxide at the yttrium oxide at 80 K (5x30 3 PaH 2 ) and 300 K (6.5x10 2 PaCO) respectively are studied by the method of IR spectroscopy. It is shown, that at the surface of yttrium oxide trained in vacuum at 970 K, at least four types of centres of hydrogen adsorption, able to polarize H-H bond in a molecule, exist. Acid-base couple is the highest polarized centre, in the content of which there is a coordination-unsaturated highly-charged yttrium cation. Low-temperature dissociation of hydrogen on Y 2 O 3 surface occurs on the centres which polarized H-H bond in molecule comparatively slow

  19. Hydrogen production from food wastes and gas post-treatment by CO2 adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondas, V.; Gómez, X.; García, S.; Pevida, C.; Rubiera, F.; Morán, A.; Pis, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The dark fermentation process of food wastes was studied over an extended period. ► Decreasing the HRT of the process negatively affected the specific gas production. ► Adsorption of CO 2 was successfully attained using a biomass type activated carbon. ► H 2 concentration in the range of 85–95% was obtained for the treated gas-stream. - Abstract: The production of H 2 by biological means, although still far from being a commercially viable proposition, offers great promise for the future. Purification of the biogas obtained may lead to the production of highly concentrated H 2 streams appropriate for industrial application. This research work evaluates the dark fermentation of food wastes and assesses the possibility of adsorbing CO 2 from the gas stream by means of a low cost biomass-based adsorbent. The reactor used was a completely stirred tank reactor run at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) while the concentration of solids of the feeding stream was kept constant. The results obtained demonstrate that the H 2 yields from the fermentation of food wastes were affected by modifications in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) due to incomplete hydrolysis. The decrease in the duration of fermentation had a negative effect on the conversion of the substrate into soluble products. This resulted in a lower amount of soluble substrate being available for metabolisation by H 2 producing microflora leading to a reduction in specific H 2 production. Adsorption of CO 2 from a gas stream generated from the dark fermentation process was successfully carried out. The data obtained demonstrate that the column filled with biomass-derived activated carbon resulted in a high degree of hydrogen purification. Co-adsorption of H 2 S onto the activated carbon also took place, there being no evidence of H 2 S present in the bio-H 2 exiting the column. Nevertheless, the concentration of H 2 S was very low, and this co-adsorption did not affect the CO 2

  20. Hydrogen adsorption strength and sites in the metal organic framework MOF5: Comparing experiment and model calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, F. M.; Dingemans, T. J.; Schimmel, H. G.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Kearley, G. J.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in porous, high surface area, and stable metal organic frameworks (MOF's) appears a novel route towards hydrogen storage materials [N.L. Rosi, J. Eckert, M. Eddaoudi, D.T. Vodak, J. Kim, M. O'Keeffe, O.M. Yaghi, Science 300 (2003) 1127; J.L.C. Rowsell, A.R. Millward, K. Sung Park, O.M. Yaghi, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126 (2004) 5666; G. Ferey, M. Latroche, C. Serre, F. Millange, T. Loiseau, A. Percheron-Guegan, Chem. Commun. (2003) 2976; T. Loiseau, C. Serre, C. Huguenard, G. Fink, F. Taulelle, M. Henry, T. Bataille, G. Férey, Chem. Eur. J. 10 (2004) 1373]. A prerequisite for such materials is sufficient adsorption interaction strength for hydrogen adsorbed on the adsorption sites of the material because this facilitates successful operation under moderate temperature and pressure conditions. Here we report detailed information on the geometry of the hydrogen adsorption sites, based on the analysis of inelastic neutron spectroscopy (INS). The adsorption energies for the metal organic framework MOF5 equal about 800 K for part of the different sites, which is significantly higher than for nanoporous carbon materials (˜550 K) [H.G. Schimmel, G.J. Kearley, M.G. Nijkamp, C.T. Visser, K.P. de Jong, F.M. Mulder, Chem. Eur. J. 9 (2003) 4764], and is in agreement with what is found in first principles calculations [T. Sagara, J. Klassen, E. Ganz, J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2004) 12543; F.M. Mulder, T.J. Dingemans, M. Wagemaker, G.J. Kearley, Chem. Phys. 317 (2005) 113]. Assignments of the INS spectra is realized using comparison with independently published model calculations [F.M. Mulder, T.J. Dingemans, M. Wagemaker, G.J. Kearley, Chem. Phys. 317 (2005) 113] and structural data [T. Yildirim, M.R. Hartman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 (2005) 215504].

  1. Hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon nanotubes with an atomic-sized vanadium catalyst investigated by electrical resistance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Ji Sun; Yun, Jumi; Kang, Seok Chang; Lee, Sung Kyu; Lee, Young-Seak

    2012-01-01

    Activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared with appended vanadium as a hydrogen storage medium. The pore structure was significantly improved by an activation process that was studied using Raman spectroscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy and pore analysis techniques. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results reveal that the vanadium catalyst was introduced into the carbon nanotubes in controlled proportions, forming V 8 C 7 . The improved pore structure functioned as a path through the carbon nanotubes that encouraged hydrogen molecule adsorption, and the introduced vanadium catalyst led to high levels of hydrogen storage through the dissociation of hydrogen molecules via the spill-over phenomenon. The hydrogen storage behavior was investigated by electrical resistance measurements for the hydrogen adsorbed on a prepared sample. The proposed mechanism of hydrogen storage suggests that the vanadium catalyst increases not only the amount of hydrogen that is stored but also the speed at which it is stored. A hydrogen storage capacity of 2.26 wt.% was achieved with the activation effects and the vanadium catalyst at 30 °C and 10 MPa.

  2. EFFECT OF DIATOMEAOUS EARTH TREATMENT USING HYDROGEN CHLORIDE AND SULFURIC ACID ON KINETICS OF CADMIUM(II ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, treatment of diatomaceous earth, Sangiran, Central Java using hydrogen chloride (HCl and sulfuric acid (H2SO4 on kinetics of Cd(II adsorption in aqueous solution has been carried out. The work was conducted by mixing an amount of grounded diatomaceous earth (200 mesh in size with HCl or H2SO4 solution in various concentrations for two hours at temperature range of 100 - 150oC. The mixture was then filtered and washed with water until the filtrate pH is approximately 7 and then the residue was dried for four hours at a temperature of 70oC. The product was used as an adsorbent to adsorb Cd(II in aqueous solution with various concentrations. The Cd(II adsorbed was determined by analyzing the rest of Cd(II in the solution using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effect of treatment was evaluated from kinetic parameter of adsorption rate constant calculated based on the simple kinetic model. Results showed  that before equilibrium condition reached, adsorpstion of Cd(II occurred through two steps, i.e. a step tends to follow a reaction of irreversible first order  (step I followed by reaction of reversible first order (step II. Treatment with acids, either hydrogen chloride or sulfuric acid, decreased adsorption rate constant for the step I from 15.2/min to a range of 6.4 - 9.4/min.  However, increasing concentration of acid (in a range of concentration investigated did not give significant and constant change of adsorption rate constant. For step II process,  adsorption involved physical interaction with the sufficient low adsorption energy (in a range of 311.3 - 1001 J/mol.     Keywords: adsorption, cdmium, diatomaceous earth, kinetics.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon fiber. Tests on Parisian subway; Elimination du sulfure d'hydrogene par adsorption sur tissu de charbon actif. Essais sur site RATP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzaza, A.; Marsteau, St.; Laplanche, A. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, Lab. Chimie des Nuissances et Genie de l' Environnement - CNGE, 35 - Rennes (France); Garrot, B. [RATP, Dept. Environnement et Securite-Domaines d' Expertises de l' Environnement-Entite Qualite de l' Air, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has an unpleasant odor and may cause damage to the electrical materials of the Parisian subway. The activated carbon has some intrinsic catalytic activity, so the removal of hydrogen sulfide is due to an adsorption-oxidation process. In a laboratory scale, some kinetic parameters were acquired, which allowed us to build up two dynamic reactors. These continuous reactors, equipped with activated carbon fibers, were tested on the Madeleine station of the Parisian subway. The feasibility of the elimination of H{sub 2}S by continuous adsorption-oxidation was confirmed. The relative humidity of the gas phase was found to play an important role in the performance of the elimination. The durability of the pilot tested was compatible with an industrial exploitation of the process. (authors)

  4. Hydrogen spillover phenomenon: Enhanced reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-coated Pt electrode in acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, Shunsuke [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G1-5 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Awad, Mohamed I.; El-Deab, Mohamed S. [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G1-5 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Okajima, Takeyoshi [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G1-5 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Ohsaka, Takeo, E-mail: ohsaka@echem.titech.ac.j [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G1-5 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2010-04-01

    The current study is concerned with the preparation and characterization of tantalum oxide-loaded Pt (TaO{sub x}/Pt) electrodes for hydrogen spillover application. XPS, SEM, EDX and XRD techniques are used to characterize the TaO{sub x}/Pt surfaces. TaO{sub x}/Pt electrodes were prepared by galvanostatic electrodeposition of Ta on Pt from LiF-NaF (60:40 mol%) molten salts containing K{sub 2}TaF{sub 7} (20 wt%) at 800 deg. C and then by annealing in air at various temperatures (200, 400 and 600 deg. C). The thus-fabricated TaO{sub x}/Pt electrodes were compared with the non-annealed Ta/Pt and the unmodified Pt electrodes for the hydrogen adsorption/desorption (H{sub ads}/H{sub des}) reaction. The oxidation of Ta to the stoichiometric oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) increases with increasing the annealing temperature as revealed from XPS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The higher the annealing temperature the larger is the enhancement in the H{sub ads}/H{sub des} reaction at TaO{sub x}/Pt electrode. The extraordinary increase in the hydrogen adsorption/desorption at the electrode annealed at 600 deg. C is explained on the basis of a hydrogen spillover-reverse spillover mechanism. The hydrogen adsorption at the TaO{sub x}/Pt electrode is a diffusion-controlled process.

  5. Development of a facility for the recovery of high-purity hydrogen from coke oven gas by pressure swing adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M; Saida, K; Uenoyama, K; Sugishita, M; Imokawa, K

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports 1) a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system comprising three towers, each packed with three different adsorbents; and 2) studies of the application of this system to the recovery of high-purity hydrogen from coke oven gas. Running the adsorption plant at 35 C and 9.5 kg/cm/sup 2/ gives optimum operating stability and economy. In addition, an optimum time cycle for the three-tower system has been developed. Gas from the PSA equipment proper still contains traces of oxygen. This is removed in a further tower packed with Pd catalyst. The ultimate recovery of hydrogen is closely related to its concentration in the raw coke oven gas and to the degree of purity attained. 3 references.

  6. A three-site Langmuir adsorption model to elucidate the temperature, pressure, and support dependence of the hydrogen coverage on supported Pt particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Y.; Koot, V.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Ramaker, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    The three-site adsorption model, previously developed to describe H adsorption on small Pt particles, was used to gain insight into dependence of hydrogen coverage on temperature, pressure, and support ionicity. The three sites, in order of decreasing PtH bond strength, involve H in an atop, a

  7. Green Hydrogen Production from Raw Biogas: A Techno-Economic Investigation of Conventional Processes Using Pressure Swing Adsorption Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gioele Di Marcoberardino

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the techno-economic assessment of hydrogen production from biogas with conventional systems. The work is part of the European project BIONICO, whose purpose is to develop and test a membrane reactor (MR for hydrogen production from biogas. Within the BIONICO project, steam reforming (SR and autothermal reforming (ATR, have been identified as well-known technologies for hydrogen production from biogas. Two biogases were examined: one produced by landfill and the other one by anaerobic digester. The purification unit required in the conventional plants has been studied and modeled in detail, using Aspen Adsorption. A pressure swing adsorption system (PSA with two and four beds and a vacuum PSA (VPSA made of four beds are compared. VPSA operates at sub-atmospheric pressure, thus increasing the recovery: results of the simulations show that the performances strongly depend on the design choices and on the gas feeding the purification unit. The best purity and recovery values were obtained with the VPSA system, which achieves a recovery between 50% and 60% at a vacuum pressure of 0.1 bar and a hydrogen purity of 99.999%. The SR and ATR plants were designed in Aspen Plus, integrating the studied VPSA model, and analyzing the behavior of the systems at the variation of the pressure and the type of input biogas. The SR system achieves a maximum efficiency, calculated on the LHV, of 52% at 12 bar, while the ATR of 28% at 18 bar. The economic analysis determined a hydrogen production cost of around 5 €/kg of hydrogen for the SR case.

  8. Simulation of oxygen-steam gasification with CO{sub 2} adsorption for hydrogen production from empty fruit bunch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M.M.; Inayat, A.; Yusup, S.; Sabil, K.M. [Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Tronoh (Malaysia). Center of Biofuel and Biochemical, Green Technology Mission Oriented Research

    2011-07-01

    The world is facing a critical situation in which fossil fuel reservoir is depleting while the demand for energy is increasing worldwide. Scientists globally have shifted their effort towards developing alternative sustainable fuels and quite a number of technologies have been discovered. One potential alternative solution is to produce energy from hydrogen as its energy content per kilogram is three times larger than that of gasoline. The combustion of hydrogen produces water instead of greenhouse gases, along with energy, making hydrogen even more attractive as a clean fuel. Current study focuses on the process development of hydrogen production via gasification of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) with in-situ adsorption of CO{sub 2} based on equilibrium modeling approach. The process flowsheet simulation is performed using iCON, PETRONAS process simulation software. This work investigates the influence of the temperature within the range of 600 to 1000 C and steam/biomass ratio between 0.1 and 1.0 on the hydrogen yield and product gas composition. The importance of different reactions involved in the system is also discussed. Using the simulation, the optimal operating conditions are predicted to be at 800 C and steam/biomass ratio of 0.6. Hydrogen yield of 149g kg{sup -1} of EFB can be obtained at 1000 C. The preliminary economic potential per annum of the oxygen-steam gasification system coupled with in situ CO{sub 2} adsorption is RM 6.64 x 10{sup 6} or approximately USD 2 x 10{sup 6}.

  9. Hydrogen Adsorption on Ga2O3 Surface: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yun-xiang; Mei, Donghai; Liu, Chang-jun; Ge, Qingfeng

    2011-05-03

    In the present work, hydrogen adsorption on the Ga2O3 surfaces was investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Both the FTIR and DFT studies suggest that H2 dissociates on the Ga2O3 surfaces, producing OH and GaH species. The FTIR bands at 3730, 3700, 3630 and 3600 cm-1 are attributed to the vibration of the OH species whereas those at 2070 and 1990 cm-1 to the GaH species. The structures of the species detected in experiments are established through a comparison with the DFT calculated stretching frequencies. The O atom of the experimentally detected OH species is believed to originate from the surface O3c atom. On the other hand, the H atom that binds the coordinately unsaturated Ga atom results in the experimentally detected GaH species. Dissociation of H2 on the perfect Ga2O3 surface, with the formation of both OH and GaH species, is endothermic and has an energy barrier of 0.90 eV. In contrast, H2 dissociation on the defective Ga2O3 surface with oxygen vacancies, which mainly produces GaH species, is exothermic, with an energy barrier of 0.61 eV. Accordingly, presence of the oxygen vacancies promotes H2 dissociation and production of GaH species on the Ga2O3 surfaces. Higher temperatures are expected to favor oxygen vacancy creation on the Ga2O3 surfaces, and thereby benefit the production of GaH species. This analysis is consistent with the FTIR results that the bands assigned to GaH species become stronger at higher temperatures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Comparison of reactivity on step and terrace sites of Pd (3 3 2) surface for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Farouq; Nagumo, Ryo; Miura, Ryuji; Ai, Suzuki; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The notion of 'active sites' is fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis. However, the exact nature of the active sites, and hence the mechanism by which they act, are still largely a matter of speculation. In this study, we have presented a systematic quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations for the interaction of hydrogen on different step and terrace sites of the Pd (3 3 2) surface. Finally the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on step and terrace as well as the influence of surface hydrogen vacancy for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen has been investigated through QCMD. This is a state-of-the-art method for calculating the interaction of atoms and molecules with metal surfaces. It is found that fully hydrogen covered (saturated) step sites can dissociate hydrogen moderately and that a monovacancy surface is suitable for significant dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. However in terrace site of the surface we have found that dissociation of hydrogen takes place only on Pd sites where the metal atom is not bound to any pre-adsorbed hydrogen atoms. Furthermore, from the molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations, we identify a number of consequences for the interpretation and modeling of diffusion experiments demonstrating the coverage and directional dependence of atomic hydrogen diffusion on stepped palladium surface.

  11. Enhanced reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on the composites of graphene/graphite oxide with copper (hydr)oxychlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-06-27

    Composites of copper (hydr)oxychlorides with graphite oxide or graphene were synthesized and used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at dynamic conditions at ambient temperatures. The materials were extensively characterized before and after adsorption in order to link their performance to the surface features. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, thermal analysis, TEM, SEM/EDX, and adsorption of nitrogen were used. It was found that the composite with graphene has the most favorable surface features enhancing reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide. The presence of moisture in the H2S stream has a positive effect on the removal process owing to the dissociation process. H2S is retained on the surface via a direct replacement of OH groups and via acid-base reactions with the copper (hydr)oxide. Highly dispersed reduced copper species on the surface of the composite with graphene enhance activation of oxygen and cause formation of sulfites and sulfates. Higher conductivity of the graphene phase than that of graphite oxide helps in electron transfer in redox reactions.

  12. Effects of buffer agents on hydrogen adsorption and desorption at/within activated carbon for the negative electrode of aqueous asymmetric supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, Hsiu-Chuan; Wu, Tzu-Ho; Rajkumar, Muniyandi; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • H adsorption causes local pH increase and negatively shifts the double-layer potential window. • The local pH variation at AC/electrolyte interface can be controlled via adding buffer agents. • H adsorption potential on AC in buffer electrolytes follows the Nernstian dependence. • The pseudocapacitive reversibility of H adsorption/desorption at/within AC is too poor. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of adding buffer agents into aqueous electrolytes on the hydrogen adsorption/desorption behaviour at/within activated carbon are systematically investigated for the negative electrode of asymmetric supercapacitors. Due to the poor electrochemical reversibility of hydrogen adsorption/desorption at/within activated carbon, the hydrogen responses at/within activated carbon are not suitable for pseudo-capacitive energy storage of high-performance asymmetric supercapacitor. The electrochemical adsorption of H atoms consumes protons and causes the local pH change at the activated carbon/electrolyte interface, leading to the negative shift in the H adsorption potential when weakly acidic, neutral, and weakly basic electrolytes without buffer agents are employed. The addition of buffer agents into electrolytes significantly improves the rate of proton supply and promotes the rate of hydrogen adsorption at/within AC. Interestingly, the onset potential of significant H adsorption obtained from the buffered electrolytes generally follows the Nernstian dependence, suggesting the Nerstian dependence of H"+/H_a_d_s on AC at all pH values. In order to obtain the energy storage devices with high coulombic and energy efficiencies, the onset potential of significant H adsorption obtained from the electrolyte containing buffer agents is a reliable lower potential limit of the AC-coated negative electrode for aqueous asymmetric supercapacitors.

  13. Influence of hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions on the adsorption performance of ionic liquid surface molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guifen; Gao, Xia; Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Jianji; Fan, Jing

    2018-01-12

    To illuminate the influence mechanism of anionic structure of ionic liquids (ILs) on the adsorption performance of surface molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), in this work, six newly designed MIPs were prepared on the surface of amino-poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) particles by using imidazolium ILs with the same cation [C 4 mim] + but different anions (Cl, CH 3 SO 3 , PF 6 , BF 4 , C 4 F 7 O 2 , C 4 F 9 SO 3 ) as template molecules, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, and ethylene dimethacrylate as cross-linker. The resulting MIP materials were characterized by IR and SEM, and the influence of hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions on the adsorption performance of the MIPs for the ILs was investigated in acetonitrile. It was found that adsorption capacity of the MIPs towards the ILs decreased in the order MIP [C4mim][Cl]  > MIP [C4mim][C4F7O2]  ≥ MIP [C4mim][BF4] and MIP [C4mim][CH3SO3]  > MIP [C4mim][C4F9SO3]  > MIP [C4mim][PF6] , which is in good agreement with the ability of anions of the ILs to form hydrogen bonds. Ultraviolet, 1 H-NMR and 35 Cl-NMR spectroscopy was then used to study the interactions of anions of the ILs with the functional monomer. It was found that the hydrogen bond interaction between anions of the ILs and acidic proton of the functional monomer was the main driving force for the high adsorption selectivity of the imprinted polymers, and the stronger hydrogen bond interaction indicates higher binding capacity and higher selectivity of the polymers towards the ILs. It was also verified that the ILs with stronger hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions could be selectively extracted by the corresponding IL-MIPs. These results may provide new insight into the recognition mechanism of MIPs for ILs, and are also useful for the rational design of this new class of imprinting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. D/H fractionation in the H2-H2O system at supercritical water conditions: Compositional and hydrogen bonding effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Mysen, Bjorn O.

    2012-06-01

    A series of experiments has been conducted in the H2-D2-D2O-H2O-Ti-TiO2 system at temperatures ranging from 300 to 800 °C and pressures between ∼0.3 and 1.3 GPa in a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell, utilizing Raman spectroscopy as a quantitative tool to explore the relative distribution of hydrogen and deuterium isotopologues of the H2 and H2O in supercritical fluids. In detail, H2O-D2O solutions (1:1) were reacted with Ti metal (3-9 h) in the diamond cell, leading to formation of H2, D2, HD, and HDO species through Ti oxidation and H-D isotope exchange reactions. Experimental results obtained in situ and at ambient conditions on quenched samples indicate significant differences from the theoretical estimates of the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of the H-D exchange reactions. In fact, the estimated enthalpy for the H2(aq)-D2(aq) disproportionation reaction (ΔHrxn) is about -3.4 kcal/mol, which differs greatly from the +0.16 kcal/mol predicted for the exchange reaction in the gas phase by statistical mechanics models. The exothermic behavior of the exchange reaction implies enhanced stability of H2 and D2 relative to HD. Accordingly, the significant energy difference of the internal H2(aq)-D2(aq)-HD(aq) equilibrium translates to strong differences of the fractionation effects between the H2O-H2 and D2O-D2 isotope exchange relationships. The D/H fractionation factors between H2O-H2(aq) and D2O-D2(aq) differ by 365‰ in the 600-800 °C temperature range, and are indicative of the greater effect of D2O contribution to the δD isotopic composition of supercritical fluids. The negative ΔHrxn values for the H2(aq)-D2(aq)-HD(aq) equilibrium and the apparent decrease of the equilibrium constant with increasing temperature might be because of differences of the Henry’s law constant between the H- and D-bearing species dissolved in supercritical aqueous solutions. Such effects may be attributed to the stronger hydrogen bonding in the O-H⋯O relative to the

  15. Scaling properties of adsorption energies for hydrogen-containing molecules on transition-metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Studt, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately with the adsorp...

  16. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon Sub [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Greenhouse Gas Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Moon Gyu [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Croiset, Eric, E-mail: ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Chen, Zhongwei [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung [Greenhouse Gas Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Kwang Bok, E-mail: cosy32@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H{sub 2}S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H{sub 2}S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} on H{sub 2}S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H{sub 2}S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H{sub 2}S since it allows a reducing environment for Zn-O and Zn-S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn{sup 2+}) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}.

  17. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hoon Sub; Park, Moon Gyu; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Yi, Kwang Bok

    2013-09-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H2S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H2S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H2 and CO2 on H2S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H2S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H2S since it allows a reducing environment for Znsbnd O and Znsbnd S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn2+) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H2S and CO2.

  18. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon Sub; Park, Moon Gyu; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Yi, Kwang Bok

    2013-01-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H 2 S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H 2 S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H 2 and CO 2 on H 2 S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H 2 S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H 2 S since it allows a reducing environment for Zn-O and Zn-S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn 2+ ) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H 2 S and CO 2 .

  19. Adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by metals in non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, A.I.; Notkin, M.E.; Pustovojt, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    To study the interaction of thermonuclear plasma and additions with metallic walls, nonequilibrium system of thermal atomary hydrogen - ''cold'' (300-1100 K) metal is experimentally investigated. Atomary hydrogen was feeded to samples of Ni and Pd in the shape of atomic beam, coming into vacuum from high-frequency gaseous discharge. It is shown that hydrogen solubility under nonequilibrium conditions increases with surface passivation (contamination); in this case it surpasses equilibrium solubility by value orders. Nickel and iron dissolve more hydrogen than palladium at a certain state of surface ( passivation) and gas (atomary hydrogen). The sign of the temperature dependence of hydrogen solubility in passivated N 1 and Fe changes when alterating molecular hydrogen by atomary hydrogen

  20. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.; Bessho, Naoki; Bhandari, Dhaval A.; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki; Koros, William J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  1. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2012-10-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  2. Semiempirical quantum model approach for hydrogen adsorption in ZrNi alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bin-Hao, E-mail: binhao17@gmail.com [Department of Energy Application Engineering, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Rd., Xinshi Dist., Tainan City 74448, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Chien-Chung [Department of Hydrogen Energy and Fuel Cells, Green Energy and Eco-Technology Center, ITRI, No. 49, Zhonghua Rd., Xinshi Dist., Tainan City 74448, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yeh, Yen-Lian; Jang, Ming-Jyi [Department of Automation and Control Engineering, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Rd., Xinshi Dist., Tainan City 74448, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •The hydrogen diffusion behavior in solid ZrNi alloy performs clearly by MD. •Shear and Young’s modulus agree with the experiment study very well. •Current model can apply to hydrogen-tech material development. -- Abstract: Hydrogen storage is an important topic because of its relevance to the future energy economy. Hydrogen diffusivity in materials plays an important role in hydrogen technology both for hydrogen separation and hydrogen storage. To clarify the mechanism of the rate-controlling step, diffusion mechanism of hydrogen in metallic materials is studied by molecular dynamics method. This study performs semi-empirical-quantum molecular dynamic simulations in order to clarify hydrogen atom diffusion behavior in ZrNi alloys materials. We investigate the mechanical properties change associated with temperature variation for ZrNi base alloys and also consider the influence of materials micro-structure change of hydrogen diffusion. Finally, current work presents a theoretically prediction of dynamical diffusion coefficient to compare diffusion kinetics of crystalline and amorphous structure.

  3. First Principles Study of Adsorption of Hydrogen on Typical Alloying Elements and Inclusions in Molten 2219 Al Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the effect of the components of molten 2219 Al alloy on the hydrogen content dissolved in it, the H adsorption on various positions of alloying element clusters of Cu, Mn and Al, as well as the inclusion of Al2O3, MgO and Al4C3, were investigated by means of first principles calculation, and the thermodynamic stability of H adsorbed on each possible site was also studied on the basis of formation energy. Results show that the interaction between Al, MgO, Al4C3 and H atoms is mainly repulsive and energetically unfavorable; a favorable interaction between Cu, Mn, Al2O3 and H atoms was determined, with H being more likely to be adsorbed on the top of the third atomic layer of Cu(111, the second atomic layer of Mn(111, and the O atom in the third atomic layer of Al2O3, compared with other sites. It was found that alloying elements Cu and Mn and including Al2O3 may increase the hydrogen adsorption in the molten 2219 Al alloy with Al2O3 being the most sensitive component in this regard.

  4. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF HYDROGEN ADSORBING TO AMORPHOUS WATER ICE: DEFINING ADSORPTION IN CLASSICAL MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, John L.; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Gas–grain and gas–phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas–grain reactions require a substrate (e.g., a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas–grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking probabilities and coefficients. Here, using our new definition of a sticking event, we report sticking probabilities and sticking coefficients for nine different incident kinetic energies of hydrogen atoms [5–400 K] across seven different temperatures of dust grains [10–70 K]. We find that probabilities and coefficients vary both as a function of grain temperature and incident kinetic energy over the range of 0.99–0.22.

  5. Characterization of narrow micropores in almond shell biochars by nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterization of biochars usually includes surface area and pore volume determination by nitrogen adsorption. In this study, we show that there is a substantial pore volume in biochars created via slow pyrolysis from low- and high-ash almond shells that cannot be characterized in this fashion due...

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of the use a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water-splitting cycle for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved 'steam' parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625degC and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600degC. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the 'nuclear' heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted of

  7. Hydrogen adsorption and storage on Palladium – functionalized graphene with NH-dopant: A first principles calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faye, Omar, E-mail: omf071@mail.usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 Saskatchewan (Canada); Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar (Senegal); Szpunar, Jerzy A; Szpunar, Barbara [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 Saskatchewan (Canada); Beye, Aboubaker Chedikh [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar (Senegal)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • H{sub 2} adsorption in single and double-sided Pd-G(3x3) and the effect of NH radical on graphene were studied. • Strong interaction of Pd and graphene in double-sided Pd-G(3x3) than that in the single-sided Pd-G(3x3). • The storage capacity was 3.622 wt% with a binding energy of 0.658 eV/H2. • The increase of NH radicals on Pd-G(3x3) enhanced the binding of Pd atoms on the graphene sheet. • We predicted that 2NH-dopant at the opposite site of Pd atoms prevents the desorption of Pd atom from graphene sheet. - Abstract: We conducted a detailed theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of single and double sided Pd-functionalized graphene and NH-doped Pd-functionalized graphene, which are shown to be efficient materials for hydrogen storage. Nitrene radical dopant was an effective addition required for enhancing the Pd binding on the graphene sheet as well as the storage of hydrogen. We found that up to eight H{sub 2} molecules could be adsorbed by double-sided Pd-functionalized graphene at 0 K with an average binding energy in the range 1.315–0.567 eVA gravimetric hydrogen density of 3.622 wt% was reached in the Pd-functionalized graphene on both sides. The binding mechanism of H{sub 2} molecules came not only the polarization mechanism between Pd and H atoms but also from the binding of the Pd atoms on the graphene sheet and the orbital hybridization. The most crucial part of our work is measuring the effect of nitrene radical on the H{sub 2} adsorption on Pd-functionalized graphene. Our calculations predicted that the addition of NH radicals on Pd-functionalized graphene enhance the binding of H{sub 2} molecules, which helps also to avoid the desorption of Pd(H{sub 2}){sub n} (n = 1–5) complexes from graphene sheet. Our results also predict Pd-functionalized NH-doped graphene is a potential hydrogen storage medium for on-board applications.

  8. Hydrogen adsorption and storage on Palladium – functionalized graphene with NH-dopant: A first principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faye, Omar; Szpunar, Jerzy A; Szpunar, Barbara; Beye, Aboubaker Chedikh

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • H_2 adsorption in single and double-sided Pd-G(3x3) and the effect of NH radical on graphene were studied. • Strong interaction of Pd and graphene in double-sided Pd-G(3x3) than that in the single-sided Pd-G(3x3). • The storage capacity was 3.622 wt% with a binding energy of 0.658 eV/H2. • The increase of NH radicals on Pd-G(3x3) enhanced the binding of Pd atoms on the graphene sheet. • We predicted that 2NH-dopant at the opposite site of Pd atoms prevents the desorption of Pd atom from graphene sheet. - Abstract: We conducted a detailed theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of single and double sided Pd-functionalized graphene and NH-doped Pd-functionalized graphene, which are shown to be efficient materials for hydrogen storage. Nitrene radical dopant was an effective addition required for enhancing the Pd binding on the graphene sheet as well as the storage of hydrogen. We found that up to eight H_2 molecules could be adsorbed by double-sided Pd-functionalized graphene at 0 K with an average binding energy in the range 1.315–0.567 eVA gravimetric hydrogen density of 3.622 wt% was reached in the Pd-functionalized graphene on both sides. The binding mechanism of H_2 molecules came not only the polarization mechanism between Pd and H atoms but also from the binding of the Pd atoms on the graphene sheet and the orbital hybridization. The most crucial part of our work is measuring the effect of nitrene radical on the H_2 adsorption on Pd-functionalized graphene. Our calculations predicted that the addition of NH radicals on Pd-functionalized graphene enhance the binding of H_2 molecules, which helps also to avoid the desorption of Pd(H_2)_n (n = 1–5) complexes from graphene sheet. Our results also predict Pd-functionalized NH-doped graphene is a potential hydrogen storage medium for on-board applications.

  9. Nanoporous spongy graphene: Potential applications for hydrogen adsorption and selective gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostoglou, Nikolaos, E-mail: nikolaos.kostoglou@stud.unileoben.ac.at [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Constantinides, Georgios [Research Unit for Nanostructured Materials Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, Cyprus University of Technology, 3036 Lemesos (Cyprus); Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Steriotis, Theodore [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Agia Paraskevi Attikis, 15310 Athens (Greece); Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Li, Yuanqing; Liao, Kin [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ryzhkov, Vladislav [Nanotube Production Department, Fibrtec Incorporation, TX, 75551 Atlanta (United States); Mitterer, Christian [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Rebholz, Claus, E-mail: claus@ucy.ac.cy [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, a nanoporous (pore width ~ 0.7 nm) graphene-based sponge-like material with large surface area (~ 350 m{sup 2}/g) was synthesized by wet chemical reduction of graphene oxide in combination with freeze-drying. Surface morphology and elemental composition were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Surface chemistry was qualitatively examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, while the respective structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Textural properties, including Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) surface area, micropore volume and surface area as well as pore size distribution, were deduced from nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption data obtained at 77 K and up to 1 bar. Potential use of the spongy graphene for gas storage and separation applications was preliminarily assessed by low-pressure (0–1 bar) H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} sorption measurements at different temperatures (77, 273 and 298 K). The adsorption capacities for each gas were evaluated up to ~ 1 bar, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption for CO{sub 2} (28–33 kJ/mol) and CH{sub 4} (30–38 kJ/mol) were calculated using the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, while the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas selectivity (up to 95:1) was estimated using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST). - Highlights: • Nanoporous sponge produced by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and freeze-drying • Characterization performed using SEM, EDS, TEM, FT-IR, BET and XRD methods • Gas storage performance evaluated towards H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption up to 1 bar • CO{sub 2} over CH{sub 4} gas selectivity estimated between 45 and 95 at 273 K using the IAST model.

  10. Nanoporous spongy graphene: Potential applications for hydrogen adsorption and selective gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostoglou, Nikolaos; Constantinides, Georgios; Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Steriotis, Theodore; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Li, Yuanqing; Liao, Kin; Ryzhkov, Vladislav; Mitterer, Christian; Rebholz, Claus

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a nanoporous (pore width ~ 0.7 nm) graphene-based sponge-like material with large surface area (~ 350 m"2/g) was synthesized by wet chemical reduction of graphene oxide in combination with freeze-drying. Surface morphology and elemental composition were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Surface chemistry was qualitatively examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, while the respective structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Textural properties, including Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) surface area, micropore volume and surface area as well as pore size distribution, were deduced from nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption data obtained at 77 K and up to 1 bar. Potential use of the spongy graphene for gas storage and separation applications was preliminarily assessed by low-pressure (0–1 bar) H_2, CO_2 and CH_4 sorption measurements at different temperatures (77, 273 and 298 K). The adsorption capacities for each gas were evaluated up to ~ 1 bar, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption for CO_2 (28–33 kJ/mol) and CH_4 (30–38 kJ/mol) were calculated using the Clausius–Clapeyron equation, while the CO_2/CH_4 gas selectivity (up to 95:1) was estimated using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST). - Highlights: • Nanoporous sponge produced by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and freeze-drying • Characterization performed using SEM, EDS, TEM, FT-IR, BET and XRD methods • Gas storage performance evaluated towards H_2, CO_2 and CH_4 adsorption up to 1 bar • CO_2 over CH_4 gas selectivity estimated between 45 and 95 at 273 K using the IAST model

  11. On the nature of gallium species in gallium-modified mordenite and MFI zeolites. A comparative DRIFT study of carbon monoxide adsorption and hydrogen dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serykh, Alexander I; Kolesnikov, Stanislav P

    2011-04-21

    The results of a DRIFT study of carbon monoxide molecular adsorption and hydrogen dissociative adsorption on gallium-modified mordenite and MFI (ZSM-5) zeolites are presented. It was found that in the reduced gallium-modified mordenite (Ga-MOR) both Ga(3+) and Ga(+) exchanged cations are present and can be detected by CO adsorption. Ga(3+) cations in Ga-MOR dissociatively adsorb molecular hydrogen at elevated temperatures, resulting in the formation of gallium hydride species and acidic hydroxyl groups. In the reduced Ga-MFI evacuated at 823 K under medium vacuum conditions only Ga(+) exchanged intrazeolite cations were detected. It was found, however, that Ga(3+) intrazeolite exchanged cations which form upon high-temperature disproportionation of Ga(+) cations in the reduced Ga-MFI and Ga-MOR can be stabilized by high-temperature oxidation of these zeolites.

  12. Adsorption of alcohols and fatty acids onto hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M.; Kovač, J.; Jakša, G.

    2016-02-01

    Information about the interactions between lubricants and DLC coatings is scarce, despite there having been many studies over the years. In this investigation we used ToF-SIMS, XPS and contact-angle analyses to examine the adsorption ability and mechanisms with respect to two oiliness additives, i.e., hexadecanol and hexadecanoic acid, on an a-C:H coating. In addition, we analyzed the resistance of the adsorbed films to external influences like solvent cleaning. The results show that both molecules adsorb onto surface oxides and hydroxides present on the initial DLC surface and shield these structures with their hydrocarbon tails. This makes the surfaces less polar, which is manifested in a smaller polar component of the surface energy. We also showed that ultrasonic cleaning in heptane has no significant effect on the quantity of adsorbed molecules or on their chemical state. This not only shows the relatively strong adsorption of these molecules, but also provides useful information for future experimental work. Of the two examined molecules, the acid showed a greater adsorption ability than the alcohol, which explains some of the previously reported better tribological properties in the case of the acid with respect to the alcohol.

  13. Techno-economic assessment of biogas plant upgrading by adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on treated sewage–sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, P.G.; Gutiérrez Ortiz, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three processes were considered: desulfurization by adsorption, in-situ sorbent regeneration and its production. • The steam for regeneration was studied considering it as a bought external utility and as an in-situ produced utility. • From the cash flow analysis, the cost of the overall desulfurization process was between 2.5 and 4.0 c€/Nm"3. • A sensitivity analysis was carried out to consider the uncertainty of the methodology. • The competitiveness of the technology seems to be promising versus other biogas H_2S removal technologies. - Abstract: Biogas plant upgrading by adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on treated sewage–sludge was techno-economically assessed. Three different processes were included in the study: the desulfurization of biogas by adsorption, the in-situ regeneration of the adsorbent and its production from sewage-sludge. Biogas plant upgrading was performed for a flow rate of 1000 Nm"3/h of biogas with a H_2S concentration of 2000 ppmv and a breakthrough concentration of 200 ppmv, which is the technical limit value for internal combustion engines. The cost due to the steam required for the in-situ regeneration was evaluated in two different scenarios: as a bought external utility and as an in-situ produced utility, installing an electric or a biogas steam boiler. According to the cash flow analysis carried out, all the options require a similar minimum selling price for the upgraded biogas (about 0.27–0.29 €/Nm"3), with a cost of the overall desulfurization process between 2.5 and 4.0 c€/Nm"3.

  14. A study on metal organic framework (MOF-177) synthesis, characterization and hydrogen adsorption -desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viditha, V.; Venkateswer Rao, M.; Srilatha, K.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P. (India); Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen has long been considered to be an ideal alternative to fossil-fuel systems and much work has now been done on its storage. There are four main methods of hydrogen storage: as a liquid; as compressed hydrogen; in the form of metal hydrides; and by physisorption. Among all the materials metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are considered to have desirable properties like high porosity, pore volume and high thermal stability. MOF-177 is considered to be an ideal storage material. In this paper we study about its synthesis and hydrogen storage capacities of MOF-177 at different pressures ranging from 25, 50, 75 and 100 bar respectively. The obtained samples are characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The recorded results show that the obtained hydrogen capacity is 1.1, 2.20, 2.4 and 2.80 wt%. The desorption capacity is 0.9, 2.1, 2.37 and 2.7 wt% at certain temperatures like 373 K.

  15. Effect of hydrogen adsorption on the formation and annealing of Stone-Wales defects in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlivaev, A. I.; Openov, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The heights of energy barriers preventing the formation and annealing of Stone-Wales defects in graphene with a hydrogen atom adsorbed on the defect or in its immediate vicinity have been calculated using the atomistic computer simulation. It has been shown that, in the presence of hydrogen, both barriers are significantly lower than those in the absence of hydrogen. Based on the analysis of the potential energy surface, the frequency factors have been calculated for two different paths of the Stone-Wales transformation, and the temperature dependences of the corresponding annealing times of the defects have been found. The results obtained have been compared with the first-principles calculations and molecular dynamics data.

  16. Creation of paired electron states in the gap of semiconducting carbon nanotubes by correlated hydrogen adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchs, Gilles; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Ruffieux, Pascal; Groening, Pierangelo; Foster, Adam S; Nieminen, Risto M; Groening, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The specific, local modification of the electronic structure of carbon nanomaterials is as important for novel electronic device fabrication as the doping in the case of silicon-based electronics. Here, we report low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of semiconducting carbon nanotubes subjected to hydrogen-plasma treatment. We show that plasma treatment mostly results in the creation of paired electronic states in the nanotube band gap. Combined with extensive first-principle simulations, our results provide direct evidence that these states originate from correlated chemisorption of hydrogen adatoms on the tube surface. The energy splitting of the paired states is governed by the adatom-adatom interaction, so that controlled hydrogenation can be used for engineering the local electronic structure of nanotubes and other sp 2 -bonded nanocarbon systems

  17. Ab initio investigation on hydrogen adsorption capability in Zn and Cu-based metal organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanuwijaya, V. V., E-mail: viny.veronika@gmail.com [Engineering Physics, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganeca 10 Gd. T.P. Rachmat, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Hidayat, N. N., E-mail: avantgarde.vee@gmail.com; Agusta, M. K., E-mail: kemal@fti.itb.ac.id; Dipojono, H. K., E-mail: dipojono@tf.itb.ac.id

    2015-09-30

    One of the biggest challenge in material technology for hydrogen storage application is to increase hydrogen uptake in room temperature and pressure. As a class of highly porous material, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) holds great potential with its tunable structure. However, little is known about the effect of metal cluster to its hydrogen storage capability. Investigation on this matter has been carried out carefully on small cluster of Zn and Cu-based MOF using first principles method. The calculation of two distinct building units of MOFs, namely octahedral and paddle-wheel models, have been done with B3LYP density functional method using 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. From geometry optimization of Zn-based MOF linked by benzene-dicarboxylate (MOF-5), it is found that hydrogen tends to keep distance from metal cluster group and stays above benzene ring. In the other hand, hydrogen molecule prefers to stay atop of the exposed Cu atom in Cu-based MOF system linked by the same linker group (Cu-bdc). Calculated hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu octahedral cages at ZnO{sub 3} sites are 1.64kJ/mol and 2.73kJ/mol respectively, while hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu paddle-wheel cages calculated on top of metal atoms are found to be at 6.05kJ/mol and 6.10kJ/mol respectively. Major difference between Zn-MOF-5 and Cu-bdc hydrogen uptake performance might be caused by unsaturated metal sites present in Cu-bdc system and the influence of their geometric structures, although a small difference on binding energy in the type of transition metal used is also observed. The comparison between Zn and Cu-based MOF may contribute to a comprehensive understanding of metal clusters and the importance of selecting best transition metal for design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks.

  18. Nitrogen Adsorption and Hydrogenation on a MoFe6S9 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1999-01-01

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological nitrogen fixation where N-2 is reduced to NH3. Density functional calculations are presented of the bonding and hydrogenation of N-2 on a MoFe6S9 complex constructed to model aspects of the active site of nitrogenase. N-2 is found to bind end on to ...... on to one of the Fe atoms. A complete energy diagram for the addition of hydrogen to the MoFe6S9 complex with and without N-2 is given, and a mechanism for ammonia synthesis is proposed on this basis....

  19. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  20. Hydrogen isotope in erbium oxide: Adsorption, penetration, diffusion, and vacancy trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Wei; Chikada, Takumi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H adsorption on cubic Er 2 O 3 surface results in electron transfer from H to the surface. • The H penetration energy of at least 1.6 eV is required for cubic Er 2 O 3 surface. • The dominated mechanisms of H diffusion in bulk Er 2 O 3 are elucidated. • H diffusion near or at vacancies in Er 2 O 3 is an exothermic reaction. - Abstract: In this study, we report results using first-principles density functional theory calculations for four critical aspects of the interaction: H adsorption on Er 2 O 3 surface, surface-to-subsurface penetration of H into Er 2 O 3 , bulk diffusion of H in Er 2 O 3 , and trapping of H at vacancies. We identify surface stable adsorption positions and find that H prefers to transfer electrons to the surfaces and form covalent bonds with the nearest neighboring four oxygen atoms. For low surface coverage of H as in our case (0.89 × 10 14 H/cm 2 ), a penetration energy of at least 1.60 eV is required for cubic Er 2 O 3 surfaces. Further, the H diffusion barrier between the planes defined by Er 2 O 3 units along the favorable <1 1 1> direction is found to be very small – 0.16 eV – whereas higher barriers of 0.41 eV and 1.64 eV are required for diffusion across the planes, somewhat higher than the diffusion energy barrier of 0.20 eV observed experimentally at 873 K. In addition, we predict that interstitial H is exothermically trapped when it approaches a vacancy with the vacancy defect behaving as an electron trap since the H-vacancy defect is found to be more stable than the intrinsic defect

  1. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  2. Hydrogen isotope in erbium oxide: Adsorption, penetration, diffusion, and vacancy trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Wei, E-mail: mao@nuclear.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Chikada, Takumi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Suzuki, Akihiro [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22, Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Naka 319-1188, Ibaraki (Japan); Terai, Takayuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • H adsorption on cubic Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface results in electron transfer from H to the surface. • The H penetration energy of at least 1.6 eV is required for cubic Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. • The dominated mechanisms of H diffusion in bulk Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} are elucidated. • H diffusion near or at vacancies in Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an exothermic reaction. - Abstract: In this study, we report results using first-principles density functional theory calculations for four critical aspects of the interaction: H adsorption on Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, surface-to-subsurface penetration of H into Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, bulk diffusion of H in Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and trapping of H at vacancies. We identify surface stable adsorption positions and find that H prefers to transfer electrons to the surfaces and form covalent bonds with the nearest neighboring four oxygen atoms. For low surface coverage of H as in our case (0.89 × 10{sup 14} H/cm{sup 2}), a penetration energy of at least 1.60 eV is required for cubic Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces. Further, the H diffusion barrier between the planes defined by Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} units along the favorable <1 1 1> direction is found to be very small – 0.16 eV – whereas higher barriers of 0.41 eV and 1.64 eV are required for diffusion across the planes, somewhat higher than the diffusion energy barrier of 0.20 eV observed experimentally at 873 K. In addition, we predict that interstitial H is exothermically trapped when it approaches a vacancy with the vacancy defect behaving as an electron trap since the H-vacancy defect is found to be more stable than the intrinsic defect.

  3. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on the properties of double wall BN and (BN){sub x}C{sub y} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58059-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Azevedo, S., E-mail: sazevedo@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58059-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Kaschny, J.R. [Instituto Federal da Bahia – Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Avenida Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitória da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    In the present contribution, we apply first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to study the effects of hydrogen adsorption on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride and hybrid carbon–boron nitride double wall nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the hydrogen decoration induces significant structural deformation and an appreciable reduction in the gap energy. When the number of hydrogen atoms introduced on the outer wall is increased, desorption of hydrogen pairs are observed. The calculations indicate that each adsorbed hydrogen atom induces a structural deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. It is also found that the introduction of hydrogen atoms can be applied as an efficient tool for tuning the electronic properties of such structures. - Graphical abstract: Localized density of states of a hydrogenated double wall boron nitride nanotube. Some hydrogen pairs are desorbed, forming H{sub 2} molecules. - Highlights: • Hydrogenation induces structural deformation and reduction in the gap energy. • Each H atom induces a deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. • In some cases, desorption of H pairs from the outer wall is observed.

  4. Competitive Adsorption-Assisted Formation of One-Dimensional Cobalt Nanochains with High CO Hydrogenation Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xin [State; Ren, Zhibo [State; Institute; Zhu, Xiaolin [State; Zhang, Qinwei [State; Mei, Donghai [Institute; Chen, Biaohua [State

    2017-10-31

    In the present work, cobalt nanochains have been successfully synthesized by a novel co assisted self-assembling formation strategy. A dramatic morphology transformation from cobalt nanoparticles to nanochains are observed when co molecules were introduced into the synthetic system. DFT calculations further confirm that competitive co-adsorbed co and oleylamine over the cobalt nanoparticles facilitates the formation of cobalt nanochains, which show higher co hydrogenation performance. The present work provides a new strategic and promising method for controllable synthesis of catalyst nanomaterials with the preferred surface structure and morphology.

  5. Corrosion in the SCWR: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of the supercritical water - iron hydroxide interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallikragas, D.; Plugatyr, A.; Svishchev, I.M., E-mail: dimitrioskallikragas@trentu.ca [Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The adsorption properties of supercritical water confined between parallel iron (II) hydroxide surfaces were determined through molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations were conducted at temperatures and water densities typically found in the heat transport system of the supercritical water cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). Surface water layer densities were compared to those of the bulk water. Adsorption coverage was calculated as a function of the number of waters per surface OH group. Images of the water molecules configurations are provided along with the density profile of the adsorption layer. The observed localized adsorption and surface clustering of supercritical water, would likely produce more localized corrosion phenomena in the water bearing components of the SCWR. (author)

  6. Adsorption/oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on nitrogen-containing activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, F.; Bagreev, A.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2000-02-22

    Wood-based activated carbon was modified by impregnation with urea and heat treatment at 450 and 950 C. The chemical and physical properties of materials were determined using acid/base titration, FTIR, thermal analysis, IGC, and sorption of nitrogen. The surface features were compared to those of a commercial urea-modified carbon. Then, the H{sub 2}S breakthrough capacity tests were carried out, and the sorption capacity was evaluated. The results showed that urea-modified sorbents have a capacity similar to that of the received material; however, the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to a water-soluble species is significantly higher. It happens due to a high dispersion of basic nitrogen compounds in the small pores of carbons, where oxidation of hydrogen sulfide ions to sulfur radicals followed by the creation of sulfur oxides and sulfuric acid occurs. It is proposed that the process proceeds gradually, from small pores to larger, and that the degree of microporosity is an important factor.

  7. Hydrogen storage by adsorption on activated carbon: investigation of the thermal effects during the charging process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermosilla-Lara, G.

    2007-02-01

    This work presents an experimental and numerical investigation of the thermal effects occurring during the charge of adsorbent fixed bed tank. The influence of these thermal effects, which result from the exothermal character of the adsorption process and the pressure forces work, on the storage capacity is specially analysed. An experimental setup allowing the dynamic measurements of the temperature and pressure profiles has been used. Then the numerical protocol with the Fluent software, has been validated by comparison of the simulated pressure, flow rate and temperature fields in the tank with the results obtained from an experimental investigation carried out the dynamic storage. Several predictive simulations have been carried out in order to study the effect of the boundary conditions, as the wall temperature or effective thermal conductivity of the porous bed, on the storage capacity of the reservoir. We searched the optimal geometry of an interbed thermal dissipator for a given industrial tank. To do this we made vary the H/L ratio, which represents the ratio of the height of an elementary stage and the total length of the tank. We could determine an optimal geometry which corresponds to the value 1/3 of the ratio H/L. From this optimum we studied the effect of five additional cooling tubes on the tank storage capacity. The stored mass is 15 % higher than that obtained without these tubes. (author)

  8. Reactivity of a reduced metal oxide surface: hydrogen, water and carbon monoxide adsorption on oxygen defective rutile TiO 2( 1 1 0 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menetrey, M.; Markovits, A.; Minot, C.

    2003-02-01

    The reactivity at reduced surface differs from that on the stoichiometric perfect surfaces. This does not originate uniquely from the modification of the coordination; electron count also is determining. The general trend is a decrease of the heat of adsorption on the metal cations. The reactivity decreases at sites in the vicinity of the defects due to the reduction induced by the O vacancies. At the defect site the decrease is less pronounced for H, H 2, CO and molecular H 2O. In the case of H 2O dissociative adsorption, the defect site is more reactive than the perfect surface. Thus, a hydration converting the defective-reduced TiO 2 to the hydrogenated non-defective-reduced surface is easy. The resulting structure possesses surface hydroxyl groups. It is probably the easiest way to form the hydrogenated non-defective surface. On TiO 2, the defective surface requires very anhydrous conditions.

  9. Probing the structure, stability and hydrogen adsorption of lithium functionalized isoreticular MOF-5 (Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn) by density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramanan, Natarajan Sathiyamoorthy; Sahara, Ryoji; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-04-14

    Li adsorption on isoreticular MOFs with metal Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn was studied using density function theory. Li functionalization shows a considerable structural change associated with a volume change in isoreticular MOF-5 except for the Zn metal center. Hydrogen binding energies on Li functionalized MOFs are seen to be in the range of 0.2 eV, which is the desired value for an ideal reversible storage system. This study has clearly shown that Li doping is possible only in Zn-based MOF-5, which would be better candidate to reversibly store hydrogen.

  10. Probing the Structure, Stability and Hydrogen Adsorption of Lithium Functionalized Isoreticular MOF-5 (Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn by Density Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kawazoe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Li adsorption on isoreticular MOFs with metal Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn was studied using density function theory. Li functionalization shows a considerable structural change associated with a volume change in isoreticular MOF-5 except for the Zn metal center. Hydrogen binding energies on Li functionalized MOFs are seen to be in the range of 0.2 eV, which is the desired value for an ideal reversible storage system. This study has clearly shown that Li doping is possible only in Zn-based MOF-5, which would be better candidate to reversibly store hydrogen.

  11. Measurement of solubility of hydrogen isotopes in Li-Pb by adsorption and desorption method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edao, Yuki; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of tritium solubility in lithium lead eutectic alloy (Li-Pb) has been performed under the Japan-US collaboration work of 'TITAN'. The present paper reports that results of H and D solubility in Li-Pb which melted in an alumina tube determined by means of a constant volume method, and also reports an experimental apparatus for measurement of tritium solubility in Li-Pb in a tungsten crucible is improved and examined in the STAR facility of the Idaho National Laboratory. It was shown that H solubility in Li-Pb was easily influenced by impurities, interaction with surrounding materials and evaporated Li-Pb. The influences were suggested to be caused by large scattering among the previously reported data on solubility of hydrogen isotopes in Li-Pb. (author)

  12. Quantum mechanical calculation of the adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on metallic nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhenghe; Liu Youcheng; Wang Hongyan; Jiang Gang; Tan Mingliang

    1998-01-01

    The electronic ground state of NiH, NiD and NiT is derived to be 2 Σ + based on atomic and molecular reaction statics, then, energy E, heat capacity at constant volume C V and entropy S of these molecules have been calculated using QCISD/6-311G ** method. considering the characteristics of different motion types, the electronic and vibrational energy or entropy of molecule are assumed to be the corresponding values of their solid states. Then, it is easy to calculate ΔH degree, ΔS degree, ΔG degree and equilibrium pressure and examine the isotopic effect. The present method is somehow applicable to theoretical study on the storage-hydrogen materials

  13. Adsorption separation factors for hydrogen--deuterium (H/sub 2/-HD-D/sub 2/) mixtures on synthetic mordenite at 48 to 62/sup 0/K. [Reaction Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parbuzin, V S; Kuryakov, Yu N

    1975-07-01

    The temperature dependence of selectivity has been determined for the adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by sodium mordenite. Heats and entropies of exchange of the isotopic molecules in the gas-zeolite system have been calculated from the experimental results. (auth)

  14. Carbon nanotubes for energy storage using their hydrogen adsorption capacity: state of the art and perspectives; Nanotubos de carbono para estocagem de energia por adsorcao de hidrogenio: estado da arte e perspectivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maestro, Luis Fernando; Luengo, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Combustiveis Alternativos], e-mail: lmaestro@ifi.unicamp.br

    2004-07-01

    It is presented an updated scope of the research in carbon nanotubes synthesis, their purification and a discussion of recent results in energy storage using their hydrogen adsorption capacity. The GCA activities in this area are also discussed. (author)

  15. Generic supercritical water technology; Generic technology to shite no chorinkaisui riyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K; Ajiri, M; Inomata, H; Smith, R; Hakuta, Y [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokoyama, C [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). The Institute forChemical Reaction Science; Chin, L [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the measurement and analysis for clarifying solution structure of supercritical water and exhibition mechanism of solvent functions. It also describes the development of new processes using supercritical water as reaction solvent. The PVT measurements were conducted in the supercritical region using pure water and NaCl aqueous solution, to confirm the reduction of molar volume of the electrolyte solution. The hydration structure was examined in the supercritical aqueous solution by the molecular dynamic simulation. As a result, presence of hydrogen bond structure, where the contribution of two branching hydrogen bond can not be ignored, was suggested under the supercritical condition. Characteristics of supercritical aqueous solutions are analyzed through in-situ Raman and scattered X-ray spectral measurements. Moreover, this paper introduces developments of some processes in the supercritical water, such as decomposition of wasted polymers, recovery of chemical materials, reforming of heavy hydrocarbons by contact hydrogenation, and synthesis of fine powders of metal oxide by reaction crystallization.

  16. Early construction and operation of the highly contaminated water treatment system in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (4). Assessment of hydrogen behavior in stored Cs adsorption vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masahiro; Arai, Takahiro; Nishi, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion behavior in a cesium adsorption vessel is assessed. The vessel is used to remove radioactive substance from contaminated water, which is proceeded from Fukushima accident. Experiment and numerical calculation are conducted to clarify the characteristics of natural circulation in the vessel. The natural circulation arising from the temperature difference between inside and outside the vessel is confirmed. We develop an evaluation model to predict the natural circulation and its prediction agrees well with the results obtained by the experiment and the calculation. Using the model, we predict steady and transient behavior of hydrogen concentration. Results indicate that hydrogen concentration is kept lower than the flammability limit when the short vent pipe is open. (author)

  17. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  18. Water-Stable Metal-Organic Framework with Three Hydrogen-Bond Acceptors: Versatile Theoretical and Experimental Insights into Adsorption Ability and Thermo-Hydrolytic Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roztocki, Kornel; Lupa, Magdalena; Sławek, Andrzej; Makowski, Wacław; Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan; Matoga, Dariusz

    2018-03-19

    A new microporous cadmium metal-organic framework was synthesized both mechanochemically and in solution by using a sulfonyl-functionalized dicarboxylate linker and an acylhydrazone colinker. The three-dimensional framework is highly stable upon heating to 300 °C as well as in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures or acidic conditions. The thermally activated material exhibits steep water vapor uptake at low relative pressures at 298 K and excellent recyclability up to 260 °C as confirmed by both quasi-equilibrated temperature-programmed desorption and adsorption (QE-TPDA) method as well as adsorption isotherm measurements. Reversible isotherms and hysteretic isobars recorded for the desorption-adsorption cycles indicate the maximum uptake of 0.19 g/g (at 298 K, up to p/p 0 = 1) or 0.18 g/g (at 1 bar, within 295-375 K range), respectively. The experimental isosteric heat of adsorption (48.9 kJ/mol) indicates noncoordinative interactions of water molecules with the framework. Exchange of the solvent molecules in the as-made material with water, performed in the single-crystal to single-crystal manner, allows direct comparison of both X-ray crystal structures. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction for the water-loaded framework demonstrates the orientation of water clusters in the framework cavities and reveals their strong hydrogen bonding with sulfonyl, acyl, and carboxylate groups of the two linkers. The grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of H 2 O adsorption corroborate the experimental findings and reveal preferable locations of guest molecules in the framework voids at various pressures. Additionally, both experimental and GCMC simulation insights into the adsorption of CO 2 (at 195 K) on the activated framework are presented.

  19. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of clay minerals on the adsorption of Sr-85 and Tc-95m under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Washburne, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of three clay minerals with hydrogen peroxide affects the observed adsorption behavior of technetium relative to untreated clay under anoxic conditions. A possible adsorption mechanism of Tc is the reduction of TcO - 4 to a more positively charged or better adsorbed species. Oxidation of the clay by H 2 O 2 would hinder the reduction of TcO - 4 by buffering the clay-water system at a higher Eh value, although a difference in measured Eh value may go undetected. Sorption of strontium by the clays under the same conditions is not affected by a pretreatment with H 2 O 2 . The behavior of strontium follows that expected from ion exchange theory. 13 tables

  20. Adsorption of ammonia at GaN(0001) surface in the mixed ammonia/hydrogen ambient - a summary of ab initio data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempisty, Paweł; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of ammonia at NH 3 /NH 2 /H-covered GaN(0001) surface was analyzed using results of ab initio calculations. The whole configuration space of partially NH 3 /NH 2 /H-covered GaN(0001) surface was divided into zones of differently pinned Fermi level: at the Ga broken bond state for dominantly bare surface (region I), at the valence band maximum (VBM) for NH 2 and H-covered surface (region II), and at the conduction band minimum (CBM) for NH 3 -covered surface (region III). The electron counting rule (ECR) extension was formulated for the case of adsorbed molecules. The extensive ab intio calculations show the validity of the ECR in case of all mixed H-NH 2 -NH 3 coverages for the determination of the borders between the three regions. The adsorption was analyzed using the recently identified dependence of the adsorption energy on the charge transfer at the surface. For region I ammonia adsorbs dissociatively, disintegrating into a H adatom and a HN 2 radical for a large fraction of vacant sites, while for region II adsorption of ammonia is molecular. The dissociative adsorption energy strongly depends on the Fermi level at the surface (pinned) and in the bulk (unpinned) while the molecular adsorption energy is determined by bonding to surface only, in accordance to the recently published theory. Adsorption of Ammonia in region III (Fermi level pinned at CBM) leads to an unstable configuration both molecular and dissociative, which is explained by the fact that broken Ga-bonds are doubly occupied by electrons. The adsorbing ammonia brings 8 electrons to the surface, necessitating the transfer of these two electrons from the Ga broken bond state to the Fermi level. This is an energetically costly process. Adsorption of ammonia at H-covered site leads to the creation of a NH 2 radical at the surface and escape of H 2 molecule. The process energy is close to 0.12 eV, thus not large, but the direct inverse process is not possible due to the escape of the

  1. Catalytic depolymerization of lignin in supercritical ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.; Koranyi, T.I.; Boot, M.D.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    One-step valorization of soda lignin in supercritical ethanol using a CuMgAlOx catalyst results in high monomer yield (23 wt¿%) without char formation. Aromatics are the main products. The catalyst combines excellent deoxygenation with low ring-hydrogenation activity. Almost half of the monomer

  2. Remarkable adsorptive removal of nitrogen-containing compounds from a model fuel by a graphene oxide/MIL-101 composite through a combined effect of improved porosity and hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Imteaz; Jhung, Sung Hwa, E-mail: sung@knu.ac.kr

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Metal-organic frameworks (MIL-101) were composed with graphene oxide (GnO). • GnO/MIL-101 showed the highest adsorption capacity for indole and quinoline. • Adsorption mechanism was clearly shown based on adsorption results and FTIR. • GnO/MIL-101 might be applied commercially considering capacity and reusability. - Abstract: A composite was prepared by combining a highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101 (Cr-benzenedicarboxylate), and graphene oxide (GnO). The porosity of the composite increased appreciably by the addition of GnO up to a specific amount in the MOF, though further increases in the quantity of GnO was detrimental to porosity. The improved porosity of the GnO/MIL-101 composite was utilized for adsorptive denitrogenation (ADN) of a model fuel where indole (IND) and quinoline (QUI) were used as nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs). It was found that both IND and QUI showed improved adsorption on the composite compared with pristine MIL-101 or GnO due to the improved porosity of the composite. Interestingly, the improvement in adsorption of IND was much higher than the quantity estimated for the porosity. Importantly, GnO/MIL-101 showed the highest adsorption capacities for NCCs. Irrespective of the studied solvents and co-presence of IND and QUI, the composite adsorbent performed ADN most effectively. This remarkable improvement is explained by the additional mechanism of hydrogen bonding between the surface functional groups of GnO and the hydrogen attached to the nitrogen atom of IND. This hydrogen bonding mechanism is also supported by the results of the adsorption of pyrrole and methylpyrrole. On the other hand, QUI does not show hydrogen-bonding capability, and therefore, its enhanced adsorption originates from only the increased porosity of the adsorbents.

  3. Remarkable adsorptive removal of nitrogen-containing compounds from a model fuel by a graphene oxide/MIL-101 composite through a combined effect of improved porosity and hydrogen bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Imteaz; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal-organic frameworks (MIL-101) were composed with graphene oxide (GnO). • GnO/MIL-101 showed the highest adsorption capacity for indole and quinoline. • Adsorption mechanism was clearly shown based on adsorption results and FTIR. • GnO/MIL-101 might be applied commercially considering capacity and reusability. - Abstract: A composite was prepared by combining a highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101 (Cr-benzenedicarboxylate), and graphene oxide (GnO). The porosity of the composite increased appreciably by the addition of GnO up to a specific amount in the MOF, though further increases in the quantity of GnO was detrimental to porosity. The improved porosity of the GnO/MIL-101 composite was utilized for adsorptive denitrogenation (ADN) of a model fuel where indole (IND) and quinoline (QUI) were used as nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs). It was found that both IND and QUI showed improved adsorption on the composite compared with pristine MIL-101 or GnO due to the improved porosity of the composite. Interestingly, the improvement in adsorption of IND was much higher than the quantity estimated for the porosity. Importantly, GnO/MIL-101 showed the highest adsorption capacities for NCCs. Irrespective of the studied solvents and co-presence of IND and QUI, the composite adsorbent performed ADN most effectively. This remarkable improvement is explained by the additional mechanism of hydrogen bonding between the surface functional groups of GnO and the hydrogen attached to the nitrogen atom of IND. This hydrogen bonding mechanism is also supported by the results of the adsorption of pyrrole and methylpyrrole. On the other hand, QUI does not show hydrogen-bonding capability, and therefore, its enhanced adsorption originates from only the increased porosity of the adsorbents.

  4. Development of an installation for the production of high-purity hydrogen using the pressure-swing-adsorption process with coke-oven gas as feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M; Sugishita, M

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes how Nippon Steel developed a process for producing high-purity hydrogen using the PSA method with coke-oven gas as a feedstock. The process comprises a gas-compression and gas-cooling stage, a pre-treatment stage, an adsorption stage, a de-oxygenation stage and various control and maintenance devices, etc. The triple-tower plant constructed is the equivalent of a four-tower conventional installation, with a maximum capacity of around 10,000 Nm/sup 3//h. 1 tab., 14 figs., 3 refs.

  5. Effects of van der Waals density functional corrections on trends in furfural adsorption and hydrogenation on close-packed transition metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry; Greeley, Jeffrey

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on Pd(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111) is studied with both standard Density Functional Theory (DFT)-GGA functionals and with van der Waals-corrected density functionals. VdW-DF functionals, including optPBE, optB88, optB86b, and Grimme's method, are used to optimize the adsorption configurations of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and related intermediates resulting from hydrogenation of furfural, and the results are compared to corresponding values determined with GGA functionals, including PW91 and PBE. On Pd(111) and Pt(111), the adsorption geometries of the intermediates are not noticeably different between the two classes of functionals, while on Cu(111), modest changes are seen in both the perpendicular distance and the orientation of the aromatic ring with respect to the planar surface. In general, the binding energies increase substantially in magnitude as a result of van der Waals contributions on all metals. In contrast, however, dispersion effects on the kinetics of hydrogenation are relatively small. It is found that activation barriers are not significantly affected by the inclusion of dispersion effects, and a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship developed solely from PW91 calculations on Pd(111) is capable of describing corresponding results on Cu(111) and Pt(111), even when the dispersion effects are included. Finally, the reaction energies and barriers derived from the dispersion-corrected and pure GGA calculations are used to plot simple potential energy profiles for furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol on the three considered metals, and an approximately constant downshift of the energetics due to the dispersion corrections is observed.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption in microporous alkali-doped carbons (single-wall carbon nano-tubes and activated carbons)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent Duclaux; Szymon Los; Michel Letellier; Philippe Azais; Roland Pellenq; Thomas Roussel; Xavier Fuhr

    2006-01-01

    Doping of microporous carbon by Li or K leads to an increase in the energy of adsorption of H 2 or D 2 molecules. Thus, the room temperature sorption capacities (at P≤3 MPa) can be higher than the ones of the raw materials after slight doping. However, the maximum H 2 (or D 2 ) storage uptake measured at T≤ 77 K is lower than the one of pristine materials as the sites of adsorption are occupied by alkali ions inserted in the micropores. The microporous adsorption sites of doped single-walled carbon nano-tubes, identified by neutron diffraction, are both the interstitial voids (in electric-arc or HiPCO tubes) in between the tubes and the central canals of the tubes (only in HiPCO tubes). (authors)

  7. Upgrading of bitumen using supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayukawa, T. [JGC Corp., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation outlined the technical and economic aspects of thermal cracking by supercritical water. Supercritical water (SCW) is a commonly used method for upgrading heavy oil to produce pipeline-transportable oil from high-viscous bitumen. The process uses water and does not require hydrogen nor catalysts. Pre-heated bitumen and water enter a vertical reactor with flows of counter current at the supercritical point of water. The upgraded synthetic crude oil (SCO) and pitch are obtained from the top of the reactor when the bitumen is thermally cracked. Bench-scale studies have shown that Canadian oil sands bitumen can be converted to 80 volume per cent of SCO and 20 volume per cent of pitch. The SCO has satisfied Canadian pipeline specifications in terms of API gravity and kinetic viscosity. The kinetic viscosity of the pitch has also satisfied boiler fuel specifications. tabs., figs.

  8. Adsorption of charged and neutral polymer chains on silica surfaces: The role of electrostatics, volume exclusion, and hydrogen bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, Evan; Biesheuvel, P.M.; de Vos, Wiebe Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    We develop an off-lattice (continuum) model to describe the adsorption of neutral polymer chains and polyelectrolytes to surfaces. Our continuum description allows taking excluded volume interactions between polymer chains and ions directly into account. To implement those interactions, we use a

  9. Kelvin probe force microscopy studies of the charge effects upon adsorption of carbon nanotubes and C60 fullerenes on hydrogen-terminated diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölsch, S.; Fritz, F.; Fenner, M. A.; Kurch, S.; Wöhrl, N.; Mayne, A. J.; Dujardin, G.; Meyer, C.

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen-terminated diamond is known for its unusually high surface conductivity that is ascribed to its negative electron affinity. In the presence of acceptor molecules, electrons are expected to transfer from the surface to the acceptor, resulting in p-type surface conductivity. Here, we present Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements on carbon nanotubes and C60 adsorbed onto a hydrogen-terminated diamond(001) surface. A clear reduction in the Kelvin signal is observed at the position of the carbon nanotubes and C60 molecules as compared with the bare, air-exposed surface. This result can be explained by the high positive electron affinity of carbon nanotubes and C60, resulting in electron transfer from the surface to the adsorbates. When an oxygen-terminated diamond(001) is used instead, no reduction in the Kelvin signal is obtained. While the presence of a charged adsorbate or a difference in work function could induce a change in the KPFM signal, a charge transfer effect of the hydrogen-terminated diamond surface, by the adsorption of the carbon nanotubes and the C60 fullerenes, is consistent with previous theoretical studies.

  10. Selective free radical reactions using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Philip J; Clarke, Ryan M; McFadden, Ryan M L; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2014-02-12

    We report herein a means to modify the reactivity of alkenes, and particularly to modify their selectivity toward reactions with nonpolar reactants (e.g., nonpolar free radicals) in supercritical carbon dioxide near the critical point. Rate constants for free radical addition of the light hydrogen isotope muonium to ethylene, vinylidene fluoride, and vinylidene chloride in supercritical carbon dioxide are compared over a range of pressures and temperatures. Near carbon dioxide's critical point, the addition to ethylene exhibits critical speeding up, while the halogenated analogues display critical slowing. This suggests that supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent may be used to tune alkene chemistry in near-critical conditions.

  11. Extraction with supercritical gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, G M; Wilke, G; Stahl, E

    1980-01-01

    The contents of this book derives from a symposium on the 5th and 6th of June 1978 in the ''Haus der Technik'' in Essen. Contributions were made to separation with supercritical gases, fluid extraction of hops, spices and tobacco, physicochemical principles of extraction, phase equilibria and critical curves of binary ammonia-hydrocarbon mixtures, a quick method for the microanalytical evaluation of the dissolving power of supercritical gases, chromatography with supercritical fluids, the separation of nonvolatile substances by means of compressed gases in countercurrent processes, large-scale industrial plant for extraction with supercritical gases, development and design of plant for high-pressure extraction of natural products.

  12. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  13. The influence of oxygen and hydrogen adsorption on the magneticstructure of the ultrathin iron film on the Ir(001) surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máca, František; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Redinger, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2013), "045423-1"-"045423-7" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100912; GA ČR GA202/09/0775 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : surface magnetism * magnetic overlayer * gas adsorption * magnetic phase stability * density functional calculation * STM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  14. Adsorption of Hydrogen and Potassium on GaAs(110) Studied by Time-of-Flight Scattering and Recoiling Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayone, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    We study the adsorption of H and K on a GaAs(ll0) surface by Time-of-Flight Ion-Scattering (ISS) and Direct Recoiling (DRS) Spectrometry. The method for cleaning and preparation of the surface consists on cycles of grazing bombardment with 20 keV Ar+ combined with annealing. Since this is the first time that this method is applied to a semiconductor surface, the crystallographic structure of the grazing ion bombarded surface is first characterized by ISS and DRS. The variations of the projectile scattered intensity as a function of the incident and azimuthal angles are interpreted in terms of calculated shadowing and focusing effects. The crystallographic structure of the GaAs(ll0) surface prepared by this method presents the surface relaxation observed for cleaved surfaces. The adsorption of H on GaAs(ll0) is studied as a function of the H 2 exposure and the surface temperature.The behavior of the intensity of projectiles scattered from the first two As and Ga layers is consistent with a process of unrelaxation towards the ideal surface termination upon H adsorption. We have determined that for exposures of 1000 L and 2000 L the AsI-GaI splitting corresponding to the unrelaxed surface is reduced to ΔZ = (0.0 n 0.08) A, as it should be expected for the bulk terminated surface. In addition, the fraction of the surface remaining relaxed as in the clean surface decreases strongly with the H 2 exposure. The H atoms adsorbed on the surface can be detected as recoils produced in quasi-single collisions allowing the study of the adsorption kinetics. The variations of the H recoil intensity with the exposure show that the sticking coefficient changes strongly with the H coverage since the beginning the adsorption. Above ∼ 500 L, the adsorption kinetics deviates from the initial behavior and the sticking coefficient becomes almost constant and small. The simultaneous measurements of the H coverage (with DRS) and the changes in the atomic structure (with ISS) as a

  15. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  16. Facile synthesis of hydroxy-modified MOF-5 for improving the adsorption capacity of hydrogen by lithium doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Masaru; Hagi, Hayato; Shimojima, Atsushi; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2013-11-01

    A facile synthesis of partially hydroxy-modified MOF-5 and its improved H2-adsorption capacity by lithium doping are reported. The reaction of Zn(NO3)2·6H2O with a mixture of terephthalic acid (H2BDC) and 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid (H2BDC-OH) in DMF gave hydroxy-modified MOF-5 (MOF-5-OH-x), in which the molar fraction (x) of BDC-OH(2-) was up to 0.54 of the whole ligand. The MOF-5-OH-x frameworks had high BET surface areas (about 3300 m(2) g(-1)), which were comparable to that of MOF-5. We suggest that the MOF-5-OH-x frameworks are formed by the secondary growth of BDC(2-)-rich MOF-5 seed crystals, which are nucleated during the early stage of the reaction. Subsequent Li doping into MOF-5-OH-x results in increased H2 uptake at 77 K and 0.1 MPa from 1.23 to 1.39 wt.% and an increased isosteric heat of H2 adsorption from 5.1-4.2 kJ mol(-1) to 5.5-4.4 kJ mol(-1). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Jack A.; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide–acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  18. Electrocatalytic activity of a mononuclear yttrium(III)–methyl orange complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles for adsorption/desorption of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaie, Fahimeh [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadzadeh, Hassan, E-mail: hadad@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behnamfar, Mohammad Taghi [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rudbari, Hadi Amiri [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan, 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    A new mononuclear yttrium(III) complex, [Y(MO){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (where MO{sup –} is methyl orange anion (4-[(4-dimethylamino)phenyldiazenyl]benzenesulfonate)), was synthesized in an aqueous solution. The complex was characterized by elemental analysis, UV/Vis, FT-IR, and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The yttrium oxysulfate nanoparticles (Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were then prepared by calcination of [Y(MO){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The hydrogen adsorption/desorption (H{sub ads}/H{sub des}) behavior of the Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles was studied at a carbon paste electrode (CPE) in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The recorded voltammograms exhibited a pair of peaks corresponding to the adsorption/desorption of hydrogen for the Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles. The results show a reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption reaction for both compounds. The voltammograms of the nanoparticles indicate an excellent cycling stability for the adsorption/desorption of hydrogen. In addition, the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) technique was used to investigate the electrocatalytic activity of both compounds for the hydrogen adsorption reaction. The linear voltammograms of both compounds demonstrate the excellent electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen adsorption reaction. - Highlights: • Preparation of a new Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Investigation of the H{sub ads}/H{sub des} reaction for both compounds by voltammetry. • Observation of two peaks corresponding to the H{sub ads}/H{sub des} in both compounds. • An excellent cycling stability for the nanoparticles in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  19. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L. [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China). High Pressure Adsorption Laboratory

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  20. Adsorption behavior and current-voltage characteristics of CdSe nanocrystals on hydrogen-passivated silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walzer, Karsten; Quaade, Ulrich; Ginger, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy we have studied both the geometric distribution and the conduction properties of organic shell capped CdSe nanocrystals adsorbed on hydrogen-passivated Si(100). At submonolayer concentrations, the nanocrystal distribution on the surface was found...... found that the current through the MIS junction is limited by the nanocrystals only in one bias direction, while in the other bias direction the current is limited by the semiconducting substrate. This property may be of relevance for the construction of hybrid electronic devices combining semiconductor...

  1. Li2 NH-LiBH4 : a Complex Hydride with Near Ambient Hydrogen Adsorption and Fast Lithium Ion Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Cao, Hujun; Zhang, Weijin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Hui; Pistidda, Claudio; Ju, Xiaohua; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Guotao; Etter, Martin; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin; Chen, Ping

    2018-01-26

    Complex hydrides have played important roles in energy storage area. Here a complex hydride made of Li 2 NH and LiBH 4 was synthesized, which has a structure tentatively indexed using an orthorhombic cell with a space group of Pna2 1 and lattice parameters of a=10.121, b=6.997, and c=11.457 Å. The Li 2 NH-LiBH 4 sample (in a molar ratio of 1:1) shows excellent hydrogenation kinetics, starting to absorb H 2 at 310 K, which is more than 100 K lower than that of pristine Li 2 NH. Furthermore, the Li + ion conductivity of the Li 2 NH-LiBH 4 sample is about 1.0×10 -5  S cm -1 at room temperature, and is higher than that of either Li 2 NH or LiBH 4 at 373 K. Those unique properties of the Li 2 NH-LiBH 4 complex render it a promising candidate for hydrogen storage and Li ion conduction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Computer simulation study of in-zeolites templated carbon replicas: structural and adsorption properties for hydrogen storage application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, T.

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen storage is the key issue to envisage this gas for instance as an energy vector in the field of transportation. Porous carbons are materials that are considered as possible candidates. We have studied well-controlled microporous carbon nano-structures, carbonaceous replicas of meso-porous ordered silica materials and zeolites. We realized numerically (using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulations, GCMC) the atomic nano-structures of the carbon replication of four zeolites: AlPO 4 -5, silicalite-1, and Faujasite (FAU and EMT). The faujasite replicas allow nano-casting of a new form of carbon crystalline solid made of tetrahedrally or hexagonally interconnected single wall nano-tubes. The pore size networks are nano-metric giving these materials optimized hydrogen molecular storage capacities (for pure carbon phases). However, we demonstrate that these new carbon forms are not interesting for room temperature efficient storage compared to the void space of a classical gas cylinder. We showed that doping with an alkaline element, such as lithium, one could store the same quantities at 350 bar compared to a classical tank at 700 bar. This result is a possible route to achieve interesting performances for on-board docking systems for instance. (author)

  3. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  4. using Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Supercritical CO2 extraction technology was adopted in this experiment to study the process of extraction of volatile oil from Polygonatum odoratum while gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer ..... Saponin rich fractions from.

  5. Supercritical fluid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdergauz, M. S.; Lobachev, A. L.; Lobacheva, I. V.; Platonov, I. A.

    1992-03-01

    The characteristic features of supercritical fluid chromatography (SCFC) are examined and there is a brief historical note concerning the development of the method. Information concerning the use of supercritical fluid chromatography in the analysis of objects of different nature is presented in the form of a table. The roles of the mobile and stationary phases in the separation process and the characteristic features of the apparatus and of the use of the method in physicochemical research are discussed. The bibliography includes 364 references.

  6. A comparative study of the adsorption and hydrogenation of acrolein on Pt(1 1 1), Ni(1 1 1) film and Pt Ni Pt(1 1 1) bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Luis E.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    In this study we have investigated the reaction pathways for the decomposition and hydrogenation of acrolein (CH 2dbnd CH-CH dbnd O) on Ni/Pt(1 1 1) surfaces under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). While gas-phase hydrogenation products are not observed from clean Pt(1 1 1), the subsurface Pt-Ni-Pt(1 1 1), with Ni residing below the first layer of Pt, is active for the self-hydrogenation of the C dbnd O bond to produce unsaturated alcohol (2-propenol) and the C dbnd C bond to produce saturated aldehyde (propanal), with the latter being the main hydrogenation product without the consecutive hydrogenation to saturated alcohol. For a thick Ni(1 1 1) film prepared on Pt(1 1 1), the self-hydrogenation yields for both products are lower than that from the Pt-Ni-Pt(1 1 1) surface. The presence of pre-adsorbed hydrogen further enhances the selectivity toward C dbnd O bond hydrogenation on the Pt-Ni-Pt(1 1 1) surface. In addition, HREELS studies of the adsorption of the two hydrogenation products, 2-propenol and propanal, are performed on the Pt-Ni-Pt(1 1 1) surface to identify the possible surface intermediates during the reaction of acrolein. The results presented here indicate that the hydrogenation activity and selectivity of acrolein on Pt(1 1 1) can be significantly modified by the formation of the bimetallic surfaces.

  7. Theoretical study of hydrogen adsorption of graphene and carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium; Estudio teorico de la adsorcion de hidrogeno sobre grafeno y nanotubos de carbono decorados con paladio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Corral, Ignacio; German, Estefania [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Volpe, Maria A [Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica (UNS/CONICET), Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Brizuela, Graciela; Juan, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2008-10-15

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have awakened great interest in materials science thanks to their extraordinary structural, electronic and mechanical properties which facilitate their application in many different areas. One of the most promising applications is the possibility of using CNT to store hydrogen for use in small scale fuel cells. Unfortunately, experimental studies performed some years ago have often led to controversial conclusions, causing a continuing debate that has still not been resolved. The most recent work suggests that the storage of hydrogen for practical purposes can be achieved with CNT decorated with transition metals, for example Pd. In this context, theoretical modeling methods have to be used for a detailed understanding of the influence and scope of this type of modification in the interaction of the nanotubes with atomic or molecular hydrogen. This work studied hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) doped with Pd atoms, using density functional theory (DFT) and semi-empirical methods. As a preliminary approximation to the system a graphene sheet was used, modeled with a 190 atom cluster of C in a hexagonal arrangement, on which a single Pd atom was placed in adsorption sites. Then C{sub 190} clusters were used to simulate two different types of SWCNT: the zigzag SWCNT of quirality (10.0) and the armchair SWCNT of quirality (5.5), both decorated similarly on the graphene. Geometric optimization procedures for the system's different components were carried out with these models, and then the changes produced during the adsorption process in the electronic occupation of atomic orbitals and unions, for which crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) curves and overlap population (OP) values were evaluated. The results obtained with the graphene and nanotube approximations are in agreement and show that the SWCNT modified with Pd have more capacity to trap hydrogen than the non doped SWCNT. The

  8. Materials processing using supercritical fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Aleksandar M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting areas of supercritical fluids applications is the processing of novel materials. These new materials are designed to meet specific requirements and to make possible new applications in Pharmaceuticals design, heterogeneous catalysis, micro- and nano-particles with unique structures, special insulating materials, super capacitors and other special technical materials. Two distinct possibilities to apply supercritical fluids in processing of materials: synthesis of materials in supercritical fluid environment and/or further processing of already obtained materials with the help of supercritical fluids. By adjusting synthesis parameters the properties of supercritical fluids can be significantly altered which further results in the materials with different structures. Unique materials can be also obtained by conducting synthesis in quite specific environments like reversed micelles. This paper is mainly devoted to processing of previously synthesized materials which are further processed using supercritical fluids. Several new methods have been developed to produce micro- and nano-particles with the use of supercritical fluids. The following methods: rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS supercritical anti-solvent (SAS, materials synthesis under supercritical conditions and encapsulation and coating using supercritical fluids were recently developed.

  9. Supercritical Synthesis of Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Vaultier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of biodiesel fuel from lipids (vegetable oils and animal fats has gained in importance as a possible source of renewable non-fossil energy in an attempt to reduce our dependence on petroleum-based fuels. The catalytic processes commonly used for the production of biodiesel fuel present a series of limitations and drawbacks, among them the high energy consumption required for complex purification operations and undesirable side reactions. Supercritical fluid (SCF technologies offer an interesting alternative to conventional processes for preparing biodiesel. This review highlights the advances, advantages, drawbacks and new tendencies involved in the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs for biodiesel synthesis.

  10. Supercritical fluid analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.; Kalinoski, H.T.; Wright, B.W.; Udseth, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Supercritical fluids are providing the basis for new and improved methods across a range of analytical technologies. New methods are being developed to allow the detection and measurement of compounds that are incompatible with conventional analytical methodologies. Characterization of process and effluent streams for synfuel plants requires instruments capable of detecting and measuring high-molecular-weight compounds, polar compounds, or other materials that are generally difficult to analyze. The purpose of this program is to develop and apply new supercritical fluid techniques for extraction, separation, and analysis. These new technologies will be applied to previously intractable synfuel process materials and to complex mixtures resulting from their interaction with environmental and biological systems

  11. Simplified local density model for adsorption over large pressure ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, B.; Lira, C.T.; Subramanian, R.

    1995-01-01

    Physical adsorption of high-pressure fluids onto solids is of interest in the transportation and storage of fuel and radioactive gases; the separation and purification of lower hydrocarbons; solid-phase extractions; adsorbent regenerations using supercritical fluids; supercritical fluid chromatography; and critical point drying. A mean-field model is developed that superimposes the fluid-solid potential on a fluid equation of state to predict adsorption on a flat wall from vapor, liquid, and supercritical phases. A van der Waals-type equation of state is used to represent the fluid phase, and is simplified with a local density approximation for calculating the configurational energy of the inhomogeneous fluid. The simplified local density approximation makes the model tractable for routine calculations over wide pressure ranges. The model is capable of prediction of Type 2 and 3 subcritical isotherms for adsorption on a flat wall, and shows the characteristic cusplike behavior and crossovers seen experimentally near the fluid critical point

  12. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  13. Supercritical transitiometry of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randzio, S L; Grolier, J P

    1998-06-01

    Employing supercritical fluids (SCFs) during polymers processing allows the unusual properties of SCFs to be exploited for making polymer products that cannot be obtained by other means. A new supercritical transitiometer has been constructed to permit study of the interactions of SCFs with polymers during processing under well-defined conditions of temperature and pressure. The supercritical transitiometer allows pressure to be exerted by either a supercritical fluid or a neutral medium and enables simultaneous determination of four basic parameters of a transition, i.e., p, T, Δ(tr)H and Δ(tr)V. This permits determination of the SCF effect on modification of the polymer structure at a given pressure and temperature and defines conditions to allow reproducible preparation of new polymer structures. Study of a semicrystalline polyethylene by this method has defined conditions for preparation of new microfoamed phases with good mechanical properties. The low densities and microporous structures of the new materials may make them useful for applications in medicine, pharmacy, or the food industry, for example.

  14. Design of a hydrogen test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, M.J.; Beam, J.E.; Sehmbey, M.S.; Pais, M.R.; Chow, L.C.; Hahn, O.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force has sponsored a program at the University of Kentucky which will lead to a better understanding of the thermal and fluid instabilities during blowdown of supercritical fluids at cryogenic temperatures. An integral part of that program is the design and construction of that hydrogen test facility. This facility will be capable of providing supercritical hydrogen at 30 bars and 35 K at a maximum flow rate of 0.1 kg/s for 90 seconds. Also presented here is an extension of this facility to accommodate the use of supercritical helium

  15. A case of Z/E-isomers elution order inversion caused by cosolvent percentage change in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiy, Oleg I; Ustinovich, Konstantin B; Usovich, Oleg I; Parenago, Olga O; Lunin, Valeriy V; Ovchinnikov, Denis V; Kosyakov, Dmitry S

    2017-01-06

    A case of elution order inversion caused by cosolvent percentage change in supercritical fluid chromatography was observed and investigated in some detail. Z- and E-isomers of phenylisobutylketone oxime experience an elution order reversal on most columns if the mobile phase consists of CO 2 and alcohol. At lower percentages of alcohol Z-oxime is retained less, somewhere at 2-5% coelution occurs and at larger cosolvent volume elution order reverses - Z-oxime is eluted later than E-oxime. We suppose inversion with CO 2 -ROH phases happens due to a shift in balance between two main interactions governing retention. At low ROH percentages stationary phase surface is only slightly covered by ROH molecules so oximes primarily interact with adsorption sites via hydrogen bond formation. Due to intramolecular sterical hindrance Z-oxime is less able to form hydrogen bonds and consequently is eluted first. At higher percentages alcohols occupy most of strong hydrogen bonding sites on silica surface thus leaving non-specific electrostatic interactions predominantly responsible for Z/E selectivity. Z-oxime has a much larger dipole moment than E-oxime and at these conditions it is eluted later. Additional experimental data with CO 2 -CH 3 CN, hexane-iPrOH and CHF 3 -ROH mobile phases supporting this explanation are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Crystallinity, Composition, and Texture on Hydrogen Solubility and Adsorption in Lunar Surface Materials and their Relevance to Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, M. D.; Hibbitts, C.; Orlando, T. M.; Poston, M.; Grieves, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Abundant spacecraft data now demonstrate the presence of features associated with H on the lunar surface. The origin of that lunar H, whether as OH or H2O, is some combination of endogenic (juvenile) sources in the interiors of planetary materials and those resulting from exogenic deposition such as from the solar wind or comets. The ability of mineral (rock) and glass surfaces to internally host and surficially adsorb H is a function of several interrelated variables -- composition, crystallinity, and texture -- all of which will have an effect on observed band depth in remote sensing measurements. Studies of terrestrial materials show that the ability of nominally-anhydrous minerals to host H is related to composition in ways that reflect partition coefficients for H between melt and mineral, variations in bond strengths, and defect densities. This is important because the ability of a mineral to adsorb water on its exterior surface (chemisorption) should be related to some of the same factors that govern 'solubility' of H in the interiors of different mineral groups and compositions. IR signatures of internal OH/H2O can easily be confused with those of adsorbed OH/H2O. No correlation between H solubility and surface adsorptivity is observed in pristine glasses, which generally have passivated bonds on the surface and are hydrophobic. However, on the Moon, glass 'matures' rapidly via micrometeorite bombardment, potentially exposing dangling bonds on the surface that provide sites for H to adsorb. Unlike glasses, crystalline materials provide both defect lattice sites and dangling bonds on freshly-fractured surfaces that may enhance H adsorption. For example, bonding on mineral surfaces ranges from hydrogen bonding at non-lattice oxygen atoms (electronegative sites) to chemisorption at electropositive surface sites, such as structural defects or unsatisfied cations. Moreover, glasses and different mineral species also have different optical absorption coefficients

  17. Supercritical fluids processing: emerging opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovaly, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    This publication on the emerging opportunities of supercritical fluids processing reveals the latest research findings and development trends in this field. These findings and development trends are highlighted, and the results of applications of technology to the business of supercritical fluids are reported. Applications of supercritical fluids to chemical intermediates, environmental applications, chemical reactions, food and biochemistry processing, and fuels processing are discussed in some detail

  18. Supercritical fluids in ionic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.C.; Peters, C.J.; Plechkova, N.V.; Seddon, K.R.

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquids and supercritical fluids are both alternative environmentally benign solvents, but their properties are very different. Ionic liquids are non-volatile but often considered highly polar compounds, whereas supercritical fluids are non-polar but highly volatile compounds. The combination

  19. Supercritical water gasification of Victorian brown coal: Experimental characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Doki; Aye, Lu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Vic 3010 (Australia); Sanderson, P. John; Lim, Seng [CSIRO Minerals, Clayton, Vic 3168 (Australia)

    2009-05-15

    Supercritical water gasification is an innovative thermochemical conversion method for converting wet feedstocks into hydrogen-rich gaseous products. The non-catalytic gasification characteristics of Victorian brown coal were investigated in supercritical water by using a novel immersion technique with quartz batch reactors. Various operating parameters such as temperature, feed concentration and reaction time were varied to investigate their effect on the gasification behaviour. Gas yields, carbon gasification efficiency and the total gasification efficiency increased with increasing temperature and reaction time, and decreasing feed concentration. The mole fraction of hydrogen in the product gases was lowest at 600 C, and increased to over 30 % at a temperature of 800 C. Varying parameters, especially reaction time, did not improve the coal utilisation for gas production significantly and the measured data showed a large deviation from the equilibrium level. (author)

  20. Adsorption and diffusion of fluids in well-characterized adsorbent materials. Renewal progress report, August 1, 1995 to January 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbins, Keith E.; Cracknell, R.F.; Maddox, M.; Nicholson, D.

    1999-08-01

    This is an invited review paper describing recent advances in molecular simulation and theory of fluids confined within well-characterized porous materials. Methods and intermolecular potential models are described. This is followed by showing results for several examples, including supercritical methane adsorption in carbons, adsorption and diffusion of argon in VPI-5, adsorption of argon in silicalite-1, nitrogen adsorption in MCM-41, and adsorption of argon and nitrogen in carbon nanotubes.

  1. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide–Based Sterilization of Decellularized Heart Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S. Hennessy, MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Sterilization of grafts is essential. Supercritical carbon dioxide, electrolyzed water, gamma radiation, ethanol-peracetic acid, and hydrogen peroxide techniques were compared for impact on sterility and mechanical integrity of porcine decellularized aortic valves. Ethanol-peracetic acid– and supercritical carbon dioxide–treated valves were found to be sterile using histology, microbe culture, and electron microscopy assays. The cusp tensile properties of supercritical carbon dioxide–treated valves were higher compared with valves treated with other techniques. Superior sterility and integrity was found in the decellularized valves treated with supercritical carbon dioxide sterilization. This sterilization technique may hold promise for other decellularized soft tissues. Key Words: decellularized, decontamination, heart valve, tensile properties, tissue engineering

  2. Study of the modes of adsorption and electronic structure of hydrogen peroxide and ethanol over TiO2 rutile (110) surface within the context of water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, H.; Idriss, H.

    2018-03-01

    While photocatalytic water splitting over many materials is favourable thermodynamically the kinetic of the reaction is very slow. One of the proposed reasons linked to the slow oxidation reaction rate is H2O2 formation as a reaction intermediate. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) H2O2 is investigated on TiO2 rutile (110) surface to determine its most stable adsorption modes: molecular, (H)O(H)O - (a), partially dissociated, (H)OO - (a), and fully dissociated (a) - OO - (a). We then compare H2O2 interaction to that of a fast hole scavenger molecule, ethanol. Geometry, electronic structure, charge density difference and work function determination of both adsorbates are presented and compared using DFT with different functionals (PBE, PBE-D, PBE-U, and HSE + D). H2O2 is found to be strongly adsorbed on TiO2 rutile (110) surface with adsorption energies reaching 0.95 eV, comparable to that of ethanol (0.89 eV); using GGA PBE. The negative changes in the work function upon adsorption were found to be highest for molecular adsorption ( - 1.23 eV) and lowest for the fully dissociated mode ( - 0.54 eV) of H2O2. This may indicate that electrons flow from the surface to the adsorbate in order to make O(s)-H partially offset the overall magnitude of the oxygen lone pair interaction (of H2O2) with Ti4+ cations. Examination of the electronic structure through density of states (DOS) at the PBE level of computation, indicates that the H2O2 highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level is not overlapping with oxygen atoms of TiO2 surface at any of its adsorption modes and at any of the computation methods. Some overlap is seen using the HSE + D computational method. On the other hand the dissociated mode of ethanol (ethoxides) does overlap with all computational methods used. The high adsorption energy and the absence of overlapping of the HOMO level of H2O2 with TiO2 rutile (110) surface may explain why water splitting is slow.

  3. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  4. Modeling the adsorption of hydrogen, sodium, chloride and phthalate on goethite using a strict charge-neutral ion-exchange theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulthess, Cristian P; Ndu, Udonna

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous adsorption modeling of four ions was predicted with a strict net charge-neutral ion-exchange theory and its corresponding equilibrium and mass balance equations. An important key to the success of this approach was the proper collection of all the data, particularly the proton adsorption data, and the inclusion of variable concentrations of conjugate ions from the experimental pH adjustments. Using IExFit software, the ion-exchange model used here predicted the competitive retention of several ions on goethite by assuming that the co-adsorption or desorption of all ions occurred in the correct stoichiometries needed to maintain electroneutrality. This approach also revealed that the retention strength of Cl- ions on goethite increases in the presence of phthalate ions. That is, an anion-anion enhancement effect was observed. The retention of Cl- ions was much weaker than phthalate ions, and this also resulted in a higher sensitivity of the Cl- ions toward minor variations in the surface reactivity. The proposed model uses four goethite surface sites. The drop in retention of phthalate ions at low pH was fully described here as resulting from competitive Cl- reactions, which were introduced in increasing concentrations into the matrix as the conjugate base to the acid added to lower the pH.

  5. Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of bezafibrate using a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Jorge Armando; Oliveira, Geiser Gabriel; Medeiros, Roberta Antigo; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-04-07

    A highly sensitive method for bezafibrate determination using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film based on square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV) is proposed. The electrochemical behaviour of bezafibrate has been studied by cyclic voltammetry, showing an irreversible anodic peak at a potential of 1.09 V in 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer solution (pH 2.0). A study of the scan rate showed that the oxidation of bezafibrate is an adsorptive-controlled process, involving the transfer of two electrons and two protons per molecule. The analytical curve was linear over a bezafibrate concentration range from 50 to 910 nmol L(-1), with a detection limit of 16 nmol L(-1). This analytical method was successfully applied for benzafibrate determination in pharmaceutical formulations, with results showing good agreement with those obtained using a comparative spectrophotometric method, and has the potential for field application.

  6. Supercritical water gasification of sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aye, L.; Yamaguchi, D. [Melbourne Univ. International Technologies Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an attractive technology for producing fuels from biomass and waste materials. As a result of greenhouse gas emissions and issues related to local air pollutants, hydrogen production from these renewable energy resources has been gaining in popularity. Disposal of sewage sludge is another environmental problem that have led to severe regulations. Incineration has been one of the most commonly used means of sewage sludge disposal. Thermal gasification produces gaseous fuel, making it a better option over incineration. However, due to its high moisture content, this process is not feasible to make use of sewage sludge directly. In order to analyze SCWG of sewage sludge, it has been determined that equilibrium analysis is most suitable since the maximum achievable amount of hydrogen in a given reacting condition can be estimated. The equilibrium model can be divided into two types of models, namely stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric. This paper presented the results of a study that used a computer program to develop a nonstoichiometric model with the direct Gibbs free energy minimization technique. In addition, various biomass were simulated for comparisons in order to identify if sewage sludge is a potential feedstock for hydrogen production. Last, the effects of reaction pressure and temperature on product distribution were also examined. It was shown that the proposed model is capable of estimating the product distribution at equilibrium. 33 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  7. Modeling of the Kinetics of Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lipids from Microalgae with Emphasis on Extract Desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Sovová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae contain valuable biologically active lipophilic substances such as omega-3 fatty acids and carotenoids. In contrast to the recovery of vegetable oils from seeds, where the extraction with supercritical CO2 is used as a mild and selective method, economically viable application of this method on similarly soluble oils from microalgae requires, in most cases, much higher pressure. This paper presents and verifies hypothesis that this difference is caused by high adsorption capacity of microalgae. Under the pressures usually applied in supercritical fluid extraction from plants, microalgae bind a large fraction of the extracted oil, while under extremely high CO2 pressures their adsorption capacity diminishes and the extraction rate depends on oil solubility in supercritical CO2. A mathematical model for the extraction from microalgae was derived and applied to literature data on the extraction kinetics in order to determine model parameters.

  8. Method and apparatus for waste destruction using supercritical water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldsen, Brent Lowell; Wu, Benjamin Chiau-pin

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an improved apparatus and method for initiating and sustaining an oxidation reaction. A hazardous waste, is introduced into a reaction zone within a pressurized containment vessel. An oxidizer, preferably hydrogen peroxide, is mixed with a carrier fluid, preferably water, and the mixture is heated until the fluid achieves supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The heating means comprise cartridge heaters placed in closed-end tubes extending into the center region of the pressure vessel along the reactor longitudinal axis. A cooling jacket surrounds the pressure vessel to remove excess heat at the walls. Heating and cooling the fluid mixture in this manner creates a limited reaction zone near the center of the pressure vessel by establishing a steady state density gradient in the fluid mixture which gradually forces the fluid to circulate internally. This circulation allows the fluid mixture to oscillate between supercritical and subcritical states as it is heated and cooled.

  9. Catalytic reforming of glycerol in supercritical water over bimetallic Pt-Ni catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakinala, A.G.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; de Vlieger, Dennis; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic reforming of pure glycerol for the production of hydrogen at low temperature and short residence times in supercritical water was investigated using a bimetallic Pt–Ni catalyst supported on alumina. Initial tests were carried out to study the reforming activity of bimetallic Pt–Ni

  10. Technology with Supercritical Fluid. Part 2. Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marongiu, B.; De Giorgi, M. R.; Porcedda, S.; Cadoni, E.

    1998-01-01

    The present article is based on a bibliographical analysis of the main applications of the supercritical fluid in various fields, as: extraction from solid matrices, division of liquid charges, chromatography HPLC with supercritical eluent, chemical and biochemical reactions in supercritical solvents etc [it

  11. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study

    OpenAIRE

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3 - 8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acen...

  12. Capillary condensation and adsorption of binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, B; Darkrim-Lamari, F; Levesque, D

    2006-06-21

    The adsorption of equimolar binary mixtures of hydrogen-carbon dioxide, hydrogen-methane, and methane-carbon dioxide in porous material models is determined by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The material models have an adsorbent surface similar to that of nanofibers with a herringbone structure. Our main result, which is relevant for hydrogen purification and carbon dioxide capture, is that the adsorption selectivities calculated for the mixtures can differ significantly from those deduced from simulations of the adsorption of pure gases, in particular, when one of the adsorbed gases presents a capillary condensation induced by confinement within the pore network. A comparison of our data is also made with theoretical models used in the literature for predicting the properties of the mixture adsorption.

  13. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3–8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acenes, the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li-adsorbed acenes are in the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). Besides, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li-adsorbed acenes are in the range of 9.9 to 10.7 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li-adsorbed acenes can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials for reversible hydrogen uptake and release at ambient conditions. PMID:27609626

  14. Updated heat transfer correlations for supercritical water-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokry, S.J.; Pioro, I.L.; Farah, A.; King, K.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the development of SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs), research is currently being conducted for heat-transfer at supercritical conditions. Currently, there are no experimental datasets for heat transfer from power reactor fuel bundles to the fuel coolant (Water) available in open literature. Therefore, for preliminary calculations, heat-transfer correlations obtained with bare tube data can be used as a conservative approach. A large set of experimental data, for supercritical water was analyzed and an updated heat-transfer correlation for forced-convective heat-transfer, in the normal heat transfer regime, was developed. This experimental dataset was obtained within conditions similar to those for proposed SCWR concepts. Thus, this new correlation can be used for preliminary heat-transfer calculations in SCWR fuel channels. It has demonstrated a good fit for the analyzed dataset. Experiments with SuperCritical Water (SCW) are very expensive. Therefore, a number of experiments are performed in modeling fluids, such as carbon dioxide and refrigerants. However, there is no common opinion if SC modeling fluids' correlations can be applied to SCW and vice versa. Therefore, a correlation for supercritical carbon dioxide heat transfer was developed as a less expensive alternative to using supercritical water. The conducted analysis also meets the objective of improving our fundamental knowledge of the transport processes and handling of supercritical fluids. These correlations can be used for supercritical water heat exchangers linked to indirect-cycle concepts and the cogeneration of hydrogen, for future comparisons with other independent datasets, with bundle data, for the verification of computer codes for SCWR core thermalhydraulics and for the verification of scaling parameters between water and modeling fluids. (author)

  15. Study of the influence of adsorption of oxygen, hydrogen and water on radiation-induced thermally activated currents of magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysocki, S.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, radiation-induced thermally activated currents (RITAC) have been studied in purified and magnesium-doped lithium fluoride. In the RITAC method, the electric field is applied at low temperature, only during irradiation. The present paper deals with the dipolar complexes generated by γ-radiations in the surface region of magnesium oxide in vacuum and in the presence of oxygen, hydrogen and water. Spectrally pure MgO single crystal spectrally pure oxygen and hydrogen and doubly distilled water were used. The electrodes were deposited on the (100) surface of MgO single crystal by vacuum evaporation of gold. Experimental details are given. A figure shows the thermally activated depolarization (TAD) curve for MgO in vacuum. In a TAD experiment, the sample was subjected to a constant electric field at 700 K and cooled. Upon reaching room temperature the electric field was removed In this case we observed a single peak at Tsub(max) = 511 K. A figure shows RITAC curves for an MgO sample in vacuum after irradiation. The results are shown and discussed. (author)

  16. The adsorption of hydrogen on a molecular sieve at -196{sup o}C and the observation of an isotope effect; Adsorption d'hydrogene sur un tamis moleculaire a -196{sup o}C et observation d'un effet isotopique; Absorbtsiya vodoroda na molekulyarnom fil'tre pri -196{sup o} i nablyudenie rezul'tatov dejstviya izotopov; Adsorcion de hidrogeno en un tamiz molecular a -196{sup o}C y observacion de un efecto isotopico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncombe, W G [Wellcome Research Laboratories, Beckenham, Kent (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-15

    Linde Molecular Sieve 4A has been examined as a possible means of handling small volumes of hydrogen isotopes in a vacuum system, as an alternative to the slow Toepler pump method. The equilibrium pressure (P) was measured for various volumes (V) of hydrogen adsorbed by 1 g of Sieve at -196{sup o}C. Experiments with activated charcoal showed the superiority of the Sieve as a hydrogen adsorbent. 1 g of the Sieve in a system of vol. 500 ml will adsorb about 97% of a 1-ml sample of hydrogen. Adsorption is negligible at -78{sup o}C and desorption is quantitative and rapid at room temperature. The possibility of an isotope effect was investigated by adsorbing measured volumes of tritium (5 {mu}c/mole) at an equilibrium pressure of about 5 mm, pumping off the system for times up to 15 min and measuring the volume of residual hydrogen. The latter was converted quantitatively to water, thence to butane, and gas-counted. The specific activity was always higher than that of tritium which had undergone 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption without intermediate pumping off, so that there was no net loss of gas. This had the same specific activity as untreated tritium from the storage bulb. It was found that log (residual vol./ initial vol.) was proportional to 1/log (residual sp. act./ initial sp. act.) over the range investigated (0-90% of initial gas pumped off). When 90% had been removed the specific activity ratio was about 3. Isotopic fractionation during adsorption is possible, but in these experiments about 99% of the initial hydrogen was adsorbed on the Molecular Sieve before desorption by pumping off was begun. It seems likely, therefore, that the considerable fractionation observed occurs mainly during desorption. The effect is thus not likely to be important when the Sieve is used for manipulating small volumes of hydrogen isotopes, since complete desorption by warming will usually be employed. (author) [French] L'auteur a examine la possibilite d'utiliser le tamis

  17. Design of preparative-supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Arvind

    2012-08-10

    Preparative supercritical fluid chromatography (prep-SFC) is an important separation process in the chromatographers toolbox. Owing to the unique properties of the mobile phase, which is predominantly CO(2), the behavior of SFC is markedly different from high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This review article focuses on the scale-up of preparative chromatography. The basics of SFC, with particular focus on highlighting the key differences between SFC and HPLC, are introduced. Then, a framework for rational design of prep-SFC is proposed. This framework is based on obtaining basic system parameters from analytical scale equipment, i.e., with very small amount of material, and performing design and optimization in silico to evaluate process performance and to identify operating conditions for scale-up. The tools required to obtain the input parameters such as adsorption isotherms are discussed and the development of the design and optimization framework is elaborated. Examples from the literature which use this approach for successful scale-up are provided. Finally the design of multi-column SFC systems is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    initially-adsorbed protein. Interphase protein concentration CI increases as VI decreases, resulting in slow reduction in interfacial energetics. Steady-state is governed by a net partition coefficient P=(/CBCI). In the process of occupying space within the interphase, adsorbing protein molecules must displace an equivalent volume of interphase water. Interphase water is itself associated with surface-bound water through a network of transient hydrogen bonds. Displacement of interphase water thus requires an amount of energy that depends on the adsorbent surface chemistry/energy. This “adsorption-dehydration” step is the significant free-energy cost of adsorption that controls the maximum amount of protein that can be adsorbed at steady state to a unit adsorbent-surface area (the adsorbent capacity). As adsorbent hydrophilicity increases, protein adsorption monotonically decreases because the energetic cost of surface dehydration increases, ultimately leading to no protein adsorption near an adsorbent water wettability (surface energy) characterized by a water contact angle θ → 65°. Consequently, protein does not adsorb (accumulate at interphase concentrations greater than bulk solution) to more hydrophilic adsorbents exhibiting θ protein/surface interactions can be highly favorable, causing protein to adsorb in multilayers in a relatively thick interphase. A straightforward, three-component free energy relationship captures salient features of protein adsorption to all surfaces predicting that the overall free energy of protein adsorption ΔGadso is a relatively small multiple of thermal energy for any surface chemistry (except perhaps for bioengineered surfaces bearing specific ligands for adsorbing protein) because a surface chemistry that interacts chemically with proteins must also interact with water through hydrogen bonding. In this way, water moderates protein adsorption to any surface by competing with adsorbing protein molecules. This Leading Opinion ends

  19. Applications of subcritical and supercritical water conditions for extraction, hydrolysis, gasification, and carbonization of biomass: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lachos-Perez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the recent essential aspects of subcritical and supercritical water technology applied tothe extraction, hydrolysis, carbonization, and gasification processes. These are clean and fast technologies which do not need pretreatment, require less reaction time, generate less corrosion and residues, do not usetoxic solvents, and reduce the synthesis of degradation byproducts. The equipment design, process parameters, and types of biomass used for subcritical and supercritical water process are presented. The benefits of catalysis to improve process efficiency are addressed. Bioactive compounds, reducing sugars, hydrogen, biodiesel, and hydrothermal char are the final products of subcritical and supercritical water processes. The present review also revisits advances of the research trends in the development of subcriticaland supercritical water process technologies.

  20. Molecular simulation of CO chemisorption on Co(0001) in presence of supercritical fluid solvent: A potential of mean force study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asiaee, Alireza; Benjamin, Kenneth M., E-mail: kenneth.benjamin@sdsmt.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph St., Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)

    2016-08-28

    For several decades, heterogeneous catalytic processes have been improved through utilizing supercritical fluids (SCFs) as solvents. While numerous experimental studies have been established across a range of chemistries, such as oxidation, pyrolysis, amination, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, still there is little fundamental, molecular-level information regarding the role of the SCF on elementary heterogeneous catalytic steps. In this study, the influence of hexane solvent on the adsorption of carbon monoxide on Co(0001), as the first step in the reaction mechanism of many processes involving syngas conversion, is probed. Simulations are performed at various bulk hexane densities, ranging from ideal gas conditions (no SCF hexane) to various near- and super-critical hexane densities. For this purpose, both density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations are employed to determine the adsorption energy and free energy change during CO chemisorption. Potential of mean force calculations, utilizing umbrella sampling and the weighted histogram analysis method, provide the first commentary on SCF solvent effects on the energetic aspects of the chemisorption process. Simulation results indicate an enhanced stability of CO adsorption on the catalyst surface in the presence of supercritical hexane within the reduced pressure range of 1.0–1.5 at a constant temperature of 523 K. Furthermore, it is shown that the maximum stability of CO in the adsorbed state as a function of supercritical hexane density at 523 K nearly coincides with the maximum isothermal compressibility of bulk hexane at this temperature.

  1. Drying of supercritical carbon dioxide with membrane processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohaus, Theresa; Scholz, Marco; Koziara, Beata; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In supercritical extraction processes regenerating the supercritical fluid represents the main cost constraint. Membrane technology has potential for cost efficient regeneration of water-loaded supercritical carbon dioxide. In this study we have designed membrane-based processes to dehydrate

  2. Method and apparatus for dissociating metals from metal compounds extracted into supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred H.; Smart, Neil G.; Lin, Yuehe

    2000-01-01

    A method for dissociating metal-ligand complexes in a supercritical fluid by treating the metal-ligand complex with heat and/or reducing or oxidizing agents is described. Once the metal-ligand complex is dissociated, the resulting metal and/or metal oxide form fine particles of substantially uniform size. In preferred embodiments, the solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the ligand is a .beta.-diketone such as hexafluoroacetylacetone or dibutyldiacetate. In other preferred embodiments, the metals in the metal-ligand complex are copper, silver, gold, tungsten, titanium, tantalum, tin, or mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the reducing agent is hydrogen. The method provides an efficient process for dissociating metal-ligand complexes and produces easily-collected metal particles free from hydrocarbon solvent impurities. The ligand and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated to provide an economic, efficient process.

  3. Adsorption of antibiotics on microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Kaina; Zhang, Hua

    2018-06-01

    Microplastics and antibiotics are two classes of emerging contaminants with proposed negative impacts to aqueous ecosystems. Adsorption of antibiotics on microplastics may result in their long-range transport and may cause compound combination effects. In this study, we investigated the adsorption of 5 antibiotics [sulfadiazine (SDZ), amoxicillin (AMX), tetracycline (TC), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and trimethoprim (TMP)] on 5 types of microplastics [polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyamide (PA), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)] in the freshwater and seawater systems. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis revealed that microplastics have different surface characterizes and various degrees of crystalline. Adsorption isotherms demonstrated that PA had the strongest adsorption capacity for antibiotics with distribution coefficient (K d ) values ranged from 7.36 ± 0.257 to 756 ± 48.0 L kg -1 in the freshwater system, which can be attributed to its porous structure and hydrogen bonding. Relatively low adsorption capacity was observed on other four microplastics. The adsorption amounts of 5 antibiotics on PS, PE, PP, and PVC decreased in the order of CIP > AMX > TMP > SDZ > TC with K f correlated positively with octanol-water partition coefficients (Log K ow ). Comparing to freshwater system, adsorption capacity in seawater decreased significantly and no adsorption was observed for CIP and AMX. Our results indicated that commonly observed polyamide particles can serve as a carrier of antibiotics in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulse radiolysis study of supercritical water-G-value measurement up to 450 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the understanding of water radiolysis at elevated temperatures is inevitably important in the field of water chemistry in light water reactors because water radiolysis is closely related to many subjects such as hydrogen water chemistry (H 2 injection), SCC (stress corrosion cracking), dose accumulation and so on. This situation would also be applied to the future reactor using supercritical water (>374 C, 22.1MPa) as a coolant, so called supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). Therefore, it is important to investigate water radiolysis of supercritical water. In 1989 Prof. Oka, University of Tokyo, proposed the SCWR as a future reactor and done much design study. This reactor has many advantages such as high energy efficiency, applicability of experience accumulated in light water reactors and supercritical fissile plant, and compact structure. In 2002 the Department of Energy in USA has selected the SCWR as one of the six Generation IV reactors and fundamental research has started in different countries as a national or an international project. In the present research G-values of water radiolysis have been measured by using a pulse radiolysis method up to 450 degree C to obtain the fundamental data relevant to the development of the SCWR. In supercritical water, the pressure controls the density of water easily and it was found that the G-values are strongly dependent not only on temperature but also on density in supercritical water. After presentation of experimental method and its difficulties, temperature and density dependent G-values of water decomposition products in supercritical water would be summarized. (authors)

  5. PULSE RADIOLYSIS IN SUPERCRITICAL RARE GAS FLUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLROYD, R.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, supercritical fluids have become quite popular in chemical and semiconductor industries for applications in chemical synthesis, extraction, separation processes, and surface cleaning. These applications are based on: the high dissolving power due to density build-up around solute molecules, and the ability to tune the conditions of a supercritical fluid, such as density and temperature, that are most suitable for a particular reaction. The rare gases also possess these properties and have the added advantage of being supercritical at room temperature. Information about the density buildup around both charged and neutral species can be obtained from fundamental studies of volume changes in the reactions of charged species in supercritical fluids. Volume changes are much larger in supercritical fluids than in ordinary solvents because of their higher compressibility. Hopefully basic studies, such as discussed here, of the behavior of charged species in supercritical gases will provide information useful for the utilization of these solvents in industrial applications

  6. High temperature and high performance light water cooled reactors operating at supercritical pressure, research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Yamada, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of supercritical-pressure, once-through coolant cycle nuclear power plant (SCR) was developed at the University of Tokyo. The research and development (R and D) started worldwide. This paper summarized the conceptual design and R and D in Japan. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants (FPP) in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants will be fully utilized for SCR. The high temperature, supercritical-pressure light water reactor is the logical evolution of LWR. Boiling evolved from circular boilers, water tube boilers and once-through boilers. It is the reactor version of the once-through boiler. The development from LWR to SCR follows the history of boilers. The goal of the R and D should be the capital cost reduction that cannot be achieved by the improvement of LWR. The reactor can be used for hydrogen production either by catalysis and chemical decomposition of low quality hydrocarbons in supercritical water. The reactor is compatible with tight lattice fast core for breeders due to low outlet coolant density, small coolant flow rate and high head coolant pumps

  7. Injection of Fluids into Supercritical Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oschwald, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes and compares the results of systematic research programs at two independent laboratories regarding the injection of cryogenic liquids at subcritical and supercritical pressures...

  8. Mixing Dynamics of Supercritical Droplets and Jets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Talley, Douglas G; Cohn, R. K; Coy, E. B; Chehroudi, B; Davis, D. W

    2005-01-01

    .... At supercritical pressures, however, a distinct difference between "gaseous" and "liquid" phases no longer exists, surface tension and the enthalpy of vaporization vanish, and "gas" phase density...

  9. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Cryogenic Injection Processes at Supercritical Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oefelein, Joseph C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper highlights results from the first of a series of hierarchical simulations aimed at assessing the modeling requirements for application of the large eddy simulation technique to cryogenic injection and combustion processes in liquid rocket engines. The focus is on liquid-oxygen-hydrogen coaxial injectors at a condition where the liquid-oxygen is injected at a subcritical temperature into a supercritical environment. For this situation a diffusion dominated mode of combustion occurs in the presence of exceedingly large thermophysical property gradients. Though continuous, these gradients approach the behavior of a contact discontinuity. Significant real gas effects and transport anomalies coexist locally in colder regions of the flow, with ideal gas and transport characteristics occurring within the flame zone. The current focal point is on the interfacial region between the liquid-oxygen core and the coaxial hydrogen jet where the flame anchors itself.

  11. Lipidomics by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Laboureur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review enlightens the role of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC in the field of lipid analysis. SFC has been popular in the late 1980s and 1990s before almost disappearing due to the commercial success of liquid chromatography (LC. It is only 20 years later that a regain of interest appeared when new commercial instruments were introduced. As SFC is fully compatible with the injection of extracts in pure organic solvent, this technique is perfectly suitable for lipid analysis and can be coupled with either highly universal (UV or evaporative light scattering or highly specific (mass spectrometry detection methods. A short history of the use of supercritical fluids as mobile phase for the separation oflipids will be introduced first. Then, the advantages and drawbacks of SFC are discussed for each class of lipids (fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols, prenols, polyketides defined by the LIPID MAPS consortium.

  12. Lipidomics by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboureur, Laurent; Ollero, Mario; Touboul, David

    2015-01-01

    This review enlightens the role of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) in the field of lipid analysis. SFC has been popular in the late 1980s and 1990s before almost disappearing due to the commercial success of liquid chromatography (LC). It is only 20 years later that a regain of interest appeared when new commercial instruments were introduced. As SFC is fully compatible with the injection of extracts in pure organic solvent, this technique is perfectly suitable for lipid analysis and can be coupled with either highly universal (UV or evaporative light scattering) or highly specific (mass spectrometry) detection methods. A short history of the use of supercritical fluids as mobile phase for the separation oflipids will be introduced first. Then, the advantages and drawbacks of SFC are discussed for each class of lipids (fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols, prenols, polyketides) defined by the LIPID MAPS consortium. PMID:26090714

  13. Pillared-layer microporous metal-organic frameworks constructed by robust hydrogen bonds. Synthesis, characterization, and magnetic and adsorption properties of 2,2'-biimidazole and carboxylate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bing-Bing; Weng, Yan-Qin; Mao, Zong-Wan; Lam, Chi-Keung; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ye, Bao-Hui

    2005-11-28

    Two new isostructural complexes [M(H2biim)3][M(btc)(Hbiim)].2H2O (M = Co, (1); M = Ni, (2)) (btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate; H2biim = 2,2'-biimidazole) have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. They present a unique structure consisting of two distinct units: the monomeric cations [M(H2biim)3]2+ and the two-dimensional (2D) anionic polymer [M(Hbiim)(btc)]2-. In the anionic moiety, the Hbiim- monoanion is simultaneously coordinated to one metal atom in a bidentate mode and further to another metal atom in a monodentate mode. The imidazolate groups bridge the two adjacent metal ions into a helical chain which is further arranged in left- and right-handed manners. These chains are bridged by btc ligands into a 2D brick wall structure. The most interesting aspect is that the [M(H2biim)3]2+ cations act as pillars and link the anionic layers via robust heteromeric hydrogen-bonded synthons (9) and (7) formed by the uncoordinated oxygen atoms of carboxylate groups and the H2biim ligands, resulting in a microporous metal-organic framework with one-dimensional (1D) channels (ca. 11.85 angstroms x 11.85 angstroms for 1 and 11.43 angstroms x 11.43 angstroms for 2). Magnetic properties of these two complexes have also been studied in the temperature range of 2-300 K, and their magnetic susceptibilities obey the Curie-Weiss law in the temperature range of 20-300 K (for 1) and 2-300 K (for 2), respectively, showing anti-ferromagnetic coupling through imidazolate bridging. Taking into consideration the Heisenberg infinite chain model as well as the possibility of chain-to-chain and chain-to-cation interactions, the anti-ferromagnetic exchange of 2 is analyzed via a correction for the molecular field, giving the values of g(cat) = 2.296, g(Ni) = 2.564, J = -13.30 cm(-1), and zJ' = -0.017 cm(-1). The microporous frameworks are stable at ca. 350 degrees C. They do not collapse after removal of the guest water molecules in the channels, and they

  14. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  15. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  16. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  17. On the gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water : over de vergassing van natte biomassa in superkritiek water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a challenging thermo-chemical conversion route for wet biomass and waste streams into hydrogen and/or methane. At temperatures and pressures above the critical point the physical properties of water differ strongly from liquid water or steam. Because of the

  18. Supercritical Regeneration of an Activated Carbon Fiber Exhausted with Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jesus Sanchez-Montero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of supercritical CO2 (SCCO2 and supercritical water (SCW turn them into fluids with a great ability to remove organic adsorbates retained on solids. These properties were used herein to regenerate an activated carbon fiber (ACF saturated with a pollutant usually contained in wastewater and drinking water, phenol. Severe regeneration conditions, up to 225 bar and 400 °C, had to be employed in SCCO2 regeneration to break the strong interaction established between phenol and the ACF. Under suitable conditions (regeneration temperature, time, and pressure, and flow of SCCO2 the adsorption capacity of the exhausted ACF was completely recovered, and even slightly increased. Most of the retained phenol was removed by thermal desorption, but the extra percentage removed by extraction allowed SCCO2 regeneration to be significantly more efficient than the classical thermal regeneration methods. SCCO2 regeneration and SCW regeneration were also compared for the first time. The use of SCW slightly improved regeneration, although SCW pressure was thrice SCCO2 pressure. The pathways that controlled SCW regeneration were also investigated.

  19. Bimetallic Cobalt-Based Phosphide Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework: CoP x Phase-Dependent Electrical Conductivity and Hydrogen Atom Adsorption Energy for Efficient Overall Water Splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Xu, Bo Z. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Ye, Ranfeng [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Beckman, Scott P. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-10-25

    Cobalt-based bimetallic phosphide encapsulated in carbonized zeolitic imadazolate frameworks has been successfully synthesized and showed excellent activities toward both hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Density functional theory calculation and electrochemical measurements reveal that the electrical conductivity and electrochemical activity are closely associated with the Co2P/CoP mixed phase behaviors upon Cu metal doping. This relationship is found to be the decisive factor for enhanced electrocatalytic performance. Moreover, the precise control of Cu content in Co-host lattice effectively alters the Gibbs free energy for H* adsorption, which is favorable for facilitating reaction kinetics. Impressively, an optimized performance has been achieved with mild Cu doping in Cu0.3Co2.7P/nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) which exhibits an ultralow overpotential of 0.19 V at 10 mA cm–2 and satisfying stability for OER. Cu0.3Co2.7P/NC also shows excellent HER activity, affording a current density of 10 mA cm–2 at a low overpotential of 0.22 V. In addition, a homemade electrolyzer with Cu0.3Co2.7P/NC paired electrodes shows 60% larger current density than Pt/ RuO2 couple at 1.74 V, along with negligible catalytic deactivation after 50 h operation. The manipulation of electronic structure by controlled incorporation of second metal sheds light on understanding and synthesizing bimetallic transition metal phosphides for electrolysis-based energy conversion.

  20. Nanotechnology and supercritical fluids | Hamidreza | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Supercritical fluid (SCF) technology has become an important tool of materials processing in the last two decades. Supercritical CO2 and H2O are extensively being used in the preparation of a great variety of nanomaterials. The interest in the preparation and application of nanometer size materials is increasing since they ...

  1. Transport properties of supercritical carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavanchy, F.; Fourcade, E.; de Koeijer, E.A.; Wijers, J.G.; Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Kemmere, M.F.; Meyer, T.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, supercritical fluids have emerged as more sustainable alternatives for the organic solvents often used in polymer processes. This is the first book emphasizing the potential of supercritical carbon dioxide for polymer processes from an engineering point of view. It develops a

  2. Effect of various experimental parameters on the swelling and supercritical extraction properties of lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacimehmetoglu, S.; Sinag, A.; Tekes, A.T.; Misirlioglu, Z.; Canel, M. [Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Science

    2007-07-01

    The original lignite sample, the samples swollen in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine, tetrahydrofuran (THF), acetone, ethylenediamine (EDA), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH), the samples impregnated by ZnCl{sub 2} as catalyst and the samples both swollen in the solvents and impregnated by ZnCl{sub 2} were subjected to the supercritical toluene extraction and the effects of temperature, pressure, pre-swelling procedure, hydrogen donor solvent (tetralin), and catalyst on the extract yields were investigated.

  3. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  4. Computer simulation study of in-zeolites templated carbon replicas: structural and adsorption properties for hydrogen storage application; simulation numerique de repliques de zeolithes en carbone: structures et proprietes d'adsorption en vue d'une application au stockage d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, T

    2007-05-15

    Hydrogen storage is the key issue to envisage this gas for instance as an energy vector in the field of transportation. Porous carbons are materials that are considered as possible candidates. We have studied well-controlled microporous carbon nano-structures, carbonaceous replicas of meso-porous ordered silica materials and zeolites. We realized numerically (using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulations, GCMC) the atomic nano-structures of the carbon replication of four zeolites: AlPO{sub 4}-5, silicalite-1, and Faujasite (FAU and EMT). The faujasite replicas allow nano-casting of a new form of carbon crystalline solid made of tetrahedrally or hexagonally interconnected single wall nano-tubes. The pore size networks are nano-metric giving these materials optimized hydrogen molecular storage capacities (for pure carbon phases). However, we demonstrate that these new carbon forms are not interesting for room temperature efficient storage compared to the void space of a classical gas cylinder. We showed that doping with an alkaline element, such as lithium, one could store the same quantities at 350 bar compared to a classical tank at 700 bar. This result is a possible route to achieve interesting performances for on-board docking systems for instance. (author)

  5. Computer simulation study of in-zeolites templated carbon replicas: structural and adsorption properties for hydrogen storage application; simulation numerique de repliques de zeolithes en carbone: structures et proprietes d'adsorption en vue d'une application au stockage d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, T

    2007-05-15

    Hydrogen storage is the key issue to envisage this gas for instance as an energy vector in the field of transportation. Porous carbons are materials that are considered as possible candidates. We have studied well-controlled microporous carbon nano-structures, carbonaceous replicas of meso-porous ordered silica materials and zeolites. We realized numerically (using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulations, GCMC) the atomic nano-structures of the carbon replication of four zeolites: AlPO{sub 4}-5, silicalite-1, and Faujasite (FAU and EMT). The faujasite replicas allow nano-casting of a new form of carbon crystalline solid made of tetrahedrally or hexagonally interconnected single wall nano-tubes. The pore size networks are nano-metric giving these materials optimized hydrogen molecular storage capacities (for pure carbon phases). However, we demonstrate that these new carbon forms are not interesting for room temperature efficient storage compared to the void space of a classical gas cylinder. We showed that doping with an alkaline element, such as lithium, one could store the same quantities at 350 bar compared to a classical tank at 700 bar. This result is a possible route to achieve interesting performances for on-board docking systems for instance. (author)

  6. European supercritical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.; Marsault, P.; Bittermann, D.; Maraczy, C.; Laurien, E.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Anglart, H.; Andreani, M.; Ruzickova, M.; Toivonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The HPLWR reactor design is an example of a supercritical water cooled reactor. → Cladding material tests have started but materials are not yet satisfactory. → Numerical heat transfer predictions are promising but need further validation. → The research project is most suited for nuclear education and training. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 o C average core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 10 partners and 3 active supporters from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small fuel assemblies in boxes with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Besides the scientific and technical progress, the HPLWR project turned out to be most successful in training the young generation of nuclear engineers

  7. The supercritical pomeron in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Deep-inelastic diffractive scaling violations have provided fundamental insight into the QCD pomeron, suggesting a single gluon inner structure rather than that of a perturbative two-gluon bound state. This talk outlines a derivation of a high-energy, transverse momentum cut-off, confining solution of QCD. The pomeron, in first approximation, is a single reggeized gluon plus a ''wee parton'' component that compensates for the color and particle properties of the gluon. This solution corresponds to a super-critical phase of Reggeon Field Theory

  8. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    Uranium being strategic material, its separation and purification is of utmost importance in nuclear industry, for which solvent extraction is being employed. During solvent extraction significant quantity of radioactive liquid waste gets generated which is of environmental concern. In recent decades supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has emerged as promising alternative to solvent extraction owing to its inherent advantage of reduction in liquid waste generation and simplification of process. In this paper a brief overview of research work carried out so far on SFE of uranium by BARC has been given

  9. Hydrogen storage by adsorption on activated carbon: investigation of the thermal effects during the charging process; Stockage de l'hydrogene par adsorption sur charbon actif: etude des effets thermiques lors de la charge dynamique d'un reservoir a lit fixe adsorbant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermosilla-Lara, G

    2007-02-15

    This work presents an experimental and numerical investigation of the thermal effects occurring during the charge of adsorbent fixed bed tank. The influence of these thermal effects, which result from the exothermal character of the adsorption process and the pressure forces work, on the storage capacity is specially analysed. An experimental setup allowing the dynamic measurements of the temperature and pressure profiles has been used. Then the numerical protocol with the Fluent software, has been validated by comparison of the simulated pressure, flow rate and temperature fields in the tank with the results obtained from an experimental investigation carried out the dynamic storage. Several predictive simulations have been carried out in order to study the effect of the boundary conditions, as the wall temperature or effective thermal conductivity of the porous bed, on the storage capacity of the reservoir. We searched the optimal geometry of an interbed thermal dissipator for a given industrial tank. To do this we made vary the H/L ratio, which represents the ratio of the height of an elementary stage and the total length of the tank. We could determine an optimal geometry which corresponds to the value 1/3 of the ratio H/L. From this optimum we studied the effect of five additional cooling tubes on the tank storage capacity. The stored mass is 15 % higher than that obtained without these tubes. (author)

  10. Carbon dioxide adsorption in graphene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Mishra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Control over the CO2 emission via automobiles and industrial exhaust in atmosphere, is one of the major concerns to render environmental friendly milieu. Adsorption can be considered to be one of the more promising methods, offering potential energy savings compared to absorbent systems. Different carbon nanostructures (activated carbon and carbon nanotubes have attracted attention as CO2 adsorbents due to their unique surface morphology. In the present work, we have demonstrated the CO2 adsorption capacity of graphene, prepared via hydrogen induced exfoliation of graphitic oxide at moderate temperatures. The CO2 adsorption study was performed using high pressure Sieverts apparatus and capacity was calculated by gas equation using van der Waals corrections. Physical adsorption of CO2 molecules in graphene was confirmed by FTIR study. Synthesis of graphene sheets via hydrogen exfoliation is possible at large scale and lower cost and higher adsorption capacity of as prepared graphene compared to other carbon nanostructures suggests its possible use as CO2 adsorbent for industrial application. Maximum adsorption capacity of 21.6 mmole/g was observed at 11 bar pressure and room temperature (25 ºC.

  11. Adsorption of dodecylamine hydrochloride on graphene oxide in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    Full Text Available Cationic surfactants in water are difficult to be degraded, leading to serious water pollution. In this work, graphene oxide (GO was used as an adsorbent for removing Dodecylamine Hydrochloride (DACl, a representative cationic surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM were used to characterize the prepared GO. The adsorption of DACl on GO have been investigated through measurements of adsorption capacity, zeta potential, FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The experimental results have shown that the adsorption kinetics could be described as a rate-limiting pseudo second-order process, and the adsorption isotherm agreed well with the Freundlich model. GO was a good adsorbent for DACl removal, compared with coal fly ash and powdered activated carbon. The adsorption process was endothermic, and could be attributed to electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding between DACl and GO. Keywords: Graphene oxide, Dodecylamine hydrochloride, Adsorption isotherm, Adsorption mechanisms

  12. Degradation Characteristics of Wood Using Supercritical Alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeeban Poudel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the characteristics of wood degradation using supercritical alcohols have been studied. Supercritical ethanol and supercritical methanol were used as solvents. The kinetics of wood degradation were analyzed using the nonisothermal weight loss technique with heating rates of 3.1, 9.8, and 14.5 °C/min for ethanol and 5.2, 11.3, and 16.3 °C/min for methanol. Three different kinetic analysis methods were implemented to obtain the apparent activation energy and the overall reaction order for wood degradation using supercritical alcohols. These were used to compare with previous data for supercritical methanol. From this work, the activation energies of wood degradation in supercritical ethanol were obtained as 78.0–86.0, 40.1–48.1, and 114 kJ/mol for the different kinetic analysis methods used in this work. The activation energies of wood degradation in supercritical ethanol were obtained as 78.0–86.0, 40.1–48.1, and 114 kJ/mol. This paper also includes the analysis of the liquid products obtained from this work. The characteristic analysis of liquid products on increasing reaction temperature and time has been performed by GC-MS. The liquid products were categorized according to carbon numbers and aromatic/aliphatic components. It was found that higher conversion in supercritical ethanol occurs at a lower temperature than that of supercritical methanol. The product analysis shows that the majority of products fall in the 2 to 15 carbon number range.

  13. Geothermal energy production with supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.

    2003-12-30

    There has been invented a method for producing geothermal energy using supercritical fluids for creation of the underground reservoir, production of the geothermal energy, and for heat transport. Underground reservoirs are created by pumping a supercritical fluid such as carbon dioxide into a formation to fracture the rock. Once the reservoir is formed, the same supercritical fluid is allowed to heat up and expand, then is pumped out of the reservoir to transfer the heat to a surface power generating plant or other application.

  14. Supercritical heat transfer phenomena in nuclear system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyoung Woo; Kim, Moo Hwan; Anderson, Mark H.; Corradini, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    A supercritical water (SCW) power cycle has been considered as one of the viable candidates for advanced fission reactor designs. However, the dramatic variation of thermo-physical properties with a modest change of temperature near the pseudo-critical point make existing heat transfer correlations such as the Dittus-Boelter correlation not suitably accurate to calculate the heat transfer in supercritical fluid. Several other correlations have also been suggested but none of them are able to predict the heat transfer over a parameter range, needed for reactor thermal-hydraulics simulation and design. This has prompted additional research to understand the characteristic of supercritical fluid heat transfer

  15. High purity hydrogen production system by the PSA method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    In a process developed by Nippon Steel, coke oven gas is compressed and purified of tarry matter, sulphur compounds and gum-formers by adsorption. It is then passed through a three-tower pressure-swing adsorption system to recover hydrogen whose purity can be selected in the range 99 to 99.999%. A composite adsorption agent is used.

  16. Enhanced Hydrogen Dipole Physisorption, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Channing [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-01-03

    The hydrogen gas adsorption effort at Caltech was designed to probe and apply our understanding of known interactions between molecular hydrogen and adsorbent surfaces as part of a materials development effort to enable room temperature storage of hydrogen at nominal pressure. The work we have performed over the past five years has been tailored to address the outstanding issues associated with weak hydrogen sorbent interactions in order to find an adequate solution for storage tank technology.

  17. Equilibrium curve determination of HF adsorption by activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, H.; Safdari, S. J.; Mousavian, S. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the byproducts of uranium enrichment industry is hydrogen fluoride gas. Due to the toxicity and corrosivity of the molecule, it has adverse effects on the environment and the process. Therefore, it must be removed by adsorption towers. The activated carbon is one of the proposed sorbent for the adsorption. Hydrogen fluoride adsorption equilibrium curve gives important information for designing the adsorption towers. In this article, the hydrogen fluoride adsorption and adsorption factors were determined experimentally, and four different types of carbon have been used. The operating pressure in all tests was less than 30 mbar. Comparison between the obtained experimental equilibrium curves shows that the first, second and fourth types of activated carbon are suitable for the adsorption of hydrogen fluoride. The experimental data were fitted using mathematical models of Langmuir, Freundlich, Toth and Henry. The results show that Toth mathematical model is more suitable than other models. Also, the absolute error were predicted by the model of Toth for the first, second and fourth types of the activated carbon were 12.9, 16.5 and 34 percent, respectively.

  18. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  19. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  20. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2001-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  1. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  2. GAT 4 production and storage of hydrogen. Report July 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This paper concerns two aspects of the hydrogen: the production and the storage. For both parts the challenges and a state of the art are presented. It discusses also the hydrogen production by renewable energies, by solar energy, the hydrogen of hydrocarbons reforming purification, active phases development, thermal transfer simulation. Concerning the hydrogen storage the hydrogen adsorption by large surface solid, the storage by metallic hydrides, the alanates and light hydrides, the adsorption on carbon nano-tubes, the storage in nano-structures, the thermal and mechanical simulation of the hydrogen are presented. (A.L.B.)

  3. Influence of adsorbed carbon dioxide on hydrogen electrosorption in palladium-platinum-rhodium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszewski, M.; Grden, M.; Czerwinski, A.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon dioxide electroreduction was applied to examine the processes of hydrogen electrosorption (adsorption, absorption and desorption) by thin electrodeposits of Pd-Pt-Rh alloys under conditions of cyclic voltammetric (CV) experiments. Due to different adsorption characteristics towards the adsorption product of the electroreduction of CO 2 (reduced CO 2 ) exhibited by the alloy components hydrogen adsorption and hydrogen absorption signals can be distinguished on CV curves. Reduced CO 2 causes partial blocking of hydrogen adsorbed on surface Pt and Rh atoms, without any significant effect on hydrogen absorption into alloy. It reflects the fact that adsorbed hydrogen bonded to Pd atoms does not participate in CO 2 reduction, while hydrogen adsorbed on Pt and Rh surface sites is inactive in the absorption reaction. In contrast, CO is adsorbed on all alloy components and causes a marked inhibition of hydrogen sorption (both adsorption and absorption)/desorption reactions

  4. Monitoring corrosion and chemistry phenomena in supercritical aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Liu, C.; Kriksunov, L.; Medina, E.; Villa, J.; Bueno, J.

    1994-01-01

    The in situ monitoring of the chemistry and electrochemistry of aqueous heat transport fluids in thermal (nuclear and fossil) power plants is now considered essential if adequate assessment and close control of corrosion and mass transfer phenomena are to be achieved. Because of the elevated temperatures and pressures involved. new sensor technologies are required that are able to measure key parameters under plant operating conditions for extended periods of time. In this paper, the authors outline a research and development program that is designed to develop practical sensors for use in thermal power plants. The current emphasis is on sensors for measuring corrosion potential, pH, the concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen, and the electrochemical noise generated by corrosion processes at temperatures ranging from ∼250 C to 500 C. The program is currently at the laboratory stage, but testing of prototype sensors in a coal-fired supercritical power plant in Spain will begin shortly

  5. Heat transfers and related effects in supercritical fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Zappoli, Bernard; Garrabos, Yves

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the unique hydrodynamics and heat transfer problems that are encountered in the vicinity of the critical point of fluids. Emphasis is given on weightlessness conditions, gravity effects and thermovibrational phenomena. Near their critical point, fluids indeed obey universal behavior and become very compressible and expandable. Their comportment, when gravity effects are suppressed, becomes quite unusual. The problems that are treated in this book are of interest to students and researchers interested in the original behavior of near-critical fluids as well as to engineers that have to manage supercritical fluids. A special chapter is dedicated to the present knowledge of critical point phenomena. Specific data for many fluids are provided, ranging from cryogenics (hydrogen) to high temperature (water). Basic information in statistical mechanics, mathematics and measurement techniques is also included. The basic concepts of fluid mechanics are given for the non-specialists to be able to ...

  6. Charting the Landscape of Supercritical String Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellerman, Simeon; Swanson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Special solutions of string theory in supercritical dimensions can interpolate in time between theories with different numbers of spacetime dimensions and different amounts of world sheet supersymmetry. These solutions connect supercritical string theories to the more familiar string duality web in ten dimensions and provide a precise link between supersymmetric and purely bosonic string theories. Dimension quenching and c duality appear to be natural concepts in string theory, giving rise to large networks of interconnected theories

  7. Supercritical solvent extraction of oil sand bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Tileuberdi, Ye.; Mansurov, Z. A.; Golovko, A. K.; Rudyk, S.

    2017-08-01

    The supercritical solvent extraction of bitumen from oil sand studied with organic solvents. The experiments were performed in autoclave reactor at temperature above 255 °C and pressure 29 atm with stirring for 6 h. The reaction resulted in the formation of coke products with mineral part of oil sands. The remaining products separated into SARA fractions. The properties of the obtained products were studied. The supercritical solvent extraction significantly upgraded extracted natural bitumen.

  8. Supercritical fields and bald black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvine, J M

    1975-01-01

    The instability of a many-fermion ground state against particle-hole excitations is reviewed and the existence of supercritical electromagnetic and strong interaction fields is briefly discussed. The nature of associated phase changes and in particular the change in conservation laws which accompanies the phase changes is outlined. Finally, the supercritical gravitational field is considered and weight given to the argument that ''black holes have no hair.''

  9. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-02-28

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storage applications, but later on it was found to be unable to store enough amounts of hydrogen under ambient conditions. New arrangements of carbon nanotubes were constructed and hydrogen sorption properties were investigated using state-of-the-art simulation methods. The simulations indicate outstanding total hydrogen uptake (up to 19.0 wt.% at 77 K and 5.52wt.% at 300 K), which makes these materials excellent candidates for storage applications. This reopens the carbon route to superior materials for a hydrogen-based economy. Zeolite imidazolate frameworks are subclass of MOFs with an exceptional chemical and thermal stability. The hydrogen adsorption in ZIFs was investigated as a function of network geometry and organic linker exchange. Ab initio calculations performed at the MP2 level to obtain correct interaction energies between hydrogen molecules and the ZIF framework. Subsequently, GCMC simulations are carried out to obtain the hydrogen uptake of ZIFs at different thermodynamic conditions. The best of these materials (ZIF-8) is found to be able to store up to 5 wt.% at 77 K and high pressure. We expected possible improvement of hydrogen capacity of ZIFs by substituting the metal atom (Zn{sup 2+}) in the structure by lighter elements such as B or Li. Therefore, we investigated the energy landscape of LiB(IM)4 polymorphs in detail and analyzed their hydrogen storage capacities. The structure with the fau topology was shown to be one of the best materials for hydrogen storage. Its

  10. Study on neutronics performance of flower shape advanced supercritical water cooled fast reactor with different solid moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Li Zhifeng; Xie Jinsen; Peng Honghua

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical water cooled fast reactors worked at such harsh condition with high temperature and high pressure, huge hydrogen balance pressure and thermal shock can result in a great loss of hydrogen. The released hydrogen would be out of control under accident situations. K_e_f_f, conversion ratio, moderator temperature effect, Doppler effect and void effect of different material such as ZrH_1_._7, Bp, BeO, C and SiC are discussed. BeO and SiC hold better integrated performance among these materials. Besides, moderators have less effect on the Doppler effect of fuel. (authors)

  11. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  12. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  13. Sub- and supercritical jet disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSouza, Shaun; Segal, Corin

    2017-04-01

    Shadowgraph visualization and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) are applied to single orifice injection in the same facility and same fluid conditions to analyze sub- to supercritical jet disintegration and mixing. The comparison includes jet disintegration and lateral spreading angle. The results indicate that the shadowgraph data are in agreement with previous visualization studies but differ from the PLIF results that provided quantitative measurement of central jet plane density and density gradients. The study further evaluated the effect of thermodynamic conditions on droplet production and quantified droplet size and distribution. The results indicate an increase in the normalized drop diameter and a decrease in the droplet population with increasing chamber temperatures. Droplet size and distribution were found to be independent of chamber pressure.

  14. Supercritical Water Oxidation Program (SCWOP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Purpose of SCWOP is to develop and demonstrate supercritical water oxidation as a viable technology for treating DOE hazardous and mixed wastes and to coordinate SCWO research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities. The process involves bringing together organic waste, water, and an oxidant (air, O 2 , etc.) to temperatures and pressures above water's critical point (374 C, 22.1 MPa); organic destruction is >99.99% efficient, and the resulting effluents (mostly water, CO 2 ) are relatively benign. Pilot-scale (300--500 gallons/day) SCWO units are to be constructed and demonstrated. Two phases will be conducted: hazardous waste pilot plant demonstration and mixed waste pilot demonstration. Contacts for further information and for getting involved are given

  15. Effect of sub- and supercritical water treatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell chitin and its enzymatic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Mitsumasa; Miura, Chika; Nakagawa, Yuko S; Kaihara, Mikio; Nikaido, Mitsuru; Totani, Kazuhide

    2015-12-10

    This study examined the effects of sub- and supercritical water pretreatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell α-chitin and its enzymatic degradation to obtain N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc)2. Following sub- and supercritical water pretreatments, the protein in the crab shell was removed and the residue of crab shell contained α-chitin and CaCO3. Prolonged pretreatment led to α-chitin decomposition. The reaction of pure α-chitin in sub- and supercritical water pretreatments was investigated separately; we observed lower mean molecular weight and weaker hydrogen bonds compared with untreated α-chitin. (GlcNAc)2 yields from enzymatic degradation of subcritical (350 °C, 7 min) and supercritical water (400 °C, 2.5 min) pretreated crab shell were 8% and 6%, compared with 0% without any pretreatment. This study shows that sub- and supercritical water pretreatments of crab shell provide to an alternative method to the use of acid and base for decalcification and deproteinization of crab shell required for (GlcNAc)2 production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  17. Hydrogen production from hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Docekal, J

    1986-01-01

    Hydrogen is an important feed stock for chemical and petroleum industries, in addition to being considered as the energy carrier of the future. At the present time the feed stock hydrogen is mainly manufactured from hydrocarbons using steam reforming. In steam reforming two processes are employed, the conventional process and PSA (pressure swing adsorption) process. These two processes are described and compared. The results show that the total costs and the maintenance costs are lower for the PSA process, the capital outlay is lower for the conventional process, and the operating costs are similar for the two processes.

  18. Hydrogen storage capacity of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoda, Ai; Oshima, Shinji; Iki, Hideshi; Akiba, Etsuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrogen adsorption of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons has been studied. • Lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity. • Lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. • Lithium reagent can alter the pore structure, depending on the raw material. • Optimizing the pore size and functional group is needed for better hydrogen uptake. - Abstract: The authors have studied the hydrogen adsorption performance of several types of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons. In the case of activated cokes, lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity from 5.02 kg/m 3 to 5.86 kg/m 3 at 303 K. Hydrogen adsorption density increases by around 17% after lithium doping, likely due to the fact that lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. The effects of lithium on hydrogen storage capacity vary depending on the raw material, because the lithium reagent can react with the material and alter the pore structure, indicating that lithium doping has the effect of plugging or filling the micropores and changing the structures of functional groups, resulting in the formation of mesopores. Despite an observed decrease in hydrogen uptake, lithium doping was found to improve hydrogen adsorption affinity. Lithium doping increases hydrogen uptake by optimizing the pore size and functional group composition

  19. Adsorption of volatile hydrocarbons in iron polysulfide chalcogels

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ejaz

    2014-11-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization and possible applications of three new metal-chalcogenide aerogels KFe3Co3S 21, KFe3Y3S22 and KFe 3Eu3S22. Metal acetates react with the alkali metal polychalcogenides in formamide/water mixture to form extended polymeric frameworks that exhibit gelation phenomena. Amorphous aerogels obtained after supercritical CO2 drying have BET surface area from 461 to 573 m 2/g. Electron microscopy images and nitrogen adsorption measurements showed that pore sizes are found in micro (below 2 nm), meso (2-50 nm), and macro (above 50 nm) porous regions. These chalcogels possess optical bandgaps in the range of 1.55-2.70 eV. These aerogels have been studied for the adsorption of volatile hydrocarbons and gases. A much higher adsorption of toluene in comparison with cyclohexane and cyclopentane vapors have been observed. The adsorption capacities of the three volatile hydrocarbons are found in the following order: toluene > cyclohexane > cyclopentane. It has been observed that high selectivity in adsorption is feasible with high-surface-area metal chalcogenides. Similarly, almost an eight to ten times increase in adsorption selectivity towards CO2 over H2/CH4 was observed in the aerogels. Moreover, reversible ion-exchange properties for K+/Cs+ ions have also been demonstrated. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. (Amino acid + silica) adsorption thermodynamics: Effects of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebben, Damien; Pendleton, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High resolution, low concentration Gly, Lys and Glu solution adsorption isotherms. • All isotherms fitted with Langmuir–Freundlich isotherm model. • Gly, Lys and Glu show exothermic adsorption processes. • Isosteric heat analyses reveal changes in interaction strength with surface coverage. - Abstract: A thorough understanding of amino acid adsorption by mineral and oxide surfaces has a major impact on a variety of industrial and biomedical applications. Little information currently exists regarding temperature effects on most of these adsorption processes. Deeper thermodynamic analyses of their multiple temperature adsorption isotherms would aid the interpretation of the interfacial interactions. Low solution concentration adsorption isotherms for glycine, lysine and glutamic acid on a silica adsorbent were generated for T = (291, 298 and 310) K. Data analysis via the Clausius–Clapeyron method yielded the isosteric heat of adsorption as a function of fractional monolayer coverage for each adsorptive. Each amino acid showed an exothermic adsorption response. Glycine and lysine experienced a greater negative effect of increased temperature compared with glutamic acid, indicating a greater number of adsorbed molecules than glutamic acid, with the former undergoing intermolecular clustering within the adsorbed phase. Isosteric heat analyses suggest ionic interactions for lysine and hydrogen bonding for glutamic acid, both weakening with increased coverage. In contrast, initial hydrogen bonding led to ionic bonding for glycine with increasing coverage

  1. FY1995 generic supercritical water technology; 1995 nendo generic technology to shite no chorinkai riyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the establishment of the basis of supercritical fluid technology, we perform elucidation of the specific feature of the supercritical fluid as a reaction media and development of some new process. In this study, we first studied the fluid structure of SCF through in-situ spectroscopy and MD simulation. As a result, significant hydrogen bonding amongst water molecules and a solvation structure around the solute were observed in the supercritical state. This fluid structure has new features different from that of high temperature steam or liquid water. We found that this is closely related to the difference of bulk properties of SCF and local one around the solute. On the basis of these fundamental findings and with the better understanding of the specific features of SCF as a reaction media, development of some new process had been conducted more efficiently and successfully. The processes being developed in this study include 1) waste biomass and plastic conversion to recover chemicals, 2) hydrogenation of heavy oil for desulphurization through partial oxidation 1 and 3) hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide fine particles. (NEDO)

  2. Challenges of selecting materials for the process of biomass gasification in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukis, N.; Habicht, W.; Hauer, E.; Dinjus, E. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie

    2010-07-01

    A new process for the gasification of wet biomass is the reaction in supercritical water. The product is a combustible gas, rich in hydrogen with a high calorific value. The reaction is performed under high temperatures - up to 700 C - and pressures up to 30 MPa. The combination of these physical conditions and the corrosive environment is very demanding for the construction materials of the reactor. Only few alloys exhibit the required mechanical properties, especially the mechanical strength at temperatures higher than 600 C. Ni-Base alloys like alloy 625 can be applied up to a temperature of 700 C and are common materials for application under supercritical water conditions. During gasification experiments with corn silage and other biomasses, corrosion of the reactor material alloy 625 appears. The gasification of an aqueous methanol solution in supercritical water at temperatures up to 600 C and 25 - 30 MPa pressure results in an product gas rich in hydrogen, carbon dioxide and some methane. Alloy 625 shows very low corrosion rates in this environment. It is obvious that the heteroatoms and salts present in biomass cause corrosion of the reactor material. (orig.)

  3. Screening of hydrocarbons as supercritical ORCs working fluids by thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Xiaoye; Shi, Lin; An, Qingsong; Qian, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A rapid evaluation method for thermal stability of hydrocarbons for ORCs. • Methane and hydrogen are confirmed to be decomposition indicators. • The decomposition temperatures for some hydrocarbons using the rapid method. • Long carbon chain hydrocarbons are not suitable for supercritical ORCs. - Abstract: Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems are widely used for industrial waste heat recovery and renewable energy utilization. The supercritical ORC is currently one of the main development directions due to its low exergy loss, high thermal efficiency and high work output. The thermal stability is the major limitation of organic working fluid selection with high temperature heat sources. This paper presents a rapid experimental method for assessing the thermal stability of hydrocarbons for ORCs. The fluids were tested in a high temperature reactor with methane and hydrogen theoretically and experimentally confirmed to be the indicators of thermal decomposition. The thermal decomposition temperatures were obtained for n-hexane, n-pentane, isopentane, cyclopentane, n-butane and isobutane using the rapid experimental method. The results show that cycloalkanes are not the good choices by thermal stability and long carbon chain hydrocarbons (longer than C6) are not suitable for supercritical ORCs due to the thermal stability limitation.

  4. Hydrogen retention properties of lithium film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Koh; Yamauchi, Yuji; Hirohata, Yuko; Hino, Tomoaki; Mori, Kintaro

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen retention properties of Li films and lithium oxide-lithium hydroxide (Li 2 O-LiOH) mixed films were investigated by two methods, hydrogen ion irradiation and hydrogen glow discharge. In a case of the hydrogen ion irradiation, thermal desorption spectrum of hydrogen retained in Li 2 O-LiOH film had two desorption peaks at around 470 K and 570 K. The ratio between retained hydrogen and Li atom was about 0.7. In a case of the hydrogen glow discharge, the hydrogen was also gettered in Li film during the discharge. The ratio of H/Li was almost 0.9. Most of gettered hydrogen desorbed by a baking with a temperature of 370 K. On the contrary, when the Li film exposed to the atmosphere was irradiated by the hydrogen plasma, the desorption of H 2 O was observed in addition to the adsorption of H 2 . (author)

  5. Real gas CFD simulations of hydrogen/oxygen supercritical combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, S.; Jarczyk, M.; Pfitzner, M.; Rogg, B.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive numerical framework has been established to simulate reacting flows under conditions typically encountered in rocket combustion chambers. The model implemented into the commercial CFD Code ANSYS CFX includes appropriate real gas relations based on the volume-corrected Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) for the flow field and a real gas extension of the laminar flamelet combustion model. The results indicate that the real gas relations have a considerably larger impact on the flow field than on the detailed flame structure. Generally, a realistic flame shape could be achieved for the real gas approach compared to experimental data from the Mascotte test rig V03 operated at ONERA when the differential diffusion processes were only considered within the flame zone.

  6. Supercritical water reformation of crude glycerol solution for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Glycerol, also known as glycerin, is a less desirable byproduct formed in the production of biodiesel via the transesterification otriglycerides and presents a nontrivial issue in terms of developing other beneficial end uses. With an inflated glycer...

  7. Is the hydrogen production from biomass technology really sustainable? Answer by Life Cycle Emergy Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Hanwei; Ren, Jingzheng; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Sustainability performance of biomass-based hydrogen is in debate. This study aims at using Emergy Theory to investigate the sustainability hydrogen production from corn stalks by supercritical water gasification, all the inputs including renewable resources, non-renewable resources, purchased...

  8. Operation and Performance of the Supercritical Fluids Reactor (SFR)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanush, R

    1996-01-01

    The Supercritical Fluids Reactor (SFR) at Sandia National Laboratories, CA has been developed to examine and solve engineering, process, and fundamental chemistry issues regarding the development of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO...

  9. Catalyst retention in continuous flow with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouten, S.C.; Noel, T.; Wang, Q.; Hessel, V.

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the retention of organometallic catalysts in continuous flow processes utilizing supercritical carbon dioxide. Due to its innovative properties, supercritical carbon dioxide offers interesting possibilities for process intensification. As a result of safety and cost

  10. Comparative study of hydrogen storage on metal doped mesoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, P. M.; Sapag, K.; Oliva, M. I.; Eimer, G. A.

    2018-06-01

    The hydrogen adsorption capacity of mesoporous materials MCM-41 modified with Co, Fe, Ti, Mg and Ni at 77 K and 10 bar was investigated. Various techniques including XRD, N2 adsorption and DRUV-vis were employed for the materials characterization. The results showed that a low nickel loading on MCM-41 support promoted the presence of hydrogen-favorable sites, increasing the hydrogen storage capacity.

  11. Supercritical fluid technology: concepts and pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Kumar, G Aravind; Kumar, Averineni Ranjith; Shavi, Gopal Venkatesh; Karthik, Arumugam; Reddy, Meka Sreenivasa; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2011-01-01

    In light of environmental apprehension, supercritical fluid technology (SFT) exhibits excellent opportunities to accomplish key objectives in the drug delivery sector. Supercritical fluid extraction using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) has been recognized as a green technology. It is a clean and versatile solvent with gas-like diffusivity and liquid-like density in the supercritical phase, which has provided an excellent alternative to the use of chemical solvents. The present commentary provides an overview of different techniques using supercritical fluids and their future opportunity for the drug delivery industry. Some of the emerging applications of SFT in pharmaceuticals, such as particle design, drug solubilization, inclusion complex, polymer impregnation, polymorphism, drug extraction process, and analysis, are also covered in this review. The data collection methods are based on the recent literature related to drug delivery systems using SFT platforms. SFT has become a much more versatile and environmentally attractive technology that can handle a variety of complicated problems in pharmaceuticals. This cutting-edge technology is growing predominantly to surrogate conventional unit operations in relevance to the pharmaceutical production process. Supercritical fluid technology has recently drawn attention in the field of pharmaceuticals. It is a distinct conception that utilizes the solvent properties of supercritical fluids above their critical temperature and pressure, where they exhibit both liquid-like and gas-like properties, which can enable many pharmaceutical applications. For example, the liquid-like properties provide benefits in extraction processes of organic solvents or impurities, drug solubilization, and polymer plasticization, and the gas-like features facilitate mass transfer processes. It has become a much more versatile and environmentally attractive technology that can handle a variety of complicated problems in pharmaceuticals. This review is

  12. Pressure drop and friction factor correlations of supercritical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiande; Xu Yu; Su Xianghui; Shi Rongrong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Survey and evaluation of friction factor models for supercritical flow. ► Survey of experimental study of supercritical flow. ► New correlation of friction factor for supercritical flow. - Abstract: The determination of the in-tube friction pressure drop under supercritical conditions is important to the design, analysis and simulation of transcritical cycles of air conditioning and heat pump systems, nuclear reactor cooling systems and some other systems. A number of correlations for supercritical friction factors have been proposed. Their accuracy and applicability should be examined. This paper provides a comprehensive survey of experimental investigations into the pressure drop of supercritical flow in the past decade and a comparative study of supercritical friction factor correlations. Our analysis shows that none of the existing correlations is completely satisfactory, that there are contradictions between the existing experimental results and thus more elaborate experiments are needed, and that the tube roughness should be considered. A new friction factor correlation for supercritical tube flow is proposed based on 390 experimental data from the available literature, including 263 data of supercritical R410A cooling, 45 data of supercritical R404A cooling, 64 data of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) cooling and 18 data of supercritical R22 heating. Compared with the best existing model, the new correlation increases the accuracy by more than 10%.

  13. FY 1999 Advanced research and development project under New Sunshine Project. Study on supercritical solvolysis reaction; 1999 nendo chorinkai ryutai riyo gijutsu sendo kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The research and development project is implemented for the chemical processes which utilize supercritical fluids, in order to establish the basic technologies for the environment-friendly chemical processes. For the solvolysis, the conditions under which plastics are hydrolyzed in supercritical water are investigated, and the basic data are obtained for the optimum conditions under which thermoplastic resins are hydrolyzed. The mechanisms involved in hydrolysis of polymers in supercritical water are elucidated to some extent. The environment-friendly process for synthesizing polycarbonate in supercritical carbon dioxide gas is investigated, and the continuous flow sheets are established for securing almost 100% conversion in the presence of an inexpensive catalyst. For the oxidation, the tests are conducted to burn low-grade coal in supercritical water, and the conditions under which it is burnt without releasing acid and toxic gases are found. For the hydrogenation, heavy fuel oil is treated in supercritical water to produce the lighter products. The conditions under which light oils and gases are produced are clarified, and the basic data are obtained for producing light gases from the resultant coke as the by-product. (NEDO)

  14. Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sienicki, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nellis, Gregory [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Klein, Sanford [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Fluids operating in the supercritical state have promising characteristics for future high efficiency power cycles. In order to develop power cycles using supercritical fluids, it is necessary to understand the flow characteristics of fluids under both supercritical and two-phase conditions. In this study, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methodology was developed for supercritical fluids flowing through complex geometries. A real fluid property module was implemented to provide properties for different supercritical fluids. However, in each simulation case, there is only one species of fluid. As a result, the fluid property module provides properties for either supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) or supercritical water (SCW). The Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) was employed to model the two-phase flow. HEM assumes two phases have same velocity, pressure, and temperature, making it only applicable for the dilute dispersed two-phase flow situation. Three example geometries, including orifices, labyrinth seals, and valves, were used to validate this methodology with experimental data. For the first geometry, S-CO2 and SCW flowing through orifices were simulated and compared with experimental data. The maximum difference between the mass flow rate predictions and experimental measurements is less than 5%. This is a significant improvement as previous works can only guarantee 10% error. In this research, several efforts were made to help this improvement. First, an accurate real fluid module was used to provide properties. Second, the upstream condition was determined by pressure and density, which determines supercritical states more precise than using pressure and temperature. For the second geometry, the flow through labyrinth seals was studied. After a successful validation, parametric studies were performed to study geometric effects on the leakage rate. Based on these parametric studies, an optimum design strategy for the see

  15. Theoretical models for supercritical fluid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen; Shi, Xiao-Han; Jiang, Wei-Juan

    2012-08-10

    For the proper design of supercritical fluid extraction processes, it is essential to have a sound knowledge of the mass transfer mechanism of the extraction process and the appropriate mathematical representation. In this paper, the advances and applications of kinetic models for describing supercritical fluid extraction from various solid matrices have been presented. The theoretical models overviewed here include the hot ball diffusion, broken and intact cell, shrinking core and some relatively simple models. Mathematical representations of these models have been in detail interpreted as well as their assumptions, parameter identifications and application examples. Extraction process of the analyte solute from the solid matrix by means of supercritical fluid includes the dissolution of the analyte from the solid, the analyte diffusion in the matrix and its transport to the bulk supercritical fluid. Mechanisms involved in a mass transfer model are discussed in terms of external mass transfer resistance, internal mass transfer resistance, solute-solid interactions and axial dispersion. The correlations of the external mass transfer coefficient and axial dispersion coefficient with certain dimensionless numbers are also discussed. Among these models, the broken and intact cell model seems to be the most relevant mathematical model as it is able to provide realistic description of the plant material structure for better understanding the mass-transfer kinetics and thus it has been widely employed for modeling supercritical fluid extraction of natural matters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Supercritical Fluid Chromatographic Separation of Dimethylpolysiloxane Polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyo, Dong Jin; Lim, Chang Hyun [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Water was used as a polar modifier and a μ-porasil column as a saturator column. The μ-porasil column was inserted between the pump outlet and the injection valve. During the passage of the supercritical fluid mobile phase through the silica column, a polar modifier (water) can be dissolved in the pressurized supercritical fluid. Dimethylpolysiloxane polymer has been known as more polar polymer than polystyrene polymer. Dimethylpolysiloxane polymer has never been separated using water modified mobile phase. In this paper, using a μ-porasil column as a saturator column, excellent supercritical fluid chromatograms of dimethylpolysiloxane oligomers were obtained. The use of compressed (dense) gases and supercritical fluids as chromatographic mobile phases in conjunction with liquid chromatographic (LC)-type packed columns was first reported by Klesper et al. in 1962. During its relatively short history, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has become an attractive alternative to GC and LC in certain industrially important applications. SFC gives the advantage of high efficiency and allows the analysis of nonvolatile or thermally labile mixtures.

  17. Supercritical Fluid Chromatographic Separation of Dimethylpolysiloxane Polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyo, Dong Jin; Lim, Chang Hyun

    2005-01-01

    Water was used as a polar modifier and a μ-porasil column as a saturator column. The μ-porasil column was inserted between the pump outlet and the injection valve. During the passage of the supercritical fluid mobile phase through the silica column, a polar modifier (water) can be dissolved in the pressurized supercritical fluid. Dimethylpolysiloxane polymer has been known as more polar polymer than polystyrene polymer. Dimethylpolysiloxane polymer has never been separated using water modified mobile phase. In this paper, using a μ-porasil column as a saturator column, excellent supercritical fluid chromatograms of dimethylpolysiloxane oligomers were obtained. The use of compressed (dense) gases and supercritical fluids as chromatographic mobile phases in conjunction with liquid chromatographic (LC)-type packed columns was first reported by Klesper et al. in 1962. During its relatively short history, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has become an attractive alternative to GC and LC in certain industrially important applications. SFC gives the advantage of high efficiency and allows the analysis of nonvolatile or thermally labile mixtures

  18. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  19. Detection of hydrogen peroxide with graphyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, R.; Karami, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electronic properties of graphyne has been investigated to explore the possibility of using graphyne based biosensor. We have used density functional theory to study the electronic properties of γ-graphyne in the presence of different number of hydrogen peroxide. The optimal adsorption position, orientation, and distance of hydrogen peroxide adsorbed on the graphyne sheet have been determined by calculating adsorption energy. It is found that γ-graphyne which is an intrinsic semiconductor becomes an n-type semiconductor due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The energy band gap of γ-graphyne is decreased by increasing the number of hydrogen peroxide. The results demonstrate that γ-graphyne is a promising candidate for biosensor application because of its electrical sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Enhancing power cycle efficiency for a supercritical Brayton cycle power system using tunable supercritical gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Vernon, Milton E.; Radel, Ross F.

    2017-08-29

    Various technologies pertaining to tuning composition of a fluid mixture in a supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system are described herein. Compounds, such as Alkanes, are selectively added or removed from an operating fluid of the supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system to cause the critical temperature of the fluid to move up or down, depending upon environmental conditions. As efficiency of the supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system is substantially optimized when heat is rejected near the critical temperature of the fluid, dynamically modifying the critical temperature of the fluid based upon sensed environmental conditions improves efficiency of such a system.

  1. Driving Interconnected Networks to Supercriticality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Radicchi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Networks in the real world do not exist as isolated entities, but they are often part of more complicated structures composed of many interconnected network layers. Recent studies have shown that such mutual dependence makes real networked systems potentially exposed to atypical structural and dynamical behaviors, and thus there is an urgent necessity to better understand the mechanisms at the basis of these anomalies. Previous research has mainly focused on the emergence of atypical properties in relation to the moments of the intra- and interlayer degree distributions. In this paper, we show that an additional ingredient plays a fundamental role for the possible scenario that an interconnected network can face: the correlation between intra- and interlayer degrees. For sufficiently high amounts of correlation, an interconnected network can be tuned, by varying the moments of the intra- and interlayer degree distributions, in distinct topological and dynamical regimes. When instead the correlation between intra- and interlayer degrees is lower than a critical value, the system enters in a supercritical regime where dynamical and topological phases are no longer distinguishable.

  2. Supercritical waste oxidation pump investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurston, G.; Garcia, K.

    1993-02-01

    This report investigates the pumping techniques and pumping equipment that would be appropriate for a 5,000 gallon per day supercritical water oxidation waste disposal facility. The pumps must boost water, waste, and additives from atmospheric pressure to approximately 27.6 MPa (4,000 psia). The required flow ranges from 10 gpm to less than 0.1 gpm. For the higher flows, many commercial piston pumps are available. These pumps have packing and check-valves that will require periodic maintenance; probably at 2 to 6 month intervals. Several commercial diaphragm pumps were also discovered that could pump the higher flow rates. Diaphragm pumps have the advantage of not requiring dynamic seals. For the lower flows associated with the waste and additive materials, commercial diaphragm pumps. are available. Difficult to pump materials that are sticky, radioactive, or contain solids, could be injected with an accumulator using an inert gas as the driving mechanism. The information presented in this report serves as a spring board for trade studies and the development of equipment specifications

  3. Supercritical carbon dioxide hop extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfaf-Šovljanski Ivana I.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hop of Magnum cultivar was extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SFE-as extractant. Extraction was carried out in the two steps: the first one being carried out at 150 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (Extract A, and the second was the extraction of the same hop sample at 300 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (Extract B. Extraction kinetics of the system hop-SFE-CO2 was investigated. Two of four most common compounds of hop aroma (α-humulene and β-caryophyllene were detected in Extract A. Isomerised α-acids and β-acids were detected too. a-Acid content in Extract B was high (that means it is a bitter variety of hop. Mathematical modeling using empirical model characteristic time model and simple single sphere model has been performed on Magnum cultivar extraction experimental results. Characteristic time model equations, best fitted experimental results. Empirical model equation, fitted results well, while simple single sphere model equation poorly approximated the results.

  4. Supercritical fluid extraction of hops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZORAN ZEKOVIC

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Five cultivars of hop were extracted by the method of supercritical fluid extraction using carbon dioxide (SFE–CO2 as extractant. The extraction (50 g of hop sample using a CO2 flow rate of 97.725 L/h was done in the two steps: 1. extraction at 150 bar and 40°C for 2.5 h (sample of series A was obtained and, after that, the same sample of hop was extracted in the second step: 2. extraction at 300 bar and 40 °C for 2.5 h (sample of series B was obtained. The Magnum cultivar was chosen for the investigation of the extraction kinetics. For the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the obtained hop extracts, the GC-MS method was used. Two of four themost common compounds of hop aroma (a-humulene and b-caryophyllene were detected in samples of series A. In addition, isomerized a-acids and a high content of b-acids were detected. The a-acids content in the samples of series B was the highest in the extract of the Magnum cultivar (it is a bitter variety of hop. The low contents of a-acids in all the other hop samples resulted in extracts with low a-acids content, i.e., that contents were under the prescribed a-acids content.

  5. Gasification of fruit wastes and agro-food residues in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Sonil; Isen, Jamie; Dalai, Ajay K.; Kozinski, Janusz A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical water gasification of various fruit wastes and agro-food residues. • Coconut shell had superior carbon content and calorific value due to high lignin. • Maximum H_2 yields at 600 °C with 1:10 biomass-to-water ratio, 45 min and 23–25 MPa. • High H_2 yields from coconut shell, bagasse and aloe vera rind with 2 wt% K_2CO_3. • High CH_4 yields from coconut shell with 2 wt% NaOH due to methanation reaction. - Abstract: Considerable amounts of fruit wastes and agro-food residues are generated worldwide as a result of food processing. Converting the bioactive components (e.g., carbohydrates, lipids, fats, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in food wastes to biofuels is a potential remediation approach. This study highlights the characterization and hydrothermal conversion of several fruit wastes and agro-food residues such as aloe vera rind, banana peel, coconut shell, lemon peel, orange peel, pineapple peel and sugarcane bagasse to hydrogen-rich syngas through supercritical water gasification. The agro-food wastes were gasified in supercritical water to study the impacts of temperature (400–600 °C), biomass-to-water ratio (1:5 and 1:10) and reaction time (15–45 min) at a pressure range of 23–25 MPa. The catalytic effects of NaOH and K_2CO_3 were also investigated to maximize the hydrogen yields and selectivity. The elevated temperature (600 °C), longer reaction time (45 min) and lower feed concentration (1:10 biomass-to-water ratio) were optimal for higher hydrogen yield (0.91 mmol/g) and total gas yield (5.5 mmol/g) from orange peel. However, coconut shell with 2 wt% K_2CO_3 at 600 °C and 1:10 biomass-to-water ratio for 45 min revealed superior hydrogen yield (4.8 mmol/g), hydrogen selectivity (45.8%) and total gas yield (15 mmol/g) with enhanced lower heating value of the gas product (1595 kJ/Nm"3). The overall findings suggest that supercritical water gasification of fruit wastes and agro-food residues could serve as

  6. Site competition on metal surfaces: an electron spectroscopic study of sequential adsorption on W(110)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkilberg, M.; Menzel, D.

    1977-01-01

    Using UPS and XPS, the sequential adsorption of hydrogen + carbon monoxide, and of hydrogen + oxygen, on W(110) has been studied at room temperature. Adsorption of CO on a H-covered surface is rapid and leads to total displacement of hydrogen. The resulting CO layer however, is different from that formed on the clean surface under identical conditions, in that it consists of a higher percentage of virgin CO, while considerably more β-CO forms on the clean surface. Oxygen does not adsorb on a H-covered surface, nor displace hydrogen. It is concluded that hydrogen most probably occupies the same sites utilized by dissociative adsorption of CO and oxygen, while virgin CO can also occupy different sites; its adsorption can thus lead to interactional weakening of the H-surface bond. (Auth.)

  7. Heat Transfer Phenomena of Supercritical Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krau, Carmen Isabella; Kuhn, Dietmar; Schulenberg, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In concepts for supercritical water cooled reactors, the reactor core is cooled and moderated by water at supercritical pressures. The significant temperature dependence of the fluid properties of water requires an exact knowledge of the heat transfer mechanism to avoid fuel pin damages. Near the pseudo-critical point a deterioration of heat transfer might happen. Processes, that take place in this case, are not fully understood and are due to be examined systematically. In this paper a general overview on the properties of supercritical water is given, experimental observations of different authors will be reviewed in order to identify heat transfer phenomena and onset of occurrence. The conceptional design of a test rig to investigate heat transfer in the boundary layer will be discussed. Both, water and carbon dioxide, may serve as operating fluids. The loop, including instrumentation and safety devices, is shown and suitable measuring methods are described. (authors)

  8. Supercritical water decontamination of town gas soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, B.S.; Azzam, F.O.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    Town gas sites represent a large environmental problem that exists in more than 2,000 sites across North America alone. The major contaminants in town gas sods are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These are stable compounds that migrate deep into the soil and are traditionally very difficult to remove by conventional remediation processes. Supercritical fluids offer enhanced solvating properties along with reduced mass transfer resistances that make them ideal for removing compounds that are difficult or impossible to remove by conventional processes. Supercritical water is ideal for removing PAHs and other hydrocarbons from soil due to its high solvating power towards most hydrocarbon species. Supercritical water was investigated for its ability to remediate two different town gas sods containing from 3--20 wt% contamination. The sod was remediated in a 300-cc semi-continuous system to a more environmentally acceptable level

  9. FY 1998 'The New Sunshine Project' leading R and D. Report on the results of the leading R and D of supercritical fluid utilization technology; 1998 nendo 'New Sunshine Keikaku' sendo kenkyu kaihatsu. Chorinkai ryutai riyo gijutsu sendo kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The paper reported the FY 1998 achievement of the supercritical fluid utilization leading R and D which started in FY 1997 on a 3-year plan. In the R and D, solvolysis reaction, oxidation reaction and hydrogenation reaction were taken up in the chemical process using supercritical fluid. In the study of solvolysis reaction, the basic data were obtained on decomposition conditions of thermoplastic and thermosetting plastics in supercritical water. Further, concerning the synthesis of environmental friendly type carbonate using CO2, a conversion rate of almost 100% was obtained. About the oxidation reaction, conditions were found out for burning low grade coal in supercritical water without emitting acid gas. This is considered to lead to a possibility of the supercritical water power generation. Relating to the hydrogenation reaction, a study was made on lightening technology of heavy distillate using supercritical water, and the conditions for effective emission of methane and hydrogen were found out. As to the base technology, a study was made of metal materials with high corrosion resistance against supercritical water. (NEDO)

  10. FY 1998 'The New Sunshine Project' leading R and D. Report on the results of the leading R and D of supercritical fluid utilization technology; 1998 nendo 'New Sunshine Keikaku' sendo kenkyu kaihatsu. Chorinkai ryutai riyo gijutsu sendo kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The paper reported the FY 1998 achievement of the supercritical fluid utilization leading R and D which started in FY 1997 on a 3-year plan. In the R and D, solvolysis reaction, oxidation reaction and hydrogenation reaction were taken up in the chemical process using supercritical fluid. In the study of solvolysis reaction, the basic data were obtained on decomposition conditions of thermoplastic and thermosetting plastics in supercritical water. Further, concerning the synthesis of environmental friendly type carbonate using CO2, a conversion rate of almost 100% was obtained. About the oxidation reaction, conditions were found out for burning low grade coal in supercritical water without emitting acid gas. This is considered to lead to a possibility of the supercritical water power generation. Relating to the hydrogenation reaction, a study was made on lightening technology of heavy distillate using supercritical water, and the conditions for effective emission of methane and hydrogen were found out. As to the base technology, a study was made of metal materials with high corrosion resistance against supercritical water. (NEDO)

  11. Thermal stability of biodiesel in supercritical methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroaki Imahara; Eiji Minami; Shusaku Hari; Shiro Saka [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Department of Socio-Environmental Energy Science

    2008-01-15

    Non-catalytic biodiesel production technologies from oils/fats in plants and animals have been developed in our laboratory employing supercritical methanol. Due to conditions in high temperature and high pressure of the supercritical fluid, thermal stability of fatty acid methyl esters and actual biodiesel prepared from various plant oils was studied in supercritical methanol over a range of its condition between 270{sup o}C/17 MPa and 380{sup o}C/56 MPa. In addition, the effect of thermal degradation on cold flow properties was studied. As a result, it was found that all fatty acid methyl esters including poly-unsaturated ones were stable at 270{sup o}C/17 MPa, but at 350{sup o}C/43 MPa, they were partly decomposed to reduce the yield with isomerization from cis-type to trans-type. These behaviors were also observed for actual biodiesel prepared from linseed oil, safflower oil, which are high in poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Cold flow properties of actual biodiesel, however, remained almost unchanged after supercritical methanol exposure at 270{sup o}C/17 MPa and 350{sup o}C/43 MPa. For the latter condition, however, poly-unsaturated fatty acids were sacrificed to be decomposed and reduced in yield. From these results, it was clarified that reaction temperature in supercritical methanol process should be lower than 300{sup o}C, preferably 270{sup o}C with a supercritical pressure higher than 8.09 MPa, in terms of thermal stabilization for high-quality biodiesel production. 9 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Adsorption properties of thermally sputtered calcein film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglenko, I.; Burlachenko, J.; Kravchenko, S.; Savchenko, A.; Slabkovska, M.; Shirshov, Yu.

    2014-05-01

    High humidity environments are often found in such areas as biotechnology, food chemistry, plant physiology etc. The controlling of parameters of such ambiences is vitally important. Thermally deposited calcein films have extremely high adsorptivity at exposure to water vapor of high concentration. This feature makes calcein a promising material for humidity sensing applications. The aim of this work is to explain high sensitivity and selectivity of calcein film to high humidity. Quartz crystal microbalance sensor, AFM and ellipsometry were used for calcein film characterization and adsorption properties investigation. The proposed model takes into account both the molecular properties of calcein (the presence of several functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds, and their arrangement) and the features of structure of thermally deposited calcein film (film restructuring due to the switching of bonds "calcein-calcein" to "calcein-water" in the course of water adsorption).

  13. Hydrogen molecule on lithium adsorbed graphene: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Gaganpreet; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations for the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on lithium (Li) decorated and pristine graphene have been studied systematically using SIESTA code [1] within the framework of the first-principle DFT under the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)[2], including spin polarization. The energy of adsorption of hydrogen molecule on graphene is always enhanced by the presence of co-adsorbed lithium. The most efficient adsorption configuration is when H 2 is lying parallel to lithium adsorbed graphene which is in contrast to its adsorption on pristine graphene (PG) where it prefers perpendicular orientation.

  14. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan; Liang, Hanfeng; Zhu, Jiajie; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt

  15. A new apparatus for the determination of adsorption isotherms and adsorption enthalpies on microporous and meso-porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouahid, A.

    2010-01-01

    A specific thermostated experimental device comprising a differential heat flow calorimeter coupled with a home built manometric system has been built for the simultaneous determination of adsorption isotherms and adsorption enthalpies. The differential heat flow calorimeter is a Tian Calvet Setaram C80 model which measures the heat flux of a gas and can be operated isothermally, the manometric system is a stainless steel homemade apparatus. This coupled apparatus allows measurements for pressure up to 2.5 MPa and temperature up to 423.15 K. On the one hand, the apparatus and the experimental procedures are described. On the second hand the reliability and reproducibility were established by measuring adsorption isotherms on a benchmark (Filtrasorb F400) at 318.15 K. The gravimetric method has been used at higher pressure at various temperatures. These devices allowed us to study the adsorption of supercritical fluid (nitrogen N 2 , methane CH 4 , carbon dioxide CO 2 ) in activated carbons and microporous or meso-porous silica. The adsorption of methane on a rock of type (TGR) was also studied. These experimental results are used for the study of the interactions fluid / solid that must be taken into account in molecular simulations or DFT theory. (author)

  16. Processes of H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Weiwei; Peng, Liang; Peng, Daoling [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Gu, Feng Long, E-mail: gu@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Jun [Material Design and Simulation Technology Co. Ltd., Room 1716, V-Faction, 10 Vanke, 2 Ring Road of North Section, Chengdu (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • The hydrogen coverages for H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface ranging from 0.125 to 1.000 are prepared by using different surface supercells. • With the reduction of coverage, the average iron atomic energy is increased and the adsorption energy is decreased, leading to the system more stable; while coverage has little effect on the Fe(1 1 0) surface structure and the hydrogen adsorption process. • The most stable absorption site is found to be the on-top site. • DFT calculations show that it is a weak adsorption and the adsorption energy barriers under 4.4 kcal/mol. • The final state is H{sub 2} molecule dissociated into two hydrogen atoms interacting with surface iron atoms to form stable Fe-H bonds. - Abstract: Processes of H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface have been studied by the density functional theory, properties such as surface structure, adsorption position, and adsorption energies are discussed as well. To investigate the atomic geometries and stability under different hydrogen coverages for this adsorption, the hydrogen coverages ranging from 0.125 to 1.000 are prepared by using different surface supercells. It is found that with the reduction of coverage, the average iron atomic energy and the adsorption energy are increased, leading to the system more stable; while coverage has little effect on the Fe(1 1 0) surface structure and the hydrogen adsorption process. The most stable absorption site is found to be the on-top site. Our calculations show that it is a weak adsorption and the adsorption energy barriers under 4.4 kcal/mol. The final state is H{sub 2} molecule dissociated into two hydrogen atoms and interacting with surface iron atoms to form stable Fe-H bonds.

  17. Solid catalyzed isoparaffin alkylation at supercritical fluid and near-supercritical fluid conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Kong, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method for the alkylation reaction of isoparaffins with olefins over solid catalysts including contacting a mixture of an isoparaffin, an olefin and a phase-modifying material with a solid acid catalyst member under alkylation conversion conditions at either supercritical fluid, or near-supercritical fluid conditions, at a temperature and a pressure relative to the critical temperature(T.sub.c) and the critical pressure(P.sub.c) of the reaction mixture. The phase-modifying phase-modifying material is employed to promote the reaction's achievement of either a supercritical fluid state or a near-supercritical state while simultaneously allowing for decreased reaction temperature and longer catalyst life.

  18. Gas separation by pressure swing adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.; Gottzman, C.F.; Notaro, F.; Stewart, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past twenty years separation processes based upon pressure swing adsorption have replaced cryogenic processes in a number of selected applications such as air separation for production of moderate quantities of nitrogen and oxygen and recovery of hydrogen from refinery and chemical plant gases. Key events contributing to the emergence of PSA as an important process option have been the development of synthetic zeolite molecular sieves by Union Carbide Corporation in the USA and of carbon molecular sieves by Bergbau-Forschung in Germany. Today PSA processes enjoy significant commercial use producing oxygen from 0.1 Nm 3 /h for medical application to 1500 Nm 3 /h for steel mill use, for making nitrogen up to 1000 Nm 3 /h for inerting and in purifying hydrogen streams of up to 100,000 Nm 3 /h for refinery use. In this paper some of the principles of adsorptive separations are reviewed. The history of the technology is traced briefly with emphasis on key material, process and application events. The major commercial processes in the application of adsorption to bulk separation of air and hydrogen purification are reviewed in more detail with comparisons made to cryogenic alternatives in terms of specific characteristics, advantages and disadvantages where appropriate. Information on performance, reliability and comparative economics are discussed where available

  19. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  20. Development of liquefaction process of coal and biomass in supercritical water; Chorinkaisui wo mochiita sekitan biomass doji ekika process no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, H.; Matsumura, Y.; Tsutsumi, A.; Yoshida, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Masuno, Y.; Inaba, A. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Liquefaction of coal and biomass in supercritical water has been investigated, in which strong solubilization force of supercritical water against hydrocarbons is utilized. Free radicals are formed through the cleavage of covalent bonds in coal under the heating condition at around 400{degree}C during coal liquefaction. It is important to stabilize these unstable intermediate products by hydrogen transfer. On the other hand, hydrogen is not required for the liquefaction of biomass having higher H/C atomic ratio and oxygen content than those of coal. Co-liquefaction of coal and biomass was conducted using supercritical water, in which excess hydrogen from the liquefaction of biomass would be transferred to coal, resulting in the effective liquefaction of coal. Mixture of coal and cellulose was liquefied in supercritical water at 390{degree}C under the pressure of 25 MPa using a semi-continuous reactor, and the results were compared with those from the separate liquefaction of them. The co-liquefaction of coal and cellulose did not show any difference in the residue yield from the separate liquefaction of these, but led to the increased production of compounds with lower molecular weight. The liquefaction was completed in 15 minutes. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Interfacial adsorption of insulin - Conformational changes and reversibility of adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollmann, SH; Jorgensen, L; Bukrinsky, JT; Elofsson, U; Norde, W; Frokjaer, S

    The adsorption of human insulin to Teflon particles was studied with respect to conformational changes and the reversibility of adsorption was examined by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Adsorption isotherms for the adsorption of human insulin indicated high affinity adsorption, even

  2. Supercritical CO{sub 2} mediated synthesis and catalytic activity of graphene/Pd nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lulu [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeoungbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Van Hoa [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeoungbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Nha Trang University, 2 Nguyen Dinh Chieu, Nha Trang (Viet Nam); Shim, Jae-Jin, E-mail: jjshim@yu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeoungbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • RGO/Pd composite was efficiently prepared via a facile method in supercritical CO{sub 2}. • Graphene sheets were coated uniformly with Pd nanoparticles with a size of ∼8 nm. • Composites exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the Suzuki reaction even after 10 cycles. - Abstract: Graphene sheets were decorated with palladium nanoparticles using a facile and efficient method in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The nanoparticles were formed on the graphene sheets by the simple hydrogen reduction of palladium(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate precursor in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly dispersed nanoparticles with various sizes and shapes adhered well to the graphene sheets. The composites showed high catalytic activities for the Suzuki reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions within 5 min. The effects of the different Pd precursor loadings on the catalytic activities of the composites were also examined.

  3. Adsorption of dodecylamine hydrochloride on graphene oxide in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Li, Hongqiang; Song, Shaoxian; Weng, Xiaoqing; He, Dongsheng; Zhao, Yunliang

    Cationic surfactants in water are difficult to be degraded, leading to serious water pollution. In this work, graphene oxide (GO) was used as an adsorbent for removing Dodecylamine Hydrochloride (DACl), a representative cationic surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM) were used to characterize the prepared GO. The adsorption of DACl on GO have been investigated through measurements of adsorption capacity, zeta potential, FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results have shown that the adsorption kinetics could be described as a rate-limiting pseudo second-order process, and the adsorption isotherm agreed well with the Freundlich model. GO was a good adsorbent for DACl removal, compared with coal fly ash and powdered activated carbon. The adsorption process was endothermic, and could be attributed to electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding between DACl and GO.

  4. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  5. Destruction of Energetic Materials in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-25

    controls and difficulties associated with controlling processes and obtaining permits can negate potential advantages . Supercritical water oxidation...for H2 and an Alltech CTR-1 column with a temperature ramp program from -10 °C to 180 °C was used for the other gases. A mass spectrometer (HP 5971

  6. Electrodeposition of germanium from supercritical fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jie; Bartlett, Philip N; Cook, David; Easun, Timothy L; George, Michael W; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Smith, David; Su, Wenta; Zhang, Wenjian

    2012-01-28

    Several Ge(II) and Ge(IV) compounds were investigated as possible reagents for the electrodeposition of Ge from liquid CH(3)CN and CH(2)F(2) and supercritical CO(2) containing as a co-solvent CH(3)CN (scCO(2)) and supercritical CH(2)F(2) (scCH(2)F(2)). For Ge(II) reagents the most promising results were obtained using [NBu(n)(4)][GeCl(3)]. However the reproducibility was poor and the reduction currents were significantly less than the estimated mass transport limited values. Deposition of Ge containing films was possible at high cathodic potential from [NBu(n)(4)][GeCl(3)] in liquid CH(3)CN and supercritical CO(2) containing CH(3)CN but in all cases they were heavily contaminated by C, O, F and Cl. Much more promising results were obtained using GeCl(4) in liquid CH(2)F(2) and supercritical CH(2)F(2). In this case the reduction currents were consistent with mass transport limited reduction and bulk electrodeposition produced amorphous films of Ge. Characterisation by XPS showed the presence of low levels of O, F and C, XPS confirmed the presence of Ge together with germanium oxides, and Raman spectroscopy showed that the as deposited amorphous Ge could be crystallised by the laser used in obtaining the Raman measurements.

  7. Supercritical fluids technology. Pt. 1 General topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marongiu, B.; De Giorgi, M. R.; Porcedda, S.; Cadoni, E.

    1998-01-01

    Supercritical fluids technology is among the emerging 'clean' technologies, that allows the minimization in the use of chemical and thermic treatments and products irradiation, diminishing the quantity of liquid wastes to be treated. In this first article phase equilibria thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of transport phenomena are reviewed [it

  8. Successful treatment with supercritical water oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.

    1994-01-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) operates in a totally enclosed system. It uses water at high temperatures and high pressure to chemically change wastes. Oily substances become soluble and complex hydrocarbons are converted into water and carbon dioxide. Research and development on SCWO is described

  9. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Robert E.; Hansen, Brian N.

    1990-01-01

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  10. Diiodination of Alkynes in supercritical Carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金恒; 谢叶香; 尹笃林; 江焕峰

    2003-01-01

    A general,green and efficient method for the synthesis of transdiiodoalkenes in CO2(sc) has been developed.Trans-diiodoalkenes were obtained stereospecifically in quantitative yields via diiodination of both electron-rich and electron-deficient alkynes in the presence of KI,Ce(SO4)2 and water in supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2(sc)]at 40℃.

  11. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Ankita; Tomar, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a process akin to liquid-liquid or solvent extraction where a Supercritical fluid (SCF) is contacted with a solid/ liquid matrix for the purpose of separating the component of interest from the original matrix. Carbon dioxide is a preferred choice as supercritical fluid (SCF) owing to its moderate critical parameter (P c = 7.38 MPa and T c = 304.1K) coupled with radiation and chemical stability, non toxic nature and low cost. Despite widespread applications for extraction of organic compounds and associated advantages especially liquid waste minimization, the SFE of metal ions was left unexplored for quite some time, as direct metal ion extraction is inefficient due charge neutralization requirement and weak solute-solvent interaction. Neutral SCF soluble metal-ligand complexation is imperative and SFE of actinides was reported only in 1994. Several studies have been carried out on SFE of uranium, thorium and plutonium from nitric acid medium employing different sets of ligands (organophosphorus, diketones, amides). Especially attractive is the possibility of direct dissolution and extraction of actinides employing ligand-acid adducts (like TBP.HNO 3 adduct) from solid matrices of different stages of nuclear fuel cycle viz. ores, spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes. Also, partitioning of actinides from fission products has been explored in spent nuclear fuel. These studies on supercritical fluid extraction of actinides indicate a more efficient and environmentally sustainable technology. (author)

  12. Thermal Adsorption Processing Of Hydrocarbon Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudad H. Al.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The raw materials of secondary catalytic processes must be pre-refined. Among these refining processes are the deasphalting and demetallization including their thermo adsorption or thermo-contact adsorption variety. In oil processing four main processes of thermo-adsorption refining of hydrocarbon residues are used ART Asphalt Residual Treating - residues deasphaltizing 3D Discriminatory Destructive Distillation developed in the US ACT Adsorption-Contact Treatment and ETCC Express Thermo-Contact Cracking developed in Russia. ART and ACT are processes with absorbers of lift type reactor while 3D and ETCC processes are with an adsorbing reactor having ultra-short contact time of the raw material with the adsorbent. In all these processes refining of hydrocarbon residues is achieved by partial Thermo-destructive transformations of hydrocarbons and hetero-atomic compounds with simultaneous adsorption of the formed on the surface of the adsorbents resins asphaltene and carboids as well as metal- sulphur - and nitro-organic compounds. Demetallized and deasphalted light and heavy gas oils or their mixtures are a quality raw material for secondary deepening refining processes catalytic and hydrogenation cracking etc. since they are characterized by low coking ability and low content of organometallic compounds that lead to irreversible deactivation of the catalysts of these deepening processes.

  13. Adsorption and catalytic properties of skeleton nickel alloyed by tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erzhanova, M S; Sokol' skii, D V; Popov, N I; Kondratenko, V I

    1977-02-01

    Adsorption properties are studied of Ni-Ta-catalysts composed of 20-50% Ni, 0-30% Ta, 50% Al with respect to hydrogen; their activity in a number of reactions has been tested. The adsorption capacity is characterized with respect to H/sub 2/ by the methods of thermodesorption and conductometry. It is shown that three forms to hydrogen (..beta.., ..gamma.., sigma) adsorb onto the surface of the alloyed catalysts, whose desorption peaks overlap because of their high mobility and interchangeability. Variation of activity, selectivity and isomerizing capacity of the catalysts correlates with the content of a weakly adsorbed mobile form of H/sub 2/.

  14. Structural behavior of supercritical fluids under confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kanka; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    The existence of the Frenkel line in the supercritical regime of a Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid shown through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations initially and later corroborated by experiments on argon opens up possibilities of understanding the structure and dynamics of supercritical fluids in general and of the Frenkel line in particular. The location of the Frenkel line, which demarcates two distinct physical states, liquidlike and gaslike within the supercritical regime, has been established through MD simulations of the velocity autocorrelation (VACF) and radial distribution function (RDF). We, in this article, explore the changes in the structural features of supercritical LJ fluid under partial confinement using atomistic walls. The study is carried out across the Frenkel line through a series of MD simulations considering a set of thermodynamics states in the supercritical regime (P =5000 bar, 240 K ≤T ≤1500 K ) of argon well above the critical point. Confinement is partial, with atomistic walls located normal to z and extending to "infinity" along the x and y directions. In the "liquidlike" regime of the supercritical phase, particles are found to be distributed in distinct layers along the z axis with layer spacing less than one atomic diameter and the lateral RDF showing amorphous-like structure for specific spacings (packing frustration) and non-amorphous-like structure for other spacings. Increasing the rigidity of the atomistic walls is found to lead to stronger layering and increased structural order. For confinement with reflective walls, layers are found to form with one atomic diameter spacing and the lateral RDF showing close-packed structure for the smaller confinements. Translational order parameter and excess entropy assessment confirms the ordering taking place for atomistic wall and reflective wall confinements. In the "gaslike" regime of the supercritical phase, particle distribution along the spacing and the lateral RDF exhibit features

  15. Adsorption. What else?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Alirio E.

    2012-01-01

    [EN] Chemical Engineering today combines Molecular and Materials Engineerig and Process and Product Engineering (ChE=M2P2). Cyclic adsorptive processes (Simulated Moving Bed –SMB and Pressure Swing Adsorption-PSA) will be discussed for “old” and “new” applications making use of “old” and “new” (MOFs) adsorbent materials. After revisiting my memory as PhD student and the First Brazilian Adsorption meeting I will review the basic concepts involved in adsorption processes and then...

  16. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  17. GAT 4 production and storage of hydrogen. Report July 2004; GAT 4 procduction et stockage de l'hydrogene. Rapport juillet 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns two aspects of the hydrogen: the production and the storage. For both parts the challenges and a state of the art are presented. It discusses also the hydrogen production by renewable energies, by solar energy, the hydrogen of hydrocarbons reforming purification, active phases development, thermal transfer simulation. Concerning the hydrogen storage the hydrogen adsorption by large surface solid, the storage by metallic hydrides, the alanates and light hydrides, the adsorption on carbon nano-tubes, the storage in nano-structures, the thermal and mechanical simulation of the hydrogen are presented. (A.L.B.)

  18. Adsorption of Hydrogen and Potassium on GaAs(110) Studied by Time-of-Flight Scattering and Recoiling Spectrometry; Espectrometria de Iones Aplicada al Estudio de la Adsorcion de H y K en GaAs(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayone, J E [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    We study the adsorption of H and K on a GaAs(ll0) surface by Time-of-Flight Ion-Scattering (ISS) and Direct Recoiling (DRS) Spectrometry. The method for cleaning and preparation of the surface consists on cycles of grazing bombardment with 20 keV Ar+ combined with annealing. Since this is the first time that this method is applied to a semiconductor surface, the crystallographic structure of the grazing ion bombarded surface is first characterized by ISS and DRS. The variations of the projectile scattered intensity as a function of the incident and azimuthal angles are interpreted in terms of calculated shadowing and focusing effects. The crystallographic structure of the GaAs(ll0) surface prepared by this method presents the surface relaxation observed for cleaved surfaces. The adsorption of H on GaAs(ll0) is studied as a function of the H{sub 2} exposure and the surface temperature.The behavior of the intensity of projectiles scattered from the first two As and Ga layers is consistent with a process of unrelaxation towards the ideal surface termination upon H adsorption. We have determined that for exposures of 1000 L and 2000 L the AsI-GaI splitting corresponding to the unrelaxed surface is reduced to {delta}Z = (0.0 n 0.08) A, as it should be expected for the bulk terminated surface. In addition, the fraction of the surface remaining relaxed as in the clean surface decreases strongly with the H{sub 2} exposure. The H atoms adsorbed on the surface can be detected as recoils produced in quasi-single collisions allowing the study of the adsorption kinetics. The variations of the H recoil intensity with the exposure show that the sticking coefficient changes strongly with the H coverage since the beginning the adsorption. Above {approx} 500 L, the adsorption kinetics deviates from the initial behavior and the sticking coefficient becomes almost constant and small. The simultaneous measurements of the H coverage (with DRS) and the changes in the atomic structure

  19. Supercritical Fluids Processing of Biomass to Chemicals and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Norman K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-09-28

    The main objective of this project is to develop and/or enhance cost-effective methodologies for converting biomass into a wide variety of chemicals, fuels, and products using supercritical fluids. Supercritical fluids will be used both to perform reactions of biomass to chemicals and products as well as to perform extractions/separations of bio-based chemicals from non-homogeneous mixtures. This work supports the Biomass Program’s Thermochemical Platform Goals. Supercritical fluids are a thermochemical approach to processing biomass that, while aligned with the Biomass Program’s interests in gasification and pyrolysis, offer the potential for more precise and controllable reactions. Indeed, the literature with respect to the use of water as a supercritical fluid frequently refers to “supercritical water gasification” or “supercritical water pyrolysis.”

  20. Bio-oil production from biomass via supercritical fluid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durak, Halil, E-mail: halildurak@yyu.edu.tr [Yuzuncu Yıl University, Vocational School of Health Services, 65080, Van (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Supercritical fluid extraction is used for producing bio-fuel from biomass. Supercritical fluid extraction process under supercritical conditions is the thermally disruption process of the lignocellulose or other organic materials at 250-400 °C temperature range under high pressure (4-5 MPa). Supercritical fluid extraction trials were performed in a cylindrical reactor (75 mL) in organic solvents (acetone, ethanol) under supercritical conditions with (calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and without catalyst at the temperatures of 250, 275 and 300 °C. The produced liquids at 300 °C in supercritical liquefaction were analyzed and characterized by elemental, GC-MS and FT-IR. 36 and 37 different types of compounds were identified by GC-MS obtained in acetone and ethanol respectively.

  1. Supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic-processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matson, D.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the applications of supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic processing. The physical and chemical properties of these densified gases are summarized and related to their use as solvents and processing media. Several areas are identified in which specific ceramic processes benefit from the unique properties of supercritical fluids. The rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions provides a technique for producing fine uniform powders and thin films of widely varying materials. Supercritical drying technologies allow the formation of highly porous aerogel products with potentially wide application. Hydrothermal processes leading to the formation of large single crystals and microcrystalline powders can also be extended into the supercritical regime of water. Additional applications and potential applications are identified in the areas of extraction of binders and other additives from ceramic compacts, densification of porous ceramics, the formation of powders in supercritical micro-emulsions, and in preceramic polymer processing

  2. Bio-oil production from biomass via supercritical fluid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durak, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction is used for producing bio-fuel from biomass. Supercritical fluid extraction process under supercritical conditions is the thermally disruption process of the lignocellulose or other organic materials at 250-400 °C temperature range under high pressure (4-5 MPa). Supercritical fluid extraction trials were performed in a cylindrical reactor (75 mL) in organic solvents (acetone, ethanol) under supercritical conditions with (calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and without catalyst at the temperatures of 250, 275 and 300 °C. The produced liquids at 300 °C in supercritical liquefaction were analyzed and characterized by elemental, GC-MS and FT-IR. 36 and 37 different types of compounds were identified by GC-MS obtained in acetone and ethanol respectively.

  3. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  4. Low Pressure Adsorbent for Recovery & Storage Vented Hydrogen, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance fullerene-based adsorbent is proposed for recovery and storage hydrogen and separating helium via pressure-swing-adsorption (PSA) process....

  5. Hydrogen storage using microporous carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In the present century hydrogen will lie the most important source of energy and will replace petroleum and petroleum-derived products in the next future. Hydrogen is an almost ideal fuel, both because of its unlimited accessibility and for ecological reasons; the product of its combustion - water vapour - is neither any gaseous contamination nor a component of greenhouse gases. Nowadays hydrogen is applied in industrial processes, but may be also used as a source of house lighting and heating energy, for production of electricity, and as fuel for car engines. Fuel cells, applying reaction between hydrogen and oxygen for production of electricity have been for a long time used in the space technology. Application of hydrogen as fuel should give a possibility of storage and transfer of the high quality energy, i.e. the energy of a high exo-energetic ratio[l]. Due to its low density, one of the main obstacles to the widespread use of hydrogen in energy sector is an efficient storage technology. At present, the methods of hydrogen storage are to liquefy and store in refrigerated containers, which is very expensive, or to store it in high - pressure gas cylinders at room temperature. Unfortunately, low storage density of hydrogen for the latter technique is a significant drawback. Between alternatives have been considered (chemical storage in irreversible hydrogen carriers like methanol or ammonia, reversible metal and chemical hydrides and adsorption in porous media), the latter one seems to be the most promising [2]. Physical adsorption is a method by which more gas can be stored at a lower pressure by means of Van der Waals interactions at the gas solid interface. Adsorptive storage is particularly promising for permanent gases, which need to be stored, transported, or used in ambient temperature. Thanks to the high density of adsorbed phase, adsorptive storage system could allow the storage of a high density of hydrogen at much lower pressures than compression and

  6. Hydrogen storage using microporous carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B Buczek; E Wolak

    2005-01-01

    In the present century hydrogen will be the most important source of energy and will replace petroleum and petroleum-derived products in the next future. Hydrogen is an almost ideal fuel, both because of its unlimited accessibility and for ecological reasons; the product of its combustion - water vapour - is neither any gaseous contamination nor a component of greenhouse gases. Nowadays hydrogen is applied in industrial processes, but may be also used as a source of house lighting and heating energy, for production of electricity, and as fuel for car engines. Fuel cells, applying reaction between hydrogen and oxygen for production of electricity have been for a long time used in the space technology. Application of hydrogen as fuel should give a possibility of storage and transfer of the high quality energy, i.e. the energy of a high exo-energetic ratio. Due to its low density, one of the main obstacles to the widespread use of hydrogen in energy sector is an efficient storage technology. At present, the methods of hydrogen storage are to liquefy and store in refrigerated containers, which is very expensive, or to store it in high - pressure gas cylinders at room temperature. Unfortunately, low storage density of hydrogen for the latter technique is a significant drawback. Between alternatives have been considered (chemical storage in irreversible hydrogen carriers like methanol or ammonia, reversible metal and chemical hydrides and adsorption in porous media), the latter one seems to lie the most promising. Physical adsorption is a method by which more gas can be stored at a lower pressure by means of Van der Waals interactions at the gas solid interface. Adsorptive storage is particularly promising for permanent gases, which need to be stored, transported, or used in ambient temperature. Thanks to the high density of adsorbed phase, adsorptive storage system could allow the storage of a high density of hydrogen at much lower pressures than compression and higher

  7. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  8. Alcohol molecules adsorption on graphane nanosheets - A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, V.; Chandiramouli, R.

    2018-05-01

    The geometric structure, electronic and adsorption properties of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol molecules on hydrogenated graphene (graphane) were investigated using first-principles calculations. The stability of graphane base material is confirmed using formation energy and phonon band structures. The adsorption of alcohol molecules on bare graphane and hydrogen vacant graphane nanosheet is found to be prominent and the selectivity of alcohol molecules can be achieved using bare or hydrogen vacant graphane nanosheet. Moreover, the interaction of alcohol molecules on bare and hydrogen vacant graphane nanosheets is studied using the adsorption energy, energy band gap variation, Bader charge transfer and average energy band gap variation. The adsorption energy ranges from -0.149 to -0.383 eV upon alcohol adsorption. The energy gap varies from 4.71 to 2.62 eV for bare graphane and from 4.02 to 3.60 eV for hydrogen vacant graphane nanosheets upon adsorption of alcohol molecules. The adsorption properties of alcohol molecules provide useful information for the possible application of graphane nanosheet as a base material for the detection of alcohol molecules.

  9. Industrial applications and current trends in supercritical fluid technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Gamse Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids have a great potential for wide fields of processes Although CO2 is still one of the most used supercritical gases, for special purposes propane or even fluorinated-chlorinated fluids have also been tested. The specific characteristics of supercritical fluids behaviour were analyzed such as for example the solubilities of different components and the phase equilibria between the solute and solvent. The application at industrial scale (decaffeinating of tea and coffee, hop...

  10. Radioactive nuclide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of a radioactive nuclide adsorption device by applying a nickel plating on a nickel plate to render the surface active. Constitution: A capturing device for radioactive nuclide such as manganese 54, cobalt 60, 58 and the like is disposed to the inside of a pipeway provided on the upper portion of fuel assemblies through which liquid sodium as the coolant for LMFBR type reactor is passed. The device comprises a cylindrical adsorption body and spacers. The adsorption body is made of nickel and applied with a nickel plating on the surface thereof. The surface of the adsorption body is unevened to result in disturbance in the coolant and thereby improve the adsorptive efficiency. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Preliminary Hazard Analysis of Supercritical Fluid Separation of Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and elsewhere, particularly at the Phasex Corporation, Lawrence, MA, has demonstrated the feasibility of separating the energetic moieties by use of supercritical CO2...

  12. Supercritical boiler material selection using fuzzy analytic network process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Ranjan Maity

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of world is being adversely affected by the scarcity of power and energy. To survive in the next generation, it is thus necessary to explore the non-conventional energy sources and efficiently consume the available sources. For efficient exploitation of the existing energy sources, a great scope lies in the use of Rankin cycle-based thermal power plants. Today, the gross efficiency of Rankin cycle-based thermal power plants is less than 28% which has been increased up to 40% with reheating and regenerative cycles. But, it can be further improved up to 47% by using supercritical power plant technology. Supercritical power plants use supercritical boilers which are able to withstand a very high temperature (650-720˚C and pressure (22.1 MPa while producing superheated steam. The thermal efficiency of a supercritical boiler greatly depends on the material of its different components. The supercritical boiler material should possess high creep rupture strength, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, high specific heat and very high temperature withstandability. This paper considers a list of seven supercritical boiler materials whose performance is evaluated based on seven pivotal criteria. Given the intricacy and difficulty of this supercritical boiler material selection problem having interactions and interdependencies between different criteria, this paper applies fuzzy analytic network process to select the most appropriate material for a supercritical boiler. Rene 41 is the best supercritical boiler material, whereas, Haynes 230 is the worst preferred choice.

  13. Kinetics of Chemical Agents Destruction in Supercritical Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tester, Jefferson

    2003-01-01

    .... An experimental study of methylphosphonic acid (MPA) oxidation has been completed that includes macroscopic modeling of the overall global rate law for MPA oxidation in supercritical water (SCW...

  14. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from nitric acid medium using organophosphorous compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchaiah, K.C.; Sujatha, K.; Rao, C.V.S. Brahmmananda; Subramaniam, S.; Sivaraman, N.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) technique has been widely used for the extraction of metal ions. In the present study, extraction of uranium from nitric acid medium was investigated using supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO{sub 2}) containing various organophosphorous compounds such as trialkyl phosphates e.g. tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP), tri-sec-butyl phosphate (TsBP) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), dialkylalkyl phosphonates, e.g. diamylamyl phosphonate (DAAP) and dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), dialkyl hydrogen phosphonates, e.g. dioctyl hydrogen phosphonate (DOHP), dioctylphosphineoxide (DOPO), trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO), n-octylphenyl N,N-diisobutyl carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and di-2-ethyl-hexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP). Some of these ligands have been investigated for the first time in the supercritical phase for the extraction of uranium. The extraction efficiency of uranium was studied with TiAP, DAAP and DBBP as a function of nitric acid concentration; the kinetics of the equilibration period (static extraction) and transportation of the metal complex (dynamic extraction) was investigated. The influence of pressure and temperature on the extraction behaviour of uranium with DAAP was studied from 4 N HNO{sub 3}. The extraction efficiency of uranium from 4 N nitric acid medium was found to increase in the order of phosphates < phosphonates < HDEHP < TOPO < CMPO. In the case of phosphates and phosphonates, the maximum extraction of uranium was found to be from 4 N HNO{sub 3} medium. The acidic extractants, HDEHP and DOHP showed relatively higher extraction at lower acidities. The relative extraction of uranium and thorium from their mixture was also examined using Sc-CO{sub 2} containing phosphates, phosphonates and TOPO. The ligand, TsBP provided better fractionation between uranium and thorium compared to trialkyl phosphates, dialkyl alkyl phosphonates and TOPO.

  15. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, F.B.; Grzetic, V.

    1982-01-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes

  16. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, F B; Grzetic, V [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)

    1983-02-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes.

  17. Methods and systems for the production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang H [Idaho Falls, ID; Kim, Eung S [Ammon, ID; Sherman, Steven R [Augusta, GA

    2012-03-13

    Methods and systems are disclosed for the production of hydrogen and the use of high-temperature heat sources in energy conversion. In one embodiment, a primary loop may include a nuclear reactor utilizing a molten salt or helium as a coolant. The nuclear reactor may provide heat energy to a power generation loop for production of electrical energy. For example, a supercritical carbon dioxide fluid may be heated by the nuclear reactor via the molten salt and then expanded in a turbine to drive a generator. An intermediate heat exchange loop may also be thermally coupled with the primary loop and provide heat energy to one or more hydrogen production facilities. A portion of the hydrogen produced by the hydrogen production facility may be diverted to a combustor to elevate the temperature of water being split into hydrogen and oxygen by the hydrogen production facility.

  18. Pd Nanoparticles and MOFs Synergistically Hybridized Halloysite Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Ouyang, Jing; Yang, Huaming

    2017-03-01

    Natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were hybridized with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to prepare novel composites. MOFs were transformed into carbon by carbonization calcination, and palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were introduced to build an emerging ternary compound system for hydrogen adsorption. The hydrogen adsorption capacities of HNT-MOF composites were 0.23 and 0.24 wt%, while those of carbonized products were 0.24 and 0.27 wt% at 25 °C and 2.65 MPa, respectively. Al-based samples showed higher hydrogen adsorption capacities than Zn-based samples on account of different selectivity between metal and hydrogen and approximate porous characteristics. More pore structures are generated by the carbonization reaction from metal-organic frameworks into carbon; high specific surface area, uniform pore size, and large pore volume benefited the hydrogen adsorption ability of composites. Moreover, it was also possible to promote hydrogen adsorption capacity by incorporating Pd. The hydrogen adsorption capacity of ternary compound, Pd-C-H3-MOFs(Al), reached 0.32 wt% at 25 °C and 2.65 MPa. Dissociation was assumed to take place on the Pd particles, then atomic and molecule hydrogen spilled over to the structure of carboxylated HNTs, MOFs, and the carbon products for enhancing the hydrogen adsorption capacity.

  19. Pd Nanoparticles and MOFs Synergistically Hybridized Halloysite Nanotubes for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Ouyang, Jing; Yang, Huaming

    2017-12-01

    Natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were hybridized with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to prepare novel composites. MOFs were transformed into carbon by carbonization calcination, and palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were introduced to build an emerging ternary compound system for hydrogen adsorption. The hydrogen adsorption capacities of HNT-MOF composites were 0.23 and 0.24 wt%, while those of carbonized products were 0.24 and 0.27 wt% at 25 °C and 2.65 MPa, respectively. Al-based samples showed higher hydrogen adsorption capacities than Zn-based samples on account of different selectivity between metal and hydrogen and approximate porous characteristics. More pore structures are generated by the carbonization reaction from metal-organic frameworks into carbon; high specific surface area, uniform pore size, and large pore volume benefited the hydrogen adsorption ability of composites. Moreover, it was also possible to promote hydrogen adsorption capacity by incorporating Pd. The hydrogen adsorption capacity of ternary compound, Pd-C-H3-MOFs(Al), reached 0.32 wt% at 25 °C and 2.65 MPa. Dissociation was assumed to take place on the Pd particles, then atomic and molecule hydrogen spilled over to the structure of carboxylated HNTs, MOFs, and the carbon products for enhancing the hydrogen adsorption capacity.

  20. Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Orlando Jose

    density. In practical systems the adsorption phenomena were found to be far more complex. Electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions play a major role in the adsorption of cationic polyelectrolytes on cellulosic substrates. Cationic and underivatized guar gum macromolecules form complexes with fines and dissolved and colloidal carbohydrates which are then retained on the cellulose fibers. The extent of the adsorption and association depends on the charge and nature of all the components present in pulp suspensions.

  1. Catalytic hydrodechlorination of dioxins over palladium nanoparticles in supercritical CO2 swollen microcellular polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ben-Zen; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Wang, Joanna S.; Tan, Chung-Sung; Wai, Chien M.; Liao, Weisheng; Chiu, KongHwa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pd nanoparticles are embedded in microcellular high density polyethylene (Pd/m-HDPE). ► Pd/m-HDPE is used as heterogeneous catalysts in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO 2 ). ► Dioxins are remedied via hydrodechlorination and hydrogenation over Pd/m-HDPE in sc-CO 2 . ► The final products are dechlorinated and benzene-ring-saturated dioxins. ► Pd/m-HDPE can be recyclable and reusable without complicated cleaning procedures. - Abstract: In this study, palladium nanoparticles embedded in monolithic microcellular high density polyethylene supports are synthesized as heterogeneous catalysts for remediation of 1,6-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 2,8-dichlorodibenzofuran in 200 atm of supercritical carbon dioxide containing 10 atm of hydrogen gas and at 50–90 °C. Stepwise removal of chlorine atoms takes place first, followed by saturation of two benzene rings with slower reaction rates. The pseudo first order rate constant of initial hydrodechlorination for 2,8-dichlorodibenzofuran is 4.3 times greater than that for 1,6-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin at 78 °C. The catalysts are easily separated from products and can be recyclable and reusable without complicated recovery and cleaning procedures.

  2. Catalytic hydrodechlorination of dioxins over palladium nanoparticles in supercritical CO{sub 2} swollen microcellular polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ben-Zen [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hua-Lien 970, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Hsiang-Yu [Department of Chemistry, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li, Tao-Yuan 320, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Joanna S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844m (United States); Tan, Chung-Sung [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, HsinChu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wai, Chien M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844m (United States); Liao, Weisheng, E-mail: liao1427@vandals.uidaho.edu [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hua-Lien 970, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiu, KongHwa, E-mail: ckh@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hua-Lien 970, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd nanoparticles are embedded in microcellular high density polyethylene (Pd/m-HDPE). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd/m-HDPE is used as heterogeneous catalysts in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dioxins are remedied via hydrodechlorination and hydrogenation over Pd/m-HDPE in sc-CO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final products are dechlorinated and benzene-ring-saturated dioxins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd/m-HDPE can be recyclable and reusable without complicated cleaning procedures. - Abstract: In this study, palladium nanoparticles embedded in monolithic microcellular high density polyethylene supports are synthesized as heterogeneous catalysts for remediation of 1,6-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 2,8-dichlorodibenzofuran in 200 atm of supercritical carbon dioxide containing 10 atm of hydrogen gas and at 50-90 Degree-Sign C. Stepwise removal of chlorine atoms takes place first, followed by saturation of two benzene rings with slower reaction rates. The pseudo first order rate constant of initial hydrodechlorination for 2,8-dichlorodibenzofuran is 4.3 times greater than that for 1,6-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin at 78 Degree-Sign C. The catalysts are easily separated from products and can be recyclable and reusable without complicated recovery and cleaning procedures.

  3. Supercritical fluid extraction of reed (thypa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucuk, M.; Genel, Y. [YYU Educational Faculty, Van (Turkey); Demir, H. [YYU Science and Art Faculty, Van (Turkey)

    2005-04-15

    Reed (typha) mill was converted to liquid products by using organic solvents (methanol, ethanol and acetone) with catalysts (% 10 NaOH and ZnCl{sub 2}) and without catalyst in an autoclave at temperatures of 533, 553, and 573 K. The liquid products were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction [DSA1] (benzene and diethyl ether). The yields from supercritical methanol, ethanol and acetone conversions were 36.2, 24.5, and 55.1%, respectively, at 573 K. In the catalytic runs with methanol and ethanol extracts were 46.3 and 35.5% (for NaOH catalyst) and 51.8 and 38.5% (for ZnCl{sub 2} catalyst) respectively, at 573 K. The yields from supercritical methanol were increased from 38.2 to 52.4% as the temperature was increased from 533 to 573 K in the catalytic run. (Author)

  4. Study on Shale Adsorption Equation Based on Monolayer Adsorption, Multilayer Adsorption, and Capillary Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas is an effective gas resource all over the world. The evaluation of pore structure plays a critical role in exploring shale gas efficiently. Nitrogen adsorption experiment is one of the significant approaches to analyze pore size structure of shale. Shale is extremely heterogeneous due to component diversity and structure complexity. Therefore, adsorption isotherms for homogeneous adsorbents and empirical isotherms may not apply to shale. The shape of adsorption-desorption curve indicates that nitrogen adsorption on shale includes monolayer adsorption, multilayer adsorption, and capillary condensation. Usually, Langmuir isotherm is a monolayer adsorption model for ideal interfaces; BET (Brunauer, Emmett, Teller adsorption isotherm is a multilayer adsorption model based on specific assumptions; Freundlich isotherm is an empirical equation widely applied in liquid phase adsorption. In this study, a new nitrogen adsorption isotherm is applied to simultaneously depict monolayer adsorption, multilayer adsorption, and capillary condensation, which provides more real and accurate representation of nitrogen adsorption on shale. In addition, parameters are discussed in relation to heat of adsorption which is relevant to the shape of the adsorption isotherm curve. The curve fitting results indicate that our new nitrogen adsorption isotherm can appropriately describe the whole process of nitrogen adsorption on shale.

  5. Effect of supercritical fluid density on nanoencapsulated drug particle size using the supercritical antisolvent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Mahshid; Yunus, Robiah

    2012-01-01

    The reported work demonstrates and discusses the effect of supercritical fluid density (pressure and temperature of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide) on particle size and distribution using the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) method in the purpose of drug encapsulation. In this study, paracetamol was encapsulated inside L-polylactic acid, a semicrystalline polymer, with different process parameters, including pressure and temperature, using the SAS process. The morphology and particle size of the prepared nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that increasing temperature enhanced mean particle size due to the plasticizing effect. Furthermore, increasing pressure enhanced molecular interaction and solubility; thus, particle size was reduced. Transmission electron microscopy images defined the internal structure of nanoparticles. Thermal characteristics of nanoparticles were also investigated via differential scanning calorimetry. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the changes in crystallinity structure during the SAS process. In vitro drug release analysis determined the sustained release of paracetamol in over 4 weeks.

  6. Hydrogen production using plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.; Whidden, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma processing is a promising method of extracting hydrogen from natural gas while avoiding the greenhouse gas (GHG) production typical of other methods such as steam methane reforming. This presentation describes a plasma discharge process based that, in a single reactor pass, can yield hydrogen concentrations of up to 50 % by volume in the product gas mixture. The process is free of GHG's, does not require catalysts and is easily scalable. Chemical and morphological analyses of the gaseous and solid products of the process by gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry, microscopic Raman analyses and electron microscopy respectively are reviewed. The direct production of hydrogen-enriched natural gas (HENG) as a fuel for low pollution internal combustion engines and its purification to high-purity hydrogen (99.99%) from the product gas by pressure swing adsorption (PSA) purifier beds are reviewed. The presentation reviews potential commercial applications for the technology

  7. Etching of glass microchips with supercritical water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Grym, Jakub; Roth, Michal; Planeta, Josef; Foret, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2015), s. 311-318 ISSN 1473-0197 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0182 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : glass microchips * channel etching * supercritical water Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.586, year: 2015

  8. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  9. Computational Modeling of Supercritical and Transcritical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Acentric factor I. Introduction Liquid rocket and gas turbine engines operate at high pressures . For gas turbines, the combustor pressurecan be 60 − 100...equation of state for several reduced pressures . The model captures the high density at very low temperatures and the supercritical behavior at high reduced...physical meaning. The temperature range over which the three roots are present is bounded by TL on the low side and TH on the high side. Figure 2: Roots

  10. Supercritical fluid extraction behaviour of polymer matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujatha, K.; Kumar, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Organic compounds present in polymeric matrices such as neoprene, surgical gloves and PVC were co-extracted during the removal of uranium using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) technique. Hence SFE studies of these matrices were carried out to establish the extracted species using HPLC, IR and mass spectrometry techniques. The initial study indicated that uranium present in the extract could be purified from the co-extracted organic species. (author)

  11. Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Bruce D.

    2010-06-15

    The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above

  12. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  13. Evaluation of the Characteristics of the Adsorption of Fibrinogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with calcium and magnesium ions increased the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed onto it as against treatment with potassium ion (a monovalent ion). Electrostatic attraction on the surface of the treated HAP and hydrogen are responsible for the adsorption. The results are useful in fabricating bone and teeth implants that are ...

  14. Fast infrared spectroscopy in supercritical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.

    2000-05-01

    Chapter 1: Introduction. A brief introduction to supercritical fluids is given, illustrating why supercritical fluids are unique solvents and why there is a wide application of supercritical fluids in industry and laboratories. Potential ways for solvation in supercritical fluids to affect reactivity are briefly reviewed. A general introduction to the photochemistry of organometallic complexes is also given. Chapter 2: Time resolved vibrational spectroscopy. Time resolved resonance Raman is introduced and compared with Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR). The different approaches of TRIR, including microsecond, nanosecond, and ultrafast (picosecond and femtosecond) systems are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of these systems are also compared. The TRIR apparatus using an IR diode laser used for work in this thesis are described in detail. Experimental procedures for supercritical fluid TRIR experiments are described with emphasis on handling the IR cell for supercritical fluids and preparation of supercritical fluid solutions. Chapter 3: Photochemistry of group VIB hexacarbonyl compounds in supercritical noble gases and CO 2 solutions. A systematic TRIR study of the photolysis of M(CO) 6 in supercritical Ar, Kr, Xe, and CO 2 and the observation of M(CO) 5 L (M = Cr, Mo, and W; L = Ar (W only), Kr, Xe, and CO 2 ) is described. The second-order rate constants for the reaction of M(CO) 5 L with CO have been evaluated and the reactivity for each metal is Kr > Xe ∼ CO 2 . For M(CO) 5 Kr, M(CO) 5 Xe, or M(CO) 5 (CO 2 ), the reactivity is Cr ∼ Mo > W. In supercritical Kr doped with either Xe or CO 2 , the M(CO) 5 moiety interacts with Xe or CO 2 in preference to Kr. The effect of solvent density on the rate of the reaction of W(CO) 5 (CO 2 ) with CO has been investigated. The reaction of W(CO) 5 (CO 2 ) with CO in scCO 2 is predominantly a dissociative process. The activation energies for the reaction of W(CO) 5 Xe and W(CO) 5 (CO 2 ) with CO and

  15. Use of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki (Niigata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Niigata, (Japan))

    1989-09-25

    Supercritical fluid extraction is a novel diffusion and separation technique which exploits simultaneously the increase of vapor pressure and the difference of chemical affinities of fluids near the critical point. A solvent which is used as the supercritical fluid has the following features: the critical point exists in the position of relatively ease of handling, the solvent is applicable to the extraction of a physiological active substance of thermal instability. Carbon dioxide as the solvent is non-flammable, non-corrosive, non-toxic, cheap, and readily available of high purity. The results of studies on the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent for natural products in the fermentation and food industries, were collected. SC-CO{sub 2} extraction are used in many fields, examples for the application are as follows: removal of organic solvents from antibiotics; extraction of vegetable oils contained in wheat germ oil, high quality mustard seeds, rice bran and so on; brewing of sake using rice and rice-koji; use as a non-aqueous medium for the synthesis of precursors of the Aspartame; and use in sterilization. 66 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs.

  16. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  17. Supercritical water oxidation of dioxins and furans in waste incinerator fly ash, sewage sludge and industrial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Safari; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2014-08-01

    Three environmental samples containing dioxins and furans have been oxidized in the presence of hydrogen peroxide under supercritical water oxidation conditions. The samples consisted of a waste incinerator fly ash, sewage sludge and contaminated industrial soil. The reactor system was a batch, autoclave reactor operated at temperatures between 350 degrees C and 450degrees C, corresponding to pressures of approximately 20-33.5 MPa and with hydrogen peroxide concentrations from 0.0 to 11.25 vol%. Hydrogen peroxide concentration and temperature/pressure had a strong positive effect on the oxidation of dioxins and furans. At the highest temperatures and pressure of supercritical water oxidation of 4500C and 33.5 MPa and with 11.25 vol% of hydrogen peroxide, the destruction efficiencies of the individual polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) isomers were between 90% and 99%. There did not appear to be any significant differences in the PCDD/PCDF destruction efficiencies in relation to the different sample matrices of the waste incinerator fly ash, sewage sludge and contaminated industrial soil.

  18. adsorption, eosin, humic, peat

    OpenAIRE

    anshar, andi muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Eosin is one of the dyes commonly used in the industry and has the potential to cause pollution of the water environment. The Eosin pollution treatment methods used in this study was the adsorption method using humin fraction obtained from the peat land comes from Kalimantan. From the research data showed that the adsorption of eosin in humin result of washing with HCl / HF optimum at pH 4 and a contact time of 60 minutes with the adsorption-order rate was 8,4 x 10-3 min-1

  19. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  20. Preparation and characterization of PMMA graded microporous foams via one-step supercritical carbon dioxide foaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Huan; Li Junguo; Xiong Yuanlu; Luo Guoqiang; Shen Qiang; Zhang Lianmeng

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO 2 ) foaming which is inexpensive and environmental friendly has been widely used to prepare polymer-based microporous materials. In this paper, PMMA graded microporous materials were foamed by PMMA matrix after an unstable saturation process which was done under supercritical condition of 28MPa and 50 °C. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the morphology of the graded foam. A gas adsorption model was proposed to predict the graded gas concentration in the different region of the polymer matrix. The SEM results showed that the solid and foam region of the graded foam can be connected without laminated layers. With the increasing thickness position of the graded microporous foam, the cell size increased from 3.4 to 27.5 μm, while the cell density decreased from 1.04 × 10 9 to 1.96 × 10 7 cells/cm 3 . It also found that the gradient microporous structure of the foam came from graded gas concentration which was obtained in the initial saturation process.

  1. PREPARATION OF MESOPOROUS TITANIA-SILICA AEROGELS BY CO2 SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvester Tursiloadi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stable anatase is attractive because of its notable functions for photocatalysis and photon-electron transfer.  TiO2-nanoparticles dispersed SiO2 wet gels were prepared by hydrolysis of Ti(OC4H9n4 and Si(OC2H54 in a 2-propanol solution with acid catalyst.  The solvent in the wet gels was supercritically extracted using CO2 at 60 oC and 22 Mpa in one-step.  Thermal evolution of the microstructure of the extracted gels (aerogels was evaluated by XRD measurements, TEM and N2 adsorption measurements. The as-extracted aerogel with a large specific surface area, more than 365 m2g-1, contained anatase nanoparticles, about 5 nm in diameter.  The anatase phase was stable after calcinations at temperatures up to 1000 oC, and BET specific surface area, total pore volume and average pore diameter did not change significantly after calcinations at temperature up to 800 oC.   Keywords: Stable anatase, sol-gel, CO2 supercritical extraction.

  2. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  3. Effects of supercritical carbon dioxide on immobile bound polymer chains on solid substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Mani; Asada, Mitsunori; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya K.; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil; Koga, Tadanori

    2013-03-01

    Adsorbed polymer layers formed on flat solid substrates have recently been the subject of extensive studies because it is postulated to control the dynamics of technologically relevant polymer thin films, for example, in lithography. Such adsorbed layers have been reported to hinder the mobility of polymer chains in thin films even at a large length scale. Consequently, this bound layer remains immobile regardless of processing techniques (i.e. thermal annealing, solvent dissolution, etc). Here, we investigate the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a novel plasticizer for bound polystyrene layers formed on silicon substrates. In-situ swelling and interdiffusion experiments using neutron reflectivity were performed. As a result, we found the anomalous plasticization effects of scCO2 on the bound polymer layers near the critical point where the anomalous adsorption of CO2 molecules in polymer thin films has been reported previously. Acknowledgement: We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-084626.

  4. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  5. Co adsorption in kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Eliel S.; Silva, Paulo S.C.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption of metal ions in clay minerals has been used as an alternative to water and effluents treatment. Kaolinite is a clay mineral that presents low specific surface area and exchange ion capacity. Nevertheless, structural modifications can be achieved by means of acid or thermal activation. In this paper, it was studied the surface area of kaolinite/bentonite, kaolinite/activated carbon mixtures, thermal activated kaolinite and thermal activated kaolinite/activated carbon mixture. The mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon was tested for pH, contact time, interfering ions and initial concentration effects in the cobalt adsorption. Results showed that the optimized parameters are pH 6 and contact time of 30 min. Chromium acted as a competitive ion, zinc does not appear to have affected adsorption while iron seems to have favored it. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms indicated that the adsorption of Co in the mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon is a spontaneous process. (author)

  6. Co adsorption in kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Eliel S.; Silva, Paulo S.C., E-mail: eliel201019@hotmail.com, E-mail: pscsilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Adsorption of metal ions in clay minerals has been used as an alternative to water and effluents treatment. Kaolinite is a clay mineral that presents low specific surface area and exchange ion capacity. Nevertheless, structural modifications can be achieved by means of acid or thermal activation. In this paper, it was studied the surface area of kaolinite/bentonite, kaolinite/activated carbon mixtures, thermal activated kaolinite and thermal activated kaolinite/activated carbon mixture. The mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon was tested for pH, contact time, interfering ions and initial concentration effects in the cobalt adsorption. Results showed that the optimized parameters are pH 6 and contact time of 30 min. Chromium acted as a competitive ion, zinc does not appear to have affected adsorption while iron seems to have favored it. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms indicated that the adsorption of Co in the mixture of kaolinite/activated carbon is a spontaneous process. (author)

  7. Study of adsorption properties on lithium doped activated carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los, S.; Daclaux, L.; Letellier, M.; Azais, P.

    2005-01-01

    A volumetric method was applied to study an adsorption coefficient of hydrogen molecules in a gas phase on super activated carbon surface. The investigations were focused on getting the best possible materials for the energy storage. Several treatments on raw samples were used to improve adsorption properties. The biggest capacities were obtain after high temperature treatment at reduced atmosphere. The adsorption coefficient at 77 K and 2 MPa amounts to 3.158 wt.%. The charge transfer between lithium and carbon surface groups via the doping reaction enhanced the energy of adsorption. It was also found that is a gradual decrease in the adsorbed amount of H 2 molecules due to occupation active sites by lithium ions. (author)

  8. Insight into the adsorption of chloramphenicol on a vermiculite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tri, Nguyen Ngoc; Carvalho, A. J. P.; Dordio, A. V.; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Trung, Nguyen Tien

    2018-05-01

    Four stable configurations were found upon adsorption of the chloramphenicol on a period slab model of the vermiculite surface, using the PBE and C09-vdW functionals in a projector-augmented wave (PAW) method approach. The adsorption is a strong chemisorption process, characterized by an adsorption energy of -106.5 kcal mol-1 at the most stable configuration. Stability of configurations contributed mainly by Mg⋯O/Cl attractive electrostatic interactions and C/Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. It is remarkable that the vermiculite is found to be a solid material with good potential to be used for adsorption and consequent removal of this type of antibiotic drugs.

  9. Structure sensitivity in adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Nielsen, Ole Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1997-01-01

    The structure sensitivity of CO adsorption on different flat, stepped, kinked and reconstructed Pt surfaces is studied using large-scale density-functional calculations. We find an extremely strong structure sensitivity in the adsorption energy with variations up to 1 eV (or 100%) from one...... structure to the next. We propose a model to explain this behavior, and use it to discuss more generally the origin of structure sensitivity in heterogeneous catalysis....

  10. Channel type reactors with supercritical water coolant. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Transition to coolant of supercritical parameters allows for principle engineering-andeconomic characteristics of light-water nuclear power reactors to be substantially enhanced. Russian experience in development of channel-type reactors with supercritical water coolant has demonstrated advantages and practical feasibility of such reactors. (author)

  11. Thermodynamic Optimization of Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhim, Dong-Ryul; Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Hyun; Yeom, Choong-Sub [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has been studied for nuclear applications, mainly for one of the alternative power conversion systems of the sodium cooled fast reactor, since 1960's. Although the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has not been expected to show higher efficiency at lower turbine inlet temperature over the conventional steam Rankine cycle, the higher density of supercritical CO{sub 2} like a liquid in the supercritical region could reduce turbo-machinery sizes, and the potential problem of sodium-water reaction with the sodium cooled fast reactor might be solved with the use of CO{sub 2} instead of water. The supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle was proposed for the better thermodynamic efficiency than for the simple supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Thus this paper presents the efficiencies of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle along with several decision variables for the thermodynamic optimization of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle. The analytic results in this study show that the system efficiency reaches its maximum value at a compressor outlet pressure of 200 bars and a recycle fraction of 30 %, and the lower minimum temperature approach at the two heat exchangers shows higher system efficiency as expected.

  12. Chemistry control challenges in a supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzonas, David; Tremaine, Peter; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    The long-term viability of a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) will depend on the ability of designers to predict and control water chemistry to minimize corrosion and the transport of corrosion products and radionuclides. Meeting this goal requires an enhanced understanding of water chemistry as the temperature and pressure are raised beyond the critical point. A key aspect of SCWR water chemistry control will be mitigation of the effects of water radiolysis; preliminary studies suggest markedly different behavior than that predicted from simple extrapolations from conventional water-cooled reactor behavior. The commonly used strategy of adding excess hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to suppress the net radiolytic production of primary oxidizing species may not be effective in an SCWR. The behavior of low concentrations of impurities such as transition metal corrosion products, chemistry control agents, anions introduced via make-up water or from ion-exchange resins, and radionuclides (e.g., 60 Co) needs to be understood. The formation of neutral complexes increases with temperature, and can become important under near-critical and supercritical conditions; the most important region is from 300-450 C, where the properties of water change dramatically, and solvent compressibility effects exert a huge influence on solvation. The potential for increased transport and deposition of corrosion products (active and inactive), leading to (a) increased deposition on fuel cladding surfaces, and (b) increased out-of-core radiation fields and worker dose, must be assessed. There are also significant challenges associated with chemistry sampling and monitoring in an SCWR. The typical methods used in current reactor designs (grab samples, on-line monitors at the end of a cooled, depressurized sample line) will be inadequate, and in-situ measurements of key parameters will be required. This paper describes current Canadian activities in SCWR chemistry and chemistry

  13. Prospects for hydrogen storage in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-01-07

    Hydrogen-based fuel cells are promising solutions for the efficient and clean delivery of electricity. Since hydrogen is an energy carrier, a key step for the development of a reliable hydrogen-based technology requires solving the issue of storage and transport of hydrogen. Several proposals based on the design of advanced materials such as metal hydrides and carbon structures have been made to overcome the limitations of the conventional solution of compressing or liquefying hydrogen in tanks. Nevertheless none of these systems are currently offering the required performances in terms of hydrogen storage capacity and control of adsorption/desorption processes. Therefore the problem of hydrogen storage remains so far unsolved and it continues to represent a significant bottleneck to the advancement and proliferation of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Recently, however, several studies on graphene, the one-atom-thick membrane of carbon atoms packed in a honeycomb lattice, have highlighted the potentialities of this material for hydrogen storage and raise new hopes for the development of an efficient solid-state hydrogen storage device. Here we review on-going efforts and studies on functionalized and nanostructured graphene for hydrogen storage and suggest possible developments for efficient storage/release of hydrogen under ambient conditions.

  14. Oxidation stability of biodiesel fuel as prepared by supercritical methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiayu Xin; Hiroaki Imahara; Shiro Saka [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Department of Socio-Environmental Energy Science, Graduate School of Energy Science

    2008-08-15

    A non-catalytic supercritical methanol method is an attractive process to convert various oils/fats efficiently into biodiesel. To evaluate oxidation stability of biodiesel, biodiesel produced by alkali-catalyzed method was exposed to supercritical methanol at several temperatures for 30 min. As a result, it was found that the tocopherol in biodiesel is not stable at a temperature higher than 300{sup o}C. After the supercritical methanol treatment, hydroperoxides were greatly reduced for biodiesel with initially high in peroxide value, while the tocopherol slightly decreased in its content. As a result, the biodiesel prepared by the supercritical methanol method was enhanced for oxidation stability when compared with that prepared by alkali-catalyzed method from waste oil. Therefore, supercritical methanol method is useful especially for oils/fats having higher peroxide values. 32 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. 27.12 MHz plasma generation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Ayato; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Takemori, Toshihiko; Mukasa, Shinobu; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted for generating high-frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide; it is expected to have the potential for applications in various types of practical processes. It was successfully generated at 6-20 MPa using electrodes mounted in a supercritical cell with a gap of 1 mm. Emission spectra were then measured to investigate the physical properties of supercritical carbon dioxide plasma. The results indicated that while the emission spectra for carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide could be mainly obtained at a low pressure, the emission spectra for atomic oxygen could be obtained in the supercritical state, which increased with the pressure. The temperature of the plasma in supercritical state was estimated to be approximately 6000-7000 K on the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the calculation results of thermal equilibrium composition in this state showed the increase of atomic oxygen by the decomposition of CO 2

  16. Introduction to supercritical fluids a spreadsheet-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Richard; Peters, Cor

    2013-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to supercritical fluids with easy-to-use Excel spreadsheets suitable for both specialized-discipline (chemistry or chemical engineering student) and mixed-discipline (engineering/economic student) classes. Each chapter contains worked examples, tip boxes and end-of-the-chapter problems and projects. Part I covers web-based chemical information resources, applications and simplified theory presented in a way that allows students of all disciplines to delve into the properties of supercritical fluids and to design energy, extraction and materials formation systems for real-world processes that use supercritical water or supercritical carbon dioxide. Part II takes a practical approach and addresses the thermodynamic framework, equations of state, fluid phase equilibria, heat and mass transfer, chemical equilibria and reaction kinetics of supercritical fluids. Spreadsheets are arranged as Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) functions and macros that are completely (source code) ...

  17. Simulation of Thermal Hydraulic at Supercritical Pressures with APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurki, Joona [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The proposed concepts for the fourth generation of nuclear reactors include a reactor operating with water at thermodynamically supercritical state, the Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR). For the design and safety demonstrations of such a reactor, the possibility to accurately simulate the thermal hydraulics of the supercritical coolant is an absolute prerequisite. For this purpose, the one-dimensional two-phase thermal hydraulics solution of APROS process simulation software was developed to function at the supercritical pressure region. Software modifications included the redefinition of some parameters that have physical significance only at the subcritical pressures, improvement of the steam tables, and addition of heat transfer and friction correlations suitable for the supercritical pressure region. (author)

  18. Radiolytic and electron-transfer reactions in supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, D. M.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Takahashi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Using supercritical fluids as solvents is useful for both practical and theoretical reasons. It has been proposed to use supercritical CO 2 as a solvent for synthesis because it eliminates the air pollution arising from other solvents. The properties of supercritical fluids can be easily varied with only modest changes in temperature and density, so they provide a way of testing theories of chemical reactions. It has also been proposed to use supercritical fluids for the treatment of hazardous mixed waste. For these reasons the authors have studied the production of radiolytic species in supercritical CO 2 and have measured their reactivity as a function of density. They have shown that the C 2 O 4 + is formed. They also have shown that the electron transfer reactions of dimethylaniline to C 2 O 4 + and CO 2 (e - ) to benzoquinone are diffusion controlled over a considerable density range

  19. Analysis and test of a breadboard cryogenic hydrogen/Freon heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, L. F.; Hooper, J.

    1973-01-01

    System studies required to verify a tube-in-tube cryogenic heat exchanger as optimum for the space shuttle mission are described. Design of the optimum configuration, which could be fabricated from commercially available hardware, is discussed. Finally, testing of the proposed configuration with supercritical hydrogen and Freon 21 is discussed and results are compared with thermal and dynamic analysis.

  20. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on ferroaluminophosphate for desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of microporous ferroaluminophosphate adsorbent (FAM-Z01, Mitsubishi Plastics) are evaluated for possible application in adsorption desalination and cooling (AD) cycles. A particular interest is its water vapor uptake behavior at assorted adsorption temperatures and pressures whilst comparing them to the commercial silica gels of AD plants. The surface characteristics are first carried out using N2 gas adsorption followed by the water vapor uptake analysis for temperature ranging from 20°C to 80°C. We propose a hybrid isotherm model, composing of the Henry and the Sips isotherms, which can be integrated to satisfactorily fit the experimental data of water adsorption on the FAM-Z01. The hybrid model is selected to fit the unusual isotherm shapes, that is, a low adsorption in the initial section and followed by a rapid vapor uptake leading to a likely micropore volume filling by hydrogen bonding and cooperative interaction in micropores. It is shown that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of FAM-Z01 can be up to 5 folds higher than that of conventional silica gels. Owing to the quantum increase in the adsorbate uptake, the FAM-Z01 has the potential to significantly reduce the footprint of an existing AD plant for the same output capacity. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  1. A review on adsorption refrigeration technology and adsorption deterioration in physical adsorption systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D.C.; Li, Y.H. [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, the Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Li, D.; Zhang, J.P. [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Xia, Y.Z. [Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, the Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2010-01-15

    As one kind of environmentally friendly refrigeration, the adsorption refrigeration has attracted many attentions in resent decades. This paper introduces the researches of adsorption refrigeration systems with the commonly used working pairs, advanced adsorption cycles, heat and mass transfer enhancement and attempts of adsorption refrigeration applications. Poor heat and mass transfer problem is a bottleneck to prevent the improvements of the adsorption refrigeration technique. Two ways to enhance the heat and mass transfer are discussed in this paper. The adsorption deterioration of adsorbent, another obstacle to physical adsorption refrigeration applications, is also pointed out. And the possible reasons and the possible methods are analyzed. (author)

  2. Temperature and pressure effects on solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide and retention in supercritical fluid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.W.; Janssen, J.G.M.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Solubilities of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured with a procedure based on a direct on-line combination of a saturation cell to a flame ionization detector. Acenaphthene, anthrance and chrysene were selected as the test solutes. A method was

  3. Correlation of supercritical-fluid extraction recoveries with supercritical-fluid chromatographic retention data: A fundamental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.W.; Janssen, J.G.M.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of using supercritical-fluid chromatographic retention data for examining the effects of operational parameters, such as pressure and flow rate, on the extraction characteristics in supercritical-fluid extraction (SFE) was investigated. A model was derived for calculating the

  4. Impact of neutron thermal scattering laws on the burn-up analysis of supercritical LWR's fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    This work is a contribution to the HPLWR2 (High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2), a research project having the goal to investigate the technical feasibility of the High Performance Light Water Reactor. The basic idea of the HPLWR is that of an LWR working at supercritical pressure, which would allow heating up the coolant to a temperature of about 500 C without having phase transition and sending the coolant directly to the turbine. One issue aroused by this design, deserving to be addressed by research, is the behaviour of thermal neutrons in supercritical water. At thermal energies, the De Broglie wavelength associated with the neutron is comparable to the interatomic distances in crystals and molecules and the scattering is fully governed by the laws of quantum mechanics, according to which the geometry of the aggregates the nuclei are bound to and their intra- and intermolecular dynamics are of crucial importance. It can be shown that there is a certain mathematical relation between the Fourier-transform of the hydrogen atoms' velocity autocorrelation function and their double-differential scattering cross section. This Fourier-transform, called ''generalized frequency distribution'', can be derived from experimental measurements and, effectively, Bernnat et al. of the Institut fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme of the University of Stuttgart derived the generalized frequency distribution for liquid water on the basis of experimental results of Page and Haywood. Unfortunately there exists no experimental facility nowadays to support a thorough work of this type on supercritical water and therefore the scattering kernel for thermal neutrons in supercritical water is unknown. In criticality calculations involving supercritical water one can turn to one of the thermal scattering kernels available nowadays for hydrogen bound to the H 2 O molecule: for liquid water, for vapour or considering the nuclei of hydrogen as unbound. The third, most naive option

  5. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  6. The effect of water chemistry on a change in the composition of gas phase in the steam-water path of a supercritical-pressure boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, I. I.; Belokonova, A. F.

    2010-07-01

    We present the results from an experimental research work on studying the behavior of the gas phase in the path of a supercritical-pressure boiler during its operation with different water chemistries, including all-volatile (hydrazine-ammonia), complexone, neutral oxygenated, and combined oxygenated-ammonia chemistries. It is shown that the minimal content of hydrogen in steam is achieved if feedwater is treated with oxygen.

  7. Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 to Methanol: Study of Synergistic Effect on Adsorption Properties of CO2 and H2 in CuO/ZnO/ZrO2 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of CuO/ZnO/ZrO2 (CZZ catalysts with different CuO/ZnO weight ratios have been synthesized by citrate method and tested in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Experimental results showed that the catalyst with the lowest CuO/ZnO weight ratio of 2/7 exhibited the best catalytic performance with a CO2 conversion of 32.9%, 45.8% methanol selectivity, and a process delivery of 193.9 gMeOH·kgcat−1·h−1. A synergetic effect is found by systematic temperature-programmed-desorption (TPD studies. Comparing with single and di-component systems, the interaction via different components in a CZZ system provides additional active sites to adsorb more H2 and CO2 in the low temperature range, resulting in higher weight time yield (WTY of methanol.

  8. Solvation of o-hydroxybenzoic acid in pure and modified supercritical carbon dioxide, according to numerical modeling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.; Petrenko, V. E.

    2015-08-01

    The dissolution of an elementary fragment of crystal structure (an o-hydroxybenzoic acid ( o-HBA) dimer) in both pure and modified supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide by adding methanol (molar fraction, 0.035) at T = 318 K, ρ = 0.7 g/cm3 is simulated. Features of the solvation mechanism in each solvent are revealed. The solvation of o-HBA in pure SC CO2 is shown to occur via electron donor-acceptor interactions. o-HBA forms a solvate complex in modified SC CO2 through hydrogen bonds between the carboxyl group and methanol. The hydroxyl group of o-HBA participates in the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond, and not in interactions with the solvent. It is concluded that the o-HBA-methanol complex is a stable molecular structure, and its lifetime is one order of magnitude higher than those of other hydrogen bonds in fluids.

  9. Process simulation of nuclear-based thermochemical hydrogen production with a copper-chlorine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukwu, C.C.; Naterer, G.F.; Rosen, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermochemical processes for hydrogen production driven by nuclear energy are promising alternatives to existing technologies for large-scale commercial production of hydrogen without fossil fuels. The copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle, in which water is decomposed into hydrogen and oxygen, is promising for thermochemical hydrogen production in conjunction with a Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor. Here, the cycle efficiency is examined using the Aspen Plus process simulation code. Possible efficiency improvements are discussed. The results are expected to assist the development of a lab-scale cycle demonstration, which is currently being undertaken at University of Ontario Institute of Technology in collaboration with numerous partners. (author)

  10. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  11. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  12. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed

  13. Supercritical nonlinear parametric dynamics of Timoshenko microbeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Ghayesh, Mergen H.

    2018-06-01

    The nonlinear supercritical parametric dynamics of a Timoshenko microbeam subject to an axial harmonic excitation force is examined theoretically, by means of different numerical techniques, and employing a high-dimensional analysis. The time-variant axial load is assumed to consist of a mean value along with harmonic fluctuations. In terms of modelling, a continuous expression for the elastic potential energy of the system is developed based on the modified couple stress theory, taking into account small-size effects; the kinetic energy of the system is also modelled as a continuous function of the displacement field. Hamilton's principle is employed to balance the energies and to obtain the continuous model of the system. Employing the Galerkin scheme along with an assumed-mode technique, the energy terms are reduced, yielding a second-order reduced-order model with finite number of degrees of freedom. A transformation is carried out to convert the second-order reduced-order model into a double-dimensional first order one. A bifurcation analysis is performed for the system in the absence of the axial load fluctuations. Moreover, a mean value for the axial load is selected in the supercritical range, and the principal parametric resonant response, due to the time-variant component of the axial load, is obtained - as opposed to transversely excited systems, for parametrically excited system (such as our problem here), the nonlinear resonance occurs in the vicinity of twice any natural frequency of the linear system; this is accomplished via use of the pseudo-arclength continuation technique, a direct time integration, an eigenvalue analysis, and the Floquet theory for stability. The natural frequencies of the system prior to and beyond buckling are also determined. Moreover, the effect of different system parameters on the nonlinear supercritical parametric dynamics of the system is analysed, with special consideration to the effect of the length-scale parameter.

  14. COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillip E. Savage

    1999-01-01

    Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, we examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO(sub 2), bulk TiO(sub 2), and CuO supported on Al(sub 2) O(sub 3). We used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which we can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO(sub 2) yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that we could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, we performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO(sub 2) and TiO(sub 2) catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO(sub 2) formation rates during SCWO. MnO(sub 2) does not affect the selectivity to CO(sub 2), or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO(sub 2) are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO(sub 2) , which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of

  15. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  16. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  17. Bedforms formed by experimental supercritical density flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Hajime; Izumi, Norihiro; Yokokawa, Miwa; Muto, Tetsuji

    2014-05-01

    This study reveals characteristics and formative conditions of bedforms produced by saline density flows in supercritical flow conditions, especially focusing on the mechanism of the formation of plane bed. The motion of sediment particles forming bedforms was resolved by high-speed cameras (1/1000 frame/seconds). Experimental density flows were produced by mixtures of salt water (1.01-1.04 in density) and plastic particles (1.5 in specific density, 140 or 240 mm in diameter). Salt water and plastic particles are analogue materials of muddy water and sand particles in turbidity currents respectively. Acrylic flume (4.0 m long, 2.0 cm wide and 0.5 m deep) was submerged in an experimental tank (6.0 m long, 1.8 m wide and 1.2 m deep) that was filled by clear water. Features of bedforms were observed when the bed state in the flume reached equilibrium condition. The experimental conditions range 1.5-4.2 in densimetric Froude number and 0.2-0.8 in Shields dimensionless stress. We report the two major discoveries as a result of the flume experiments: (1) Plane bed under Froude-supercritical flows and (2) Geometrical characteristics of cyclic steps formed by density flows. (1) Plane bed was formed under the condition of supercritical flow regime. In previous studies, plane bed has been known to be formed by subcritical unidirectional flows (ca. 0.8 in Froude number). However, this study implies that plane bed can also be formed by supercritical conditions with high Shields dimensionless stress (>0.4) and very high Froude number (> 4.0). This discovery may suggest that previous estimations of paleo-hydraulic conditions of parallel lamination in turbidites should be reconsidered. The previous experimental studies and data from high-speed camera suggest that the region of plane bed formation coincides with the region of the sheet flow developments. The particle transport in sheet flow (thick bedload layer) induces transform of profile of flow shear stress, which may be

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of a supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.

    2007-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed for a hypothetical design of a Supercritical Water Reactor, with emphasis on Canadian design criteria. The model solves for cycle efficiency, mass flows and physical conditions throughout the plant based on input parameters of operating pressures and efficiencies of components. The model includes eight feedwater heaters, three feedwater pumps, a deaerator, a condenser, the core, three turbines and two reheaters. To perform the calculations, Microsoft Excel was used in conjunction with FLUIDCAL-IAPWS95 and VBA code. The calculations show that a thermal efficiency of 47.5% can be achieved with a core outlet temperature of 625 o C. (author)

  19. Hydrogen storage composition and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K; Wicks, George G.

    2003-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition based on a metal hydride dispersed in an aerogel prepared by a sol-gel process. The starting material for the aerogel is an organometallic compound, including the alkoxysilanes, organometals of the form M(OR)x and MOxRy, where R is an alkyl group of the form C.sub.n H.sub.2n+1, M is an oxide-forming metal, n, x, and y are integers, and y is two less than the valence of M. A sol is prepared by combining the starting material, alcohol, water, and an acid. The sol is conditioned to the proper viscosity and a hydride in the form of a fine powder is added. The mixture is polymerized and dried under supercritical conditions. The final product is a composition having a hydride uniformly dispersed throughout an inert, stable and highly porous matrix. It is capable of absorbing up to 30 moles of hydrogen per kilogram at room temperature and pressure, rapidly and reversibly. Hydrogen absorbed by the composition can be readily be recovered by heat or evacuation.

  20. Advanced nanostructured materials as media for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, E.; Niculescu, V.; Armeanu, A.; Sandru, C.; Constantinescu, M.; Sisu, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In a future sustainable energy system based on renewable energy, environmentally harmless energy carriers like hydrogen, will be of crucial importance. One of the major impediments for the transition to a hydrogen based energy system is the lack of satisfactory hydrogen storage alternatives. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials has been proposed as a solution for adequate hydrogen storage for a number of applications, in particular for transportation. This paper is a preliminary study with the focus on possibilities for hydrogen storage in zeolites, alumina and nanostructured carbon materials. The adsorption properties of these materials were evaluated in correlation with their internal structure. From N 2 physisorption data the BET surface area (S BET ) , total pore volume (PV), micropore volume (MPV) and total surface area (S t ) were derived. H 2 physisorption measurements were performed at 77 K and a pressure value of 1 bar. From these data the adsorption capacities of sorbent materials were determined. Apparently the microporous adsorbents, e.g activated carbons, display appreciable sorption capacities. Based on their micropore volume, carbon-based sorbents have the largest adsorption capacity for H 2 , over 230 cm 3 (STP)/g, at the previous conditions. By increasing the micropore volume (∼ 1 cm 3 /g) of sorbents and optimizing the adsorption conditions it is expected to obtain an adsorption capacity of ∼ 560 cm 3 (STP)/g, close to targets set for mobile applications. (authors)

  1. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  2. Supercritical fluid extraction: spectroscopic study of interactions comparison to solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustenholtz Farawila, A.

    2005-06-01

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO 2 ) was chosen to study Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) of cesium and uranium. At first, crown ethers were considered as chelating agents for the SFE of cesium. The role of water and its interaction with crown ethers were especially studied using Fourier-Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy in SF-CO 2 . A sandwich configuration between two crown ethers and a water molecule was observed in the SF-CO 2 phase for the first time. The equilibrium between the single and the bridge configurations was defined. The enthalpy of the hydrogen bond formation was also calculated. These results were then compared to the one in different mixtures of chloroform and carbon tetra-chloride using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). To conclude this first part and in order to understand the whole picture of the recovery of cesium, I studied the role of water in the equilibrium between the cesium and the di-cyclo-hexano18-crown-6.In a second part, the supercritical fluid extraction of uranium was studied in SF-CO 2 . For this purpose, different complexes of Tributyl Phosphate (TBP), nitric acid and water were used as chelating and oxidizing agents. I first used FT-IR to study the TBP-water interaction in SF-CO 2 . These results were then compared to the one obtained with NMR in chloroform. NMR spectroscopy was also used to understand the TBP-nitric acid-water interaction first alone and then in chloroform. To conclude my research work, I succeeded to improve the efficiency of uranium extraction and stripping into water for a pilot-plant where enriched uranium is extracted from incinerated waste coming from nuclear fuel fabrication. TBP-nitric acid complexes were used in SF-CO 2 for the extraction of uranium from ash. (author)

  3. Supercritical fluid extraction: spectroscopic study of interactions comparison to solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustenholtz Farawila, A

    2005-06-15

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO{sub 2}) was chosen to study Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) of cesium and uranium. At first, crown ethers were considered as chelating agents for the SFE of cesium. The role of water and its interaction with crown ethers were especially studied using Fourier-Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy in SF-CO{sub 2}. A sandwich configuration between two crown ethers and a water molecule was observed in the SF-CO{sub 2} phase for the first time. The equilibrium between the single and the bridge configurations was defined. The enthalpy of the hydrogen bond formation was also calculated. These results were then compared to the one in different mixtures of chloroform and carbon tetra-chloride using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). To conclude this first part and in order to understand the whole picture of the recovery of cesium, I studied the role of water in the equilibrium between the cesium and the di-cyclo-hexano18-crown-6.In a second part, the supercritical fluid extraction of uranium was studied in SF-CO{sub 2}. For this purpose, different complexes of Tributyl Phosphate (TBP), nitric acid and water were used as chelating and oxidizing agents. I first used FT-IR to study the TBP-water interaction in SF-CO{sub 2}. These results were then compared to the one obtained with NMR in chloroform. NMR spectroscopy was also used to understand the TBP-nitric acid-water interaction first alone and then in chloroform. To conclude my research work, I succeeded to improve the efficiency of uranium extraction and stripping into water for a pilot-plant where enriched uranium is extracted from incinerated waste coming from nuclear fuel fabrication. TBP-nitric acid complexes were used in SF-CO{sub 2} for the extraction of uranium from ash. (author)

  4. Fiscal 1997 report on the results of the introductory R and D of the New Sunshine Project under a consignment from NEDO. Introductory R and D of the supercritical fluid use technology; 1997 nendo `New Sunshine keikaku` sendo kenkyu kaihatsu Shin Energy Sangyo Gijutsu Sogo Kaihatsu Kiko itaku. Chorinkai ryutai riyo gijutsu sendo kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The R and D of chemical reaction using supercritical fluids started in fiscal 1997. In the R and D of solvent reaction, as the research on polymer decomposition with supercritical water, studies were conducted of the mechanism of conversion reaction to chemical materials, cleavage mechanism of stable chemical bonds, and synthetic reaction in the supercritical state reaction field. In the research on oxidation reaction, as the study of complete oxidation in supercritical water for high efficiency energy recovery, studies of complete oxidation of liquid fuels, and complete oxidation of solid fuels. In the research on hydrogenation, studies of lightening of heavy oil in supercritical water, etc. In the R and D of the basic technology, studies of corrosion mechanism of metals in supercritical water, construction of the basic framework for technical database of supercritical fluids, etc. In the survey of technical trends and new research themes, the introductory R and D of element technology, etc. were conducted, and the results were described of the survey of technical trends and new research themes and the trend survey of overseas technology. 314 refs., 87 figs., 81 tabs.

  5. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  6. Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

    2013-09-01

    In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for

  7. Supercritical water natural circulation flow stability experiment research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Dongliang; Zhou, Tao; Li, Bing [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Nuclear Science and Engineering; North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear Thermalhydraulic Safety and Standardization; North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). Beijing Key Lab. of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy; Huang, Yanping [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China). Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Lab.

    2017-12-15

    The Thermal hydraulic characteristics of supercritical water natural circulation plays an important role in the safety of the Generation-IV supercritical water-cooled reactors. Hence it is crucial to conduct the natural circulation heat transfer experiment of supercritical water. The heat transfer characteristics have been studied under different system pressures in the natural circulation systems. Results show that the fluctuations in the subcritical flow rate (for natural circulation) is relatively small, as compared to the supercritical flow rate. By increasing the heating power, it is observed that the amplitude (and time period) of the fluctuation tends to become larger for the natural circulation of supercritical water. This tends to show the presence of flow instability in the supercritical water. It is possible to observe the flow instability phenomenon when the system pressure is suddenly reduced from the supercritical pressure state to the subcritical state. At the test outlet section, the temperature is prone to increase suddenly, whereas the blocking effect may be observed in the inlet section of the experiment.

  8. Development of a test facility for analyzing supercritical fluid blowdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, Thiago D.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2015-01-01

    The generation IV nuclear reactors under development mostly use supercritical fluids as the working fluid because higher temperatures improve the thermal efficiency. Supercritical fluids are used by modern nuclear power plants to achieve thermal efficiencies of around 45%. With water as the supercritical working fluid, these plants operate at a high temperature and pressure. However, experiments on supercritical water are limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids, which have more feasible supercritical conditions and exhibit a lower critical pressure and temperature. Experimental research is normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine model fluids that can represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. This paper presents an application of fractional scale analysis to determine the simulation parameters for a depressurization test facility. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and R134a gas were considered as the model fluids because their critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. The similarities of water (prototype), CO 2 (model) and R134a (model) for depressurization in a pressure vessel were analyzed. (author)

  9. Adsorption of emerging contaminant metformin using graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuai; Liu, Yun-Guo; Liu, Shao-Bo; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Jiang, Lu-Hua; Tan, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Lu; Zeng, Wei; Li, Ting-Ting; Yang, Chun-Ping

    2017-07-01

    The occurrence of emerging contaminants in our water resources poses potential threats to the livings. Due to the poor treatment in wastewater management, treatment technologies are needed to effectively remove these products for living organism safety. In this study, Graphene oxide (GO) was tested for the first time for its capacity to remove a kind of emerging wastewater contaminants, metformin. The research was conducted by using a series of systematic adsorption and kinetic experiments. The results indicated that GO could rapidly and efficiently reduce the concentration of metformin, which could provide a solution in handling this problem. The uptake of metformin on the graphene oxide was strongly dependent on temperature, pH, ionic strength, and background electrolyte. The adsorption kinetic experiments revealed that almost 80% removal of metformin was achieved within 20 min for all the doses studied, corresponding to the relatively high k 1 (0.232 min -1 ) and k 2 (0.007 g mg -1  min -1 ) values in the kinetic models. It indicated that the highest adsorption capacity in the investigated range (q m ) of GO for metformin was at pH 6.0 and 288 K. Thermodynamic study indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous (ΔG 0  adsorption of metformin increased when the pH values changed from 4.0 to 6.0, and decreased adsorption were observed at pH 6.0-11.0. GO still exhibited excellent adsorption capacity after several desorption/adsorption cycles. Besides, both so-called π-π interactions and hydrogen bonds might be mainly responsible for the adsorption of metformin onto GO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced hydrogen storage by using lithium decoration on phosphorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Wan, Neng, E-mail: wn@seu.edu.cn, E-mail: lsy@seu.edu.cn; Lei, Shuangying, E-mail: wn@seu.edu.cn, E-mail: lsy@seu.edu.cn; Yu, Hong [Key Laboratory of Microelectromechanical Systems of the Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2016-07-14

    The hydrogen storage characteristics of Li decorated phosphorene were systematically investigated based on first-principle density functional theory. It is revealed that the adsorption of H{sub 2} on pristine phosphorene is relatively weak with an adsorption energy of 0.06 eV. While this value can be dramatically enhanced to ∼0.2 eV after the phosphorene was decorated by Li, and each Li atom can adsorb up to three H{sub 2} molecules. The detailed mechanism of the enhanced hydrogen storage was discussed based on our density functional theory calculations. Our studies give a conservative prediction of hydrogen storage capacity to be 4.4 wt. % through Li decoration on pristine phosphorene. By comparing our calculations to the present molecular dynamic simulation results, we expect our adsorption system is stable under room temperature and hydrogen can be released after moderate heating.

  11. Natural diatomite modified as novel hydrogen storage material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Zheng, Chenghui; Yang, Huaming

    2014-03-01

    Natural diatomite, subjected to different modifications, is investigated for hydrogen adsorption capacities at room temperature. An effective metal-modified strategy is developed to disperse platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) nanoparticles on the surface of diatomite. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of pristine diatomite (diatomite) is 0.463 wt.% at 2.63 MPa and 298 K, among the highest of the known sorbents, while that of acid-thermally activated diatomite (A-diatomite) could reach up to 0.833 wt.% due to the appropriate pore properties by activation. By incorporation with a small amount of Pt and Pd ( 0.5 wt.%), hydrogen adsorption capacities are enhanced to 0.696 wt.% and 0.980 wt.%, respectively, indicating that activated diatomite shows interesting application in the field of hydrogen storage at room temperature.

  12. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  13. Effects of Supercritical Environment on Hydrocarbon-fuel Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bongchul Shin; Dohun Kim; Min Son; Jaye Koo

    2017-01-01

    In this study,the effects of environment conditions on decane were investigated.Decane was injected in subcritical and supercritical ambient conditions.The visualization chamber was pressurized to 1.68 MPa by using nitrogen gas at a temperature of 653 K for subcritical ambient conditions.For supercritical ambient conditions,the visualization chamber was pressurized to 2.52 MPa by using helium at a temperature of 653 K.The decane injection in the pressurized chamber was visualized via a shadowgraph technique and gradient images were obtained by a post processing method.A large variation in density gradient was observed at jet interface in the case of subcritical injection in subcritical ambient conditions.Conversely,for supercritical injection in supercritical ambient conditions,a small density gradient was observed at the jet interface.In a manner similar to that observed in other cases,supercritical injection in subcritical ambient conditions differed from supercritical ambient conditions such as sphere shape liquid.Additionally,there were changes in the interface,and the supercritical injection core width was thicker than that in the subcritical injection.Furthermore,in cases with the same injection conditions,the change in the supercritical ambient normalized core width was smaller than the change in the subcritical ambient normalized core width owing to high specific heat at the supercritical injection and small phase change at the interface.Therefore,the interface was affected by the changing ambient condition.Given that the effect of changing the thermodynamic properties of propellants could be essential for a variable thrust rocket engine,the effects of the ambient conditions were investigated experimentally.

  14. Effects of supercritical environment on hydrocarbon-fuel injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bongchul; Kim, Dohun; Son, Min; Koo, Jaye

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the effects of environment conditions on decane were investigated. Decane was injected in subcritical and supercritical ambient conditions. The visualization chamber was pressurized to 1.68 MPa by using nitrogen gas at a temperature of 653 K for subcritical ambient conditions. For supercritical ambient conditions, the visualization chamber was pressurized to 2.52 MPa by using helium at a temperature of 653 K. The decane injection in the pressurized chamber was visualized via a shadowgraph technique and gradient images were obtained by a post processing method. A large variation in density gradient was observed at jet interface in the case of subcritical injection in subcritical ambient conditions. Conversely, for supercritical injection in supercritical ambient conditions, a small density gradient was observed at the jet interface. In a manner similar to that observed in other cases, supercritical injection in subcritical ambient conditions differed from supercritical ambient conditions such as sphere shape liquid. Additionally, there were changes in the interface, and the supercritical injection core width was thicker than that in the subcritical injection. Furthermore, in cases with the same injection conditions, the change in the supercritical ambient normalized core width was smaller than the change in the subcritical ambient normalized core width owing to high specific heat at the supercritical injection and small phase change at the interface. Therefore, the interface was affected by the changing ambient condition. Given that the effect of changing the thermodynamic properties of propellants could be essential for a variable thrust rocket engine, the effects of the ambient conditions were investigated experimentally.

  15. Electric field improved hydrogen storage of Ca-decorated monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Nahong [College of Computer and Information Engineering, Henan University of Economics and Law, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Yusheng [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Gao, Haiyan; Jiang, Weifen; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Bin [College of Mathematics and Information Science, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Sun, Qiang [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [International Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2015-04-17

    Hydrogen storage property of Ca-decorated MoS{sub 2} is carried out using first-principles calculations. Our calculations demonstrate that the preferential binding of Ca atoms on MoS{sub 2} effectively prevent the Ca clustering. Six H{sub 2} molecules per Ca atom can be adsorbed with a desirable adsorption energy of 0.14 eV/H{sub 2}. Both hybridization of the Ca-3d and S-2s with the H-1s orbital and the polarization of the H{sub 2} molecules contribute to the hydrogen adsorption. Our results show that the external electric field can effectively tune the hydrogen adsorption energy, therefore making hydrogen storage and release reversible. - Highlights: • Ca binds with MoS{sub 2} stalely without clustering. • It can operate under ambient thermodynamic conditions. • External electric field can effectively tune the hydrogen adsorption energy.

  16. Supercritical gas extracts from low-quality coals. On the search of new precursors for carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Roberto; Arenillas, Ana; Rubiera, Fernando; Moinelo, Sabino R. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon INCAR, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080, Oviedo (Spain)

    2004-11-25

    This paper studies the chemical composition of several supercritical gas (SCG) extracts and its influence on the thermal behaviour under carbonisation conditions. The extracts were obtained from a Spanish lignite (Mequinenza), a low-quality coal from the point of view of energy applications. The lignite was treated with toluene, ethanol (EtOH) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvents under different supercritical temperature and pressure conditions. The extracts display high aliphatic nature and enhanced concentrations of oxygen functional groups, aided by the contribution of hydrogenation and oxygen incorporation reactions occurring in the SCG extraction with EtOH and THF. Thiophenic compounds are also present in great concentrations derived from the exceptionally high organic sulphur content of the parent coal. The carbonisation of the extracts renders anisotropic material with fine mosaic texture, as a consequence of the significant thermal reactivity inferred by the aliphatic and oxygenated groups. The size of the mosaic increases with the temperature of the SCG extraction and varies with the supercritical solvent in the order: toluene

  17. Disposition of nonflammable low-level radioactive wastes using supercritical water with ruthenium(IV) oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the distribution behavior of iron, cobalt, cesium, iodine and strontium attached to nonflammable organic materials, in solid, liquid and gas phases during the decomposition of these materials using supercritical water with ruthenium(IV) oxide (RuO 2 ) catalyst. The distributions of these elements under various conditions (initial amounts, with/without precipitation reagent) were determined by using their radioisotopes as simulated low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) in order to ease the detection of trace amounts of elements even in solid and gas phases. Iron and cobalt were found only in the solid phase when iron hydroxide was added as a precipitation reagent before the supercritical water reaction. Cesium, iodine and strontium were found in the liquid phase after the reaction. Therefore, by adding precipitation reagents such as sodium tetraphenylborate, and sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) (or sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO 3 )) and silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ) aqueous solutions to each resultant liquid phase containing cesium, strontium and iodine, respectively, these elements can be successfully recovered only in the solid phase. The gases produced during the decomposition of the organic material contain no radioactivity under all conditions in this study. These results indicate that all of the elements investigated in this study (iron, cobalt, cesium, iodine and strontium) can be recovered successfully by this supercritical water process using RuO 2 Consequently, this process is suggested as a predominant candidate for the treatment of nonflammable organic materials in LLW. (author)

  18. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  19. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  20. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw; Amy, Gary; Chunggaze, Mohammed; Al-Ghasham, Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.