WorldWideScience

Sample records for supercooled large droplet

  1. Effect of drop size on the impact thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet in aircraft icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Supercooled large droplet (SLD), which can cause abnormal icing, is a well-known issue in aerospace engineering. Although efforts have been exerted to understand large droplet impact dynamics and the supercooled feature in the film/substrate interface, respectively, the thermodynamic effect during the SLD impact process has not received sufficient attention. This work conducts experimental studies to determine the effects of drop size on the thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet impingement. Through phenomenological reproduction, the rapid-freezing characteristics are observed in diameters of 400, 800, and 1300 μm. The experimental analysis provides information on the maximum spreading rate and the shrinkage rate of the drop, the supercooled diffusive rate, and the freezing time. A physical explanation of this unsteady heat transfer process is proposed theoretically, which indicates that the drop size is a critical factor influencing the supercooled heat exchange and effective heat transfer duration between the film/substrate interface. On the basis of the present experimental data and theoretical analysis, an impinging heating model is developed and applied to typical SLD cases. The model behaves as anticipated, which underlines the wide applicability to SLD icing problems in related fields.

  2. Numerical investigation on super-cooled large droplet icing of fan rotor blade in jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Icing (or ice accretion) is a phenomenon in which super-cooled water droplets impinge and accrete on a body. It is well known that ice accretion on blades and vanes leads to performance degradation and has caused severe accidents. Although various anti-icing and deicing systems have been developed, such accidents still occur. Therefore, it is important to clarify the phenomenon of ice accretion on an aircraft and in a jet engine. However, flight tests for ice accretion are very expensive, and in the wind tunnel it is difficult to reproduce all climate conditions where ice accretion can occur. Therefore, it is expected that computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which can estimate ice accretion in various climate conditions, will be a useful way to predict and understand the ice accretion phenomenon. On the other hand, although the icing caused by super-cooled large droplets (SLD) is very dangerous, the numerical method has not been established yet. This is why SLD icing is characterized by splash and bounce phenomena of droplets and they are very complex in nature. In the present study, we develop an ice accretion code considering the splash and bounce phenomena to predict SLD icing, and the code is applied to a fan rotor blade. The numerical results with and without the SLD icing model are compared. Through this study, the influence of the SLD icing model is numerically clarified.

  3. NASA/FAA/NCAR Supercooled Large Droplet Icing Flight Research: Summary of Winter 1996-1997 Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean; Ratvasky, Thomas; Bernstein, Ben; McDonough, Frank; Strapp, J. Walter

    1998-01-01

    During the winter of 1996-1997, a flight research program was conducted at the NASA-Lewis Research Center to study the characteristics of Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD) within the Great Lakes region. This flight program was a joint effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Based on weather forecasts and real-time in-flight guidance provided by NCAR, the NASA-Lewis Icing Research Aircraft was flown to locations where conditions were believed to be conducive to the formation of Supercooled Large Droplets aloft. Onboard instrumentation was then used to record meteorological, ice accretion, and aero-performance characteristics encountered during the flight. A total of 29 icing research flights were conducted, during which "conventional" small droplet icing, SLD, and mixed phase conditions were encountered aloft. This paper will describe how flight operations were conducted, provide an operational summary of the flights, present selected experimental results from one typical research flight, and conclude with practical "lessons learned" from this first year of operation.

  4. Mechanism of supercooled droplet freezing on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Stefan; Tiwari, Manish K.; Doan, N. Vuong; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-01-01

    Understanding ice formation from supercooled water on surfaces is a problem of fundamental importance and general utility. Superhydrophobic surfaces promise to have remarkable 'icephobicity' and low ice adhesion. Here we show that their icephobicity can be rendered ineffective by simple changes in environmental conditions. Through experiments, nucleation theory and heat transfer physics, we establish that humidity and/or the flow of a surrounding gas can fundamentally switch the ice crystallization mechanism, drastically affecting surface icephobicity. Evaporative cooling of the supercooled liquid can engender ice crystallization by homogeneous nucleation at the droplet-free surface as opposed to the expected heterogeneous nucleation at the substrate. The related interplay between droplet roll-off and rapid crystallization is also studied. Overall, we bring a novel perspective to icing and icephobicity, unveiling the strong influence of environmental conditions in addition to the accepted effects of the surface conditions and hydrophobicity.

  5. What am I? Supercooled droplet or ice?

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, Carlo; Maitra, Tanmoy; Tiwari, Manish K; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show the trick played by a supercooled liquid water drop against a superhydrophobic surface. The water drop shows a double personality, impacting onto the surface the first time while still in the liquid state, and then re-impacting as a frozen ice crystal.

  6. Mechanism of Supercooled Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras-Alba, Belen; Palacios, Jose; Vargas, Mario; Ruggeri, Charles; Bartkus, Tadas P.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on supercooled droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The results are compared to prior room temperature droplet deformation results to explore the effects of droplet supercooling. The experiments were conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) at The Pennsylvania State University. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotor blades mounted onto the hub in the AERTS chamber was moved at speeds ranging between 50 and 80 m/sec. The temperature of the chamber was set at -20°C. A monotonic droplet generator was used to produce droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The supercooled state of the droplets was determined by measurement of the temperature of the drops at various locations below the droplet generator exit. A temperature prediction code was also used to estimate the temperature of the droplets based on vertical velocity and the distance traveled by droplets from the droplet generator to the airfoil stagnation line. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging provided droplet deformation information as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. It was demonstrated that to compare the effects of water supercooling on droplet deformation, the ratio of the slip velocity and the initial droplet velocity must be equal. A case with equal slip velocity to initial velocity ratios was selected for room temperature and supercooled droplet conditions. The airfoil velocity was 60 m/s and the slip velocity for both sets of data was 40 m/s. In these cases, the deformation of the weakly supercooled and warm droplets did not present different trends. The similar behavior for both environmental conditions indicates that water

  7. Temperature measurement of supercooled droplet in icing phenomenon by means of dual-luminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M.; Morita, K.; Mamori, H.; Fukushima, N.; Yamamoto, M.

    2017-08-01

    The collision of a supercooled water droplet with a surface result an object creates ice accretion on the surface. The icing problem in any cold environments leads to severe damages on aircrafts, and a lot of studies on prevention and prediction techniques for icing have been conducted so far. Therefore, it is very important to know the detail of freezing mechanism of supercooled water droplets to improve the anti-and de-icing devices and icing simulation codes. The icing mechanism of a single supercooled water droplet impacting on an object surface would give us great insights for the purpose. In the present study, we develop a dual-luminescent imaging technique to measure the time-resolved temperature of a supercooled water droplet impacting on the surface under different temperature conditions. We apply this technique to measure the exact temperature of a water droplet, and to discuss the detail of the freezing process.

  8. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relative roles of volume and surface nucleation in the freezing of water droplets. Nucleation experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled liquid water aerosols with radii between about 1 and 3 μ m. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rate between 234.8 and 236.2 K are derived with help of a microphysical model from aerosol compositions and size distributions based on infrared extinction measurements in the aerosol flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process and has implications for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models.

  9. A quantitative test of infrared optical constants for supercooled sulphuric and nitric acid droplet aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR extinction spectra of supercooled H2SO4/H2O and HNO3/H2O solution droplets were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for a range of aerosol compositions and at temperatures extending down to 192 K. The measured spectra were quantitatively analysed in terms of aerosol composition and mass concentration by using Mie theory in combination with published refractive index data as input parameters. Simultaneously, total sulphuric acid and nitric acid mass concentrations from filter analysis and total water concentrations measured with the Lyman-a hygrometer of Forschungszentrum Jülich were used to calculate the aerosol composition at thermodynamic equilibrium inside the aerosol chamber. By comparing these measured aerosol parameters with those retrieved from the analysis of the FTIR spectra, the accuracy of the literature data sets of refractive indices could be assessed. In summary, four data sets were tested in the H2SO4/H2O system as well as two data sets in the HNO3/H2O system, partly revealing significant discrepancies in the retrieved aerosol properties. Potential explanations for these differences are discussed in this paper.

  10. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relative roles of volume and surface nucleation were investigated for the homogeneous freezing of pure water droplets. Experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled water aerosols with maximum volume densities at radii between 1 and 3 μm. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rates between 234.8 and 236.2 K were derived using a microphysical model and aerosol phase compositions and size distributions determined from infrared extinction measurements in the flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process. The implications of surface nucleation for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models are considered.

  11. Discrimination of micrometre-sized ice and super-cooled droplets in mixed-phase cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Greenaway, R. S.; Field, P.; Johnson, D. W.

    Preliminary experimental results are presented from an aircraft-mounted probe designed to provide in situ data on cloud particle shape, size, and number concentration. In particular, the probe has been designed to facilitate discrimination between super-cooled water droplets and ice crystals of 1-25 μm size within mixed-phase clouds and to provide information on cloud interstitial aerosols. The probe acquires spatial light scattering data from individual particles at throughput rates of several thousand particles per second. These data are logged at 100 ms intervals to allow the distribution and number concentration of each particle type to be determined with 10 m spatial resolution at a typical airspeed of 100 m s -1. Preliminary results from flight data recorded in altocumulus castellanus, showing liquid water phase, mixed phase, and ice phase are presented to illustrate the probe's particle discrimination capabilities.

  12. Supercooled Water Droplet Impacting Superhydrophobic Surfaces in the Presence of Cold Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an investigation of stagnation flow imposed on a supercooled water drop in cold environmental conditions was carried out at various air velocities ranging from 0 (i.e., still air to 10 m/s along with temperature spanning from −10 to −30 °C. The net effect of air flow on the impacting water droplet was investigated by controlling the droplet impact velocity to make it similar with and without air flow. In cold atmospheric conditions with temperatures as low as −30 °C, due to the large increase of both internal and contact line viscosity combined with the presence of ice nucleation mechanisms, supercooled water droplet wetting behavior was systematically affected. Instantaneous pinning for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was observed when the spread drop reached the maximum spreading diameter (i.e., no recoiling phase. Nevertheless, superhydrophobic surfaces showed a great repellency (e.g., contact time reduction up to 30% where air velocity was increased up to 10 m/s at temperatures above the critical temperature of heterogeneous ice nucleation (i.e., −24 °C. However, the freezing line of the impacting water droplet was extended up to 2-fold at air velocity up to 10 m/s where substrate temperature was maintained below the aforementioned critical temperature (e.g., −30 °C.

  13. A systematic experimental study on the evaporation rate of supercooled water droplets at subzero temperatures and varying relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberto, S.; Reutzsch, J.; Roth, N.; Weigand, B.

    2017-05-01

    Supercooled water droplets (SWD) are present in clouds at high altitude and subjected to very low temperatures and high relative humidity. These droplets exist in a metastable state. The understanding of the evaporation of SWD at these extreme conditions is of high interest to understand rain, snow, and hail generating mechanisms in clouds. This paper focuses on the experimental results of the measurements of the evaporation rates β of supercooled water droplets. For this purpose, single SWDs are trapped by means of optical levitation. During the evaporation process, the elastically scattered light in the forward regime is recorded and evaluated. Experiments have been performed for different relative humidities φ at three constant ambient temperatures, namely, {T_∞}=268.15; 263.15; 253.15 {{K}} ({t_∞} = -5; -10; -20°C). The experimental data agrees well with direct numerical simulations (DNS) carried out with the in-house code Free Surface 3D (FS3D) and shows that the use of a simplified model is permissible for these ambient conditions.

  14. Evaporative supercooling characteristics of single water droplet in ice-slurry production system with evaporative supercooled water%蒸发式过冷水制冰中单个水滴的蒸发过冷特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫俊海; 张小松

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the evaporation characteristics of single water droplet in low temperature and low humidity ratio air in ice production system with evaporative supercooled water, a mathematical model of evaporative supercooling process of single water droplet was proposed. The evaporation process of droplet in supercooling stage was simulated with theoretical model and the results are basically consistent with the experiment on suspended single water droplet, so it is feasible to predict the evaporative supercooling characteristics of small water droplet by the mathematical model. The influence of initial diameter and temperature of water droplet, air temperature, humidity ratio of air, and air velocity on the temperature of water droplet during its evaporative supercooling process was analyzed. The numerical results show that smaller diameter and lower temperature of water droplet and larger air velocity can increase the cooling rate of water droplet and shorten the supercooling time reaching steady state evaporation stage. Additionally, lowering the temperature or humidity ratio of air can not only improve the cooling rate of water droplet, but also increase the supercooling degree of water droplet reaching steady state evaporation stage. The investigation of evaporative supercooling process of water droplet can provide a foundation for improving the efficiency of ice production and optimal design for ice-making system with evaporative supercooled water.%为分析蒸发式过冷水制冰中单个水滴在此低温低湿空气环境中的蒸发特性,建立了水滴蒸发过冷过程的数理模型.通过悬挂水滴实验与模拟结果的对比,验证了模型的有效性.因此利用该数学模型预测微小直径水滴的蒸发特性是可行的.通过模拟计算获得了水滴初始直径、初始水温、空气温度、空气含湿量和空气流速对水滴蒸发过冷过程的影响.结果表明,水滴初始直径越小、温度越低或空气流速越大,

  15. Modeling of water droplet in super-cooling water evaporative system for ice slurry production%蒸发式过冷水制冰液滴蒸发结晶的模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马善军; 李鹏辉; 孔令健; 李少华; 韩吉田

    2016-01-01

    Ice storage technology is considered as one of the most promising options to achieve the so-called “peak load leveling of power system” and to relieve the contradiction between the supply and demand of peak power currently encountered in China. Among the ice-producing methods being developed around the world, the evaporative supercooling water ice-making one is a new and efficient way for ice slurry production of large scale without ice blockage. Therefore, it is of significant importance to investigate the heat and mass transfer characteristics during the cooling and crystallization process of water droplets in the evaporative supercooling water ice-making chamber to the development of practical ice-making system. In order to analyze the heat and mass transfer characteristics of water droplets in an evaporative super-cooling water system for ice slurry production, we proposed a mathematical model for the cooling and crystallization process of a single water droplet falling in the evaporation chamber with large space, which comprehensively took into account the three different zones of entire liquid phase, solid-liquid interphase and entire solid phase during the cooling and crystallization process of a water droplet. The developed mathematical model was then validated by use of the theoretical and experimental results presented in the available literature and satisfactory agreement was achieved in between the model simulation results and the research ones reported in the literature, indicating the correctness of the mathematical model. The parameter variations of the water droplet with changes in some of the key system operating variables, such as the inlet size and temperature of water droplet, the flow rate and relative humidity of the cold air, were numerically determined by solving the developed mathematical model. Effects of the inlet size and temperature of water droplet, inlet temperature, flow rate and relative humidity of the cold air in the

  16. Predictive Model of Supercooled Water Droplet Pinning/Repulsion Impacting a Superhydrophobic Surface: The Role of the Gas-Liquid Interface Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Morteza; Tembely, Moussa; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2017-02-28

    Dynamical analysis of an impacting liquid drop on superhydrophobic surfaces is mostly carried out by evaluating the droplet contact time and maximum spreading diameter. In this study, we present a general transient model of the droplet spreading diameter developed from the previously defined mass-spring model for bouncing drops. The effect of viscosity was also considered in the model by definition of a dash-pot term extracted from experiments on various viscous liquid droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Furthermore, the resultant shear force of the stagnation air flow was also considered with the help of the classical Homann flow approach. It was clearly shown that the proposed model predicts the maximum spreading diameter and droplet contact time very well. On the other hand, where stagnation air flow is present in contradiction to the theoretical model, the droplet contact time was reduced as a function of both droplet Weber numbers and incoming air velocities. Indeed, the reduction in the droplet contact time (e.g., 35% at a droplet Weber number of up to 140) was justified by the presence of a formed thin air layer underneath the impacting drop on the superhydrophobic surface (i.e., full slip condition). Finally, the droplet wetting model was also further developed to account for low temperature through the incorporation of classical nucleation theory. Homogeneous ice nucleation was integrated into the model through the concept of the reduction of the supercooled water drop surface tension as a function of the gas-liquid interface temperature, which was directly correlated with the Nusselt number of incoming air flow. It was shown that the experimental results was qualitatively predicted by the proposed model under all supercooling conditions (i.e., from -10 to -30 °C).

  17. Measurements of electric charge separated during the formation of rime by the accretion of supercooled droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Avila

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In these experiments, the electric charge carried by single particles ejected from the surface of a graupel particle growing by riming was measured. Simulated graupel pellets were grown by accretion of supercooled water drops, at temperatures ranging from −2 to −10°C in a wind tunnel at air velocities between 5 and 10 m s−1, with the goal of studying the charging of graupel pellets under conditions of secondary ice crystal production (Hallett-Mossop mechanism. The graupel, and induction rings upstream and downstream of the graupel, were connected to electrometers and analyzing circuits of sufficient sensitivity and speed to measure, correlate and display individual charging events. The results suggest that fewer than 1% of the ejected particles carry a measurable electric charge (>2 fC. Further, it was observed that the graupel pellets acquire a positive charge and the average charge of a single splinter ejected is −14 fC. This mechanism of ejection of charged particles seems adequate to account for a positive charge of around 1 pC that individual precipitation particles of mm-size could acquire in the lower part of the cloud, which in turn could contribute to the lower positive charge region of thunderstorms.

  18. 单个水滴蒸发过冷过程的特性分析%Characteristic analysis of single water droplet in evaporative supercooled process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫俊海; 张小松; 周斌

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the movement and evaporation characteristics of single water droplet in low temperature and low humidity ratio air, a mathematical model of water droplet heat and mass transfer and movement process was proposed. The evaporation process of droplet in supercooled stage was simulated through theoretical model, results from modeling basically tally with experiment of hanging single water droplet. The temperature, diameter, velocity and trajectory of water droplet during evaporation and motion process and the influence of the initial parameters of droplet and air velocity were investigated. The numerical results show that at a certain spray angle and with same dropping height the smaller droplet diameter can shorten movement distance at horizontal direction and the super-cooled time of water droplet, meanwhile decrease the corresponding velocity of water droplet faster. The lower initial temperature of water droplet or the higher velocity of air can improve the cooling rate of water droplet and the water droplet can be cooled to supercooled state in a very short dropping height. In addition, the higher the initial temperature of water droplet and the air velocity are, the faster the diameter of water droplet reduces. Thus, the precooled water droplets can not only improve the ice-making efficiency but also reduce the evaporative loss of water droplet.%为分析单个水滴在低温、低湿空气中的运动和蒸发特性,建立了描述整个传热传质及运动过程的数学模型,并通过对悬挂水滴的蒸发冷却实验验证了该模型的有效性.通过模拟计算获得了水滴温度、直径、速度和运动轨迹的变化规律,以及水滴初始参数和空气速度对制冰效率的影响.结果表明,水滴在某一喷射角度下,直径越小,同样的下落高度水滴水平飞行的距离越短,而相应的速度衰减则越快,同时水滴蒸发过冷所需的时间越短.另外,水滴初始温度越低和逆流空气速度越高,

  19. Eulerian method for super-cooled large-droplet ice-accretion on aircraft wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Many research has been done to provide scientists and aviation engineers with tools to predict ice accretions on in ight aircraft. The ice accretion problem is often sudden, its eects can be dramatic, leading to aircraft accidents with possible loss of lives. Until now this eld has been relatively s

  20. Nature of large aggregates in supercooled aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franses, E.I. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN); Davis, H.T.; Miller, W.G.; Scriven, L.E.

    1980-09-18

    Preparations of 2.0 and 5.5 wt % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in 3.5 wt % (0.6 M) aqueous NaCl are equilibrium micellar solutions above 28/sup 0/C, the Krafft point of the surfactant at this salinity. These systems can be supercooled and remain transparent for hours and days. At 25/sup 0/C at equilibrium they are biphasic, a hydrated crystal phase and an aqueous salt solution phase containing only 0.01/sub 2/ wt % SDS. Conductimetry and /sup 13/C NMR show that these transparent supercooled systems are indeed supersaturated solutions and not microdispersions of the hydrated crystal. The time lag for the onset of nucleation of the crystals depends strongly on stirring details and probably on presence of gas-liquid interface. The big nonequilibrium aggregates present in the supersaturated systems resemble micelles in conductivity and molecular motion, and are likely to be metastable micelles as is presumed by Mazer, Benedek, and Carey. 21 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  1. Supercooled liquids for pedestrians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    When we lower the temperature of a liquid, at some point we meet a first order phase transition to the crystal. Yet, under certain conditions it is possible to keep the system in its metastable phase and to avoid crystallization. In this way the liquid enters in the supercooled phase. Supercooled liquids have a very rich phenomenology, which is still far from being completely understood. To begin with, there is the problem of how to prevent crystallization and how deeply the liquid can be supercooled before a metastability limit is hit. But by far the most interesting feature of supercooled liquids is the dynamic glass transition: when the temperature is decreased below a certain point, the relaxation time increases so much that a dramatic dynamical arrest intervenes and we are unable to equilibrate the system within reasonable experimental times. The glass transition is a phenomenon whose physical origin has stirred an enormous interest in the last hundred years. Why does it occur? Is it just a conventional reference point, or does it have a more profound physical meaning? Is it a purely dynamical event, or the manifestation of a true thermodynamic transition? What is the correlation length associated to the sharp increase of the relaxation time? Can we define a new kind of amorphous order? A shared theory of supercooled liquids and the glass transition does not yet exist and these questions are still largely open. Here, I will illustrate in the most elementary fashion the main phenomenological traits of supercooled liquids and discuss in a very partial way a few theoretical ideas on the subject.

  2. Thermocapillary migration of a droplet with a thermal source at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zuo-Bing

    2014-01-01

    The {\\it unsteady} process for thermocapillary droplet migration at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers has been previously reported by identifying a nonconservative integral thermal flux across the surface in the {\\it steady} thermocapillary droplet migration, [Wu and Hu, J. Math. Phys. {\\bf 54} 023102, (2013)]. Here we add a thermal source in the droplet to preserve the integral thermal flux across the surface as conservative, so that thermocapillary droplet migration at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers can reach a {\\it quasi-steady} process. Under assumptions of {\\it quasi-steady} state and non-deformation of the droplet, we make an analytical result for the {\\it steady} thermocapillary migration of droplet with the thermal source at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. The result shows that the thermocapillary droplet migration speed slowly increases with the increase of Marangoni number.

  3. Coalescence and Break-up of large, deformable droplets with different viscoties in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco; Soldati, Alfredo

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of large, deformable droplets released in a turbulent channel flow is numerically analyzed. Pseudo-Spectral direct numerical simulations are based on the resolution of the coupled Navier-Stokes and Cahn-Hiliard equations (Phase-Field Model). The droplets have the same density but different viscosity compared to the surrounding fluid. We first focus on droplets coalescence and break-up rate. Two different dynamic are observed, depending on the Weber number We , (which measures the ratio between the inertial forces and the surface tension forces) and the viscosity ratio λ, (ratio between the viscosity of the drop and the continuous phase). For small We, droplets are only slightly deformed and their viscosity does not influence much the coalescence/break-up rate. For larger We, droplets are deformable and their viscosity can significantly alter the coalescence and break-up dynamics. PAR FSC 2007-2013, Regione FVG Underwater Blue Efficiency.

  4. Terminal states of thermocapillary migration of a planar droplet at moderate and large Marangoni numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zuo-Bing

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, thermocapillary migration of a planar droplet at moderate and large Marangoni numbers is investigated analytically and numerically. By using the dimension-analysis method, the thermal diffusion time scale is determined as the controlling one of the thermocapillary droplet migration system. During this time, the whole thermocapillary migration process is fully developed. By using the front-tracking method, the steady/unsteady states as the terminal ones at moderate/large Marango...

  5. Flow behaviour of emulsions containing small and large droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Steady flow and visco-elastic properties of kerosene-in-water and mineral oil-in-water emulsions were studied using a controlled-stress rheometer. Results showed that the viscosity, storage and loss moduli of kerosene-in-water and mineral oil-in-water increase substantially when droplet size is reduced. The emulsion became more elastic and shear-thinning. The minimum in viscosity occurs only at low shear stresses in both kerosene-in-water and mineral oil-in-water emulsions. 59 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  6. Development of injection gas heating system for introducing large droplets to inductively coupled plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburaki, Yuki; Nomura, Akito; Ishihara, Yukiko; Iwai, Takahiro; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi

    2013-01-01

    We developed an injection gas heating system for introducing large droplets, because we want to effectively to measure elements in a single cell. This system was applied to ICP-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), to evaluate it performance. To evaluate the effect of the emission intensity, the emission intensity of Ca(II) increased to a maximum of tenfold at 147°C and the peak was shifted upstream of the plasma. To investigate in detail the effect of an injection gas heating system, we studied different conditions of the injection gas temperature and droplet volume. When the injection gas temperature was 89°C, smaller droplets were easily ionized. At 147°C, the emission intensity ratio and the absolute amount of the sample including the droplet exhibited close agreement. These results show the advantages of the injection gas heating system for large droplet introduction, and the sufficient reduction in the solvent load. The solvent load could be reduced by heating to 147°C using the system.

  7. Effect of the Flow of Large Water Droplets on the Water Mist Sprays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beda László

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the velocity field generated by water droplets with relatively large diameter that has great effect on the movement of several orders of magnitude smaller particles. A CFD model, Fire Dynamic Simulator (FDS version 5.5.3 was used for the numerical simulation. The data obtained from the numerical studies are analysed.

  8. Large scale generation of micro-droplet array by vapor condensation on mesh screen piece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian; Xu, Jinliang; He, Xiaotian; Liu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a novel micro-droplet array system, which is based on the distinct three dimensional mesh screen structure and sintering and oxidation induced thermal-fluid performance. Mesh screen was sintered on a copper substrate by bonding the two components. Non-uniform residue stress is generated along weft wires, with larger stress on weft wire top location than elsewhere. Oxidation of the sintered package forms micro pits with few nanograsses on weft wire top location, due to the stress corrosion mechanism. Nanograsses grow elsewhere to show hydrophobic behavior. Thus, surface-energy-gradient weft wires are formed. Cooling the structure in a wet air environment nucleates water droplets on weft wire top location, which is more “hydrophilic” than elsewhere. Droplet size is well controlled by substrate temperature, air humidity and cooling time. Because warp wires do not contact copper substrate and there is a larger conductive thermal resistance between warp wire and weft wire, warp wires contribute less to condensation but function as supporting structure. The surface energy analysis of drops along weft wires explains why droplet array can be generated on the mesh screen piece. Because the commercial material is used, the droplet system is cost effective and can be used for large scale utilization.

  9. Large Scale Behavior and Droplet Size Distributions in Crude Oil Jets and Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Murphy, David; Morra, David

    2013-11-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout introduced several million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Injected initially as a turbulent jet containing crude oil and gas, the spill caused formation of a subsurface plume stretching for tens of miles. The behavior of such buoyant multiphase plumes depends on several factors, such as the oil droplet and bubble size distributions, current speed, and ambient stratification. While large droplets quickly rise to the surface, fine ones together with entrained seawater form intrusion layers. Many elements of the physics of droplet formation by an immiscible turbulent jet and their resulting size distribution have not been elucidated, but are known to be significantly influenced by the addition of dispersants, which vary the Weber Number by orders of magnitude. We present experimental high speed visualizations of turbulent jets of sweet petroleum crude oil (MC 252) premixed with Corexit 9500A dispersant at various dispersant to oil ratios. Observations were conducted in a 0.9 m × 0.9 m × 2.5 m towing tank, where large-scale behavior of the jet, both stationary and towed at various speeds to simulate cross-flow, have been recorded at high speed. Preliminary data on oil droplet size and spatial distributions were also measured using a videoscope and pulsed light sheet. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  10. Puddle jumping: Spontaneous ejection of large liquid droplets from hydrophobic surfaces during drop tower tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, B.; Weislogel, M.; Wollman, A.; Chen, Y.; Snyder, T.

    2016-10-01

    Large droplets and puddles jump spontaneously from sufficiently hydrophobic surfaces during routine drop tower tests. The simple low-cost passive mechanism can in turn be used as an experimental device to investigate dynamic droplet phenomena for drops up to 104 times larger than their normal terrestrial counterparts. We provide and/or confirm quick and qualitative design guides for such "drop shooters" as employed in drop tower tests including relationships to predict droplet ejection durations and velocities as functions of drop volume, surface texture, surface contour, wettability pattern, and fluid properties including contact angle. The latter is determined via profile image comparisons with numerical equilibrium interface computations. Water drop volumes of 0.04-400 ml at ejection speeds of -0.007-0.12 m/s are demonstrated herein. A sample application of the drop jump method is made to the classic problem of low-gravity phase change heat transfer for large impinging drops. Many other candidate problems might be identified by the reader.

  11. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of a liquid crystalline droplet with fast multipole implementations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.; Lupo, J.; Patnaik, S.S.; McKenney, A.; Pachter, R.

    1999-07-01

    The Fast Multipole Method (FMM) offers an efficient way (order O(N)) to handle long range electrostatic interactions, thus enabling more realistic molecular dynamics simulations of large molecular systems. The performance of the fast molecular dynamics (FMD) code, a parallel MD code being developed in the group, using the three-dimensional fast multipole method, shows a good speedup. The application to the full atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulation of a liquid crystalline droplet of 4-n-pentyl-4{prime}-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) molecules, of size 35,872 atoms, shows strong surface effects on various orientational order parameters.

  12. First Dark Matter Limits from a Large-Mass, Low-Background Superheated Droplet Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J.I.; Girard, T.A.; Limagne, D.; Miley, H.S.; Waysand, G.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the fabrication aspects and calibration of the first large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) modules of SIMPLE, a search for particle dark matter using Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs). While still limited by the statistical uncertainty of the small data sample on hand, the first weeks of operation in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt already provide a sensitivity to axially-coupled Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) competitive with leading experiments, confirming SDDs as a convenient, low-cost alternative for WIMP detection.

  13. The interaction of radio frequency electromagnetic fields with atmospheric water droplets and applications to aircraft ice prevention. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of computerized simulation of the physics of advanced microwave anti-icing systems, which preheat impinging supercooled water droplets prior to impact, was investigated. Theoretical and experimental work performed to create a physically realistic simulation is described. The behavior of the absorption cross section for melting ice particles was measured by a resonant cavity technique and found to agree with theoretical predictions. Values of the dielectric parameters of supercooled water were measured by a similar technique at lambda = 2.82 cm down to -17 C. The hydrodynamic behavior of accelerated water droplets was studied photograhically in a wind tunnel. Droplets were found to initially deform as oblate spheroids and to eventually become unstable and break up in Bessel function modes for large values of acceleration or droplet size. This confirms the theory as to the maximum stable droplet size in the atmosphere. A computer code which predicts droplet trajectories in an arbitrary flow field was written and confirmed experimentally. The results were consolidated into a simulation to study the heating by electromagnetic fields of droplets impinging onto an object such as an airfoil. It was determined that there is sufficient time to heat droplets prior to impact for typical parameter values. Design curves for such a system are presented.

  14. Black Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Black droplets and black funnels are gravitational duals to states of a large N, strongly coupled CFT on a fixed black hole background. We numerically construct black droplets corresponding to a CFT on a Schwarzchild background with finite asymptotic temperature. We find two branches of such droplet solutions which meet at a turning point. Our results suggest that the equilibrium black droplet solution does not exist, which would imply that the Hartle-Hawking state in this system is dual to the black funnel constructed in \\cite{Santos:2012he}. We also compute the holographic stress energy tensor and match its asymptotic behaviour to perturbation theory.

  15. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Westesen, K; Drechsler, M

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of preparing nanoparticles in the supercooled thermotropic liquid crystalline state from cholesterol esters with saturated acyl chains as well as the incorporation of model drugs into the dispersions was investigated using cholesteryl myristate (CM) as a model cholesterol ester....

  16. Supercooled Liquids and Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    In these lectures, which were presented at "Soft and Fragile Matter, Nonequilibrium Dynamics, Metastability and Flow" University of St. Andrews, 8 July - 22 July, 1999, I give an introduction to the physics of supercooled liquids and glasses and discuss some computer simulations done to investigate these systems.

  17. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Westesen, K; Drechsler, M

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of preparing nanoparticles in the supercooled thermotropic liquid crystalline state from cholesterol esters with saturated acyl chains as well as the incorporation of model drugs into the dispersions was investigated using cholesteryl myristate (CM) as a model cholesterol ester....

  18. mTORC1 signalling mediates PI3K-dependent large lipid droplet accumulation in Drosophila ovarian nurse cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B. Mensah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS, which is primarily mediated by the PI3-kinase (PI3K/PTEN/Akt kinase signalling cassette, is a highly evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in co-ordinating growth, development, ageing and nutrient homeostasis with dietary intake. It controls transcriptional regulators, in addition to promoting signalling by mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, which stimulates biosynthesis of proteins and other macromolecules, and drives organismal growth. Previous studies in nutrient-storing germline nurse cells of the Drosophila ovary showed that a cytoplasmic pool of activated phosphorylated Akt (pAkt controlled by Pten, an antagonist of IIS, cell-autonomously regulates accumulation of large lipid droplets in these cells at late stages of oogenesis. Here, we show that the large lipid droplet phenotype induced by Pten mutation is strongly suppressed when mTor function is removed. Furthermore, nurse cells lacking either Tsc1 or Tsc2, which negatively regulate mTORC1 activity, also accumulate large lipid droplets via a mechanism involving Rheb, the downstream G-protein target of TSC2, which positively regulates mTORC1. We conclude that elevated IIS/mTORC1 signalling is both necessary and sufficient to induce large lipid droplet formation in late-stage nurse cells, suggesting roles for this pathway in aspects of lipid droplet biogenesis, in addition to control of lipid metabolism.

  19. Oil droplets transport due to irregular waves: Development of large-scale spreading coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Ozgokmen, Tamay; King, Thomas; Lee, Kenneth; Lu, Youyu; Zhao, Lin

    2016-03-15

    The movement of oil droplets due to waves and buoyancy was investigated by assuming an irregular sea state following a JONSWAP spectrum and four buoyancy values. A technique known as Wheeler stretching was used to model the movement of particles under the moving water surface. In each simulation, 500 particles were released and were tracked for a real time of 4.0 h. A Monte Carlo approach was used to obtain ensemble properties. It was found that small eddy diffusivities that decrease rapidly with depth generated the largest horizontal spreading of the plume. It was also found that large eddy diffusivities that decrease slowly with depth generated the smallest horizontal spreading coefficient of the plume. The increase in buoyancy resulted in a decrease in the horizontal spreading coefficient, which suggests that two-dimensional (horizontal) models that predict the transport of surface oil could be overestimating the spreading of oil.

  20. Strain Pattern in Supercooled Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Hajnal, David; Klix, Christian; Keim, Peter; Fuchs, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    Investigations of strain correlations at the glass transition reveal unexpected phenomena. The shear strain fluctuations show an Eshelby-strain pattern [˜cos (4 θ ) /r2 ], characteristic of elastic response, even in liquids, at long times. We address this using a mode-coupling theory for the strain fluctuations in supercooled liquids and data from both video microscopy of a two-dimensional colloidal glass former and simulations of Brownian hard disks. We show that the long-ranged and long-lived strain signatures follow a scaling law valid close to the glass transition. For large enough viscosities, the Eshelby-strain pattern is visible even on time scales longer than the structural relaxation time τ and after the shear modulus has relaxed to zero.

  1. Design of ice-free nanostructured surfaces based on repulsion of impacting water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Taylor, J Ashley; Krupenkin, Tom; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2010-12-28

    Materials that control ice accumulation are important to aircraft efficiency, highway and powerline maintenance, and building construction. Most current deicing systems include either physical or chemical removal of ice, both energy and resource-intensive. A more desirable approach would be to prevent ice formation rather than to fight its build-up. Much attention has been given recently to freezing of static water droplets resting on supercooled surfaces. Ice accretion, however, begins with the droplet/substrate collision followed by freezing. Here we focus on the behavior of dynamic droplets impacting supercooled nano- and microstructured surfaces. Detailed experimental analysis of the temperature-dependent droplet/surface interaction shows that highly ordered superhydrophobic materials can be designed to remain entirely ice-free down to ca. -25 to -30 °C, due to their ability to repel impacting water before ice nucleation occurs. Ice accumulated below these temperatures can be easily removed. Factors contributing to droplet retraction, pinning and freezing are addressed by combining classical nucleation theory with heat transfer and wetting dynamics, forming the foundation for the development of rationally designed ice-preventive materials. In particular, we emphasize the potential of hydrophobic polymeric coatings bearing closed-cell surface microstructures for their improved mechanical and pressure stability, amenability to facile replication and large-scale fabrication, and opportunities for greater tuning of their material and chemical properties.

  2. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-28

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  3. Observations of ice multiplication in a weakly convective cell embedded in supercooled mid-level stratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Crosier

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of cloud microphysical properties were obtained by in-situ aircraft measurements and ground based Radar/Lidar. Widespread mid-level stratus cloud was present below a temperature inversion (~5 °C magnitude at 3.6 km altitude. Localised convection (peak updraft 1.5 m s−1 was observed 20 km west of the Radar station. This was associated with convergence at 2.5 km altitude. The convection was unable to penetrate the inversion capping the mid-level stratus.

    The mid-level stratus cloud was vertically thin (~400 m, horizontally extensive (covering 100 s of km and persisted for more than 24 h. The cloud consisted of supercooled water droplets and small concentrations of large (~1 mm stellar/plate like ice which slowly precipitated out. This ice was nucleated at temperatures greater than −12.2 °C and less than −10.0 °C, (cloud top and cloud base temperatures, respectively. No ice seeding from above the cloud layer was observed. This ice was formed by primary nucleation, either through the entrainment of efficient ice nuclei from above/below cloud, or by the slow stochastic activation of immersion freezing ice nuclei contained within the supercooled drops. Above cloud top significant concentrations of sub-micron aerosol were observed and consisted of a mixture of sulphate and carbonaceous material, a potential source of ice nuclei.

    Precipitation from the mid-level stratus evaporated before reaching the surface, whereas rates of up to 1 mm h−1 were observed below the convective feature. There is strong evidence for the Hallett-Mossop (HM process of secondary ice particle production leading to the formation of the precipitation observed. This includes (1 Ice concentrations in the convective feature were more than an order of magnitude greater than the concentration of primary ice in the overlaying stratus, (2 Large concentrations of small pristine columns were observed at the ~−5

  4. Temperature-dependent bouncing of super-cooled water on teflon-coated superhydrophobic tungsten nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khedir, Khedir R.; Kannarpady, Ganesh K.; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Woo, Justin; Asar, Madhu P. [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR, 72204 (United States); Ryerson, Charles [Terrestrial and Cryospheric Sciences Branch Cold Regions, Research and Engineering Laboratory, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Hanover, NH 03755-1290 (United States); Biris, Alexandru S., E-mail: asbiris@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR, 72204 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The bouncing mechanism of warm and supercooled water droplets with temperatures ranging from 20 °C to −10 °C on the surface of superhydrophobic (SHP) tungsten nanorods (WNRs), held at a constant temperature of −10 °C, was investigated. The measurements were carried out inside a chamber kept at a low relative humidity of 20%. A considerable energy loss was observed mainly due to the increase in the viscous forces of the supercooled water droplet. The increase in the values of the capillary number, as a result of the variation in both viscosity and surface energy of the supercooled water droplet, has confirmed the significant role of viscous forces in the dissipation of bouncing energy. However, the contact time and contact line evolution of the supercooled water droplet on the surface remained unaffected by the decrease in its temperature at constant humidity. The calculations of the bouncing restitution and dissipated energy at various water droplet temperatures, using classical mechanics, were also carried out.

  5. Rotating Rig Development for Droplet Deformation/Breakup and Impact Induced by Aerodynamic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, A.; Vargas, M.; Sor, A.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the development of a Rotating Rig Facility by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center. The facility is located at the INTA installations near Madrid, Spain. It has been designed to study the deformation, breakup and impact of large droplets induced by aerodynamic bodies. The importance of these physical phenomena is related to the effects of Supercooled Large Droplets in icing clouds on the impinging efficiency of the droplets on the body, that may change should these phenomena not be taken into account. The important variables and the similarity parameters that enter in this problem are presented. The facility's components are described and some possible set-ups are explained. Application examples from past experiments are presented in order to indicate the capabilities of the new facility.

  6. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Koch, Michel H J; Fahr, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    , laser diffraction combined with polarizing intensity differential scattering, DSC and SAXS. The morphology of selected formulations was studied by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. All smectic nanoparticles with a mixed cholesterol ester matrix were stable against recrystallization when stored...... in the bulk was studied by polarizing light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Colloidal dispersions with pure and mixed cholesterol ester matrices were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization and characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy...... administration of lipophilic drugs, the cytotoxicity of selected formulations was compared with that of a clinically used colloidal fat emulsion (Lipofundin MCT) in the murine fibroblast cell line L929 using the sulforhodamine B assay. The supercooled smectic nanoparticle formulations display a good overall cell...

  7. Damped and thermal motion of large, laser-aligned molecules in droplet beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodub, D; Doak, B; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Wu, J; Spence, J; Howells, M; Marcus, M; Shapiro, D; Barty, A; Chapman, H

    2005-09-29

    We consider a monodispersed Rayleigh droplet beam of water droplets doped with proteins. An intense infrared laser is used to align these droplets. The arrangement has been proposed for electron and X-ray diffraction studies of proteins which are difficult to crystallize. This paper considers the effect of thermal fluctuations on the angular spread of alignment in thermal equilibrium, and relaxation phenomena, particularly the damping of oscillations excited as the molecules enter the field. The possibility of adiabatic alignment is also considered. We find that damping times in high pressure gas cell as used in X-ray diffraction experiments are short compared to the time taken for molecules to traverse the beam, and that a suitably shaped field might be used for electron diffraction experiments in vacuum to provide adiabatic alignment, thus obviating the need for a damping gas cell.

  8. Freezing of water droplets colliding with kaolinite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Erik Anders; Delval, Christophe Eric Ludovic; Freiherr von Und zu Hessberg, P J H;

    2009-01-01

    Contact freezing of single supercooled water droplets colliding with kaolinite dust particles has been investigated. The experiments were performed with droplets levitated in an electrodynamic balance at temperatures from 240 to 268 K. Under dry conditions freezing 5 was observed to occur below 2...... studies to describe freezing rates are appropriate for kaolinite aerosol particles. Mechanisms for contact freezing are briefly discussed....

  9. Supersaturation calculation in large eddy simulation models for prediction of the droplet number concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Thouron

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new parameterization scheme is described for calculation of supersaturation in LES models that specifically aims at the simulation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activation and prediction of the droplet number concentration. The scheme is tested against current parameterizations in the framework of the Meso-NH LES model. It is shown that the saturation adjustment scheme based on parameterizations of CCN activation in a convective updraft over estimates the droplet concentration in the cloud core while it cannot simulate cloud top supersaturation production due to mixing between cloudy and clear air. A supersaturation diagnostic scheme mitigates these artefacts by accounting for the presence of already condensed water in the cloud core but it is too sensitive to supersaturation fluctuations at cloud top and produces spurious CCN activation during cloud top mixing. The proposed pseudo-prognostic scheme shows performance similar to the diagnostic one in the cloud core but significantly mitigates CCN activation at cloud top.

  10. Droplet-based microfluidic flow injection system with large-scale concentration gradient by a single nanoliter-scale injection for enzyme inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Long-Fei; Zhu, Ying; Du, Guan-Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2012-01-03

    We described a microfluidic chip-based system capable of generating droplet array with a large scale concentration gradient by coupling flow injection gradient technique with droplet-based microfluidics. Multiple modules including sample injection, sample dispersion, gradient generation, droplet formation, mixing of sample and reagents, and online reaction within the droplets were integrated into the microchip. In the system, nanoliter-scale sample solution was automatically injected into the chip under valveless flow injection analysis mode. The sample zone was first dispersed in the microchannel to form a concentration gradient along the axial direction of the microchannel and then segmented into a linear array of droplets by immiscible oil phase. With the segmentation and protection of the oil phase, the concentration gradient profile of the sample was preserved in the droplet array with high fidelity. With a single injection of 16 nL of sample solution, an array of droplets with concentration gradient spanning 3-4 orders of magnitude could be generated. The present system was applied in the enzyme inhibition assay of β-galactosidase to preliminarily demonstrate its potential in high throughput drug screening. With a single injection of 16 nL of inhibitor solution, more than 240 in-droplet enzyme inhibition reactions with different inhibitor concentrations could be performed with an analysis time of 2.5 min. Compared with multiwell plate-based screening systems, the inhibitor consumption was reduced 1000-fold.

  11. Development of an imaging method for quantifying a large digital PCR droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Yu; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    Portable devices have been recognized as the future linkage between end-users and lab-on-a-chip devices. It has a user friendly interface and provides apps to interface headphones, cameras, and communication duct, etc. In particular, the digital resolution of cameras installed in smartphones or pads already has a high imaging resolution with a high number of pixels. This unique feature has triggered researches to integrate optical fixtures with smartphone to provide microscopic imaging capabilities. In this paper, we report our study on developing a portable diagnostic tool based on the imaging system of a smartphone and a digital PCR biochip. A computational algorithm is developed to processing optical images taken from a digital PCR biochip with a smartphone in a black box. Each reaction droplet is recorded in pixels and is analyzed in a sRGB (red, green, and blue) color space. Multistep filtering algorithm and auto-threshold algorithm are adopted to minimize background noise contributed from ccd cameras and rule out false positive droplets, respectively. Finally, a size-filtering method is applied to identify the number of positive droplets to quantify target's concentration. Statistical analysis is then performed for diagnostic purpose. This process can be integrated in an app and can provide a user friendly interface without professional training.

  12. Hydrodynamic states in water below the temperature of the density maximum: the limit to supercooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elsken, J.; van Boom, L.; Bot, A.

    1988-01-01

    Spectra of fluctuations in the total intensity of laser light deflected by supercooled water show that even under carefully controlled conditions large samples give convection when cooled below -0%. This is in agreement with the Rayleigh versus Prandtlnumber relation for supercooled water.

  13. Response of the Nevzorov hot wire probe in Arctic clouds dominated by very large droplet sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schwarzenboeck

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During the airborne research mission ASTAR 2004 (Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation performed over the island of Svalbard in the Arctic a constant-temperature hot-wire Nevzorov Probe designed for aircraft measurements, has been used onboard the aircraft POLAR 2. The Nevzorov probe measured liquid water (LWC and total condensed water content (TWC in supercooled liquid and partly mixed phase clouds, respectively. As for other hotwire probes the calculation of LWC and/or TWC (and thus the ice water content IWC has to take into account the collection efficiencies of the two separate sensors for LWC and TWC which both react differently with respect to cloud phase and what is even more difficult to quantify with respect to the size of ice and liquid cloud particles. The study demonstrates that during pure liquid cloud sequences the ASTAR data set of the Nevzorov probe allowed to improve the quantification of the collection efficiency, particularly of the LWC probe part with respect to water. The improved quantification of liquid water content should lead to improved retrievals of IWC content. Simultaneous retrievals of LWC and IWC are correlated with the asymmetry factor derived from the Polar Nephelometer instrument.

  14. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  15. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  16. Metastable Demixing of Supercooled Cu-Co and Cu-Fe Alloys in an Oxide Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Williams, G.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study on the liquid separation in supercooled Cu-Co and Cu-Fe alloys was performed using a melt fluxing which permits high supercooling to be achieved. Moreover, this method renders it possible to directly measure binodal temperatures and establish metastable liquid miscibility gap (LMG). All phase-separated samples at compositions ranging from 10 to 80 wt pct Co or to 83 wt pct Fe were found to exhibit droplet-shaped morphologies, in spite of various droplet distributions. Uniformly dispersed microstructures were obtained as the minority component was less than 20 vol.%; while beyond this percentage, serious coarsening was brought about. Calculations of the miscibility gap in the Cu-Co system and Stokes movement velocity of Co and Fe droplets in Cu matrix were made to analyze the experimental results.

  17. Large and Small Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils and Two Simulated Ice Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Wong, See-Cheuk; Rachman, Arief; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2007-01-01

    Water droplet impingement data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for four wings and one wing with two simulated ice shapes. The wings tested include three 36-in. chord wings (MS(1)-317, GLC-305, and a NACA 652-415) and a 57-in. chord Twin Otter horizontal tail section. The simulated ice shapes were 22.5- and 45-min glaze ice shapes for the Twin Otter horizontal tail section generated using the LEWICE 2.2 ice accretion program. The impingement experiments were performed with spray clouds having median volumetric diameters of 11, 21, 79, 137, and 168 mm. Comparisons to the experimental data were generated which showed good agreement for the clean wings and ice shapes at lower drop sizes. For larger drop sizes LEWICE 2.2 over predicted the collection efficiencies due to droplet splashing effects which were not modeled in the program. Also for the more complex glaze ice shapes interpolation errors resulted in the over prediction of collection efficiencies in cove and shadow regions of ice shapes.

  18. The transient behavior of Peltier junctions pulsed with supercooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J. N.; Chen, H. X.; Jia, H.; Qian, X. L.

    2012-07-01

    There exists the transient thermoelectric supercooling effect that can be enhanced by keeping on increasing the Peltier cooling effect to compensate for the Joule heating effect and Fourier heat conduction effect arriving at the cold junction, in which a transient cold spike can be produced by superimposing an additional shaped current pulse of a large magnitude on the original steady-state optimum value. Most previous work on the transient supercooling mainly focused on the minimum supercooling temperature achievable and separately analyzed the beneficial or detrimental effects on the transient supercooling performance, which was not clarified quantitatively to what extent the interactional effects were on the enhancement of the transient supercooling performance. In this work, we systematically investigate a numerical solution involving time-dependent imposed voltage pulse and time-dependent thermal boundary conditions on the transient supercooling behavior as well as the response of characteristic time and cold-junction temperature distribution to the pulse operation parameters during the periods of pulse start-up, pulse-on time, and pulse-off time, which is served as a theoretical basis for exploiting the coupling interaction of the thermoelectric effects on the heat diffusion from or to the cold junction interrelated with the amount of the availably electrical conversion in the short time scale. Additionally, the advantage of certain pulse forms over others is described. The results indicate that Peltier supercooling capacity shows a decreasing monotonic trend in proportion to the total amount of electrical conversion, and the maximum coefficient of performance for cooling state is about 0.5 to be achieved at steady state. Taking advantage of the temporary Peltier effect focused electrical conversion as the additional cooling for a period long enough against the earlier arrival of the excessively Joule heating dominated heat accumulation is the key parameter

  19. Large amplitude motion of the acetylene molecule within acetylene-neon complexes hosted in helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, M; Mengesha, E; de Pujo, P; Gaveau, M-A; Soep, B; Mestdagh, J-M; Poisson, L

    2016-06-28

    Superfluid helium droplets provide an ideal environment for spectroscopic studies with rotational resolution. Nevertheless, the molecular rotation is hindered because the embedded molecules are surrounded by a non-superfluid component. The present work explores the dynamical role of this component in the hindered rotation of C2H2 within the C2H2-Ne complex. A HENDI experiment was built and near-infrared spectroscopy of C2H2-Ne and C2H2 was performed in the spectral region overlapping the ν3/ν2 + ν4 + ν5 Fermi-type resonance of C2H2. The comparison between measured and simulated spectra helped to address the above issue.

  20. Thermal conductivity of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-04-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37°C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, i.e., the ratio of the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. However, while the thermal conductivity is known to diverge at the vapor-liquid critical point due to critical density fluctuations, the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, calculated as the product of thermal diffusivity and heat capacity, does not show any sign of such an anomaly. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water and found that indeed any critical thermal-conductivity enhancement would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. Moreover, the behavior of thermal conductivity can be explained by the observed anomalies of the thermodynamic properties. In particular, we show that thermal conductivity should go through a minimum when temperature is decreased, as Kumar and Stanley observed in the TIP5P model of water. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the behavior of thermal conductivity in water near the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points.

  1. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed. PMID:28054600

  2. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed.

  3. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with phospholipids (PL) (Nuturis®; PL of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction origin) in early life protected against excessive body fat accumulation following a diet challenge in adult life. We now set out to determine the relevance of increased droplet size and/or MFGM lipid droplet coating to the observed anti-obesogenic effects in adult life. From day 16 to 42, male mouse pups were exposed to diets with small (S) or large (L) lipid droplets (0·3 v. 2·9 µm average mode diameter, respectively), either without MFGM or with MFGM coating around the lipid droplet, resulting in four groups: S (control diet), L, Scoating and Lcoating (Nuturis® IMF diet). Mice were subsequently challenged with a Western-style diet until dissection at postnatal day 98. A non-challenged group served as reference (REF). We repeatedly determined body composition between postnatal day 42 and 98. At day 98 plasma and gene expression measurements were performed. Only the Nuturis® IMF diet (Lcoating) in early life containing MFGM-coated large lipid droplets reduced body fat mass to a level comparable with the REF group. These data support the notion that the structural aspects of lipids in human milk, for example, both lipid droplet size as well as the MFGM coating, may contribute to its reported protective effect against obesity in later life.

  4. Can Suspended Iron-Alloy Droplets Explain the Origin, Composition and Properties of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Dorfman, S. M.; Labidi, J.; Zhang, S.; Manga, M.; Stixrude, L. P.; McDonough, W. F.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The enigmatic large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) identified by seismic tomography at the base of the Earth's mantle have been proposed to be reservoirs of primordial mantle composition tapped by hot spot volcanism. The LLSVPs are characterized by anomalously low shear wave speed, VS, slightly elevated bulk sound speed, VB, and high density, ρ, in piles as thick as 1000 km above the core-mantle boundary. This combination of properties could be explained by a few percent dense melt, but the solidus of the lower mantle silicate and oxide assemblage may be too high to produce melt over the large extent of these regions. Iron-rich sulfur-bearing alloy may be molten at the conditions of the LLSVPs and ~1-2% of this component could satisfy both constraints on VS and ρ. An Fe alloy phase in the LLSVPs also has the potential to explain geochemical anomalies associated with hot spot volcanism, and its existence can be constrained by geochemical mass balance. Primordial noble gases such as 3He would be preferentially dissolved in Fe-rich melt rather than crystalline silicates. The reconstructed abundances of the moderately siderophile/chalcophile elements S, Cu and Pb in iron-alloy-bearing LLSVPs do not exceed predicted losses from volatilization, though this depends on the S-content of the alloy. The alloy phase would also be expected to incorporate W, and W isotope anomalies associated with hot spots are thus expected to have important implications for the timing of LLSVP formation. We have developed a model, via CIDER-2014, for the origin and properties of LLSVPs incorporating geochemistry, mineral physics, and fluid dynamic constraints on the generation, capture, and thermoelastic properties of Fe-rich melt droplets. The solidification of a basal magma ocean would produce both solid silicates and metallic melt. The bulk of the alloy generated by this process would sink to merge with the core. However, once the density of the remnant liquid exceeds that of the

  5. Thermodynamic geometry of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Helge-Otmar; Mausbach, Peter; Ruppeiner, George

    2015-03-01

    The thermodynamic curvature scalar R is evaluated for supercooled water with a two-state equation of state correlated with the most recent available experimental data. This model assumes a liquid-liquid critical point. Our investigation extends the understanding of the thermodynamic behavior of R considerably. We show that R diverges to -∞ when approaching the assumed liquid-liquid critical point. This limit is consistent with all of the fluid critical point models known so far. In addition, we demonstrate a sign change of R along the liquid-liquid line from negative near the critical point to positive on moving away from the critical point in the low density "ice-like" liquid phase. We also trace out the Widom line in phase space. In addition, we investigate increasing correlation length in supercooled water and compare our results with recent published small angle x-ray scattering measurements.

  6. Food gels filled with emulsion droplets : linking large deformation properties to sensory perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.

    2007-01-01

    Key words: polymer gels, particle gels, emulsion, large deformation, friction, sensory

      This thesis reports studies on the large deformation and lubrication properties of emulsion-filled gels and the way these properties are related to the sensory perception of the gels. The des

  7. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J.; van der Beek, Eline M.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with

  8. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with p

  9. Observations of ice multiplication in a weakly convective cell embedded in supercooled mid-level stratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Crosier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of cloud microphysical properties were obtained by in-situ aircraft measurements and ground based Radar/Lidar. Widespread mid-level stratus cloud was present below a temperature inversion (~5 °C magnitude at 3.6 km altitude. Localised convection (peak updraft 1.5 m s−1 was observed 20 km west of the Radar station. This was associated with convergence at 2.5 km altitude. The convection was unable to penetrate the inversion capping the mid-level stratus.

    The mid-level stratus cloud was vertically thin (~400 m, horizontally extensive (covering 100 s of km and persisted for more than 24 h. The cloud consisted of supercooled water droplets and small concentrations of large (~1 mm stellar/plate like ice which slowly precipitated out. This ice was nucleated at temperatures greater than −12.2 °C and less than −10.0 °C, (cloud top and cloud base temperatures, respectively. No ice seeding from above the cloud layer was observed. This ice was formed by primary nucleation, either through the entrainment of efficient ice nuclei from above/below cloud, or by the slow stochastic activation of immersion freezing ice nuclei contained within the supercooled drops. Above cloud top significant concentrations of sub-micron aerosol were observed and consisted of a mixture of sulphate and carbonaceous material, a potential source of ice nuclei. Particle number concentrations (in the size range 0.1<D<3.0 μm were measured above and below cloud in concentrations of ~25 cm−3. Ice crystal concentrations in the cloud were constant at around 0.2 L−1. It is estimated that entrainment of aerosol particles into cloud cannot replenish the loss of ice nuclei from the cloud layer via precipitation.

    Precipitation from the mid-level stratus evaporated before reaching the surface, whereas rates of up to 1 mm h−1 were observed below the convective feature. There is strong

  10. Electro-optical response of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal single layers of large nematic droplets oriented by rubbed teflon nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Y. G.; Hadjichristov, G. B.; Petrov, A. G.; Marino, S.; Versace, C.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2013-02-01

    The surface orienting effect of rubbed teflon nanolayers on the morphology and electro-optical (EO) response of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) single layers of large nematic droplets was studied experimentally. In PDLC composites of the nematic liquid crystal (LC) E7 and NOA65 polymer, single droplets of LC with diameters as larger as 10 μm were confined in layers with a thickness of 10 μm, and the nematic director field was efficiently modified by nanostructuring teflon rubbing of the glass plates of the PDLC cell. For layered PDLCs arranged and oriented in this way, the modulated EO response by the dielectric oscillations of the nematic director exhibits a selective amplitude-frequency modulation controllable by both temperature and voltage applied, and is simply related to the LC droplet size. That may be of practical interest for PDLC-based modulators operating in the infrasound frequency range.

  11. Microfluidic devices for droplet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Akartuna, Ilke; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    As picoliter-scale reaction vessels, microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions have found application for high-throughput, large-sample number analyses. Often, the biological or chemical system under investigation needs to be encapsulated into droplets to prevent cross contamination prior to the introduction of reaction reagents. Previous techniques of picoinjection or droplet synchronization and merging enable the addition of reagents to individual droplets, but present limitations on what can be added to each droplet. We present microfluidic devices that couple the strengths of picoinjection and droplet merging, allowing us to selectively add precise volume to our droplet reactions.

  12. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  13. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  14. Fragile to strong crossover at the Widom line in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome, Italy and INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Corradini, D.; Rovere, M., E-mail: rovere@fis.uniroma3.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-28

    We study by molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical properties of an aqueous solution of NaCl at a concentration of 0.67 mol/kg upon supercooling. In a previous study of the same ionic solution, we have located the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) and determined the Widom line connected to the liquid-liquid transition. We present here the results obtained from the study of the self-intermediate scattering function in a large range of temperatures and densities approaching the LLCP. The structural relaxation is in agreement with the mode coupling theory (MCT) in the region of mild supercooling. In the deeper supercooled region the α-relaxation time as function of temperature deviates from the MCT power law prediction showing a crossover from a fragile to a strong behavior. This crossover is found upon crossing the Widom line. The same trend was found in bulk water upon supercooling and it appears almost unchanged by the interaction with ions apart from a shift in the thermodynamic plane toward lower pressures and higher temperatures. These results show that the phenomenology of supercooled water transfers from bulk to solution where the study of the supercooled region is experimentally less difficult.

  15. Fragile to strong crossover at the Widom line in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, P; Corradini, D; Rovere, M

    2013-11-28

    We study by molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical properties of an aqueous solution of NaCl at a concentration of 0.67 mol/kg upon supercooling. In a previous study of the same ionic solution, we have located the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) and determined the Widom line connected to the liquid-liquid transition. We present here the results obtained from the study of the self-intermediate scattering function in a large range of temperatures and densities approaching the LLCP. The structural relaxation is in agreement with the mode coupling theory (MCT) in the region of mild supercooling. In the deeper supercooled region the α-relaxation time as function of temperature deviates from the MCT power law prediction showing a crossover from a fragile to a strong behavior. This crossover is found upon crossing the Widom line. The same trend was found in bulk water upon supercooling and it appears almost unchanged by the interaction with ions apart from a shift in the thermodynamic plane toward lower pressures and higher temperatures. These results show that the phenomenology of supercooled water transfers from bulk to solution where the study of the supercooled region is experimentally less difficult.

  16. Radiative consequences of low-temperature infrared refractive indices for supercooled water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Rowe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cloud radiative properties for climate modeling and remote sensing rely on accurate knowledge of the complex refractive index (CRI of water. Although conventional algorithms employ a temperature independent assumption (TIA, recent infrared measurements of supercooled water have demonstrated that the CRI becomes increasingly ice-like at lower temperatures. Here, we assess biases that result from ignoring this temperature dependence. We show that TIA-based cloud retrievals introduce spurious ice into pure, supercooled clouds, or underestimate cloud thickness and droplet size. TIA-based downwelling radiative fluxes are lower than those for the temperature-dependent CRI by as much as 1.7 W m−2 (in cold regions, while top-of-atmosphere fluxes are higher by as much as 3.4 W m−2 (in warm regions. Proper accounting of the temperature dependence of the CRI, therefore, leads to significantly greater local greenhouse warming due to supercooled clouds than previously predicted. The current experimental uncertainty in the CRI at low temperatures must be reduced to properly account for supercooled clouds in both climate models and cloud property retrievals.

  17. Radiative consequences of low-temperature infrared refractive indices for supercooled water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Rowe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cloud radiative properties for climate modeling and remote sensing rely on accurate knowledge of the complex refractive index (CRI of water. Although conventional algorithms employ a temperature-independent assumption (TIA, recent infrared measurements of supercooled water have demonstrated that the CRI becomes increasingly ice-like at lower temperatures. Here, we assess biases that result from ignoring this temperature dependence. We show that TIA-based cloud retrievals introduce spurious ice into pure, supercooled clouds, or underestimate cloud optical thickness and droplet size. TIA-based downwelling radiative fluxes are lower than those for the temperature-dependent CRI by as much as 1.7 W m−2 (in cold regions, while top-of-atmosphere fluxes are higher by as much as 3.4 W m−2 (in warm regions. Proper accounting of the temperature dependence of the CRI, therefore, leads to significantly greater local greenhouse warming due to supercooled clouds than previously predicted. The current experimental uncertainty in the CRI at low temperatures must be reduced to account for supercooled clouds properly in both climate models and cloud-property retrievals.

  18. Swimming Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  19. Dancing Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on corona treated glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on clean glass surfaces. These droplets exhibit a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction or repulsion, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors, and propose a detailed model for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: passively sort droplets by surface tension, spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, and cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  20. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnel, M.; Kalinin, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fernández, J. M.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Montero, S. [Laboratory of Molecular Fluid Dynamics, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Tramonto, F.; Galli, D. E. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nava, M. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Computational Science, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI Campus, Via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI - Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH{sub 2}) or orthodeuterium (oD{sub 2}) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH{sub 2} and oD{sub 2} crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH{sub 2}-oD{sub 2} liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites.

  1. Chemical composition of ambient aerosol, ice residues and cloud droplet residues in mixed-phase clouds: single particle analysis during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamphus

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Two different single particle mass spectrometers were operated in parallel at the Swiss High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ, 3580 m a.s.l. during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6 in February and March 2007. During mixed phase cloud events ice crystals from 5 μm up to 20 μm were separated from large ice aggregates, non-activated, interstitial aerosol particles and supercooled droplets using an Ice-Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI. During one cloud period supercooled droplets were additionally sampled and analyzed by changing the Ice-CVI setup. The small ice particles and droplets were evaporated by injection into dry air inside the Ice-CVI. The resulting ice and droplet residues (IR and DR were analyzed for size and composition by two single particle mass spectrometers: a custom-built Single Particle Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT and a commercial Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS, TSI Model 3800. During CLACE 6 the SPLAT instrument characterized 355 individual ice residues that produced a mass spectrum for at least one polarity and the ATOFMS measured 152 particles. The mass spectra were binned in classes, based on the combination of dominating substances, such as mineral dust, sulfate, potassium and elemental carbon or organic material. The derived chemical information from the ice residues is compared to the JFJ ambient aerosol that was sampled while the measurement station was out of clouds (several thousand particles analyzed by SPLAT and ATOFMS and to the composition of the residues of supercooled cloud droplets (SPLAT: 162 cloud droplet residues analyzed, ATOFMS: 1094. The measurements showed that mineral dust particles were strongly enhanced in the ice particle residues. 57% of the SPLAT spectra from ice residues were dominated by signatures from mineral compounds, and 78% of the ATOFMS spectra. Sulfate and nitrate containing particles were strongly

  2. Experimental evidence for supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low temperature perchlorate glasses on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of liquid water on the cold and dry surface of Mars is possible where concentrated salt solutions lower the freezing point of water. The eutectic temperature is the maximum equilibrium freezing point depression possible for a given salt solution, which ranges from near 0°C for carbonates and sulfates, to as low as -75°C for perchlorates. Although eutectic temperatures suggest a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars, salt solutions will typically supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. We report on results investigating the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration for pure salt solutions and saturated soil solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. We measured supercooling by monitoring solution temperatures during slow cooling and warming experiments. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions typically supercool 5-15°C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the Martian summer. Remarkably, we found that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions never crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120°C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, which will induce crystallization in most salt solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are

  3. Dancing Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Cira, Nate J

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on clean glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on high energy surfaces. In this fluid dynamics video we show a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors including a mechanism for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface, and passively sort droplets by surface tension. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  4. Droplets Evaporation on Heated Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modes of evaporation in a wide range of droplet sizes and wall temperatures have been investigated in the present work. For any initial drop size there are three typical boiling regime: 1 the nucleate boiling; 2 the transitional regime; 3 the film boiling. The width of the transition region of boiling crisis increases with increasing the initial volume V0. Evaporation of large droplets at high superheat depends on the initial droplet shape.

  5. Droplets Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Dahan, Raphael; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to their capillary resonances (Rayleigh, 1879) and their optical resonances (Ashkin, 1977), droplets acoustical resonances were rarely considered. Here we experimentally excite, for the first time, the acoustical resonances of a droplet that relies on sound instead of capillary waves. Droplets vibrations at 37 MHz rates and 100 quality factor are optically excited and interrogated at an optical threshold of 68 microWatt. Our vibrations span a spectral band that is 1000 times higher when compared with drops previously-studied capillary vibration.

  6. Surface Crystallization of Cloud Droplets: Implications for Climate Change and Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Djikaev, Y. S.; Reiss, H.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The process of supercooled liquid water crystallization into ice is still not well understood. Current experimental data on homogeneous freezing rates of ice nucleation in supercooled water droplets show considerable scatter. For example, at -33 C, the reported freezing nucleation rates vary by as much as 5 orders of magnitude, which is well outside the range of measurement uncertainties. Until now, experimental data on the freezing of supercooled water has been analyzed under the assumption that nucleation of ice took place in the interior volume of a water droplet. Here, the same data is reanalyzed assuming that the nucleation occurred "pseudoheterogeneously" at the air (or oil)-liquid water interface of the droplet. Our analysis suggest that the scatter in the nucleation data can be explained by two main factors. First, the current assumption that nucleation occurs solely inside the volume of a water droplet is incorrect. Second, because the nucleation process most likely occurs on the surface, the rates of nuclei formation could differ vastly when oil or air interfaces are involved. Our results suggest that ice freezing in clouds may initiate on droplet surfaces and such a process can allow for low amounts of liquid water (approx. 0.002 g per cubic meters) to remain supercooled down to -40 C as observed in the atmosphere.

  7. The Influence of Constitutional Supercooling on the Distribution of Te-particles in Melt-Grown CZT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Alvine, Kyle J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bliss, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Jean A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-03

    A section of a vertical gradient freeze Cd0.9Zn0.1Te boule approximately 2100-mm3 with a planar area of 300-mm2 was prepared and examined using transmitted IR microscopy at various magnifications to determine the three-dimensional spatial and size distributions of Te-particles over large longitudinal and radial length scales. Te-particle density distributions were determined as a function of longitudinal and radial positions in these strips and exhibited a multi-modal lognormal size density distribution that indicated a slight preference for increasing size with longitudinal growth time, while showing a pronounced cellular network structure. Higher magnification images revealed a typical Rayleigh-instability pearl string morphology with large and small satellite droplets. This study includes solidification experiments in small crucibles of 30:70 mixtures of Cd:Te performed over a wide range of cooling rates that clearly demonstrated a growth instability with Te-particle capture that is suggested to be responsible for one of the peaks in the size distribution using size discrimination visualization. The results are discussed with regard to a manifold Te-particle genesis history as Te-particle direct capture from melt-solid growth instabilities due to constitutional supercooling and as Te-particle formation from the breakup of Te-ribbons via a Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  8. Scaling Laws for Inter-droplet Ice Bridging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Saurabh; Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the dynamics of an ice bridge growing from a frozen droplet towards its neighboring supercooled liquid droplet. Experiments were done on a Peltier stage inside a humidity chamber with deposited or condensed droplets where the substrate temperature and ambient humidity could be controlled. Following a quasi-steady diffusion-driven model, we develop scaling laws to show how the growth rate depends on the substrate temperature, droplet sizes and inter-droplet distances over and above other environmental parameters such as air temperature and humidity. The growth rate as well as the success or failure of an ice bridge to connect to its neighboring liquid droplet depend on a nondimensional number called the separation parameter S*, defined as the ratio of the initial inter-droplet spacing to the diameter of the evaporating liquid droplet. It is shown that the maximum value of S* for connection scales as 1 as long as frozen drop is larger than the liquid droplet. For the converse case of a larger water drop, there are at least three separate regimes of critical S*, depending on whether the water drop is a puddle, a spherical cap or if the frozen drop is a puddle.

  9. Impact of blood droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Laan

    2015-01-01

    Within Bloodstain Pattern Analysis, forensic experts commonly use the stringing method, based on a straight line approximation of the blood droplets trajectories to determine where the source of a bloodstain pattern was. However, by ignoring gravity, large errors may arise when inferring the 3D-loca

  10. Significance of droplet-droplet interactions in droplet streams: Atmospheric to supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Corinne Shirley

    In an effort to optimize liquid fuel combustion a considerable amount of research has been directed towards the atomization of large liquid masses into small droplets to increase the surface area available for vaporization. The current work uses a single linear array of moving droplets of uniform size and spacing to investigate the behavior of interacting droplets. A series of experiments, over a range of ambient conditions, demonstrate how a lead droplet alters the environment experienced by its trailing neighbor. This behavior is of particular interest for droplet groups under high pressure and temperature, where experimental data has been limited. Gas phase velocity and vapor concentration measurements show that as the space between adjacent droplets decreases entrainment of fluid towards the axis of motion is reduced. Trapped gases create a gaseous cylinder, composed of ambient gas and fuel vapor, which surrounds and moves with the droplet stream. As ambient pressure increase, the oscillatory behavior of the lead droplet wake begins to interfere with its trailing neighbor. Loss of stream stability and enhanced droplet stripping in part result from these oscillating wakes. However, acceleration of droplet stripping is mainly produced by liquid and gas density similarity, which increases the centrifugal stress and the growth rate of capillary waves. Further, injection of subcritical droplets into an ambient environment at temperatures and pressures above the liquid droplet critical point shows behavior not greatly different from the results obtained at high ambient pressures. The similarity results from thermal heatup times exceeding the breakup times generated from the severe aerodynamics encountered at high ambient density and high liquid-gas relative velocities.

  11. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-10-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered.

  12. Gelation on heating of supercooled gelatin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigo, Nathanaël; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas; Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2012-04-23

    Diluted (1.0-1.5 wt%) aqueous gelatin solutions have been cooled to -10 °C at a cooling rate 20 °C min(-1) without freezing and detectable gelation. When heated at a constant heating rate (0.5 -2 °C min(-1)), the obtained supercooled solutions demonstrate an atypical process of gelation that has been characterized by regular and stochastically modulated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as well as by isoconversional kinetic analysis. The process is detectable as an exothermic peak in the total heat flow of regular DSC and in the nonreversing heat flow of stochastically modulated DSC. Isoconversional kinetic analysis applied to DSC data reveals that the effective activation energy of the process increases from approximately 75 to 200 kJ mol(-1) as a supercooled solution transforms to gel on continuous heating.

  13. Coalescence-induced droplet actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Verdier, Claude; Nock, Volker

    2011-11-01

    This work investigates a little explored driving mechanism to actuate droplets: the surface tension gradient which arises during the coalescence of two droplets of liquid having different compositions and therefore surface tensions. The resulting surface tension gradient gives rise to a Marangoni flow which, if sufficiently large, can displace the droplet. In order to understand, the flow dynamics arising during the coalescence of droplets of different fluids, a model has been developed in the lubrication framework. The numerical results confirm the existence of a self-propulsion window which depends on two dimensionless groups representing competing effects during the coalescence: the surface tension contrast between the droplets which promotes actuation and species diffusion which tends to make the mixture uniform thereby anihilating Marangoni flow and droplet motion. In parallel, experiments have been conducted to confirm this self-propulsion behaviour. The experiment consists in depositing a droplet of distilled water on a ``hydrophilic highway.'' This stripe was obtained by plasma-treating a piece of PDMS shielded in some parts by glass coverslips. This surface functionalization was found to be the most convenient way to control the coalescence. When a droplet of ethanol is deposited near the ``water slug,'' coalescence occurs and a rapid motion of the resulting mixture is observed. The support of the Dumont d'Urville NZ-France Science & Technology program is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Droplet organelles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchaine, Edward M; Lu, Alice; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-08-01

    Cells contain numerous, molecularly distinct cellular compartments that are not enclosed by lipid bilayers. These compartments are implicated in a wide range of cellular activities, and they have been variously described as bodies, granules, or organelles. Recent evidence suggests that a liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) process may drive their formation, possibly justifying the unifying term "droplet organelle". A veritable deluge of recent publications points to the importance of low-complexity proteins and RNA in determining the physical properties of phase-separated structures. Many of the proteins linked to such structures are implicated in human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We provide an overview of the organizational principles that characterize putative "droplet organelles" in healthy and diseased cells, connecting protein biochemistry with cell physiology.

  15. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  16. The formation of supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low-temperature perchlorate glasses in aqueous solutions relevant to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-05-01

    Salt solutions on Mars can stabilize liquid water at low temperatures by lowering the freezing point of water. The maximum equilibrium freezing-point depression possible, known as the eutectic temperature, suggests a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars; however, salt solutions can supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. To investigate the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration, we performed slow cooling and warming experiments on pure salt solutions and saturated soil-solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. By monitoring solution temperatures, we identified exothermic crystallization events and determined the composition of precipitated phases from the eutectic melting temperature. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. In general, supercooling is greater in more concentrated solutions and with salts of Ca and Mg. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions investigated in this study typically supercool 5-15 °C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil-solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil-solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil-solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the martian summer. In contrast, we find that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions do not crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120 °C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are also

  17. Role of water vapor desublimation in the adhesion of an iced droplet to a superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M

    2014-10-28

    The study of the adhesion of solid and liquid aqueous phases to superhydrophobic surfaces has become an attractive topic for researchers in various fields as a vital step in the design of icephobic coatings. The analysis of the available results shows that the experimentally measured values of adhesion strength for superhydrophobic substrates, which in some cases are quite small, are still essentially higher than might be expected from the portion of the actual wetted area. In this study we have considered the peculiarities of the three-phase contact zone between sessile supercooled water or ice droplets and a superhydrophobic coating at negative temperatures (below 0 °C) and during the water-ice phase transition. Two types of superhydrophobic coatings with very different textures were used to analyze the evolution of shape parameters of a sessile water droplet during droplet cooling and freezing. It was shown that the evolution of the contact angle and droplet contact diameter of a water droplet deposited on a superhydrophobic surface does not undergo essential changes when the droplet is cooled simultaneously with the substrate and the surrounding environment, and the humidity is maintained close to 100% during the cooling process. However, the phase transition from supercooled water to ice droplets leads to the growth of a metastable iced meniscus and a frost halo in the vicinity of the three-phase contact zone. The meniscus effectively increases the area of adhesive contact between the droplet and the substrate. This phenomenon is intrinsically related to the release of the heat of crystallization and is responsible for the enhancement of adhesion to a superhydrophobic substrate upon droplet transition from supercooled water to ice. At the same time, it was shown that the metastable state of the above meniscus leads to its spontaneous sublimation during exposure at negative temperatures.

  18. Sophisticated compound droplets on fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Floriane; Lismont, Marjorie; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Droplets on fibers are part of our everyday lives. Indeed, many phenomena involve drops and fibers such as the formation of dew droplets on a spiderweb, the trapping of water droplets on cactus spines or the dyeing of cotton or wool fibers. Therefore, this topic has been widely studied in the recent years and it appears that droplets on fibers can be the starting point for an open digital microfluidics. We study the behavior of soapy water droplets on a fiber array. When a droplet slides along a vertical fiber and encounters a horizontal fiber, it can either stick there or continue its way. In the latter case, the droplet releases a tiny residue. We study the volume of these residues depending on the geometry of the node. By using this technique, a large number of small droplets can be trapped at the nodes of a fiber array. These residues can be encapsulated and collected by an oil droplet in order to create a multicompound droplet. Moreover, by using optical fibers, we can provoke and detect the fluorescence of the inner droplets. Fibers provide therefore an original way to study compound droplets and multiple reactions. F. Weyer is financially supported by an FNRS grant. This work is also supported by the FRFC 2.4504.12.

  19. Self-propelled droplet behavior during condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bei; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-05-01

    Self-propelled droplet motion has applications in various engineering fields such as self-cleaning surfaces, heat transfer enhancement, and anti-icing methods. A superhydrophobic surface was fabricated using two simultaneous chemical reactions with droplet condensation experiments performed on the horizontal superhydrophobic surface to characterize the droplet behavior. The droplet behavior is classified into three types based on their motion features and leftover marks as immobile droplet coalescence, self-propelled droplet jumping, and self-propelled droplet sweeping. This study focuses on the droplet sweeping that occurs due to the ultra-small rolling angle of the superhydrophobic surface, where the resulting droplet sweeps along the surface, merging with all the droplets it meets and leaving a long, narrow, clear track with a large droplet at the end of the track. An easy method is developed to predict the droplet sweeping direction based on the relative positions of the droplets just before coalescence. The droplet sweeping always absorbs dozens of droplets and is not limited by the surface structures; thus, this sweeping has many useful applications. In addition, the relationships between the droplet behavior and the number of participating droplets are also analyzed statistically.

  20. Influence of Nanoparticles and Graphite Foam on the Supercooling of Acetamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetamide is a promising phase change materials (PCMs for thermal storage,but the large supercooling during the freezing process has limited its application. In this study, we prepared acetamide-SiO2 composites by adding nano-SiO2 into acetamide. This modified PCM was then impregnated into the porous graphite foam forming acetamide-SiO2-graphite foam form-stable composites. These composites were subjected to melting-solidification cycles 50 times; the time-temperature curves were tracked and recorded during these cycles. The time-temperature curves showed that, for the acetamide containing 2 wt. % SiO2, the supercooling phenomenon was eliminated and the material’s performance was stable for 50 cycles. The solidification temperature of the acetamide-SiO2-graphite foam samples was 65°C and the melting temperature was lowered to 65°C. The samples exhibited almost no supercooling and the presence of SiO2 had no significant effect on the melting-solidification temperature. The microscopic supercooling of the acetamide-SiO2 composite was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The results indicated that when the content of SiO2 was 1 wt. to 2 wt. %, the supercooling could be reduced to less than 10°C and heat was sufficiently released during solidification. Finally, a set of algorithms was derived using MATLAB software for simulating the crystallization of samples based on the classical nucleation theory. The results of the simulation agreed with the experiment results.

  1. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  2. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  3. Bouncing of polymeric droplets on liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, S.; Dorbolo, S.; Terwagne, D.; Vandewalle, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of polymers on the bouncing behavior of droplets in a highly viscous, vertically shaken silicone oil bath was investigated in this study. Droplets of a sample liquid were carefully placed on a vibrating bath that was maintained well below the threshold of Faraday waves. The bouncing threshold of the plate acceleration depended on the acceleration frequency. For pure water droplets and droplets of aqueous polymer solutions, a minimum acceleration amplitude was observed in the acceleration threshold curves as a function of frequency. The bouncing acceleration amplitude for a droplet of a dilute aqueous polymer solution was higher than the acceleration amplitude for a pure water droplet. Measurements of the center of mass trajectory and the droplet deformations showed that the controlling parameter in the bouncing process was the oscillating elongational rate of the droplet. This parameter can be directly related to the elongational viscosity of the polymeric samples. The large elongational viscosity of the polymer solution droplets suppressed large droplet deformations, resulting in less chaotic bouncing.

  4. A maximum-entropy approach to the adiabatic freezing of a supercooled liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestipino, Santi

    2013-04-28

    I employ the van der Waals theory of Baus and co-workers to analyze the fast, adiabatic decay of a supercooled liquid in a closed vessel with which the solidification process usually starts. By imposing a further constraint on either the system volume or pressure, I use the maximum-entropy method to quantify the fraction of liquid that is transformed into solid as a function of undercooling and of the amount of a foreign gas that could possibly be also present in the test tube. Upon looking at the implications of thermal and mechanical insulation for the energy cost of forming a solid droplet within the liquid, I identify one situation where the onset of solidification inevitably occurs near the wall in contact with the bath.

  5. Compound droplet manipulations on fiber arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Floriane; Lismont, Marjorie; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    Recent works demonstrated that fibers are the basis of an open digital microfluidics. Indeed, various processes such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, releasing, mixing and encapsulation can be constructed on fiber arrays. However, addressing a large number of tiny droplets resulting from the mixing of several liquid components is still a challenge. Here we show that it is possible to manipulate tiny droplets reaching a high level of complexity. Wetting droplets are known to glide along vertical fibers. When a droplet reaches an horizontal fiber, it sticks at the crossing if capillary overcomes gravity. Otherwise, the droplet continues its way, crosses the node and leaves a tiny residue. Therefore, a vertical fiber decorated with a series of horizontal fibers will retain residual droplets at the successive nodes. An oil droplet, sliding on the vertical fiber, is able to collect the residues. Thus a multicompound droplet is created. The volume of the residual droplets has been studied and seems to be related to the diameters of both vertical and horizontal fibers. Moreover, the conditions under which the residues are released have been investigated in order to understand the formation of such a fluidic object. F. Weyer is financially supported by an FNRS grant. This work is also supported by the FRFC 2.4504.12.

  6. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration-Induced Single Droplet Ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Kai; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet atomization occurs when small secondary droplets are ejected from the free surface of a larger droplet placed on a vibrating membrane. To model a single ejection event, a liquid droplet is placed on a small piston and vibrated using an electromagnetic driver. The droplet oscillates in a characteristic mode shape that depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the properties of the liquid, and the size of the droplet. When the excitation amplitude is large enough, a small secondary droplet is ejected from the primary droplet. Observations of this process using high-speed digital video imaging show that droplet ejection occurs when a small liquid column or jet appears on the primary droplet and a secondary droplet forms on the column by a capillary-pinching mechanism. The liquid column or jet emanates from a crater in the primary droplet. As the driving frequency increases, this crater becomes smaller and the diameter of the ejected droplet decreases. We shall present results showing how the ejected droplet diameter and speed depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the liquid properties, and the primary droplet volume.

  7. Transport properties of supercooled confined water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, F.; Branca, C.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Gonzalez-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Stanley, H. E.; Chen, S.-H.

    2008-07-01

    This article presents an overview of recent experiments performed on transport properties of water in the deeply supercooled region, a temperature region of fundamental importance in the science of water. We report data of nuclear magnetic resonance, quasi-elastic neutron scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, studying water confined in nanometer-scale environments. When contained within small pores, water does not crystallise, and can be supercooled well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature Th. On this basis it is possible to carry out a careful analysis of the well known thermodynamical anomalies of water. Studying the temperature and pressure dependencies of water dynamics, we show that the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis represents a reliable model for describing liquid water. In this model, water in the liquid state is a mixture of two different local structures, characterised by different densities, namely the low density liquid (LDL) and the high-density liquid (HDL). The LLPT line should terminate at a special transition point: a low-T liquid-liquid critical point. We discuss the following experimental findings on liquid water: (i) a crossover from non-Arrhenius behaviour at high T to Arrhenius behaviour at low T in transport parameters; (ii) a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation; (iii) the existence of a Widom line, which is the locus of points corresponding to maximum correlation length in the p-T phase diagram and which ends in the liquid-liquid critical point; (iv) the direct observation of the LDL phase; (v) a minimum in the density at approximately 70 K below the temperature of the density maximum. In our opinion these results represent the experimental proofs of the validity of the LLPT hypothesis.

  8. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in Ni droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk; Demo, Pavel

    2017-10-01

    Crystal nucleation kinetics is often represented by induction times or metastable zone widths (Kulkarni et al., 2013; Bokeloh et al., 2011). Repeating measurements of supercooling or time delay, at which phase transition is detected, are statistically processed to determine the so-called survivorship function, from which nucleation rate is computed. The size distribution of nuclei is difficult to measure near the critical size directly, and it is not clear which amount of nuclei is formed at the moment when the phase transition is detected. In the present paper, kinetic nucleation equations are solved for the crystal nucleation in Ni liquid droplet to determine the number of nuclei formed within a considered system. Analysis of supercooling experimental data, based on the classical nucleation theory CNT), computes appropriate values of the nucleation rate. However, CNT underestimates the number of nuclei F (F ≪ 1 for supercritical sizes). Taking into account the dependence of the surface energy on nucleus size to data analysis overcomes this discrepancy and leads to reasonable values of the size distribution of nuclei.

  9. Compound droplet manipulations on fiber arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Weyer, Floriane; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Recent works demonstrated that fiber arrays may constitue the basis of an open digital microfluidics. Various processes, such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, release, mixing and encapsulation, may be achieved on fiber arrays. However, handling a large number of tiny droplets resulting from the mixing of several liquid components is still a challenge for developing microreactors, smart sensors or microemulsifying drugs. Here, we show that the manipulation of tiny droplets onto fiber networks allows for creating compound droplets with a high complexity level. Moreover, this cost-effective and flexible method may also be implemented with optical fibers in order to develop fluorescence-based biosensor.

  10. Raman Spectra and Nucleation Rates of Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Aerosols Supercooled with Respect to Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Koop, T.; Weers, U. G.; Krieger, U. K.; Peter, T.

    2001-12-01

    Sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles can serve as ice condensation nuclei for the formation of upper tropospheric cirrus clouds. These clouds influence the global radiation budget by scattering of short wavelength (solar) radiation as well as by absorbing long wavelength (terrestrial) radiation. Knowledge of the thermodynamics and the nucleation rates of aerosols is fundamental for the understanding of formation processes of cirrus clouds. Here, we present a new investigation tool to observe phase transitions of aerosols supercooled with respect to ice. Confocal Raman microscopy is used to determine the phase changes and the morphology of the particles. Raman spectroscopy is employed to distinguish and to characterize the different phases inside the frozen particles. Single droplets with a diameter of typically 20-120 μ m are deposited on a hydrophobically coated Herasil-plate that is covered by a spacer and another plate. Since the gas phase volume of the cell is small compared to the liquid droplet volume the composition of the droplets remains fixed during temperature changes. The temperature of the droplets can be varied between 150-350~K. We present the first Raman spectra of aqueous H2SO4/H2O and (NH4)2SO4/H2O droplets for several concentrations and temperatures to the homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The analysis of the speciation of the components inside the droplets (e.g. sulfate vs. bisulfate ions) is compared to results from thermodynamic models. Evaluation of the freezing data gives upper limits for ice nucleation rates of droplets as a function of sulfuric acid or ammonium sulfate concentration.

  11. The Common Occurrence of Highly Supercooled Drizzle and Rain near the Coastal Regions of the Western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Rasmussen, R M.; McDonough, Frank; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cazorla, Alberto; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-05

    The formation of highly supercooled rain was documented by aircraft observations in clouds at a wide range of conditions near the coastal region of the western United States. Several case studies are described in detail using combined cloud and aerosol measurements to document both the highly super-cooled condition and the relatively pristine aerosol conditions under which it forms. The case studies include: (1) Marine convective clouds over the coastal waters of northern California, as measured by cloud physics probes flown on a Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the CALWATER campaign in February and early March 2011. The clouds had extensive drizzle in their tops, which extended downward to the 0°C isotherm as supercooled rain. Ice multiplication was observed only in mature parts of the clouds where cloud water was already depleted. (2) Orographically triggered convective clouds in marine air mass over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the east of Sacramento, as measured in CALWATER. Supercooled rain was observed down to -21°C. No indications for ice multiplication were evident. (3) Orographic layer clouds over Yosemite National Park, also measured in CALWATER. The clouds had extensive drizzle at -21°C, which intensified with little freezing lower in the cloud, and (4) Supercooled drizzle drops in layer clouds near Juneau, Alaska, as measured by the Wyoming King Air as part of a FAA project to study aircraft icing in this region. Low concentrations of CCN was a common observation in all these clouds, allowing for the formation of clouds with small concentration of large drops that coalesced into supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Another common observation was the absence of ice nuclei and/or ice crystals in measurable concentrations was associated with the persistent supercooled drizzle and rain. Average ice crystal concentrations were 0.007 l-1 at the top of convective clouds at -12°C and 0.03 l-1 in the case of layer clouds at -21°C. In combination these

  12. Entropy-driven liquid-liquid separation in supercooled water

    OpenAIRE

    Holten, V.; Anisimov, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago Poole et al. (Nature 360, 324, 1992) suggested that the anomalous properties of supercooled water may be caused by a critical point that terminates a line of liquid-liquid separation of lower-density and higher-density water. Here we present an explicit thermodynamic model based on this hypothesis, which describes all available experimental data for supercooled water with better quality and with fewer adjustable parameters than any other model suggested so far. Liquid water a...

  13. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization --- A Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ashley; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1997-11-01

    The atomization of a liquid droplet placed on a vibrating membrane starts with the development of Faraday free surface waves. As the excitation amplitude increases, the waves grow in amplitude and ultimately begin to eject smaller secondary droplets from the wave crests. The rate of droplet ejection can be large enough to completely drain the primary droplet, an event we call bursting. The evolution of the droplet ejection process depends on a coupled system dynamic between the droplet and the membrane. When droplets are ejected the resonant frequency of the system increases. This changes the acceleration felt by the droplet and, in turn, the rate of droplet ejection. Depending on the excitation frequency and amplitude, various types of bursting or droplet ejection processes may occur. A simple, single degree-of-freedom model of this coupled system is presented. The model is used to illustrate the effect of the excitation frequency and amplitude and the initial droplet size on the acceleration of the membrane and the droplet ejection rate. The results of the model will be compared to our experimental data on droplet ejection. Additional work is directed towards an understanding of the mechanism behind the droplet ejection process.

  14. Modeling wet deposition of inorganics over Northeast Asia with MRI-PM/c and the effects of super large sea salt droplets at near-the-coast stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kajino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a regional-scale simulation (with grid spacing = 60 km over Northeast Asia for the entire year of 2006 by using an aerosol chemical transport model, the lateral and upper boundary concentrations of which we predicted with a global stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry-climate model, with a horizontal resolution of T42 (grid spacing ~300 km and a time resolution of 1 h. The present one-way nested global-through-regional-scale model is called the Meteorological Research Institute – Passive-tracers Model system for atmospheric Chemistry (MRI-PM/c. We evaluated the model performance with respect to the major inorganic components in rain and snow measured by stations of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET. Through statistical analysis, we show that the model successfully reproduced the regional-scale processes of emission, transport, transformation, and wet deposition of major inorganic species derived from anthropogenic and natural sources, including SO42−, NH4+, NO3, Na+ and Ca2+. Interestingly, the only exception was Na+ in precipitation at near-coastal stations (where the distance from the coast was from 150 to 700 m, concentrations of which were significantly underestimated by the model, by up to a factor of 30. This result suggested that the contribution of short-lived, super-large sea salt droplets (SLSD; D > 10–100 μm was substantial in precipitation samples at stations near the coast of Japan; thus samples were horizontally representative only within the traveling distances of SLSD (from 1 to 10 km. Nevertheless, the calculated effect of SLSD on precipitation pH was very low, a change of about +0.014 on average, even if the ratio of SLSD to all sea salt in precipitation was assumed to be 90%.

  15. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  16. Snell's law and walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John; Pucci, Giuseppe; Aubin, Benjamin; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Faria, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    Droplets walking on the surface of a vibrating bath have been shown to exhibit a number of quantum-like features. We here present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of such droplets crossing a linear step corresponding to a reduction in bath depth. When the step is sufficiently large, the walker reflects off the step; otherwise, it is refracted as it crosses the step. Particular attention is given to an examination of the regime in which the droplet obeys a form of Snell's Law, a behavior captured in accompanying simulations. Attempts to provide theoretical rationale for the dependence of the effective refractive index on the system parameters are described. Supported by NSF through CMMI-1333242.

  17. Dueling Mechanisms for Dry Zones around Frozen Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbano, Caitlin; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Ice acts as a local humidity sink, due to its depressed saturation pressure relative to that of supercooled water. Hygroscopic chemicals typically exhibit annular dry zones of inhibited condensation; however, dry zones do not tend to form around ice because of inter-droplet frost growth to nearby liquid droplets that have already condensed on the chilled surface. Here, we use a humidity chamber with an embedded Peltier stage to initially suppress the growth of condensation on a chilled surface containing a single frozen droplet, in order to characterize the dry zone around ice for the first time. The length of the dry zone was observed to vary by at least two orders of magnitude as a function of surface temperature, ambient humidity, and the size of the frozen droplet. The surface temperature and ambient humidity govern the magnitudes of the in-plane and out-of-plane gradients in vapor pressure, while the size of the frozen droplet effects the local thickness of the concentration boundary layer. We develop an analytical model that reveals two different types of dry zones are possible: one in which nucleation is inhibited and one where the net growth of condensate is inhibited. Finally, a phase map was developed to predict the parameter space in which nucleation dry zones versus flux dry zones are dominant.

  18. Detection and Analysis of High Ice Concentration Events and Supercooled Drizzle from IAGOS Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Martin; Baumgardner, Darrel; Lloyd, Gary; Beswick, Karl; Freer, Matt; Durant, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Hazardous encounters with high ice concentrations that lead to temperature and airspeed sensor measurement errors, as well as engine rollback and flameout, continue to pose serious problems for flight operations of commercial air carriers. Supercooled liquid droplets (SLD) are an additional hazard, especially for smaller commuter aircraft that do not have sufficient power to fly out of heavy icing conditions or heat to remove the ice. New regulations issued by the United States and European regulatory agencies are being implemented that will require aircraft below a certain weight class to carry sensors that will detect and warn of these types of icing conditions. Commercial aircraft do not currently carry standard sensors to detect the presence of ice crystals in high concentrations because they are typical found in sizes that are below the detection range of aircraft weather radar. Likewise, the sensors that are currently used to detect supercooled water do not respond well to drizzle-sized drops. Hence, there is a need for a sensor that can fill this measurement void. In addition, the forecast models that are used to predict regions of icing rely on pilot observations as the only means to validate the model products and currently there are no forecasts for the prevalence of high altitude ice crystals. Backscatter Cloud Probes (BCP) have been flying since 2011 under the IAGOS project on six Airbus commercial airliners operated by Lufthansa, Air France, China Air, Iberia and Cathay Pacific, and measure cloud droplets, ice crystals and aerosol particles larger than 5 μm. The BCP can detect these particles and measures an optical equivalent diameter (OED) but is not able to distinguish the type of particle, i.e. whether they are droplets, ice crystals, dust or ash. However, some qualification can be done based on measured temperature to discriminate between liquid water and ice. The next generation BCP (BCPD, Backscatter Cloud Probe with polarization detection) is

  19. Supercooled water in austral summer in Prydz Bay,Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jiuxin; CHENG Yaoyao; JIAO Yutian; HOU Jiaqiang

    2011-01-01

    Supercooled water with temperatures below freezing point, was identified from hydrographic data obtained by Chinese and Australian expeditions to Prydz Bay, Antarctica, during the austral summer. The study shows that most supercooled waters occurred at depths of 63-271 m in the region north of the Amery Ice Shelf (AIS) front. The maximum supercooling was 0.16℃ below the in-situ freezing point. In temperature and salinity ranges of-2.14 - -1.96℃ and 34.39--34.46, respectively,the water was colder and fresher than peripheral shelf water. The supercooled water had less variability in the vertical profiles compared to shelf water. Based on analysis of their thermohaline features and spatial distribution, as well as the circulation pattern in Prydz Bay, we conclude that these supercooled waters originated from a cavity beneath the AIS and resulted from upwelling just outside of the AIS front. Water emerging from the ice shelf cools to an extremely low temperature (about -2.0℃) by additional cooling from the ice shelf, and becomes buoyant with the addition of melt water from the ice shelf base. When this water flows out of the ice shelf front, its upper boundary is removed, and thus it rises abruptly. Once the temperature of this water reaches below the freezing point, supercooling takes place. In summer, the seasonal pycnocline at ~100 m water depth acts as a barrier to upwelling and supercooling. The upwelling of ice shelf outflow water illuminates a unique mid-depth convection of the polar ocean.

  20. Fractional Walden rule for electrolytes in supercooled disaccharide aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longinotti, M Paula; Corti, Horacio R

    2009-04-23

    The electrical conductivity of CsCl, KCl, Bu(4)NBr, and Bu(4)NI was studied in stable and supercooled (metastable) sucrose and trehalose aqueous solutions over a wide viscosity range. The results indicate that large positive deviations from the Walden rule occur in these systems due to the higher tendency of the ions to move in water-rich regions, as previously observed for NaCl and MgCl(2). The electrical molar conductivity viscosity dependence can be described with a fractional Walden rule (Lambdaeta(alpha) = constant), where alpha is a decoupling parameter which increases with ionic size and varies between 0.61 and 0.74 for all of the studied electrolytes. Using the electrical molar conductivity dependence of ion-ion interactions, an effective dielectric constant was calculated for a trehalose 39 wt% aqueous solution as a function of temperature. Above 278 K, the effective and the bulk solution dielectric constants are similar, but at lower temperatures, where the carbohydrate becomes less mobile than water, the effective dielectric constant approaches the dielectric constant of water. We also conclude that the solute-solvent dielectric friction contribution can be neglected, reinforcing the idea that the observed breakdown of the Walden rule is due to the existence of local microheterogeneities. The Walden plots for the studied ionic solutes show a decoupling similar to that found for the diffusion of water in the same solutions.

  1. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity of local free volumes in highly supercooled liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Hayato; Kawasaki, Takeshi

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the spatiotemporal behavior of local density and its relation to dynamical heterogeneity in a highly supercooled liquid by using molecular dynamics simulations of a binary mixture with different particle sizes in two dimensions. To trace voids heterogeneously existing with lower local densities, which move along with the structural relaxation, we employ the minimum local density for each particle in a time window whose width is set along with the structural relaxation time. Particles subject to free volumes correspond well to the configuration rearranging region of dynamical heterogeneity. While the correlation length for dynamical heterogeneity grows with temperature decrease, no growth in the correlation length of heterogeneity in the minimum local density distribution takes place. A comparison of these results with those of normal mode analysis reveals that superpositions of lower-frequency soft modes extending over the free volumes exhibit spatial correlation with the broken bonds. This observation suggests a possibility that long-ranged vibration modes facilitate the interactions between fragile regions represented by free volumes, to induce dynamical correlations at a large scale.

  2. Rebound of continuous droplet streams from an immiscible liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, William J.; Laiacona, Danielle M.; German, Guy K.; Chiarot, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the rebound of high velocity continuous water droplet streams from the surface of an immiscible oil pool. The droplets have diameters and velocities of less than 90 μm and 15 m/s, respectively, and were created at frequencies up to 60 kHz. The impact and rebound of continuous droplet streams at this scale and velocity have been largely unexplored. This regime bridges the gap between single drop and jet impacts. The impinging droplets create a divot at the surface of the oil pool that had a common characteristic shape across a wide-range of droplet and oil properties. After impact, the reflected droplets maintain the same uniformity and periodicity of the incoming droplets but have significantly lower velocity and kinetic energy. This was solely attributed to the generation of a flow induced in the viscous oil pool by the impacting droplets. Unlike normally directed impact of millimeter-scale droplets with a solid surface, our results show that an air film does not appear to be maintained beneath the droplets during impact. This suggests direct contact between the droplets and the surface of the oil pool. A ballistic failure limit, correlated with the Weber number, was identified where the rebound was suppressed and the droplets were driven through the oil surface. A secondary failure mode was identified for aperiodic incoming streams. Startup effects and early time dynamics of the rebounding droplet stream were also investigated.

  3. Microfluidic droplet generator with controlled break-up mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez, David Conchouso

    2017-04-13

    Droplet generation devices and systems that parallelize droplet generation devices are provided. The droplet generation devices can include a symmetric block-and-break system and a tapered droplet generation zone. The symmetric block-and-break system can include a pair of break channels and a pair of bypass channels symmetrically arranged with respect to the dispersed-phase input channel and the output channel. The droplet generation devices can generate monodisperse droplets with a predefined volume over a range of flow rates, pressures, and fluid properties. The droplet generation devices are therefore capable of parallelization to achieve large-capacity droplet generation, e.g. greater than 1 L/hr, with small overall coefficients of variation.

  4. Droplet sorting in a loop of flat microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Erfan; Herminghaus, Stephan; Brinkmann, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we numerically study the droplet traffic in microfluidic channels forming an asymmetric loop with a long and a short arm. The loop is connected to an inlet and an outlet channel by two right angled T-junctions. Assuming flat channels, we employ the boundary element method (BEM) to numerically solve the two-dimensional Darcy equation that governs two phase flow in the Hele-Shaw limit. The occurrence of different sorting regimes is summarized in sorting diagrams in terms of droplet size, distance between consecutive droplets in the inlet channel, and loop asymmetry for mobility ratios of the liquid phases larger and smaller than one. For large droplet distances, the traffic is regulated by the ratio of the total hydraulic resistances of the long and short arms. At high droplet densities and below a critical droplet size, droplet-droplet collisions are observed for both mobility ratios.

  5. Effects of PVA(Polyvinyl Alcohol) on Supercooling Phenomena of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Saito, Akio; Okawa, Seiji; Takizawa, Hiroshi

    In this paper, effects of polymer additive on supercooling of water were investigated experimentally. Poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) were used as the polymer, and the samples were prepared by dissolving PVA in ultra pure water. Concentration, degree of polymerization and saponification of PVA were varied as the experimental parameters. The sample was cooled, and the temperature at the instant when ice appears was measured. Since freezing of supercooled water is statistical phenomenon, many experiments were carried out and average degrees of supercooling were obtained for each experimental condition. As the result, it was found that PVA affects nucleation of supercooling and the degree of supercooling increases by adding the PVA. Especially, it is found that the average degree of supercooling increases and the standard deviation of average degree of supercooling decreases with increase of degree of saponification of PVA. However, the average degree of supercooling are independent of the degree of polymerization of PVA in the range of this study.

  6. Analysis of coalescence behavior for compressed droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Woong; Lee, Dong Eon; Lee, Woo Il; Kim, Han Sang

    2017-03-01

    Coalescence of droplets is a significant phenomenon, and it has been adapted to many applications such as raindrop formation, emulsion polymerization, ink-jet printing, coating, and multiphase flows. In this study, the morphological characteristics of two compressed adjacent droplets between two parallel plates were investigated to study the phenomenon of coalescence of droplets. By controlling the distance of the dispensed droplets, various results for coalescence of droplets were evaluated, especially, from the view of the minor axis, major axis, and meniscus liquid bridge of the coalesced droplet. Experimental results show that the length of the meniscus liquid bridge rapidly increases and then the rate of increase slows with time. The increase rate of the major and minor axes is largely influenced by the meniscus liquid bridge, which is mainly due to the curvature between the droplets. The numerical modeling of the coalescence of the two compressed droplets between two parallel plates was presented and simulation was conducted to realize the coalescence behavior. Comparison with numerical simulation showed that there was a good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Heterogeneous freezing of single sulphuric acid solution droplets: laboratory experiments utilising an acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettner, M.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2004-03-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of single binary sulphuric acid solution droplets were measured in dependency of acid concentration down to temperatures as low as -70°C. In order to avoid influence of supporting substrates on the freezing characteristics, the droplets were suspended by means of an acoustic levitator. The droplets contained immersed particles of graphite, kaolin or montmorillonite in order to study the influence of the presence of such contamination on the freezing temperature. The radii of the suspended droplets spanned the range between 0,4 and 1,1 mm and the concentration of the sulphuric acid solution varied between 5 and 25 weight percent. The presence of the particles in the solution raises the freezing temperature with respect to homogeneous freezing of these solution droplets. The pure solution droplets can be supercooled up to 40° below the ice-acid solution thermodynamic equilibrium curve. Depending on the concentration of sulphuric acid and the nature of the impurity the polluted droplets froze between -11°C and -35°C. The experimental set-up, combining a deep freezer with a movable ultrasonic levitator and suitable optics, proved to be a useful approach for such investigations on individual droplets.

  8. Heterogeneous freezing of water droplets containing kaolinite and montmorillonite particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Clouds composed of both ice particles and supercooled liquid water droplets exist at temperatures above ~236 K. These mixed phase clouds, which strongly impact climate, are very sensitive to the presence of solid particles that can catalyse freezing. In this paper we describe experiments to determine the rate at which kaolinite and montmorillonite nucleate ice when immersed within water droplets. These are the first immersion mode experiments in which the ice nucleating ability of individual minerals has been determined quantitatively. Water droplets containing a known amount of clay mineral were supported on a hydrophobic surface and cooled at a rate of 10 K min−1. The temperatures at which individual 10–40 μm diameter droplets froze were determined by optical microscopy. As the concentration of kaolinite in the droplets was increased from 0.005 wt% to 1 wt% the median nucleation temperature increased from close to the homogeneous nucleation limit (236 K to 240.8±0.6 K. We go onto show that the probability of freezing scales with surface area of the kaolinite inclusions rather than, as is often assumed, the volume of the droplet. When droplets contained montmorillonite ice always nucleated at 245.8±0.6 K, independent of the mineral concentration. We report temperature dependent nucleation rates and present parameterisations for nucleation by these minerals which capture the surface area and cooling rate dependence of the nucleation rate. We show that our parameterisations produce significantly different results to parameterisations employed in global models. These results also highlight the importance of understanding the ice nucleating properties of individual minerals rather than complex mixtures of minerals found in natural dusts and so-called test dusts.

  9. Supercooling across first-order phase transitions in vortex matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Chaddah; S B Roy

    2000-06-01

    Hysteresis in cycling through first-order phase transitions in vortex matter, akin to the well-studied phenomenon of supercooling of water, has been discussed in literature. Hysteresis can be seen while varying either temperature or magnetic field (and thus the density of vortices). Our recent work on phase transitions with two control variables shows that the observable region of metastability of the supercooled phase would depend on the path followed in - space, and will be larger when is lowered at constant compared to the case when is lowered at constant . We discuss the effect of isothermal field variations on metastable supercooled states produced by field-cooling. This path dependence is not a priori applicable to metastability caused by reduced diffusivity or hindered kinetics.

  10. On the potential energy landscape of supercooled liquids and glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodney, D.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The activation-relaxation technique (ART), a saddle-point search method, is applied to determine the potential energy landscape around supercooled and glassy configurations of a three-dimensional binary Lennard-Jones system. We show a strong relation between the distribution of activation energies...... around a given glassy configuration and its history, in particular, the cooling rate used to produce the glass and whether or not the glass was plastically deformed prior to sampling. We also compare the thermally activated transitions found by ART around a supercooled configuration with the succession...... of transitions undergone by the same supercooled liquid during a time trajectory simulated by molecular dynamics. We find that ART is biased towards more heterogeneous transitions with higher activation energies and more broken bonds than the MD simulation....

  11. Dynamic Melting of Freezing Droplets on Ultraslippery Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Wang, Lingli

    2017-03-08

    Condensed droplet freezing and freezing droplet melting phenomena on the prepared ultraslippery superhydrophobic surface were observed and discussed in this study. Although the freezing delay performance of the surface is common, the melting of the freezing droplets on the surface is quite interesting. Three self-propelled movements of the melting droplets (ice- water mixture) were found including the droplet rotating, the droplet jumping, and the droplet sliding. The melting droplet rotating, which means that the melting droplet rotates spontaneously on the superhydrophobic surface like a spinning top, is first reported in this study and may have some potential applications in various engineering fields. The melting droplet jumping and sliding are similar to those occurring during condensation but have larger size scale and motion scale, as the melting droplets have extra-large specific surface area with much more surface energy available. These self-propelled movements make all the melting droplets on the superhydrophobic surface dynamic, easily removed, which may be promising for the anti-icing/frosting applications.

  12. Dynamics of droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohn, A.; Roth, N. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik der Luft- und Raumfahrt

    2000-07-01

    Intended to privide an up-to-date overview of the field, this book is also likely to become a standard work of reference on the science of droplets. Beginning with the theoretical background important for droplet dynamics, it continues with a presentation of the various methods for generating single droplets and regular droplet systems. Also included is a detailed description of the experimental methods employed in droplet research. A special chapter is devoted to the various types of droplet interactions without phase transition. A separate chapter then treats many examples of the possible phase transition processes. The final part of the book gives a summary of important applications. With its comprehensive content, this book will be of interest to all scientists and lecturers concerned with two-phase flow, spray technology, heterogeneous combustion, and aerosol science. (orig.)

  13. Thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Marco G.

    This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of the thermodynamic and dynamic behavior of liquid water. As liquid water is cooled down into the supercooled state, some regions of the sample show correlated molecular motion. Previously, only the translational motion has been the object of investigation. Given the importance of orientational dynamics for water, a question that naturally arises is whether the rotational molecular motion also shows heterogeneous dynamics. We show that the most rotationally mobile molecules tend to form clusters, "rotational heterogeneities", and we study their dependence upon observation time and temperature. Further, we show evidence that molecules belonging to dynamic heterogeneities are involved in bifurcated bonds. Since the presence of dynamic heterogeneities is increasingly important as the temperature is lowered, one would expect a signature of this phenomenon in dynamical quantities. We study the effect of dynamic heterogeneities on the origin of the breakdown of the Stokes--- Einstein and Stokes---Einstein---Debye relations for water. These relations link the diffusivity to temperature and viscosity. We study the separation of time scales of dynamic heterogeneities and the diffusive regime. We also consider different sets of mobility, slowest and fastest, for both translational and rotational heterogeneities. A long-standing problem in biology is the seemingly universal loss of biological activity of all biomolecules, a phenomenon termed the "protein glass transition". We explore the connection between the hypothesized liquid-liquid phase transition of water, and the protein glass transition. We find that the protein glass transition coincides with the crossing of the Widom line of hydration water. Many different scenarios have been proposed to rationalize water's thermodynamic anomalies. We study a tell model for water using the Wolff' cluster algorithm, which permits

  14. Catching proteins in liquid helium droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Kupser, Peter; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2010-01-01

    An experimental approach is presented that allows for the incorporation of large mass/charge selected ions in liquid helium droplets. It is demonstrated that droplets can be efficiently doped with a mass/charge selected amino acid as well as with the much bigger m$\\approx$12 000 amu protein Cytochrome C in selected charge states. The sizes of the ion-doped droplets are determined via electrostatic deflection. Under the experimental conditions employed, the observed droplet sizes are very large and range, dependent on the incorporated ion, from 10$^{10}$ helium atoms for protonated Phenylalanine to 10$^{12}$ helium atoms for Cytochrome C. As a possible explanation, a simple model based on the size- and internal energy-dependence of the pickup efficiency is given.

  15. Peculiar thermodynamics of the second critical point in supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, C E; Anisimov, M A

    2011-12-08

    On the basis of the principle of critical-point universality, we examine the peculiar thermodynamics of the liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water. We show that the liquid-liquid criticality in water represents a special kind of critical behavior in fluids, intermediate between two limiting cases: the lattice gas, commonly used to model liquid-vapor transitions, and the lattice liquid, a weakly compressible liquid with an entropy-driven phase separation. While the ordering field in the lattice gas is associated with the chemical potential and the order parameter with the density, in the lattice liquid the ordering field is the temperature and the order parameter is the entropy. The behavior of supercooled water is much closer to lattice-liquid behavior than to lattice-gas behavior. Using new experimental data recently obtained by Mishima [J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 133, 144503], we have revised the parametric scaled equation of state, previously suggested by Fuentevilla and Anisimov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 195702], and obtain a consistent description of the thermodynamic anomalies of supercooled water by adjusting linear backgrounds, one critical amplitude, and the critical pressure. We also show how the lattice-liquid description affects the finite-size scaling description of supercooled water in confined media.

  16. Hopping in a supercooled binary Lennard-Jones liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe

    1998-01-01

    A binary Lennard–Jones liquid has been investigated by molecular dynamics at equilibrium supercooled conditions. At the lowest temperature investigated, hopping is present in the system as indicated by a secondary peak in 4r2Gs(r,t), where Gs(r,t) is the van Hove self correlation function...

  17. Entropy calculations for a supercooled liquid crystalline blue phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, U [Physics Department, University of the West Indies, PO Box 64, Bridgetown (Barbados)

    2007-01-15

    We observed, using polarized light microscopy, the supercooling of the blue phase (BPI) of cholesteryl proprionate and measured the corresponding liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures. From these temperatures and additional published data we have provided, for the benefit of undergraduate physics students, a nontraditional example involving entropy calculations for an irreversible transition.

  18. Non-equilibrium solidification of undercooled droplets during atomization process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Shukla; R K Mandal; S N Ojha

    2001-10-01

    Thermal history of droplets associated with gas atomization of melt has been investigated. A mathematical model, based on classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation and volume separation of nucleants among droplets size distribution, is described to predict undercooling of droplets. Newtonian heat flow condition coupled with velocity dependent heat transfer coefficient is used to obtain cooling rate before and after nucleation of droplets. The results indicate that temperature profile of droplets in the spray during recalescence, segregated and eutectic solidification regimes is dependent on their size and related undercooling. The interface temperature during solidification of undercooled droplets rapidly approaches the liquidus temperature of the alloy with a subsequent decrease in solid–liquid interface velocity. A comparison in cooling rates of atomized powder particles estimated from secondary dendrite arm spacing measurements are observed to be closer to those predicted from the model during segregated solidification regime of large size droplets.

  19. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  20. Modeling of sea spray droplets in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jian-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplets are known to play an important role in momentum, heat, and moisture transfer between the ocean and atmosphere. A lot of scholars and experts aim to investigate the effects of droplets on the climate and make precise forecast for hurricane conditions. So the profiles of droplets concentration at different heights above the sea surface are important. For a better study of the momentum and energy transport among the boundary layer, we also need to know the distribution of droplets with different radii. After wave break, with the coupled effects of inertia, gravity, wind updraught, and turbulent mixing, droplets can be transported to certain heights above the sea surface. In the present study, we develop a modified subgrid-scale flow field model coupled with the large eddy simulation to investigate the profiles of spay droplets concentration after wave break. The results in our simulation show that, the distribution of the droplets with the same radii in vertical direction is roughly Gaussian distribution, and the maximum appears at the height nearly above the significant wave height. For different radii, the concentration of droplets with larger radii can be higher than that of the smaller ones at some heights. Since the droplets in our model only include the spay droplets generated by wave break, the data will not be identical with the measurement in the open ocean and laboratory, which include all the kinds of droplets above the ocean.

  1. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization --- An Experimental Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1997-11-01

    The atomization of a liquid droplet placed on a vibrating membrane starts with the development of Faraday free surface waves. As the excitation amplitude increases, the waves grow in amplitude and ultimately begin to eject smaller secondary droplets from the wave crests. The rate of droplet ejection can be large enough to completely drain the primary droplet, an event we call bursting. The evolution of the droplet ejection process depends on a coupled system dynamic between the droplet and the membrane. When droplets are ejected the resonant frequency of the system increases. This changes the acceleration felt by the droplet and, in turn, the rate of droplet ejection. Depending on the excitation frequency and amplitude, various types of bursting or droplet ejection processes may occur. In the present experiments, the high acceleration needed to attain ejection (typically 300g) is achieved by driving a light-weight membrane near its resonant frequency (nominally 1000 Hz). The resonant characteristics and the acceleration during the ejection process for various droplet sizes and excitation amplitudes are investigated using a surface-mounted microfabricated accelerometer and a laboratory computer system.

  2. Free energy of formation of small ice nuclei near the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhariwalla, Connor R C; Bowles, Richard K; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Sciortino, Francesco; Poole, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    The ST2 interaction potential has been used in a large number of simulation studies to explore the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in supercooled water. Using umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations of ST2 water, we evaluate the free energy of formation of small ice nuclei in the supercooled liquid in the vicinity of the Widom line, the region above the critical temperature of the LLPT where a number of thermodynamic anomalies occur. Our results show that in this region there is a substantial free-energy cost for the formation of small ice nuclei, demonstrating that the thermodynamic anomalies associated with the Widom line in ST2 water occur in a well-defined metastable liquid phase. On passing through the Widom line, we identify changes in the free energy to form small ice nuclei that illustrate how the thermodynamic anomalies associated with the LLPT may influence the ice nucleation process.

  3. Self-propelled droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Maass, Corinna C.

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled droplets are a special kind of self-propelled matter that are easily fabricated by standard microfluidic tools and locomote for a certain time without external sources of energy. The typical driving mechanism is a Marangoni flow due to gradients in the interfacial energy on the droplet interface. In this article we review the hydrodynamic prerequisites for self-sustained locomotion and present two examples to realize those conditions for emulsion droplets, i.e. droplets stabilized by a surfactant layer in a surrounding immiscible liquid. One possibility to achieve self-propelled motion relies on chemical reactions affecting the surface active properties of the surfactant molecules. The other relies on micellar solubilization of the droplet phase into the surrounding liquid phase. Remarkable cruising ranges can be achieved in both cases and the relative insensitivity to their own `exhausts' allows to additionally study collective phenomena.

  4. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  5. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar, E-mail: soundar@dalembert.upmc.fr; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme [Institut Jean Le Rond d' Alembert, UPMC Univ. Paris 06 and CNRS-UMR 7190, F-75005 Paris (France); Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire des Écoulements Géophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), Univ. Grenoble Alpes and CNRS - UMR 5519, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2013-11-15

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  6. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  7. Generation of live offspring from vitrified embryos with synthetic polymers SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Jimenez, F; Jimenez-Trigos, E; Lavara, R; Vicente, J S

    2014-01-01

    Ice growth and recrystallisation are considered important factors in determining vitrification outcomes. Synthetic polymers inhibit ice formation during cooling or warming of the vitrification process. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding commercially available synthetic polymers SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000 to vitrification media on in vivo development competence of rabbit embryos. Four hundred and thirty morphologically normal embryos recovered at 72 h of gestation were used. The vitrification media contained 20% dimethyl sulphoxide and 20% ethylene glycol, either alone or in combination with 1% of SuperCool X-1000 and 1% SuperCool. Our results show that embryos can be successfully vitrified using SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000 and when embryos are transferred, live offspring can be successfully produced. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that we succeeded for the first time in obtaining live offspring after vitrification of embryos using SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000 polymers.

  8. Motion and deformation of immiscible droplet in plane Poiseuille flow at low Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘定一; 林雨青; 张凌新; 邵雪明

    2016-01-01

    Droplet migration in plane Poiseuille flow is numerically investigated with a dissipative particle dynamics method. The single droplet deformation in the channel flow is first studied to verify the current method and the physical model. The effect of the viscosity ratio between the droplet and the solvent and the effect of the confinement are systematically investigated. The droplet is in an off-centerline equilibrium position with a specific selection of the parameters. A large viscosity ratio makes the droplet locate in a near-wall equilibrium position, and a large capillary number makes the droplet migrate to the near-centerline region of the channel. For the droplet migration at the same Capillary number, there is a critical width of the channel, which is less than twice of the droplet diameter, and the droplet will only migrate to the channel centerline if the width is less than this critical value.

  9. Ice-lens formation and geometrical supercooling in soils and other colloidal materials

    CERN Document Server

    Style, Robert W; Cocks, Alan C F; Wettlaufer, John S

    2011-01-01

    We present a new, physically-intuitive model of ice-lens formation and growth during the freezing of soils and other dense, particulate suspensions. Motivated by experimental evidence, we consider the growth of an ice-filled crack in a freezing soil. At low temperatures, ice in the crack exerts large pressures on the crack walls that will eventually cause the crack to split open. We show that the crack will then propagate across the soil to form a new lens. The process is controlled by two factors: the cohesion of the soil, and the geometrical supercooling of the water in the soil; a new concept introduced to measure the energy available to form a new ice lens. When the supercooling exceeds a critical amount (proportional to the cohesive strength of the soil) a new ice lens forms. This condition for ice-lens formation and growth does not appeal to any ad hoc, empirical assumptions, and explains how periodic ice lenses can form with or without the presence of a frozen fringe. The proposed mechanism is in good ...

  10. Growth rate of crystalline ice and the diffusivity of supercooled water from 126 to 262 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuntao; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-12-12

    Understanding deeply supercooled water is key to unraveling many of water’s anomalous properties. However, this has proven difficult due to rapid and uncontrolled crystallization. Using a pulsed laser heating technique, we measure the growth rate of crystalline ice, G(T), for 180 K < T < 262 K, i.e. deep within water’s “no man’s land.” The self-diffusion of supercooled liquid water, D(T), is obtained from G(T) using the Wilson-Frenkel model of crystal growth. For T > 237 K, G(T) and D(T) have super-Arrhenius (“fragile”) temperature dependences, but both crossover to Arrhenius (“strong”) behavior with a large activation energy in “no man’s land.” The fact that G(T) and D(T) are smoothly varying rules out the hypothesis that liquid water’s properties have a singularity at or near 228 K. However the results are consistent with a previous prediction for D(T) that assumed no thermodynamic transitions occur in “no man’s land.

  11. Waveguides for walking droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Filoux, Boris; Schlagheck, Peter; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    When gently placing a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath, a drop can bounce permanently. Upon increasing the forcing acceleration, the droplet is propelled by the wave it generates and becomes a walker with a well defined speed. We investigate the confinement of a walker in different rectangular cavities, used as waveguides for the Faraday waves emitted by successive droplet bounces. By studying the walker velocities, we discover that 1d confinement is optimal for narrow channels. We also propose an analogy with waveguide models based on the observation of the Faraday instability within the channels.

  12. Detection of supercooled liquid water-topped mixed-phase clouds >from shortwave-infrared satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOH, Y. J.; Miller, S. D.; Heidinger, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the utility of multispectral information from satellite passive radiometers for detecting and retrieving the properties of cloud globally, which conventionally utilizes shortwave- and thermal-infrared bands. However, the satellite-derived cloud information comes mainly from cloud top or represents a vertically integrated property. This can produce a large bias in determining cloud phase characteristics, in particular for mixed-phase clouds which are often observed to have supercooled liquid water at cloud top but a predominantly ice phase residing below. The current satellite retrieval algorithms may report these clouds simply as supercooled liquid without any further information regarding the presence of a sub-cloud-top ice phase. More accurate characterization of these clouds is very important for climate models and aviation applications. In this study, we present a physical basis and preliminary results for the algorithm development of supercooled liquid-topped mixed-phase cloud detection using satellite radiometer observations. The detection algorithm is based on differential absorption properties between liquid and ice particles in the shortwave-infrared bands. Solar reflectance data in narrow bands at 1.6 μm and 2.25 μm are used to optically probe below clouds for distinction between supercooled liquid-topped clouds with and without an underlying mixed phase component. Varying solar/sensor geometry and cloud optical properties are also considered. The spectral band combination utilized for the algorithm is currently available on Suomi NPP Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), Himawari-8 Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), and the future GOES-R Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). When tested on simulated cloud fields from WRF model and synthetic ABI data, favorable results were shown with reasonable threat scores (0.6-0.8) and false alarm rates (0.1-0.2). An ARM/NSA case study applied to VIIRS data also indicated promising

  13. Shear-accelerated crystallization in a supercooled atomic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhen; Singer, Jonathan P; Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Ze; Li, Huiping; Gopinadhan, Manesh; O'Hern, Corey S; Schroers, Jan; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2015-02-01

    A bulk metallic glass forming alloy is subjected to shear flow in its supercooled state by compression of a short rod to produce a flat disk. The resulting material exhibits enhanced crystallization kinetics during isothermal annealing as reflected in the decrease of the crystallization time relative to the nondeformed case. The transition from quiescent to shear-accelerated crystallization is linked to strain accumulated during shear flow above a critical shear rate γ̇(c)≈0.3 s(-1) which corresponds to Péclet number, Pe∼O(1). The observation of shear-accelerated crystallization in an atomic system at modest shear rates is uncommon. It is made possible here by the substantial viscosity of the supercooled liquid which increases strongly with temperature in the approach to the glass transition. We may therefore anticipate the encounter of nontrivial shear-related effects during thermoplastic deformation of similar systems.

  14. Slow dynamics of supercooled water confined in nanoporous silica materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Faraone, A [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mou, C-Y [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Yen, C-W [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, S-H [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2004-11-17

    We review our incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) studies of the dynamics of supercooled water confined in nanoporous silica materials. QENS data were analysed by using the relaxing cage model (RCM) previously developed by us. We first use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the extended simple point charge model (SPC/E) for bulk supercooled water to establish the validity of the RCM, which applies to both the translational and rotational motion of water molecules. We then assume that the dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of a hydrophilic surface is similar to a bulk water at an equivalent lower supercooled temperature. This analogy was experimentally demonstrated in previous investigations of water in Vycor glasses and near hydrophilic protein surfaces. Studies were made of supercooled water in MCM-41-S (pore sizes 25, 18, and 14 A) and MCM-48-S (pore size 22 A) using three QENS spectrometers of respective energy resolutions 1, 30, and 60 {mu}eV, covering the temperature range from 325 to 200 K. Five quantities are extracted from the analysis: they are {beta}, the stretch exponent characterizing the {alpha}-relaxation; {beta}{gamma}, the exponent determining the power-law dependence of the relaxation time on Q; <{tau}{sub 0}>, the Q-independent pre-factor for the average translational relaxation time; <{tau}{sub R{sub 1}}>, the relaxation time for the first-order rotational correlation function; and <{tau}{sub R{sub 3}}>, the relaxation time for the second-order rotational correlation function. We discuss the temperature dependence of these parameters and note that, in particular, the dynamics is rapidly slowing down at temperature around 220 K, signalling the onset of a structural arrest transition of liquid water into an amorphous solid water.

  15. Volume analysis of supercooled water under high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Duki, Solomon F.; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental findings on the volume of supercooled water at high pressure [O. Mishima, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144503 (2010)] we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations study of bulk water in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. Cooling and heating cycles at different isobars and isothermal compression at different temperatures are performed on the water sample with pressures that range from 0 to 1.0 GPa. The cooling simulations are done at temperatures that range from...

  16. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-09-01

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces have emerged. Specifically, when two droplets coalesce, they can spontaneously jump away from a superhydrophobic surface due to the release of excess surface energy. Here we show that jumping droplets gain a net positive charge that causes them to repel each other mid-flight. We used electric fields to quantify the charge on the droplets and identified the mechanism for the charge accumulation, which is associated with the formation of the electric double layer at the droplet-surface interface. The observation of droplet charge accumulation provides insight into jumping droplet physics as well as processes involving charged liquid droplets. Furthermore, this work is a starting point for more advanced approaches for enhancing jumping droplet surface performance by using external electric fields to control droplet jumping.

  17. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  18. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    of a technology with living properties. Otto Butschli first described the system in 1898, when he used alkaline water droplets in olive oil to initiate a saponification reaction. This simple recipe produced structures that moved and exhibited characteristics that resembled, at least superficially, the amoeba. We......Dynamical oil-water systems such as droplets display lifelike properties and may lend themselves to chemical programming to perform useful work, specifically with respect to the built environment. We present Butschli water-in-oil droplets as a model for further investigation into the development...... to the oil phase), qualify this system as an example of living technology. The analysis of the Butschli droplets suggests that a set of conditions may precede the emergence of lifelike characteristics and exemplifies the richness of this rudimentary chemical system, not only for artificial life...

  19. Resonant and rolling droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Dorbolo, S; Vandewalle, N; Gilet, T

    2008-01-01

    When an oil droplet is placed on a quiescent oil bath, it eventually collapses into the bath due to gravity. The resulting coalescence may be eliminated when the bath is vertically vibrated. The droplet bounces periodically on the bath, and the air layer between the droplet and the bath is replenished at each bounce. This sustained bouncing motion is achieved when the forcing acceleration is higher than a threshold value. When the droplet has a sufficiently low viscosity, it significantly deforms : spherical harmonic \\boldmath{$Y_{\\ell}^m$} modes are excited, resulting in resonant effects on the threshold acceleration curve. Indeed, a lower acceleration is needed when $\\ell$ modes with $m=0$ are excited. Modes $m \

  20. Effects of poly-vinyl alcohol on supercooling phenomena of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Tetsuo; Kudoh, Tomoya [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1, Wakasato, Nagano City, 380-8553 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    The effects of a polymer additive on the supercooling of water were investigated experimentally. Poly-vinyl alcohols (PVAs) were used as the additives, and samples were prepared by dissolving the PVA in water. Since the characteristics of PVA are decided by its degrees of polymerization and saponification, these were varied along with the concentration as the experimental parameters. Moreover, the effect of purity of the water was also considered. Each sample was cooled and the temperature at the instant when ice appeared was measured. Since the freezing of supercooled water is a statistical phenomenon, many experiments were carried out and the average degree of supercooling was obtained. It was found that PVA affects the nucleation of ice in supercooled water and the degree of supercooling increases with the addition of PVA even for water with low purity. The average degree of supercooling increases with an increase in the degree of saponification of PVA. (author)

  1. Functions of the Coacervate Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okihana, Hiroyuki; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1982-12-01

    Functions of coacervate droplets as protocells are studied by using synthetic polymers. The coacervate droplets were made from PVA-A and PVA-S. When glycine or diglycine were in the surrounding medium, the coacervate droplets concentrated them. The concentration of glycine in the coacervate droplets was higher than that of diglycine. When this mixture was irradiated by UV light, the coacervate droplets protected them from the photochemical decomposition.

  2. Droplet impacts upon liquid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, B.; Golay, M.W.; Johnson, T.J.

    1984-11-02

    The absorption and rebounding of single droplets and streams of droplets (of diameter less than 1200 micrometers) impacting upon the surface of a deep liquid were examined experimentally. Conservation of mechanical energy and momentum were used to explain rebounding droplet interactions, and impaction criteria have been established regarding the absorption of droplet streams. Surface tension is the dominant mechanism governing the observed behavior. Single droplets were never observed to rebound.

  3. OCS in He droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebenev, V.

    2000-06-01

    Phenomenon of superfluidity of para-hydrogen (pH{sub 2}){sub 1-17} and helium {sup 4}He{sub 1-7000} systems doped with an OCS chromophore molecule was investigated in this work. The study of such systems became possible after the development of the depletion spectroscopy technique in helium droplets. The droplets can be easily created and doped with up to 100 particles such as OCS, para-hydrogen or ortho-hydrogen molecules and {sup 4}He atoms. The measured infrared depletion spectra give the information about the temperature of the droplets and their aggregate state. The depletion spectrum of OCS in pure {sup 4}He droplets was comprehensively studied. The rovibrational OCS spectrum shows well resolved narrow lines. The spectrum is shifted to the red relative to the corresponding gas phase spectrum and the rotational constant of OCS in {sup 4}He droplet is three times smaller than that for free molecule. Different models of OCS rotation in the helium environment were discussed. It was shown that the shapes of the rovibrational lines are defined mainly by inhomogeneous broadening due to the droplet size distribution. The sub-rotational structure of the OCS rovibrational lines was revealed in microwave-infrared double resonance experiments. This structure arises due to the interaction of the OCS with the He environment. However, the information obtained in the experiments was not enough to understand the nature of this interaction. (orig.)

  4. Droplet based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  5. Droplet based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  6. Droplet microfluidics--a tool for single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensson, Haakan N; Andersson Svahn, Helene

    2012-12-03

    Droplet microfluidics allows the isolation of single cells and reagents in monodisperse picoliter liquid capsules and manipulations at a throughput of thousands of droplets per second. These qualities allow many of the challenges in single-cell analysis to be overcome. Monodispersity enables quantitative control of solute concentrations, while encapsulation in droplets provides an isolated compartment for the single cell and its immediate environment. The high throughput allows the processing and analysis of the tens of thousands to millions of cells that must be analyzed to accurately describe a heterogeneous cell population so as to find rare cell types or access sufficient biological space to find hits in a directed evolution experiment. The low volumes of the droplets make very large screens economically viable. This Review gives an overview of the current state of single-cell analysis involving droplet microfluidics and offers examples where droplet microfluidics can further biological understanding.

  7. Microphysical Effects of Cloud Seeding in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Observed from NOAA Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the satellite retrieval methodology, the spectral characteristics and cloud microphysical properties were analyzed that included brightness temperatures of Channels 4 and 5, and their brightness temperature difference (BTD), the particle effective radius of seeded cloud track caused by an operational cloud seeding and the microphysical effects of cloud seeding were revealed by the comparisons of their differences inside and outside the seeded track. The cloud track was actually a cloud channel reaching 1.5-km deep and 14-km wide lasting for more than 80 min. The effective radius of ambient clouds was 10-15μm, while that within the cloud track ranged from 15 to 26 μm. The ambient clouds were composed of supercooled droplets, and the composition of the cloud within the seeding track was ice. With respect to the rather stable reflectance of two ambient sides around the track, the visible spectral reflectance in the cloud track varied at least 10%, and reached a maximum of 35%, the reflectance of 3.7 μm in the seeded track relatively decreased at least 10%. As cloud seeding advanced, the width and depth were gradually increased. Simultaneously the cloud top temperature within the track became progressively warmer with respect to the ambient clouds,and the maximum temperature differences reached 4.2 and 3.9℃ at the first seeding position for Channels 4 and 5. In addition, the BTD in the track also increased steadily to a maximum of 1.4℃, compared with 0.2-0.4℃ of the ambient clouds. The evidence that the seeded cloud became thinner comes from the visible image showing a channel, the warming of the cloud tops, and the increase of BTD in the seeded track.The seeded cloud became thinner mainly because the cloud top descended and it lost water to precipitation throughout its depth. For this cloud seeding case, the glaciation became apparent at cloud tops about 22min after seeding. The formation of a cloud track in the supercooled stratiform clouds was

  8. Dynamics of a Water Droplet over a Sessile Oil Droplet: Compound Droplets Satisfying a Neumann Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, R; Dhiman, S; Sen, A K; Shen, Amy Q

    2017-06-13

    We report the dynamics of compound droplets with a denser liquid (water) droplet over a less dense sessile droplet (mineral oil) that satisfies the Neumann condition. For a fixed size of an oil droplet, depending on the size of the water droplet, either it attains the axisymmetric position or tends to migrate toward the edge of the oil droplet. For a water droplet-to-oil droplet at volume ratio Vw/Vo ≥ 0.05, stable axisymmetric configuration is achieved; for Vw/Vo droplet is observed. The stability and migration of water droplets of size above and below critical size, respectively, are explained using the force balance at the three-phase contact line and film tension. The larger and smaller droplets that initially attain the axisymmetric position or some radial position, respectively, evaporate continuously and thus migrate toward the edge of the oil droplet. The radial location and migration of the water droplets of different initial sizes with respect to time are studied. Experiments with water droplets on a flat oil-air interface did not show migration, which signified the role of the curved oil-air interface for droplet migration. Finally, coalescence of water droplets of size above the critical size at the axisymmetric position is demonstrated. Our compound droplet studies could be beneficial for applications involving droplet transport where contamination due to direct contact and pinning of droplets on solid surfaces is of concern. Migration and coalescence of water droplets on curved oil-air interfaces could open new frontiers in chemical and biological applications including multiphase processing and biological interaction of cells and atmospheric chemistry.

  9. Rheological properties of soybean protein isolate gels containing emulsion droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, K.H.; Renkema, J.M.S.; Vliet, van T.

    2001-01-01

    Rheological properties of soybean protein gels containing various volume fractions oil droplets have been studied at small and large deformations. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of soybean protein isolate gels were determined as a function of the volume fraction of oil droplets stabilised by the sa

  10. Large-eddy simulation and Lagrangian stochastic modelling of solid particle and droplet dispersion and mixing. Application to atmospheric pollution; Dispersion et melange turbulents de particules solides et de gouttelettes par une simulation des grandes echelles et une modelisation stochastique lagrangienne. Application a la pollution de l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinkovic, I.

    2005-07-15

    In order to study atmospheric pollution and the dispersion of industrial stack emissions, a large eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky-Germano sub-grid-scale model is coupled with Lagrangian tracking of fluid particles containing scalar, solid particles and droplets. The movement of fluid particles at a sub-grid level is given by a three-dimensional Langevin model. The stochastic model is written in terms of sub-grid-scale statistics at a mesh level. By introducing a diffusion model, the coupling between the large-eddy simulation and the modified three-dimensional Langevin model is applied to passive scalar dispersion. The results are validated by comparison with the wind-tunnel experiments of Fackrell and Robins (1982). The equation of motion of a small rigid sphere in a turbulent flow is introduced. Solid particles and droplets are tracked in a Lagrangian way. The velocity of solid particles and droplets is considered to have a large scale component (directly computed by the large-eddy simulation) and a sub-grid scale part. Because of inertia and gravity effects, solid particles and droplets, deviate from the trajectories of the surrounding fluid particles. Therefore, a modified Lagrangian correlation timescale is introduced into the Langevin model previously developed for the sub-grid velocity of fluid particles. Two-way coupling and collisions are taken into account. The results of the large-eddy simulation with solid particles are compared with the wind-tunnel experiments of Nalpanis et al. (1993) and of Taniere et al. (1997) on sand particles in saltation and in modified saltation, respectively. A model for droplet coalescence and breakup is implemented which allows to predict droplet interactions under turbulent flow conditions in the frame of the Euler/Lagrange approach. Coalescence and breakup are considered as a stochastic process with simple scaling symmetry assumption for the droplet radius, initially proposed by Kolmogorov (1941). At high

  11. Local order in a supercooled colloidal fluid observed by confocal microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gasser, U; Weitz, D A

    2003-01-01

    The local order in a supercooled monodisperse colloidal fluid is studied by direct imaging of the particles with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The local structure is analysed with a bond order parameter method, which allows one to discern simple structures that are relevant in this system. As expected for samples that crystallize eventually, a large fraction of the particles are found to sit in surroundings with dominant face-centred cubic or hexagonally close-packed character. Evidence for local structures that contain fragments of icosahedra is found, and, moreover, the icosahedral character increases with volume fraction phi, which indicates that it might play an important role at volume fractions near the glass transition.

  12. Local order in a supercooled colloidal fluid observed by confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasser, U [Department of Physics and Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schofield, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Weitz, D A [Department of Physics and Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2003-01-15

    The local order in a supercooled monodisperse colloidal fluid is studied by direct imaging of the particles with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The local structure is analysed with a bond order parameter method, which allows one to discern simple structures that are relevant in this system. As expected for samples that crystallize eventually, a large fraction of the particles are found to sit in surroundings with dominant face-centred cubic or hexagonally close-packed character. Evidence for local structures that contain fragments of icosahedra is found, and, moreover, the icosahedral character increases with volume fraction {phi}, which indicates that it might play an important role at volume fractions near the glass transition.

  13. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed. PMID:27121926

  14. Microfluidic droplet sorting using integrated bilayer micro-valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuncong; Tian, Yang; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Xinran; Yu, Sicong; Dong, Liang

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports on a microfluidic device capable of sorting microfluidic droplets utilizing conventional bilayer pneumatic micro-valves as sorting controllers. The device consists of two micro-valves placed symmetrically on two sides of a sorting area, each on top of a branching channel at an inclined angle with respect to the main channel. Changes in transmitted light intensity, induced by varying light absorbance by each droplet, are used to divert the droplet from the sorting area into one of the three outlet channels. When no valve is activated, the droplet flows into the outlet channel in the direction of the main channel. When one of the valves is triggered, the flexible membrane of valve will first be deflected. Once the droplet leaves the detection point, the deflected membrane will immediately return to its default flattened position, thereby exerting a drawing pressure on the droplet and deviating it from its original streamline to the outlet on the same side as the valve. This sorting method will be particularly suitable for numerous large-scale integrated microfluidic systems, where pneumatic micro-valves are already used. Only few structural modifications are needed to achieve droplet sorting capabilities in these systems. Due to the mechanical nature of diverting energy applied to droplets, the proposed sorting method may induce only minimal interference to biological species or microorganisms encapsulated inside the droplets that may accompany electrical, optical and magnetic-based techniques.

  15. Digitally controlled droplet microfluidic system based on electrophoretic actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Do Jin; Yoo, Byeong Sun; Ahn, Myung Mo; Moon, Dustin; Kang, In Seok

    2012-11-01

    Most researches on direct charging and the subsequent manipulation of a charged droplet were focused on an on-demand sorting in microchannel where carrier fluid transports droplets. Only recently, an individual actuation of a droplet without microchannel and carrier fluid was tried. However, in the previous work, the system size was too large and the actuation voltage was too high (1.5 kV), which limits the applicability of the technology to mobile use. Therefore, in the current research, we have developed a miniaturized digital microfluidic system based on the electrophoresis of a charged droplet (ECD). By using a pin header socket for an array of electrodes, much smaller microfluidic system can be made from simple fabrication process with low cost. A full two dimensional manipulation (0.4 cm/s) of a droplet (300 nL) suspended in silicone oil (6 cSt) and multiple droplet actuation have been performed with reasonable actuation voltage (300 V). By multiple droplet actuation and coalescence, a practical biochemical application also has been demonstrated. We hope the current droplet manipulation method (ECD) can be a good alternative or complimentary technology to the conventional ones and therefore contributes to the development of droplet microfluidics. This work has been supported by BK21 program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST) of Korea.

  16. Explosion of Leidenfrost Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Florian; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2012-11-01

    When a drop is released on a plate heated above a given temperature, a thin layer of vapour can isolate the droplet so that it levitates over the plate. This effect was first reported by Leidenfrost in 1756. However, this fascinating subject remains an active field of research in both fundamental and applied researches. In this work, we focus on what happens when surfactant is added to the drop. The aim is to study the influence of a decrease of the surface tension. Surprisingly, as the droplet evaporates, suddenly it explodes. The evolution of the droplet and the resulting explosion are followed using a high speed camera. We show that when a critical concentration of surfactant is reached inside the drop, a shell of surfactant is formed leading to the explosion. The authors would like to thank FNRS for financial support. This work is financially supported by ODILE project (Contract No. FRFC 2.4623.11).

  17. Vitrification and devitrification of micro-droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoun Youn, Jae; Song, Young Seok

    2012-11-01

    Vitrification can be achieved by flash freezing and thawing (i.e. quenching) when ice crystal formation is inhibited in a cryogenic environment. Such ultra-rapid cooling and rewarming occurs due to the large temperature difference between the liquid and its surrounding medium. Here, we analyze the crystallization behavior of a droplet (i.e. vitrification and devitrification) by using a numerical model. The numerical results were found to explain the experimental observations successfully. The findings showed that for successful cryopreservation not only sufficiently fast cooling, but also rewarming processes should be designed and controlled to avoid devitrification of a droplet.

  18. Long term thermal energy storage with stable supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Schultz, Jørgen M.; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2015-01-01

    it expands and will cause a pressure built up in a closed chamber which might compromise stability of the supercooling. This can be avoided by having an air volume above the phase change material connected to an external pressure less expansion tank. Supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate at 20 °C stores up...

  19. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  20. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  1. Supercooling of rapidly expanding quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Zabrodin, E E; Csernai, László P; Stöcker, H; Greiner, W

    1998-01-01

    We reexamine the scenario of homogeneous nucleation of the quark-gluon plasma produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. A generalization of the standard nucleation theory to rapidly expanding system is proposed. The nucleation rate is derived via the new scaling parameter $\\lambda_Z$. It is shown that the size distribution of hadronic clusters plays an important role in the dynamics of the phase transition. The longitudinally expanding system is supercooled to about 3-6%, then it is reheated, and the hadronization is completed within 6-10 fm/c, i.e. 5-10 times faster than it was estimated earlier, in a strongly nonequilibrium way.

  2. Hopping in a supercooled binary Lennard-Jones liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe

    1998-01-01

    A binary Lennard–Jones liquid has been investigated by molecular dynamics at equilibrium supercooled conditions. At the lowest temperature investigated, hopping is present in the system as indicated by a secondary peak in 4r2Gs(r,t), where Gs(r,t) is the van Hove self correlation function....... To examine the dynamics of the system, we consider transitions between the inherent structures (local minima in the potential energy) along the trajectory. We conclude that the plateau in the mean square displacement found at lower temperatures is indeed a result of particles being trapped in local "cages...

  3. The freezing and supercooling of garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Christian; Seignemartin, Violaine; James, Stephen J. [Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre (FRPERC), University of Bristol, Churchill Building, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    This work shows that peeled garlic cloves demonstrate significant supercooling during freezing under standard conditions and can be stored at temperatures well below their freezing point (-2.7 C) without freezing. The nucleation point or 'metastable limit temperature' (the point at which ice crystal nucleation is initiated) of peeled garlic cloves was found to be between -7.7 and -14.6 C. Peeled garlic cloves were stored under static air conditions at temperatures between -6 and -9 C for up to 69 h without freezing, and unpeeled whole garlic bulbs and cloves were stored for 1 week at -6 C without freezing. (author)

  4. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    CERN Document Server

    Jerome, J John Soundar; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vor...

  5. Bouncing droplets on a billiard table

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokoff, David

    2012-01-01

    In a set of experiments, Couder et. al. demonstrate that an oscillating fluid bed may propagate a bouncing droplet through the guidance of the surface waves. We present a dynamical systems model, in the form of an iterative map, for a droplet on an oscillating bath. We examine the droplet bifurcation from bouncing to walking, and prescribe general requirements for the surface wave to support stable walking states. We show that in addition to walking, there is a region of large forcing that may support the chaotic bouncing of the droplet. Using the map, we then investigate the droplet trajectories for two different wave responses in a square (billiard ball) domain. We show that for waves which are quickly damped in space, the long time trajectories in a square domain are either non-periodic dense curves, or approach a quasiperiodic orbit. In contrast, for waves which extend over many wavelengths, at low forcing, trajectories tend to approach an array of circular attracting sets. As the forcing increases, the a...

  6. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  7. A study of oil droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyson, T K; Pashley, R M

    2007-12-01

    Oil droplets dispersed in water can be readily studied when they are coated with surfactants, which lower their interfacial tension and enhance their stability. Pure oil droplets are more difficult to study because of their high interfacial tension, which facilitates coalescence and the adsorption of contaminants. In this study, we have characterised the surface charging properties of a water insoluble oil, bromododecane, which has a density close to water. The small density difference allows us to study relatively large drops of this oil and to analyse its coalescence behaviour. The results obtained with this simple, surfactant-free, system suggest that an additional attractive force, such as the long range hydrophobic interaction, might be required to explain oil droplet coalescence behaviour.

  8. Enhancing Throughput of Combinatorial Droplet Devices via Droplet Bifurcation, Parallelized Droplet Fusion, and Parallelized Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuangwen Hsieh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial droplet microfluidic devices with programmable microfluidic valves have recently emerged as a viable approach for performing multiplexed experiments in microfluidic droplets. However, the serial operation in these devices restricts their throughput. To address this limitation, we present a parallelized combinatorial droplet device that enhances device throughput via droplet bifurcation, parallelized droplet fusion, and parallelized droplet detection. In this device, sample droplets split evenly at bifurcating Y-junctions before multiple independent reagent droplets are injected directly into the split sample droplets for robust droplet fusion. Finally, the fused sample and reagent droplets can be imaged in parallel via microscopy. The combination of these approaches enabled us to improve the throughput over traditional, serially-operated combinatorial droplet devices by 16-fold—with ready potential for further enhancement. Given its current performance and prospect for future improvements, we believe the parallelized combinatorial droplet device has the potential to meet the demand as a flexible and cost-effective tool that can perform high throughput screening applications.

  9. Effects of Cloud Horizontal Inhomogeneity and Drizzle on Remote Sensing of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius: Case Studies Based on Large-eddy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Feingold, Graham; Platnick, Steven; Pincus, Robert; Xue, Huiwen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates effects of drizzle and cloud horizontal inhomogeneity on cloud effective radius (re) retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In order to identify the relative importance of various factors, we developed a MODIS cloud property retrieval simulator based on the combination of large-eddy simulations (LES) and radiative transfer computations. The case studies based on synthetic LES cloud fields indicate that at high spatial resolution (100 m) 3-D radiative transfer effects, such as illumination and shadowing, can induce significant differences between retrievals ofre based on reflectance at 2.1 m (re,2.1) and 3.7 m (re,3.7). It is also found that 3-D effects tend to have stronger impact onre,2.1 than re,3.7, leading to positive difference between the two (re,3.72.1) from illumination and negative re,3.72.1from shadowing. The cancellation of opposing 3-D effects leads to overall reasonable agreement betweenre,2.1 and re,3.7 at high spatial resolution as far as domain averages are concerned. At resolutions similar to MODIS, however, re,2.1 is systematically larger than re,3.7when averaged over the LES domain, with the difference exhibiting a threshold-like dependence on bothre,2.1and an index of the sub-pixel variability in reflectance (H), consistent with MODIS observations. In the LES cases studied, drizzle does not strongly impact reretrievals at either wavelength. It is also found that opposing 3-D radiative transfer effects partly cancel each other when cloud reflectance is aggregated from high spatial resolution to MODIS resolution, resulting in a weaker net impact of 3-D radiative effects onre retrievals. The large difference at MODIS resolution between re,3.7 and re,2.1 for highly inhomogeneous pixels with H 0.4 can be largely attributed to what we refer to as the plane-parallelrebias, which is attributable to the impact of sub-pixel level horizontal variability of cloud optical thickness onre retrievals

  10. Successful vitrification of mouse ovaries using less-concentrated cryoprotectants with Supercool X-1000 supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiuwen; Song, Enliang; Liu, Xiaomu; Liu, Guifen; Cheng, Haijian; Wan, Fachun

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the feasibility of using less-concentrated cryoprotectants supplemented with ice blocker Supercool X-1000 to vitrify ovarian tissues. Mouse ovaries were cryopreserved in different concentrations of vitrification solution alone or with Supercool X-1000, and fresh non-frozen ovaries were used as control. The proportions of morphological normality of follicles, normal GCs in follicular fluids and developing to blastocysts were higher in 12.5% ethylene glycol (EG) + 12.5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) with Supercool X-1000 than those of treated in 10% EG + 10% DMSO or 15% EG + 15% DMSO alone or with Supercool X-1000. In conclusion, the inclusion of Supercool X-1000 in less-concentrated vitrification solution was effective to improve the efficiency and efficacy of cryopreservation of ovarian tissues.

  11. Refreeze experiments with water droplets containing different types of ice nuclei interpreted by classical nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Lukas; Marcolli, Claudia; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water droplets is a stochastic process. In its classical description, the growth of the ice phase requires the emergence of a critical embryo from random fluctuations of water molecules between the water bulk and ice-like clusters, which is associated with overcoming an energy barrier. For heterogeneous ice nucleation on ice-nucleating surfaces both stochastic and deterministic descriptions are in use. Deterministic (singular) descriptions are often favored because the temperature dependence of ice nucleation on a substrate usually dominates the stochastic time dependence, and the ease of representation facilitates the incorporation in climate models. Conversely, classical nucleation theory (CNT) describes heterogeneous ice nucleation as a stochastic process with a reduced energy barrier for the formation of a critical embryo in the presence of an ice-nucleating surface. The energy reduction is conveniently parameterized in terms of a contact angle α between the ice phase immersed in liquid water and the heterogeneous surface. This study investigates various ice-nucleating agents in immersion mode by subjecting them to repeated freezing cycles to elucidate and discriminate the time and temperature dependences of heterogeneous ice nucleation. Freezing rates determined from such refreeze experiments are presented for Hoggar Mountain dust, birch pollen washing water, Arizona test dust (ATD), and also nonadecanol coatings. For the analysis of the experimental data with CNT, we assumed the same active site to be always responsible for freezing. Three different CNT-based parameterizations were used to describe rate coefficients for heterogeneous ice nucleation as a function of temperature, all leading to very similar results: for Hoggar Mountain dust, ATD, and larger nonadecanol-coated water droplets, the experimentally determined increase in freezing rate with decreasing temperature is too shallow to be described properly by

  12. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  13. On the application of the classic Kessler and Berry schemes in Large Eddy Simulation models with a particular emphasis on cloud autoconversion, the onset time of precipitation and droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghosh

    Full Text Available Many Large Eddy Simulation (LES models use the classic Kessler parameterisation either as it is or in a modified form to model the process of cloud water autoconversion into precipitation. The Kessler scheme, being linear, is particularly useful and is computationally straightforward to implement. However, a major limitation with this scheme lies in its inability to predict different autoconversion rates for maritime and continental clouds. In contrast, the Berry formulation overcomes this difficulty, although it is cubic. Due to their different forms, it is difficult to match the two solutions to each other. In this paper we single out the processes of cloud conversion and accretion operating in a deep model cloud and neglect the advection terms for simplicity. This facilitates exact analytical integration and we are able to derive new expressions for the time of onset of precipitation using both the Kessler and Berry formulations. We then discuss the conditions when the two schemes are equivalent. Finally, we also critically examine the process of droplet evaporation within the framework of the classic Kessler scheme. We improve the existing parameterisation with an accurate estimation of the diffusional mass transport of water vapour. We then demonstrate the overall robustness of our calculations by comparing our results with the experimental observations of Beard and Pruppacher, and find excellent agreement.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure · Cloud physics and chemistry · Pollution · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Precipitation

  14. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations.

  15. Observations on the Freezing of Supercooled Pollen Washing Water by a New Electrodynamic Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Haijie; Pope, Francis D.; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological particles can act as efficient ice nuclei (IN) by initiating freezing events at temperatures warmer than the homogenous freezing temperature [1, 2]. For example, pollen grain particles can trigger freezing events at temperatures as warm as -5 °C in the contact freezing mode [3]. More recently pollen residues, which are released by washing pollen grains in water, were also observed to act as efficient IN in the immersion mode [4, 5]. In this study we developed a new cold electrodynamic balance (CEDB) system and investigated the freezing properties of single particles of supercooled pollen washing water (SPWW). The EDB technique allows for a contact free measurement of freezing events. The phase of the particle (liquid or frozen solid) can be distinguished via measuring the Mie scattering signal from the particle. Furthermore the size of liquid (spherical) particles can be determined. The freezing events are characterized through the loss of the regular Mie scattering signal from the levitated droplet as it changes state from liquid to a frozen solid. The statistical freezing probabilities of SPWW were obtained in the temperature range: -15 to -40 °C. Each temperature measurement point consists of the analysis of 30-100 droplets. Preliminary conclusions are that SPWW is IN active in the immersion mode. Further discussion will focus on the temperature range of the IN activity, the important variables (other than temperature) for IN activity, other likely modes of IN activity, and the implications of these results in terms of the atmospheric relevance of SPWW. This study was supported by the NERC. We acknowledge Professor Jonathan Reid and James Davis from the University of Bristol for providing information of the design of the warm EDB system. References: [1] Möhler, O., et al. (2007) Biogeosciences, 4, 1059-1071. [2] Prenni, A. J., et al. (2009) Nat. Geosci., 2, 401-404. [3] Diehl, K., et al. (2002) Atmos. Res., 61, 125-133. [4] Pummer, B. G

  16. A highly addressable static droplet array enabling digital control of a single droplet at pico-volume resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heon-Ho; Lee, Byungjin; Jin, Si Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Geun; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-04-26

    Droplet-based microfluidics enabling exquisite liquid-handling has been developed for diagnosis, drug discovery and quantitative biology. Compartmentalization of samples into a large number of tiny droplets is a great approach to perform multiplex assays and to improve reliability and accuracy using a limited volume of samples. Despite significant advances in microfluidic technology, individual droplet handling in pico-volume resolution is still a challenge in obtaining more efficient and varying multiplex assays. We present a highly addressable static droplet array (SDA) enabling individual digital manipulation of a single droplet using a microvalve system. In a conventional single-layer microvalve system, the number of microvalves required is dictated by the number of operation objects; thus, individual trap-and-release on a large-scale 2D array format is highly challenging. By integrating double-layer microvalves, we achieve a "balloon" valve that preserves the pressure-on state under released pressure; this valve can allow the selective releasing and trapping of 7200 multiplexed pico-droplets using only 1 μL of sample without volume loss. This selectivity and addressability completely arranged only single-cell encapsulated droplets from a mixture of droplet compositions via repetitive selective trapping and releasing. Thus, it will be useful for efficient handling of miniscule volumes of rare or clinical samples in multiplex or combinatory assays, and the selective collection of samples.

  17. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 Å. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at TL = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature TL.

  18. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Broccio, Matteo [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Faraone, Antonio [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Liu Li [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mou, C-Y [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, S-H [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2006-09-13

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 A. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at T{sub L} = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature T{sub L}.

  19. Entropy-driven liquid-liquid separation in supercooled water

    CERN Document Server

    Holten, V

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago Poole et al. (Nature 360, 324, 1992) suggested that the anomalous properties of supercooled water may be caused by a critical point that terminates a line of liquid-liquid separation of lower-density and higher-density water. Here we present an explicit thermodynamic model based on this hypothesis, which describes all available experimental data for supercooled water with better quality and with fewer adjustable parameters than any other model suggested so far. Liquid water at low temperatures is viewed as an 'athermal solution' of two molecular structures with different entropies and densities. Alternatively to popular models for water, in which the liquid-liquid separation is driven by energy, the phase separation in the athermal two-state water is driven by entropy upon increasing the pressure, while the critical temperature is defined by the 'reaction' equilibrium constant. In particular, the model predicts the location of density maxima at the locus of a near-constant fraction (about 0.1...

  20. Ice-lens formation and geometrical supercooling in soils and other colloidal materials

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-10-14

    We present a physically intuitive model of ice-lens formation and growth during the freezing of soils and other dense, particulate suspensions. Motivated by experimental evidence, we consider the growth of an ice-filled crack in a freezing soil. At low temperatures, ice in the crack exerts large pressures on the crack walls that will eventually cause the crack to split open. We show that the crack will then propagate across the soil to form a new lens. The process is controlled by two factors: the cohesion of the soil and the geometrical supercooling of the water in the soil, a new concept introduced to measure the energy available to form a new ice lens. When the supercooling exceeds a critical amount (proportional to the cohesive strength of the soil) a new ice lens forms. This condition for ice-lens formation and growth does not appeal to any ad hoc, empirical assumptions, and explains how periodic ice lenses can form with or without the presence of a frozen fringe. The proposed mechanism is in good agreement with experiments, in particular explaining ice-lens pattern formation and surges in heave rate associated with the growth of new lenses. Importantly for systems with no frozen fringe, ice-lens formation and frost heave can be predicted given only the unfrozen properties of the soil. We use our theory to estimate ice-lens growth temperatures obtaining quantitative agreement with the limited experimental data that are currently available. Finally we suggest experiments that might be performed in order to verify this theory in more detail. The theory is generalizable to complex natural-soil scenarios and should therefore be useful in the prediction of macroscopic frost-heave rates. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  1. Unidirectional Fast Growth and Forced Jumping of Stretched Droplets on Nanostructured Microporous Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aili, Abulimiti; Li, Hongxia; Alhosani, Mohamed H; Zhang, TieJun

    2016-08-24

    Superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have demonstrated outstanding capability in energy and water applications by promoting dropwise condensation, where fast droplet growth and efficient condensate removal are two key parameters. However, these parameters remain contradictory. Although efficient droplet removal is easily obtained through coalescence jumping on uniform superhydrophobic surfaces, simultaneously achieving fast droplet growth is still challenging. Also, on such surfaces droplets can grow to larger sizes without restriction if there is no coalescence. In this work, we show that superhydrophobic nanostructured microporous surfaces can manipulate the droplet growth and jumping. Microporous surface morphology effectively enhances the growth of droplets in pores owing to large solid-liquid contact area. At low supersaturations, the upward growth rate (1-1.5 μm/s) of these droplets in pores is observed to be around 15-25 times that of the droplets outside the pores. Meanwhile, their top curvature radius increases relatively slowly (∼0.25 μm/s) due to pore confinement, which results in a highly stretched droplet surface. We also observed forced jumping of stretched droplets in pores either through coalescence with spherical droplets outside pores or through self-pulling without coalescence. Both experimental observation and theoretical modeling reveal that excess surface free energy stored in the stretched droplet surface and micropore confinement are responsible for this pore-scale-forced jumping. These findings reveal the insightful physics of stretched droplet dynamics and offer guidelines for the design and fabrication of novel super-repellent surfaces with microporous morphology.

  2. Proteomic profiling of lipid droplet-associated proteins in primary adipocytes of normal and obese mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yubo Ding; Yibo Wu; Rong Zeng; Kan Liao

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets in adipocytes serve as the principal longterm energy storage depot of animals.There is increasing recognition that lipid droplets are not merely a static neutral lipid storage site,but in fact dynamic and multifunctional organelles.Structurally,lipid droplet consists of a neutral lipid core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and proteins embedded in or bound to the phospholipid layer.Proteins on the surface of lipid droplets are crucial to droplet structure and dynamics.To understand the lipid droplet-associated proteome of primary adipocyte with a large central lipid droplet,lipid droplets of white adipose tissue from C57BL/6 mice were isolated.And the proteins were extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.A total of 193 proteins including 73 previously unreported proteins were identified.Furthermore,the isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) was used to compare the difference of lipid droplet-associated proteomes between the normal lean and the high-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice.Of 23proteins quantified by ICAT analysis,3 proteins were upregulated and 4 proteins were down-regulated in the lipid droplets of adipose tissue from the obese mice.Importantly,two structural proteins of lipid droplets,perilipin A and vimentin,were greatly reduced in the lipid droplets of the adipose tissue from the obese mice,implicating reduced protein machinery for lipid droplet stability.

  3. Liquid droplet coalescence and fragmentation at the aqueous-air surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneru, Govind; Law, Bruce M; Ibi, Koki; Ushijima, Baku; Flanders, Bret N; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-01-13

    For hexadecane oil droplets at an aqueous-air surface, the surface film in coexistence with the droplets exhibits two-dimensional gaseous (G), liquid (L), or solid (S) behavior depending upon the temperature and concentration of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide. In the G (L) phase, oil droplets are observed to coalesce (fragment) as a function of time. In the coalescence region, droplets coalesce on all length scales, and the final state is a single oil droplet at the aqueous-air surface. The fragmentation regime is complex. Large oil droplets spread as oil films; hole nucleation breaks up this film into much smaller fluctuating and fragmenting or metastable droplets. Metastable droplets are small contact angle spherical caps and do not fluctuate in time; however, they are unstable over long time periods and eventually sink into the bulk water phase. Buoyancy forces provide a counterbalancing force where the net result is that small oil droplets (radius r droplets at liquid surfaces indicates that droplet coalesce is primarily driven by surface tension effects. This theory, which only considers spherical cap shaped surface droplets, qualitatively suggests that in the L phase the sinking of metastable surface droplets into the bulk aqueous medium is driven by a negative line tension and a very small spreading coefficient.

  4. Electrostatic levitation studies of supercooled liquids and metastable solid phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustan, Gustav Errol

    A new laboratory has been developed at Iowa State University (ISU) to be used for the study of high temperature liquids and solids, with particular focus on the supercooling of liquids and their metastable solidification products. This new laboratory employs the electrostatic levitation (ESL) technique, in which a charged sample is suspended between a set of electrodes to achieve non-contact handling. Owing to the elimination of a crucible, high temperature processing of samples can be achieved with reduced levels of contamination and heterogeneous nucleation. Because of the reduction in heterogeneous nucleation, samples can be supercooled well below their equilibrium melting temperature, opening the door to a wide range of measurements on supercooled liquids. Measurements methods have been implemented for the characterization of thermophysical properties such as: volume/density, ratio of specific heat to total hemispherical emissivity, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, and magnetic susceptibility. For measurements of electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility, a new method has been developed at ISU based on the tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) technique. The TDO technique uses the negative differential resistance of a tunnel diode to drive an LC tank circuit into self-sustained oscillation at the resonant LC frequency. The LC tank is inductively coupled to the samples under study, and changes in the electrical resistivity or magnetic susceptibility of the sample are manifested as changes in the resonant frequency. By measuring the frequency shifts of the TDO, insights can be made into changes in the material's electrical and magnetic properties. This method has been validated by performing resistivity measurements on a sample of high purity Zr, and by performing measurements on the ferromagnetic transition in a low-carbon steel ball bearing. In addition to the development of the laboratory and its supporting instrumentation, an effort has

  5. Shear driven droplet shedding and coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtadernejad, S.; Tembely, M.; Jadidi, M.; Esmail, N.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The interest on shedding and coalescence of sessile droplets arises from the importance of these phenomena in various scientific problems and industrial applications such as ice formation on wind turbine blades, power lines, nacelles, and aircraft wings. It is shown recently that one of the ways to reduce the probability of ice accretion on industrial components is using superhydrophobic coatings due to their low adhesion to water droplets. In this study, a combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate droplet shedding and coalescence phenomena under the influence of air shear flow on a superhydrophobic surface. Droplets with a size of 2 mm are subjected to various air speeds ranging from 5 to 90 m/s. A numerical simulation based on the Volume of Fluid method coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation turbulent model is carried out in conjunction with the validating experiments to shed more light on the coalescence of droplets and detachment phenomena through a detailed analysis of the aerodynamics forces and velocity vectors on the droplet and the streamlines around it. The results indicate a contrast in the mechanism of two-droplet coalescence and subsequent detachment with those related to the case of a single droplet shedding. At lower speeds, the two droplets coalesce by attracting each other with successive rebounds of the merged droplet on the substrate, while at higher speeds, the detachment occurs almost instantly after coalescence, with a detachment time decreasing exponentially with the air speed. It is shown that coalescence phenomenon assists droplet detachment from the superhydrophobic substrate at lower air speeds.

  6. Direct contact droplet heat exchangers for thermal management in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Hertzberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid droplet heat exchanger for space applications is described which transfers heat between a gas and a liquid metal dispersed into droplets. The ability of the droplet heat exchanger to transfer heat between two media in direct contact over a wide temperature range circumvents many of the material limitations of conventional tube-type heat exchangers and does away with complicated plumbing systems and their tendency toward single point failure. Droplet heat exchangers offer large surface to volume ratios in a compact geometry, very low gas pressure drop, and high effectiveness. The application of the droplet heat exchanger in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate its performance and operational characteristics.

  7. Buckling instability of squeezed droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Elfring, Gwynn J

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we consider theoretically the compression of droplets pinned at the bottom on a surface of finite area. We show that if the droplet is sufficiently compressed at the top by a surface, it will always develop a shape instability at a critical compression. When the top surface is flat, the shape instability occurs precisely when the apparent contact angle of the droplet at the pinned surface is pi, regardless of the contact angle of the upper surface, reminiscent of past work on liquid bridges and sessile droplets as first observed by Plateau. After the critical compression, the droplet transitions from a symmetric to an asymmetric shape. The force required to deform the droplet peaks at the critical point then progressively decreases indicative of catastrophic buckling. We characterize the transition in droplet shape using illustrative examples in two dimensions followed by perturbative analysis as well as numerical simulation in three dimensions. When the upper surface is not f...

  8. Sorting of droplets by migration on structured surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Konrad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Controlled transport of microdroplets is a topic of interest for various applications. It is well known that liquid droplets move towards areas of minimum contact angle if placed on a flat solid surface exhibiting a gradient of contact angle. This effect can be utilised for droplet manipulation. In this contribution we describe how controlled droplet movement can be achieved by a surface pattern consisting of cones and funnels whose length scales are comparable to the droplet diameter.Results: The surface energy of a droplet attached to a cone in a symmetry-preserving way can be smaller than the surface energy of a freely floating droplet. If the value of the contact angle is fixed and lies within a certain interval, then droplets sitting initially on a cone can gain energy by moving to adjacent cones.Conclusion: Surfaces covered with cone-shaped protrusions or cavities may be devised for constructing “band-conveyors” for droplets. In our approach, it is essentially the surface structure which is varied, not the contact angle. It may be speculated that suitably patterned surfaces are also utilised in biological surfaces where a large variety of ornamentations and surface structuring are often observed.

  9. Köhler theory for a polydisperse droplet population in the presence of a soluble trace gas, and an application to stratospheric STS droplet growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kokkola

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider the equilibrium behavior of a polydisperse aqueous droplet population as a function of relative humidity (RH when a soluble trace gas, such as nitric acid, is present in the system. The droplet population experiences a splitting when the RH is increased sufficiently. This splitting is not related to the traditional Köhler activation of cloud droplets, as it may occur at relative humidities below 100%. Remarkably, the splitting always takes place in such a way that the largest size class of the (discretized droplet population starts taking up the soluble trace gas efficiently, growing steeply as a function of RH, and forcing the smaller droplets to shrink. We consider this behavior in terms of open and closed system Köhler curves (open system referring to one in which the trace gas concentration remains constant and closed system to one in which the gas concentration decreases as a result of uptake of the trace gas. We show how the open and closed system Köhler curves are related, and that the splitting of the population can be explained in terms of closed system curves crossing the Köhler maxima of the open system curves. We then go on to consider time-dependent situations, and show that due to gas-phase mass transfer limitations, the splitting of the size distributions moves toward smaller sizes as the rate of RH increase becomes more rapid. Finally, we consider stratospheric supercooled ternary solution droplet populations, and show that the splitting described using the new theory may explain observed bimodal size distributions.

  10. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  11. Factors contributing to deep supercooling capability and cold survival in dwarf bamboo (Sasa senanensis leaf blades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya eIshikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wintering Sasa senanensis, dwarf bamboo, has been known to employ deep supercooling as the mechanism of cold hardiness in its most of the tissues from leaves to rhizomes. The unique cold hardiness mechanism of this plant was further characterized using current year leaf blades. Cold hardiness levels increased from August (LT20: –11 °C to December (LT20: –20 °C, which coincided with the initiation temperature of low temperature exotherms (LTE detected in differential thermal analyses. When leaf blades were stored at –5 °C for 1-14 days, there was no nucleation of the supercooled tissue units compartmentalized by the longitudinal and transverse veins either in summer or winter. However, only summer leaves suffered significant injury after prolonged supercooling of the tissue units. This may be a novel type of low temperature-induced injury in supercooled state at subfreezing temperatures. When winter leaf blades were maintained at the threshold temperature (-20 °C, a longer storage period (1-7 days increased lethal freezing of the supercooled tissue units. Within a wintering shoot, the second or third leaf blade from the top was most cold hardy and leaf blades at lower positions tended to suffer more injury due to lethal freezing of the supercooled units, which was not correlated with the leaf water content. LTE were shifted to higher temperatures (2-5 °C after a lethal freeze-thaw cycle. The results demonstrate that the tissue unit compartmentalized with longitudinal and transverse veins serves as the unit of supercooling and temperature- and time-dependent freezing of the units is lethal both in laboratory freeze tests and in the field. To establish such supercooling in the unit, structural ice barriers such as development of sclerenchyma and biochemical mechanisms to increase the stability of supercooling are considered important. We discussed these mechanisms in regard to ecological and physiological significance in winter survival.

  12. Hovering UFO Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Anand, Sushant; Dhiman, Rajeev; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 65th Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD. This video shows behavior of condensing droplets on a lubricant impregnated surface and a comparison with a superhydrophobic surface. On impregnated surfaces, drops appear like UFOs hovering over a surface. The videos were recorded in an Environmental SEM and a specially built condensation rig.

  13. Formation of large NAT particles and denitrification in polar stratosphere: possible role of cosmic rays and effect of solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles has important implications for denitrification and ozone depletion. Existing theories can't explain the recent observations of large NAT particles over wide Arctic regions at temperature above ice frost point. Our analyses reveal that high-energy comic rays may induce the freezing of supercooled HNO3−H2O–H2SO4 droplets when they penetrate these thermodynamically unstable droplets. The cosmic ray-induced freezing (CRIF is consistent with the observed highly selective formation of NAT particles. We suggest that the physics behind the CRIF mechanism is the reorientation of polar solution molecules into the crystalline configuration in the strong electrical fields of moving secondary ions generated by passing cosmic rays. Our simulations indicate that strong solar proton events (SPEs may significantly enhance the formation of large NAT particles and denitrification. The CRIF mechanism can explain the high correlations between the thin nitrate-rich layers in polar ice cores and major SPEs. The observed enhancement in aerosol backscattering ratio at PSC layers shortly after an SPE and the significant precipitation velocity of the enhanced PSC payers also provide strong support for the CRIF mechanism.

  14. Laboratory test of a prototype heat storage module based on stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Kong, Weiqiang; Fan, Jianhua;

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory test of a long term heat storage module utilizing the principle of stable supercooling of 199.5 kg of sodium acetate water mixture has been carried out. Avoiding phase separation of the incongruently melting salt hydrate by using the extra water principle increased the heat storage...... the supercooled sodium acetate water mixture was 194 kJ/kg of sodium acetate water mixture in the first test cycles dropping to 179 kJ/kg in the later test cycles. Instability of the supercooling occurred when the charging periods were short and in the last test cycles where the tube connecting the module...

  15. Effects of Artificial Supercooling Followed by Slow Freezing on the Microstructure and Qualities of Pork Loin

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yiseul; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of artificial supercooling followed by still air freezing (SSF) on the qualities of pork loin. The qualities of pork frozen by SSF were compared with the fresh control (CT, stored at 4℃ for 24 h), slow freezing (SAF, still air freezing) and rapid freezing (EIF, ethanol immersion freezing) treatments. Compared with no supercooling phenomena of SAF and EIF, the extent of supercooling obtained by SSF treatment was 1.4℃. Despite that SSF was conducted with the ...

  16. Characteristics of droplet motion in effervescent sprays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedelský Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved droplet size and velocity measurement was made using Phase-Doppler anemometry in an effervescent spray at GLR of 6 % and operation pressure drops 21 – 52 kPa. The spray shows a size dependent variation of mean as well as fluctuating axial and radial velocities of droplets similarly for all operation regimes. Particles under 13 μm follow the gas flow, axially decelerated due to gas expansion. Velocity of medium sized particles is positively size correlated and larger particles keep high velocity, given them during discharge. Fluctuating radial velocity of small particles is larger than that of large particles while fluctuating axial velocity increases with size. Small particles thus reach a ratio of radial to axial velocity fluctuations ~ 0.6 but large particles only ~ 0.1, which indicates large transverse dispersion of small particles. Overall fluctuating velocity ratios smaller than 0.5 document an anisotropic character of the liquid mass fluctuations. Power spectral density (PSD of axial velocity fluctuations of large droplets is uniform up to 1 kHz, while PSD of smaller particles drops down with frequency for frequencies > 100 Hz. Large particles thus preserve the fluctuations imposed during discharge while the gas turbulence drops with frequency. Turbulence intensity reaches 14 to 21 % depending on pressure. Such high-turbulence character of the flow probably results from a heterogeneous gas–liquid mixture at the discharge.

  17. The Gibbs-Thomson effect and intergranular melting in ice emulsions: Interpreting the anomalous heat capacity and volume of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G. P.

    1997-12-01

    Calculations for the Gibbs-Thomson effect and the intergranular melting of the ice droplets in (water) emulsions at temperatures below 273.16 K show that water and ice coexist at thermodynamic equilibrium in an apparently frozen emulsion. The fraction of water at this equilibrium increases on heating, which alters further the thermodynamic properties of the emulsion. As some of the ice in the emulsion has already melted, the increase in the enthalpy, H, and heat capacity, Cp, and the decrease in the volume measured on the normal melting at 273.16 K, are less than the values anticipated. The ratio of this increase in H, or Cp, on melting of the emulsion to the corresponding value for pure ice, underestimates the emulsion's water content which, when used for scaling the difference between the Cp of the unfrozen and frozen emulsion at lower temperatures, as in earlier studies, leads to a larger Cp of supercooled water than the actual value. Similar scaling of the corresponding difference between the volume leads to higher volume, or lower density, than the actual value. A formalism for this premelting effect is given for both the adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and its magnitude is calculated. New experiments show that the rise in the DSC signal, or equivalently in the apparent Cp observed on heating the frozen emulsion, occurs over a temperature range much wider than the Gibbs-Thomson effect and intergranular melting predict, for which reasons are given. It is shown that Cp of the dispersant phase is also affected by the melting of ice droplets. There are four consequences of the premelting effects for all finely dispersed materials, for frozen water emulsions below 273.16 K: (i) water and ice coexist in the emulsion, (ii) its apparent Cp will increase with increase in the heat input used to measure it, (iii) the apparent Cp will increase with decrease in the average size of the droplets, and (iv) the apparent Cp will decrease on annealing the

  18. Controlling the partial coalescence of a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath

    CERN Document Server

    Gilet, T; Vandewalle, N

    2007-01-01

    A new method is proposed to stop a cascade of partial coalescences of a droplet laid onto a liquid bath. This technique consists in vertically vibrating the bath in order to keep small droplets bouncing. Since large droplets are not able to bounce, they partially coalesce until they reach a critical size. The system behaves as a low pass filter : droplets smaller than the critical size are selected. This size has been investigated as a function of the bath acceleration. The method could be used in order to create droplets with a defined size.

  19. Controlling the partial coalescence of a droplet on a vertically vibrated bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilet, T; Vandewalle, N; Dorbolo, S

    2007-09-01

    A method is proposed to stop the cascade of partial coalescences of a droplet laid on a liquid bath. The strategy consists of vibrating the bath in the vertical direction in order to keep small droplets bouncing. Since large droplets are not able to bounce, they partially coalesce until they reach a critical size. The system behaves as a low pass filter: droplets smaller than the critical size are selected. This size has been investigated as a function of the acceleration and the frequency of the bath vibration. Results suggest that the limit size for bouncing is related to the first mode of the droplet deformation.

  20. Numerical simulations of pendant droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Carlos; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2015-11-01

    We simulate the evolution of a three-dimensional pendant droplet through pinch-off using a new parallel two-phase flow solver called BLUE. The parallelization of the code is based on the technique of algebraic domain decomposition where the velocity field is solved by a parallel GMRes method for the viscous terms and the pressure by a parallel multigrid/GMRes method. Communication is handled by MPI message passing procedures. The method for the treatment of the fluid interfaces uses a hybrid Front Tracking/Level Set technique which defines the interface both by a discontinuous density field as well as by a local triangular Lagrangian mesh. This structure allows the interface to undergo large deformations including the rupture and coalescence of fluid interfaces. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  1. Electrospray Droplet Impact/SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo

    A new type of cluster SIMS, named as electrospray droplet impact (EDI), has been developed in our laboratory. It was found that peptides deposited on the stainless steel substrate were ionized/desorbed without the accumulation of radiation products. The organic samples with film thickness thinner than 10 monolayers are desorbed/ionized with little damage underneath the surface. In general, rather strong negative ions as well as positive ions are generated. The mechanism for the ionization/desorption in EDI is much less complicated than those for MALDI and SIMS due to the fact that only very thin sample layers take part in the shock-wave excited selvedge and higher-order side reactions are largely suppressed.

  2. Mechanism of supercooling in flower bud of Camellia oleifea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏维埃; 潘良文

    1995-01-01

    It is the first time for MRI to be used in the research of flower buds supercooling. Directobservation on freezing course of living flower buds of Camellia yuhsienensis by MRI and tissue browning test showed that freezing order of the flower organs is bud axis, scale, petal, pistil and stamen. It is coincident with the direction of ice development from bud axes to flower organs upwards. The corresponding results from MRI and freezing-fixation showed that the water translocation from flower organs to axes and scales is carried on in the course of bud freezing. ’H spectral measurement of NMR was used to follow the decrease of unfrozen water in the buds during the cooling.

  3. A molecular dynamics study on surface properties of supercooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yongjun; WEI Bingbo

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the surface properties of water in a temperature range from 228 to 293 K by using the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and four-site TIP4P potentials. The calculated surface tension increases with the decrease of temperature, and moreover the slopes of the surface tension-temperature curves show a weak rise below 273 K, whereas no obvious anomalies appear near 228 K, which accords with the previous experiments. Compared with the measured values, the SPC/E potential shows a good agreement, and the TIP4P potential scription of the surface structure of supercooled water for the SPC/E. When simulating the orientational distributions of water molecules near the surface, the SPC/E potential produces higher ordering and larger surface potentials than the TIP4P potential.

  4. Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces and Droplet Transportation by Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J. T.; Geraldi, N. R.; Guan, J. H.; McHale, G.; Wells, G. G.; Fu, Y. Q.

    2017-01-01

    On a solid surface, a droplet of liquid will stick due to the capillary adhesion, and this causes low droplet mobility. To reduce contact line pinning, surface chemistry can be coupled to micro- and/or nanostructures to create superhydrophobic surfaces on which a droplet balls up into an almost spherical shape, thus, minimizing the contact area. Recent progress in soft matter has now led to alternative lubricant-impregnated surfaces capable of almost zero contact line pinning and high droplet mobility without causing droplets to ball up and minimize the contact area. Here we report an approach to surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW) actuated droplet transportation enabled using such a surface. These surfaces maintain the contact area required for efficient energy and momentum transfer of the wave energy into the droplet while achieving high droplet mobility and a large footprint, therefore, reducing the threshold power required to induce droplet motion. In our approach, we use a slippery layer of lubricating oil infused into a self-assembled porous hydrophobic layer, which is significantly thinner than the SAW wavelength, and avoid damping of the wave. We find a significant reduction (up to 85%) in the threshold power for droplet transportation compared to that using a conventional surface-treatment method. Moreover, unlike droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces, where interaction with the SAW induces a transition from a Cassie-Baxter state to a Wenzel state, the droplets on our liquid-impregnated surfaces remain in a mobile state after interaction with the SAW.

  5. Dynamical Instability Causes the Demise of a Supercooled Tetrahedral Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Arvind Kumar; Pingua, Nandlal; Goyal, Aashish; Apte, Pankaj A.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the relaxation mechanism of a supercooled tetrahedral liquid at its limit of stability using isothermal isobaric ( NPT) Monte Carlo simulations. In similarity with systems which are far from equilibrium but near the onset of jamming (O'Hern et al. in Phys Rev Lett 93:165702, 2004), we find that the relaxation is characterized by two time-scales: the decay of long-wavelength (slow) fluctuations of potential energy is controlled by the slope [partial (G/N)/partial φ ] of the Gibbs free energy ( G) at a unique value of per particle potential energy φ = φ _{{\\tiny mid}}. The short-wavelength (fast) fluctuations are controlled by the bath temperature T. The relaxation of the supercooled liquid is initiated with a dynamical crossover after which the potential energy fluctuations are biased towards values progressively lesser than φ _{{\\tiny mid}}. The dynamical crossover leads to the change of time-scale, i.e., the decay of long-wavelength potential energy fluctuations (intermediate stage of relaxation). Because of the condition [partial ^2 (G/N)/partial φ ^2 = 0] at φ = φ _{{\\tiny mid}}, the slope [partial (G/N)/partial φ ] has a unique value and governs the intermediate stage of relaxation, which ends just after the crossover. In the subsequent stage, there is a relatively rapid crystallization due to lack of long-wavelength fluctuations and the instability at φ _{{\\tiny mid}}, i.e., the condition that G decreases as configurations with potential energies lower than φ _{{\\tiny mid}} are accessed. The dynamical crossover point and the associated change in the time-scale of fluctuations is found to be consistent with the previous studies.

  6. Simulation of Interpersonal Transport of Expiratory Droplets and Droplet Nuclei between Two Standing Manikins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Y, Li,

    2012-01-01

    Interpersonal transport of expiratory droplets and droplet nuclei constitutes a prerequisite for the transmission of pathogens as well as the transmission of respiratory diseases. Numerical simulations considering droplet evaporation and droplet nucleus sizes were carried out, using two detailed...

  7. Rapidly pulsed helium droplet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; Riechers, Ricarda; Dick, Bernhard; Slenczka, Alkwin [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Even, Uzi; Lavie, Nachum; Brown, Raviv; Luria, Kfir [Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    A pulsed valve connected to a closed-cycle cryostat was optimized for producing helium droplets. The pulsed droplet beam appeared with a bimodal size distribution. The leading part of the pulse consists of droplets suitable for doping with molecules. The average size of this part can be varied between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} helium atoms, and the width of the distribution is smaller as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source. The system has been tested in a single pulse mode and at repetition rates of up to 500 Hz with almost constant intensity. The droplet density was found to be increased by more than an order of magnitude as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source.

  8. Droplet microfluidics based microseparation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Niu, Menglei; Zhang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Lab on a chip (LOC) technology is a promising miniaturization approach. The feature that it significantly reduced sample consumption makes great sense in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Since the start of LOC technology, much attention has been focused on continuous flow microfluidic systems. At the turn of the century, droplet microfluidics, which was also termed segmented flow microfluidics, was introduced. Droplet microfluidics employs two immiscible phases to form discrete droplets, which are ideal vessels with confined volume, restricted dispersion, limited cross-contamination, and high surface area. Due to these unique features, droplet microfluidics proves to be a versatile tool in microscale sample handling. This article reviews the utility of droplet microfluidics in microanalytical systems with an emphasize on separation science, including sample encapsulation at ultra-small volume, compartmentalization of separation bands, isolation of droplet contents, and related detection techniques.

  9. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  10. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  11. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J. D.; Neuberg, J. W.; O’Sullivan, D.; Wilson, T. W.; Whale, T. F.; Neve, L.; Umo, N. S.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry. PMID:28056077

  12. Size-dependent contact angle and the wetting and drying transition of a droplet adsorbed onto a spherical substrate: Line-tension effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2016-10-01

    The size-dependent contact angle and the drying and wetting morphological transition are studied with respect to the volume change for a spherical cap-shaped droplet placed on a spherical substrate. The line-tension effect is included using the rigorous formula for the Helmholtz free energy in the droplet capillary model. A morphological drying transition from a cap-shaped to a spherical droplet occurs when the substrate is hydrophobic and the droplet volume is small, similar to the transition predicted on a flat substrate. In addition, a morphological wetting transition from a cap-shaped to a wrapped spherical droplet occurs for a hydrophilic substrate and a large droplet volume. The contact angle depends on the droplet size: it decreases as the droplet volume increases when the line tension is positive, whereas it increases when the line tension is negative. The spherical droplets and wrapped droplets are stable when the line tension is positive and large.

  13. Small droplets on superhydrophobic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Markus; Varnik, Fathollah; Raabe, Dierk; Steinbach, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the wetting behavior of liquid droplets on rough hydrophobic substrates for the case of droplets that are of comparable size to the surface asperities. Using a simple three-dimensional analytical free-energy model, we have shown in a recent letter [M. Gross, F. Varnik, and D. Raabe, EPL 88, 26002 (2009)] that, in addition to the well-known Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states, there exists a further metastable wetting state where the droplet is immersed into the texture to a finite depth, yet not touching the bottom of the substrate. Due to this new state, a quasistatically evaporating droplet can be saved from going over to the Wenzel state and instead remains close to the top of the surface. In the present paper, we give an in-depth account of the droplet behavior based on the results of extensive computer simulations and an improved theoretical model. In particular, we show that releasing the assumption that the droplet is pinned at the outer edges of the pillars improves the analytical results for larger droplets. Interestingly, all qualitative aspects, such as the existence of an intermediate minimum and the "reentrant transition," remain unchanged. We also give a detailed description of the evaporation process for droplets of varying sizes. Our results point out the role of droplet size for superhydrophobicity and give hints for achieving the desired wetting properties of technically produced materials.

  14. A phase space approach to supercooled liquids and a universal collapse of their viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Weingartner, Nicholas B; Nogueira, Flavio S; Kelton, K F; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-01-01

    A broad fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenology of supercooled liquids has remained elusive, despite decades of intense exploration. When supercooled beneath its characteristic melting temperature, a liquid sees a sharp rise in its viscosity over a narrow temperature range, eventually becoming frozen on laboratory timescales. Explaining this immense increase in viscosity is one of the principle goals of condensed matter physicists. To that end, numerous theoretical frameworks have been proposed which explain and reproduce the temperature dependence of the viscosity of supercooled liquids. Each of these frameworks appears only applicable to specific classes of glassformers and each possess a number of variable parameters. Here we describe a classical framework for explaining the dynamical behavior of supercooled liquids based on statistical mechanical considerations, and possessing only a single variable parameter. This parameter varies weakly from liquid to liquid. Furthermore...

  15. Controlled Buckling and Crumpling of Nanoparticle-Coated Droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Sujit S.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Weitz, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new experimental approach to study the structural transitions of large numbers of nanoparticle-coated droplets as their volume is reduced. We use an emulsion system where the dispersed phase is slightly soluble in the continuous phase. By adding a fixed amount of unsaturated continuous phase, the volume of the droplets can be controllably reduced, causing them to buckle or crumple, thereby becoming nonspherical. The resultant morphologies depend both on the extent of volume red...

  16. Precision stacking of nanoparticle laden sessile droplets to control solute deposit morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabi, Prasenjit; Basu, Saptarshi; Sanyal, Apratim; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo

    2015-02-01

    Stacking pure solvent droplets on a solid substrate is apparently impossible in the absence of an external force as the second droplet will invariably spill over the first leading to a large wetted area. However, the unique feature that emerges during the drying of a nanoparticle laden droplet is the progressively enlarging thin solid film along the evaporating sessile droplet liquid periphery. This solid interface: the edge of which we shall refer to as the agglomeration front comprises of a thin layer of nanoparticle assembly and can support a carefully dispensed second droplet thereby allowing droplet stacking. It will be shown that the growth of this agglomeration front can also be effectively controlled by the dispensing time difference and the nanoparticle concentration in the two droplets. So far, we are commonly aware of material stacking in solid phase. This letter demonstrates stacking in the liquid phase and control over the thin solid interface growth.

  17. Evaporation of particle-laden droplets on a superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Masoud; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigated the evaporation dynamics of water droplets suspended with minute particles of varying concentrations on a superhydrophobic surface. The contact angle, diameter, and height of the droplets decreased during the evaporation process. For pure water, the droplet went through a wetting transition from a partial wetting (Cassie-Baxter), with a large contact angle (>140°), to completely wetting (Wenzel) state, with a small contact angle. Unlike pure water, the nanofluid droplets maintain high contact angles (>100°) during evaporation. We found that the contact line was pinned, and an increase (10 %) in the weight fraction of nanoparticles led to a remarkable 40 % decrease in the total drying time. The nanofluid droplets left donut-shaped drying patterns. In these final drying structures, a shrinkage of the droplet height and base diameter was observed for nanofluids with lower concentrations. The results show that droplet evaporation rate and deposit pattern depend on the concentration of nanoparticles, implying the crucial influences of water evaporation and particle migration dynamics and time-scales.

  18. Droplet migration in emulsion systems measured using MR methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, K G; Johns, M L

    2006-04-15

    The migration of emulsion droplets under shear flow remains a largely unexplored area of study, despite the existence of an extensive literature on the analogous problem of solid particle migration. A novel methodology is presented to track the shear-induced migration of emulsion droplets based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The work is in three parts: first, single droplets of one Newtonian fluid are suspended in a second Newtonian fluid (water in silicone oil (PDMS)) and are tracked as they migrate within a Couette cell; second, the migration of emulsion droplets in Poiseuille flow is considered; third, water-in-silicone oil emulsions are sheared in a Couette cell. The effect of (a) rotational speed of the Couette, (b) the continuous phase viscosity, and (c) the droplet phase concentration are considered. The equilibrium extent of migration and rate of migration increase with rotational speed for two different emulsion systems and increased continuous phase viscosity, leads to a greater equilibrium extent of migration. The relationship between the droplet phase concentration and migration is however complex. These results for semi-concentrated emulsion systems and wide-gap Couette cells are not well described by existing models of emulsion droplet migration.

  19. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in microfluidic droplets: towards fast and cheap analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teste, Bruno; Champ, Jerome; Londono-Vallejo, Arturo; Descroix, Stéphanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Draskovic, Irena; Mottet, Guillaume

    2017-01-31

    Genetic organization is governed by the interaction of DNA with histone proteins, and differential modifications of these proteins is a fundamental mechanism of gene regulation. Histone modifications are primarily studied through chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, however conventional ChIP procedures are time consuming, laborious and require a large number of cells. Here we report for the first time the development of ChIP in droplets based on a microfluidic platform combining nanoliter droplets, magnetic beads (MB) and magnetic tweezers (MT). The droplet approach enabled compartmentalization and improved mixing, while reducing the consumption of samples and reagents in an integrated workflow. Anti-histone antibodies grafted to MB were used as a solid support to capture and transfer the target chromatin from droplets to droplets in order to perform chromatin immunoprecipitation, washing, elution and purification of DNA. We designed a new ChIP protocol to investigate four different types of modified histones with known roles in gene activation or repression. We evaluated the performances of this new ChIP in droplet assay in comparison with conventional methods. The proposed technology dramatically reduces analytical time from a few days to 7 hours, simplifies the ChIP protocol and decreases the number of cells required by 100 fold while maintaining a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Therefore this droplet-based ChIP assay represents a new, highly advantageous and convenient approach to epigenetic analyses.

  20. Nonlinear transport of soft droplets in pore networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernerey, Franck; Benet Cerda, Eduard; Koo, Kanghyeon

    A large number of biological and technological processes depend on the transport of soft colloidal particles through porous media; this includes the transport and separation of cells, viruses or drugs through tissues, membranes and microfluidic devices. In these systems, the interactions between soft particles, background fluid and the surrounding pore space yield complex, nonlinear behaviors such as non-Darcy flows, localization and jamming. We devise a computational strategy to investigate the transport of non-wetting and deformable water droplets in a microfluidic device made of a random distribution of cylindrical obstacles. We first derive scaling laws for the entry of the droplet in a single pore and discuss the role of surface tension, contact angle and size in this process. This information is then used to study the transport of multiple droplets in an obstacle network. We find that when the droplet size is close to the pore size, fluid flow and droplet trafficking strongly interact, leading to local redistributions in pressure fields, intermittent clogging and jamming. Importantly, it is found that the overall droplet and fluid transport display three different scaling regimes depending on the forcing pressure, and that these regimes can be related to droplet properties.

  1. Tuning Superhydrophobic Nanostructures to Enhance Jumping-Droplet Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroe, Megan; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Collier, Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    It was recently discovered that condensation growing on a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface can spontaneously jump off the surface when two or more droplets coalesce together. The minimum droplet size for jumping to occur is of order 10 microns, but it is unclear whether this is the true lower limit of jumping droplets or simply a limitation of current superhydrophobic surfaces. Here, we analyze the dynamics of jumping droplets on six different superhydrophobic surfaces where the topography of the nanopillars was systematically varied. The critical diameter for jumping to occur was observed to be highly dependent upon the height and diameter of the nanopillars; surfaces with very tall and slender nanopillars enabled jumping droplets at a smaller critical size of order 1 micron. An energetic model of the incipient growth of condensate shows that the nanostructure topology affects the rate of increase of a growing droplet's apparent contact angle, with jumping being enabled at very large angles. These findings indicate that the true upper limit to the performance of jumping-droplet condensers has not yet been reached and can be further improved using advanced nanofabrication techniques.

  2. Hard rhenium–boron–cobalt amorphous alloys with a wide supercooled liquid region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianfeng, E-mail: jfwang316@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhu, Shijie; Wang, Liguo; Guan, Shaokang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Li, Ran; Zhang, Tao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Novel Re–B–Co amorphous alloys with compositions of Re{sub 65−x}B{sub 35}Co{sub x} (at%, x=25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50) were fabricated by single-roller melt spinning. These alloys were found to exhibit a clear glass transition phenomenon. The width of supercooled liquid region (ΔT{sub x}) is in the range of 52–71 K. Such a large ΔT{sub x} allows us to produce amorphous alloy bulks by thermoplastic forming. The Vickers hardness is up to 19.10 GPa for the Re{sub 40}B{sub 35}Co{sub 25} alloy, which is close to that reported for some hard covalent crystals. Thus, the present alloys with a combination of large ΔT{sub x} and high hardness are expected to be used as a new type of structural materials. Furthermore, the relationships of hardness with glass transition temperature and Young's modulus were also discussed.

  3. Interaction forces between microfluidic droplets in a Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarig, I.; Starosvetsky, Y.; Gat, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    Various microfluidic systems, such as chemical and biological lab-on-a-chip devices, involve motion of multiple droplets within an immersing fluid in shallow micro-channels. Modeling the dynamics of such systems requires calculation of the forces of interaction between the moving droplets. These forces are commonly approximated by superposition of dipoles solutions, which requires an assumption of sufficiently large distance between the droplets. In this work we obtain exact solutions (in the Hele-Shaw limit) for two moving droplets, and a droplet within a droplet, located within a moving immersing fluid, without limitation on the distance between the droplets. This is achieved by solution of the pressure field in a bi-polar coordinate system and calculation of the force in a Cartesian coordinate system. Our results are compared with numerical computations, experimental data and the existing dipole-based models. We utilize the results to calculate the dynamics of a droplet within a droplet, and of two close droplets, located within an immersing fluid with oscillating speed. The obtained results may be used to study the dynamics of dense droplet lattices, common to many microfluidic systems.

  4. Droplet formation and growth inside a polymer network: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiyun; Jang, Eunseon; Shoaib, Mahbubul Alam; Jo, Kyubong; Kim, Jun Soo

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study that focuses on the formation and growth of nanoscale droplets inside polymer networks. Droplet formation and growth are investigated by the liquid-vapor phase separation of a dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid inside regularly crosslinked, polymer networks with varying mesh sizes. In a polymer network with small mesh sizes, droplet formation can be suppressed, the extent of which is dependent on the attraction strength between the LJ particles. When droplets form in a polymer network with intermediate mesh sizes, subsequent growth is significantly slower when compared with that in bulk without a polymer network. Interestingly, droplet growth beyond the initial nucleation stage occurs by different mechanisms depending on the mesh size: droplets grow mainly by diffusion and coalescence inside polymer networks with large mesh sizes (as observed in bulk), whereas Ostwald ripening becomes a more dominant mechanism for droplet growth for small mesh sizes. The analysis of droplet trajectories clearly reveals the obstruction effect of the polymer network on the movement of growing droplets, which leads to Ostwald ripening of droplets. This study suggests how polymer networks can be used to control the growth of nanoscale droplets.

  5. Coalescence-induced jumping of droplet: Inertia and viscosity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhirad, Samaneh; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Lee, Taehun

    2015-10-01

    The problem of coalescence-induced self-propelled jumping of droplet is studied using three-dimensional numerical simulation. The focus is on the effect of inertia and in particular the effect of air density on the behavior of the merged droplet during jumping. A lattice Boltzmann method is used for two identical, static micro-droplets coalescing on a homogeneous substrate with contact angle ranging from 0∘ to 180∘. The results reveal that the effect of air density is significant on detachment of the merged droplet from the substrate at the later stage of the jumping process; the larger the air density, the larger the jumping height of the droplet. Analysis of streamlines and vorticity contours is performed for density ratios ranging from 60 to 800. These show a generation of vortical structures inside and around the droplet. The intensity of these structures gets weaker after droplet departure as the air inertia is decreased. The results are also presented in terms of phase diagrams of the merged droplet jumping for different Ohnesorge numbers (Oh) and surface wettabilities for both small and large density ratios. The critical value of contact angle where the merged droplet jumps away from the substrate is independent of density ratio and has a value around 150∘. However, the critical value of Oh depends on both density ratio and wettability of the surface for contact angles greater than 150∘. In this range of contact angle, the diagrams show two distinct dynamical regimes for different density ratios, namely, inertial and viscous regimes.

  6. Microfluidic platform for combinatorial synthesis in picolitre droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Ashleigh B; Mayot, Estelle; El Harrak, Abdeslam; Kleinschmidt, Felix; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2012-04-07

    This paper presents a droplet-based microfluidic platform for miniaturized combinatorial synthesis. As a proof of concept, a library of small molecules for early stage drug screening was produced. We present an efficient strategy for producing a 7 × 3 library of potential thrombin inhibitors that can be utilized for other combinatorial synthesis applications. Picolitre droplets containing the first type of reagent (reagents A(1), A(2), …, A(m)) were formed individually in identical microfluidic chips and then stored off chip with the aid of stabilizing surfactants. These droplets were then mixed to form a library of droplets containing reagents A(1-m), each individually compartmentalized, which was reinjected into a second microfluidic chip and combinatorially fused with picolitre droplets containing the second reagent (reagents B(1), B(2), …, B(n)) that were formed on chip. The concept was demonstrated with a three-component Ugi-type reaction involving an amine (reagents A(1-3)), an aldehyde (reagents B(1-7)), and an isocyanide (held constant), to synthesize a library of small molecules with potential thrombin inhibitory activity. Our technique produced 10(6) droplets of each reaction at a rate of 2.3 kHz. Each droplet had a reaction volume of 3.1 pL, at least six orders of magnitude lower than conventional techniques. The droplets can then be divided into aliquots for different downstream screening applications. In addition to medicinal chemistry applications, this combinatorial droplet-based approach holds great potential for other applications that involve sampling large areas of chemical parameter space with minimal reagent consumption; such an approach could be beneficial when optimizing reaction conditions or performing combinatorial reactions aimed at producing novel materials.

  7. DROPLET COLLISION AND COALESCENCE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; CAI Ti-min; HE Guo-qiang; HU Chun-bo

    2006-01-01

    A new droplet collision and coalescence model was presented, a quick-sort method for locating collision partners was also devised and based on theoretical and experimental results, further advancement was made to the droplet collision outcome.The advantages of the two implementations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)method were used to limit the collision of droplets to a given number of nearest droplets and define the probability of coalescence, numerical simulations were carried out for model validation. Results show that the model presented is mesh-independent and less time consuming, it can not only maintains the system momentum conservation perfectly, but not susceptible to initial droplet size distribution as well.

  8. Driving Droplet by Scale Effect on Microstructured Hydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing

    2012-01-01

    A new type of water droplet transportation on microstructured hydrophobic surface is proposed and investigated experimentally and theoretically - water droplet could be driven by scale effect which is different from the traditional methods. Gradient microstructured hydrophobic surface is fabricated in which the area fraction is kept constant, but the scales of the micro-pillars are monotonic changed. When additional water or horizontal vibration is applied, the original water droplet could move unidirectionally to the direction from the small scale to the large scale to decrease its total surface energy. A new mechanism based on line tension model could be used to explain this phenomenon. It is also found that dynamic contact angle decreases with increasing the scale of the micro-pillars along the moving direction. These new findings will deepen our understanding of the relationship between topology and wetting properties, and could be very helpful to design liquid droplet transportation device in microfluidi...

  9. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  10. Simulation study of water and sugar dynamics in supercooled mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Valeria; Cagin, Tahir; Goddard, William A.

    2003-03-01

    Water dynamics in concentrated carbohydrate solutions is of utmost importance in food and pharmaceutical technology, where low water mobility is desirable to slow down chemical degradation and preserve biomolecules. We have studied the microscopic mechanism of water diffusion in binary and polydisperse malto-oligosaccharides and water mixtures by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The computations were performed with a coarse grain model (M3B), derived from atomistic simulations of water and malto-oligosaccharides. The use of the M3B model permits simulations of the order of 0.1 microsecond, thus allowing us to explore water dynamics from the liquid to the deep supercooled regime. The dynamics of water confined in the sugar matrix is slowed down with respect to bulk water. We found that at low moisture content and low temperature, ranslational diffusion of water and glucose rotation proceed through a hopping-diffusion mechanism. Moreover, we found water mobility to be heterogeneous: there is a broad distribution of time scales for different water molecules in the mixtures. We discuss whether there is a relationship between the heterogeneous structure of these mixtures in the sub-nanometer scale and the heterogeneous dynamics of water molecules.

  11. The Transient Supercooling Enhancement For A Pulsed Thermoelectric Cooler (TEC)

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Jia-ni; Du, Jun-yan; Wang, Shi-fei; Zhou, Jing-wei; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Once TEC excitated by a high-voltage pulse, there exists a transient thermoelectric supercooling effect, which can be enhanced by keeping on increasing the Peltier cooling effect to compensate for the negative self-heating from the Joule heating effect and Fourier heat conduction effect. After superimposing an additional voltage pulse over a steady-state reference value in a short time scale, abrupt temperature drop will be produc...

  12. Thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamics in supercooled ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrjanowicz, K; Wojnarowska, Z; Paluch, M; Pionteck, J

    2011-04-28

    It was shown recently that ibuprofen revealed a strong tendency to form hydrogen bonded aggregates such as dimers and trimers of either cyclic or linear geometry, which somehow seems to control molecular mobility of that drug [Brás et al. J. Phys. Chem. B2008, 112 (35), 11 087-11 099]. For such hydrogen-bonded liquids, superpositioning of dynamics under various temperature T, pressure P, and volume V conditions, when plotted versus the scaling function of T(-1)V(-γ) (where γ is a material constant), may not always be satisfying. In the present work, we have tested the validity of this scaling for supercooled ibuprofen. In order to do that, pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) measurements combined with isobaric and isothermal dielectric relaxation studies (pressure up to 310 MPa) were carried out. The scaling properties of the examined drug were derived from the fitting of the τ(α)(T,V) dependences to the modified Avramov equation and by analyzing in double logarithmic scale the T(g)(V(g)) dependences, where the glass transition temperature T(g) and volume V(g) were defined for various relaxation times. In view of the obtained results, we conjecture that for ibuprofen the thermodynamic scaling idea works but not perfectly. The slight departure from the scaling behavior is discussed in the context of the hydrogen bonding abilities of the examined system and compared with the results reported for other strongly associated liquids.

  13. The Transient Supercooling Enhancement For A Pulsed Thermoelectric Cooler (TEC)

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Jia-ni; Du, Jun-yan; Wang, Shi-fei; Zhou, Jing-wei; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Once TEC excitated by a high-voltage pulse, there exists a transient thermoelectric supercooling effect, which can be enhanced by keeping on increasing the Peltier cooling effect to compensate for the negative self-heating from the Joule heating effect and Fourier heat conduction effect. After superimposing an additional voltage pulse over a steady-state reference value in a short time scale, abrupt temperature drop will be produc...

  14. Leidenfrost levitation: beyond droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Yuhao; Coder, Benjamin; Osborne, Paul A; Spafford, Jonathon; Michael, Grant E; Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Friction is a major inhibitor in almost every mechanical system. Enlightened by the Leidenfrost effect - a droplet can be levitated by its own vapor layer on a sufficiently hot surface - we demonstrate for the first time that a small cart can also be levitated by Leidenfrost vapor. The levitated cart can carry certain amount of load and move frictionlessly over the hot surface. The maximum load that the cart can carry is experimentally tested over a range of surface temperatures. We show that the levitated cart can be propelled not only by gravitational force over a slanted flat surface, but also self-propelled over a ratchet shaped horizontal surface. In the end, we experimentally tested water consumption rate for sustaining the levitated cart, and compared the results to theoretical calculations. If perfected, this frictionless Leidenfrost cart could be used in numerous engineering applications where relative motion exists between surfaces.

  15. Supercooling and cold energy storage characteristics of nano-media in ball-packed porous structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qunzhi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented experiments aimed to study the supercooling and cold-energy storage characteristics of nanofluids and water-based nano-media in ball-packed porous structures (BPS. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs measuring 20nm and 80nm were used as additives and sodium dodecyl benzene sulphonate (SDBS was used as anionic surfactant. The experiments used different concentrations of nanofluid, distilled with BPS of different spherical diameter and different concentrations of nano-media, and were conducted 20 times. Experimental results of supercooling were analysed by statistical methods. Results show that the average and peak supercooling degrees of nanofluids and nano-media in BPS are lower than those of distilled water. For the distilled water in BPS, the supercooling degree decreases on the whole with the decrease of the ball diameter. With the same spherical diameter (8mm of BPS, the supercooling degree of TiO2 NPs measuring 20nm is lower than the supercooling degree of distilled water in BPS. Step-cooling experiments of different concentrations of nanofluids and nano-media in BPS were also conducted. Results showed that phase transition time is reduced because of the presence of TiO2 NPs. The BPS substrate and the NPs enhance the heat transfer. Distilled water with a porous solid base and nanoparticles means the amount of cold-energy storage increases and the supercooling degree and the total time are greatly reduced. The phase transition time of distilled water is about 3.5 times that of nano-media in BPS.

  16. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  17. Combustion dynamics of low vapour pressure nanofuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Khushboo; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Basu, Saptarshi

    2017-07-01

    Multiscale combustion dynamics, shape oscillations, secondary atomization, and precipitate formation have been elucidated for low vapour pressure nanofuel [n-dodecane seeded with alumina nanoparticles (NPs)] droplets. Dilute nanoparticle loading rates (0.1%-1%) have been considered. Contrary to our previous studies of ethanol-water blend (high vapour pressure fuel), pure dodecane droplets do not exhibit internal boiling after ignition. However, variation in surface tension due to temperature causes shape deformations for pure dodecane droplets. In the case of nanofuels, intense heat release from the enveloping flame leads to the formation of micron-size aggregates (of alumina NPS) which serve as nucleation sites promoting heterogeneous boiling. Three boiling regimes (A, B, and C) have been identified with varying bubble dynamics. We have deciphered key mechanisms responsible for the growth, transport, and rupture of the bubbles. Bubble rupture causes ejections of liquid droplets termed as secondary atomization. Ejection of small bubbles (mode 1) resembles the classical vapour bubble collapse mechanism near a flat free surface. However, large bubbles induce severe shape deformations as well as bulk oscillations. Rupture of large bubbles results in high speed liquid jet formation which undergoes Rayleigh-Plateau tip break-up. Both modes contribute towards direct fuel transfer from the droplet surface to flame envelope bypassing diffusion limitations. Combustion lifetime of nanofuel droplets consequently has two stages: stage I (where bubble dynamics are dominant) and stage II (formation of gelatinous mass due to continuous fuel depletion; NP agglomeration). In the present work, variation of flame dynamics and spatio-temporal heat release (HR) have been analysed using high speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging. Fluctuations in droplet shape and flame heat release are found to be well correlated. Droplet flame is bifurcated in two zones (I and II). Flame response is

  18. Global rainbow refractometry for droplet temperature measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascal Lemaitre; Emmanuel Porcheron; Amandine Nuboer; Philippe Brun; Pierre Cornet; Jeanne Malet; Jacques Vendel; Laurent Bouilloux [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire DSU/SERAC, BP 68, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gerard Grehan [UMR 6614 CORIA, Laboratoire d' Electromagnetisme et Systemes Particulaires Site Universitaire du Madrillet, Avenue de l' universite BP 12, 76 801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex, (France)

    2005-07-01

    . Lemaitre, E. Porcheron, P. Brun, J. Malet, P. Cornet, J. Vendel, G. Grehan. Global rainbow refractometry development for droplet temperature measurement in hostile environment. 9. ICLASS, Sorrento, Italie, July 13-17, 2003. [3] P. Lemaitre, E. Porcheron, A. Nuboer, P. Brun, J. Malet, P. Cornet, J. Vendel, G. Grehan. Development of the global rainbow refractometry to measure droplet spray temperature in a large containment vessel. 5. ICMF, Yokohama, Japan, May 30 - June 4, 2004. (authors)

  19. A phase space approach to supercooled liquids and a universal collapse of their viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Bryan Weingartner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A broad fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenology of supercooled liquids has remained elusive, despite decades of intense exploration. When supercooled beneath its characteristic melting temperature, a liquid sees a sharp rise in its viscosity over a narrow temperature range, eventually becoming frozen on laboratory timescales. Explaining this immense increase in viscosity is one of the principle goals of condensed matter physicists. To that end, numerous theoretical frameworks have been proposed which explain and reproduce the temperature dependence of the viscosity of supercooled liquids. Each of these frameworks appears only applicable to specific classes of glassformers and each possess a number of variable parameters. Here we describe a classical framework for explaining the dynamical behavior of supercooled liquids based on statistical mechanical considerations, and possessing only a single variable parameter. This parameter varies weakly from liquid to liquid. Furthermore, as predicted by this new classical theory and its earlier quantum counterpart, we find with the aid of a small dimensionless constant that varies in size from sim 0.05-0.12 , a universal (16 decade collapse of the viscosity data as a function of temperature. The collapse appears in all known types of glass forming supercooled liquids (silicates, metallic alloys, organic systems, chalcogenide, sugars, and water.

  20. Radiometric Observations of Supercooled Liquid Water within a Split Front over the Sierra Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggli, Mark F.; Reynolds, David W.

    1985-11-01

    A storm bearing close structural resemblance to a katafront was observed from the ground with microwave radiometry and a vertically pointing Ka-band radar over the Sierra Nevada of California. The onset and duration of supercooled liquid water was determined and matched to a split front model used to describe the synoptic features of a katafront. Results indicate that prior to the passage of the upper front no supercooled liquid water was observed. This portion of the storm provided the deepest cloud and coldest cloud tops. Supercooled liquid water was most prevalent after the upper front passage, and persisted until the suspected surface front passage. The duration of measured supercooled water was 16 hours.This information broadens the knowledge regarding the presence of supercooled liquid water, and thus possible seeding potential, within winter storms so that treatment can be confined to the period of storms amenable to cloud seeding. Future studies may well confirm the ease with which these periods can be predicted on an operational basis in the Sierra Nevada.

  1. Liquid Supercoolability and Synthesis Kinetics of Quinary Refractory High-entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. L.; Hu, L.; Yang, S. J.; Wang, A.; Wang, L.; Wei, B.

    2016-11-01

    The high-entropy configuration of equiatomic multicomponent alloys opens an effective access to the development of advanced materials. Here we report the synthesis of a new quinary refractory WMoTaNbZr high-entropy alloy under electrostatic levitation condition. It showed a high liquidus temperature of 2686 K and achieved a maximum supercooling of 640 K (0.24 TL) at molten state. The containerless measurements revealed a linear increasing tendency for both its liquid state density and the specific heat to emissivity ratio versus alloy supercooling. A high-entropy body-centered cubic (HEB) phase dominated its phase constitution despite the formation of a negligible amount of solid solution (Zr) phase. The dendritic growth of HEB phase always governed the crystallization process, attained a fastest growth velocity of 13.5 m/s and displayed a power function relation to alloy supercooling. The high speed videographic research of recalescence phenomenon indicated Johnson-Mehl-Avrami type transition kinetics for its rapid solidification process. As supercooling increases, the microstructures of primary HEB phase were refined conspicuously and exhibited an obvious solute trapping effect of the segregative Zr component. Meanwhile, the Vickers hardness of HEB phase displayed the rising tendency with supercooling.

  2. A phase space approach to supercooled liquids and a universal collapse of their viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartner, Nicholas; Nogueira, Flavio; Pueblo, Chris; Kelton, Kenneth; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-11-01

    A broad fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenology of supercooled liquids has remained elusive, despite decades of intense exploration. When supercooled beneath its characteristic melting temperature, a liquid sees a sharp rise in its viscosity over a narrow temperature range, eventually becoming frozen on laboratory timescales. Explaining this immense increase in viscosity is one of the principle goals of condensed matter physicists. To that end, numerous theoretical frameworks have been proposed which explain and reproduce the temperature dependence of the viscosity of supercooled liquids. Each of these frameworks appears only applicable to specific classes of glassformers and each possess a number of variable parameters. Here we describe a classical framework for explaining the dynamical behavior of supercooled liquids based on statistical mechanical considerations, and possessing only a single variable parameter. This parameter varies weakly from liquid to liquid. Furthermore, as predicted by this new classical theory and its earlier quantum counterpart, we find with the aid of a small dimensionless constant that varies in size from ˜ 0.05-0.12, a universal (16 decade) collapse of the viscosity data as a function of temperature. The collapse appears in all known types of glass forming supercooled liquids (silicates, metallic alloys, organic systems, chalcogenide, sugars, and water).

  3. Simulation of Interpersonal Transport of Expiratory Droplets and Droplet Nuclei between Two Standing Manikins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Y, Li,

    2012-01-01

    Interpersonal transport of expiratory droplets and droplet nuclei constitutes a prerequisite for the transmission of pathogens as well as the transmission of respiratory diseases. Numerical simulations considering droplet evaporation and droplet nucleus sizes were carried out, using two detailed...... the existence of direct spray route of the interpersonal transport of expiratory droplets....

  4. Vitrification and levitation of a liquid droplet on liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young S.; Adler, Douglas; Xu, Feng; Kayaalp, Emre; Nureddin, Aida; Anchan, Raymond M.; Maas, Richard L.; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    The vitrification of a liquid occurs when ice crystal formation is prevented in the cryogenic environment through ultrarapid cooling. In general, vitrification entails a large temperature difference between the liquid and its surrounding medium. In our droplet vitrification experiments, we observed that such vitrification events are accompanied by a Leidenfrost phenomenon, which impedes the heat transfer to cool the liquid, when the liquid droplet comes into direct contact with liquid nitrogen. This is distinct from the more generally observed Leidenfrost phenomenon that occurs when a liquid droplet is self-vaporized on a hot plate. In the case of rapid cooling, the phase transition from liquid to vitrified solid (i.e., vitrification) and the levitation of droplets on liquid nitrogen (i.e., Leidenfrost phenomenon) take place simultaneously. Here, we investigate these two simultaneous physical events by using a theoretical model containing three dimensionless parameters (i.e., Stefan, Biot, and Fourier numbers). We explain theoretically and observe experimentally a threshold droplet radius during the vitrification of a cryoprotectant droplet in the presence of the Leidenfrost effect. PMID:20176969

  5. Quantification of protein interaction kinetics in a micro droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. L.; Wang, S. P.; Shan, X. N.; Zhang, S. T.; Tao, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of protein interactions is essential to the discovery of disease biomarkers, the development of diagnostic assays, and the screening for therapeutic drugs. Conventional flow-through kinetic measurements need relative large amount of sample that is not feasible for precious protein samples. We report a novel method to measure protein interaction kinetics in a single droplet with sub microliter or less volume. A droplet in a humidity-controlled environmental chamber is replacing the microfluidic channels as the reactor for the protein interaction. The binding process is monitored by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system. Association curves are obtained from the average SPR image intensity in the center area of the droplet. The washing step required by conventional flow-through SPR method is eliminated in the droplet method. The association and dissociation rate constants and binding affinity of an antigen-antibody interaction are obtained by global fitting of association curves at different concentrations. The result obtained by this method is accurate as validated by conventional flow-through SPR system. This droplet-based method not only allows kinetic studies for proteins with limited supply but also opens the door for high-throughput protein interaction study in a droplet-based microarray format that enables measurement of many to many interactions on a single chip.

  6. Devices for the production and sorting of microfluidic droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Heyman, John; Agresti, Jeremy; Köster, Sarah; Weitz, David

    2010-03-01

    Droplets produced in microfluidic devices are a great set of tools for studying large cell populations and permutations of reactions. Sample populations of 10^6 - 10^7 can be studied with relative ease, as encapsulation and screening rates in the kHz range are accessible. Previous droplet work has shown encapsulation of cells in droplets allows individual cells and their products to be studied. Advantages include correlation between detected products and initial drop contents, as well as minimized sample cross-contamination. Most microfluidic-based biological assays rely on fluorescent labeling of cells or use of cellular products to initiate a fluorescence-producing reaction. Detection of the fluorescence provides a trigger for sorting those cells or cell-containing droplets away from the general population. Though this allows some cellular processes to be studied, detection and quantification of all products, not just those expressed to the cell surface or those that catalyze reactions, would impact development of better therapeutics. We are currently working to adapt benchtop biological assays that label and detect cellular products for use in a droplet-based system. The work presented here details the chain of modular microfluidic devices we use to encapsulate, incubate, interrogate, and sort a population of droplets containing a model system.

  7. The recoiling of liquid droplets upon collision with solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.-Y.; Chun, J.-H.

    2001-03-01

    Although the spreading behavior of liquid droplets impacting on solid surfaces has been extensively studied, the mechanism of recoiling which takes place after the droplet reaches its maximum spread diameter has not yet been fully understood. This paper reports the study of the recoiling behavior of different liquid droplets (water, ink, and silicone oil) on different solid surfaces (polycarbonate and silicon oxide). The droplet dynamics are experimentally studied using a high speed video system. Analytical methods using the variational principle, which were originated by Kendall and Rohsenow (MIT Technical Report 85694-100, 1978) and Bechtel et al. [IBM J. Res. Dev. 25, 963 (1981)], are modified to account for wetting and viscous effects. In our model, an empirically determined dissipation factor is used to estimate the viscous friction. It is shown that the model closely predicts the experimental results obtained for the varying dynamic impact conditions and wetting characteristics. This study shows that droplets recoil fast and vigorously when the Ohnesorge number decreases or the Weber number increases. Droplets with a large equilibrium contact angle are also found to recoil faster. Here the Ohnesorge number scales the resisting force to the recoiling motion, and is shown to play the most important role in characterizing the recoiling motion.

  8. Quantification of protein interaction kinetics in a micro droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L. L. [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wang, S. P., E-mail: shaopeng.wang@asu.edu, E-mail: njtao@asu.edu; Shan, X. N.; Tao, N. J., E-mail: shaopeng.wang@asu.edu, E-mail: njtao@asu.edu [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhang, S. T. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Characterization of protein interactions is essential to the discovery of disease biomarkers, the development of diagnostic assays, and the screening for therapeutic drugs. Conventional flow-through kinetic measurements need relative large amount of sample that is not feasible for precious protein samples. We report a novel method to measure protein interaction kinetics in a single droplet with sub microliter or less volume. A droplet in a humidity-controlled environmental chamber is replacing the microfluidic channels as the reactor for the protein interaction. The binding process is monitored by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system. Association curves are obtained from the average SPR image intensity in the center area of the droplet. The washing step required by conventional flow-through SPR method is eliminated in the droplet method. The association and dissociation rate constants and binding affinity of an antigen-antibody interaction are obtained by global fitting of association curves at different concentrations. The result obtained by this method is accurate as validated by conventional flow-through SPR system. This droplet-based method not only allows kinetic studies for proteins with limited supply but also opens the door for high-throughput protein interaction study in a droplet-based microarray format that enables measurement of many to many interactions on a single chip.

  9. Ultrasonic estimation of the contact angle of a sessile droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, R.; Simonetti, F. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Radiation of energy by large amplitude leaky Rayleigh waves is regarded as one of the key physical mechanisms regulating the actuation and manipulation of droplets in surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic devices. The interaction between a SAW and a droplet is highly complex and is presently the subject of extensive research. This paper investigates the existence of an additional interaction mechanism based on the propagation of quasi-Stoneley waves inside sessile droplets deposited on a solid substrate. In contrast with the leaky Rayleigh wave, the energy of the Stoneley wave is confined within a thin fluid layer in contact with the substrate. The hypothesis is confirmed by three-dimensional finite element simulations and ultrasonic scattering experiments measuring the reflection of Rayleigh waves from droplets of different diameters. Moreover, real-time monitoring of the droplet evaporation process reveals a clear correlation between the droplet contact angle and the spectral information of the reflected Rayleigh signal, thus paving the way for ultrasonic measurements of surface tension.

  10. Monodisperse droplet generation for microscale mass transfer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine; Rao, Rekha; Grillet, Anne; Jove-Colon, Carlos; Brooks, Carlton; Nemer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Understanding interfacial mass transport on a droplet scale is essential for modeling liquid-liquid extraction processes. A thin flow-focusing microfluidic channel is evaluated for generating monodisperse liquid droplets for microscale mass transport studies. Surface treatment of the microfluidic device allows creation of both oil in water and water in oil emulsions, facilitating a large parameter study of viscosity and flow rate ratios. The unusually thin channel height promotes a flow regime where no droplets form. Through confocal microscopy, this regime is shown to be highly influenced by the contact angle of the liquids with the channel. Drop sizes are found to scale with a modified capillary number. Liquid streamlines within the droplets are inferred by high speed imagery of microparticles dispersed in the droplet phase. Finally, species mass transfer to the droplet fluid is quantitatively measured using high speed imaging. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  11. Droplet Impact on Inclined Surfaces for Forensic Bloodstain Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marc; Lockard, Michael; Neitzel, G. Paul

    2015-11-01

    During a crime scene investigation, bloodstains are used to infer the size, impact angle, and velocity of the blood droplet that produced the stain. This droplet impact process was explored using experiments and numerical simulations of droplets impacting planar, inclined surfaces with different roughness and wetting properties over a range of Reynolds numbers (1,000 - 5,500) and Weber numbers (200 - 2,000) typical of some forensics applications. Results will be presented showing how the size and shape of the final elliptical bloodstain varies with impact angle and surface roughness. The common forensics practice to predict the impact angle is fairly accurate for near-normal impacts, but it under-predicts the angle for oblique impacts less than about 40° and this effect worsens for rougher surfaces. The spreading of the droplet normal to the impact plane is shown to follow that of a droplet under normal impact as the impact velocity increases. This effect is also lessened by increased surface roughness. The reasons for these effects will be explored using a new GPU-based wavelet-adaptive flow simulation, which can resolve the flows near the solid surface and near the moving contact line of these droplets for the large Reynolds and Weber numbers of these experiments. Supported by the National Institute of Justice.

  12. Droplet depinning in a wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshanginejad, Alireza; Lee, Sungyon

    2017-03-01

    Pinning and depinning of a windswept droplet on a surface is familiar yet deceptively complex for it depends on the interaction of the contact line with the microscopic features of the solid substrate. This physical picture is further compounded when wind of the Reynolds number greater than 100 blows over pinned drops, leading to the boundary layer separation and wake generation. In this Rapid Communication, we incorporate the well-developed ideas of the classical boundary layer to study partially wetting droplets in a wake created by a leader object. Depending on its distance from the leader, the droplet is observed to exhibit drafting, upstream motion, and splitting, due to the wake-induced hydrodynamic coupling that is analogous to drafting of moving bodies. We successfully rationalize the onset of the upstream motion regime using a reduced model that computes the droplet shape governed by the pressure field inside the wake.

  13. A numerical study of thermocapillary migration of a small liquid droplet on a horizontal solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy-Bich; Chen, Jyh-Chen

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, the transient thermocapillary migration of a small liquid droplet on a horizontal solid surface is numerically investigated. The droplet has a large static contact angle and a high aspect ratio of the maximum height of the droplet to its footprint. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations for both the droplet and surrounding air are solved through the finite element method. The evolution of the isotherms, the flow fields and the contact angle hysteresis are presented. Two asymmetric thermocapillary vortices appear inside the droplet. The variation of the size of the thermocapillary vortex during the migration process causes the speed of the droplet to first increase significantly, and then decrease gradually to approach a constant value. The higher imposed temperature gradient causes the droplet velocity to reach its maximal value earlier and have a higher final speed. If the static contact angle of the droplet is less than (or higher) than 90°, the droplet speed is lower (or higher) since the net thermocapillary momentum in the horizontal direction is diminished (or enhanced) by the presence of capillary force. The present results for the migration velocity and the contact angle hysteresis for a squalane droplet are also in good agreement with the previous experimental results.

  14. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs(+) is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs(+)-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10(6) helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  15. Contact angle and droplet heat transfer during evaporation on structured and smooth surfaces of heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Water evaporation in a wide range of droplet diameters and wall temperatures on the structured and smooth surfaces were studied experimentally. Linear dependence of evaporation rate (dV/dt) on a droplet radius varies when the volume is greater than 40-60 μl. The static contact angles on the structured surface vary with a droplet diameter for high wall superheating. Dependence of the contact angle on diameter for the corrugated surface is defined by a change in both potential energy barrier U and three-phase contact line tension τcl. This energy barrier for the structured wall changes with an increase in the initial droplet diameter and becomes constant for the large droplets. For high wall superheating, the power in the law of evaporation increases from 1 to 1.45 with an increase in the initial droplet diameter. Depending on the droplet radius, number of droplets and heater length, four different characters of evaporation are realized. Complete droplet evaporation time on structured surface is less than smooth wall. Heat transfer coefficient is greater for structured wall than smooth one. When simulating droplet evaporation and heat transfer, it is necessary to take into account free convection of air and vapor.

  16. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  17. Magnetic droplets and dynamical skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Johan

    2015-03-01

    Nanocontact spin-torque oscillators (NC-STOs) provide an excellent environment for studying nano-magnetic phenomena such as localized and propagating auto-oscillatory spin wave (SW) modes. The recent experimental observation of magnetic droplet solitons in NC-STOs with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) free layers, and the numerical and experimental demonstrations of spin transfer torque (STT) nucleated skyrmions in similar magnetic thin films add two interesting and useful nanoscale magnetic objects. Due to the competition between exchange, anisotropy, and, in the case of skyrmions, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), the droplet and the skyrmion are extremely compact, on the order of 10-100 nm. One of the main differences between a magnetic dissipative droplet soliton and a skyrmion is that the former is a dynamical object with all its spins precessing around an effective field and stabilized by STT, exchange, and PMA, while the latter has static spins and an internal structure stabilized by DMI, exchange, and PMA. The dissipative droplet is furthermore a non-topological soliton, while the skyrmion is topologically protected. In this work I will report on our most recent droplet experiments, including droplet collapse at very high fields, droplets excited in nano-wire based NC-STOs, and studies of the field-current droplet nucleation boundary. I will also demonstrate numerically and analytically that STT driven precession can stabilize so-called dynamical skyrmions even in the absence of DMI, and I will describe their very promising properties in detail. From a more fundamental perspective, precession is hence a third independent possibility to stabilize a skyrmion, without the need for the conventional stabilization from either dipolar energy or DMI.

  18. The energetics of bouncing droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Sam; Molacek, Jan; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation of the energetics of droplets bouncing on the surface of a vertically vibrating bath. We first assess the relative magnitudes of the kinetic, surface and gravitational potential energies of both the droplet and its wave field. We then seek to rationalize the transitions between the various bouncing and walking states that arise as the vibrational forcing is increased. Our results are compared with prior theoretical and experimental work.

  19. Thermal conductivity enhancement of sodium acetate trihydrate by adding graphite powder and the effect on stability of supercooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Berg; Dannemand, Mark; Kong, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate and graphite powder mixtures have been evaluated to investigate the influence of the graphite powder on the stability of supercooling. A sodium acetate and water mixture mixed with graphite powder was successfully supercooled at ambient indoor temperatures for five month...

  20. An investigation on supercooling directional solidification process of Cu-Ni single phase alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Supercooling directional solidification (SDS) is put forward by combination of melt supercooling and conventional solidification by application of supercooling inheritance. On the self-designed SDS equipment, SDS of Cu-Ni alloy was achieved successfully. The results are as follows: (ⅰ) The primary arm spacing is about 30 m m, the growth of secondary arms are strongly suppressed. The primary arm spacing is nearly the same as LMC method (GL=25 K/mm, V=500 m m/s), the primary stems are straight, fine and completed, with an inclination angle of about 5.8o. (ⅱ) A semi-quantitative T-T model is brought forward to describe the dendrite growth rate V vs. undercooling D T. The prediction of T-T model agrees well with experimental results. The formation of fine equiaxed dendrites, transition region and dendrite region can be explained successfully by D T-V-x relation of T-T model.

  1. Development of seasonal heat storage based on stable supercooling of a sodium acetate water mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua; Andersen, Elsa

    2012-01-01

    A number of heat storage modules for seasonal heat storages based on stable supercooling of a sodium acetate water mixture have been tested by means of experiments in a heat storage test facility. The modules had different volumes and designs. Further, different methods were used to transfer heat....... • The reliability of the supercooling was elucidated for the heat storage modules for different operation conditions. • The reliability of a cooling method used to start solidification of the supercooled sodium acetate water mixture was elucidated. The method is making use of boiling CO2 in a small tank in good...... to and from the sodium acetate water mixture in the modules. By means of the experiments: • The heat exchange capacity rates to and from the sodium acetate water mixture in the heat storage modules were determined for different volume flow rates. • The heat content of the heat storage modules were determined...

  2. Experimental investigations on cylindrical latent heat storage units with sodium acetate trihydrate composites utilizing supercooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg; Kong, Weiqiang;

    2016-01-01

    unit was tested with 116.3 kg SAT with 0.5% Xanthan rubber as a thickening agent and 4.4% graphite powder. The heat exchange capacity rate during charge was significantly lower for the unit with SAT and Xanthan rubber compared to the unit with SAT and extra water. This was due to less convection......Latent heat storage units utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) composites were tested in a laboratory. The stainless steel units were 1.5 m high cylinders with internal heat exchangers of tubes with fins. One unit was tested with 116 kg SAT with 6% extra water. Another...... in the thickened phase change material after melting. The heat content in the fully charged state and the heat released after solidification of the supercooled SAT mixtures at ambient temperature was higher for the unit with the thickened SAT mixture. The heat discharged after solidification of the supercooled SAT...

  3. Experimental investigations on heat content of supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate by a simple heat loss method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Weiqiang; Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2016-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate is a phase change material that can be used for long term heat storage in solar heating systems because of its relatively high heat of fusion, a melting temperature of 58 °C and its ability to supercool stable. In practical applications sodium acetate trihydrate tend...... to suffer from phase separation which is the phenomenon where anhydrous salt settles to the bottom over time. This happens especially in supercooled state. The heat released from the crystallization of supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate with phase separation will be lower than the heat released from...... sodium acetate trihydrate without phase separation. Possible ways of avoiding or reducing the problem of phase separation were investigated. A wide variety of composites of sodium acetate trihydrate with additives including extra water, thickening agents, solid and liquid polymers have been...

  4. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  5. Evaporation-Induced Buckling and Fission of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Sarles, Stephen A [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a robust platform for studying synthetic cellular membranes; however, to date no DIBs have been produced at cellular length scales. Here, we create microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) at the interface between aqueous femtoliter-volume droplets within an oil-filled microfluidic channel. The uniquely large area-to-volume ratio of the droplets results in strong evaporation effects, causing the system to transition through three distinct regimes. First, the two adjacent droplets shrink into the shape of a single spherical droplet, where an augmented lipid bilayer partitions two hemi-spherical volumes. In the second regime, the combined effects of the shrinking monolayers and growing bilayer force the confined bilayer to buckle to conserve its mass. Finally, at a bending moment corresponding to a critical shear stress, the buckling bilayer fissions a vesicle to regulate its shape and stress. The DIBs produced here enable evaporation-induced bilayer dynamics reminiscent of endo- and exocytosis in cells.

  6. Long term thermal energy storage with stable supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Schultz, Jørgen M.; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate makes it possible to store thermal energy partly loss free. This principle makes seasonal heat storage in compact systems possible. To keep high and stable energy content and cycling stability phase separation of the storage material must...... to 230 kJ/kg. TRNSYS simulations of a solar combi system including a storage with four heat storage modules of each 200 kg of sodium acetate trihydrate utilizing stable supercooling achieved a solar fraction of 80% for a low energy house in Danish climatic conditions....

  7. Elemental diffusion during the droplet epitaxy growth of In(Ga)As/GaAs(001) quantum dots by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. B.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y. B.; Liao, X. Z., E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lei, W. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Zou, J. [Materials Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Ringer, S. P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-01-13

    Droplet epitaxy is an important method to produce epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Droplet epitaxy of III-V QDs comprises group III elemental droplet deposition and the droplet crystallization through the introduction of group V elements. Here, we report that, in the droplet epitaxy of InAs/GaAs(001) QDs using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, significant elemental diffusion from the substrate to In droplets occurs, resulting in the formation of In(Ga)As crystals, before As flux is provided. The supply of As flux suppresses the further elemental diffusion from the substrate and promotes surface migration, leading to large island formation with a low island density.

  8. Bouncing of charged droplets: An explanation using mean curvature flow

    CERN Document Server

    Helmensdorfer, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Two oppositely charged droplets of (say) water in e.g. oil or air will tend to drift together under the influence of their charges. As they make contact, one might expect them to coalesce and form one large droplet, and this indeed happens when the charge difference is sufficiently small. However, Ristenpart et al discovered a remarkable physical phenomenon whereby for large enough charge differentials, the droplets bounce off each other as they make contact. Explanations based on minimisation of area under a volume constraint have been proposed based on the premise that consideration of surface energy cannot be sufficient. However, in this note we explain that on the contrary, the bouncing phenomenon can be completely explained in terms of energy, including an accurate prediction of the threshold charge differential between coalescence and bouncing.

  9. Droplet formation in a T-shaped microchannel junction: A model system for membrane emulsification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, van der S.; Steegmans, M.L.J.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Droplet formation was studied in a glass microchip with a small channel containing to-be-dispersed phase perpendicular to a large channel with a cross-flowing continuous phase. This resembles the situation during cross-flow membrane emulsification. In this model system, droplets are formed at a

  10. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  11. Photoacoustic measurements of photokinetics in single optically trapped aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Paul; Cremer, Johannes; Signorell, Ruth; Thaler, Klemens; Haisch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    It is well established that interaction of light with atmospheric aerosols has a large impact on the Earth's climate. However, uncertainties in the magnitude of this impact remain large, due in part to broad distributions of aerosol size, composition, and chemical reactivity. In this context, photoacoustic spectroscopy is commonly used to measure light absorption by aerosols. Here, we present photoacoustic measurements of single, optically-trapped nanodroplets to reveal droplet size-depencies of photochemical and physical processes. Theoretical considerations have pointed to a size-dependence in the magnitude and phase of the photoacoustic response from aerosol droplets. This dependence is thought to originate from heat transfer processes that are slow compared to the acoustic excitation frequency. In the case of a model aerosol, our measurements of single particle absorption cross-section versus droplet size confirm these theoretical predictions. In a related study, using the same model aerosol, we also demonstrate a droplet size-dependence of photochemical reaction rates [1]. Within sub-micron sized particles, photolysis rates were observed to be an order of magnitude greater than those observed in larger droplets. [1] J. W. Cremer, K. M. Thaler, C. Haisch, and R. Signorell. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics. Nat. Commun., 7:10941, 2016.

  12. Droplet Motion on a Shape Gradient Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanfen; Cheng, Jiang; Zhou, Cailong; Xing, Haiting; Wen, Xiufang; Pi, Pihui; Xu, Shouping

    2017-05-02

    We demonstrate a facile method to induce water droplet motion on an wedge-shaped superhydrophobic copper surface combining with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oil layer on it. The unbalanced interfacial tension from the shape gradient offers the actuating force. The superhydrophobicity critically eliminates the droplet contact line pinning and the slippery PDMS oil layer lubricates the droplet motion, which makes the droplet move easily. The maximum velocity and furthest position of droplet motion were recorded and found to be influenced by the gradient angle. The mechanism of droplet motion on the shape gradient surface is systematically discussed, and the theoretical model analysis is well matched with the experimental results.

  13. Continuous transfer of liquid metal droplets across a fluid-fluid interface within an integrated microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol, Berrak; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J; Kurdzinski, Michael E; Tang, Shi-Yang; Petersen, Phred; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-06-07

    Micro scale liquid metal droplets have been hailed as the potential key building blocks of future micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). However, most of the current liquid metal enabled systems involve millimeter scale droplets, which are manually injected onto the desired locations of the microchip. Despite its simplicity, this method is impractical for patterning large arrays or complex systems based on micro scale droplets. Here, we present a microfluidic chip, which integrates continuous generation of micro scale galinstan droplets in glycerol, and the hydrodynamic transfer of these droplets into sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Observation via high-speed imaging along with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis are utilised to comprehend the lateral migration of droplets from the glycerol to NaOH fluid. This platform is simple, can be readily integrated into other microfluidic systems, and creates flexibility by separating the continuous phase for droplet generation from the eventual target carrier fluid within a monolithic chip.

  14. Motorized actuation system to perform droplet operations on printed plastic sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Taejoon; Brien, Riley; Njus, Zach; Kalwa, Upender; Pandey, Santosh

    2016-05-21

    We developed an open microfluidic system to dispense and manipulate discrete droplets on planar plastic sheets. Here, a superhydrophobic material is spray-coated on commercially-available plastic sheets followed by the printing of hydrophilic symbols using an inkjet printer. The patterned plastic sheets are taped to a two-axis tilting platform, powered by stepper motors, that provides mechanical agitation for droplet transport. We demonstrate the following droplet operations: transport of droplets of different sizes, parallel transport of multiple droplets, merging and mixing of multiple droplets, dispensing of smaller droplets from a large droplet or a fluid reservoir, and one-directional transport of droplets. As a proof-of-concept, a colorimetric assay is implemented to measure the glucose concentration in sheep serum. Compared to silicon-based digital microfluidic devices, we believe that the presented system is appealing for various biological experiments because of the ease of altering design layouts of hydrophilic symbols, relatively faster turnaround time in printing plastic sheets, larger area to accommodate more tests, and lower operational costs by using off-the-shelf products.

  15. Interaction Forces Between Microfluidic Droplets in a Hele-Shaw Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Sarig, Itai; Gat, Amir D

    2015-01-01

    Various microfluidic systems, such as chemical and biological lab-on-a-chip devices, involve motion of multiple droplets within an immersing fluid in shallow micro-channels. Modeling the dynamics of such systems requires calculation of the forces of interaction between the moving droplets. These forces are commonly approximated by superposition of dipoles solutions, which requires an assumption of sufficiently large distance between the droplets. In this work we obtain exact solutions (in the Hele-Shaw limit) for two moving droplets, and a droplet within a droplet, located within a moving immersing fluid, without limitation on the distance between the droplets. This is achieved by solution of the pressure field in a bi-polar coordinate system and calculation of the force in a Cartesian coordinate system. Our results are compared with numerical computations, experimental data and the existing dipole-based models. We utilize the results to calculate the dynamics of a droplet within a droplet, and of two close d...

  16. Marangoni Convection in Evaporating Organic Liquid Droplets on a Nonwetting Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Aditya; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Chen, Xuemei; Garimella, Suresh V

    2016-05-17

    We quantitatively characterize the flow field inside organic liquid droplets evaporating on a nonwetting substrate. A mushroom-structured surface yields the desired nonwetting behavior with methanol droplets, while use of a cooled substrate (5-15 °C) slows the rate of evaporation to allow quasi-static particle image velocimetry. Visualization reveals a toroidal vortex within the droplet that is characteristic of surface tension-driven flow; we demonstrate by means of a scaling analysis that this recirculating flow is Marangoni convection. The velocities in the droplet are on the order of 10-45 mm/s. Thus, unlike in the case of evaporation on wetting substrates where Marangoni convection can be ignored for the purpose of estimating the evaporation rate, advection due to the surface tension-driven flow plays a dominant role in the heat transfer within an evaporating droplet on a nonwetting substrate because of the large height-to-radius aspect ratio of the droplet. We formulate a reduced-order model that includes advective transport within the droplet for prediction of organic liquid droplet evaporation on a nonwetting substrate and confirm that the predicted temperature differential across the height of the droplet matches experiments.

  17. Microfluidics using spatially defined arrays of droplets in one, two, and three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompano, Rebecca R; Liu, Weishan; Du, Wenbin; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2011-01-01

    Spatially defined arrays of droplets differ from bulk emulsions in that droplets in arrays can be indexed on the basis of one or more spatial variables to enable identification, monitoring, and addressability of individual droplets. Spatial indexing is critical in experiments with hundreds to millions of unique compartmentalized microscale processes--for example, in applications such as digital measurements of rare events in a large sample, high-throughput time-lapse studies of the contents of individual droplets, and controlled droplet-droplet interactions. This review describes approaches for spatially organizing and manipulating droplets in one-, two-, and three-dimensional structured arrays, including aspiration, laminar flow, droplet traps, the SlipChip, self-assembly, and optical or electrical fields. This review also presents techniques to analyze droplets in arrays and applications of spatially defined arrays, including time-lapse studies of chemical, enzymatic, and cellular processes, as well as further opportunities in chemical, biological, and engineering sciences, including perturbation/response experiments and personal and point-of-care diagnostics.

  18. Multilayered silicone oil droplets of narrow size distribution: preparation and improved deposition on hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Habiba; Wang, Lianyan; Lian, Guoping; Zhu, Shiping; Zhang, Yueling; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Guanghui

    2012-12-01

    Silicone oil droplets have limited deposition on hair due to electrostatic repulsion with negative surface charge of hair substrates. Aiming to improve silicone deposition on hair substrates, surface properties of uniform-sized silicone oil droplets (produced by membrane emulsification) were modified using layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition. By using this method, silicone oil droplets were coated with large molecular weight polymers, i.e. quaternized chitosan and alginate, and low molecular weight compounds, i.e. diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride and glycerol to obtain six alternate layers of different surface charges. It was found that the dispersion of coated silicone oil droplets of narrow size distribution exhibited much improved mechanical strength and increased viscosity against shear compared to uncoated droplets. These multilayered silicone oil droplets were then added into model shampoos and conditioners to study the effect of charge and molecular weight of coating materials on silicone oil deposition on hair. The results clearly demonstrated that surface charge and charge density have significant influence on silicone oil deposition. Droplets with higher positive charge density resulted in increased deposition of silicone on hair due to electrostatic attraction. Characterization of the hair surface potential, wetting properties and friction certified the results further, showing reduced friction, decreased wetting angle and positive surface potential of high density positively charged silicone oil droplets. Therefore, LBL surface modification combined with membrane emulsification is a promising method for preparing multilayered silicone oil droplets of increased mechanical strength, viscosity and deposition on hair.

  19. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hiranuma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nuclei chamber (CCNC as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (hygroscopic salts but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres or adipic acid. The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from ambient measurements using this technique and AMS analysis were inconclusive, showing little chemical differentiation between ambient aerosol and activated droplet residuals, largely due to low signal levels. When employing as single particle mass spectrometer for compositional analysis, however, we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals.

  20. Characterization of the evaporation of interacting droplets using combined optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Lionel; Castanet, Guillaume; Lemoine, Fabrice

    2015-02-01

    A monodisperse droplet stream is injected into a high-temperature enclosure supplied with air heated up to 540 °C. The two-color laser-induced fluorescence (2cLIF) is used for measuring the droplet temperature. The liquid fuel is seeded by pyrromethene 597-C8, which is a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye. Calibration tests are performed for different types of fuels including ethanol and several alkanes and some of their mixtures. Morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) are identified as a possible adverse effect for temperature measurements. Due to MDRs, lasing of pyrromethene 597-C8 may occur within fluorescent droplets and affect drastically the fluorescence signal upon which temperature measurement relies. The determination of the droplet size and velocity is achieved by means of quantitative shadow imaging. A double cavity PIV laser is focused on a piece of PMMA doped with a fluorescent dye to produce the background illumination of the droplets. A PIV camera is used to capture the drop motion between the pulses of the laser cavities. A large range of initial distance parameters (the ratio between the inter-droplet distance and the droplet diameter) is explored for different liquid fuels (ethanol, isohexane, n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane) and their mixtures. To put forward the effects of the interactions between the droplets, size and temperature measurements are compared to the isolated droplet whose evolution can be predicted with the use of classical models. Comparisons reveal that the inter-droplet spacing and also the fuel volatility play an important role in the reduction of the heat and mass transfers for these interacting droplets. Finally, the ability of the 2cLIF techniques to address the case of multicomponent droplet is also demonstrated.

  1. Walking droplets in linear channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Boris; Hubert, Maxime; Schlagheck, Peter; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    When a droplet is placed onto a vertically vibrated bath, it can bounce without coalescing. Upon an increase of the forcing acceleration, the droplet is propelled by the wave it generates and becomes a walker with a well-defined speed. We investigate the confinement of a walker in different rectangular cavities, used as waveguides for the Faraday waves emitted by successive droplet bounces. By studying the walker velocities, we discover that one-dimensional confinement is optimal for narrow channels of width of D ≃1.5 λF . Thereby, the walker follows a quasilinear path. We also propose an analogy with waveguide models based on the observation of the Faraday instability within the channels.

  2. Soft substrates suppress droplet splashing

    CERN Document Server

    Howland, Christopher J; Style, Robert W; Castrejón-Pita, A A

    2015-01-01

    Droplets splash when they impact dry, flat substrates above a critical velocity that depends on parameters such as droplet size, viscosity and air pressure. We show that substrate stiffness also impacts the splashing threshold by imaging ethanol drops impacting silicone gels of different stiffnesses. Splashing is significantly suppressed: droplets on the softest substrates need over 70% more kinetic energy to splash than they do on rigid substrates. We show that splash suppression is likely to be due to energy losses caused by deformations of soft substrates during the first few microseconds of impact. We find that solids with Youngs modulus $\\lesssim O(10^5)$Pa suppress splashing, in agreement with simple scaling arguments. Thus materials like soft gels and elastomers can be used as simple coatings for effective splash prevention.

  3. Influence of Bulk Elasticity and Interfacial Tension on the Deformation of Gelled Water-in-Oil Emulsion Droplets: An AFM Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filip, D.; Uricanu, V.I.; Duits, M.H.G.; Agterof, W.G.M.; Mellema, J.

    2005-01-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the deformation and wetting behavior of large (50-250 m) emulsion droplets upon mechanical loading with a colloidal glass probe. Our droplets were obtained from water-in-oil emulsions. By adding gelatin to the water prior to emulsification, also droplet

  4. Dynamics of hydrogen bonds in water and consequences for the unusual behaviour of supercooled water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    José Teixeira

    2008-10-01

    The dynamics of liquid water is evaluated by the coherent quasi-elastic scattering at two different momentum transfers, in order to discriminate hydrogen bond life-time from molecular dynamics. The results indicate a possible issue for the puzzle of the behaviour of supercooled water.

  5. Crystallization in diblock copolymer thin films at different degrees of supercooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darko, C.; Botiz, I.; Reiter, G.

    2009-01-01

    The crystalline structures in thin films of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) diblock copolymers were studied in dependence on the degree of supercooling. Atomic force microscopy showed that the crystalline domains (lamellae) consist of grains, which are macroscopic at low...

  6. Solidification of supercooled water in the vicinity of a solid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schremb, Markus; Tropea, Cameron

    2016-11-01

    An experimental approach utilizing a Hele-Shaw cell for the investigation of the solidification of a supercooled liquid in contact with a solid wall is presented. The setup is based on an idea presented by Marín et al. [A. G. Marín et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 054301 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.054301], who investigated the planar freezing of a sessile drop without supercooling. This apparatus overcomes optical distortions present when observing the freezing of sessile drops, arising due to reflections and refraction of light on the drop surface. The facility is used to investigate the freezing process of water drops, supercooled down to -20∘C , and to qualitatively demonstrate that the growth behavior is uninfluenced by the use of the Hele-Shaw cell. Different features during freezing, which are known for sessile water drops, are also observed with the Hele-Shaw cell. The growth morphology within the first phase of solidification is categorized according to the initial drop supercooling. Furthermore, freezing velocities within this phase are related to data available in the literature for the growth of single ice dendrites.

  7. Hydrophobic Surfaces: Topography Effects on Wetting by Supercooled Water and Freezing Delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydari, Golrokh; Thormann, Esben; Järn, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobicity, and in particular superhydrophobicity, has been extensively considered to promote ice-phobicity. Dynamic contact angle measurements above 0 °C have been widely used to evaluate the water repellency. However, it is the wetting properties of supercooled water at subzero temperatures...

  8. Supercooling Suppression of Microencapsulated n-Alkanes by Introducing an Organic Gelator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Kong-ying; WANG Shuang; QI Heng-zhi; LI Hui; ZHAO Yun-hui; YUAN Xiao-yan

    2012-01-01

    Supercooling of the microencapsulated phase change materials(PCMs) during cooling usually happens.This phenomenon can interfere with heat transfer and is necessary to further overcome.In this study,melamine-formaldehyde microcapsules containing two n-alkane PCMs,namely,n-dodecane(C12) or n-tetradecane(C14)were prepared by in situ polymerization.A small amount of n-hexatriacontane(C36) was introduced as an organic gelator into the core of microcapsules to cope with the supercooling problem.Analyses demonstrate that supcrcooling of the microencapsulated C12 or C14 was significantly suppressed by adding 3%(mass fraction) C36,without changing the spherical morphology and dispersibility.It could be also found that the enthalpy of microencapsulated C12 or C14 containing C36 was similar to that of microencapsulated n-alkanes without C36,whereas the difference between onsets of crystallization and melting(degree of supercooling) is similar to that of those of pure n-alkanes,suggesting the remarkable suppression ability of the organic gelator on supercooling.

  9. Anomalous dependence of the heat capacity of supercooled water on pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some papers, dependences of the isobaric heat capacity of water versus pressure and temperature were obtained. It is shown that these dependences contradict both the dependence of heat capacity on temperature for supercooled water, and an important thermodynamic equation for the dependence of heat capacity on pressure. A possible explanation for this contradiction is proposed.

  10. Compressive Deformation Induced Nanocrystallization of a Supercooled Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-Lin; SHAN De-Bin; MA Ming-Zhen; GUO Bin

    2008-01-01

    The nanocrystallization behaviour of a bulk Zr-based metallic glass subjected to compressive stress is investigated in the supercooled liquid region. Compared with annealing treatments without compressive stress, compressive deformation promotes the development of nucleation and suppresses the coarsening of nanocrystallites at high ternperatures.

  11. Predicting How Nanoconfinement Changes the Relaxation Time of a Supercooled Liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Errington, Jeff; Truskett, Tom;

    2013-01-01

    asymmetric dumbbell-shaped molecules, which can be deeply supercooled without crystallizing. We find that the dimensionless structural relaxation times—spanning six decades as a function of temperature, density, and degree of confinement—collapse when plotted versus excess entropy. The data also collapse...

  12. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine;

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This “Thermalization Calorimetry” technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat...

  13. Evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces. Variation of elongation is achieved by depositing droplets on surfaces with varying ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripe widths. Elongated droplets evaporate faster than more spherical droplets. Bo

  14. Droplet migration characteristics in confined oscillatory microflows

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the migration characteristics of a droplet in an oscillatory flow field in a parallel plate micro-confinement. Using phase filed formalism, we capture the dynamical evolution of the droplet over a wide range of the frequency of the imposed oscillation in the flow field, drop size relative to the channel gap, and the capillary number. The latter two factors imply the contribution of droplet deformability, commonly considered in the study of droplet migration under steady shear flow conditions. We show that the imposed oscillation brings in additional time complexity in the droplet movement, realized through temporally varying drop-shape, flow direction and the inertial response of the droplet. As a consequence, we observe a spatially complicated pathway of the droplet along the transverse direction, in sharp contrast to the smooth migration under a similar yet steady shear flow condition. Intuitively, the longitudinal component of the droplet movement is in tandem with the flow continuity and evolve...

  15. Materials science: Droplets leap into action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    What could cause a water droplet to start bouncing on a surface? It seems that a combination of evaporation and a highly water-repellent surface induces droplet bouncing when ambient pressure is reduced. See Letter p.82

  16. High precision droplet based new form manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves,S; Hadjiconstantinou, N; Miller, W O; Orme, M; Sahai, V; Shapiro, A B

    1999-09-16

    In collaboration with the University of California at Irvine (UCI), we are working on a new technology that relies on the precise deposition of nanoliter molten-metal droplets that are targeted onto a substrate by electrostatic charging and deflection. By this way, three-dimensional (3D) structural materials can be manufactured microlayer by microlayer. Because the volume of the droplets are small, they rapidly solidify on impact, bringing forth a material component with fine grain structures which lead to enhanced material properties (e.g., strength). UCI is responsible for an experimental investigation of the manufacturing feasibility of this process. LLNL has unique expertise in the computational modeling of 3D heat transfer and solid mechanics and has the large-scale computer resources necessary to model this large system. Process modeling will help move this technology from the bench-top to an industrial process. Applications at LLNL include rapid prototyping of metal parts and manufacturing new alloys by co-jetting different metals.

  17. Quantitative visualization of droplet hot-surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Nejdet; Okamoto, Koji

    2013-11-01

    Up to this date liquid droplet impingement phenomenon onto hot surfaces has drawn massive attention from a broad spectrum of research fields, since its hydrodynamic and thermodynamic characteristics has profound importance for various industrial applications Although tremendous experimental and computational work exist in the literature, thermal-hydraulic mechanism of droplet impingement boiling on hot surfaces received several contradictory approaches due to the parametric sensitivity of the problem. To understand and to predict the physical mechanism, an experimental database including large amount of spatio-temporal data, which is formed by the tests performed under well-controlled BCs and high sensitive devices, is still a necessity. This study investigates the parametric variation of droplet boiling regimes due to the experimental BCs (e.g surface roughness, ambient pressure) by performing separate effect tests employing high-speed visualization system. Differences in the impingement boiling characteristics of water droplets on solid (with surface roughness) and liquid metal (without surface roughness) in film boiling regime are investigated. A unique quantitative velocity data inside the droplet at several surface temperatures including (Leidenfrost temperatures) captured by Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). This data is a unique component for the validation of CFD simulations which are performed to resolve the phenomena.

  18. Mechanical responses and stress fluctuations of a supercooled liquid in a sheared non-equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, H; Yamamoto, R

    2012-04-01

    A steady shear flow can drive supercooled liquids into a non-equilibrium state. Using molecular dynamics simulations under steady shear flow superimposed with oscillatory shear strain for a probe, non-equilibrium mechanical responses are studied for a model supercooled liquid composed of binary soft spheres. We found that even in the strongly sheared situation, the supercooled liquid exhibits surprisingly isotropic responses to oscillating shear strains applied in three different components of the strain tensor. Based on this isotropic feature, we successfully constructed a simple two-mode Maxwell model that can capture the key features of the storage and loss moduli, even for highly non-equilibrium state. Furthermore, we examined the correlation functions of the shear stress fluctuations, which also exhibit isotropic relaxation behaviors in the sheared non-equilibrium situation. In contrast to the isotropic features, the supercooled liquid additionally demonstrates anisotropies in both its responses and its correlations to the shear stress fluctuations. Using the constitutive equation (a two-mode Maxwell model), we demonstrated that the anisotropic responses are caused by the coupling between the oscillating strain and the driving shear flow. Due to these anisotropic responses and fluctuations, the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) is distinct for different components. We measured the magnitude of this violation in terms of the effective temperature. It was demonstrated that the effective temperature is notably different between different components, which indicates that a simple scalar mapping, such as the concept of an effective temperature, oversimplifies the true nature of supercooled liquids under shear flow. An understanding of the mechanism of isotropies and anisotropies in the responses and fluctuations will lead to a better appreciation of these violations of the FDT, as well as certain consequent modifications to the concept of an

  19. Stability of thin liquid films and sessile droplets under confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörfler, Fabian; Rauscher, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2013-07-01

    The stability of nonvolatile thin liquid films and of sessile droplets is strongly affected by finite size effects. We analyze their stability within the framework of density functional theory using the sharp kink approximation, i.e., on the basis of an effective interface Hamiltonian. We show that finite size effects suppress spinodal dewetting of films because it is driven by a long-wavelength instability. Therefore nonvolatile films are stable if the substrate area is too small. Similarly, nonvolatile droplets connected to a wetting film become unstable if the substrate area is too large. This instability of a nonvolatile sessile droplet turns out to be equivalent to the instability of a volatile drop which can attain chemical equilibrium with its vapor.

  20. Curvature-driven bubbles or droplets on the spiral surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanpeng; Liu, Jianlin; Hou, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Directional motion of droplets or bubbles can often be observed in nature and our daily life, and this phenomenon holds great potential in many engineering areas. The study shows that droplets or bubbles can be driven to migrate perpetually on some special substrates, such as the Archimedean spiral, the logarithmic spiral and a cantilever sheet in large deflection. It is found that a bubble approaches or deviates from the position with highest curvature of the substrate, when it is on the concave or convex side. This fact is helpful to explain the repelling water capability of Nepenthes alata. Based on the force and energy analysis, the mechanism of the bubble migration is well addressed. These findings pave a new way to accurately manipulate droplet or bubble movement, which bring inspirations to the design of microfluidic and water harvesting devices, as well as oil displacement and ore filtration.

  1. Breaking anchored droplets in a microfluidic Hele-Shaw cell

    CERN Document Server

    Amselem, Gabriel; Gallaire, François; Baroud, Charles N

    2015-01-01

    We study microfluidic self digitization in Hele-Shaw cells using pancake droplets anchored to surface tension traps. We show that above a critical flow rate, large anchored droplets break up to form two daughter droplets, one of which remains in the anchor. Below the critical flow velocity for breakup the shape of the anchored drop is given by an elastica equation that depends on the capillary number of the outer fluid. As the velocity crosses the critical value, the equation stops admitting a solution that satisfies the boundary conditions; the drop breaks up in spite of the neck still having finite width. A similar breaking event also takes place between the holes of an array of anchors, which we use to produce a 2D array of stationary drops in situ.

  2. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S.

    2009-09-01

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector.

  3. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S. [INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector. (orig.)

  4. Characterization of Bioeffects on Endothelial Cells under Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2015-12-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization, which results in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events, resulting in cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was subjected to acoustic droplet vaporization using a 3.5-MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional) and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The bubble cloud generated was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application.

  5. Mechanical vibrations of pendant liquid droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Temperton, Robert H.; Smith, Michael I.; Sharp, James S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre pendant droplets of deuterium oxide, formamide, and 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane. Droplets of different volumes of each liquid were suspended from the end of a microlitre pipette and vibrated using a small puff of nitrogen gas. A laser was passed through the droplets and the scattered light was collected using a photodiode. Vibration of the droplets resulted in the motion of the scattered beam and time-dependen...

  6. Dynamics of Droplet Motion under Electrowetting Actuation

    OpenAIRE

    Annapragada, S. Ravi; Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V.; Murthy, Jayathi Y.

    2011-01-01

    The static shape of droplets under electrowetting actuation is well understood. The steady-state shape of the droplet is obtained on the basis of the balance of surface tension and electrowetting forces, and the change in the apparent contact angle is well characterized by the Young-Lippmann equation However, the transient droplet shape behavior when a voltage is suddenly applied across a droplet has received less attention. Additional dynamic frictional forces are at play during this transie...

  7. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties supercooled liquids at temperatures near their respective glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this perspective we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition.

  8. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg, making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this Perspective, we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition.

  9. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You David J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A computer numerical control (CNC apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study. This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate. Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction. The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability, in rapid succession (using droplets

  10. Cool-flame Extinction During N-Alkane Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent droplet combustion experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed that large n-alkane droplets can continue to burn quasi-steadily following radiative extinction in a low-temperature regime, characterized by negative-temperaturecoefficient (NTC) chemistry. In this study we report experimental observations of n-heptane, n-octane, and n-decane droplets of varying initial sizes burning in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/helium/nitrogen environments at 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 atmospheric pressures. The oxygen concentration in these tests varied in the range of 14% to 25% by volume. Large n-alkane droplets exhibited quasi-steady low-temperature burning and extinction following radiative extinction of the visible flame while smaller droplets burned to completion or disruptively extinguished. A vapor-cloud formed in most cases slightly prior to or following the "cool flame" extinction. Results for droplet burning rates in both the hot-flame and cool-flame regimes as well as droplet extinction diameters at the end of each stage are presented. Time histories of radiant emission from the droplet captured using broadband radiometers are also presented. Remarkably the "cool flame" extinction diameters for all the three n-alkanes follow a trend reminiscent of the ignition delay times observed in previous studies. The similarities and differences among the n-alkanes during "cool flame" combustion are discussed using simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon

  11. The Explosive Ejection of Small Droplets From a Liquid-Gas Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ashley; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1996-11-01

    Vibration-induced liquid atomization is a process that occurs when a liquid droplet is placed on a vibrating membrane. When the proper operating conditions are attained, the droplet resonates with the motion of the membrane and explosively bursts into a spray of very small droplets. The process occurs through an instability of the surface wave motion on the free surface of the large droplet set up by the vibration of the underlying surface. We present experimental data on this process that shows how the droplet ejection event depends on the frequency and amplitude of the vibrating surface and on the initial volume of the large liquid droplet. Video images are also presented that show the basic process and some interesting transient behaviors leading to the ejection event. Our current and future experimental and analytical work on this process is directed towards an understanding of the mechanism behind the atomization process, a full characterization of the free surface instability leading to the droplet ejection event, and a knowledge of the size and velocity distributions in the resulting spray. In addition, vibration-induced droplet atomization is the basis of a new design for an evaporative heat transfer cell that is currently under development for micro-gravity applications. Supported by NASA and Georgia Tech.

  12. Floating Droplet Array: An Ultrahigh-Throughput Device for Droplet Trapping, Real-time Analysisand Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louai Labanieh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design, fabrication and use of a dual-layered microfluidic device for ultrahigh-throughput droplet trapping, analysis, and recovery using droplet buoyancy. To demonstrate the utility of this device for digital quantification of analytes, we quantify the number of droplets, which contain a β-galactosidase-conjugated bead among more than 100,000 immobilized droplets. In addition, we demonstrate that this device can be used for droplet clustering and real-time analysis by clustering several droplets together into microwells and monitoring diffusion of fluorescein, a product of the enzymatic reaction of β-galactosidase and its fluorogenic substrate FDG, between droplets.

  13. Evaporation kinetics of sessile water droplets on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Leeladhar, Rajesh; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2013-05-21

    Evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile droplets of water on micropillared superhydrophobic surfaces are experimentally investigated. The results show that a constant contact radius (CCR) mode and a constant contact angle (CCA) mode are two dominating evaporation modes during droplet evaporation on the superhydrophobic surfaces. With the decrease in the solid fraction of the superhydrophobic surfaces, the duration of a CCR mode is reduced and that of a CCA mode is increased. Compared to Rowan's kinetic model, which is based on the vapor diffusion across the droplet boundary, the change in a contact angle in a CCR (pinned) mode shows a remarkable deviation, decreasing at a slower rate on the superhydrophobic surfaces with less-solid fractions. In a CCA (receding) mode, the change in a contact radius agrees well with the theoretical expectation, and the receding speed is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces with lower solid fractions. The discrepancy between experimental results and Rowan's model is attributed to the initial large contact angle of a droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces. The droplet geometry with a large contact angle results in a narrow wedge region of air along the contact boundary, where the liquid-vapor diffusion is significantly restricted. Such an effect becomes minor as the evaporation proceeds with the decrease in a contact angle. In both the CCR and CCA modes, the evaporative mass transfer shows the linear relationship between mass(2/3) and evaporation time. However, the evaporation rate is slower on the superhydrophobic surfaces, which is more significant on the surfaces with lower solid fractions. As a result, the superhydrophobic surfaces slow down the drying process of a sessile droplet on them.

  14. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using droplet microfluidics for screening mammalian cell factories has been limited by the difficulty in achieving continuous cell division during cultivation in droplets. Here, we report the influence of droplet size on mammalian cell division and viability during cultivation...... in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped...... after 24 h, whereas continuous cell division was observed in 180 and 320 pL droplets for 72 h. The viability of the cells cultivated in the 33 pL droplets also dropped to about 50% in 72 h. In contrast, the viability of the cells in the larger droplets was above 90% even after 72 h of cultivation...

  15. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  16. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; Jong, de N.; Versluis, M.; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  17. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahidzadeh, N.; Schut, M.F.L.; Desarnaud, J.; Prat, M.; Bonn, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls, but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, deicing of

  18. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahidzadeh, N.; Schut, M.F.L.; Desarnaud, J.; Prat, M.; Bonn, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls, but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, deicing of airplan

  19. Shock wave-droplet interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi Khoshmehr, Hamed; Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2016-11-01

    Disintegration of a liquid droplet under the action of a shock wave is experimentally investigated. The shock wave-pulse is electromagnetically generated by discharging a high voltage capacitor into a flat spiral coil, above which an isolated circular metal membrane is placed in a close proximity. The Lorentz force arising due to the eddy current induced in the membrane abruptly accelerates it away from the spiral coil thus generating a shock wave. The liquid droplet placed at the center of the membrane, where the maximum deflection occurs, is disintegrated in the process of interaction with the shock wave. The effects of droplet viscosity and surface tension on the droplet destruction are studied with high-speed photography. Water-glycerol solution at different concentrations is used for investigating the effect of viscosity and various concentrations of water-sugar and water-ethanol solution are used for studying the effect of surface tension. Here we report on how the metamorphoses, which a liquid drop undergoes in the process of interaction with a shock wave, are affected by varied viscosity and surface tension.

  20. A passive microfluidic system based on step emulsification allows the generation of libraries of nanoliter-sized droplets from microliter droplets of varying and known concentrations of a sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, W; Kaminski, T S; Garstecki, P

    2017-03-29

    We present a novel geometry of microfluidic channels that allows us to passively generate monodisperse emulsions of hundreds of droplets smaller than 1 nL from collections of larger (ca. 0.4 μL) mother droplets. We introduce a new microfluidic module for the generation of droplets via passive break-up at a step. The module alleviates a common problem in step emulsification with efficient removal of the droplets from the vicinity of the step. In our solution, the droplets are pushed away from the step by a continuous liquid that bypasses the mother droplets via specially engineered bypasses that lead to the step around the main channel. We show that the bypasses tighten the distribution of volume of daughter droplets and eliminate subpopulations of daughter droplets. Clearing away the just produced droplets from the vicinity of the step provides for similar conditions of break-up for every subsequent droplet and, consequently, leads to superior monodispersity of the generated emulsions. Importantly, this function is realized autonomously (passively) in a protocol in which only a sequence of large mother droplets is forced through the module. Our system features the advantage of step emulsification systems in that the volumes of the generated droplets depend very weakly on the rate of flow through the module - an increase in the flow rate by 300% causes only a slight increase of the average diameter of generated droplets by less than 5%. We combined our geometry with a simple T-junction and a simple trap-based microdroplet dilutor to produce a collection of libraries of droplets of gradually changing and known concentrations of a sample. The microfluidic system can be operated with only two syringe pumps set at constant rates of flow during the experiment.

  1. Droplet size distribution in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlekar, Prasad; Biferale, Luca; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Srivastava, Sudhir; Toschi, Federico

    2012-06-01

    We study the physics of droplet breakup in a statistically stationary homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow by means of high resolution numerical investigations based on the multicomponent lattice Boltzmann method. We verified the validity of the criterion proposed by Hinze [AIChE J. 1, 289 (1955)] for droplet breakup and we measured the full probability distribution function of droplets radii at different Reynolds numbers and for different volume fractions. By means of a Lagrangian tracking we could follow individual droplets along their trajectories, define a local Weber number based on the velocity gradients, and study its cross-correlation with droplet deformation.

  2. Single fiber optical trapping of a liquid droplet and its application in microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihai; Chen, Yunhao; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Yong; Zhu, Zongda; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate an optical trapping of a liquid droplet and its application based on an annular core microstructured optical fiber. We grind and polish the annular core fiber tip to be a special frustum cone shape to make sure the optical force large enough to trap the liquid droplet non-intrusively. The axial and transverse optical trapping forces are simulated. In addition, we investigate the whispering gallery modes resonance characteristic of the trapped liquid droplet as the example of applications. The whispering gallery modes spectrum is sensitive to the size of the micro liquid droplet. Due to the simple construction and flexible manipulation, the fiber-based optical trapping technology for micro liquid droplets trapping, manipulating, and controlling has great application penitential in many fields, such as physics, biology, and interdisciplinary studies.

  3. Multiple and high-throughput droplet reactions via combination of microsampling technique and microfluidic chip

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2012-11-20

    Microdroplets offer unique compartments for accommodating a large number of chemical and biological reactions in tiny volume with precise control. A major concern in droplet-based microfluidics is the difficulty to address droplets individually and achieve high throughput at the same time. Here, we have combined an improved cartridge sampling technique with a microfluidic chip to perform droplet screenings and aggressive reaction with minimal (nanoliter-scale) reagent consumption. The droplet composition, distance, volume (nanoliter to subnanoliter scale), number, and sequence could be precisely and digitally programmed through the improved sampling technique, while sample evaporation and cross-contamination are effectively eliminated. Our combined device provides a simple model to utilize multiple droplets for various reactions with low reagent consumption and high throughput. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Taking advantage of reduced droplet-surface interaction to optimize transport of bioanalytes in digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Sergio L S; Thorne, Nathaniel; Wutkowski, Michael; Dao, Selina

    2014-11-10

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a technique for manipulation of droplets, is a promising alternative for the development of "lab-on-a-chip" platforms. Often, droplet motion relies on the wetting of a surface, directly associated with the application of an electric field; surface interactions, however, make motion dependent on droplet contents, limiting the breadth of applications of the technique. Some alternatives have been presented to minimize this dependence. However, they rely on the addition of extra chemical species to the droplet or its surroundings, which could potentially interact with droplet moieties. Addressing this challenge, our group recently developed Field-DW devices to allow the transport of cells and proteins in DMF, without extra additives. Here, the protocol for device fabrication and operation is provided, including the electronic interface for motion control. We also continue the studies with the devices, showing that multicellular, relatively large, model organisms can also be transported, arguably unaffected by the electric fields required for device operation.

  5. Laplace pressure versus Marangoni convection in photothermal manipulation of micro droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuno, Nobuo; Tsukahara, Takahiro; Motosuke, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    We have numerically demonstrated micro droplet migrations by photothermal manipulation, in order to investigate the driving force and accompanying flows. We focus on an oil (oleic acid) droplet in water that provides a positive temperature dependence of interfacial tension. The present direct numerical simulation employs the volume-of-fluid method and the continuum-surface-force method with consideration of temperature dependency. The driving velocity and force magnitude, which we measured quantitatively, agree with experimental and theoretical data. We have found that the dominant driving force exerted on the microdroplet is the interface normal force, i.e., the Laplace pressure, on a curved interface rather than the tangential force. The tangential component directly triggers the Marangoni convection; however, the induced flows inside the droplet are opposite between the cases of "an oil droplet in water" and "a water droplet in oil". This may be caused by the large difference between the viscosities of water and oil.

  6. Photoionization Dynamics in Pure Helium Droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Chia C.; Poisson,Lionel; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2007-02-04

    The photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy of pure He droplets are investigated at photon energies between 24.6 eV (the ionization energy of He) and 28 eV. Time-of-flight mass spectra and photoelectron images were obtained at a series of molecular beam source temperatures and pressures to assess the effect of droplet size on the photoionization dynamics. At source temperatures below 16 K, the photoelectron images are dominated by fast electrons produced via direct ionization of He atoms, with a small contribution from very slow electrons with kinetic energies below 1 meV arising from an indirect mechanism. The fast photoelectrons have as much as 0.5 eV more kinetic energy than those from atomic He at the same photon energy. This result is interpreted and simulated within the context of a 'dimer model', in which one assumes vertical ionization from two nearest neighbor He atoms to the attractive region of the He2+ potential energy curve. Possible mechanism for the slow electrons, which were also seen at energies below IE(He), are discussed, including vibrational autoionizaton of Rydberg states comprising an electron weakly bound to the surface of a large HeN+ core.

  7. Spontaneous Capillarity-Driven Droplet Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Andrew; Pettit, Donald; Weislogel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The first large length-scale capillary rise experiments were conducted by R. Siegel using a drop tower at NASA LeRC shortly after the 1957 launch of Sputnik I. Siegel was curious if the wetting fluid would expel from the end of short capillary tubes in a low-gravity environment. He observed that although the fluid partially left the tubes, it was always pulled back by surface tension, which caused the fluid to remain pinned to the tubes' end. By exploiting tube geometry and fluid properties, we demonstrate that such capillary flows can in fact eject a variety of jets and drops. This fluid dynamics video provides a historical overview of such spontaneous capillarity-driven droplet ejection. Footage of terrestrial and low earth orbit experiments are also shown. Droplets generated in a microgravity environment are $10^6$ times larger than those ejected in a terrestrial environment. The accompanying article provides a summary of the critical parameters and experimental procedures. Scaling the governing equations ...

  8. Dynamics of droplet motion under electrowetting actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapragada, S Ravi; Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V; Murthy, Jayathi Y

    2011-07-05

    The static shape of droplets under electrowetting actuation is well understood. The steady-state shape of the droplet is obtained on the basis of the balance of surface tension and electrowetting forces, and the change in the apparent contact angle is well characterized by the Young-Lippmann equation. However, the transient droplet shape behavior when a voltage is suddenly applied across a droplet has received less attention. Additional dynamic frictional forces are at play during this transient process. We present a model to predict this transient behavior of the droplet shape under electrowetting actuation. The droplet shape is modeled using the volume of fluid method. The electrowetting and dynamic frictional forces are included as an effective dynamic contact angle through a force balance at the contact line. The model is used to predict the transient behavior of water droplets on smooth hydrophobic surfaces under electrowetting actuation. The predictions of the transient behavior of droplet shape and contact radius are in excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The internal fluid motion is explained, and the droplet motion is shown to initiate from the contact line. An approximate mathematical model is also developed to understand the physics of the droplet motion and to describe the overall droplet motion and the contact line velocities.

  9. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jh; Oyarzua, Elton; Rojano, Andres

    2016-11-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial thermal gradient and CNT chirality. We find that the droplet motion in the armchair CNTs exhibits two clearly delimited stages, a regime wherein the droplet is accelerated and subsequently, a regime wherein the droplet moves with constant velocity. Inside the zig zag CNTs, the droplet accelerates during a very short time and then it moves with constant velocity. We compute the net force during the droplet acceleration and find a correlation between the droplet acceleration and the magnitude of the thermal gradient without any dependence on the droplet size. Moreover, we conduct velocity constrained MD simulations to determine the friction and thermophoretic forces acting on the droplet. We acknowledge partial funding from FONDECYT through the Project No. 11130559 and from VRID Universidad de Concepcion.

  10. 75 FR 37311 - Airplane and Engine Certification Requirements in Supercooled Large Drop, Mixed Phase, and Ice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... certain transport category airplanes certified for flight in icing conditions and the icing airworthiness... charged with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing minimum standards... million annually) Costs Nominal cost PV cost Engine Cert Cost 7,936,000 6,931,610 Engine Capital Cost 6...

  11. 75 FR 49865 - Extension of Comment Period; Airplane and Engine Certification Requirements in Supercooled Large...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... Groupe SAFRAN, an engine manufacturer, have requested an extension of the comment period from 60 days to... Groupe SAFRAN (Turbomeca) also requested an extension to the comment period from 60 days to 120...

  12. Droplet lasers: a review of current progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGloin, D.

    2017-05-01

    It is perhaps surprising that something as fragile as a microscopic droplet could possibly form a laser. In this article we will review some of the underpinning physics as to how this might be possible, and then examine the state of the art in the field. The technology to create and manipulate droplets will be examined, as will the different classes of droplet lasers. We discuss the rapidly developing fields of droplet biolasers, liquid crystal laser droplets and explore how droplet lasers could give rise to new bio and chemical sensing and analysis. The challenges that droplet lasers face in becoming robust devices, either as sensors or as photonic components in the lab on chip devices, is assessed.

  13. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-10-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  14. Uptake of water droplets by nonwetting capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Willmott, Geoff R; Hendy, Shaun C

    2010-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence that water droplets can spontaneously penetrate non-wetting capillaries, driven by the action of Laplace pressure due to high droplet curvature. Using high-speed optical imaging, microcapillaries of radius 50 to 150 micron, and water microdroplets of average radius between 100 and 1900 micron, we demonstrate that there is a critical droplet radius below which water droplets can be taken up by hydrophobised glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillaries. The rate of capillary uptake is shown to depend strongly on droplet size, with smaller droplets being absorbed more quickly. Droplet size is also shown to influence meniscus motion in a pre-filled non-wetting capillary, and quantitative measurements of this effect result in a derived water-PTFE static contact angle between 96 degrees and 114 degrees. Our measurements confirm recent theoretical predictions and simulations for metal nanodroplets penetrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The results are relevant to a wide ...

  15. Leidenfrost droplets in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, Sander; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-11-01

    In a recent video broadcast dubbed the ``Knitting Needle Experiment,'' astronaut Don Petit aboard the ISS demonstrated how weightless water droplets can be made to orbit a statically charged Teflon rod. We study the earthly analogue of mobile droplets in an electric field, whereby the mobility is ensured by a thin vapor film sustained between the droplet and a hot plate (the Leidenfrost effect). We find that in a strong vertical electric field the droplet starts to bounce progressively higher, defying gravitational attraction. From its trajectory we can deduce the temporal evolution of the charge on the droplet. The measurements show that the charge starts high and then decreases in a step-like manner as the droplet evaporates. The discharge trend is predicted well by treating the droplet as a dielectric sphere in electrical contact with the hot plate, but the mechanism by which definite lumps of charge are transferred through the vapor film is still an open question.

  16. Aqueous phase oxidation of sulphur dioxide by ozone in cloud droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Saathoff, H.; Dias, A.; El Haddad, I.; Gysel, M.; Coburn, S. C.; Tröstl, J.; Bernhammer, A.-K.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Corbin, J. C.; Craven, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Höppel, N.; Heinritzi, M.; Kristensen, T. B.; Molteni, U.; Nichman, L.; Pinterich, T.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Simon, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Steiner, G.; Tomé, A.; Vogel, A. L.; Volkamer, R.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Wexler, A. S.; Williamson, C.; Winkler, P. M.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Flagan, R. C.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Stratmann, F.; Worsnop, D. R.; Baltensperger, U.

    2016-02-01

    The growth of aerosol due to the aqueous phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone was measured in laboratory-generated clouds created in the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Experiments were performed at 10 and -10 °C, on acidic (sulfuric acid) and on partially to fully neutralised (ammonium sulfate) seed aerosol. Clouds were generated by performing an adiabatic expansion - pressurising the chamber to 220 hPa above atmospheric pressure, and then rapidly releasing the excess pressure, resulting in a cooling, condensation of water on the aerosol and a cloud lifetime of approximately 6 min. A model was developed to compare the observed aerosol growth with that predicted using oxidation rate constants previously measured in bulk solutions. The model captured the measured aerosol growth very well for experiments performed at 10 and -10 °C, indicating that, in contrast to some previous studies, the oxidation rates of SO2 in a dispersed aqueous system can be well represented by using accepted rate constants, based on bulk measurements. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first laboratory-based measurements of aqueous phase oxidation in a dispersed, super-cooled population of droplets. The measurements are therefore important in confirming that the extrapolation of currently accepted reaction rate constants to temperatures below 0 °C is correct.

  17. Nucleation and droplet growth from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below the triple point temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2016-01-01

    In 1897 Ostwald formulated his step rule for formation of the most stable crystal state for a system with crystal polymorphism. The rule describes the irreversible way a system converts to the crystal with lowest free energy. But in fact the irreversible way a supercooled gas below the triple point temperature $T_{tr.p.}$ crystallizes via a liquid droplet is an example of Ostwald's step rule. The homogeneous nucleation in the supersaturated gas is not to a crystal, but to a liquid-like critical nucleus. We have for the first time performed constant energy (NVE) Molecular Dynamics (MD) of homogeneous nucleation without the use of a thermostat. The simulations of homogeneous nucleation in a Lennard-Jones system from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below $T_{tr.p.}$ reveals that the nucleation to a liquid-like critical nucleus is initiated by a small cold cluster [S. Toxvaerd, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{143} 154705 (2015)]. The release of latent heat at the subsequent droplet growth increases the temperature in...

  18. Dancing droplets: Autonomous surface tension-driven droplet motion

    OpenAIRE

    Cira, Nate J.; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    International audience; When droplets of water and food coloring at different concentrations are deposited on a clean glass slide they enter a complex dance. We reproduce this phenomenon by using a two-component mixture of propylene glycol and water deposited on corona treated (Electro-TechnicBD-20AC) glass slides and record the phenomena using a Cannon 5D Mark II camera with a 50mm macro lens

  19. Controlled Gelation of Particle Suspensions Using Controlled Solvent Removal in Picoliter Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Sharon; Walker, Lynn; Anna, Shelley

    2013-11-01

    Droplets in microfluidic devices have proven useful as uniform picoliter reactors for nanoparticle synthesis and as components in tunable emulsions. However, there can be significant transport between the component phases depending on solubility and other factors. In the present talk, we show that water droplets trapped within a microfluidic device for tens of hours slowly dehydrate, concentrating the contents encapsulated within. We use this slow dehydration along with control of the initial droplet composition to monitor gelation of aqueous suspensions of spherical silica particles (Ludox) and disk-shaped clay particles (Laponite). Droplets are generated in a microfluidic device containing small wells that trap the droplets. We monitor the concentration process through size and shape changes of these droplets as a function of time in tens of droplets and use the large number of individual reactors to generate statistics regarding the gelation process. We also examine changes in suspension viscosity through fluorescent particle tracking as a function of dehydration rate, initial suspension concentration and initial droplet volume, and added salt, and compare the results with the Krieger-Dougherty model in which viscosity increases dramatically with particle volume fraction.

  20. Controlling micro-sized droplet generation using electrical pulses for studying liquid-liquid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandino, M.; La Forgia, N.; Vera, A. J.; Bjerknes, J.; Dorao, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Water droplets removal from oil is a critical process in several industries, in particular in the oil and gas industry. Water/oil separation is commonly done in large gravitational sedimentation tanks, which are over dimensioned due to the lack of accurate models to allow for optimization. This can become challenging for off-shore and subsea processing installations. One of the bottlenecks to study droplet dynamics in the micron range, is the generation of droplets with less than 100μm in diameter. In this regard, one of the most promising techniques for controlling the generated droplet size is based on the use of a high voltage electrical signal or electro-hydrodynamic technique (EHD). Although much work on EHD and droplet generation can been found in the literature, many challenges still remain. One of this is the generation of droplets smaller than 100μm in diameter in a controllable, on-demand manner. In this work, the effect of the meniscus shape and the electric pulse characteristics on the size of the generated droplet is investigated. Both the meniscus height and width help to determine the droplet size, with the latter having a stronger effect. No significant influence of the pulse amplitude and pulse width was observed for the tested conditions.

  1. Dielectrowetting manipulation for digital microfluidics: creating, transporting, splitting, and merging of droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hongyao; Feng, Jian; Stabryla, Lisa Marie; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2017-03-14

    Generating, splitting, transporting, and merging droplets are fundamental and critical unit operations for digital (droplet-based) microfluidics. State-of-the-art digital microfluidics performs such operations commonly using electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) in the typical configuration of two parallel channel plates. This paper presents such operations using dielectrowetting (derived from liquid dielectrophoresis), not EWOD, with an array of interdigitated electrodes. The major and unique feature is that the present droplet manipulations are effective for conductive (water with/without surfactant) and non-conductive (propylene carbonate) fluids. An equally important aspect is that the manipulations are performed in an open space without the covering top plate. This behavior is attributed to the intrinsic nature of dielectrowetting to generate stronger wetting forces than EWOD (with the ability to achieve complete wetting with contact angle = 0° to form a thin film). Using dielectrowetting, micro-droplets of various volumes are created from a large droplet and transported. Splitting a single droplet as well as multiple droplets and merging them are also achieved, even when the droplets are smaller than the electrode pads. The above splitting, transport, and merging operations are effective for propylene carbonate as well as DI water with/without surfactant, though the creating operation is proven only for propylene carbonate at this moment. All the above manipulations are successfully carried out on a single plate, which not only simplifies the structure and operation procedure, but could also eliminate the restriction to the volume of fluid handled.

  2. Development and analysis of a capacitive touch sensor using a liquid metal droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seungbum; Won, Dong-Joon; Gil Kim, Joong; Kim, Joonwon

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a small-sized capacitive touch sensor with large variations in its capacitance. This sensor uses the changes in capacitance caused by the variation of the overlap area between a liquid metal (LM) droplet and a flat electrode while keeping the gap between the droplet and the bottom electrode at a small constant value (i.e. thickness of dielectric layer). Initially, the droplet is placed inside a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chamber, and a thin silicon dioxide film separates the droplet and the electrode. Owing to the high surface tension of the LM, the droplet retains its spherical shape and the overlap area remains small, which means that the capacitance between the droplet and the electrode also remains small. When normal force is applied, the pressure on the membrane pushes the droplet downward, thus spreading the droplet to the bottom of the chamber and increasing the capacitance. To verify our concept, we performed theoretical analyses and experiments using a 2 mm  ×  2 mm  ×  2 mm 1-cell touch sensor. Finally, we obtained a capacitance variation of ~30 pF by applying forces between 0 N and 1 N.

  3. Vapour-mediated sensing and motility in two-component droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, N. J.; Benusiglio, A.; Prakash, M.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the wetting behaviour of liquids on surfaces is important for a variety of industrial applications such as water-repellent coatings and lubrication. Liquid behaviour on a surface can range from complete spreading, as in the `tears of wine' effect, to minimal wetting as observed on a superhydrophobic lotus leaf. Controlling droplet movement is important in microfluidic liquid handling, on self-cleaning surfaces and in heat transfer. Droplet motion can be achieved by gradients of surface energy. However, existing techniques require either a large gradient or a carefully prepared surface to overcome the effects of contact line pinning, which usually limit droplet motion. Here we show that two-component droplets of well-chosen miscible liquids such as propylene glycol and water deposited on clean glass are not subject to pinning and cause the motion of neighbouring droplets over a distance. Unlike the canonical predictions for these liquids on a high-energy surface, these droplets do not spread completely but exhibit an apparent contact angle. We demonstrate experimentally and analytically that these droplets are stabilized by evaporation-induced surface tension gradients and that they move in response to the vapour emitted by neighbouring droplets. Our fundamental understanding of this robust system enabled us to construct a wide variety of autonomous fluidic machines out of everyday materials.

  4. Oscillation and collective conveyor of water-in-oil droplets by microfluidic bolus flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmura, Takuya; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Maeda, Yusuke T

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic techniques have been extensively developed to realize micro-total analysis systems in a small chip. For microanalysis, the trapping or arranging of objects in a line is a critical step. Physical effects such as inertial lift force have been utilized so far, however, hydrodynamic interaction in a many body system is yet to be explored despite its relevance to pattern formation. Here, we report water-in-oil (W/O) droplets can be transported with sequential order in the grid of one-dimensional array of another large W/O droplets. As each droplet comes close to an interspace of the large droplet array, while exhibiting persistent back-and-forth motion, it is conveyed at a velocity equal to the droplet array. The droplet also makes asymmetric orbit to and from the large droplet behind, suggesting vortex like stream was involved. We confirm the appearance of closed streamlines, which called bolus flow, in numerical simulation based on lattice Boltzmann method. The existence region of bolus flow account...

  5. Line tension and morphology of a sessile droplet on a spherical substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2016-05-01

    The effects of line tension on the morphology of a sessile droplet placed on top of a convex spherical substrate are studied. The morphology of the droplet is determined from the global minimum of the Helmholtz free energy. The contact angle between the droplet and the spherical substrate is expressed by the generalized Young's formula. When the line tension is positive and large, the contact angle jumps discontinuously to 180∘, the circular contact line shrinks towards the top of the substrate, and the droplet detaches from the substrate, forming a spherical droplet if the substrate is hydrophobic (i.e., the Young's contact angle is large). This finding is consistent with that predicted by Widom [J. Phys. Chem. 99, 2803 (1995), 10.1021/j100009a041]; the line tension induces a drying transition on a flat substrate. On the other hand, the contact angle jumps to 0∘, the circular contact line shrinks towards the bottom of the substrate, and the droplet spreads over the substrate to form a wrapped spherical droplet if the substrate is hydrophilic (i.e., the Young's contact angle is small). Therefore, not only the drying transition of a cap-shaped to a detached spherical droplet but also the wetting transition of a cap-shaped to a wrapped spherical droplet could occur on a spherical substrate as the surface area of the substrate is finite. When the line tension is negative and its magnitude increases, the contact line asymptotically approaches the equator from either above or below. The droplet with a contact line that coincides with the equator is an isolated, singular solution of the first variational problem. In this instance, the contact line is pinned and cannot move as far as the line tension is smaller than the critical magnitude, where the wetting transition occurs.

  6. A highly modular beamline electrostatic levitation facility, optimized for in situ high-energy x-ray scattering studies of equilibrium and supercooled liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, N A; Kelton, K F

    2011-03-01

    High-energy x-ray diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about structural evolution on the atomic length scale, leading to insights into the origin of the nucleation barrier and the processes of supercooling and glass formation. The containerless processing of the beamline electrostatic levitation (BESL) facility allows coordinated thermophysical and structural studies of equilibrium and supercooled liquids to be made in a contamination-free, high-vacuum (∼10(-8) Torr) environment. To date, the incorporation of electrostatic levitation facilities into synchrotron beamlines has been difficult due to the large footprint of the apparatus and the difficulties associated with its transportation and implementation. Here, we describe a modular levitation facility that is optimized for diffraction studies of high-temperature liquids at high-energy synchrotron beamlines. The modular approach used in the apparatus design allows it to be easily transported and quickly setup. Unlike most previous electrostatic levitation facilities, BESL can be operated by a single user instead of a user team.

  7. Droplets impact on textured surfaces: Mesoscopic simulation of spreading dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxiang; Chen, Shuo

    2015-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention due to their excellent water-repellent property. In the present study, droplets in the ideal Cassie state were focused on, and a particle-based numerical method, many-body dissipative particle dynamics, was employed to explore the mechanism of droplets impact on textured surfaces. A solid-fluid interaction with three linear weight functions was used to generate different wettability and a simple but efficient method was introduced to compute the contact angle. The simulated results show that the static contact angle is in good agreement with the Cassie-Baxter formula for smaller ∅S and Fa, but more deviation will be produced for larger ∅S and Fa, and it is related to the fact that the Cassie-Baxter theory does not consider the contact angle hysteresis effect in their formula. Furthermore, high impact velocity can induce large contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with larger ∅S and Fa. The typical time-based evolutions of the spreading diameter were simulated, and they were analyzed from an energy transformation viewpoint. These results also show that the dynamical properties of droplet, such as rebounding or pinning, contact time and maximum spreading diameters, largely depend on the comprehensive effects of the material wettability, fraction of the pillars and impact velocities of the droplets.

  8. Integrated microfluidic system capable of size-specific droplet generation with size-dependent droplet separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Hong, Seok Jun; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2013-06-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics is receiving much attention in biomedical research area due to its advantage in uniform size droplet generation. Our previous results have reported that droplet size plays an important role in drug delivery actuated by flagellated bacteria. Recently, many research groups have been reported the size-dependent separation of emulsion droplets by a microfluidic system. In this paper, an integrated microfluidic system is proposed to produce and sort specificsized droplets sequentially. Operation of the system relies on two microfluidic transport processes: initial generation of droplets by hydrodynamic focusing and subsequent separation of droplets by a T-junction channel. The microfluidic system is fabricated by the SU-8 rapid prototyping method and poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) replica molding. A biodegradable polymer, poly-capro-lactone (PCL), is used for the droplet material. Using the proposed integrated microfluidic system, specific-sized droplets which can be delivered by flagellated bacteria are successfully generated and obtained.

  9. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J. M.; Bowick, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional.

  10. Walking droplets in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Boris; Mathieu, Olivier; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    When gently placing a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath, coalescence may be avoided: the drop bounces permanently. Upon increasing forcing acceleration, a drop interacts with the wave it generates, and becomes a ``walker'' with a well defined velocity. In this work, we investigate the confinement of a walker in a mono-dimensional geometry. The system consists of linear submarine channels used as waveguides for a walker. By studying the dynamics of walkers in those channels, we discover some 1D-2D transition. We also propose a model based on an analogy with ``Quantum Wires.'' Finally, we consider the situation of a walker in a circular submarine channel, and examine the behavior of several walking droplets in this system. We show the quantization of the drop distances, and correlate it to their bouncing modes.

  11. Possible Evidence for a New Form of Liquid Buried in the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, T. Ryan; Leong, Kai-Yang; Wang, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Contrary to the historical data, several recent experiments indicate that the surface tension of supercooled water follows a smooth extrapolation of the IAPWS equation in the supercooled regime. It can be seen, however, that a small deviation from the IAPWS equation is present in the recent experimental measurements. It is shown with simulations using the WAIL water potential that the small deviation in the experimental data is consistent with the tail of an exponential growth in surface tension as temperature decreases. The emergence temperature, Te, of a substantial deviation from the IAPWS equation is shown to be 227 K for the WAIL water and 235 K for real water. Since the 227 K Te is close to the Widom line in WAIL water, we argue that real water at 235 K approaches a similar crossover line at one atmospheric pressure.

  12. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jakobsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This “Thermalization Calorimetry” technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat conduction through an insulating material, i.e., is proportional to the temperature difference between sample and surroundings. The monitored signal reflects the sample’s specific heat and is sensitive to exo- and endothermic processes. The technique is useful for studying supercooled liquids and their crystallization, e.g., for locating the glass transition and melting point(s, as well as for investigating the stability against crystallization and estimating the relative change in specific heat between the solid and liquid phases at the glass transition.

  13. Supercooling transition in phase separated manganite thin films: An electrical transport study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Siwach, P. K.; Tyagi, Pawan Kumar; Singh, H. K.

    2014-05-01

    The impact of variation in the relative fractions of the ferromagnetic metallic and antiferromagnetic/charge ordered insulator phases on the supercooling/superheating transition in strongly phase separated system, La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y ≈ 0.4), has been studied employing magnetotransport measurements. Our study clearly shows that the supercooling transition temperature is non-unique and strongly depends on the magneto-thermodynamic path through which the low temperature state is accessed. In contrast, the superheating transition temperature remains constant. The thermo-magnetic hysteresis, the separation of the two transitions and the associated resistivity, all are functions of the relative fraction of the coexisting phases.

  14. Study on Supercooling Point and Freezing Point in Floral Organs of Apricot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Under the environment of an artificial climate chamber, supercooling point (SCP) and freezing point (FP) in flower and young fruit at different development stages and freezing injuries of floral organs were studied. The apricot cultivars tested were Kety, Golden Sun and Honghebao. With the development of flower buds, SCP and FP increased, which indicated that their cold resistance decreased. SCP and FP varied with different floral organs. For different apricot cultivars, it was found that, the lower SCP or FP in floral organs was, the more resistant capacity the cultivar had, and the larger the temperature interval from SCP to FP was. SCP was not a constant value, but a range. Frequency distribution of SCP in petals was more dispersing than that in stamens and pistils. Floral organs could maintain a supercooling state to avoid ice formation, but they were sensitive to freezing. Once floral organs froze, they turned brown after thawing.

  15. The water supercooled regime as described by four common water models

    CERN Document Server

    Malaspina, David C; Pereyra, Rodolfo G; Szleifer, Igal; Carignano, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01

    The temperature scale of simple water models in general does not coincide with the natural one. Therefore, in order to make a meaningful evaluation of different water models a temperature rescaling is necessary. In this paper we introduce a rescaling using the melting temperature and the temperature corresponding to the maximum of the heat capacity to evaluate four common water models (TIP4P-Ew, TIP4P-2005, TIP5P-Ew and Six-Sites) in the supercooled regime. Although all the models show the same general qualitative behavior, the TIP5P-Ew appears as the best representation of the supercooled regime when the rescaled temperature is used. We also analyze, using thermodynamic arguments, the critical nucleus size for ice growth. Finally, we speculate on the possible reasons why atomistic models do not usually crystalize while the coarse grained mW model do crystallize.

  16. Investigation of Critical Burning of Fuel Droplets. [of liquid rocket propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanin, S. P.; Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    An earlier analysis for the combustion response of a liquid monopropellant strand (hydrazine) was extended to consider individual droplets and sprays. While small drops gave low or negative response, large droplets provided response near unity at low frequencies, with the response declining at frequencies greater than the characteristic liquid phase frequency. Temperature gradients in the liquid phase resulted in response peaks greater than unity. A second response peak was found for large drops which corresponded to gas phase transient effects. Spray response was generally reduced from the response of the largest injected droplet, however, even a small percentage of large droplets can yield appreciable response. An apparatus was designed and fabricated to allow observation of bipropellant fuel spray combustion at elevated pressures. A locally homogeneous model was developed to describe this combustion process which allows for high pressure phenomena associated with the thermodynamic critical point.

  17. Grating droplets with a mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Dan; Le Helloco, Antoine; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Varanasi, Kripa

    2016-11-01

    A drop thrown against a mesh can pass through its holes if impacting with enough inertia. As a result, although part of the droplet may remain on one side of the sieve, the rest will end up grated through the other side. This inexpensive method to break up millimetric droplets into micrometric ones may be of particular interest in a wide variety of applications: enhancing evaporation of droplets launched from the top of an evaporative cooling tower or preventing drift of pesticides sprayed above crops by increasing their initial size and atomizing them at the very last moment with a mesh. In order to understand how much liquid will be grated we propose in this presentation to start first by studying a simpler situation: a drop impacting a plate pierced with a single off centered hole. The study of the role of natural parameters such as the radius drop and speed or the hole position, size and thickness allows us to discuss then the more general situation of a plate pierced with multiple holes: the mesh.

  18. Evidence of the existence of the low-density liquid phase in supercooled, confined water

    OpenAIRE

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Majolino, Domenico; Venuti, Valentina; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    By confining water in a nanoporous structure so narrow that the liquid could not freeze, it is possible to study properties of this previously undescribed system well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature TH = 231 K. Using this trick, we were able to study, by means of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrational spectra (HOH bending and OH-stretching modes) of deeply supercooled water in the temperature range 183 < T < 273 K. We observed, upon decreasing temperature, the bui...

  19. Quark-gluon plasma freeze-out from a supercooled state?

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, T

    1994-01-01

    The quark-gluon plasma, formed in the first 3 fm/c of the heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC, supercooles due to nucleation and develops soon a negative pressure in the bag model. The negative pressure yields mechanical instability which may lead to a sudden timelike deflagration to a (super)heated hadron gas. The resulting freeze-out times are shorter than those of the standard nucleation scenario.

  20. Behavior of Supercooled Aqueous Solutions Stemming from Hidden Liquid-Liquid Transition in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-01-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two...

  1. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fang; Zhang Guo-Feng; Dong Shuang-Li; Sun Jian-Hu; Chen Rui-Yun; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2009-01-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  2. Liquid–liquid transition in supercooled water suggested by microsecond simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yaping; Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The putative liquid–liquid phase transition in supercooled water has been used to explain many anomalous behaviors of water. However, no direct experimental verification of such a phase transition has been accomplished, and theoretical studies from different simulations contradict each other. We investigated the putative liquid–liquid phase transition using the Water potential from Adaptive Force Matching for Ice and Liquid (WAIL). The simulation reveals a first-order phase transition in the ...

  3. Dynamics of Electrically Modulated Colloidal Droplet Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Ghosh, Udita Uday; Chakraborty, Suman; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-10-20

    Electrically actuated transport dynamics of colloidal droplets, on a hydrophobic dielectric film covering an array of electrodes, is studied here. Specifically, the effects of the size and electrical properties (zeta-potential) of the colloidal particles on such transport characteristics are investigated. For the colloidal droplets, the application of an electrical voltage leads to additional attenuation of the local dielectric-droplet interfacial tension. This is due to the electrically triggered enhanced colloidal particle adsorption at the dielectric-droplet interface, in the immediate vicinity of the droplet three-phase contact line (TPCL). The extent of such interfacial particle adsorption, and hence, the extent of the consequential reduction in the interfacial tension, is dictated by the combined effects of the three-phase contact line spreading, particle size, the interfacial electrostatic interaction between the colloidal particles (if charged) and the charged dielectric surface above the activated electrode, and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The electrical driving force of varying magnitude, stemming from this altered solid-liquid interfacial tension gradient in the presence of the colloidal particles, culminates in different droplet transport velocity and droplet transfer frequency for different colloidal droplets. We substantiate the inferences from our experimental results by a quasi-steady state force balance model for colloidal droplet transport. We believe that the present work will provide an accurate framework for determining the optimal design and operational parameters for digital microfluidic chips handling colloidal droplets, as encountered in a plethora of applications.

  4. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Lance, Blake; Ho, Clifford K.

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0deg, 10deg, and 45deg), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47deg contact angle and non-wetting = 93deg contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of %7E3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45deg tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  5. Real-time observation of the isothermal crystallization kinetics in a deeply supercooled liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, M.; Cormier, L.; Hennet, L.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.

    2017-01-01

    Below the melting temperature Tm, crystals are the stable phase of typical elemental or molecular systems. However, cooling down a liquid below Tm, crystallization is anything but inevitable. The liquid can be supercooled, eventually forming a glass below the glass transition temperature Tg. Despite their long lifetimes and the presence of strong barriers that produces an apparent stability, supercooled liquids and glasses remain intrinsically a metastable state and thermodynamically unstable towards the crystal. Here we investigated the isothermal crystallization kinetics of the prototypical strong glassformer GeO2 in the deep supercooled liquid at 1100 K, about half-way between Tm and Tg. The crystallization process has been observed through time-resolved neutron diffraction for about three days. Data show a continuous reorganization of the amorphous structure towards the alpha-quartz phase with the final material composed by crystalline domains plunged into a low-density, residual amorphous matrix. A quantitative analysis of the diffraction patterns allows determining the time evolution of the relative fractions of crystal and amorphous, that was interpreted through an empirical model for the crystallization kinetics. This approach provides a very good description of the experimental data and identifies a predator-prey-like mechanism between crystal and amorphous, where the density variation acts as a blocking barrier. PMID:28255173

  6. High-speed camera observation of multi-component droplet coagulation in an ultrasonic standing wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reißenweber, Marina; Krempel, Sandro; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    With an acoustic levitator small particles can be aggregated near the nodes of a standing pressure field. Furthermore it is possible to atomize liquids on a vibrating surface. We used a combination of both mechanisms and atomized several liquids simultaneously, consecutively and emulsified in the ultrasonic field. Using a high-speed camera we observed the coagulation of the spray droplets into single large levitated droplets resolved in space and time. In case of subsequent atomization of two components the spray droplets of the second component were deposited on the surface of the previously coagulated droplet of the first component without mixing.

  7. The Stefan outflow in a multicomponent vapor-gas atmosphere around a droplet and its role for cloud expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchma, A E; Martyukova, D S

    2016-01-01

    A new comprehensive analysis of Stefan's flow caused by a free growing droplet in vapor-gas atmosphere with several condensing components is presented. This analysis, based on the nonstationary heat and material balance and diffusion transport equations, shows the appearance of the Stefan inflow in the vicinity of the growing droplet and the outflow at large distances from the droplet as a consequence of nonisothermal condensation. For an ensemble of droplets in the atmospheric cloud, this flow provides an increase of the total volume of the cloud, which can be treated as cloud thermal expansion and leads to floating the cloud as a whole due to buoyancy. We have formulated the self-similar solutions of the nonstationary diffusion and heat conduction equations for a growing multicomponent droplet and have derived analytical expressions for the nonstationary velocity profile of Stefan's flow and the expansion volume of the vapor-gas mixture around the growing droplet. To illustrate the approach, we computed the...

  8. Vibration-induced droplet atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan

    The atomization of liquid drops is investigated experimentally using laser vibrometry, high-speed imaging, and particle tracking techniques. The spray is generated by a novel vibration-induced droplet atomization (VIDA) process in which a sessile drop is atomized by an underlying vibrating thin metal diaphragm, resulting in rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the free surface of the primary drop. Under some conditions, the primary drop can be atomized extremely rapidly by a bursting-like mechanism (e.g., a 0.1 ml water drop can be atomized in 0.4 seconds). The present research has focused on four major areas: global characteristics of VIDA process, instability modes and free surface dynamics of the forced drop, mechanisms of the interface breakup, and parametric characterization of the ensuing spray. Prior to atomization, the drop free surface undergoes three transitions: from axisymmetric standing waves to azimuthal waves, to a newly-observed lattice mode, and to a disordered pre-ejection state. The droplet ejection results from localized collapse of surface troughs and initiation and ultimate breakup of momentary liquid spikes. Breakup begins with capillary pinch-off from spike tips and can be followed by additional pinching of liquid droplets. For a relatively low-viscosity liquid, e.g., water, a capillary-wave instability of the spike is observed in some cases, while for a very viscous liquid, e.g., a glycerin/water solution, the first breakup occurs near the stem of the spike, with or without subsequent breakup of the detached, elongated thread. Different mechanisms dominating the primary breakup of the spike are operative in the low- and high-viscosity ejection regimes. When ejection of the secondary droplets is triggered, the evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary drop and the vibrating diaphragm. Due to these dynamics, the process can be either self-intensifying or self-decaying. The resulting VIDA spray

  9. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N; Andersson-Svahn, Helene

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using droplet microfluidics for screening mammalian cell factories has been limited by the difficulty in achieving continuous cell division during cultivation in droplets. Here, we report the influence of droplet size on mammalian cell division and viability during cultivation in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped after 24 h, whereas continuous cell division was observed in 180 and 320 pL droplets for 72 h. The viability of the cells cultivated in the 33 pL droplets also dropped to about 50% in 72 h. In contrast, the viability of the cells in the larger droplets was above 90% even after 72 h of cultivation, making them a more suitable droplet size for 72-h cultivation. This study shows a direct correlation of microfluidic droplet size to the division and viability of mammalian cells. This highlights the importance of selecting suitable droplet size for mammalian cell factory screening assays. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. [Micro-droplet characterization and its application for amino acid detection in droplet microfluidic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiling; Dong, Libing; Tu, Ran; Du, Wenbin; Ji, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the droplet microfluidic system attracts interests due to its high throughput and low cost to detect and screen. The picoliter micro-droplets from droplet microfluidics are uniform with respect to the size and shape, and could be used as monodispensed micro-reactors for encapsulation and detection of single cell or its metabolites. Therefore, it is indispensable to characterize micro-droplet and its application from droplet microfluidic system. We first constructed the custom-designed droplet microfluidic system for generating micro-droplets, and then used the micro-droplets to encapsulate important amino acids such as glutamic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine to test the droplets' properties, including the stability, diffusivity and bio-compatibility for investigating its application for amino acid detection and sorting. The custom-designed droplet microfluidic system could generate the uniformed micro-droplets with a controllable size between 20 to 50 microm. The micro-droplets could be stable for more than 20 h without cross-contamination or fusion each other. The throughput of detection and sorting of the system is about 600 micro-droplets per minute. This study provides a high-throughput platform for the analysis and screening of amino acid-producing microorganisms.

  11. Ice and water droplets on graphite: A comparison of quantum and classical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, Rafael, E-mail: ramirez@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Singh, Jayant K. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 4, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 4, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-11-28

    Ice and water droplets on graphite have been studied by quantum path integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The point-charge q-TIP4P/F potential was used to model the interaction between flexible water molecules, while the water-graphite interaction was described by a Lennard-Jones potential previously used to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water droplets on graphite. Several energetic and structural properties of water droplets with sizes between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} molecules were analyzed in a temperature interval of 50–350 K. The vibrational density of states of crystalline and amorphous ice drops was correlated to the one of ice Ih to assess the influence of the droplet interface and molecular disorder on the vibrational properties. The average distance of covalent OH bonds is found 0.01 Å larger in the quantum limit than in the classical one. The OO distances are elongated by 0.03 Å in the quantum simulations at 50 K. Bond distance fluctuations are large as a consequence of the zero-point vibrations. The analysis of the H-bond network shows that the liquid droplet is more structured in the classical limit than in the quantum case. The average kinetic and potential energy of the ice and water droplets on graphite has been compared with the values of ice Ih and liquid water as a function of temperature. The droplet kinetic energy shows a temperature dependence similar to the one of liquid water, without apparent discontinuity at temperatures where the droplet is solid. However, the droplet potential energy becomes significantly larger than the one of ice or water at the same temperature. In the quantum limit, the ice droplet is more expanded than in a classical description. Liquid droplets display identical density profiles and liquid-vapor interfaces in the quantum and classical limits. The value of the contact angle is not influenced by quantum effects. Contact angles of droplets decrease as the size of the water droplet

  12. Impact of Viscous Droplets on Superamphiphobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Binyu; Chen, Longquan; Deng, Xu

    2016-11-01

    Superamphiphobic coating is promising for various applications in industry, e.g. self-cleaning windows, where the impingement of droplets on surfaces is commonly encountered. In this work, we experimentally investigated the impact of droplets with similar surface tension (63-72 mN/m) but much different viscosity (1-150 mPa s) on superamphiphobic surfaces. We found that droplets can rebound from the superamphiphobic surfaces when the impact velocity is larger than a critical value, which linearly increases with the liquid viscosity. Droplet with higher viscosity spreads, retracts slower, and eventually rebounds lower and fewer times than that of low viscous droplet. These findings have important implications for surface engineers to use superamphiphobic coatings. Furthermore, we measured the maximum spreading factors for droplet impact on superamphiphobic surfaces and proposed a simple model based on energy conversation to describe its relationship to the Weber number and Reynolds number.

  13. Electroporation of cells in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yihong; Wang, Jun; Bao, Ning; Lu, Chang

    2009-03-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has raised a lot of interest recently due to its wide applications to screening biological/chemical assays with high throughput. Despite the advances on droplet-based assays involving cells, gene delivery methods that are compatible with the droplet platform have been lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a simple microfluidic device that encapsulates cells into aqueous droplets and then electroporates the encapsulated cells. The electroporation occurs when the cell-containing droplets (in oil) flow through a pair of microelectrodes with a constant voltage established in between. We investigate the parameters and characteristics of the electroporation. We demonstrate delivering enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We envision the application of this technique to high-throughput functional genomics studies based on droplet microfluidics.

  14. Supercritical droplet combustion and related transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, K. C.; Shuen, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in theoretical analyses of supercritical droplet vaporization and combustion is conducted. Both hydrocarbon and cryogenic liquid droplets over a wide range of thermodynamic states are considered. Various important high-pressure effects on droplet behavior, such as thermodynamic non-ideality, transport anomaly, and property variation, are reviewed. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the criticl pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  15. CFD Model of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow made possible to identify the paths of water transport. The Node 3 airflow was computed for several ventilation scenarios. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 2-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain. The probability of the droplet transport to the adjacent rack surface with electronic equipment was predicted.

  16. The mysterious droplet birth in a microfluidic cross junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loo, Stephanie; Gilet, Tristan

    2015-11-01

    In microfluidics flow focusing is widely used to produce water-in-oil droplets in microchannels at high frequency. Nevertheless, the scaling laws associated to droplet length, speed and frequency could not be identified yet, owing to the large number of parameters involved (incl. complex geometry). We here present an experimental study of droplet formation in a microfluidic cross-junction with a minimum number of geometrical parameters. We mostly focus on the dripping regime. The formation sequence is decomposed in two steps, inflation and squeezing, that vary differently according to both water and oil flow rates. These variations reveal several insights about the fluid flows in both phases. From there we infer the scaling law that relates droplet volume and frequency to the Capillary number associated to each inlet flow rate. This law involves a minimum of fitting parameters. We finally discuss the influence of inlet control (flow rate vs. pressure) and surfactants on the formation dynamics. Supported by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  17. LES of certain droplet size effects in fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, V. A.

    2010-07-01

    This thesis belongs to the field of mechanical engineering, more precisely to computational fluid dynamics and fuel injection modelling. This type of problems have been extensively studied because of their practical importance, for example, in combustion processes of automotive industry. Novel challenges are reduction of exhaust gas emissions in the present diesel fuel-based and also in bio diesel-based concepts. The problem studied in this work is of generic nature and it can be related to many real world problems. A model problem of droplet-laden jet is studied to emulate a fuel spray. The most essential parameter that is studied is fuel droplet size. More precisely, the ratio of droplet timescale and fluid timescale i.e. the Stokes number. Mathematically, the studied system can be formulated in terms of the Navier-Stokes equation with a spray momentum source term at low Mach number regime. A feature characteristic to this study is to use large scale computer simulation to simulate the system. For adequate modelling, this work makes use of a method called Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to simulate the motion of the turbulent gas and Lagrangian Particle Tracking (LPT) to simulate the motion of the droplets. The main computational tool used in this work is the OpenFOAM software. In fact, the present work is one of the first computational studies on LES/LPT diesel spray modeling in which droplet-level phenomena are discussed in light of the global behavior of the spray jet in an extensive manner. In view of the literature on this topic the results of the work seem to be realistic. The dependence of spray shape on droplet size (Stokes number) is studied and differences between the shapes are consistently explained. It is noted that mixing inside the spray depends significantly on the fuel droplet size. Quantitative and statistical analysis methods are developed in order to explain the connection between spray shape and mixing. The presented analysis explains the results

  18. Deformation and fracture of emulsion-filled gels: Effect of gelling agent concentration and oil droplet size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Vliet, van T.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Velde, van de F.; Aken, van G.A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the ratio between the modulus of the oil droplets and that of the gel matrix (varied by changing gelling agent concentration and oil droplet size) on the large deformation properties of gelatine, ¿-carrageenan and whey protein isolate (WPI) gels was studied at different compression spe

  19. Curvature Gradient Driving Droplets in Fast Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Yin, Yajun; Tseng, Fan-gang; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-01-01

    Earlier works found out spontaneous directional motion of liquid droplets on hydrophilic conical surfaces, however, not hydrophobic case. Here we show that droplets on any surface may take place spontaneous directional motion without considering contact angle property. The driving force is found to be proportional to the curvature gradient of the surface. Fast motion can be lead at surfaces with small curvature radii. The above discovery can help to create more effective transportation technology of droplets, and better understand some observed natural phenomena.

  20. Self-propelled chemotactic ionic liquid droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Wayne; Fay, Cormac; Florea, Larisa; Diamond, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report the chemotactic behaviour of self-propelled droplets composed solely of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride ([P6,6,6,14][Cl]). These droplets spontaneously move along an aqueous-air boundary in the direction of chloride gradients to specific destinations due to asymmetric release of [P6,6,6,14]+ cationic surfactant from the droplet into the aqueous phase.

  1. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton

    2016-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes(CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermalstability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates...... for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial...

  2. Droplets as reaction compartments for protein nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenish, Sean R A; Kaltenbach, Miriam; Fischlechner, Martin; Hollfelder, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Extreme miniaturization of biological and chemical reactions in pico- to nanoliter microdroplets is emerging as an experimental paradigm that enables more experiments to be carried out with much lower sample consumption, paving the way for high-throughput experiments. This review provides the protein scientist with an experimental framework for (a) formation of polydisperse droplets by emulsification or, alternatively, of monodisperse droplets using microfluidic devices; (b) construction of experimental rigs and microfluidic chips for this purpose; and (c) handling and analysis of droplets.

  3. Evaporation of nanofluid droplet on heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chan Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experiment on the evaporation of nanofluid sessile droplet on a heated surface was conducted. A nanofluid of 0.5% volumetric concentration mixed with 80-nm-sized CuO powder and pure water were used for experiment. Droplet was applied to the heated surface, and images of the evaporation process were obtained. The recorded images were analyzed to find the volume, diameter, and contact angle of the droplet. In addition, the evaporative heat transfer coefficient was calculated from experimental result. The results of this study are summarized as follows: the base diameter of the droplet was maintained stably during the evaporation. The measured temperature of the droplet was increased rapidly for a very short time, then maintained constantly. The nanofluid droplet was evaporated faster than the pure water droplet under the experimental conditions of the same initial volume and temperature, and the average evaporative heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluid droplet was higher than that of pure water. We can consider the effects of the initial contact angle and thermal conductivity of nanofluid as the reason for this experimental result. However, the effect of surface roughness on the evaporative heat transfer of nanofluid droplet appeared unclear.

  4. Quantitative DNA Analysis Using Droplet Digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Rolf H A M; White, Stefan J

    2017-01-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is based on the isolated amplification of thousands of individual DNA molecules simultaneously, with each molecule compartmentalized in a droplet. The presence of amplified product in each droplet is indicated by a fluorescent signal, and the proportion of positive droplets allows the precise quantification of a given sequence. In this chapter we briefly outline the basis of ddPCR, and describe two different applications using the Bio-Rad QX200 system: genotyping copy number variation and quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries.

  5. Dissonant Black Droplets and Black Funnels

    CERN Document Server

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Way, Benson

    2016-01-01

    A holographic field theory on a fixed black hole background has a gravitational dual represented by a black funnel or a black droplet. These states are "detuned" when the temperature of the field theory near the horizon does not match the temperature of the background black hole. In particular, the gravitational dual to the Boulware state must be a detuned solution. We construct detuned droplets and funnels dual to a Schwarzschild background and show that the Boulware phase is represented by a droplet. We also construct hairy black droplets associated to a low-temperature scalar condensation instability and show that they are thermodynamically preferred to their hairless counterparts.

  6. Interaction between electrically charged droplets in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenbourger, Martin; Caps, Herve; Hardouin, Jerome; Vitry, Youen; Boigelot, Bernard; Dorbolo, Stephane; Grasp Team; Beams Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The past ten years, electrically charged droplets have been studied tremendously for their applications in industry (electrospray, electrowetting,...). However, charged droplets are also present in nature. Indeed, it has been shown that the droplets falling from thunderclouds possess an excess of electric charges. Moreover, some research groups try to use the electrical interaction between drops in order to control the coalescence between cloud droplets and control rain generation. The common way to study this kind of system is to make hypothesis on the interaction between two charged drops. Then, these hypothesis are extended to a system of thousands of charged droplets. Thanks to microgravity conditions, we were able to study the interaction between two electrically charged droplets. In practice, the charged droplets were propelled one in front of the other at low speed (less than 1 m/s). The droplets trajectory is studied for various charges and volumes. The repulsion between two charged drops is correctly fitted by a simple Coulomb repulsion law. In the case of attractive interactions, we discuss the collisions observed as a function of the droplets speed, volume and electric charges. Thanks to FNRS for financial support.

  7. Liquid Droplets on a Highly Deformable Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Rafael; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the deformation produced by micro-droplets atop thin elastomeric and glassy free-standing films. Due to the Laplace pressure, the droplets deform the elastic membrane thereby forming a bulge. Thus, there are two angles that define the droplet/membrane geometry: the angle the liquid surface makes with the film and the angle the deformed bulge makes with the film. The contact line geometry is well captured by a Neumann construction which includes contributions from interfacial and mechanical tensions. Finally, we show that a droplet atop a film with biaxial tension assumes an equilibrium shape which is elongated along the axis of high tension.

  8. Droplet evaporation with complexity of evaporation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Jin Young; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet often exhibits a mixed evaporation mode, where the contact radius and the contact angle simultaneously vary with time. For sessile water droplets containing polymers with different initial polymer concentrations, we experimentally study their evaporation dynamics by measuring mass and volume changes. We show how diffusion-limited evaporation governs droplet evaporation, regardless of the complexity of evaporation behavior, and how the evaporation rate depends on the polymer concentration. Finally, we suggest a unified expression for a diffusion-limited evaporation rate for a sessile droplet with complexity in evaporation dynamics.

  9. A Theory of Shape-Shifting Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Pierre; Goldstein, Raymond; Smoukov, Stoyan; Denkov, Nikolai

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of cooled oil emulsion droplets uncovered a remarkable array of shape transformations: the initially spherical droplets flatten into polygonal shapes, first hexagons, then triangles or quadrilaterals that ultimately grow thin protrusions from their corners. These transformations are driven by a partial phase transition of the bulk liquid phase. In this talk, we explore theoretically the simplest geometric competition between this phase transition and surface tension in planar polygons. We recover the experimental sequence of shapes and predict shape statistics in qualitative agreement with experiments. Extending the model to capture some of the three-dimensional structure of the droplets, we analyse the topological transition of droplet puncture observed in experiments.

  10. Self-Propulsion of Pure Water Droplets by Spontaneous Marangoni-Stress-Driven Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izri, Ziane; van der Linden, Marjolein N.; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    We report spontaneous motion in a fully biocompatible system consisting of pure water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium of squalane and monoolein. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. The strong advection and weak diffusion conditions allow for the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion in a system of isotropic particles at sufficiently large Péclet number according to a straightforward generalization of a recently proposed mechanism [S. Michelin, E. Lauga, and D. Bartolo, Phys. Fluids 25, 061701 (2013); S. Michelin and E. Lauga, J. Fluid Mech. 747, 572 (2014)]. Experiments with a highly concentrated solution of salt instead of water, and tetradecane instead of squalane, confirm the above mechanism. The present swimming droplets are able to carry external bodies such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells.

  11. Nanoliter-scale protein crystallization and screening with a microfluidic droplet robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Li-Na; Guo, Rui; Cui, Heng-Jun; Ye, Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2014-05-23

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programmable and reliable liquid-handling operations for nanoliter-scale protein crystallization experiments. We applied the droplet robot in large-scale screening of crystallization conditions of five soluble proteins and one membrane protein with 35-96 different crystallization conditions, study of volume effects on protein crystallization, and determination of phase diagrams of two proteins. The volume for each droplet reactor is only ca. 4-8 nL. The protein consumption significantly reduces 50-500 fold compared with current crystallization stations.

  12. Study on Spray Characteristics and Spray Droplets Dynamic Behavior of Diesel Engine Fueled by Rapeseed Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapit Azwan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel-air mixing is important process in diesel combustion. It directly affects the combustion and emission of diesel engine. Biomass fuel needs great help to atomize because the fuel has high viscosity and high distillation temperature. This study investigates the atomization characteristics and droplet dynamic behaviors of diesel engine spray fueled by rapeseed oil (RO. Optical observation of RO spray was carried out using shadowgraph photography technique. Single nano-spark photography technique was used to study the characteristics of the rapeseed oil spray while dual nano-spark shadowgraph technique was used to study the spray droplet behavior. The results show that RO has very poor atomization due to the high viscosity nature of the fuel. This is in agreement with the results from spray droplet dynamic behavior studies that shows due to the high viscosity, the droplets are large in size and travel downward, with very little influence of entrainment effect due to its large kinematic energy.

  13. Evaporation of bi-component droplets in a heated, highly turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, F.; Bazile, R. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France)

    2012-08-15

    This work aims to understand the phenomena that occur in a combustion chamber where multi-component fuel droplets are injected. Many evaporation models exist but the influence of turbulence on spray vaporization is not yet well understood. This study gives a useful database to improve these models. The objective of the work is to measure the dispersion and the evaporation of bi-component (octane/3-pentanone) droplets and the resulting vapor mixing in a well-known, heated, highly turbulent channel flow. The carrier flow shows high turbulence levels, flat profiles for the mean velocity and the velocity fluctuations. The injected droplets have a large variety of behaviors due to the large polydispersion and to the turbulence. The evolution of 3-pentanone liquid concentration, mass flux, and droplet clusters are described. Mean concentration, fluctuations of concentration, and mixing of the vapor phase are characterized. (orig.)

  14. Protocol for Measuring the Thermal Properties of a Supercooled Synthetic Sand-water-gas-methane Hydrate Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Susuki, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Tsuji, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-21

    Methane hydrates (MHs) are present in large amounts in the ocean floor and permafrost regions. Methane and hydrogen hydrates are being studied as future energy resources and energy storage media. To develop a method for gas production from natural MH-bearing sediments and hydrate-based technologies, it is imperative to understand the thermal properties of gas hydrates. The thermal properties' measurements of samples comprising sand, water, methane, and MH are difficult because the melting heat of MH may affect the measurements. To solve this problem, we performed thermal properties' measurements at supercooled conditions during MH formation. The measurement protocol, calculation method of the saturation change, and tips for thermal constants' analysis of the sample using transient plane source techniques are described here. The effect of the formation heat of MH on measurement is very small because the gas hydrate formation rate is very slow. This measurement method can be applied to the thermal properties of the gas hydrate-water-guest gas system, which contains hydrogen, CO2, and ozone hydrates, because the characteristic low formation rate of gas hydrate is not unique to MH. The key point of this method is the low rate of phase transition of the target material. Hence, this method may be applied to other materials having low phase-transition rates.

  15. A molecular dynamics study on surface properties of supercooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü; Yongjun

    2006-01-01

    [1]Basu J K,Hazra S,Sanyal M K.Growth mechanism of Langmuir-Blodgett films.Phys Rev Lett,1999,82:4675-4678[2]Taylor R S,Shields R L.Molecular-dynamics simulations of the ethanol liquid-vapor interface.J Chem Phys,2003,119:12569-12576[3]Velev O D,Gurkov T D,Ivanov I B,et al.Abnormal thickness and stability of nonequilibrium liquid films.Phys Rev Lett,1995,75:264-267[4]Weng J G,Park S,Lukes J R,et al.Molecular dynamics investigation of thickness effect on liquid films.J Chem Phys,2000,113:5917-5923[5]Zakharov V V,Brodskaya E N,Laaksonen A.Surface tension of water droplets:A molecular dynamics study of model and size dependencies.J Chem Phys,1997,107:10675-10683[6]Wang J Z,Chen M,Guo Z Y.A two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of liquid-vapor nucleation.Chin Sci Bull,2003,48(7):623-626[7]Guissani Y,Guillot B.A computer simulation study of the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of water.J Chem Phys,1993,98:8221-8235[8]Wilson M A,Pohorille A,Pratt L R.Surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface.J Chem Phys,1988,88:3281-3285[9]Alejandre J,Tildesley D J,Chapela G A.Molecular dynamics simulation of the orthobaric densities and surface tension of water.J Chem Phys,1995,102:4574-4583[10]Matsumoto M,Kataoka Y.Study on liquid-vapor interface of water (Ⅰ):Simulational results of thermodynamic properties and orientational structure.J Chem Phys,1988,88:3233-3245[11]Floriano M A,Angell C A.Surface tension and molar surface free energy and entropy of water to-27.2℃.J Phys Chem,1990,94:4199-4202[12]Jorgensen W L,Chandrasekhar J,Madura J D.Comparison of simple potential functions for simulating liquid water.J Chem Phys,1993,79:926-935[13]Berendsen H J C,Grigera J R,Straatsma T P.The missing term in effective pair potentials.J Phys Chem,1987,91:6269-6271[14]Arbuckle B W,Clancy P.Effects of the Ewald sum on the free energy of the extended simple point charge model for water.J Chem Phys,2002,116:5090-5098[15]Tarazona P,Chacon E,Reinaldo-Falagan M,et al

  16. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Dupuis; J M Yeomans

    2005-06-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann algorithm which can be used to explore the spreading of droplets on chemically and topologically patterned substrates. As an example we use the method to show that the final configuration of a drop on a substrate comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes can depend sensitively on the dynamical pathway by which the state is reached. We also consider a substrate covered with micron-scale posts and investigate how this can lead to superhydrophobic behaviour. Finally we model how a Namibian desert beetle collects water from the wind.

  17. Nanoliter-Scale Protein Crystallization and Screening with a Microfluidic Droplet Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Zhu; Li-Na Zhu; Rui Guo; Heng-Jun Cui; Sheng Ye; Qun Fang

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programma...

  18. Spin-Droplet State of an Interacting 2D Electron System

    OpenAIRE

    Teneh, N.; Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Pudalov, V. M.; Reznikov, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report thermodynamic magnetization measurements of two-dimensional electrons in several high mobility Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. We provide evidence for an easily polarizable electron state in a wide density range from insulating to deep into the metallic phase. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the magnetization is consistent with the formation of large-spin droplets in the insulating phase. These droplets melt in the metallic phase with increasi...

  19. Chemical composition of coastal stratus clouds: Dependence on droplet size and distance from the coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, J. William; Collett, Jeff; Daube, Bruce; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    The aerosol at elevated sites in the South Coast Air Basin in California is a mixture of sea salt and pollution-derived secondary aerosol. The influence of sea salt declines with increasing distance from the coast. Nitric acid appears to react with the NaCl in sea salt aerosol to release HCl (g) and form NaNO 3 in the aerosol. At inland sites, aerosol concentrations differ during periods of onshore and offshore flow. The highest concentrations were observed during the day when the onshore flow transported pollutants to the sites, while lower concentrations were observed at night when drainage flows from nearby mountains influenced the sites. Variations, in liquid water content are a major influence on cloudwater ion concentrations. Comparisons of the ionic concentrations in two size-segregated fractions of cloudwater collected during several sampling intervals suggest that there is a large difference between the average composition of the smaller droplets and that of the larger droplets. The concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ in the large-droplet fraction were observed to be higher than in the small-droplet fraction, while the concentrations of SO 42-, NO 3-, NH 4+ and H + were higher in the small-droplet fraction. Chloride concentrations were nearly equal in both fractions. Differences in the composition of size-fractionated cloudwater samples suggest that large droplets are formed on sea salt and soil dust, which are large aerosol, and small droplets are formed on small secondary aerosol composed primarily of (NH 4) 2SO 4 and NH 4NO 3. The concentrations of several components that exist partly in the gas phase (e.g. Cl -, HCOOH and CH 3COOH) appear to be independent of droplet size.

  20. Modeling of Droplet Generation in a Top Blowing Steelmaking Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoff; Subagyo; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Li, Zushu

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of metal droplets ejected due to impinging gas jet on the surface of liquid metal is an important parameter for the understanding and for the modeling of the refining kinetics of reactions in slag-metal emulsion zone. In the present work, a numerical study has been carried out to critically examine the applicability of droplet generation rate correlation previously proposed by Subagyo et al. on the basis of dimensionless blowing number (N B). The blowing number was re-evaluated at the impingement point of jet with taking into account the temperature effect of change in density and velocity of the gas jet. The result obtained from the work shows that the modified blowing number N B,T at the furnace temperature of 1873 K (1600 °C) is approximately double in magnitude compared to N B calculated by Subagyo and co-workers. When N B,T has been employed to the Subagyo's empirical correlation for droplet generation, a wide mismatch is observed between the experimental data obtained from cold model and hot model experiments. The reason for this large deviation has been investigated in the current study, and a theoretical approach to estimate the droplet generation rate has been proposed. The suitability of the proposed model has been tested by numerically calculating the amount of metals in slag. The study shows that the weight of metals in emulsion falls in the range of 0 to 21 wt pct of hot metal weight when droplet generation rate has been calculated at ambient furnace temperature of 1873 K (1600 °C).

  1. Droplet Digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay for Absolute RNA Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weihua; Chen, Liben; Rane, Tushar D.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-09-01

    We present a continuous-flow droplet-based digital Enzyme-Linked Oligonucleotide Hybridization Assay (droplet digital ELOHA) for sensitive detection and absolute quantification of RNA molecules. Droplet digital ELOHA incorporates direct hybridization and single enzyme reaction via the formation of single probe-RNA-probe (enzyme) complex on magnetic beads. It enables RNA detection without reverse transcription and PCR amplification processes. The magnetic beads are subsequently encapsulated into a large number of picoliter-sized droplets with enzyme substrates in a continuous-flow device. This device is capable of generating droplets at high-throughput. It also integrates in-line enzymatic incubation and detection of fluorescent products. Our droplet digital ELOHA is able to accurately quantify (differentiate 40% difference) as few as ~600 RNA molecules in a 1 mL sample (equivalent to 1 aM or lower) without molecular replication. The absolute quantification ability of droplet digital ELOHA is demonstrated with the analysis of clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA to show its potential value in real complex samples.

  2. Following or Against Topographic Wettability Gradient: Movements of Droplets on a Micropatterned Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiayi; Chen, Shuo

    2017-05-30

    Two kinds of possible movements of droplets (i.e., following or against the topographic wettability gradient) on a micropatterned surface are investigated by using a particle-based method: many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD). The displacement along the wettability gradient and contact angles on both sides of the droplet are analyzed. The results show that the migration trajectory of the droplet is determined by the coexistence of Cassie and Wenzel states and the unbalanced Young's force, which are related to the impact velocity, pillar height, and surface tension. The droplet remains in the Cassie state and advances spontaneously following the wettability gradient under a small impact velocity, high pillar height, and large surface tension. On the contrary, when the coexistence of Cassie and Wenzel states appears, the contact line on the side of the Cassie state retracts and that on the side of the Wenzel state pins, inducing droplet movement against the wettability gradient. Additionally, the critical impinging velocity, which determines the migration direction of the droplet, also depends on the pillar height and surface tension. The outcomes are helpful in designing surfaces with topographical wettability gradients for droplet transportation.

  3. Evaporation of sessile droplets affected by graphite nanoparticles and binary base fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2014-11-26

    The effects of ethanol component and nanoparticle concentration on evaporation dynamics of graphite-water nanofluid droplets have been studied experimentally. The results show that the formed deposition patterns vary greatly with an increase in ethanol concentration from 0 to 50 vol %. Nanoparticles have been observed to be carried to the droplet surface and form a large piece of aggregate. The volume evaporation rate on average increases as the ethanol concentration increases from 0 to 50 vol % in the binary mixture nanofluid droplets. The evaporation rate at the initial stage is more rapid than that at the late stage to dry, revealing a deviation from a linear fitting line, standing for a constant evaporation rate. The deviation is more intense with a higher ethanol concentration. The ethanol-induced smaller liquid-vapor surface tension leads to higher wettability of the nanofluid droplets. The graphite nanoparticles in ethanol-water droplets reinforce the pinning effect in the drying process, and the droplets with more ethanol demonstrate the depinning behavior only at the late stage. The addition of graphite nanoparticles in water enhances a droplet baseline spreading at the beginning of evaporation, a pinning effect during evaporation, and the evaporation rate. However, with a relatively high nanoparticle concentration, the enhancement is attenuated.

  4. The epididymis, cytoplasmic droplets and male fertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor G Cooper

    2011-01-01

    The potential of spermatozoa to become motile during post-testicular maturation,and the relationship between the cytoplasmic droplet and fertilizing capacity are reviewed.Post-testicular maturation of spermatozoa involves the autonomous induction of motility,which can occur in vivo in testes with occluded excurrent ducts and in vitro in testicular explants,and artefactual changes in morphology that appear to occur in the testis in vitro.Both modifications may reflect time-dependent oxidation of disulphide bonds of head and tail proteins.Regulatory volume decrease(RVD),which counters sperm swelling at ejaculation,is discussed in relation to loss of cytoplasmic droplets and consequences for fertility.It is postulated that:(i)fertile males possess spermatozoa with sufficient osmolytes to drive RVD at ejaculation,permitting the droplet to round up and pinch off without membrane rupture; and(ⅱ)infertile males possess spermatozoa with insufficient osmolytes so that RVD is inadequate,the droplet swells and the resulting flagellar angulation prevents droplet loss.Droplet retention at ejaculation is a harbinger of infertility caused by failure of the spermatozoon to negotiate the uterotubal junction or mucous and reach the egg.In this hypothesis,the epididymis regulates fertility indirectly by the extent of osmolyte provision to spermatozoa,which influences RVD and therefore droplet loss.Man is an exception,because ejaculated human spermatozoa retain their droplets.This may reflect their short midpiece,approximating head length,permitting a swollen droplet to extend along the entire midpiece; this not only obviates droplet migration and flagellar angulation but also hampers droplet loss.

  5. Forces Acting on Sessile Droplet on Inclined Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Annapragada, S. Ravi; Murthy, Jayathi Y.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2009-01-01

    Although many analytical, experimental and numerical studies have focused on droplet motion, the mechanics of the droplet while still in its static state, and just before motion starts, are not well understood. A study of static droplets would shed light on the threshold voltage (or critical inclination) for initiating electrically (or gravitationally) induced droplet motion. Before the droplet starts to move, the droplet shape changes such that the forces acting at the triple contact line ba...

  6. Droplet turbulence interactions under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, E. B.; Greenfield, S. C.; Ondas, M. S.; Song, Y.-H.; Spegar, T. D.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to experimentally characterize the behavior of droplets in vaporizing liquid sprays under conditions typical of those encountered in high pressure combustion systems such as liquid fueled rocket engines. Of particular interest are measurements of droplet drag, droplet heating, droplet vaporization, droplet distortion, and secondary droplet breakup, under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The paper presents a brief description of the specific accomplishments which have been made over the past year.

  7. Driving Droplets by Curvi-Propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2012-01-01

    How to make small liquid droplets move spontaneously and directionally on solid surfaces is a challenge in lab-on-chip technologies, DNA analysis, and heat exchangers. The best-known mechanism, a wettability gradient, does not move droplets rapidly enough for most purposes and cannot move droplets smaller than a critical size defined by the contact angle hysteresis. Here we report on a mechanism using curvature gradients, which we show is particularly effective at accelerating small droplets, and works for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. Experiments for water droplets on glass cones in the sub-millimeter range show a maximum speed of 0.28 m/s, two orders of magnitude higher than obtained by wettability gradient. From simple considerations of droplet surface area change, we show that the force exerted on a droplet on a conical surface scales as the curvature gradient. This force therefore diverges for small droplets near the tip of a cone. We illustrate this using molecular dynamics simulations, and...

  8. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Sarles, Stephen A [ORNL; Venkatesan, Guru [The University of Tennessee; Hayes, Douglas G [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  9. Exotic states of bouncing and walking droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind-Willassen, Øistein; Moláček, Jan; Harris, Daniel M.;

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of an integrated experimental and theoretical investigation of droplets bouncing on a vibrating fluid bath. A comprehensive series of experiments provides the most detailed characterisation to date of the system's dependence on fluid properties, droplet size, and vibrationa...

  10. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We's, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  11. Droplets bouncing over a vibrating fluid layer

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera-Garcia, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    This is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 65st Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD (fluid dynamics video). This video shows the motion of levitated liquid droplets. The levitation is produced by the vertical vibration of a liquid container. We made visualizations of the motion of many droplets to study the formation of clusters and their stability.

  12. Dynamically slow processes in supercooled water confined between hydrophobic plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, Giancarlo [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Santos, Francisco de los, E-mail: gfranzese@ub.ed, E-mail: fdlsant@ugr.e [Departamento de Electromagnetismo y Fisica de la Materia, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2009-12-16

    We study the dynamics of water confined between hydrophobic flat surfaces at low temperature. At different pressures, we observe different behaviors that we understand in terms of the hydrogen bond dynamics. At high pressure, the formation of the open structure of the hydrogen bond network is inhibited and the surfaces can be rapidly dried (dewetted) by formation of a large cavity with decreasing temperature. At lower pressure we observe strong non-exponential behavior of the correlation function, but with no strong increase of the correlation time. This behavior can be associated, on the one hand, to the rapid ordering of the hydrogen bonds that generates heterogeneities and, on the other hand, to the lack of a single timescale as a consequence of the cooperativity in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point that characterizes the phase diagram at low temperature of the water model considered here. At very low pressures, the gradual formation of the hydrogen bond network is responsible for the large increase of the correlation time and, eventually, the dynamical arrest of the system, with a strikingly different dewetting process, characterized by the formation of many small cavities.

  13. Case study of the 9 April 2009 ‘brown’ cloud: Observations of usually high cloud droplet concentrations in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delene, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Cloud droplets nucleate on aerosol particles termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is well known that a larger number concentration of CCN results in a larger number concentration of droplets in developing cumulus clouds. However, the conditions where dust particles can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and hence change cloud droplet concentration and precipitation formation processes is uncertain. Aircraft measurements of cloud droplet concentration between 13:20 and 13:30 UTC during the 9 April 2009 flight near Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, show total cloud droplet concentration (3-50 µm in diameter) of 800 to 1200 #/cm-3 at a altitude of 18000 ft. Typical cloud droplet concentration for this type of cloud in the Riyadh region is approximately 400 #/cm-3 and is typical of observation made between 13:00 and 13:20 UTC during the 9 April 2009 flight at 18,000 ft. Photographs of ice accumulation on the unprotected leading edge of the aircraft’s wing due to the freezing of super cooled droplets show a color changed from white during the time of low droplet number condensation to brown during the high droplet number concentration. It is hypothesized that high droplet number concentration observations were the result of ingestion of a large about of dust particles by the cloud. : Case Study of the 9 April 2009 ‘Brown’ Cloud: Observations of Usually High Cloud Droplet Concentrations in Saudi Arabia.

  14. One-way-coupling simulation of cavitation accompanied by high-speed droplet impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2016-03-01

    Erosion due to high-speed droplet impact is a crucial issue in industrial applications. The erosion is caused by the water-hammer loading on material surfaces and possibly by the reloading from collapsing cavitation bubbles that appear within the droplet. Here, we simulate the dynamics of cavitation bubbles accompanied by high-speed droplet impact against a deformable wall in order to see whether the bubble collapse is violent enough to give rise to cavitation erosion on the wall. The evolution of pressure waves in a single water (or gelatin) droplet to collide with a deformable wall at speed up to 110 m/s is inferred from simulations of multicomponent Euler flow where phase changes are not permitted. Then, we examine the dynamics of cavitation bubbles nucleated from micron/submicron-sized gas bubble nuclei that are supposed to exist inside the droplet. For simplicity, we perform Rayleigh-Plesset-type calculations in a one-way-coupling manner, namely, the bubble dynamics are determined according to the pressure variation obtained from the Euler flow simulation. In the simulation, the preexisting bubble nuclei whose size is either micron or submicron show large growth to submillimeters because tension inside the droplet is obtained through interaction of the pressure waves and the droplet interface; this supports the possibility of having cavitation due to the droplet impact. It is also found, in particular, for the case of cavitation arising from very small nuclei such as nanobubbles, that radiated pressure from the cavitation bubble collapse can overwhelm the water-hammer pressure directly created by the impact. Hence, cavitation may need to be accounted for when it comes to discussing erosion in the droplet impact problem.

  15. Stability and dynamics of droplets on patterned substrates: insights from experiments and lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnik, F; Gross, M; Moradi, N; Zikos, G; Uhlmann, P; Müller-Buschbaum, P; Magerl, D; Raabe, D; Steinbach, I; Stamm, M

    2011-05-11

    The stability and dynamics of droplets on solid substrates are studied both theoretically and via experiments. Focusing on our recent achievements within the DFG-priority program 1164 (Nano- and Microfluidics), we first consider the case of (large) droplets on the so-called gradient substrates. Here the term gradient refers to both a change of wettability (chemical gradient) or topography (roughness gradient). While the motion of a droplet on a perfectly flat substrate upon the action of a chemical gradient appears to be a natural consequence of the considered situation, we show that the behavior of a droplet on a gradient of topography is less obvious. Nevertheless, if care is taken in the choice of the topographic patterns (in order to reduce hysteresis effects), a motion may be observed. Interestingly, in this case, simple scaling arguments adequately account for the dependence of the droplet velocity on the roughness gradient (Moradi et al 2010 Europhys. Lett. 89 26006). Another issue addressed in this paper is the behavior of droplets on hydrophobic substrates with a periodic arrangement of square shaped pillars. Here, it is possible to propose an analytically solvable model for the case where the droplet size becomes comparable to the roughness scale (Gross et al 2009 Europhys. Lett. 88 26002). Two important predictions of the model are highlighted here. (i) There exists a state with a finite penetration depth, distinct from the full wetting (Wenzel) and suspended (Cassie-Baxter, CB) states. (ii) Upon quasi-static evaporation, a droplet initially on the top of the pillars (CB state) undergoes a transition to this new state with a finite penetration depth but then (upon further evaporation) climbs up the pillars and goes back to the CB state again. These predictions are confirmed via independent numerical simulations. Moreover, we also address the fundamental issue of the internal droplet dynamics and the terminal center of mass velocity on a flat substrate.

  16. Relating chromatographic retention and electrophoretic mobility to the ion distribution within electrosprayed droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bökman, C Fredrik; Bylund, Dan; Markides, Karin E; Sjöberg, Per J R

    2006-03-01

    Ions that are observed in a mass spectrum obtained with electrospray mass spectrometry can be assumed to originate preferentially from ions that have a high distribution to the surface of the charged droplets. In this study, a relation between chromatographic retention and electrophoretic mobility to the ion distribution (derived from measured signal intensities in mass spectra and electrospray current) within electrosprayed droplets for a series of tetraalkylammonium ions, ranging from tetramethyl to tetrapentyl, is presented. Chromatographic retention in a reversed-phase system was taken as a measure of the analyte's surface activity, which was found to have a large influence on the ion distribution within electrosprayed droplets. In addition, different transport mechanisms such as electrophoretic migration and diffusion can influence the surface partitioning coefficient. The viscosity of the solvent system is affected by the methanol content and will influence both diffusion and ion mobility. However, as diffusion and ion mobility are proportional to each other, we have, in this study, chosen to focus on the ion mobility parameter. It was found that the influence of ion mobility relative to surface activity on the droplet surface partitioning of analyte ions decreases with increasing methanol content. This effect is most probably coupled to the decrease in droplet size caused by the decreased surface tension at increasing methanol content. The same observation was made upon increasing the ionic strength of the solvent system, which is also known to give rise to a decreased initial droplet size. The observed effect of ionic strength on the droplet surface partitioning of analyte ions could also be explained by the fact that at higher ionic strength, a larger number of ions are initially closer to the droplet surface and, thus, the contribution of ionic transport from the bulk liquid to the liquid/air surface interface (jet and droplet surface), attributable to

  17. Photochemistry inside superfluid helium nano droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slenczka, Alkwin; Vdovin, Alexander; Dick, Bernhard [Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Superfluid helium nano droplets serve as the most gentle cyrogenic matrix for creating isolated and cold molecules. High resolution electronic spectroscopy is sensitive for the investigation of the very weak perturbation of the helium droplet on the embedded molecule. Fluorescence excitation spectra, dispersed emission spectra and pump--probe-spectra show details of the salvation of molecules in helium droplets which were attributed to relaxation processes of the first solvation layer around the dopant. Photochemistry such as ESIPT, tautomerization by proton transfer and charge transfer are highly sensitive on intermolecular perturbations. We have studies such processes in superfluid helium droplets. The comparison with the respective gas phase experiments and quantum chemical calculations reveals further details on the photochemistry as well as on the perturbation by the superfluid helium droplet.

  18. Acoustophoresis in Variously Shaped Liquid Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie; 10.1039/c1sm05871a

    2012-01-01

    The ability to precisely trap, transport and manipulate micrometer-sized objects, including biological cells, DNA-coated microspheres and microorganisms, is very important in life science studies and biomedical applications. In this study, acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave field is used for micro-objects manipulation, a technique termed as acoustophoresis. Free surfaces of liquid droplets are used as sound reflectors to confine sound waves inside the droplets. Two techniques were developed for precise control of droplet shapes: edge pinning and hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface pinning. For all tested droplet shapes, including circular, annular and rectangular, our experiments show that polymer micro particles can be manipulated by ultrasound and form into a variety of patterns, for example, concentric rings and radial lines in an annular droplet. The complexity of the pattern increases with increasing frequency, and the observations are in line with simulation results. The acoustic mani...

  19. Preparation and nucleation of spherical metallic droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-ge Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and solidification of metallic droplets attract more and more attention for their significance in both engineering and scientific fields. In this paper, the preparation and characterization of Sn-based alloy droplets using different methods such as atomization and consumable electrode direct current arc (CDCA technique are reviewed. The morphology and structure of these droplets were determined by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The solidification behavior of single droplet was systematically studied by means of scanning calorimetry (DSC, and the nucleation kinetics was also calculated. In particular, the development of fast scanning calorimetry (FSC made it possible to investigate the evolution of undercooling under ultrafast but controllable heating and cooling conditions. The combination of CDCA technique and FSC measurements opens up a new door for quantitative studies on droplet solidification, which is accessible to demonstrate some theories by experiments.

  20. New models for droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-02-01

    A brief summary of new models for droplet heating and evaporation, developed mainly at the Sir Harry Ricardo Laboratory of the University of Brighton during 2011-2012, is presented. These are hydrodynamic models for mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking into account the effects of the moving boundary due to evaporation, hydrodynamic models of multi-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking and not taking into account the effects of the moving boundary, new kinetic models of mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, and a model for mono-component droplet evaporation, based on molecular dynamics simulation. The results, predicted by the new models are compared with experimental data and the prehctions of the previously developed models where possible. © 2013 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

  1. Statistical steady state in turbulent droplet condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Siewert, Christoph; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the early stages of clouds and other systems in which droplets grow and shrink in a turbulence-driven supersaturation field, we investigate the problem of turbulent condensation using direct numerical simulations. The turbulent fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. Based on that, we propose a Lagrangian stochastic model for condensation and evaporation of small droplets in turbulent flows. It consists of a set of stochastic integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along the droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is t...

  2. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikfeldt, K T; Huang, C; Nilsson, A; Pettersson, L G M

    2011-06-07

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P∕2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (T(W)) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)] are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing T(W), consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P∕2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P∕2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching T(W). Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  3. Evidence of the existence of the low-density liquid phase in supercooled, confined water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Majolino, Domenico; Venuti, Valentina; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2007-01-09

    By confining water in a nanoporous structure so narrow that the liquid could not freeze, it is possible to study properties of this previously undescribed system well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature TH = 231 K. Using this trick, we were able to study, by means of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrational spectra (HOH bending and OH-stretching modes) of deeply supercooled water in the temperature range 183 < T < 273 K. We observed, upon decreasing temperature, the building up of a new population of hydrogen-bonded oscillators centered around 3,120 cm(-1), the contribution of which progressively dominates the spectra as one enters into the deeply supercooled regime. We determined that the fractional weight of this spectral component reaches 50% just at the temperature, TL approximately 225 K, where the confined water shows a fragile-to-strong dynamic cross-over phenomenon [Ito, K., Moynihan, C. T., Angell, C. A. (1999) Nature 398:492-494]. Furthermore, the fact that the corresponding OH stretching spectral peak position of the low-density-amorphous solid water occurs exactly at 3,120 cm(-1) [Sivakumar, T. C., Rice, S. A., Sceats, M. G. (1978) J. Chem. Phys. 69:3468-3476.] strongly suggests that these oscillators originate from existence of the low-density-liquid phase derived from the occurrence of the first-order liquid-liquid (LL) phase transition and the associated LL critical point in supercooled water proposed earlier by a computer molecular dynamics simulation [Poole, P. H., Sciortino, F., Essmann, U., Stanley, H. E. (1992) Nature 360:324-328].

  4. The Lipid-Droplet Proteome Reveals that Droplets Are a Protein-Storage Depot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermelli, Silvia; Guo, Yi; Gross, Steven P.; Welte, Michael

    2006-09-19

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous organelles that are among the basic building blocks of eukaryotic cells. Despite central roles for cholesterol homeostasis and lipid metabolism, their function and protein composition are poorly understood. Results: We purified lipid droplets from Drosophila embryos and analyzed the associated proteins by capillary LC-MS-MS. Important functional groups include enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, signaling molecules, and proteins related to membrane trafficking. Unexpectedly, histones H2A, H2Av, and H2B were present. Using biochemistry, genetics, real-time imaging, and cell biology, we confirm that roughly 50% of certain embryonic histones are physically attached to lipid droplets, a localization conserved in other fly species. Histone association with droplets starts during oogenesis and is prominent in early embryos, but it is undetectable in later stages or in cultured cells. Histones on droplets are not irreversibly trapped; quantitation of droplet histone levels and transplantation experiments suggest that histones are transferred from droplets to nuclei as development proceeds. When this maternal store of histones is unavailable because lipid droplets are mislocalized, zygotic histone production starts prematurely. Conclusions: Because we uncover a striking proteomic similarity of Drosophila droplets to mammalian lipid droplets, Drosophila likely provides a good model for understanding droplet function in general. Our analysis also reveals a new function for these organelles; the massive nature of histone association with droplets and its developmental time-course suggest that droplets sequester maternally provided proteins until they are needed. We propose that lipid droplets can serve as transient storage depots for proteins that lack appropriate binding partners in the cell. Such sequestration may provide a general cellular strategy for handling excess proteins.

  5. Crystallization Behavior and Relaxation Dynamics of Supercooled S‑Ketoprofen and the Racemic Mixture along an Isochrone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrjanowicz, Karolina; Kaminski, Kamil; Paluch, Marian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study crystallization behavior and molecular dynamics in the supercooled liquid state of the pharmaceutically important compound ketoprofen at various thermodynamic conditions. Dielectric relaxation for a racemic mixture was investigated in a wide range of temperatures and press......In this paper, we study crystallization behavior and molecular dynamics in the supercooled liquid state of the pharmaceutically important compound ketoprofen at various thermodynamic conditions. Dielectric relaxation for a racemic mixture was investigated in a wide range of temperatures...... of pure enantiomers and their 50–50 equimolar mixture in the metastable supercooled liquid state. Crystallization kinetic studies revealed that at the same isochronal conditions the behavior of the S-enantiomer and R,S-racemic mixture of ketoprofen is entirely different. This was examined in the context...

  6. In-situ High-energy X-ray Diffraction Study of the Local Structure of Supercooled Liquid Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. W.; Kim, T. H.; Sieve, B.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, D. S.; Kelton, K. F.; Goldman, A. I.

    2005-01-01

    While changes in the coordination number for liquid silicon upon supercooling, signaling an underlying liquid-liquid phase transition, have been predicted, x-ray and neutron measurements have produced conflicting reports. In particular some studies have found an increase in the first shell coordination as temperature decreases in the supercooled regime, while others have reported increases in the coordination number with decreasing temperature. Employing the technique of electrostatic levitation coupled with high energy x-ray diffraction (125 keV), and rapid data acquisition (100ms collection times) using an area detector, we have obtained high quality structural data more deeply into the supercooled regime than has been possible before. No change in coordination number is observed in this temperature region, calling into question previous experimental claims of structural evidence for the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition.

  7. Studies of a dynamic type ice storage system using supercooled water; Kareikyakusui riyo dainamikku gata shochikunetsu shisutemu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, S.; Hashimoto, A.; Miura, N. [Kanagawa Inst. of Tech., Kanagawa (Japan); Ikemoto, Y.

    1999-11-25

    An ice storage system using supercooled water was constructed and the performance was tested. The system was consisted of a storage tank with the volume of 1.2 m{sup 3} in which slurry-ice was stared, a spiral double-tube heat exchanger 22 m long for making supercooled water by brine, a refrigerating machine of the rated capacity of 2.2 kW, reservoirs for cold and hot brine, heaters, and pumps. The system was able to be operated for more than 5 hours without freezing mostly if the degree of supercooling was less than about 2 degree C. The COPs based on the power of the refrigerating machine and system were about 1.3 and 0.7, respectively. (author)

  8. Droplet-Sizing Liquid Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Icing is one of the most significant hazards to aircraft. A sizing supercooled liquid water content (SSLWC) sonde is being developed to meet a directly related need...

  9. Chosen thermodynamic experiments: depression of the freezing point of water with salt and supercooled water

    OpenAIRE

    Krnc, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The diploma thesis presents two interesting thermodynamic experiments which were executed and described by Joseph Black in 18th Century. These are: depression of the freezing point of water with salt and supercooled water. We meet water in three states of matter in nature: in the state of ice, liquid water, and water steam. Phase crossing from water to ice (and vice versa from ice to water) is done with normal air pressure with the state temperature of 0°C. If we add certain matters to wat...

  10. Slow dynamics and local quasi-equilibrium-relaxation in supercooled colloidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RubI, J M; SantamarIa-Holek, I; Perez-Madrid, A [Department de Fisica Fonamental, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-06-09

    We present a Fokker-Planck description of supercooled colloidal systems exhibiting slow relaxation dynamics. Assuming the existence of a local quasi-equilibrium state during the relaxation of the system, we derive a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation for the non-stationary conditional probability. A generalized Stokes-Einstein relation containing the temperature of the system at local quasi-equilibrium instead of the temperature of the bath is obtained. Our results explain experiments showing that the diffusion coefficient is not proportional to the inverse of the effective viscosity at frequencies related to the diffusion timescale.

  11. Experimental investigations on prototype heat storage units utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Dragsted, Janne; Fan, Jianhua;

    2016-01-01

    was filled with 220 kg SAT mixture thickened with 1% carboxymethyl cellulose. The heat exchange capacity rate during the charging of the unit with the extra water was significantly higher than for the unit with the thickening agent due to the different levels of convection. The SAT mixtures in the units were......Laboratory tests of two heat storage units based on the principle of stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) mixtures were carried out. One unit was filled with 199.5 kg of SAT with 9% extra water to avoid phase separation of the incongruently melting salt hydrate. The other unit...

  12. Oil biodegradation. Water droplets in oil are microhabitats for microbial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U; von Netzer, Frederick; Stumpp, Christine; Lueders, Tillmann; Himmelberg, Anne M; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philipp; Harir, Mourad; Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-08-08

    Anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons, typically occurring at the oil-water transition zone, influences the quality of oil reservoirs. In Pitch Lake, Trinidad and Tobago--the world's largest asphalt lake--we found that microorganisms are metabolically active in minuscule water droplets (1 to 3 microliters) entrapped in oil. Pyrotag sequencing of individual droplet microbiomes revealed complex methanogenic microbial communities actively degrading the oil into a diverse range of metabolites, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. High salinity and water-stable isotopes of the droplets indicate a deep subsurface origin. The 13.5% water content and the large surface area of the droplets represent an underestimated potential for biodegradation of oil away from the oil-water transition zone. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. High effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.

    A high-effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for thermal management in space is described. Heat is transferred by direct contact between fine droplets (≈ 100-300 μm dia.) of a suitable low vapor pressure liquid and an inert working gas. Complete separation of the droplet and gas media in the zero-g environment is accomplished by configuring the LDHX as a vortex chamber. The large heat transfer area presented by the small droplets permits heat exchanger effectiveness of 0.9-0.95 in a compact, lightweight geometry which avoids many of the limitations of conventional plate and fin or tube and shell heat exchangers, such as their tendency toward single point failure. The application of the LDHX in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate the performance and operational characteristics of this new heat exchanger concept.

  14. Light-Driven Droplet Manipulation Technologies for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yong Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based (digital microfluidics has been demonstrated in many lab-on-a-chip applications due to its free cross-contamination and no dispersion nature. Droplet manipulation mechanisms are versatile, and each has unique advantages and limitations. Recently, the idea of manipulating droplets with light beams either through optical forces or light-induced physical mechanisms has attracted some interests, since light can achieve 3D addressing, carry high energy density for high speed actuation, and be patterned and dynamically reconfigured to generate a large number of light beams for massively parallel manipulation. This paper reviews recent developments of various optical technologies for droplet manipulation and their applications in lab-on-a-chip.

  15. Modeling of the deformation of a liquid droplet impinging upon a flat surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, J.; Zhao, Z.; Poulikakos, D.; Megaridis, C. M.; Miyatake, O.

    1993-11-01

    This article presents a theoretical study of the deformation of a spherical liquid droplet impinging upon a flat surface. The study accounts for the presence of surface tension during the spreading process. The theoretical model is solved numerically utilizing deforming finite elements and grid generation to simulate accurately the large deformations, as well as the domain nonuniformities characteristic of the spreading process. The results document the effects of impact velocity, droplet diameter, surface tension, and material properties on the fluid dynamics of the deforming droplet. Two liquids with markedly different thermophysical properties, water and liquid tin, are utilized in the numerical simulations because of their relevance in the industrial processes of spray cooling and spray deposition, respectively. The occurrence of droplet recoiling and mass accumulation around the splat periphery are standout features of the numerical simulations and yield a nonmonotonic dependence of the maximum splat radius on time.

  16. Lateral hydrodynamic interactions between an emulsion droplet and a flat surface evaluated by frictional force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Higashitani, Ko; Grieser, Franz

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a lateral atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to measure the hydrodynamic drag force acting on a microscopic emulsion droplet moving parallel to a flat surface. A tetradecane oil droplet formed in an aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulfate was attached to a V-shaped atomic force microscopy cantilever, and lateral hydrodynamic interactions between the droplet and a flat glass surface were measured using a range of scanning velocities. The droplet was positioned either far from the oscillating surface or was pressed to the surface under a constant applied load. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using AFM to study lateral hydrodynamic interactions and lubricity between soft matter materials relevant to a large number of applications in areas as diverse as flavor delivery in foods to the applications of emulsions or emollients in personal care products.

  17. High effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high-effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for thermal management in space is described. Heat is transferred by direct contact between fine droplets (approximately 100-300 microns in diameter) of a suitable low vapor pressure liquid and an inert working gas. Complete separation of the droplet and gas media in the zero-g environment is accomplished by configuring the LDHX as a vortex chamber.The large heat transfer area presented by the small droplets permits heat exchanger effectiveness of 0.9-0.95 in a compact, lightweight geometry which avoids many of the limitations of conventional plate and fin or tube and shell heat exchangers, such as their tendency toward single point failure. The application of the LDHX in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate the performance and operational characteristics of this new heat exchanger concept.

  18. Growth and Division of Active Droplets: A Model for Protocells

    CERN Document Server

    Zwicker, David; Weber, Christoph A; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that during the early steps in the origin of life, small droplets could have formed via the segregation of molecules from complex mixtures by phase separation. These droplets could have provided chemical reaction centers. However, whether these droplets could divide and propagate is unclear. Here we examine the behavior of droplets in systems that are maintained away from thermodynamic equilibrium by an external supply of energy. In these systems, droplets grow by the addition of droplet material generated by chemical reactions. Surprisingly, we find that chemically driven droplet growth can lead to shape instabilities that trigger the division of droplets into two smaller daughters. Therefore, chemically active droplets can exhibit cycles of growth and division that resemble the proliferation of living cells. Dividing active droplets could serve as a model for prebiotic protocells, where chemical reactions in the droplet play the role of a prebiotic metabolism.

  19. Fluoropolymer surface coatings to control droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Carson T; Zhang, Chuchu; Gupta, Malancha; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-06-07

    We have demonstrated the application of low surface energy fluoropolymer coatings onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices for droplet formation and extraction-induced merger of droplets. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was used to pattern fluoropolymer coatings within microchannels based on geometrical constraints. In a two-phase flow system, the range of accessible flow rates for droplet formation was greatly enhanced in the coated devices. The ability to controllably apply the coating only at the inlet facilitated a method for merging droplets. An organic spacer droplet was extracted from between a pair of aqueous droplets. The size of the organic droplet and the flow rate controlled the time to merge the aqueous droplets; the process of merging was independent of the droplet sizes. Extraction-induced droplet merging is a robust method for manipulating droplets that could be applied in translating multi-step reactions to microfluidic platforms.

  20. Fragile-to-strong crossover in supercooled water: A comparison between TIP4P and TIP4P/2005 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marzio, M.; Camisasca, G.; Rovere, M.; Gallo, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present recent simulation results on the dynamics of supercooled water with the TIP4P/2005 potential. We find that the dynamical behaviour of the translational motion of the molecules is well interpreted in terms of the Mode Coupling Theory, as it was found for supercooled TIP4P water. We compare the results of the two models and in particular we find also in TIP4P/2005 a crossover from a fragile to a strong regime. We connect this crossover to the crossing of the Widom line emanating from the liquid-liquid critical point.

  1. Ring formation from a drying sessile colloidal droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ring formation from drying sessile colloidal droplets (∼1.0 mm in size containing microparticles of silicon or polystyrene was investigated with video microscopy. Results show that ring formation begins at the pinned contact line with the growth of an annular nucleus in a line by line way, which recedes inward albeit only slightly, followed by stacking of particles when the flow velocity becomes sufficiently large. The central height of the droplet decreases linearly with evaporation time, which implies that in the early stage, the number of particles arriving at contact line increases with time in a power law N∝t3/(1 + λ, where the parameter λ, according to Deegan's evaporation model, is related to the contact angle via λ=π−2θc2π−2θc. Experimental values of λ agree well with model calculation for small contact angles, but are relatively smaller in the case of large contact angles. ‘Amorphization’ mechanism for the deposit at different stages of evaporation is discussed. Marangoni flow in a droplet on heated substrate introduces a desorption path for particles along the liquid surface, which can partially resolve the ring. Residual particles floating on the liquid surface may leave behind a homogeneous monolayer coating inside the dried spot. A “jump” in the droplet surface area at later stage of evaporation seems inevitably to cause a depletion zone of particles next to the ring. These results may be helpful for the development of strategies towards suppression of coffee ring effect and/or obtaining homogeneous coatings from drying colloidal suspension.

  2. Immobilizing a drop of water: fabricating highly hydrophobic surfaces that pin water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkleman, Adam; Gotesman, Gilad; Yoffe, Alexander; Naaman, Ron

    2008-04-01

    We describe the fabrication of a patterned, hydrophobic silicon substrate that can pin a water droplet despite its large contact angle. Arrays of nm tips in silicon were fabricated by reactive ion etching using polymer masks defined by photolithography. A droplet sitting on one class of these substrates did not fall even after the substrate was turned upside-down. The production allows the fabrication of large arrays of tips with a one-step simple etching process, along with silanization, to achieve a substrate with both very large contact and tilting angles.

  3. Development of high effectiveness droplet heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, W. J., III; Sekins, K. M.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1985-04-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been carried out to assess the feasibility of developing high effectiveness, high temperature droplet heat exchangers and to identify practical applications for this type of direct contact heat exchanger. The droplet heat exchanger (DHX) concept studies uses a counterflowing gas and droplet configuration, uniformly sized droplets or particles, and a uniform dispersion of droplets in gas to achieve high heat exchanger effectiveness. Direct contact between the heat transfer media eliminates the solid heat transfer surfaces that are used in conventional heat exchangers and is expected to make very high temperature heat transfer practical. Low temperature simulation tests and analysis have been used to demonstrate that uniformly sized droplets can be generated over a wide range of fluid properties and operating conditions appropriate for high temperature droplet heat exchanger applications. One- and two-dimensional, two-phase flow and heat transfer computer models have been developed and used to characterize both individual component configurations and overall DHX heat transfer rates and effectiveness. The computer model and test data began to diverge as the operating pressure was increased, indicating a need for more general transport rate correlations and a better understanding of the two-phase flows that govern DHX operation.

  4. Mechanical vibration of viscoelastic liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, James; Harrold, Victoria

    2014-03-01

    The resonant vibrations of viscoelastic sessile droplets supported on different substrates were monitored using a simple laser light scattering technique. In these experiments, laser light was reflected from the surfaces of droplets of high Mw poly acrylamide-co-acrylic acid (PAA) dissolved in water. The scattered light was allowed to fall on the surface of a photodiode detector and a mechanical impulse was applied to the drops using a vibration motor mounted beneath the substrates. The mechanical impulse caused the droplets to vibrate and the scattered light moved across the surface of the photodiode. The resulting time dependent photodiode signal was then Fourier transformed to obtain the mechanical vibrational spectra of the droplets. The frequencies and widths of the resonant peaks were extracted for droplets containing different concentrations of PAA and with a range of sizes. This was repeated for PAA loaded water drops on surfaces which displayed different values of the three phase contact angle. The results were compared to a simple model of droplet vibration which considers the formation of standing wave states on the surface of a viscoelastic droplet. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Leverhulme trust under grant number RPG-2012-702.

  5. Electrowetting Actuation of Polydisperse Nanofluid Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crismar Patacsil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of electrowetting experiments employing droplets formed from aqueous suspensions of Au nanoparticles. A planar electrowetting system, consisting of a Pt wire electrode and a bottom Cu electrode with an insulating silicone layer, is used to observe changes in droplet contact angle when an external electric field is applied. The equilibrium contact angle at 0 V decreases with increasing nanoparticle concentration, dropping from 100.4° for pure deionized water to 94.7° for a 0.5 μM nanofluid. Increasing the nanoparticle content also lowers the required voltage for effective actuation. With actuation at 15 V, contact angle decreases by 9% and 35% for droplets formed from pure water and a 0.5 μM nanoparticle suspension, respectively. Contact angle saturation is observed with nanofluid droplets, with the threshold voltage decreasing as nanoparticle concentration rises. Maximum droplet actuation before contact angle saturation is achieved at only 10 V for a concentration of 0.5 μM. A proposed mechanism for the enhanced electrowetting response of a nanofluid droplet involves a reduction in surface tension of the droplet as nanoparticles accumulate at the liquid-vapor interface.

  6. Three dimensional force balance of asymmetric droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Cho, Kun; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    An equilibrium contact angle of a droplet is determined by a horizontal force balance among vapor, liquid, and solid, which is known as Young's law. Conventional wetting law is valid only for axis-symmetric droplets, whereas real droplets are often asymmetric. Here we show that three-dimensional geometry must be considered for a force balance for asymmetric droplets. By visualizing asymmetric droplets placed on a free-standing membrane in air with X-ray microscopy, we are able to identify that force balances in one side and in other side control pinning behaviors during evaporation of droplets. We find that X-ray microscopy is powerful for realizing the three-dimensional force balance, which would be essential in interpretation and manipulation of wetting, spreading, and drying dynamics for asymmetric droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  7. Self-arraying of charged levitating droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Nussbaumer, Jérémie; Masse, Alain; Jeandey, Christian; Grateau, Henri; Pham, Pascale; Reyne, Gilbert; Haguet, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diamagnetic levitation of water droplets in air is a promising phenomenon to achieve contactless manipulation of chemical or biochemical samples. This noncontact handling technique prevents contaminations of samples as well as provides measurements of interaction forces between levitating reactors. Under a nonuniform magnetic field, diamagnetic bodies such as water droplets experience a repulsive force which may lead to diamagnetic levitation of a single or few micro-objects. The levitation of several repulsively charged picoliter droplets was successfully performed in a ~1 mm(2) adjustable flat magnetic well provided by a centimeter-sized cylindrical permanent magnet structure. Each droplet position results from the balance between the centripetal diamagnetic force and the repulsive Coulombian forces. Levitating water droplets self-organize into satellite patterns or thin clouds, according to their charge and size. Small triangular lattices of identical droplets reproduce magneto-Wigner crystals. Repulsive forces and inner charges can be measured in the piconewton and the femtocoulomb ranges, respectively. Evolution of interaction forces is accurately followed up over time during droplet evaporation.

  8. Burning Behavior of Liquid Fuel Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Shahood Alam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ignition of flammable liquids by hot surfaces is well known to automotive and aviation industries. However, only a limited data regarding hot surface ignition (HSI of pure and commercial fuels is available in literature. Further, relatively few studies have determined the ignition delay and to our knowledge the combustion lifetime. In the present work, we have generated results from an efficient, reproducible, yet simple experimental setup involving a liquid fuel droplet, a horizontal heated stainless steel plate and quiescent environment. Tests were conducted for diesel, biodiesel and its blends as well as vegetable oils, applied/used as single droplets under variety of conditions to the heated surface. The droplet size range was approximately between 1500 micron to 2000 micron. The objective of this experiment was to determine the minimum temperatures for HSI and also the temperatures where 100% probability of ignition was expected. Further, from this experiment, we were also able to obtain the ignition delay and droplet lifetime. As an extension to this study, a separate droplet combustion model was developed to closely study the general burning behavior of these droplets by generating temperature and species concentration profiles. The droplet mass burning rate was also determined. The results obtained in the present work were in a general agreement with the experimental and modeling observations of other studies.

  9. New High-Performance Droplet Freezing Assay (HP-DFA) for the Analysis of Ice Nuclei with Complex Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Helleis, Frank; Klimach, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water above homogeneous freezing is catalyzed by ice nucleation active (INA) particles called ice nuclei (IN), which can be of various inorganic or biological origin. The freezing temperatures reach up to -1 °C for some biological samples and are dependent on the chemical composition of the IN. The standard method to analyze IN in solution is the droplet freezing assay (DFA) established by Gabor Vali in 1970. Several modifications and improvements were already made within the last decades, but they are still limited by either small droplet numbers, large droplet volumes or inadequate separation of the single droplets resulting in mutual interferences and therefore improper measurements. The probability that miscellaneous IN are concentrated together in one droplet increases with the volume of the droplet, which can be described by the Poisson distribution. At a given concentration, the partition of a droplet into several smaller droplets leads to finely dispersed IN resulting in better statistics and therefore in a better resolution of the nucleation spectrum. We designed a new customized high-performance droplet freezing assay (HP-DFA), which represents an upgrade of the previously existing DFAs in terms of temperature range and statistics. The necessity of observing freezing events at temperatures lower than homogeneous freezing due to freezing point depression, requires high-performance thermostats combined with an optimal insulation. Furthermore, we developed a cooling setup, which allows both huge and tiny temperature changes within a very short period of time. Besides that, the new DFA provides the analysis of more than 750 droplets per run with a small droplet volume of 5 μL. This enables a fast and more precise analysis of biological samples with complex IN composition as well as better statistics for every sample at the same time.

  10. High Velocity Droplet Rebound On Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, William; Laiacona, Danielle; Chiarot, Paul; German, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Rebound of high velocity, periodic droplet streams off viscous liquid pools is studied experimentally. Droplets, approximately 60 micrometers in diameter, impact the oil surface at velocities up to 13 m/s and at angles between 2-25 degrees. The oil surface does not degrade or lose its ability to provide rebound even after millions of droplet impacts. The oil was varied to examine the effect that surface tension and viscosity had on droplet rebound. Stable rebound is achievable on oils varying in dynamic viscosity in the range 13-970 Pa.s and surface tensions in the range 19-28 mN/m. When rebound occurs, a consistent 29% loss of droplet kinetic energy is observed. This is a surprising relationship due to the fact that it holds true for all cases of stable rebound regardless of the oil used. We further observe an upper inertial limit where droplets no longer provide stable rebound and instead become fully entrained in the oil pool. This limit is governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability and can be characterized and predicted using a modified version of the Weber number. The droplet rebound presented in this study is unique due to the size, velocity, and frequency of the droplets used. Another unique feature is that the rebound manifests itself as an effectively static phenomenon. No motion of the interface - oscillations, waves, or otherwise - was observed during rebound. The quasi-static nature of rebound enabled distinctions to be made regarding energy dissipation and the transition from droplet rebound to entrainment.

  11. Photoacoustic spectral characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets containing optical absorbing nanoparticles have been developed for use as theranostic agents (for both imaging and therapy) and as dual-mode contrast agents. Droplets can be used as photoacoustic contrast agents, vaporized via optical irradiation, then the resulting bubbles can be used as ultrasound imaging and therapeutic agents. The photoacoustic signals from micron-sized droplets containing silica coated gold nanospheres were measured using ultra-high frequencies (100-1000 MHz). The spectra of droplets embedded in a gelatin phantom were compared to a theoretical model which calculates the pressure wave from a spherical homogenous liquid undergoing thermoelastic expansion resulting from laser absorption. The location of the spectral features of the theoretical model and experimental spectra were in agreement after accounting for increases in the droplet sound speed with frequency. The agreement between experiment and model indicate that droplets (which have negligible optical absorption in the visible and infrared spectra by themselves) emitted pressure waves related to the droplet composition and size, and was independent of the physical characteristics of the optical absorbing nanoparticles. The diameter of individual droplets was calculated using three independent methods: the time domain photoacoustic signal, the time domain pulse echo ultrasound signal, and a fit to the photoacoustic model, then compared to the diameter as measured by optical microscopy. It was found the photoacoustic and ultrasound methods calculated diameters an average of 2.6% of each other, and 8.8% lower than that measured using optical microscopy. The discrepancy between the calculated diameters and the optical measurements may be due to the difficulty in resolving the droplet edges after being embedded in the translucent gelatin medium.

  12. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  13. Orientational dynamics and energy landscape features of thermotropic liquid crystals: An analogy with supercooled liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman Jana; Biman Bagchi

    2007-09-01

    Recent optical kerr effect (OKE) studies have revealed that orientational relaxation of rodlike nematogens near the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase boundary and also in the nematic phase exhibit temporal power law decay at intermediate times. Such behaviour has drawn an intriguing analogy with supercooled liquids. Here, we have investigated the single-particle and collective orientational dynamics of a family of model system of thermotropic liquid crystals using extensive computer simulations. Several remarkable features of glassy dynamics are on display including non-exponential relaxation, dynamical heterogeneity, and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the orientational relaxation time. Over a temperature range near the I-N phase boundary, the system behaves like a fragile glass-forming liquid. Using proper scaling, we construct the usual relaxation time versus inverse temperature plot and explicitly demonstrate that one can successfully define a density dependent fragility of liquid crystals. The fragility of liquid crystals shows a temperature and density dependence which is remarkably similar to the fragility of glass forming supercooled liquids. Energy landscape analysis of inherent structures shows that the breakdown of the Arrhenius temperature dependence of relaxation rate occurs at a temperature that marks the onset of the growth of the depth of the potential energy minima explored by the system.

  14. Measuring ice and liquid water content in moderately supercooled clouds with Cloudnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühl, Johannes; Seifert, Patric; Myagkov, Alexander; Albert, Ansmann

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between ice nuclei and clouds is an important topic in weather and climate research. Recent laboratory experiments and field in-situ field campaigns present more and more detailed measurements of ice nucleating particles (INP) at temperatures close to 0°C. This brings moderately supercooled mixed-phase clouds into the focus of current cloud research. One current example is the European Union BACCHUS project. A major goal of BACCHUS is the analysis of the anthropogenic impact on ice nucleation. Within this project, we use the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) and the Cloudnet framework in order to get quantitative insight into the formation of ice in mixed-phase layered clouds with cloud top temperature (CTT) from -40 to 0°C. Depolarization measurements from lidar and radar show a clear dependence between particle shape and the temperature under which the particles have been formed. The special focus of this work is on the CTT range from -10 to 0°C. An algorithm is presented to decide between ice and liquid water precipitation falling from the clouds showing that between 10% and 30% of all layered clouds show ice precipitation with CTT between -5 and 0°C. For these slightly supercooled clouds an average ice-water-content between 10e-7 and 10e-8 [kg per cubic meter] is found.

  15. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  16. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid–liquid transition in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A., E-mail: anisimov@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid–liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid–liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H{sub 2}O-NaCl and H{sub 2}O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid–liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of “reaction” between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  17. Liquid-liquid transition in supercooled water suggested by microsecond simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2013-07-23

    The putative liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled water has been used to explain many anomalous behaviors of water. However, no direct experimental verification of such a phase transition has been accomplished, and theoretical studies from different simulations contradict each other. We investigated the putative liquid-liquid phase transition using the Water potential from Adaptive Force Matching for Ice and Liquid (WAIL). The simulation reveals a first-order phase transition in the supercooled regime with the critical point at ~207 K and 50 MPa. Normal water is high-density liquid (HDL). Low-density liquid (LDL) emerges at lower temperatures. The LDL phase has a density only slightly larger than that of the ice-Ih and shows more long-range order than HDL. However, the transformation from LDL to HDL is spontaneous across the first-order phase transition line, suggesting the LDL configuration is not poorly formed nanocrystalline ice. It has been demonstrated in the past that the WAIL potential provides reliable predictions of water properties such as melting temperature and temperature of maximum density. Compared with other simple water potentials, WAIL is not biased by fitting to experimental properties, and simulation with this potential reflects the prediction of a high-quality first-principle potential energy surface.

  18. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: The experimental and data analysis perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschin, A.; Bartolini, P.; Eramo, R.; Righini, R.; Torre, R.

    2014-08-01

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information.

  19. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Tyagi, M. [NCNR and University of Maryland; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  20. Self-Assembly of Silver Nanowire Ring Structures Driven by the Compressive Force of a Liquid Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Baekhoon; Park, Hyun Sung; Chae, Ilkyeong; Lee, Hyungdong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jang, Hyung-Seok; Jung, Jaehyuck; Lee, Changgu; Lin, Liwei; Byun, Doyoung

    2017-04-11

    In a nanowire dispersed in liquid droplets, the interplay between the surface tension of the liquid and the elasticity of the nanowire determines the final morphology of the bent or buckled nanowire. Here, we investigate the fabrication of a silver nanowire ring generated as the nanowire encapsulated inside of fine droplets. We used a hybrid aerodynamic and electrostatic atomization method to ensure the generation of droplets with scalable size in the necessary regime for ring formation. We analytically calculate the compressive force of the droplet driven by surface tension as the key mechanism for the self-assembly of ring structures. Thus, for potential large-scale manufacturing, the droplet size provides a convenient parameter to control the realization of ring structures from nanowires.

  1. From Single Droplet to Column Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The technique state to design counter-current extraction columns is based on the performance of pilot plant experiments. The modelling is then either with the equilibrium or dispersion model, whereas in the latter the dispersion coefficient accounts for all hydrodynamic non-idealities. A new approach uses single droplet experiments to obtain the basic laws and functions governing droplet breakage, coalescence,relative velocity, and axial dispersion when using droplet populance balance models (DPBM). The hydrodynamics simulation results show that the mean Sauter diameter, hold-up, and concentration profiles could be well predicted, which promotes the use of DPBM models for further applications in industrial scale.

  2. Nonisothermal desorption of droplets of complex compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakoryakov Vladimir E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the process of nonstationary evaporation of aqueous solutions of LiBr-H2O, CaCl2-H2O, NaCl-H2O droplets on a horizontal heating surface. The following typical stages of heat and mass transfer depending on wall temperature have been considered: evaporation below boiling temperature and nucleate boiling. The significant decrease in desorption intensity with a rise of initial mass concentration of salt has been observed. Formation of a surface crystallization front at evaporation of a droplet has been detected. We have developed the experimental method for direct measurements of the mass of evaporating droplet.

  3. Foam droplet separation for nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyree, Corey A.; Allen, Jonathan O. [Arizona State University, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)], E-mail: joallen@asu.edu

    2008-03-15

    A novel approach to nanoparticle synthesis was developed whereby foam bubble bursting produced aerosol droplets, an approach patterned after the marine foam aerosol cycle. The droplets were dried to remove solvent, leaving nanometer-sized particles composed of precursor material. Nanoparticles composed of sodium chloride (mean diameter, D-bar{sub p} {approx} 100 nm), phosphotungstic acid (D-bar{sub p} {approx} 55 nm), and bovine insulin (D{sub p} {approx} 5-30 nm) were synthesized. Foam droplet separation can be carried out at ambient temperature and pressure. The 'soft' nature of the process makes it compatible with a wide range of materials.

  4. Thermocapillary migration of bubbles and droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is presented concerning the motion of droplets in a surrounding fluid induced by a temperature gradient. Such 'thermocapillary migration' may be characterized as the tangential stress at the interface that is induced by the temperature gradient's variation of interfacial tension, causing motion in the neighboring fluid both inside and outside the droplet. As a result, the droplet moves in the direction of the pole with the lower interfacial tension. An analysis is conducted in the creeping flow limit, for the case of small Marangoni number values. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used for the solution of the field equations.

  5. Liquid Droplets on a Highly Deformable Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Rafael D.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-11-01

    We examine the deformation produced by microdroplets atop thin elastomeric and glassy free-standing films. Because of the Laplace pressure, the droplets deform the elastic membrane thereby forming a bulge. Thus, two angles define the droplet or membrane geometry: the angles the deformed bulge and the liquid surface make with the film. These angles are measured as a function of the film tension, and are in excellent agreement with a force balance at the contact line. Finally, we find that if the membrane has an anisotropic tension, the droplets are no longer spherical but become elongated along the direction of high tension.

  6. Vibrations of a diamagnetically levitated water droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R J A

    2010-01-01

    We measure the frequencies of small-amplitude shape oscillations of a magnetically-levitated water droplet. The drop levitates in a magnetogravitational potential trap. The restoring forces of the trap, acting on the droplet's surface in addition to the surface tension, increase the frequency of the oscillations. We derive the eigenfrequencies of the normal mode vibrations of a spherical droplet in the trap and compare it with our experimental measurements. We also consider the effect of the shape of the potential trap on the eigenfrequencies.

  7. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet kinetic energy is transferred into the form of mechanical stress forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate. Experimental results show energy of 0.3 μJ per droplet. The scenario of moderate falling drop intensity, i.e. 230 drops per second, yields a total energy of 400 μJ. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  8. Orbiting droplets on a vibrated bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Burger, Loic; Gilet, Tristan; Microfluidics, university of liege Team

    2015-11-01

    A millimeter-sized oil droplet can bounce on a vertically vibrated liquid bath for unlimited time. It may couple to the surface wave it emits; leading to horizontal self-propulsion called walking. When several walkers coexist close to one another, they either repel or attract each other, in response to the superposition of the waves they generate. Attraction leads to various bound states, including droplets that orbit around each other. We have experimentally investigated the variety of quantized orbital motions exhibited by two, three and more identical walkers, as a function of forcing acceleration. Each motion is quantified in terms of droplet and wave energy.

  9. Analysis of droplet jumping phenomenon with lattice Boltzmann simulation of droplet coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Benli; Wang, Sifang; Lan, Zhong; Xu, Wei; Wen, Rongfu; Ma, Xuehu

    2013-04-01

    Droplet jumping from condensing surfaces induced by droplet coalescence during dropwise condensation of mixed steam on a superhydrophobic surface can significantly enhance condensation heat transfer of mixed steam with non-condensable gas. This phenomenon was visually observed and theoretically analyzed in the present paper. The dynamic evolution of droplet and the velocity distribution inside the droplet during coalescence were simulated using multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. The energy distribution released by droplet coalescence was calculated statistically, and the jumping height induced by droplet coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface was predicted based on the energy conservation method. The theoretical predictions obtained by the modified model proposed in this paper agree well with the experimental observations.

  10. The effects of turbulence on droplet drag and secondary droplet breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.-H.; Coy, E.; Greenfield, S.; Ondas, M.; Prevish, T.; Spegar, T.; Santavicca, D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to obtain an improved understanding of the behavior of droplets in vaporizing sprays, particularly under conditions typical of those in high pressure rocket sprays. Experiments are conducted in a variety of high pressure, high temperature, optically-accessible flow systems, including one which is capable of operation at pressures up to 70 atm, temperatures up to 600 K, gas velocities up to 30 m/sec and turbulence intensities up to 40 percent. Single droplets, 50 to 500 micron in diameter, are produced by an aerodynamic droplet generator and transversely injected into the flow. Measurements are made of the droplet position, size, velocity and temperature and of the droplet's vapor wake from which droplet drag, dispersion, heating, vaporization and breakup are characterized.

  11. Self-propelled oil droplets consuming "fuel" surfactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyota, Taro; Maru, Naoto; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2009-01-01

    A micrometer-sized oil droplet of 4-octylaniline containing 5 mol % of an amphiphilic catalyst exhibited a self-propelled motion, producing tiny oil droplets, in an aqueous dispersion of an amphiphilic precursor of 4-octylaniline. The tiny droplets on the surface of the self-propelled droplet wer...

  12. Quasistatic packings of droplets in flat microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Erfan

    2016-02-01

    As observed in recent experiments, monodisperse droplets self-assemble spontaneously in different ordered packings. In this work, we present a numerical study of the droplet packings in the flat rectangular microfluidic channels. Employing the boundary element method, we numerically solve the Stokes equation in two-dimension and investigate the appearance of droplet packing and transition between one and two-row packings of monodisperse emulsion droplets. By calculating packing force applied on the droplet interface, we investigate the effect of flow rate, droplet size, and surface tension on the packing configurations of droplets and transition between different topological packings.

  13. Statics and dynamics of a self-bound dipolar matter-wave droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    We study the statics and dynamics of a stable, mobile, self-bound three-dimensional dipolar matter-wave droplet created in the presence of a tiny repulsive three-body interaction. In frontal collision with an impact parameter and in angular collision at large velocities along all directions two droplets behave like quantum solitons. Such a collision is found to be quasi elastic and the droplets emerge undeformed after collision without any change of velocity. However, in a collision at small velocities the axisymmeric dipolar interaction plays a significant role and the collision dynamics is sensitive to the direction of motion. For an encounter along the z direction at small velocities, two droplets, polarized along the z direction, coalesce to form a larger droplet—a droplet molecule. For an encounter along the x direction at small velocities, the same droplets stay apart and never meet each other due to the dipolar repulsion. The present study is based on an analytic variational approximation and a numerical solution of the mean-field Gross–Pitaevskii equation using the parameters of 52Cr atoms.

  14. Electrodynamic behavior and interface instability of double emulsion droplets under high electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Muhammad Salman; Song, Ryungeun; Kim, Jaehoon; Lee, Jinkee

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, numerical solution of electro-dynamic behavior and interface instability of double emulsion droplet is presented. Level set method and leaky dielectric model coupled with Navier-Stokes equation are used to solve the electrodynamic problem. The method is validated against the theoretical analysis and the simulation results of the other researchers. Double emulsion droplet with inner droplet (core) and outer droplet (shell) phases immersed in continuous phase is subjected to high electric field. Shell/continuous and core/shell interfaces of the droplet undergo prolate-oblate or oblate-prolate deformation depending on the extent of the penetration of electric potential and sense of charge distribution at the interfaces. The deformation of the shell deviates from theory at larger volume fraction of core for oblate-prolate case whereas it follows theory for prolate-oblate case. The interfaces showing oblate-prolate deformation split away at the poles whereas, for prolate-oblate, they split at the equator. The re-union of the two split parts under high electric field results with production of daughter droplet at the core. The large decrease in critical electric field for oblate-prolate case shows their less interface stability at larger volume fraction of core. When the core is eccentric, the electric field drives it towards the shell center or to the shell/continuous interface depending on electrical parameters.

  15. Ultrasound emulsification: effect of ultrasonic and physicochemical properties on dispersed phase volume and droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Shashank G; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2008-04-01

    Ultrasonic emulsification of oil and water was carried out and the effect of irradiation time, irradiation power and physicochemical properties of oil on the dispersed phase volume and dispersed phase droplet size has been studied. The increase in the irradiation time increases the dispersed phase volume while decreases the dispersed phase droplets size. With an increase in the ultrasonic irradiation power, there is an increase in the fraction of volume of the dispersed phase while the droplet size of the dispersed phase decreases. The fractional volume of the dispersed phase increases for the case of groundnut oil-water system while it is low for paraffin (heavy) oil-water system. The droplet size of soyabean oil dispersed in water is found to be small while that of paraffin (heavy) oil is found to be large. These variations could be explained on the basis of varying physicochemical properties of the system, i.e., viscosity of oil and the interfacial tension. During the ultrasonic emulsification, coalescence phenomenon which is only marginal, has been observed, which can be attributed to the collision of small droplets when the droplet concentration increases beyond a certain number and the acoustic streaming strength increases.

  16. Patterned gradient surface for spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xianhua; Zhu, Yiying; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection on wedge-shaped gradient surfaces consisting of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Droplets on the surfaces are modeled and simulated to analyze the Gibbs free energy and free energy gradient distributions. Big half-apex angle and great wettability difference result in considerable free energy gradient, corresponding to large driving force for spontaneous droplet transportation, thus causing the droplets to move towards the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, where the Gibbs free energy is low. Gradient surfaces are then fabricated and tested. Filmwise condensation begins on the hydrophilic regions, forming wedge-shaped tracks for water collection. Dropwise condensation occurs on the hydrophobic regions, where the droplet size distribution and departure diameters are controlled by the width of the regions. Condensate water from both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are collected directionally to the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, agreeing with the simulations. Directional droplet transport and controllable departure diameters make the branched gradient surfaces more efficient than smooth surfaces for water collection, which proves that gradient surfaces are potential in water collection, microfluidic devices, anti-fogging and self-cleaning.

  17. Integrated circuit/microfluidic chip to programmably trap and move cells and droplets with dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Thomas P; Issadore, David; Westervelt, R M

    2008-01-01

    We present an integrated circuit/microfluidic chip that traps and moves individual living biological cells and chemical droplets along programmable paths using dielectrophoresis (DEP). Our chip combines the biocompatibility of microfluidics with the programmability and complexity of integrated circuits (ICs). The chip is capable of simultaneously and independently controlling the location of thousands of dielectric objects, such as cells and chemical droplets. The chip consists of an array of 128 x 256 pixels, 11 x 11 microm(2) in size, controlled by built-in SRAM memory; each pixel can be energized by a radio frequency (RF) voltage of up to 5 V(pp). The IC was built in a commercial foundry and the microfluidic chamber was fabricated on its top surface at Harvard. Using this hybrid chip, we have moved yeast and mammalian cells through a microfluidic chamber at speeds up to 30 microm sec(-1). Thousands of cells can be individually trapped and simultaneously positioned in controlled patterns. The chip can trap and move pL droplets of water in oil, split one droplet into two, and mix two droplets into one. Our IC/microfluidic chip provides a versatile platform to trap and move large numbers of cells and fluid droplets individually for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  18. Electrostatic charging and control of droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongbo; Yao, Shuhuai

    2013-03-07

    Precharged droplets can facilitate manipulation and control of low-volume liquids in droplet-based microfluidics. In this paper, we demonstrate non-contact electrostatic charging of droplets by polarizing a neutral droplet and splitting it into two oppositely charged daughter droplets in a T-junction microchannel. We performed numerical simulation to analyze the non-contact charging process and proposed a new design with a notch at the T-junction in aid of droplet splitting for more efficient charging. We experimentally characterized the induced charge in droplets in microfabricated devices. The experimental results agreed well with the simulation. Finally, we demonstrated highly effective droplet manipulation in a path selection unit appending to the droplet charging. We expect our work could enable precision manipulation of droplets for more complex liquid handling in microfluidics and promote electric-force based manipulation in 'lab-on-a-chip' systems.

  19. The role of the droplet deformations in the bouncing droplet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwagne, D.; Ludewig, F.; Vandewalle, N.; Dorbolo, S.

    2013-12-01

    Droplets bouncing on a vibrated liquid bath open ways to methods of manipulating droplets, creating double emulsion, and performing pilot wave model experiments. In this work, we focus on the role of the droplet deformations in the vertical bouncing dynamics by neglecting the deformation of the surface of the bath. To be under this favorable condition, low viscous oil droplets are dropped over a highly viscous oil bath that is vibrated. These droplets bounce vertically on the surface of the bath and exhibit many periodic trajectories and resonant modes when tuning the forcing parameters, i.e., the oscillation of the bath. This complex dynamics emphasizes the interplay between elastic energy storage and energy dissipation in droplets at each bounce. We propose to model droplets using a bouncing mass-spring-damper system that mimics a deformable droplet bouncing on a non-deformable liquid bath. From the experimental measurements, we constructed bifurcation diagrams of the bouncing trajectories and challenged our bouncing spring model. The agreement between experiment and the spring model reveals that this model can be used to rationalize and predict a variety of bouncing droplets behaviors involving multi-periodicities.

  20. Volume evolution of small sessile droplets evaporating in stick-slip mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dinghua; Wu, Huiying

    2016-04-01

    This work is aimed at developing a simple and efficient predictive model and revealing the volume evolution behavior of small sessile droplets evaporating in stick-slip (SS) mode, covering a wide range of initial (θ0) and receding (θrec) contact angles (0 ∘contact angle and contact radius of droplets evaporating in SS mode are first developed, and are then validated with the experimental data in the literature. With the proposed expressions, the volume evolutions of evaporating droplets with different θ0 and θrec are predicted and analyzed. The results show that on a hydrophilic surface (θ0≤90 ∘ ), the volume evolution of droplets in SS mode always occurs in a way between the constant contact radius (CCR) and constant contact angle (CCA) modes (i.e., two extreme modes); however, on a hydrophobic surface (θ0>90 ∘ ), as θrec increases from 0 to θ0, the volume evolution of droplets in SS mode first departs from the CCR mode, then approaches the SS mode with θrec=90 ∘ , and finally returns to the CCA mode. More interestingly, the initially identical droplets evaporating on hydrophobic surfaces with different receding contact angles (θrec=90∘±Δ θ ) can even have approximately the same volume evolution behavior. It is also found that the widely accepted 2/3 law is applicable only for volume evolution of droplets in SS mode with large initial contact angle or small contact angle hysteresis, with the predicted deviation less than 1.5% for θ0≥150∘ or θ0≥50∘ when θ0-θrec≤15∘ . Finally, a physical interpretation for the volume evolution behaviors of droplets in SS mode is proposed.