WorldWideScience

Sample records for supercooled large drop

  1. Effect of drop size on the impact thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet in aircraft icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Supercooled large droplet (SLD), which can cause abnormal icing, is a well-known issue in aerospace engineering. Although efforts have been exerted to understand large droplet impact dynamics and the supercooled feature in the film/substrate interface, respectively, the thermodynamic effect during the SLD impact process has not received sufficient attention. This work conducts experimental studies to determine the effects of drop size on the thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet impingement. Through phenomenological reproduction, the rapid-freezing characteristics are observed in diameters of 400, 800, and 1300 μm. The experimental analysis provides information on the maximum spreading rate and the shrinkage rate of the drop, the supercooled diffusive rate, and the freezing time. A physical explanation of this unsteady heat transfer process is proposed theoretically, which indicates that the drop size is a critical factor influencing the supercooled heat exchange and effective heat transfer duration between the film/substrate interface. On the basis of the present experimental data and theoretical analysis, an impinging heating model is developed and applied to typical SLD cases. The model behaves as anticipated, which underlines the wide applicability to SLD icing problems in related fields.

  2. Numerical investigation on super-cooled large droplet icing of fan rotor blade in jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Icing (or ice accretion) is a phenomenon in which super-cooled water droplets impinge and accrete on a body. It is well known that ice accretion on blades and vanes leads to performance degradation and has caused severe accidents. Although various anti-icing and deicing systems have been developed, such accidents still occur. Therefore, it is important to clarify the phenomenon of ice accretion on an aircraft and in a jet engine. However, flight tests for ice accretion are very expensive, and in the wind tunnel it is difficult to reproduce all climate conditions where ice accretion can occur. Therefore, it is expected that computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which can estimate ice accretion in various climate conditions, will be a useful way to predict and understand the ice accretion phenomenon. On the other hand, although the icing caused by super-cooled large droplets (SLD) is very dangerous, the numerical method has not been established yet. This is why SLD icing is characterized by splash and bounce phenomena of droplets and they are very complex in nature. In the present study, we develop an ice accretion code considering the splash and bounce phenomena to predict SLD icing, and the code is applied to a fan rotor blade. The numerical results with and without the SLD icing model are compared. Through this study, the influence of the SLD icing model is numerically clarified.

  3. Shape of a large drop on a rough hydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonsik; Park, Jaebum; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Ho-Young

    2013-02-01

    Large drops on solid surfaces tend to flatten due to gravitational effect. Their shapes can be predicted by solving the Young-Laplace equation when their apparent contact angles are precisely given. However, for large drops sitting on rough surfaces, the apparent contact angles are often unavailable a priori and hard to define. Here we develop a model to predict the shape of a given volume of large drop placed on a rough hydrophobic surface using an overlapping geometry of double spheroids and the free energy minimization principle. The drop shape depends on the wetting state, thus our model can be used not only to predict the shape of a drop but also to infer the wetting state of a large drop through the comparison of theory and experiment. The experimental measurements of the shape of large water drops on various micropillar arrays agree well with the model predictions. Our theoretical model is particularly useful in predicting and controlling shapes of large drops on surfaces artificially patterned in microscopic scales, which are frequently used in microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technology.

  4. Small-Scale Variability of Large Cloud Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Y.; Wiscombe, Warren

    2004-01-01

    Cloud droplet size distribution is one of the most fundamental subjects in cloud physics. Understanding of spatial distribution and small-scale fluctuations of cloud droplets is essential for both cloud physics and atmospheric radiation. For cloud physics, it relates to the coalescence growth of raindrops while for radiation, it has a strong impact on a cloud's radiative properties. Most of the existing cloud radiation and precipitation formation models assume that the mean number of drops with a given radius varies proportionally to volume. The analysis of microphysical data on liquid water drop sizes shows that, for sufficiently small volumes, the number is proportional to the drop size dependent power of the volume. For abundant small drops present, the exponent is 1 as assumed in the conventional approach. However, for rarer large drops, the exponents fall below unity. At small scales, therefore, the mean number of large drops decreases with volume at a slower rate than the conventional approach assumes, suggesting more large drops at these scales than conventional models account for; their impact is consequently underestimated. Size dependent models of spatial distribution of cloud drops that simulate the observed power laws show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents. The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. Current theories of photon-cloud interaction and warm rain formation will need radical revision in order to produce these statistics; their underlying equations are unable to yield the observed power law.

  5. Vortex-ring-induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2016-03-29

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops that are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and the pool, controls the crater deformations and pinchoff. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings that are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices that can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts are not produced by oblate drops but by more prolate drop shapes, as had been observed in previous experiments.

  6. 75 FR 37311 - Airplane and Engine Certification Requirements in Supercooled Large Drop, Mixed Phase, and Ice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... certain transport category airplanes certified for flight in icing conditions and the icing airworthiness... charged with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing minimum standards... million annually) Costs Nominal cost PV cost Engine Cert Cost 7,936,000 6,931,610 Engine Capital Cost 6...

  7. NASA/FAA/NCAR Supercooled Large Droplet Icing Flight Research: Summary of Winter 1996-1997 Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean; Ratvasky, Thomas; Bernstein, Ben; McDonough, Frank; Strapp, J. Walter

    1998-01-01

    During the winter of 1996-1997, a flight research program was conducted at the NASA-Lewis Research Center to study the characteristics of Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD) within the Great Lakes region. This flight program was a joint effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Based on weather forecasts and real-time in-flight guidance provided by NCAR, the NASA-Lewis Icing Research Aircraft was flown to locations where conditions were believed to be conducive to the formation of Supercooled Large Droplets aloft. Onboard instrumentation was then used to record meteorological, ice accretion, and aero-performance characteristics encountered during the flight. A total of 29 icing research flights were conducted, during which "conventional" small droplet icing, SLD, and mixed phase conditions were encountered aloft. This paper will describe how flight operations were conducted, provide an operational summary of the flights, present selected experimental results from one typical research flight, and conclude with practical "lessons learned" from this first year of operation.

  8. Nature of large aggregates in supercooled aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franses, E.I. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN); Davis, H.T.; Miller, W.G.; Scriven, L.E.

    1980-09-18

    Preparations of 2.0 and 5.5 wt % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in 3.5 wt % (0.6 M) aqueous NaCl are equilibrium micellar solutions above 28/sup 0/C, the Krafft point of the surfactant at this salinity. These systems can be supercooled and remain transparent for hours and days. At 25/sup 0/C at equilibrium they are biphasic, a hydrated crystal phase and an aqueous salt solution phase containing only 0.01/sub 2/ wt % SDS. Conductimetry and /sup 13/C NMR show that these transparent supercooled systems are indeed supersaturated solutions and not microdispersions of the hydrated crystal. The time lag for the onset of nucleation of the crystals depends strongly on stirring details and probably on presence of gas-liquid interface. The big nonequilibrium aggregates present in the supersaturated systems resemble micelles in conductivity and molecular motion, and are likely to be metastable micelles as is presumed by Mazer, Benedek, and Carey. 21 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  9. Vortex ring induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    CERN Document Server

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2016-01-01

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops which are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and pool, controls the crater deformations and pinch-off. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings which are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices which can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts, are not produced by oblate dro...

  10. Supercooled liquids for pedestrians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    When we lower the temperature of a liquid, at some point we meet a first order phase transition to the crystal. Yet, under certain conditions it is possible to keep the system in its metastable phase and to avoid crystallization. In this way the liquid enters in the supercooled phase. Supercooled liquids have a very rich phenomenology, which is still far from being completely understood. To begin with, there is the problem of how to prevent crystallization and how deeply the liquid can be supercooled before a metastability limit is hit. But by far the most interesting feature of supercooled liquids is the dynamic glass transition: when the temperature is decreased below a certain point, the relaxation time increases so much that a dramatic dynamical arrest intervenes and we are unable to equilibrate the system within reasonable experimental times. The glass transition is a phenomenon whose physical origin has stirred an enormous interest in the last hundred years. Why does it occur? Is it just a conventional reference point, or does it have a more profound physical meaning? Is it a purely dynamical event, or the manifestation of a true thermodynamic transition? What is the correlation length associated to the sharp increase of the relaxation time? Can we define a new kind of amorphous order? A shared theory of supercooled liquids and the glass transition does not yet exist and these questions are still largely open. Here, I will illustrate in the most elementary fashion the main phenomenological traits of supercooled liquids and discuss in a very partial way a few theoretical ideas on the subject.

  11. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  12. What am I? Supercooled droplet or ice?

    CERN Document Server

    Antonini, Carlo; Maitra, Tanmoy; Tiwari, Manish K; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show the trick played by a supercooled liquid water drop against a superhydrophobic surface. The water drop shows a double personality, impacting onto the surface the first time while still in the liquid state, and then re-impacting as a frozen ice crystal.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  14. A posterirori study of models for large eddy simulations of drop-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N. A.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is conducted of a three-dimensional temporal mixing layer whose stream is initially laden with liquid drops which may evaporate during the simulation. The gas-phase equations are written in Eulerian frame for two perfect gas species (carrier gas and vapor emanating from the drops), while the liquid-phase equations are written in a Lagrangian frame.

  15. Puddle jumping: Spontaneous ejection of large liquid droplets from hydrophobic surfaces during drop tower tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, B.; Weislogel, M.; Wollman, A.; Chen, Y.; Snyder, T.

    2016-10-01

    Large droplets and puddles jump spontaneously from sufficiently hydrophobic surfaces during routine drop tower tests. The simple low-cost passive mechanism can in turn be used as an experimental device to investigate dynamic droplet phenomena for drops up to 104 times larger than their normal terrestrial counterparts. We provide and/or confirm quick and qualitative design guides for such "drop shooters" as employed in drop tower tests including relationships to predict droplet ejection durations and velocities as functions of drop volume, surface texture, surface contour, wettability pattern, and fluid properties including contact angle. The latter is determined via profile image comparisons with numerical equilibrium interface computations. Water drop volumes of 0.04-400 ml at ejection speeds of -0.007-0.12 m/s are demonstrated herein. A sample application of the drop jump method is made to the classic problem of low-gravity phase change heat transfer for large impinging drops. Many other candidate problems might be identified by the reader.

  16. Space experimental device on Marangoni drop migrations of large Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张璞; 胡良; 刘方; 姚永龙; 解京昌; 林海; 胡文瑞

    2001-01-01

    The space experimental device for testing the Marangoni drop migrations has been discussed in the present paper. The experiment is one of the spaceship projects of China. In comparison with similar devices, it has the ability of completing all the scientific experiments by both auto controlling and telescience methods. It not only can perform drop migration experiments of large Reynolds numbers but also has an equi-thick interferential system.

  17. Capillary migration of large confined super-hydrophobic drops in wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Logan; Weislogel, Mark; Arnold, Sam

    2016-11-01

    When confined within an interior corner, drops and bubbles migrate to regions of minimum energy by the combined effects of surface tension, surface wetting, and corner geometry. Such capillary phenomena are exploited for passive phase separation operations in micro-fluidic devices on earth and macro-fluidic devices aboard spacecraft. Our study focuses on the migration of large inertial-capillary drops confined between two planar super-hydrophobic surfaces. In our experiments, the near weightless environment of a drop tower produces Bo <<1 for drop volumes O(10mL) with migration velocities up to 10 cm/s. We observe transient power law behavior as a function of drop volume, wedge angle, initial confinement, and fluid properties including contact angle. We then further demonstrate how the experiment method may be employed as a large horizontal quiescent droplet generator for studies ranging from inertial non-wetting moving contact line investigations to large geyser-free horizontal drop impacts. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12AO47A, URMP.

  18. The Common Occurrence of Highly Supercooled Drizzle and Rain near the Coastal Regions of the Western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Rasmussen, R M.; McDonough, Frank; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cazorla, Alberto; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-05

    The formation of highly supercooled rain was documented by aircraft observations in clouds at a wide range of conditions near the coastal region of the western United States. Several case studies are described in detail using combined cloud and aerosol measurements to document both the highly super-cooled condition and the relatively pristine aerosol conditions under which it forms. The case studies include: (1) Marine convective clouds over the coastal waters of northern California, as measured by cloud physics probes flown on a Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the CALWATER campaign in February and early March 2011. The clouds had extensive drizzle in their tops, which extended downward to the 0°C isotherm as supercooled rain. Ice multiplication was observed only in mature parts of the clouds where cloud water was already depleted. (2) Orographically triggered convective clouds in marine air mass over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the east of Sacramento, as measured in CALWATER. Supercooled rain was observed down to -21°C. No indications for ice multiplication were evident. (3) Orographic layer clouds over Yosemite National Park, also measured in CALWATER. The clouds had extensive drizzle at -21°C, which intensified with little freezing lower in the cloud, and (4) Supercooled drizzle drops in layer clouds near Juneau, Alaska, as measured by the Wyoming King Air as part of a FAA project to study aircraft icing in this region. Low concentrations of CCN was a common observation in all these clouds, allowing for the formation of clouds with small concentration of large drops that coalesced into supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Another common observation was the absence of ice nuclei and/or ice crystals in measurable concentrations was associated with the persistent supercooled drizzle and rain. Average ice crystal concentrations were 0.007 l-1 at the top of convective clouds at -12°C and 0.03 l-1 in the case of layer clouds at -21°C. In combination these

  19. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Westesen, K; Drechsler, M

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of preparing nanoparticles in the supercooled thermotropic liquid crystalline state from cholesterol esters with saturated acyl chains as well as the incorporation of model drugs into the dispersions was investigated using cholesteryl myristate (CM) as a model cholesterol ester....

  20. Supercooled Liquids and Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    In these lectures, which were presented at "Soft and Fragile Matter, Nonequilibrium Dynamics, Metastability and Flow" University of St. Andrews, 8 July - 22 July, 1999, I give an introduction to the physics of supercooled liquids and glasses and discuss some computer simulations done to investigate these systems.

  1. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Westesen, K; Drechsler, M

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of preparing nanoparticles in the supercooled thermotropic liquid crystalline state from cholesterol esters with saturated acyl chains as well as the incorporation of model drugs into the dispersions was investigated using cholesteryl myristate (CM) as a model cholesterol ester....

  2. Development of measurement technique of large negative reactivity by an inverse kinetics rod drop method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Murayama, Yoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    The determination of the large negative reactivity by a rod drop method is conducted by the change of the average neutron density in the core between the critical condition at constant power and the deep subcritical condition. The neutron density is measured with a neutron detector which output the pulse or electric current signal without time delay. If an electric-current-output neutron detector is used for the measurement, a logarithmic amplifier is required to measure over a wide range of neutron density of more than 3 digits and the time delay characteristic of the amplifier may badly influence the measurement results. The authors developed a measurement technique with an inverse kinetics rod drop (IKRD) method compensating the time delay characteristic of a logarithmic amplifies, and confirmed the validity and high precision of the technique by applying it to the measurement data obtained in the characteristic experiments of the JRR-3M silicide core. (author)

  3. Strain Pattern in Supercooled Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Hajnal, David; Klix, Christian; Keim, Peter; Fuchs, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    Investigations of strain correlations at the glass transition reveal unexpected phenomena. The shear strain fluctuations show an Eshelby-strain pattern [˜cos (4 θ ) /r2 ], characteristic of elastic response, even in liquids, at long times. We address this using a mode-coupling theory for the strain fluctuations in supercooled liquids and data from both video microscopy of a two-dimensional colloidal glass former and simulations of Brownian hard disks. We show that the long-ranged and long-lived strain signatures follow a scaling law valid close to the glass transition. For large enough viscosities, the Eshelby-strain pattern is visible even on time scales longer than the structural relaxation time τ and after the shear modulus has relaxed to zero.

  4. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-28

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  5. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Koch, Michel H J; Fahr, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    , laser diffraction combined with polarizing intensity differential scattering, DSC and SAXS. The morphology of selected formulations was studied by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. All smectic nanoparticles with a mixed cholesterol ester matrix were stable against recrystallization when stored...... in the bulk was studied by polarizing light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Colloidal dispersions with pure and mixed cholesterol ester matrices were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization and characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy...... administration of lipophilic drugs, the cytotoxicity of selected formulations was compared with that of a clinically used colloidal fat emulsion (Lipofundin MCT) in the murine fibroblast cell line L929 using the sulforhodamine B assay. The supercooled smectic nanoparticle formulations display a good overall cell...

  6. Laboratory test of a prototype heat storage module based on stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Kong, Weiqiang; Fan, Jianhua;

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory test of a long term heat storage module utilizing the principle of stable supercooling of 199.5 kg of sodium acetate water mixture has been carried out. Avoiding phase separation of the incongruently melting salt hydrate by using the extra water principle increased the heat storage...... the supercooled sodium acetate water mixture was 194 kJ/kg of sodium acetate water mixture in the first test cycles dropping to 179 kJ/kg in the later test cycles. Instability of the supercooling occurred when the charging periods were short and in the last test cycles where the tube connecting the module...

  7. Consistent Large-Eddy Simulation of a Temporal Mixing Layer Laden with Evaporating Drops. Part 2; A Posteriori Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboissertier, Anthony; Okong'O, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2005-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is conducted of a three-dimensional temporal mixing layer whose lower stream is initially laden with liquid drops which may evaporate during the simulation. The gas-phase equations are written in an Eulerian frame for two perfect gas species (carrier gas and vapour emanating from the drops), while the liquid-phase equations are written in a Lagrangian frame. The effect of drop evaporation on the gas phase is considered through mass, species, momentum and energy source terms. The drop evolution is modelled using physical drops, or using computational drops to represent the physical drops. Simulations are performed using various LES models previously assessed on a database obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS). These LES models are for: (i) the subgrid-scale (SGS) fluxes and (ii) the filtered source terms (FSTs) based on computational drops. The LES, which are compared to filtered-and-coarsened (FC) DNS results at the coarser LES grid, are conducted with 64 times fewer grid points than the DNS, and up to 64 times fewer computational than physical drops. It is found that both constant-coefficient and dynamic Smagorinsky SGS-flux models, though numerically stable, are overly dissipative and damp generated small-resolved-scale (SRS) turbulent structures. Although the global growth and mixing predictions of LES using Smagorinsky models are in good agreement with the FC-DNS, the spatial distributions of the drops differ significantly. In contrast, the constant-coefficient scale-similarity model and the dynamic gradient model perform well in predicting most flow features, with the latter model having the advantage of not requiring a priori calibration of the model coefficient. The ability of the dynamic models to determine the model coefficient during LES is found to be essential since the constant-coefficient gradient model, although more accurate than the Smagorinsky model, is not consistently numerically stable despite using DNS

  8. Study on determination of stress level by seismic stress drops and the stress axis deflections before and after large earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Yong-ge

    2006-01-01

    To obtain the stress level at the earthquake source, this paper sets forth the solution of the stress magnitude at the earthquake source by seismic stress drop and the stress axis deflections before and after large earthquakes. The pre-seismic and post-seismic stress direction can be statistically determined by a large collection of foreshock and aftershock focal mechanism data while the stress drop can be determined through the source fracture inversion from seismic wave data or crust deformation data. The paper attempts to make a fundamental contribution to seismic dynamics.

  9. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality.

  10. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: Large eddy simulation predictions compared to direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, Nora; Leboissetier, Anthony; Bellan, Josette

    2008-10-01

    Results are compared from direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS. The LES used computational drops, each of which represented eight physical drops, and a reduced flow field resolution using a grid spacing four times larger than that of the DNS. The LES also used models for the filtered source terms, which express the coupling of the drops with the flow, and for the unresolved subgrid-scale (SGS) fluxes of species mass, momentum, and enthalpy. The LESs were conducted using one of three different SGS-flux models: dynamic-coefficient gradient (GRD), dynamic-coefficient Smagorinsky (SMD), and constant-coefficient scale similarity (SSC). The comparison of the LES with the filtered-and-coarsened (FC) DNS considered detailed aspects of the flow that are of interest in ignition or full combustion. All LESs captured the largest-scale vortex, the global amount of vapor emanating from the drops, and the overall size distribution of the drops. All LESs tended to underpredict the global amount of irreversible entropy production (dissipation). The SMD model was found unable to capture either the global or local vorticity variation and had minimal small-scale activity in dynamic and thermodynamic variables compared to the FC-DNS. The SMD model was also deficient in predicting the spatial distribution of drops and of the dissipation. In contrast, the GRD and SSC models did mimic the small-scale activity of the FC-DNS and the spatial distribution of drops and of the dissipation. Therefore, the GRD and SSC models are recommended, while the SMD model seems inappropriate for combustion or other problems where the local activity must be predicted.

  11. Hydrodynamic states in water below the temperature of the density maximum: the limit to supercooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elsken, J.; van Boom, L.; Bot, A.

    1988-01-01

    Spectra of fluctuations in the total intensity of laser light deflected by supercooled water show that even under carefully controlled conditions large samples give convection when cooled below -0%. This is in agreement with the Rayleigh versus Prandtlnumber relation for supercooled water.

  12. Multi-modal sensor based weight drop spinal cord impact system for large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongbeom; Kim, Jong-Wan; Hyun, Jung-Keun; Park, Ilyong

    2017-08-23

    A conventional weight drop spinal cord (SC) impact system for large animals is composed of a high-speed video camera, a vision system, and other things. However, a camera with high speed at over 5,000 frames per second (FPS) is very expensive. In addition, the utilization of the vision system involves complex pattern recognition algorithms and accurate arrangement of the camera and the target. The purpose of this study was to develop a large animal spinal cord injury modeling system using a multi-modal sensor instead of a high-speed video camera and vision system. Another objective of this study was to demonstrate the possibility of the developed system to measure the impact parameters in the experiments using different stiffness materials and an in-vivo porcine SC. A multi-modal sensor based spinal cord injury impact system was developed for large animals. The experiments to measure SC impact parameters were then performed using three different stiffness materials and a Yucatan miniature pig to verify the performance of system developed. A comparative experiment was performed using three different stiffness materials such as high density (HD) sponge, rubber, and clay to demonstrate the system and perform measurement for impact parameters such as impact velocity, impulsive force, and maximally compressed displacement reflecting physical properties of materials. In the animal experiment, a female Yucatan miniature pig of 60 kg weight was used. Impact conditions for all experiments were fixed at freefalling object mass of 50 g and height of 20 cm. In the impact test, measured impact velocities were almost the same for the three different stiffness materials at 1.84 ± 0.0153 m/s. Impulsive forces for the three materials of rubber, HD sponge, and clay were 50.88 N, 32.35 N, and 6.68 N, respectively. Maximally compressed displacements for rubber, HD sponge, and clay were 1.93 mm, 3.35 mm, and 15.01 mm, respectively. In the pig experiment, impact velocity, impulsive

  13. Solidification of supercooled water in the vicinity of a solid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schremb, Markus; Tropea, Cameron

    2016-11-01

    An experimental approach utilizing a Hele-Shaw cell for the investigation of the solidification of a supercooled liquid in contact with a solid wall is presented. The setup is based on an idea presented by Marín et al. [A. G. Marín et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 054301 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.054301], who investigated the planar freezing of a sessile drop without supercooling. This apparatus overcomes optical distortions present when observing the freezing of sessile drops, arising due to reflections and refraction of light on the drop surface. The facility is used to investigate the freezing process of water drops, supercooled down to -20∘C , and to qualitatively demonstrate that the growth behavior is uninfluenced by the use of the Hele-Shaw cell. Different features during freezing, which are known for sessile water drops, are also observed with the Hele-Shaw cell. The growth morphology within the first phase of solidification is categorized according to the initial drop supercooling. Furthermore, freezing velocities within this phase are related to data available in the literature for the growth of single ice dendrites.

  14. The transient behavior of Peltier junctions pulsed with supercooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J. N.; Chen, H. X.; Jia, H.; Qian, X. L.

    2012-07-01

    There exists the transient thermoelectric supercooling effect that can be enhanced by keeping on increasing the Peltier cooling effect to compensate for the Joule heating effect and Fourier heat conduction effect arriving at the cold junction, in which a transient cold spike can be produced by superimposing an additional shaped current pulse of a large magnitude on the original steady-state optimum value. Most previous work on the transient supercooling mainly focused on the minimum supercooling temperature achievable and separately analyzed the beneficial or detrimental effects on the transient supercooling performance, which was not clarified quantitatively to what extent the interactional effects were on the enhancement of the transient supercooling performance. In this work, we systematically investigate a numerical solution involving time-dependent imposed voltage pulse and time-dependent thermal boundary conditions on the transient supercooling behavior as well as the response of characteristic time and cold-junction temperature distribution to the pulse operation parameters during the periods of pulse start-up, pulse-on time, and pulse-off time, which is served as a theoretical basis for exploiting the coupling interaction of the thermoelectric effects on the heat diffusion from or to the cold junction interrelated with the amount of the availably electrical conversion in the short time scale. Additionally, the advantage of certain pulse forms over others is described. The results indicate that Peltier supercooling capacity shows a decreasing monotonic trend in proportion to the total amount of electrical conversion, and the maximum coefficient of performance for cooling state is about 0.5 to be achieved at steady state. Taking advantage of the temporary Peltier effect focused electrical conversion as the additional cooling for a period long enough against the earlier arrival of the excessively Joule heating dominated heat accumulation is the key parameter

  15. Thermal conductivity of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-04-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37°C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, i.e., the ratio of the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. However, while the thermal conductivity is known to diverge at the vapor-liquid critical point due to critical density fluctuations, the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, calculated as the product of thermal diffusivity and heat capacity, does not show any sign of such an anomaly. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water and found that indeed any critical thermal-conductivity enhancement would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. Moreover, the behavior of thermal conductivity can be explained by the observed anomalies of the thermodynamic properties. In particular, we show that thermal conductivity should go through a minimum when temperature is decreased, as Kumar and Stanley observed in the TIP5P model of water. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the behavior of thermal conductivity in water near the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points.

  16. Soft drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew J. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marzani, Simone [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Soyez, Gregory [IPhT, CEA Saclay, CNRS URA 2306,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-29

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called “soft drop declustering”, which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters — a soft threshold z{sub cut} and an angular exponent β — with the β=0 limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the β dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The β=0 limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only “Sudakov safe” but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic results to parton shower simulations and find good agreement, and we also estimate the impact of non-perturbative effects such as hadronization and the underlying event. Finally, we demonstrate how soft drop can be used for tagging boosted W bosons, and we speculate on the potential advantages of using soft drop for pileup mitigation.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH-FIELD Q-DROP IN A LARGE-GRAIN NIOBIUM CAVITY FOR DIFFERENT OXIDATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Alex Gurevich

    2008-01-23

    In this contribution, we present the results from a series of RF tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes. After initial buffered chemical polishing, anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C was applied with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system was used allowing to measure the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to RF losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution on the RF surface. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the cavity surface showed that grain-boundaries are not the preferred location. An interesting correlation was found between the Q-drop onset, the quench field and the low-field energy gap, which supports the hypothesis of thermo-magnetic instability governing the Q-drop and the baking effect.

  18. Thermodynamic geometry of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Helge-Otmar; Mausbach, Peter; Ruppeiner, George

    2015-03-01

    The thermodynamic curvature scalar R is evaluated for supercooled water with a two-state equation of state correlated with the most recent available experimental data. This model assumes a liquid-liquid critical point. Our investigation extends the understanding of the thermodynamic behavior of R considerably. We show that R diverges to -∞ when approaching the assumed liquid-liquid critical point. This limit is consistent with all of the fluid critical point models known so far. In addition, we demonstrate a sign change of R along the liquid-liquid line from negative near the critical point to positive on moving away from the critical point in the low density "ice-like" liquid phase. We also trace out the Widom line in phase space. In addition, we investigate increasing correlation length in supercooled water and compare our results with recent published small angle x-ray scattering measurements.

  19. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow inside spool valve with large pressure drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; Pan, Dingyi; Xie, Fangfang; Shao, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    Spool valves play an important role in fluid power system. Cavitation phenomena happen frequently inside the spool valves, which cause structure damages, noise and lower down hydrodynamic performance. A numerical tools incorporating the cavitation model, are developed to predict the flow structure and cavitation pattern in the spool valve. Two major flow states in the spool valve chamber, i.e. flow-in and flow-out, are studies. The pressure distributions along the spool wall are first investigated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. For the flow-in cases, the local pressure at the throttling area drops much deeper than the pressure in flow-out cases. Meanwhile, the bubbles are more stable in flow-in cases than those in flow-out cases, which are ruptured and shed into the downstream.

  20. Soft Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Soyez, Gregory; Thaler, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called "soft drop declustering", which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters--a soft threshold $z_\\text{cut}$ and an angular exponent $\\beta$--with the $\\beta = 0$ limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the $\\beta$ dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The $\\beta = 0$ limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only "Sudakov safe" but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic r...

  1. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  2. Electric Mars: A Large Trans-Terminator Electric Potential Drop on Closed Magnetic Field Lines Above Utopia Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Glyn; Mitchell, David; Xu, Shaosui; Glocer, Alex; Grebowsky, Joseph; Hara, Takuya; Lillis, Robert; Espley, Jared; Mazelle, Christian; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Parallel electric fields and their associated electric potential structures play a crucial role inionospheric-magnetospheric interactions at any planet. Although there is abundant evidence that parallel electric fields play key roles in Martian ionospheric outflow and auroral electron acceleration, the fields themselves are challenging to directly measure due to their relatively weak nature. Using measurements by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer instrument aboard the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN(MAVEN) Mars Scout, we present the discovery and measurement of a substantial (Phi) Mars 7.7 +/-0.6 V) parallel electric potential drop on closed magnetic field lines spanning the terminator from day to night above the great impact basin of Utopia Planitia, a region largely free of crustal magnetic fields. A survey of the previous 26 orbits passing over a range of longitudes revealed similar signatures on seven orbits, with a mean potential drop (Phi) Mars of 10.9 +/- 0.8 V, suggestive that although trans-terminator electric fields of comparable strength are not ubiquitous, they may be common, at least at these northerly latitudes.

  3. Observations of ice multiplication in a weakly convective cell embedded in supercooled mid-level stratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Crosier

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of cloud microphysical properties were obtained by in-situ aircraft measurements and ground based Radar/Lidar. Widespread mid-level stratus cloud was present below a temperature inversion (~5 °C magnitude at 3.6 km altitude. Localised convection (peak updraft 1.5 m s−1 was observed 20 km west of the Radar station. This was associated with convergence at 2.5 km altitude. The convection was unable to penetrate the inversion capping the mid-level stratus.

    The mid-level stratus cloud was vertically thin (~400 m, horizontally extensive (covering 100 s of km and persisted for more than 24 h. The cloud consisted of supercooled water droplets and small concentrations of large (~1 mm stellar/plate like ice which slowly precipitated out. This ice was nucleated at temperatures greater than −12.2 °C and less than −10.0 °C, (cloud top and cloud base temperatures, respectively. No ice seeding from above the cloud layer was observed. This ice was formed by primary nucleation, either through the entrainment of efficient ice nuclei from above/below cloud, or by the slow stochastic activation of immersion freezing ice nuclei contained within the supercooled drops. Above cloud top significant concentrations of sub-micron aerosol were observed and consisted of a mixture of sulphate and carbonaceous material, a potential source of ice nuclei.

    Precipitation from the mid-level stratus evaporated before reaching the surface, whereas rates of up to 1 mm h−1 were observed below the convective feature. There is strong evidence for the Hallett-Mossop (HM process of secondary ice particle production leading to the formation of the precipitation observed. This includes (1 Ice concentrations in the convective feature were more than an order of magnitude greater than the concentration of primary ice in the overlaying stratus, (2 Large concentrations of small pristine columns were observed at the ~−5

  4. Repetition of large stress drop earthquakes on Wairarapa fault, New Zealand, revealed by LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, E.; Manighetti, I.; Garambois, S.; Beaupretre, S.; Vitard, C.

    2013-12-01

    We have acquired high-resolution LiDAR topographic data over most of the onland trace of the 120 km-long Wairarapa strike-slip fault, New Zealand. The Wairarapa fault broke in a large earthquake in 1855, and this historical earthquake is suggested to have produced up to 18 m of lateral slip at the ground surface. This would make this earthquake a remarkable event having produced a stress drop much higher than commonly observed on other earthquakes worldwide. The LiDAR data allowed us examining the ground surface morphology along the fault at vegetation. In doing so, we identified more than 900 alluvial features of various natures and sizes that are clearly laterally offset by the fault. We measured the about 670 clearest lateral offsets, along with their uncertainties. Most offsets are lower than 100 m. Each measurement was weighted by a quality factor that quantifies the confidence level in the correlation of the paired markers. Since the slips are expected to vary along the fault, we analyzed the measurements in short, 3-5 km-long fault segments. The PDF statistical analysis of the cumulative offsets per segment reveals that the alluvial morphology has well recorded, at every step along the fault, no more than a few (3-6), well distinct cumulative slips, all lower than 80 m. Plotted along the entire fault, the statistically defined cumulative slip values document four, fairly continuous slip profiles that we attribute to the four most recent large earthquakes on the Wairarapa fault. The four slip profiles have a roughly triangular and asymmetric envelope shape that is similar to the coseismic slip distributions described for most large earthquakes worldwide. The four slip profiles have their maximum slip at the same place, in the northeastern third of the fault trace. The maximum slips vary from one event to another in the range 7-15 m; the most recent 1855 earthquake produced a maximum coseismic slip of 15 × 2 m at the ground surface. Our results thus confirm

  5. Dynamic Source Inversion of an Intraslab Earthquake: a Slow and Inefficient Rupture with Large Stress Drop and Radiated Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Diaz-Mojica, J.; Madariaga, R. I.; Singh, S. K.; Tago Pacheco, J.; Iglesias, A.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a method for imaging the earthquake source dynamics through the inversion of ground motion records based on a parallel genetic algorithm. The source model follows an elliptical patch approach and uses the staggered-grid split-node method to model the earthquake dynamics. A statistical analysis is used to estimate uncertainties in both inverted and derived source parameters. Synthetic inversion tests reveal that the rupture speed (Vr), the rupture area and the stress drop (Δτ) are determined within an error of ~30%, ~12% and ~10%, respectively. In contrast, derived parameters such as the radiated energy (Er), the radiation efficiency (η) and the fracture energy (G) have larger uncertainties, around ~70%, ~40% and ~25%, respectively. We applied the method to the Mw6.5 intermediate-depth (62 km) normal-faulting earthquake of December 11, 2011 in Guerrero, Mexico (Diaz-Mojica et al., JGR, 2014). Inferred values of Δτ = 29.2±6.2 MPa and η = 0.26±0.1 are significantly higher and lower, respectively, than those of typical subduction thrust events. Fracture energy is large, so that more than 73% of the available potential energy for the dynamic process of faulting was deposited in the focal region (i.e., G = (14.4±3.5)x1014J), producing a slow rupture process (Vr/Vs = 0.47±0.09) despite the relatively-high energy radiation (Er = (0.54±0.31)x1015 J) and energy-moment ratio (Er/M0 = 5.7x10-5). It is interesting to point out that such a slow and inefficient rupture along with the large stress drop in a small focal region are features also observed in the 1994 deep Bolivian earthquake.

  6. Supercooled Water Droplet Impacting Superhydrophobic Surfaces in the Presence of Cold Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an investigation of stagnation flow imposed on a supercooled water drop in cold environmental conditions was carried out at various air velocities ranging from 0 (i.e., still air to 10 m/s along with temperature spanning from −10 to −30 °C. The net effect of air flow on the impacting water droplet was investigated by controlling the droplet impact velocity to make it similar with and without air flow. In cold atmospheric conditions with temperatures as low as −30 °C, due to the large increase of both internal and contact line viscosity combined with the presence of ice nucleation mechanisms, supercooled water droplet wetting behavior was systematically affected. Instantaneous pinning for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was observed when the spread drop reached the maximum spreading diameter (i.e., no recoiling phase. Nevertheless, superhydrophobic surfaces showed a great repellency (e.g., contact time reduction up to 30% where air velocity was increased up to 10 m/s at temperatures above the critical temperature of heterogeneous ice nucleation (i.e., −24 °C. However, the freezing line of the impacting water droplet was extended up to 2-fold at air velocity up to 10 m/s where substrate temperature was maintained below the aforementioned critical temperature (e.g., −30 °C.

  7. Fragile to strong crossover at the Widom line in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome, Italy and INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Corradini, D.; Rovere, M., E-mail: rovere@fis.uniroma3.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-28

    We study by molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical properties of an aqueous solution of NaCl at a concentration of 0.67 mol/kg upon supercooling. In a previous study of the same ionic solution, we have located the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) and determined the Widom line connected to the liquid-liquid transition. We present here the results obtained from the study of the self-intermediate scattering function in a large range of temperatures and densities approaching the LLCP. The structural relaxation is in agreement with the mode coupling theory (MCT) in the region of mild supercooling. In the deeper supercooled region the α-relaxation time as function of temperature deviates from the MCT power law prediction showing a crossover from a fragile to a strong behavior. This crossover is found upon crossing the Widom line. The same trend was found in bulk water upon supercooling and it appears almost unchanged by the interaction with ions apart from a shift in the thermodynamic plane toward lower pressures and higher temperatures. These results show that the phenomenology of supercooled water transfers from bulk to solution where the study of the supercooled region is experimentally less difficult.

  8. Fragile to strong crossover at the Widom line in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, P; Corradini, D; Rovere, M

    2013-11-28

    We study by molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical properties of an aqueous solution of NaCl at a concentration of 0.67 mol/kg upon supercooling. In a previous study of the same ionic solution, we have located the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) and determined the Widom line connected to the liquid-liquid transition. We present here the results obtained from the study of the self-intermediate scattering function in a large range of temperatures and densities approaching the LLCP. The structural relaxation is in agreement with the mode coupling theory (MCT) in the region of mild supercooling. In the deeper supercooled region the α-relaxation time as function of temperature deviates from the MCT power law prediction showing a crossover from a fragile to a strong behavior. This crossover is found upon crossing the Widom line. The same trend was found in bulk water upon supercooling and it appears almost unchanged by the interaction with ions apart from a shift in the thermodynamic plane toward lower pressures and higher temperatures. These results show that the phenomenology of supercooled water transfers from bulk to solution where the study of the supercooled region is experimentally less difficult.

  9. Mechanism of Supercooled Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras-Alba, Belen; Palacios, Jose; Vargas, Mario; Ruggeri, Charles; Bartkus, Tadas P.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on supercooled droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The results are compared to prior room temperature droplet deformation results to explore the effects of droplet supercooling. The experiments were conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) at The Pennsylvania State University. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotor blades mounted onto the hub in the AERTS chamber was moved at speeds ranging between 50 and 80 m/sec. The temperature of the chamber was set at -20°C. A monotonic droplet generator was used to produce droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The supercooled state of the droplets was determined by measurement of the temperature of the drops at various locations below the droplet generator exit. A temperature prediction code was also used to estimate the temperature of the droplets based on vertical velocity and the distance traveled by droplets from the droplet generator to the airfoil stagnation line. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging provided droplet deformation information as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. It was demonstrated that to compare the effects of water supercooling on droplet deformation, the ratio of the slip velocity and the initial droplet velocity must be equal. A case with equal slip velocity to initial velocity ratios was selected for room temperature and supercooled droplet conditions. The airfoil velocity was 60 m/s and the slip velocity for both sets of data was 40 m/s. In these cases, the deformation of the weakly supercooled and warm droplets did not present different trends. The similar behavior for both environmental conditions indicates that water

  10. Mixing effects in the crystallization of supercooled quantum binary liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühnel, M.; Kalinin, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fernández, J. M.; Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Montero, S. [Laboratory of Molecular Fluid Dynamics, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Tramonto, F.; Galli, D. E. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nava, M. [Laboratorio di Calcolo Parallelo e di Simulazioni di Materia Condensata, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Computational Science, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI Campus, Via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut für Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI - Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-08-14

    By means of Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets, we have investigated the crystallization process of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures composed of parahydrogen (pH{sub 2}) or orthodeuterium (oD{sub 2}) diluted with small amounts of neon. We show that the introduction of the Ne impurities affects the crystallization kinetics in terms of a significant reduction of the measured pH{sub 2} and oD{sub 2} crystal growth rates, similarly to what found in our previous work on supercooled pH{sub 2}-oD{sub 2} liquid mixtures [Kühnel et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 180201(R) (2014)]. Our experimental results, in combination with path-integral simulations of the supercooled liquid mixtures, suggest in particular a correlation between the measured growth rates and the ratio of the effective particle sizes originating from quantum delocalization effects. We further show that the crystalline structure of the mixtures is also affected to a large extent by the presence of the Ne impurities, which likely initiate the freezing process through the formation of Ne-rich crystallites.

  11. Experimental evidence for supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low temperature perchlorate glasses on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of liquid water on the cold and dry surface of Mars is possible where concentrated salt solutions lower the freezing point of water. The eutectic temperature is the maximum equilibrium freezing point depression possible for a given salt solution, which ranges from near 0°C for carbonates and sulfates, to as low as -75°C for perchlorates. Although eutectic temperatures suggest a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars, salt solutions will typically supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. We report on results investigating the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration for pure salt solutions and saturated soil solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. We measured supercooling by monitoring solution temperatures during slow cooling and warming experiments. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions typically supercool 5-15°C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the Martian summer. Remarkably, we found that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions never crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120°C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, which will induce crystallization in most salt solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are

  12. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  13. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  14. Observations of ice multiplication in a weakly convective cell embedded in supercooled mid-level stratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Crosier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of cloud microphysical properties were obtained by in-situ aircraft measurements and ground based Radar/Lidar. Widespread mid-level stratus cloud was present below a temperature inversion (~5 °C magnitude at 3.6 km altitude. Localised convection (peak updraft 1.5 m s−1 was observed 20 km west of the Radar station. This was associated with convergence at 2.5 km altitude. The convection was unable to penetrate the inversion capping the mid-level stratus.

    The mid-level stratus cloud was vertically thin (~400 m, horizontally extensive (covering 100 s of km and persisted for more than 24 h. The cloud consisted of supercooled water droplets and small concentrations of large (~1 mm stellar/plate like ice which slowly precipitated out. This ice was nucleated at temperatures greater than −12.2 °C and less than −10.0 °C, (cloud top and cloud base temperatures, respectively. No ice seeding from above the cloud layer was observed. This ice was formed by primary nucleation, either through the entrainment of efficient ice nuclei from above/below cloud, or by the slow stochastic activation of immersion freezing ice nuclei contained within the supercooled drops. Above cloud top significant concentrations of sub-micron aerosol were observed and consisted of a mixture of sulphate and carbonaceous material, a potential source of ice nuclei. Particle number concentrations (in the size range 0.1<D<3.0 μm were measured above and below cloud in concentrations of ~25 cm−3. Ice crystal concentrations in the cloud were constant at around 0.2 L−1. It is estimated that entrainment of aerosol particles into cloud cannot replenish the loss of ice nuclei from the cloud layer via precipitation.

    Precipitation from the mid-level stratus evaporated before reaching the surface, whereas rates of up to 1 mm h−1 were observed below the convective feature. There is strong

  15. Detecting Significant Stress Drop Variations in Large Micro-Earthquake Datasets: A Comparison Between a Convergent Step-Over in the San Andreas Fault and the Ventura Thrust Fault System, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    A key parameter in engineering seismology and earthquake physics is seismic stress drop, which describes the relative amount of high-frequency energy radiation at the source. To identify regions with potentially significant stress drop variations, we perform a comparative analysis of source parameters in the greater San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) and Ventura basin (VB) in southern California. The identification of physical stress drop variations is complicated by large data scatter as a result of attenuation, limited recording bandwidth and imprecise modeling assumptions. In light of the inherently high uncertainties in single stress drop measurements, we follow the strategy of stacking large numbers of source spectra thereby enhancing the resolution of our method. We analyze more than 6000 high-quality waveforms between 2000 and 2014, and compute seismic moments, corner frequencies and stress drops. Significant variations in stress drop estimates exist within the SGP area. Moreover, the SGP also exhibits systematically higher stress drops than VB and shows more scatter. We demonstrate that the higher scatter in SGP is not a generic artifact of our method but an expression of differences in underlying source processes. Our results suggest that higher differential stresses, which can be deduced from larger focal depth and more thrust faulting, may only be of secondary importance for stress drop variations. Instead, the general degree of stress field heterogeneity and strain localization may influence stress drops more strongly, so that more localized faulting and homogeneous stress fields favor lower stress drops. In addition, higher loading rates, for example, across the VB potentially result in stress drop reduction whereas slow loading rates on local fault segments within the SGP region result in anomalously high stress drop estimates. Our results show that crustal and fault properties systematically influence earthquake stress drops of small and large events and should

  16. Detecting Significant Stress Drop Variations in Large Micro-Earthquake Datasets: A Comparison Between a Convergent Step-Over in the San Andreas Fault and the Ventura Thrust Fault System, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A key parameter in engineering seismology and earthquake physics is seismic stress drop, which describes the relative amount of high-frequency energy radiation at the source. To identify regions with potentially significant stress drop variations, we perform a comparative analysis of source parameters in the greater San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) and Ventura basin (VB) in southern California. The identification of physical stress drop variations is complicated by large data scatter as a result of attenuation, limited recording bandwidth and imprecise modeling assumptions. In light of the inherently high uncertainties in single stress drop measurements, we follow the strategy of stacking large numbers of source spectra thereby enhancing the resolution of our method. We analyze more than 6000 high-quality waveforms between 2000 and 2014, and compute seismic moments, corner frequencies and stress drops. Significant variations in stress drop estimates exist within the SGP area. Moreover, the SGP also exhibits systematically higher stress drops than VB and shows more scatter. We demonstrate that the higher scatter in SGP is not a generic artifact of our method but an expression of differences in underlying source processes. Our results suggest that higher differential stresses, which can be deduced from larger focal depth and more thrust faulting, may only be of secondary importance for stress drop variations. Instead, the general degree of stress field heterogeneity and strain localization may influence stress drops more strongly, so that more localized faulting and homogeneous stress fields favor lower stress drops. In addition, higher loading rates, for example, across the VB potentially result in stress drop reduction whereas slow loading rates on local fault segments within the SGP region result in anomalously high stress drop estimates. Our results show that crustal and fault properties systematically influence earthquake stress drops of small and large events and should

  17. Mechanism of supercooled droplet freezing on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Stefan; Tiwari, Manish K.; Doan, N. Vuong; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-01-01

    Understanding ice formation from supercooled water on surfaces is a problem of fundamental importance and general utility. Superhydrophobic surfaces promise to have remarkable 'icephobicity' and low ice adhesion. Here we show that their icephobicity can be rendered ineffective by simple changes in environmental conditions. Through experiments, nucleation theory and heat transfer physics, we establish that humidity and/or the flow of a surrounding gas can fundamentally switch the ice crystallization mechanism, drastically affecting surface icephobicity. Evaporative cooling of the supercooled liquid can engender ice crystallization by homogeneous nucleation at the droplet-free surface as opposed to the expected heterogeneous nucleation at the substrate. The related interplay between droplet roll-off and rapid crystallization is also studied. Overall, we bring a novel perspective to icing and icephobicity, unveiling the strong influence of environmental conditions in addition to the accepted effects of the surface conditions and hydrophobicity.

  18. Gelation on heating of supercooled gelatin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigo, Nathanaël; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas; Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2012-04-23

    Diluted (1.0-1.5 wt%) aqueous gelatin solutions have been cooled to -10 °C at a cooling rate 20 °C min(-1) without freezing and detectable gelation. When heated at a constant heating rate (0.5 -2 °C min(-1)), the obtained supercooled solutions demonstrate an atypical process of gelation that has been characterized by regular and stochastically modulated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as well as by isoconversional kinetic analysis. The process is detectable as an exothermic peak in the total heat flow of regular DSC and in the nonreversing heat flow of stochastically modulated DSC. Isoconversional kinetic analysis applied to DSC data reveals that the effective activation energy of the process increases from approximately 75 to 200 kJ mol(-1) as a supercooled solution transforms to gel on continuous heating.

  19. Occurrence of organochlorine pollutants in the eggs and dropping-amended soil of Antarctic large animals and its ecological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG HaiSheng; WANG ZiPan; LU Bing; ZHU Chun; WU GuangHai; Vetter WALTER

    2007-01-01

    Persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) are analyzed for the dropping-amended soils from the habitats of Antarctic seabirds and seals in Fildes Peninsula and Ardley Island. The concentration ranges are 0.21 to 3.85 ng/g for polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCBs), 0.09 to 2.01 ng/g for organochlorine pesticides (ΣDDT), and 0.06 to 0.76 ng/g for hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs). Among these, hepatachlorobiphenyls, hexachlorobiphenyls, p,p'-DDE and α-HCH compounds are dominant. The concentration ranges of ΣPCB, DDT and HCH in the eggs of skuas were 91.9-515.5 ng/g, 56.6-304.4 ng/g and 0.5-2.0 ng/g respectively; those in the eggs of penguins were 0.4-0.9 ng/g, 2.4-10.3 ng/g and 0.1-0.4 ng/g; and those in the eggs of giant petrel were 38.1-81.7 ng/g, 12.7-53.7 ng/g and 0.5-1.5 ng/g respectively. The dominant POP compounds in the eggs are PCB180, PCB153, p,p'-DDE and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). The present study shows that the concentration of POPs in the seabird-inhabited-dropping-amended soil varies with the extent of predation and nest occupancy of different seabird populations. Statistical analysis on the POP concentrations from the different seabird eggs implies that the difference in the bio-concentration levels of the birds depends on the bio-habits of the species, such as the range of activity, distance of immigration, feeding pattern, and nest occupation. Among these, the most important factor is the location of the seabirds in the food chain and their feeding pattern. This shows that POPs accumulated in the seabirds resulted from the bio-concentration through the food chain. In addtion, 210Pb dating for the dropping-amended soils (AD1-a and AD2) was performed, which provided the POP accumulation rate and the historic record for the soil profile. It indicates that POP will continuously affect the Antarctic ecosystem for a long time.

  20. Occurrence of organochlorine pollutants in the eggs and dropping-amended soil of Antarctic large animals and its ecological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vetter; WALTER

    2007-01-01

    Persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) are analyzed for the dropping-amended soils from the habitats of Antarctic seabirds and seals in Fildes Peninsula and Ardley Island. The concentration ranges are 0.21 to 3.85 ng/g for polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCBs),0.09 to 2.01 ng/g for organochlorine pesticides (ΣDDT),and 0.06 to 0.76 ng/g for hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs). Among these,hepata-chlorobiphenyls,hexachlorobiphenyls,p,p′-DDE and α-HCH compounds are dominant. The concentra-tion ranges of ΣPCB,DDT and HCH in the eggs of skuas were 91.9―515.5 ng/g,56.6―304.4 ng/g and 0.5―2.0 ng/g respectively; those in the eggs of penguins were 0.4―0.9 ng/g,2.4―10.3 ng/g and 0.1― 0.4 ng/g; and those in the eggs of giant petrel were 38.1―81.7 ng/g,12.7―53.7 ng/g and 0.5―1.5 ng/g respectively. The dominant POP compounds in the eggs are PCB180,PCB153,p,p′-DDE and hexa-chlorobenzene (HCB). The present study shows that the concentration of POPs in the sea-bird-inhabited-dropping-amended soil varies with the extent of predation and nest occupancy of dif-ferent seabird populations. Statistical analysis on the POP concentrations from the different seabird eggs implies that the difference in the bio-concentration levels of the birds depends on the bio-habits of the species,such as the range of activity,distance of immigration,feeding pattern,and nest occupation. Among these,the most important factor is the location of the seabirds in the food chain and their feeding pattern. This shows that POPs accumulated in the seabirds resulted from the bio-concentration through the food chain. In addtion,210Pb dating for the dropping-amended soils (AD1-a and AD2) was performed,which provided the POP accumulation rate and the historic record for the soil profile. It indicates that POP will continuously affect the Antarctic ecosystem for a long time.

  1. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  2. The formation of supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low-temperature perchlorate glasses in aqueous solutions relevant to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-05-01

    Salt solutions on Mars can stabilize liquid water at low temperatures by lowering the freezing point of water. The maximum equilibrium freezing-point depression possible, known as the eutectic temperature, suggests a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars; however, salt solutions can supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. To investigate the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration, we performed slow cooling and warming experiments on pure salt solutions and saturated soil-solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. By monitoring solution temperatures, we identified exothermic crystallization events and determined the composition of precipitated phases from the eutectic melting temperature. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. In general, supercooling is greater in more concentrated solutions and with salts of Ca and Mg. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions investigated in this study typically supercool 5-15 °C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil-solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil-solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil-solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the martian summer. In contrast, we find that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions do not crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120 °C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are also

  3. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciovati

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio >200 niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop” of the cavity quality factor Q_{0}(B_{p} as the peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100–140°C in situ baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm^{2} grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere, and baking in air up to 180°C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence, and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20–30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not reappear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120°C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180°C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with transmission electron microscope and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180°C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a postpurification treatment at 1250°C. A statistic of the position of the “hot spots” on the

  4. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; gurevich, alex

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the

  5. Realisation of dynamic ice-making by supercooled water%过冷水动态制冰的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲凯阳; 江亿

    2001-01-01

    Further studies based on the authors' earlier researches the conditions under which no fpeezing occur in the supercooler while sufficient supercooling of water is guaranteed.Establishes a stably opepeting experimental assembly. Water temperature at the entrance of the supercooler reaches as low as 0.45 ℃, and the water temperature drop in supercooler isabout 1℃.%在作者前期研究的基础上,进一步研究了保证过冷水动态制冰系统中过冷却器不发生结冰的条件,建立了能够稳定运行的过冷水动态制冰实验装置。水在过冷却器入口的最低温度为0.45℃,在过冷却器中的温降约为1.0℃。

  6. The Transient Supercooling Enhancement For A Pulsed Thermoelectric Cooler (TEC)

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Jia-ni; Du, Jun-yan; Wang, Shi-fei; Zhou, Jing-wei; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Once TEC excitated by a high-voltage pulse, there exists a transient thermoelectric supercooling effect, which can be enhanced by keeping on increasing the Peltier cooling effect to compensate for the negative self-heating from the Joule heating effect and Fourier heat conduction effect. After superimposing an additional voltage pulse over a steady-state reference value in a short time scale, abrupt temperature drop will be produc...

  7. The Transient Supercooling Enhancement For A Pulsed Thermoelectric Cooler (TEC)

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Jia-ni; Du, Jun-yan; Wang, Shi-fei; Zhou, Jing-wei; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Once TEC excitated by a high-voltage pulse, there exists a transient thermoelectric supercooling effect, which can be enhanced by keeping on increasing the Peltier cooling effect to compensate for the negative self-heating from the Joule heating effect and Fourier heat conduction effect. After superimposing an additional voltage pulse over a steady-state reference value in a short time scale, abrupt temperature drop will be produc...

  8. Influence of Nanoparticles and Graphite Foam on the Supercooling of Acetamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetamide is a promising phase change materials (PCMs for thermal storage,but the large supercooling during the freezing process has limited its application. In this study, we prepared acetamide-SiO2 composites by adding nano-SiO2 into acetamide. This modified PCM was then impregnated into the porous graphite foam forming acetamide-SiO2-graphite foam form-stable composites. These composites were subjected to melting-solidification cycles 50 times; the time-temperature curves were tracked and recorded during these cycles. The time-temperature curves showed that, for the acetamide containing 2 wt. % SiO2, the supercooling phenomenon was eliminated and the material’s performance was stable for 50 cycles. The solidification temperature of the acetamide-SiO2-graphite foam samples was 65°C and the melting temperature was lowered to 65°C. The samples exhibited almost no supercooling and the presence of SiO2 had no significant effect on the melting-solidification temperature. The microscopic supercooling of the acetamide-SiO2 composite was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The results indicated that when the content of SiO2 was 1 wt. to 2 wt. %, the supercooling could be reduced to less than 10°C and heat was sufficiently released during solidification. Finally, a set of algorithms was derived using MATLAB software for simulating the crystallization of samples based on the classical nucleation theory. The results of the simulation agreed with the experiment results.

  9. Transport properties of supercooled confined water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, F.; Branca, C.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Gonzalez-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Stanley, H. E.; Chen, S.-H.

    2008-07-01

    This article presents an overview of recent experiments performed on transport properties of water in the deeply supercooled region, a temperature region of fundamental importance in the science of water. We report data of nuclear magnetic resonance, quasi-elastic neutron scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, studying water confined in nanometer-scale environments. When contained within small pores, water does not crystallise, and can be supercooled well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature Th. On this basis it is possible to carry out a careful analysis of the well known thermodynamical anomalies of water. Studying the temperature and pressure dependencies of water dynamics, we show that the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis represents a reliable model for describing liquid water. In this model, water in the liquid state is a mixture of two different local structures, characterised by different densities, namely the low density liquid (LDL) and the high-density liquid (HDL). The LLPT line should terminate at a special transition point: a low-T liquid-liquid critical point. We discuss the following experimental findings on liquid water: (i) a crossover from non-Arrhenius behaviour at high T to Arrhenius behaviour at low T in transport parameters; (ii) a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation; (iii) the existence of a Widom line, which is the locus of points corresponding to maximum correlation length in the p-T phase diagram and which ends in the liquid-liquid critical point; (iv) the direct observation of the LDL phase; (v) a minimum in the density at approximately 70 K below the temperature of the density maximum. In our opinion these results represent the experimental proofs of the validity of the LLPT hypothesis.

  10. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  11. Entropy-driven liquid-liquid separation in supercooled water

    OpenAIRE

    Holten, V.; Anisimov, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago Poole et al. (Nature 360, 324, 1992) suggested that the anomalous properties of supercooled water may be caused by a critical point that terminates a line of liquid-liquid separation of lower-density and higher-density water. Here we present an explicit thermodynamic model based on this hypothesis, which describes all available experimental data for supercooled water with better quality and with fewer adjustable parameters than any other model suggested so far. Liquid water a...

  12. Coalescence of sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Pomeau, Yves; Andrieu, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical description of the kinetics of coalescence of two water drops on a plane solid surface. The case of partial wetting is considered. The drops are in an atmosphere of nitrogen saturated with water where they grow by condensation and eventually touch each other and coalesce. A new convex composite drop is rapidly formed that then exponentially and slowly relaxes to an equilibrium hemispherical cap. The characteristic relaxation time is proportional to the drop radius R * at final equilibrium. This relaxation time appears to be nearly 10 7 times larger than the bulk capillary relaxation time t b = R * $\\eta$/$\\sigma$, where $\\sigma$ is the gas--liquid surface tension and $\\eta$ is the liquid shear viscosity. In order to explain this extremely large relaxation time, we consider a model that involves an Arrhenius kinetic factor resulting from a liquid--vapour phase change in the vicinity of the contact line. The model results in a large relaxation time of order t b exp(L/R...

  13. Supercooled water in austral summer in Prydz Bay,Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jiuxin; CHENG Yaoyao; JIAO Yutian; HOU Jiaqiang

    2011-01-01

    Supercooled water with temperatures below freezing point, was identified from hydrographic data obtained by Chinese and Australian expeditions to Prydz Bay, Antarctica, during the austral summer. The study shows that most supercooled waters occurred at depths of 63-271 m in the region north of the Amery Ice Shelf (AIS) front. The maximum supercooling was 0.16℃ below the in-situ freezing point. In temperature and salinity ranges of-2.14 - -1.96℃ and 34.39--34.46, respectively,the water was colder and fresher than peripheral shelf water. The supercooled water had less variability in the vertical profiles compared to shelf water. Based on analysis of their thermohaline features and spatial distribution, as well as the circulation pattern in Prydz Bay, we conclude that these supercooled waters originated from a cavity beneath the AIS and resulted from upwelling just outside of the AIS front. Water emerging from the ice shelf cools to an extremely low temperature (about -2.0℃) by additional cooling from the ice shelf, and becomes buoyant with the addition of melt water from the ice shelf base. When this water flows out of the ice shelf front, its upper boundary is removed, and thus it rises abruptly. Once the temperature of this water reaches below the freezing point, supercooling takes place. In summer, the seasonal pycnocline at ~100 m water depth acts as a barrier to upwelling and supercooling. The upwelling of ice shelf outflow water illuminates a unique mid-depth convection of the polar ocean.

  14. Fractional Walden rule for electrolytes in supercooled disaccharide aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longinotti, M Paula; Corti, Horacio R

    2009-04-23

    The electrical conductivity of CsCl, KCl, Bu(4)NBr, and Bu(4)NI was studied in stable and supercooled (metastable) sucrose and trehalose aqueous solutions over a wide viscosity range. The results indicate that large positive deviations from the Walden rule occur in these systems due to the higher tendency of the ions to move in water-rich regions, as previously observed for NaCl and MgCl(2). The electrical molar conductivity viscosity dependence can be described with a fractional Walden rule (Lambdaeta(alpha) = constant), where alpha is a decoupling parameter which increases with ionic size and varies between 0.61 and 0.74 for all of the studied electrolytes. Using the electrical molar conductivity dependence of ion-ion interactions, an effective dielectric constant was calculated for a trehalose 39 wt% aqueous solution as a function of temperature. Above 278 K, the effective and the bulk solution dielectric constants are similar, but at lower temperatures, where the carbohydrate becomes less mobile than water, the effective dielectric constant approaches the dielectric constant of water. We also conclude that the solute-solvent dielectric friction contribution can be neglected, reinforcing the idea that the observed breakdown of the Walden rule is due to the existence of local microheterogeneities. The Walden plots for the studied ionic solutes show a decoupling similar to that found for the diffusion of water in the same solutions.

  15. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity of local free volumes in highly supercooled liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Hayato; Kawasaki, Takeshi

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the spatiotemporal behavior of local density and its relation to dynamical heterogeneity in a highly supercooled liquid by using molecular dynamics simulations of a binary mixture with different particle sizes in two dimensions. To trace voids heterogeneously existing with lower local densities, which move along with the structural relaxation, we employ the minimum local density for each particle in a time window whose width is set along with the structural relaxation time. Particles subject to free volumes correspond well to the configuration rearranging region of dynamical heterogeneity. While the correlation length for dynamical heterogeneity grows with temperature decrease, no growth in the correlation length of heterogeneity in the minimum local density distribution takes place. A comparison of these results with those of normal mode analysis reveals that superpositions of lower-frequency soft modes extending over the free volumes exhibit spatial correlation with the broken bonds. This observation suggests a possibility that long-ranged vibration modes facilitate the interactions between fragile regions represented by free volumes, to induce dynamical correlations at a large scale.

  16. 大吨位蒸(空)模锻锤改造技术%Modification technology of large tonnage steam (air) drop hammer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董建虎; 曹文胜; 杨丹锋; 辛宏斌; 谢建国; 黄继忠

    2012-01-01

    The working principle of all hydraulic electric-liquid hammer is introduced. The innovation technology is described, offered hy China National Heavy Machinery Research Institute Co. , Ltd. lo First Tractor Co. , Ltd. , and needed for changing the large tonnage steam (air) drop hammer into an all hydraulic electric-liquid hammer whose hydrolic system adopts a heavy-calibre special service valve set, hammer rod and hammer head adopt the spherical hinge linkage, hammer return stroke is designed as a double-limit buffer unit to avoid the shatter crack of the pipeline, and partial pipeline uses hose. The modified equipment works well, and has low failure rate and high reliability. Its energy saving rate is 90%.%介绍了全液压电液锤的工作原理,以及中国重型机械研究院有限公司为第一拖拉机股份有限公司将大吨位蒸(空)模锻锤改造成全液压电液锤项目中所采用的创新技术:液压系统采用专利技术的大口径专用阀组,锤杆与锤头采用球铰活动联接,锤头回程设计为双限位缓冲装置,为避免管道被震裂,部分管路采用软管联接等.改造后的设备使用情况良好,故障率低,可靠性高,节能率90%以上.

  17. Effects of PVA(Polyvinyl Alcohol) on Supercooling Phenomena of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Saito, Akio; Okawa, Seiji; Takizawa, Hiroshi

    In this paper, effects of polymer additive on supercooling of water were investigated experimentally. Poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) were used as the polymer, and the samples were prepared by dissolving PVA in ultra pure water. Concentration, degree of polymerization and saponification of PVA were varied as the experimental parameters. The sample was cooled, and the temperature at the instant when ice appears was measured. Since freezing of supercooled water is statistical phenomenon, many experiments were carried out and average degrees of supercooling were obtained for each experimental condition. As the result, it was found that PVA affects nucleation of supercooling and the degree of supercooling increases by adding the PVA. Especially, it is found that the average degree of supercooling increases and the standard deviation of average degree of supercooling decreases with increase of degree of saponification of PVA. However, the average degree of supercooling are independent of the degree of polymerization of PVA in the range of this study.

  18. Supercooling across first-order phase transitions in vortex matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Chaddah; S B Roy

    2000-06-01

    Hysteresis in cycling through first-order phase transitions in vortex matter, akin to the well-studied phenomenon of supercooling of water, has been discussed in literature. Hysteresis can be seen while varying either temperature or magnetic field (and thus the density of vortices). Our recent work on phase transitions with two control variables shows that the observable region of metastability of the supercooled phase would depend on the path followed in - space, and will be larger when is lowered at constant compared to the case when is lowered at constant . We discuss the effect of isothermal field variations on metastable supercooled states produced by field-cooling. This path dependence is not a priori applicable to metastability caused by reduced diffusivity or hindered kinetics.

  19. On the potential energy landscape of supercooled liquids and glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodney, D.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The activation-relaxation technique (ART), a saddle-point search method, is applied to determine the potential energy landscape around supercooled and glassy configurations of a three-dimensional binary Lennard-Jones system. We show a strong relation between the distribution of activation energies...... around a given glassy configuration and its history, in particular, the cooling rate used to produce the glass and whether or not the glass was plastically deformed prior to sampling. We also compare the thermally activated transitions found by ART around a supercooled configuration with the succession...... of transitions undergone by the same supercooled liquid during a time trajectory simulated by molecular dynamics. We find that ART is biased towards more heterogeneous transitions with higher activation energies and more broken bonds than the MD simulation....

  20. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  1. Thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Marco G.

    This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of the thermodynamic and dynamic behavior of liquid water. As liquid water is cooled down into the supercooled state, some regions of the sample show correlated molecular motion. Previously, only the translational motion has been the object of investigation. Given the importance of orientational dynamics for water, a question that naturally arises is whether the rotational molecular motion also shows heterogeneous dynamics. We show that the most rotationally mobile molecules tend to form clusters, "rotational heterogeneities", and we study their dependence upon observation time and temperature. Further, we show evidence that molecules belonging to dynamic heterogeneities are involved in bifurcated bonds. Since the presence of dynamic heterogeneities is increasingly important as the temperature is lowered, one would expect a signature of this phenomenon in dynamical quantities. We study the effect of dynamic heterogeneities on the origin of the breakdown of the Stokes--- Einstein and Stokes---Einstein---Debye relations for water. These relations link the diffusivity to temperature and viscosity. We study the separation of time scales of dynamic heterogeneities and the diffusive regime. We also consider different sets of mobility, slowest and fastest, for both translational and rotational heterogeneities. A long-standing problem in biology is the seemingly universal loss of biological activity of all biomolecules, a phenomenon termed the "protein glass transition". We explore the connection between the hypothesized liquid-liquid phase transition of water, and the protein glass transition. We find that the protein glass transition coincides with the crossing of the Widom line of hydration water. Many different scenarios have been proposed to rationalize water's thermodynamic anomalies. We study a tell model for water using the Wolff' cluster algorithm, which permits

  2. Peculiar thermodynamics of the second critical point in supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, C E; Anisimov, M A

    2011-12-08

    On the basis of the principle of critical-point universality, we examine the peculiar thermodynamics of the liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water. We show that the liquid-liquid criticality in water represents a special kind of critical behavior in fluids, intermediate between two limiting cases: the lattice gas, commonly used to model liquid-vapor transitions, and the lattice liquid, a weakly compressible liquid with an entropy-driven phase separation. While the ordering field in the lattice gas is associated with the chemical potential and the order parameter with the density, in the lattice liquid the ordering field is the temperature and the order parameter is the entropy. The behavior of supercooled water is much closer to lattice-liquid behavior than to lattice-gas behavior. Using new experimental data recently obtained by Mishima [J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 133, 144503], we have revised the parametric scaled equation of state, previously suggested by Fuentevilla and Anisimov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 195702], and obtain a consistent description of the thermodynamic anomalies of supercooled water by adjusting linear backgrounds, one critical amplitude, and the critical pressure. We also show how the lattice-liquid description affects the finite-size scaling description of supercooled water in confined media.

  3. Hopping in a supercooled binary Lennard-Jones liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe

    1998-01-01

    A binary Lennard–Jones liquid has been investigated by molecular dynamics at equilibrium supercooled conditions. At the lowest temperature investigated, hopping is present in the system as indicated by a secondary peak in 4r2Gs(r,t), where Gs(r,t) is the van Hove self correlation function...

  4. Entropy calculations for a supercooled liquid crystalline blue phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, U [Physics Department, University of the West Indies, PO Box 64, Bridgetown (Barbados)

    2007-01-15

    We observed, using polarized light microscopy, the supercooling of the blue phase (BPI) of cholesteryl proprionate and measured the corresponding liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures. From these temperatures and additional published data we have provided, for the benefit of undergraduate physics students, a nontraditional example involving entropy calculations for an irreversible transition.

  5. Externally applied electric fields up to 1.6 × 10(5) V/m do not affect the homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Claudiu A; Tang, Sindy K Y; Bishop, Kyle J M; Whitesides, George M

    2011-02-10

    The freezing of water can initiate at electrically conducting electrodes kept at a high electric potential or at charged electrically insulating surfaces. The microscopic mechanisms of these phenomena are unknown, but they must involve interactions between water molecules and electric fields. This paper investigates the effect of uniform electric fields on the homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water. Electric fields were applied across drops of water immersed in a perfluorinated liquid using a parallel-plate capacitor; the drops traveled in a microchannel and were supercooled until they froze due to the homogeneous nucleation of ice. The distribution of freezing temperatures of drops depended on the rate of nucleation of ice, and the sensitivity of measurements allowed detection of changes by a factor of 1.5 in the rate of nucleation. Sinusoidal alternation of the electric field at frequencies from 3 to 100 kHz prevented free ions present in water from screening the electric field in the bulk of drops. Uniform electric fields in water with amplitudes up to (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10(5) V/m neither enhanced nor suppressed the homogeneous nucleation of ice. Estimations based on thermodynamic models suggest that fields in the range of 10(7)-10(8) V/m might cause an observable increase in the rate of nucleation.

  6. Free energy of formation of small ice nuclei near the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhariwalla, Connor R C; Bowles, Richard K; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Sciortino, Francesco; Poole, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    The ST2 interaction potential has been used in a large number of simulation studies to explore the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in supercooled water. Using umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations of ST2 water, we evaluate the free energy of formation of small ice nuclei in the supercooled liquid in the vicinity of the Widom line, the region above the critical temperature of the LLPT where a number of thermodynamic anomalies occur. Our results show that in this region there is a substantial free-energy cost for the formation of small ice nuclei, demonstrating that the thermodynamic anomalies associated with the Widom line in ST2 water occur in a well-defined metastable liquid phase. On passing through the Widom line, we identify changes in the free energy to form small ice nuclei that illustrate how the thermodynamic anomalies associated with the LLPT may influence the ice nucleation process.

  7. Coalescence of a Drop inside another Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, Vivek; Jian, Zhen; Yang, Fan; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence dynamics of a pendent drop sitting inside another drop, has been studied experimentally and in numerical simulations. Using an in-house fabricated composite micro-nozzle, a smaller salt-water drop is introduced inside a larger oil drop which is pendent in a tank containing the same liquid as the inner drop. On touching the surface of outer drop, the inner drop coalesces with the surrounding liquid forming a vortex ring, which grows in time to form a mushroom-like structure. The initial dynamics at the first bridge opening up is quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while matching the refractive index of the two liquids. The phenomenon is also numerically simulated using the open-source code Gerris. The problem is fully governed by two non-dimensional parameters: the Ohnesorge number and the diameter ratios of the two drops. The validated numerical model is used to better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon. In some cases a coalescence cascade is observed with liquid draining intermittently and the inner drop reducing in size.

  8. Generation of live offspring from vitrified embryos with synthetic polymers SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Jimenez, F; Jimenez-Trigos, E; Lavara, R; Vicente, J S

    2014-01-01

    Ice growth and recrystallisation are considered important factors in determining vitrification outcomes. Synthetic polymers inhibit ice formation during cooling or warming of the vitrification process. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding commercially available synthetic polymers SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000 to vitrification media on in vivo development competence of rabbit embryos. Four hundred and thirty morphologically normal embryos recovered at 72 h of gestation were used. The vitrification media contained 20% dimethyl sulphoxide and 20% ethylene glycol, either alone or in combination with 1% of SuperCool X-1000 and 1% SuperCool. Our results show that embryos can be successfully vitrified using SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000 and when embryos are transferred, live offspring can be successfully produced. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that we succeeded for the first time in obtaining live offspring after vitrification of embryos using SuperCool X-1000 and SuperCool Z-1000 polymers.

  9. Ice-lens formation and geometrical supercooling in soils and other colloidal materials

    CERN Document Server

    Style, Robert W; Cocks, Alan C F; Wettlaufer, John S

    2011-01-01

    We present a new, physically-intuitive model of ice-lens formation and growth during the freezing of soils and other dense, particulate suspensions. Motivated by experimental evidence, we consider the growth of an ice-filled crack in a freezing soil. At low temperatures, ice in the crack exerts large pressures on the crack walls that will eventually cause the crack to split open. We show that the crack will then propagate across the soil to form a new lens. The process is controlled by two factors: the cohesion of the soil, and the geometrical supercooling of the water in the soil; a new concept introduced to measure the energy available to form a new ice lens. When the supercooling exceeds a critical amount (proportional to the cohesive strength of the soil) a new ice lens forms. This condition for ice-lens formation and growth does not appeal to any ad hoc, empirical assumptions, and explains how periodic ice lenses can form with or without the presence of a frozen fringe. The proposed mechanism is in good ...

  10. Growth rate of crystalline ice and the diffusivity of supercooled water from 126 to 262 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuntao; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-12-12

    Understanding deeply supercooled water is key to unraveling many of water’s anomalous properties. However, this has proven difficult due to rapid and uncontrolled crystallization. Using a pulsed laser heating technique, we measure the growth rate of crystalline ice, G(T), for 180 K < T < 262 K, i.e. deep within water’s “no man’s land.” The self-diffusion of supercooled liquid water, D(T), is obtained from G(T) using the Wilson-Frenkel model of crystal growth. For T > 237 K, G(T) and D(T) have super-Arrhenius (“fragile”) temperature dependences, but both crossover to Arrhenius (“strong”) behavior with a large activation energy in “no man’s land.” The fact that G(T) and D(T) are smoothly varying rules out the hypothesis that liquid water’s properties have a singularity at or near 228 K. However the results are consistent with a previous prediction for D(T) that assumed no thermodynamic transitions occur in “no man’s land.

  11. Detection of supercooled liquid water-topped mixed-phase clouds >from shortwave-infrared satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOH, Y. J.; Miller, S. D.; Heidinger, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the utility of multispectral information from satellite passive radiometers for detecting and retrieving the properties of cloud globally, which conventionally utilizes shortwave- and thermal-infrared bands. However, the satellite-derived cloud information comes mainly from cloud top or represents a vertically integrated property. This can produce a large bias in determining cloud phase characteristics, in particular for mixed-phase clouds which are often observed to have supercooled liquid water at cloud top but a predominantly ice phase residing below. The current satellite retrieval algorithms may report these clouds simply as supercooled liquid without any further information regarding the presence of a sub-cloud-top ice phase. More accurate characterization of these clouds is very important for climate models and aviation applications. In this study, we present a physical basis and preliminary results for the algorithm development of supercooled liquid-topped mixed-phase cloud detection using satellite radiometer observations. The detection algorithm is based on differential absorption properties between liquid and ice particles in the shortwave-infrared bands. Solar reflectance data in narrow bands at 1.6 μm and 2.25 μm are used to optically probe below clouds for distinction between supercooled liquid-topped clouds with and without an underlying mixed phase component. Varying solar/sensor geometry and cloud optical properties are also considered. The spectral band combination utilized for the algorithm is currently available on Suomi NPP Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), Himawari-8 Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), and the future GOES-R Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). When tested on simulated cloud fields from WRF model and synthetic ABI data, favorable results were shown with reasonable threat scores (0.6-0.8) and false alarm rates (0.1-0.2). An ARM/NSA case study applied to VIIRS data also indicated promising

  12. Shear-accelerated crystallization in a supercooled atomic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhen; Singer, Jonathan P; Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Ze; Li, Huiping; Gopinadhan, Manesh; O'Hern, Corey S; Schroers, Jan; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2015-02-01

    A bulk metallic glass forming alloy is subjected to shear flow in its supercooled state by compression of a short rod to produce a flat disk. The resulting material exhibits enhanced crystallization kinetics during isothermal annealing as reflected in the decrease of the crystallization time relative to the nondeformed case. The transition from quiescent to shear-accelerated crystallization is linked to strain accumulated during shear flow above a critical shear rate γ̇(c)≈0.3 s(-1) which corresponds to Péclet number, Pe∼O(1). The observation of shear-accelerated crystallization in an atomic system at modest shear rates is uncommon. It is made possible here by the substantial viscosity of the supercooled liquid which increases strongly with temperature in the approach to the glass transition. We may therefore anticipate the encounter of nontrivial shear-related effects during thermoplastic deformation of similar systems.

  13. Studies of 3D-cloud optical depth from small to very large values, and of the radiation and remote sensing impacts of larger-drop clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiscombe, Warren [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Marshak, Alexander [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Knyazikhin, Yuri [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Chiu, Christine [Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-05-04

    We have basically completed all the goals stated in the previous proposal and published or submitted journal papers thereon, the only exception being First-Principles Monte Carlo which has taken more time than expected. We finally finished the comprehensive book on 3D cloud radiative transfer (edited by Marshak and Davis and published by Springer), with many contributions by ARM scientists; this book was highlighted in the 2005 ARM Annual Report. We have also completed (for now) our pioneering work on new models of cloud drop clustering based on ARM aircraft FSSP data, with applications both to radiative transfer and to rainfall. This clustering work was highlighted in the FY07 “Our Changing Planet” (annual report of the US Climate Change Science Program). Our group published 22 papers, one book, and 5 chapters in that book, during this proposal period. All are listed at the end of this section. Below, we give brief highlights of some of those papers.

  14. Slow dynamics of supercooled water confined in nanoporous silica materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Faraone, A [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mou, C-Y [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Yen, C-W [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, S-H [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2004-11-17

    We review our incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) studies of the dynamics of supercooled water confined in nanoporous silica materials. QENS data were analysed by using the relaxing cage model (RCM) previously developed by us. We first use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the extended simple point charge model (SPC/E) for bulk supercooled water to establish the validity of the RCM, which applies to both the translational and rotational motion of water molecules. We then assume that the dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of a hydrophilic surface is similar to a bulk water at an equivalent lower supercooled temperature. This analogy was experimentally demonstrated in previous investigations of water in Vycor glasses and near hydrophilic protein surfaces. Studies were made of supercooled water in MCM-41-S (pore sizes 25, 18, and 14 A) and MCM-48-S (pore size 22 A) using three QENS spectrometers of respective energy resolutions 1, 30, and 60 {mu}eV, covering the temperature range from 325 to 200 K. Five quantities are extracted from the analysis: they are {beta}, the stretch exponent characterizing the {alpha}-relaxation; {beta}{gamma}, the exponent determining the power-law dependence of the relaxation time on Q; <{tau}{sub 0}>, the Q-independent pre-factor for the average translational relaxation time; <{tau}{sub R{sub 1}}>, the relaxation time for the first-order rotational correlation function; and <{tau}{sub R{sub 3}}>, the relaxation time for the second-order rotational correlation function. We discuss the temperature dependence of these parameters and note that, in particular, the dynamics is rapidly slowing down at temperature around 220 K, signalling the onset of a structural arrest transition of liquid water into an amorphous solid water.

  15. Volume analysis of supercooled water under high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Duki, Solomon F.; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental findings on the volume of supercooled water at high pressure [O. Mishima, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144503 (2010)] we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations study of bulk water in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. Cooling and heating cycles at different isobars and isothermal compression at different temperatures are performed on the water sample with pressures that range from 0 to 1.0 GPa. The cooling simulations are done at temperatures that range from...

  16. Effects of poly-vinyl alcohol on supercooling phenomena of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Tetsuo; Kudoh, Tomoya [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1, Wakasato, Nagano City, 380-8553 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    The effects of a polymer additive on the supercooling of water were investigated experimentally. Poly-vinyl alcohols (PVAs) were used as the additives, and samples were prepared by dissolving the PVA in water. Since the characteristics of PVA are decided by its degrees of polymerization and saponification, these were varied along with the concentration as the experimental parameters. Moreover, the effect of purity of the water was also considered. Each sample was cooled and the temperature at the instant when ice appeared was measured. Since the freezing of supercooled water is a statistical phenomenon, many experiments were carried out and the average degree of supercooling was obtained. It was found that PVA affects the nucleation of ice in supercooled water and the degree of supercooling increases with the addition of PVA even for water with low purity. The average degree of supercooling increases with an increase in the degree of saponification of PVA. (author)

  17. Eye Drop Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  18. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  19. When a water drop freezes before it solidifies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavehpour, Pirouz; Davis, Stephen; Tavakoli, Faryar

    2012-11-01

    When a drop of liquid is placed on a substrate which temperature is below the melting point of the liquid, one would expect the drop to solidify instantaneously. However, many liquids, such as water, must be subcooled to solidify below its melting temperature due to homogeneous nucleation's high activation energy. Most of the drop solidification research, particularly for water, phase change is assumed to occur at equilibrium freezing temperature; however, this is not the case. We found that after a certain degree of supercooling, a kinetic based nucleation begins and latent heat of fusion is suddenly liberated, causing an increase in liquid temperature. At the end of this stage, approximately 20% of the drop is crystallized. This phenomenon is known among metallurgists as recalescence. This is followed by a slow solidification process at the melting point. As a water droplet spreads on a cold substrate, its contact line stops just prior to freezing inception from the liquid-solid interface. In this study, we assert that recalescence prior to solidification may be the cause of water's sudden immobility, which results in a fixed contact angle and droplet diameter. In our experiments, the nucleation front initiates from the trijunction point and propagates to the drop volume.

  20. Measurements of electric charge separated during the formation of rime by the accretion of supercooled droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Avila

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In these experiments, the electric charge carried by single particles ejected from the surface of a graupel particle growing by riming was measured. Simulated graupel pellets were grown by accretion of supercooled water drops, at temperatures ranging from −2 to −10°C in a wind tunnel at air velocities between 5 and 10 m s−1, with the goal of studying the charging of graupel pellets under conditions of secondary ice crystal production (Hallett-Mossop mechanism. The graupel, and induction rings upstream and downstream of the graupel, were connected to electrometers and analyzing circuits of sufficient sensitivity and speed to measure, correlate and display individual charging events. The results suggest that fewer than 1% of the ejected particles carry a measurable electric charge (>2 fC. Further, it was observed that the graupel pellets acquire a positive charge and the average charge of a single splinter ejected is −14 fC. This mechanism of ejection of charged particles seems adequate to account for a positive charge of around 1 pC that individual precipitation particles of mm-size could acquire in the lower part of the cloud, which in turn could contribute to the lower positive charge region of thunderstorms.

  1. Local order in a supercooled colloidal fluid observed by confocal microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gasser, U; Weitz, D A

    2003-01-01

    The local order in a supercooled monodisperse colloidal fluid is studied by direct imaging of the particles with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The local structure is analysed with a bond order parameter method, which allows one to discern simple structures that are relevant in this system. As expected for samples that crystallize eventually, a large fraction of the particles are found to sit in surroundings with dominant face-centred cubic or hexagonally close-packed character. Evidence for local structures that contain fragments of icosahedra is found, and, moreover, the icosahedral character increases with volume fraction phi, which indicates that it might play an important role at volume fractions near the glass transition.

  2. Local order in a supercooled colloidal fluid observed by confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasser, U [Department of Physics and Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schofield, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Weitz, D A [Department of Physics and Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2003-01-15

    The local order in a supercooled monodisperse colloidal fluid is studied by direct imaging of the particles with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The local structure is analysed with a bond order parameter method, which allows one to discern simple structures that are relevant in this system. As expected for samples that crystallize eventually, a large fraction of the particles are found to sit in surroundings with dominant face-centred cubic or hexagonally close-packed character. Evidence for local structures that contain fragments of icosahedra is found, and, moreover, the icosahedral character increases with volume fraction {phi}, which indicates that it might play an important role at volume fractions near the glass transition.

  3. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  4. Long term thermal energy storage with stable supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Schultz, Jørgen M.; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2015-01-01

    it expands and will cause a pressure built up in a closed chamber which might compromise stability of the supercooling. This can be avoided by having an air volume above the phase change material connected to an external pressure less expansion tank. Supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate at 20 °C stores up...

  5. Supercooling of rapidly expanding quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Zabrodin, E E; Csernai, László P; Stöcker, H; Greiner, W

    1998-01-01

    We reexamine the scenario of homogeneous nucleation of the quark-gluon plasma produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. A generalization of the standard nucleation theory to rapidly expanding system is proposed. The nucleation rate is derived via the new scaling parameter $\\lambda_Z$. It is shown that the size distribution of hadronic clusters plays an important role in the dynamics of the phase transition. The longitudinally expanding system is supercooled to about 3-6%, then it is reheated, and the hadronization is completed within 6-10 fm/c, i.e. 5-10 times faster than it was estimated earlier, in a strongly nonequilibrium way.

  6. Hopping in a supercooled binary Lennard-Jones liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe

    1998-01-01

    A binary Lennard–Jones liquid has been investigated by molecular dynamics at equilibrium supercooled conditions. At the lowest temperature investigated, hopping is present in the system as indicated by a secondary peak in 4r2Gs(r,t), where Gs(r,t) is the van Hove self correlation function....... To examine the dynamics of the system, we consider transitions between the inherent structures (local minima in the potential energy) along the trajectory. We conclude that the plateau in the mean square displacement found at lower temperatures is indeed a result of particles being trapped in local "cages...

  7. The freezing and supercooling of garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Christian; Seignemartin, Violaine; James, Stephen J. [Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre (FRPERC), University of Bristol, Churchill Building, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    This work shows that peeled garlic cloves demonstrate significant supercooling during freezing under standard conditions and can be stored at temperatures well below their freezing point (-2.7 C) without freezing. The nucleation point or 'metastable limit temperature' (the point at which ice crystal nucleation is initiated) of peeled garlic cloves was found to be between -7.7 and -14.6 C. Peeled garlic cloves were stored under static air conditions at temperatures between -6 and -9 C for up to 69 h without freezing, and unpeeled whole garlic bulbs and cloves were stored for 1 week at -6 C without freezing. (author)

  8. Successful vitrification of mouse ovaries using less-concentrated cryoprotectants with Supercool X-1000 supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiuwen; Song, Enliang; Liu, Xiaomu; Liu, Guifen; Cheng, Haijian; Wan, Fachun

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the feasibility of using less-concentrated cryoprotectants supplemented with ice blocker Supercool X-1000 to vitrify ovarian tissues. Mouse ovaries were cryopreserved in different concentrations of vitrification solution alone or with Supercool X-1000, and fresh non-frozen ovaries were used as control. The proportions of morphological normality of follicles, normal GCs in follicular fluids and developing to blastocysts were higher in 12.5% ethylene glycol (EG) + 12.5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) with Supercool X-1000 than those of treated in 10% EG + 10% DMSO or 15% EG + 15% DMSO alone or with Supercool X-1000. In conclusion, the inclusion of Supercool X-1000 in less-concentrated vitrification solution was effective to improve the efficiency and efficacy of cryopreservation of ovarian tissues.

  9. Drag on Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  10. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  11. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 Å. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at TL = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature TL.

  12. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Broccio, Matteo [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Faraone, Antonio [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Liu Li [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mou, C-Y [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, S-H [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2006-09-13

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 A. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at T{sub L} = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature T{sub L}.

  13. Entropy-driven liquid-liquid separation in supercooled water

    CERN Document Server

    Holten, V

    2012-01-01

    Twenty years ago Poole et al. (Nature 360, 324, 1992) suggested that the anomalous properties of supercooled water may be caused by a critical point that terminates a line of liquid-liquid separation of lower-density and higher-density water. Here we present an explicit thermodynamic model based on this hypothesis, which describes all available experimental data for supercooled water with better quality and with fewer adjustable parameters than any other model suggested so far. Liquid water at low temperatures is viewed as an 'athermal solution' of two molecular structures with different entropies and densities. Alternatively to popular models for water, in which the liquid-liquid separation is driven by energy, the phase separation in the athermal two-state water is driven by entropy upon increasing the pressure, while the critical temperature is defined by the 'reaction' equilibrium constant. In particular, the model predicts the location of density maxima at the locus of a near-constant fraction (about 0.1...

  14. Ice-lens formation and geometrical supercooling in soils and other colloidal materials

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-10-14

    We present a physically intuitive model of ice-lens formation and growth during the freezing of soils and other dense, particulate suspensions. Motivated by experimental evidence, we consider the growth of an ice-filled crack in a freezing soil. At low temperatures, ice in the crack exerts large pressures on the crack walls that will eventually cause the crack to split open. We show that the crack will then propagate across the soil to form a new lens. The process is controlled by two factors: the cohesion of the soil and the geometrical supercooling of the water in the soil, a new concept introduced to measure the energy available to form a new ice lens. When the supercooling exceeds a critical amount (proportional to the cohesive strength of the soil) a new ice lens forms. This condition for ice-lens formation and growth does not appeal to any ad hoc, empirical assumptions, and explains how periodic ice lenses can form with or without the presence of a frozen fringe. The proposed mechanism is in good agreement with experiments, in particular explaining ice-lens pattern formation and surges in heave rate associated with the growth of new lenses. Importantly for systems with no frozen fringe, ice-lens formation and frost heave can be predicted given only the unfrozen properties of the soil. We use our theory to estimate ice-lens growth temperatures obtaining quantitative agreement with the limited experimental data that are currently available. Finally we suggest experiments that might be performed in order to verify this theory in more detail. The theory is generalizable to complex natural-soil scenarios and should therefore be useful in the prediction of macroscopic frost-heave rates. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  15. Condensation on surface energy gradient shifts drop size distribution toward small drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley M; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H

    2014-02-25

    During dropwise condensation from vapor onto a cooled surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Drop surface coverage dictates the heat transfer characteristics and depends on both drop size and number of drops present on the surface at any given time. Thus, manipulating drop distributions is crucial to maximizing heat transfer. On earth, manipulation is achieved with gravity. However, in applications with small length scales or in low gravity environments, other methods of removal, such as a surface energy gradient, are required. This study examines how chemical modification of a cooled surface affects drop growth and coalescence, which in turn influences how a population of drops evolves. Steam is condensed onto a horizontally oriented surface that has been treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact angle (hydrophilic, hydrophobic) or a continuous radial gradient of contact angles (hydrophobic to hydrophilic). The time evolution of number density and associated drop size distributions are measured. For a uniform surface, the shape of the drop size distribution is unique and can be used to identify the progress of condensation. In contrast, the drop size distribution for a gradient surface, relative to a uniform surface, shifts toward a population of small drops. The frequent sweeping of drops truncates maturation of the first generation of large drops and locks the distribution shape at the initial distribution. The absence of a shape change indicates that dropwise condensation has reached a steady state. Previous reports of heat transfer enhancement on chemical gradient surfaces can be explained by this shift toward smaller drops, from which the high heat transfer coefficients in dropwise condensation are attributed to. Terrestrial applications using gravity as the primary removal mechanism also stand to benefit from inclusion of gradient surfaces because the critical threshold size required for

  16. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Roeland Cornelis Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study t

  17. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  18. Electrostatic levitation studies of supercooled liquids and metastable solid phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustan, Gustav Errol

    A new laboratory has been developed at Iowa State University (ISU) to be used for the study of high temperature liquids and solids, with particular focus on the supercooling of liquids and their metastable solidification products. This new laboratory employs the electrostatic levitation (ESL) technique, in which a charged sample is suspended between a set of electrodes to achieve non-contact handling. Owing to the elimination of a crucible, high temperature processing of samples can be achieved with reduced levels of contamination and heterogeneous nucleation. Because of the reduction in heterogeneous nucleation, samples can be supercooled well below their equilibrium melting temperature, opening the door to a wide range of measurements on supercooled liquids. Measurements methods have been implemented for the characterization of thermophysical properties such as: volume/density, ratio of specific heat to total hemispherical emissivity, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, and magnetic susceptibility. For measurements of electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility, a new method has been developed at ISU based on the tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) technique. The TDO technique uses the negative differential resistance of a tunnel diode to drive an LC tank circuit into self-sustained oscillation at the resonant LC frequency. The LC tank is inductively coupled to the samples under study, and changes in the electrical resistivity or magnetic susceptibility of the sample are manifested as changes in the resonant frequency. By measuring the frequency shifts of the TDO, insights can be made into changes in the material's electrical and magnetic properties. This method has been validated by performing resistivity measurements on a sample of high purity Zr, and by performing measurements on the ferromagnetic transition in a low-carbon steel ball bearing. In addition to the development of the laboratory and its supporting instrumentation, an effort has

  19. Detection and Analysis of High Ice Concentration Events and Supercooled Drizzle from IAGOS Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Martin; Baumgardner, Darrel; Lloyd, Gary; Beswick, Karl; Freer, Matt; Durant, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Hazardous encounters with high ice concentrations that lead to temperature and airspeed sensor measurement errors, as well as engine rollback and flameout, continue to pose serious problems for flight operations of commercial air carriers. Supercooled liquid droplets (SLD) are an additional hazard, especially for smaller commuter aircraft that do not have sufficient power to fly out of heavy icing conditions or heat to remove the ice. New regulations issued by the United States and European regulatory agencies are being implemented that will require aircraft below a certain weight class to carry sensors that will detect and warn of these types of icing conditions. Commercial aircraft do not currently carry standard sensors to detect the presence of ice crystals in high concentrations because they are typical found in sizes that are below the detection range of aircraft weather radar. Likewise, the sensors that are currently used to detect supercooled water do not respond well to drizzle-sized drops. Hence, there is a need for a sensor that can fill this measurement void. In addition, the forecast models that are used to predict regions of icing rely on pilot observations as the only means to validate the model products and currently there are no forecasts for the prevalence of high altitude ice crystals. Backscatter Cloud Probes (BCP) have been flying since 2011 under the IAGOS project on six Airbus commercial airliners operated by Lufthansa, Air France, China Air, Iberia and Cathay Pacific, and measure cloud droplets, ice crystals and aerosol particles larger than 5 μm. The BCP can detect these particles and measures an optical equivalent diameter (OED) but is not able to distinguish the type of particle, i.e. whether they are droplets, ice crystals, dust or ash. However, some qualification can be done based on measured temperature to discriminate between liquid water and ice. The next generation BCP (BCPD, Backscatter Cloud Probe with polarization detection) is

  20. Sequential multi-drop coating method for large crystallized α-(NH2)2CHPbI3 and mixed-organic-cation perovskite films for highly efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhong; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Huiyin; Shi, Jiangjian; Zhu, Lifeng; Wu, Huijue; Li, Dongmei; Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo

    2017-08-01

    A simplified multi-drop coating method that improves the grain size and film quality is introduced to construct and stabilize a pure α-phase formamidinium (FA) lead iodide ((NH2)2CHPbI3, FAPbI3) perovskite layer. The developed method is then extended to fabricate an FA and methylammonium (MA) (FA/MA) mixed cation perovskite film under ambient conditions. The acquired FAPbI3 film contains micron-sized large grains with preferred [111] orientation, which dramatically reduced the grain boundary area and the associated charge recombination to provide high short-circuit current densities and power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of up to 23.86 mA cm-2 and 17.66%, respectively. The open-circuit voltage of the device and the efficiency are further improved after extending this method to the FA/MA mixed perovskite film. Finally, the highest PCE reached 19.3%.

  1. Predictive Model of Supercooled Water Droplet Pinning/Repulsion Impacting a Superhydrophobic Surface: The Role of the Gas-Liquid Interface Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Morteza; Tembely, Moussa; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2017-02-28

    Dynamical analysis of an impacting liquid drop on superhydrophobic surfaces is mostly carried out by evaluating the droplet contact time and maximum spreading diameter. In this study, we present a general transient model of the droplet spreading diameter developed from the previously defined mass-spring model for bouncing drops. The effect of viscosity was also considered in the model by definition of a dash-pot term extracted from experiments on various viscous liquid droplets on a superhydrophobic surface. Furthermore, the resultant shear force of the stagnation air flow was also considered with the help of the classical Homann flow approach. It was clearly shown that the proposed model predicts the maximum spreading diameter and droplet contact time very well. On the other hand, where stagnation air flow is present in contradiction to the theoretical model, the droplet contact time was reduced as a function of both droplet Weber numbers and incoming air velocities. Indeed, the reduction in the droplet contact time (e.g., 35% at a droplet Weber number of up to 140) was justified by the presence of a formed thin air layer underneath the impacting drop on the superhydrophobic surface (i.e., full slip condition). Finally, the droplet wetting model was also further developed to account for low temperature through the incorporation of classical nucleation theory. Homogeneous ice nucleation was integrated into the model through the concept of the reduction of the supercooled water drop surface tension as a function of the gas-liquid interface temperature, which was directly correlated with the Nusselt number of incoming air flow. It was shown that the experimental results was qualitatively predicted by the proposed model under all supercooling conditions (i.e., from -10 to -30 °C).

  2. Design and Analysis of Throttle Orifice Applying to Small Space with Large Pressure Drop%适用于大压降小间距管道的节流件设计及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李妍; 陆道纲; 曾小康

    2013-01-01

    节流件广泛应用于核电站各类管道系统中,对于大压降和短距离的管道系统,节流孔板设置不合理将导致管道振动程度加剧并伴随节流件的孔径、厚度、偏心度和倒角等关键结构参数对节流效果的敏感性进行分析和计算,在此基础上,提出适用于大压降小间距管道的节流件为多级偏心节流孔板.计算表明:多级偏心节流孔板可有效抑制汽蚀和闪蒸的发生,节流效果较好,适用于大压降小间距管道节流.%Throttle orifices are widely used in various pipe systems of nuclear power plants.Improper placement of orifices would aggravate the vibration of the pipe with strong noise,damaging the structure of the pipe and the completeness of the system.In this paper,effects of orifice diameter,thickness,eccentric distance and chamfering on the throttling are analyzed applying CFD software.Based on that,we propose the throttle orifices which apply to small space with large pressure drop are multiple eccentric orifices.The results show that the multiple eccentric orifices can effectively restrain the cavitation and flash distillation,while generating a large pressure drop.

  3. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  4. Factors contributing to deep supercooling capability and cold survival in dwarf bamboo (Sasa senanensis leaf blades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya eIshikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wintering Sasa senanensis, dwarf bamboo, has been known to employ deep supercooling as the mechanism of cold hardiness in its most of the tissues from leaves to rhizomes. The unique cold hardiness mechanism of this plant was further characterized using current year leaf blades. Cold hardiness levels increased from August (LT20: –11 °C to December (LT20: –20 °C, which coincided with the initiation temperature of low temperature exotherms (LTE detected in differential thermal analyses. When leaf blades were stored at –5 °C for 1-14 days, there was no nucleation of the supercooled tissue units compartmentalized by the longitudinal and transverse veins either in summer or winter. However, only summer leaves suffered significant injury after prolonged supercooling of the tissue units. This may be a novel type of low temperature-induced injury in supercooled state at subfreezing temperatures. When winter leaf blades were maintained at the threshold temperature (-20 °C, a longer storage period (1-7 days increased lethal freezing of the supercooled tissue units. Within a wintering shoot, the second or third leaf blade from the top was most cold hardy and leaf blades at lower positions tended to suffer more injury due to lethal freezing of the supercooled units, which was not correlated with the leaf water content. LTE were shifted to higher temperatures (2-5 °C after a lethal freeze-thaw cycle. The results demonstrate that the tissue unit compartmentalized with longitudinal and transverse veins serves as the unit of supercooling and temperature- and time-dependent freezing of the units is lethal both in laboratory freeze tests and in the field. To establish such supercooling in the unit, structural ice barriers such as development of sclerenchyma and biochemical mechanisms to increase the stability of supercooling are considered important. We discussed these mechanisms in regard to ecological and physiological significance in winter survival.

  5. Dynamic Stability of Equilibrium Capillary Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William M.; Kim, Inwon C.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a model for contact angle motion of quasi-static capillary drops resting on a horizontal plane. We prove global in time existence and long time behavior (convergence to equilibrium) in a class of star-shaped initial data for which we show that topological changes of drops can be ruled out for all times. Our result applies to any drop which is initially star-shaped with respect to a small ball inside the drop, given that the volume of the drop is sufficiently large. For the analysis, we combine geometric arguments based on the moving-plane type method with energy dissipation methods based on the formal gradient flow structure of the problem.

  6. Effects of Artificial Supercooling Followed by Slow Freezing on the Microstructure and Qualities of Pork Loin

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yiseul; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of artificial supercooling followed by still air freezing (SSF) on the qualities of pork loin. The qualities of pork frozen by SSF were compared with the fresh control (CT, stored at 4℃ for 24 h), slow freezing (SAF, still air freezing) and rapid freezing (EIF, ethanol immersion freezing) treatments. Compared with no supercooling phenomena of SAF and EIF, the extent of supercooling obtained by SSF treatment was 1.4℃. Despite that SSF was conducted with the ...

  7. Mechanism of supercooling in flower bud of Camellia oleifea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏维埃; 潘良文

    1995-01-01

    It is the first time for MRI to be used in the research of flower buds supercooling. Directobservation on freezing course of living flower buds of Camellia yuhsienensis by MRI and tissue browning test showed that freezing order of the flower organs is bud axis, scale, petal, pistil and stamen. It is coincident with the direction of ice development from bud axes to flower organs upwards. The corresponding results from MRI and freezing-fixation showed that the water translocation from flower organs to axes and scales is carried on in the course of bud freezing. ’H spectral measurement of NMR was used to follow the decrease of unfrozen water in the buds during the cooling.

  8. A molecular dynamics study on surface properties of supercooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yongjun; WEI Bingbo

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the surface properties of water in a temperature range from 228 to 293 K by using the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and four-site TIP4P potentials. The calculated surface tension increases with the decrease of temperature, and moreover the slopes of the surface tension-temperature curves show a weak rise below 273 K, whereas no obvious anomalies appear near 228 K, which accords with the previous experiments. Compared with the measured values, the SPC/E potential shows a good agreement, and the TIP4P potential scription of the surface structure of supercooled water for the SPC/E. When simulating the orientational distributions of water molecules near the surface, the SPC/E potential produces higher ordering and larger surface potentials than the TIP4P potential.

  9. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Large Packaging design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.955(e) of this subpart. (b... § 178.960(d). (d) Test method. (1) Samples of all Large Packaging design types must be dropped onto a... be restored to the upright position for observation. (2) Large Packaging design types with a capacity...

  10. Dynamical Instability Causes the Demise of a Supercooled Tetrahedral Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Arvind Kumar; Pingua, Nandlal; Goyal, Aashish; Apte, Pankaj A.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the relaxation mechanism of a supercooled tetrahedral liquid at its limit of stability using isothermal isobaric ( NPT) Monte Carlo simulations. In similarity with systems which are far from equilibrium but near the onset of jamming (O'Hern et al. in Phys Rev Lett 93:165702, 2004), we find that the relaxation is characterized by two time-scales: the decay of long-wavelength (slow) fluctuations of potential energy is controlled by the slope [partial (G/N)/partial φ ] of the Gibbs free energy ( G) at a unique value of per particle potential energy φ = φ _{{\\tiny mid}}. The short-wavelength (fast) fluctuations are controlled by the bath temperature T. The relaxation of the supercooled liquid is initiated with a dynamical crossover after which the potential energy fluctuations are biased towards values progressively lesser than φ _{{\\tiny mid}}. The dynamical crossover leads to the change of time-scale, i.e., the decay of long-wavelength potential energy fluctuations (intermediate stage of relaxation). Because of the condition [partial ^2 (G/N)/partial φ ^2 = 0] at φ = φ _{{\\tiny mid}}, the slope [partial (G/N)/partial φ ] has a unique value and governs the intermediate stage of relaxation, which ends just after the crossover. In the subsequent stage, there is a relatively rapid crystallization due to lack of long-wavelength fluctuations and the instability at φ _{{\\tiny mid}}, i.e., the condition that G decreases as configurations with potential energies lower than φ _{{\\tiny mid}} are accessed. The dynamical crossover point and the associated change in the time-scale of fluctuations is found to be consistent with the previous studies.

  11. Total Site Heat Integration Considering Pressure Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew Hong Chew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop is an important consideration in Total Site Heat Integration (TSHI. This is due to the typically large distances between the different plants and the flow across plant elevations and equipment, including heat exchangers. Failure to consider pressure drop during utility targeting and heat exchanger network (HEN synthesis may, at best, lead to optimistic energy targets, and at worst, an inoperable system if the pumps or compressors cannot overcome the actual pressure drop. Most studies have addressed the pressure drop factor in terms of pumping cost, forbidden matches or allowable pressure drop constraints in the optimisation of HEN. This study looks at the implication of pressure drop in the context of a Total Site. The graphical Pinch-based TSHI methodology is extended to consider the pressure drop factor during the minimum energy requirement (MER targeting stage. The improved methodology provides a more realistic estimation of the MER targets and valuable insights for the implementation of the TSHI design. In the case study, when pressure drop in the steam distribution networks is considered, the heating and cooling duties increase by 14.5% and 4.5%.

  12. Temperature measurement of supercooled droplet in icing phenomenon by means of dual-luminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M.; Morita, K.; Mamori, H.; Fukushima, N.; Yamamoto, M.

    2017-08-01

    The collision of a supercooled water droplet with a surface result an object creates ice accretion on the surface. The icing problem in any cold environments leads to severe damages on aircrafts, and a lot of studies on prevention and prediction techniques for icing have been conducted so far. Therefore, it is very important to know the detail of freezing mechanism of supercooled water droplets to improve the anti-and de-icing devices and icing simulation codes. The icing mechanism of a single supercooled water droplet impacting on an object surface would give us great insights for the purpose. In the present study, we develop a dual-luminescent imaging technique to measure the time-resolved temperature of a supercooled water droplet impacting on the surface under different temperature conditions. We apply this technique to measure the exact temperature of a water droplet, and to discuss the detail of the freezing process.

  13. A phase space approach to supercooled liquids and a universal collapse of their viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Weingartner, Nicholas B; Nogueira, Flavio S; Kelton, K F; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-01-01

    A broad fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenology of supercooled liquids has remained elusive, despite decades of intense exploration. When supercooled beneath its characteristic melting temperature, a liquid sees a sharp rise in its viscosity over a narrow temperature range, eventually becoming frozen on laboratory timescales. Explaining this immense increase in viscosity is one of the principle goals of condensed matter physicists. To that end, numerous theoretical frameworks have been proposed which explain and reproduce the temperature dependence of the viscosity of supercooled liquids. Each of these frameworks appears only applicable to specific classes of glassformers and each possess a number of variable parameters. Here we describe a classical framework for explaining the dynamical behavior of supercooled liquids based on statistical mechanical considerations, and possessing only a single variable parameter. This parameter varies weakly from liquid to liquid. Furthermore...

  14. Physical Chemistry of the Freezing Process of Atmospheric Aqueous Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J

    2017-04-27

    In supercooled aqueous solutions, ice nucleation is the initial stage of the freezing process. In this paper, we present experimental results that indicate that during the freezing of aqueous solutions, freeze-induced phase separation (FIPS) into pure ice and a freeze-concentrated solution (FCS) takes place. Our observations involve the use of an optical cryo-microscope (OC-M) to record images and movies. The results visually indicate for the first time that there are two freezing processes for (NH4)3H(SO4)2/H2O solutions: (i) contact freezing, as is the case for pure water drops, and (ii) the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process, which is the growth of frozen drops (ice) at the expense of liquid ones. We also present OC-M images of frozen micrometer-scaled H2SO4/H2O drops that support our previous finding that freezing of these solutions generates mixed-phase particles, namely an ice core coated with a FCS. These results are relevant for atmospheric as well as for pharmaceutical sciences.

  15. Effect of wettability on sessile drop freezing: when superhydrophobicity stimulates an extreme freezing delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Korolev, Vadim V; Pashinin, Andrei S

    2014-02-18

    An increasing number of studies directed at supercooling water droplets on surfaces with different wettabilities have appeared in recent years. This activity has been stimulated by the recognition that water supercooling phenomena can be effectively used to develop methods for protecting outdoor equipment and infrastructure elements against icing and snow accretion. In this article, we discuss the nucleation kinetics of supercooled sessile water droplets on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces under isothermal conditions at temperatures of -8, -10, and -15 °C and a saturated water vapor atmosphere. The statistics of nucleation events for the ensembles of freezing sessile droplets is completed by the detailed analysis of the contact angle temperature dependence and freezing of individual droplets in a saturated vapor atmosphere. We have demonstrated that the most essential freezing delay is characteristic of the superhydrophobic coating on aluminum, with the texture resistant to contact with ice and water. This delay can reach many hours at T = -8 °C and a few minutes at -23 °C. The observed behavior is analyzed on the basis of different nucleation mechanisms. The dissimilarity in the total nucleation rate, detected for two superhydrophobic substrates having the same apparent contact angle of the water drop but different resistivities of surface texture to the contact with water/ice, is associated with the contribution of heterogeneous nucleation on external centers located at the water droplet/air interface.

  16. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    ;rbæk's case study presented at PEPM '95, most polyvariant specializers for procedural programs operate on recursive equations. To this end, in a pre-processing phase, they lambda-lift source programs into recursive equations, As a result, residual programs are also expressed as recursive equations, often......Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... with dozens of parameters, which most compilers do not handle efficiently. Lambda-dropping in a post-processing phase restores their block structure and lexical scope thereby significantly reducing both the compile time and the run time of residual programs....

  17. Hard rhenium–boron–cobalt amorphous alloys with a wide supercooled liquid region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianfeng, E-mail: jfwang316@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhu, Shijie; Wang, Liguo; Guan, Shaokang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Li, Ran; Zhang, Tao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Novel Re–B–Co amorphous alloys with compositions of Re{sub 65−x}B{sub 35}Co{sub x} (at%, x=25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50) were fabricated by single-roller melt spinning. These alloys were found to exhibit a clear glass transition phenomenon. The width of supercooled liquid region (ΔT{sub x}) is in the range of 52–71 K. Such a large ΔT{sub x} allows us to produce amorphous alloy bulks by thermoplastic forming. The Vickers hardness is up to 19.10 GPa for the Re{sub 40}B{sub 35}Co{sub 25} alloy, which is close to that reported for some hard covalent crystals. Thus, the present alloys with a combination of large ΔT{sub x} and high hardness are expected to be used as a new type of structural materials. Furthermore, the relationships of hardness with glass transition temperature and Young's modulus were also discussed.

  18. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  19. Oscillating and star-shaped drops levitated by an airflow

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Peters, Ivo R; Brunet, Philippe; van der Meer, Devaraj; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous oscillations of drops levitated above an air cushion, eventually inducing a breaking of axisymmetry and the appearance of `star drops'. This is strongly reminiscent of the Leidenfrost stars that are observed for drops floating above a hot substrate. The key advantage of this work is that we inject the airflow at a constant rate below the drop, thus eliminating thermal effects and allowing for a better control of the flow rate. We perform experiments with drops of different viscosities and observe stable states, oscillations and chimney instabilities. We find that for a given drop size the instability appears above a critical flow rate, where the latter is largest for small drops. All these observations are reproduced by numerical simulations, where we treat the drop using potential flow and the gas as a viscous lubrication layer. Qualitatively, the onset of instability agrees with the experimental results, although the typical flow rates are too large by a factor 10. Our results...

  20. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Brandenbourger, Martin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a non-volatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can experience a Leidenfrost effect even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014)] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrea...

  1. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  2. Sessile drops in microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces with a liquid are governing several phenomena. For instance, these interfaces are giving the shape of sessile droplets and rule the spread of liquids on surfaces. Here we analyze the shape of sessile axisymmetric drops and how it is depending on the gravity, obtaining results in agreement with experimental observations under conditions of microgravity.

  3. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-07-18

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  4. Simulation study of water and sugar dynamics in supercooled mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Valeria; Cagin, Tahir; Goddard, William A.

    2003-03-01

    Water dynamics in concentrated carbohydrate solutions is of utmost importance in food and pharmaceutical technology, where low water mobility is desirable to slow down chemical degradation and preserve biomolecules. We have studied the microscopic mechanism of water diffusion in binary and polydisperse malto-oligosaccharides and water mixtures by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The computations were performed with a coarse grain model (M3B), derived from atomistic simulations of water and malto-oligosaccharides. The use of the M3B model permits simulations of the order of 0.1 microsecond, thus allowing us to explore water dynamics from the liquid to the deep supercooled regime. The dynamics of water confined in the sugar matrix is slowed down with respect to bulk water. We found that at low moisture content and low temperature, ranslational diffusion of water and glucose rotation proceed through a hopping-diffusion mechanism. Moreover, we found water mobility to be heterogeneous: there is a broad distribution of time scales for different water molecules in the mixtures. We discuss whether there is a relationship between the heterogeneous structure of these mixtures in the sub-nanometer scale and the heterogeneous dynamics of water molecules.

  5. Thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamics in supercooled ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrjanowicz, K; Wojnarowska, Z; Paluch, M; Pionteck, J

    2011-04-28

    It was shown recently that ibuprofen revealed a strong tendency to form hydrogen bonded aggregates such as dimers and trimers of either cyclic or linear geometry, which somehow seems to control molecular mobility of that drug [Brás et al. J. Phys. Chem. B2008, 112 (35), 11 087-11 099]. For such hydrogen-bonded liquids, superpositioning of dynamics under various temperature T, pressure P, and volume V conditions, when plotted versus the scaling function of T(-1)V(-γ) (where γ is a material constant), may not always be satisfying. In the present work, we have tested the validity of this scaling for supercooled ibuprofen. In order to do that, pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) measurements combined with isobaric and isothermal dielectric relaxation studies (pressure up to 310 MPa) were carried out. The scaling properties of the examined drug were derived from the fitting of the τ(α)(T,V) dependences to the modified Avramov equation and by analyzing in double logarithmic scale the T(g)(V(g)) dependences, where the glass transition temperature T(g) and volume V(g) were defined for various relaxation times. In view of the obtained results, we conjecture that for ibuprofen the thermodynamic scaling idea works but not perfectly. The slight departure from the scaling behavior is discussed in the context of the hydrogen bonding abilities of the examined system and compared with the results reported for other strongly associated liquids.

  6. Supercooling and cold energy storage characteristics of nano-media in ball-packed porous structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qunzhi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented experiments aimed to study the supercooling and cold-energy storage characteristics of nanofluids and water-based nano-media in ball-packed porous structures (BPS. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs measuring 20nm and 80nm were used as additives and sodium dodecyl benzene sulphonate (SDBS was used as anionic surfactant. The experiments used different concentrations of nanofluid, distilled with BPS of different spherical diameter and different concentrations of nano-media, and were conducted 20 times. Experimental results of supercooling were analysed by statistical methods. Results show that the average and peak supercooling degrees of nanofluids and nano-media in BPS are lower than those of distilled water. For the distilled water in BPS, the supercooling degree decreases on the whole with the decrease of the ball diameter. With the same spherical diameter (8mm of BPS, the supercooling degree of TiO2 NPs measuring 20nm is lower than the supercooling degree of distilled water in BPS. Step-cooling experiments of different concentrations of nanofluids and nano-media in BPS were also conducted. Results showed that phase transition time is reduced because of the presence of TiO2 NPs. The BPS substrate and the NPs enhance the heat transfer. Distilled water with a porous solid base and nanoparticles means the amount of cold-energy storage increases and the supercooling degree and the total time are greatly reduced. The phase transition time of distilled water is about 3.5 times that of nano-media in BPS.

  7. A quantitative test of infrared optical constants for supercooled sulphuric and nitric acid droplet aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR extinction spectra of supercooled H2SO4/H2O and HNO3/H2O solution droplets were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for a range of aerosol compositions and at temperatures extending down to 192 K. The measured spectra were quantitatively analysed in terms of aerosol composition and mass concentration by using Mie theory in combination with published refractive index data as input parameters. Simultaneously, total sulphuric acid and nitric acid mass concentrations from filter analysis and total water concentrations measured with the Lyman-a hygrometer of Forschungszentrum Jülich were used to calculate the aerosol composition at thermodynamic equilibrium inside the aerosol chamber. By comparing these measured aerosol parameters with those retrieved from the analysis of the FTIR spectra, the accuracy of the literature data sets of refractive indices could be assessed. In summary, four data sets were tested in the H2SO4/H2O system as well as two data sets in the HNO3/H2O system, partly revealing significant discrepancies in the retrieved aerosol properties. Potential explanations for these differences are discussed in this paper.

  8. Inverse Leidenfrost Effect: Levitating Drops on Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adda-Bedia, M; Kumar, S; Lechenault, F; Moulinet, S; Schillaci, M; Vella, D

    2016-05-03

    We explore the interaction between a liquid drop (initially at room temperature) and a bath of liquid nitrogen. In this scenario, heat transfer occurs through film-boiling: a nitrogen vapor layer develops that may cause the drop to levitate at the bath surface. We report the phenomenology of this inverse Leidenfrost effect, investigating the effect of the drop size and density by using an aqueous solution of a tungsten salt to vary the drop density. We find that (depending on its size and density) a drop either levitates or instantaneously sinks into the bulk nitrogen. We begin by measuring the duration of the levitation as a function of the radius R and density ρd of the liquid drop. We find that the levitation time increases roughly linearly with drop radius but depends weakly on the drop density. However, for sufficiently large drops, R ≥ Rc(ρd), the drop sinks instantaneously; levitation does not occur. This sinking of a (relatively) hot droplet induces film-boiling, releasing a stream of vapor bubbles for a well-defined length of time. We study the duration of this immersed-drop bubbling finding similar scalings (but with different prefactors) to the levitating drop case. With these observations, we study the physical factors limiting the levitation and immersed-film-boiling times, proposing a simple model that explains the scalings observed for the duration of these phenomena, as well as the boundary of (R,ρd) parameter space that separates them.

  9. Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid-drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, W.; van der Veen, Roeland; Tran, Tuan; Keij, D.L.; Winkels, K.G.; Peters, I.R.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface, an air bubble can be entrapped. Here, we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: for large drop impact velocity and large droplets, the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for

  10. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J; Stone, H A; Eggers, Jens; Lister, John R.; Stone, Howard A.

    1999-01-01

    When two drops of radius $R$ touch, surface tension drives an initially singular motion which joins them into a bigger drop with smaller surface area. This motion is always viscously dominated at early times. We focus on the early-time behavior of the radius $\\rmn$ of the small bridge between the two drops. The flow is driven by a highly curved meniscus of length $2\\pi \\rmn$ and width $\\Delta\\ll\\rmn$ around the bridge, from which we conclude that the leading-order problem is asymptotically equivalent to its two-dimensional counterpart. An exact two-dimensional solution for the case of inviscid surroundings [Hopper, J. Fluid Mech. ${\\bf 213}$, 349 (1990)] shows that R)]$; and thus the same is true in three dimensions. The case of coalescence with an external viscous fluid is also studied in detail both analytically and numerically. A significantly different structure is found in which the outer fluid forms a toroidal bubble of radius $\\Delta \\propto \\rmn^{3/2}$ at the meniscus and $\\rmn \\sim (t\\gamma/4\\pi\\eta)...

  11. A phase space approach to supercooled liquids and a universal collapse of their viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Bryan Weingartner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A broad fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenology of supercooled liquids has remained elusive, despite decades of intense exploration. When supercooled beneath its characteristic melting temperature, a liquid sees a sharp rise in its viscosity over a narrow temperature range, eventually becoming frozen on laboratory timescales. Explaining this immense increase in viscosity is one of the principle goals of condensed matter physicists. To that end, numerous theoretical frameworks have been proposed which explain and reproduce the temperature dependence of the viscosity of supercooled liquids. Each of these frameworks appears only applicable to specific classes of glassformers and each possess a number of variable parameters. Here we describe a classical framework for explaining the dynamical behavior of supercooled liquids based on statistical mechanical considerations, and possessing only a single variable parameter. This parameter varies weakly from liquid to liquid. Furthermore, as predicted by this new classical theory and its earlier quantum counterpart, we find with the aid of a small dimensionless constant that varies in size from sim 0.05-0.12 , a universal (16 decade collapse of the viscosity data as a function of temperature. The collapse appears in all known types of glass forming supercooled liquids (silicates, metallic alloys, organic systems, chalcogenide, sugars, and water.

  12. Radiometric Observations of Supercooled Liquid Water within a Split Front over the Sierra Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggli, Mark F.; Reynolds, David W.

    1985-11-01

    A storm bearing close structural resemblance to a katafront was observed from the ground with microwave radiometry and a vertically pointing Ka-band radar over the Sierra Nevada of California. The onset and duration of supercooled liquid water was determined and matched to a split front model used to describe the synoptic features of a katafront. Results indicate that prior to the passage of the upper front no supercooled liquid water was observed. This portion of the storm provided the deepest cloud and coldest cloud tops. Supercooled liquid water was most prevalent after the upper front passage, and persisted until the suspected surface front passage. The duration of measured supercooled water was 16 hours.This information broadens the knowledge regarding the presence of supercooled liquid water, and thus possible seeding potential, within winter storms so that treatment can be confined to the period of storms amenable to cloud seeding. Future studies may well confirm the ease with which these periods can be predicted on an operational basis in the Sierra Nevada.

  13. Liquid Supercoolability and Synthesis Kinetics of Quinary Refractory High-entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. L.; Hu, L.; Yang, S. J.; Wang, A.; Wang, L.; Wei, B.

    2016-11-01

    The high-entropy configuration of equiatomic multicomponent alloys opens an effective access to the development of advanced materials. Here we report the synthesis of a new quinary refractory WMoTaNbZr high-entropy alloy under electrostatic levitation condition. It showed a high liquidus temperature of 2686 K and achieved a maximum supercooling of 640 K (0.24 TL) at molten state. The containerless measurements revealed a linear increasing tendency for both its liquid state density and the specific heat to emissivity ratio versus alloy supercooling. A high-entropy body-centered cubic (HEB) phase dominated its phase constitution despite the formation of a negligible amount of solid solution (Zr) phase. The dendritic growth of HEB phase always governed the crystallization process, attained a fastest growth velocity of 13.5 m/s and displayed a power function relation to alloy supercooling. The high speed videographic research of recalescence phenomenon indicated Johnson-Mehl-Avrami type transition kinetics for its rapid solidification process. As supercooling increases, the microstructures of primary HEB phase were refined conspicuously and exhibited an obvious solute trapping effect of the segregative Zr component. Meanwhile, the Vickers hardness of HEB phase displayed the rising tendency with supercooling.

  14. A phase space approach to supercooled liquids and a universal collapse of their viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartner, Nicholas; Nogueira, Flavio; Pueblo, Chris; Kelton, Kenneth; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-11-01

    A broad fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenology of supercooled liquids has remained elusive, despite decades of intense exploration. When supercooled beneath its characteristic melting temperature, a liquid sees a sharp rise in its viscosity over a narrow temperature range, eventually becoming frozen on laboratory timescales. Explaining this immense increase in viscosity is one of the principle goals of condensed matter physicists. To that end, numerous theoretical frameworks have been proposed which explain and reproduce the temperature dependence of the viscosity of supercooled liquids. Each of these frameworks appears only applicable to specific classes of glassformers and each possess a number of variable parameters. Here we describe a classical framework for explaining the dynamical behavior of supercooled liquids based on statistical mechanical considerations, and possessing only a single variable parameter. This parameter varies weakly from liquid to liquid. Furthermore, as predicted by this new classical theory and its earlier quantum counterpart, we find with the aid of a small dimensionless constant that varies in size from ˜ 0.05-0.12, a universal (16 decade) collapse of the viscosity data as a function of temperature. The collapse appears in all known types of glass forming supercooled liquids (silicates, metallic alloys, organic systems, chalcogenide, sugars, and water).

  15. Asymmetry of Drop Impacts on Patterned Hydrophobic Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Geoff; Robson, Simon; Broom, Matheu

    2016-11-01

    When a water drop falls on to a flat solid surface, asymmetries in the geometry of the spreading drop can be specifically determined by patterned surface microstructures. For hydrophobic (or superhydrophobic) micropillar arrays, the most important asymmetric mechanisms appear to be the surface energy of contact lines, and pathways for gas escaping from penetrated microstructure. In this presentation, static wetting and drop impact experiments will be discussed in relation to drop asymmetries. In addition to micropillar arrays, natural superhydrophobic surfaces (leaves) have been studied, and may suggest possibilities for controlling drop impacts in applications. Some of the clearest large scale drop asymmetries on leaves, which are similar to those associated with low drop impact contact times on synthetic surfaces, appear to be caused by features which generate high contact angle hysteresis, and are therefore indicative of poor superhydrophocity.

  16. Hydrodynamics of evaporating sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Several dynamical stages of the Marangoni convection of an evaporating sessile drop are obtained. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop and the diffusion of vapor in air. The stages are characterized by different number of vortices in the drop and the spatial location of vortices. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a non-monotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size, which is calculated similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. The number of vortices quickly decreases with time, resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortex structure finally evolves into the single convection vortex in the drop, existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  17. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  18. Thermal conductivity enhancement of sodium acetate trihydrate by adding graphite powder and the effect on stability of supercooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Berg; Dannemand, Mark; Kong, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate and graphite powder mixtures have been evaluated to investigate the influence of the graphite powder on the stability of supercooling. A sodium acetate and water mixture mixed with graphite powder was successfully supercooled at ambient indoor temperatures for five month...

  19. An investigation on supercooling directional solidification process of Cu-Ni single phase alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Supercooling directional solidification (SDS) is put forward by combination of melt supercooling and conventional solidification by application of supercooling inheritance. On the self-designed SDS equipment, SDS of Cu-Ni alloy was achieved successfully. The results are as follows: (ⅰ) The primary arm spacing is about 30 m m, the growth of secondary arms are strongly suppressed. The primary arm spacing is nearly the same as LMC method (GL=25 K/mm, V=500 m m/s), the primary stems are straight, fine and completed, with an inclination angle of about 5.8o. (ⅱ) A semi-quantitative T-T model is brought forward to describe the dendrite growth rate V vs. undercooling D T. The prediction of T-T model agrees well with experimental results. The formation of fine equiaxed dendrites, transition region and dendrite region can be explained successfully by D T-V-x relation of T-T model.

  20. Development of seasonal heat storage based on stable supercooling of a sodium acetate water mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua; Andersen, Elsa

    2012-01-01

    A number of heat storage modules for seasonal heat storages based on stable supercooling of a sodium acetate water mixture have been tested by means of experiments in a heat storage test facility. The modules had different volumes and designs. Further, different methods were used to transfer heat....... • The reliability of the supercooling was elucidated for the heat storage modules for different operation conditions. • The reliability of a cooling method used to start solidification of the supercooled sodium acetate water mixture was elucidated. The method is making use of boiling CO2 in a small tank in good...... to and from the sodium acetate water mixture in the modules. By means of the experiments: • The heat exchange capacity rates to and from the sodium acetate water mixture in the heat storage modules were determined for different volume flow rates. • The heat content of the heat storage modules were determined...

  1. Experimental investigations on cylindrical latent heat storage units with sodium acetate trihydrate composites utilizing supercooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg; Kong, Weiqiang;

    2016-01-01

    unit was tested with 116.3 kg SAT with 0.5% Xanthan rubber as a thickening agent and 4.4% graphite powder. The heat exchange capacity rate during charge was significantly lower for the unit with SAT and Xanthan rubber compared to the unit with SAT and extra water. This was due to less convection......Latent heat storage units utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) composites were tested in a laboratory. The stainless steel units were 1.5 m high cylinders with internal heat exchangers of tubes with fins. One unit was tested with 116 kg SAT with 6% extra water. Another...... in the thickened phase change material after melting. The heat content in the fully charged state and the heat released after solidification of the supercooled SAT mixtures at ambient temperature was higher for the unit with the thickened SAT mixture. The heat discharged after solidification of the supercooled SAT...

  2. Experimental investigations on heat content of supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate by a simple heat loss method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Weiqiang; Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2016-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate is a phase change material that can be used for long term heat storage in solar heating systems because of its relatively high heat of fusion, a melting temperature of 58 °C and its ability to supercool stable. In practical applications sodium acetate trihydrate tend...... to suffer from phase separation which is the phenomenon where anhydrous salt settles to the bottom over time. This happens especially in supercooled state. The heat released from the crystallization of supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate with phase separation will be lower than the heat released from...... sodium acetate trihydrate without phase separation. Possible ways of avoiding or reducing the problem of phase separation were investigated. A wide variety of composites of sodium acetate trihydrate with additives including extra water, thickening agents, solid and liquid polymers have been...

  3. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Leal, L. Gary; Thomas, D. A.; Crouch, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Free drops and bubbles are weakly nonlinear mechanical systems that are relatively simple to characterize experimentally in 1-G as well as in microgravity. The understanding of the details of their motion contributes to the fundamental study of nonlinear phenomena and to the measurement of the thermophysical properties of freely levitated melts. The goal of this Glovebox-based experimental investigation is the low-gravity assessment of the capabilities of a modular apparatus based on ultrasonic resonators and on the pseudo- extinction optical method. The required experimental task is the accurate measurements of the large-amplitude dynamics of free drops and bubbles in the absence of large biasing influences such as gravity and levitation fields. A single-axis levitator used for the positioning of drops in air, and an ultrasonic water-filled resonator for the trapping of air bubbles have been evaluated in low-gravity and in 1-G. The basic feasibility of drop positioning and shape oscillations measurements has been verified by using a laptop-interfaced automated data acquisition and the optical extinction technique. The major purpose of the investigation was to identify the salient technical issues associated with the development of a full-scale Microgravity experiment on single drop and bubble dynamics.

  4. Microwave Dielectric Heating of Drops in Microfluidic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Issadore, David; Brown, Keith A; Sandberg, Lori; Weitz, David; Westervelt, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique to locally and rapidly heat water drops in microfluidic devices with microwave dielectric heating. Water absorbs microwave power more efficiently than polymers, glass, and oils due to its permanent molecular dipole moment that has a large dielectric loss at GHz frequencies. The relevant heat capacity of the system is a single thermally isolated picoliter drop of water and this enables very fast thermal cycling. We demonstrate microwave dielectric heating in a microfluidic device that integrates a flow-focusing drop maker, drop splitters, and metal electrodes to locally deliver microwave power from an inexpensive, commercially available 3.0 GHz source and amplifier. The temperature of the drops is measured by observing the temperature dependent fluorescence intensity of cadmium selenide nanocrystals suspended in the water drops. We demonstrate characteristic heating times as short as 15 ms to steady-state temperatures as large as 30 degrees C above the base temperature of the microfluidi...

  5. Superheated drop neutron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Roy, B; Roy, S C; Das, Mala

    2000-01-01

    Superheated drops are known to detect neutrons through the nucleation caused by the recoil nuclei produced by the interactions of neutrons with the atoms constituting the superheated liquid molecule. A novel method of finding the neutron energy from the temperature dependence response of SDD has been developed. From the equivalence between the dependence of threshold energy for nucleation on temperature of SDD and the dependence of dE/dx of the recoil ions with the energy of the neutron, a new method of finding the neutron energy spectrum of a polychromatic as well as monochromatic neutron source has been developed.

  6. Interaction of two deformable viscous drops under external temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Berejnov, V V; Nir, A

    2001-01-01

    The axisymmetric deformation and motion of interacting droplets in an imposed temperature gradient is considered using boundary-integral techniques for slow viscous motion. Results showing temporal drop motion, deformations and separation are presented for equal-viscosity fluids. The focus is on cases when the drops are of equal radii or when the smaller drop trails behind the larger drop. For equal-size drops, our analysis shows that the motion of a leading drop is retarded while the motion of the trailing one is enchanced compared to the undeformable case. The distance between the centers of equal-sized deformable drops decreases with time. When a small drop follows a large one, two patterns of behavior may exist. For moderate or large initial separation the drops separate. However, if the initial separation is small there is a transient period in which the separation distance initially decreases and only afterwards the drops separate. This behavior stems from the multiple time scales that exist in the syst...

  7. Long term thermal energy storage with stable supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Schultz, Jørgen M.; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate makes it possible to store thermal energy partly loss free. This principle makes seasonal heat storage in compact systems possible. To keep high and stable energy content and cycling stability phase separation of the storage material must...... to 230 kJ/kg. TRNSYS simulations of a solar combi system including a storage with four heat storage modules of each 200 kg of sodium acetate trihydrate utilizing stable supercooling achieved a solar fraction of 80% for a low energy house in Danish climatic conditions....

  8. A drop jumps to weightlessness: a lecture demo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.; Saranin, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    The paper discusses the lecture demonstration of the phenomenon in which a drop lying on a solid unwettable substrate jumps when making the transition to weightlessness. An elementary theory of the phenomenon is given. A jump speed estimate is obtained for small and large drops. The natural vibrational frequency of a flying drop is determined. A full-scale model of Einstein’s elevator is described. Experimental and theoretical results are found to agree satisfactorily.

  9. Development of revolving drop surface tensiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, S; Sakai, K

    2012-01-01

    A revolving drop surface tensiometer, which measures the surface tension of a small amount of liquid, is proposed. A remarkable feature of this device is that while using the pendant drop method, it employs a centrifugal force to deform the liquid droplet. The centrifugal force induces a large distortion of the droplet, which enables an accurate measurement of the surface tension to be made. In our experimental setup, the centrifugal force can be increased so that the apparent acceleration becomes up to 100 times larger than that due to gravity, and the capability of this method to measure surface tensions was demonstrated with ethylene glycol.

  10. Cells as Drops and Drops as Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Eric R.

    2013-03-01

    How do the mechanical properties of tissues emerge from the interactions of individual cells? To shed some light on this fundamental biological question, we consider a model system of clusters of cohesive cells adherent to soft substrates. We quantify traction forces over a wide range of cluster sizes. The scaling of traction stresses with cluster size suggests the emergence of an apparent surface tension for large colonies. To explore the possible impact of cellular surface tension on physiology, we consider the behavior of liquid droplets on soft substrates. In this case, we find that the competition of surface tension and substrate elasticity can lead to rich phenomenology, mimicking certain aspects of the physiology of cells and tissues.

  11. Dynamics of hydrogen bonds in water and consequences for the unusual behaviour of supercooled water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    José Teixeira

    2008-10-01

    The dynamics of liquid water is evaluated by the coherent quasi-elastic scattering at two different momentum transfers, in order to discriminate hydrogen bond life-time from molecular dynamics. The results indicate a possible issue for the puzzle of the behaviour of supercooled water.

  12. Radiative consequences of low-temperature infrared refractive indices for supercooled water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Rowe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cloud radiative properties for climate modeling and remote sensing rely on accurate knowledge of the complex refractive index (CRI of water. Although conventional algorithms employ a temperature independent assumption (TIA, recent infrared measurements of supercooled water have demonstrated that the CRI becomes increasingly ice-like at lower temperatures. Here, we assess biases that result from ignoring this temperature dependence. We show that TIA-based cloud retrievals introduce spurious ice into pure, supercooled clouds, or underestimate cloud thickness and droplet size. TIA-based downwelling radiative fluxes are lower than those for the temperature-dependent CRI by as much as 1.7 W m−2 (in cold regions, while top-of-atmosphere fluxes are higher by as much as 3.4 W m−2 (in warm regions. Proper accounting of the temperature dependence of the CRI, therefore, leads to significantly greater local greenhouse warming due to supercooled clouds than previously predicted. The current experimental uncertainty in the CRI at low temperatures must be reduced to properly account for supercooled clouds in both climate models and cloud property retrievals.

  13. Radiative consequences of low-temperature infrared refractive indices for supercooled water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Rowe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cloud radiative properties for climate modeling and remote sensing rely on accurate knowledge of the complex refractive index (CRI of water. Although conventional algorithms employ a temperature-independent assumption (TIA, recent infrared measurements of supercooled water have demonstrated that the CRI becomes increasingly ice-like at lower temperatures. Here, we assess biases that result from ignoring this temperature dependence. We show that TIA-based cloud retrievals introduce spurious ice into pure, supercooled clouds, or underestimate cloud optical thickness and droplet size. TIA-based downwelling radiative fluxes are lower than those for the temperature-dependent CRI by as much as 1.7 W m−2 (in cold regions, while top-of-atmosphere fluxes are higher by as much as 3.4 W m−2 (in warm regions. Proper accounting of the temperature dependence of the CRI, therefore, leads to significantly greater local greenhouse warming due to supercooled clouds than previously predicted. The current experimental uncertainty in the CRI at low temperatures must be reduced to account for supercooled clouds properly in both climate models and cloud-property retrievals.

  14. Crystallization in diblock copolymer thin films at different degrees of supercooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darko, C.; Botiz, I.; Reiter, G.

    2009-01-01

    The crystalline structures in thin films of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) diblock copolymers were studied in dependence on the degree of supercooling. Atomic force microscopy showed that the crystalline domains (lamellae) consist of grains, which are macroscopic at low...

  15. Hydrophobic Surfaces: Topography Effects on Wetting by Supercooled Water and Freezing Delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydari, Golrokh; Thormann, Esben; Järn, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobicity, and in particular superhydrophobicity, has been extensively considered to promote ice-phobicity. Dynamic contact angle measurements above 0 °C have been widely used to evaluate the water repellency. However, it is the wetting properties of supercooled water at subzero temperatures...

  16. Supercooling Suppression of Microencapsulated n-Alkanes by Introducing an Organic Gelator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Kong-ying; WANG Shuang; QI Heng-zhi; LI Hui; ZHAO Yun-hui; YUAN Xiao-yan

    2012-01-01

    Supercooling of the microencapsulated phase change materials(PCMs) during cooling usually happens.This phenomenon can interfere with heat transfer and is necessary to further overcome.In this study,melamine-formaldehyde microcapsules containing two n-alkane PCMs,namely,n-dodecane(C12) or n-tetradecane(C14)were prepared by in situ polymerization.A small amount of n-hexatriacontane(C36) was introduced as an organic gelator into the core of microcapsules to cope with the supercooling problem.Analyses demonstrate that supcrcooling of the microencapsulated C12 or C14 was significantly suppressed by adding 3%(mass fraction) C36,without changing the spherical morphology and dispersibility.It could be also found that the enthalpy of microencapsulated C12 or C14 containing C36 was similar to that of microencapsulated n-alkanes without C36,whereas the difference between onsets of crystallization and melting(degree of supercooling) is similar to that of those of pure n-alkanes,suggesting the remarkable suppression ability of the organic gelator on supercooling.

  17. Anomalous dependence of the heat capacity of supercooled water on pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some papers, dependences of the isobaric heat capacity of water versus pressure and temperature were obtained. It is shown that these dependences contradict both the dependence of heat capacity on temperature for supercooled water, and an important thermodynamic equation for the dependence of heat capacity on pressure. A possible explanation for this contradiction is proposed.

  18. Compressive Deformation Induced Nanocrystallization of a Supercooled Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-Lin; SHAN De-Bin; MA Ming-Zhen; GUO Bin

    2008-01-01

    The nanocrystallization behaviour of a bulk Zr-based metallic glass subjected to compressive stress is investigated in the supercooled liquid region. Compared with annealing treatments without compressive stress, compressive deformation promotes the development of nucleation and suppresses the coarsening of nanocrystallites at high ternperatures.

  19. Predicting How Nanoconfinement Changes the Relaxation Time of a Supercooled Liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Errington, Jeff; Truskett, Tom;

    2013-01-01

    asymmetric dumbbell-shaped molecules, which can be deeply supercooled without crystallizing. We find that the dimensionless structural relaxation times—spanning six decades as a function of temperature, density, and degree of confinement—collapse when plotted versus excess entropy. The data also collapse...

  20. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine;

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This “Thermalization Calorimetry” technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat...

  1. Temperature-dependent bouncing of super-cooled water on teflon-coated superhydrophobic tungsten nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khedir, Khedir R.; Kannarpady, Ganesh K.; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Woo, Justin; Asar, Madhu P. [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR, 72204 (United States); Ryerson, Charles [Terrestrial and Cryospheric Sciences Branch Cold Regions, Research and Engineering Laboratory, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Hanover, NH 03755-1290 (United States); Biris, Alexandru S., E-mail: asbiris@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR, 72204 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The bouncing mechanism of warm and supercooled water droplets with temperatures ranging from 20 °C to −10 °C on the surface of superhydrophobic (SHP) tungsten nanorods (WNRs), held at a constant temperature of −10 °C, was investigated. The measurements were carried out inside a chamber kept at a low relative humidity of 20%. A considerable energy loss was observed mainly due to the increase in the viscous forces of the supercooled water droplet. The increase in the values of the capillary number, as a result of the variation in both viscosity and surface energy of the supercooled water droplet, has confirmed the significant role of viscous forces in the dissipation of bouncing energy. However, the contact time and contact line evolution of the supercooled water droplet on the surface remained unaffected by the decrease in its temperature at constant humidity. The calculations of the bouncing restitution and dissipated energy at various water droplet temperatures, using classical mechanics, were also carried out.

  2. Drop motion due to oscillations of an inclined substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    A sessile drop on a stationary inclined substrate remains pinned unless the angle of inclination is greater than some critical value. Alternatively, when shaken at even small angles of inclination, the drop undergoes shape deflections which may lead to drop translation. Translation occurs when large contact angle fluctuations, favored by oscillations at resonance, overcome contact angle hysteresis. In this study, resonance is triggered by substrate-normal oscillations. The drop translation is typically observed to be of constant speed for a given set of parameters. The speed is measured experimentally as a function of resonance mode, driving amplitude and drop volume. This technique of activating the motion of drops having a particular volume can be utilized for applications of droplet selection and transport.

  3. Particle-area dependence of mineral dust in the immersion mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Diehl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured by using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows to freely suspending single drops in air without electrical charges thereby avoiding any electrical influences which may affect the freezing process. Heterogeneous nucleation caused by several mineral dust particles (montmorillonite, two types of illite was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 \\unit{mm} in radius were monitored by a~video camera during cooling down to −28 °C to simulate the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was remotely determined with an infra-red thermometer so that the onset of freezing was indicated. For comparisons, measurements with one particle type were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 \\unit{{\\mu}m} radius freely suspended. The data were interpreted regarding the particle surfaces immersed in the drops. Immersion freezing was observed in a~temperature range between −13 and −26 °C in dependence of particle type and surface area per drop. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model.

  4. Mechanical responses and stress fluctuations of a supercooled liquid in a sheared non-equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, H; Yamamoto, R

    2012-04-01

    A steady shear flow can drive supercooled liquids into a non-equilibrium state. Using molecular dynamics simulations under steady shear flow superimposed with oscillatory shear strain for a probe, non-equilibrium mechanical responses are studied for a model supercooled liquid composed of binary soft spheres. We found that even in the strongly sheared situation, the supercooled liquid exhibits surprisingly isotropic responses to oscillating shear strains applied in three different components of the strain tensor. Based on this isotropic feature, we successfully constructed a simple two-mode Maxwell model that can capture the key features of the storage and loss moduli, even for highly non-equilibrium state. Furthermore, we examined the correlation functions of the shear stress fluctuations, which also exhibit isotropic relaxation behaviors in the sheared non-equilibrium situation. In contrast to the isotropic features, the supercooled liquid additionally demonstrates anisotropies in both its responses and its correlations to the shear stress fluctuations. Using the constitutive equation (a two-mode Maxwell model), we demonstrated that the anisotropic responses are caused by the coupling between the oscillating strain and the driving shear flow. Due to these anisotropic responses and fluctuations, the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) is distinct for different components. We measured the magnitude of this violation in terms of the effective temperature. It was demonstrated that the effective temperature is notably different between different components, which indicates that a simple scalar mapping, such as the concept of an effective temperature, oversimplifies the true nature of supercooled liquids under shear flow. An understanding of the mechanism of isotropies and anisotropies in the responses and fluctuations will lead to a better appreciation of these violations of the FDT, as well as certain consequent modifications to the concept of an

  5. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties supercooled liquids at temperatures near their respective glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this perspective we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition.

  6. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg, making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this Perspective, we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition.

  7. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  8. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...... the pressure drop in a contraction are given....

  9. Eulerian method for super-cooled large-droplet ice-accretion on aircraft wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Many research has been done to provide scientists and aviation engineers with tools to predict ice accretions on in ight aircraft. The ice accretion problem is often sudden, its eects can be dramatic, leading to aircraft accidents with possible loss of lives. Until now this eld has been relatively s

  10. 75 FR 49865 - Extension of Comment Period; Airplane and Engine Certification Requirements in Supercooled Large...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... Groupe SAFRAN, an engine manufacturer, have requested an extension of the comment period from 60 days to... Groupe SAFRAN (Turbomeca) also requested an extension to the comment period from 60 days to 120...

  11. A highly modular beamline electrostatic levitation facility, optimized for in situ high-energy x-ray scattering studies of equilibrium and supercooled liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, N A; Kelton, K F

    2011-03-01

    High-energy x-ray diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about structural evolution on the atomic length scale, leading to insights into the origin of the nucleation barrier and the processes of supercooling and glass formation. The containerless processing of the beamline electrostatic levitation (BESL) facility allows coordinated thermophysical and structural studies of equilibrium and supercooled liquids to be made in a contamination-free, high-vacuum (∼10(-8) Torr) environment. To date, the incorporation of electrostatic levitation facilities into synchrotron beamlines has been difficult due to the large footprint of the apparatus and the difficulties associated with its transportation and implementation. Here, we describe a modular levitation facility that is optimized for diffraction studies of high-temperature liquids at high-energy synchrotron beamlines. The modular approach used in the apparatus design allows it to be easily transported and quickly setup. Unlike most previous electrostatic levitation facilities, BESL can be operated by a single user instead of a user team.

  12. Liquid drops on soft solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2014-03-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract each other due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  13. Excited Sessile Drops Perform Harmonically

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Steen, Paul H

    2013-01-01

    In our fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate our method of visualizing and identifying various mode shapes of mechanically oscillated sessile drops. By placing metal mesh under an oscillating drop and projecting light from below, the drop's shape is visualized by the visually deformed mesh pattern seen in the top view. The observed modes are subsequently identified by their number of layers and sectors. An alternative identification associates them with spherical harmonics, as demonstrated in the tutorial. Clips of various observed modes are presented, followed by a 10-second quiz of mode identification.

  14. Possible Evidence for a New Form of Liquid Buried in the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, T. Ryan; Leong, Kai-Yang; Wang, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Contrary to the historical data, several recent experiments indicate that the surface tension of supercooled water follows a smooth extrapolation of the IAPWS equation in the supercooled regime. It can be seen, however, that a small deviation from the IAPWS equation is present in the recent experimental measurements. It is shown with simulations using the WAIL water potential that the small deviation in the experimental data is consistent with the tail of an exponential growth in surface tension as temperature decreases. The emergence temperature, Te, of a substantial deviation from the IAPWS equation is shown to be 227 K for the WAIL water and 235 K for real water. Since the 227 K Te is close to the Widom line in WAIL water, we argue that real water at 235 K approaches a similar crossover line at one atmospheric pressure.

  15. Thermalization calorimetry: A simple method for investigating glass transition and crystallization of supercooled liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jakobsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple method for fast and cheap thermal analysis on supercooled glass-forming liquids. This “Thermalization Calorimetry” technique is based on monitoring the temperature and its rate of change during heating or cooling of a sample for which the thermal power input comes from heat conduction through an insulating material, i.e., is proportional to the temperature difference between sample and surroundings. The monitored signal reflects the sample’s specific heat and is sensitive to exo- and endothermic processes. The technique is useful for studying supercooled liquids and their crystallization, e.g., for locating the glass transition and melting point(s, as well as for investigating the stability against crystallization and estimating the relative change in specific heat between the solid and liquid phases at the glass transition.

  16. Supercooling transition in phase separated manganite thin films: An electrical transport study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Siwach, P. K.; Tyagi, Pawan Kumar; Singh, H. K.

    2014-05-01

    The impact of variation in the relative fractions of the ferromagnetic metallic and antiferromagnetic/charge ordered insulator phases on the supercooling/superheating transition in strongly phase separated system, La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y ≈ 0.4), has been studied employing magnetotransport measurements. Our study clearly shows that the supercooling transition temperature is non-unique and strongly depends on the magneto-thermodynamic path through which the low temperature state is accessed. In contrast, the superheating transition temperature remains constant. The thermo-magnetic hysteresis, the separation of the two transitions and the associated resistivity, all are functions of the relative fraction of the coexisting phases.

  17. Metastable Demixing of Supercooled Cu-Co and Cu-Fe Alloys in an Oxide Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Williams, G.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study on the liquid separation in supercooled Cu-Co and Cu-Fe alloys was performed using a melt fluxing which permits high supercooling to be achieved. Moreover, this method renders it possible to directly measure binodal temperatures and establish metastable liquid miscibility gap (LMG). All phase-separated samples at compositions ranging from 10 to 80 wt pct Co or to 83 wt pct Fe were found to exhibit droplet-shaped morphologies, in spite of various droplet distributions. Uniformly dispersed microstructures were obtained as the minority component was less than 20 vol.%; while beyond this percentage, serious coarsening was brought about. Calculations of the miscibility gap in the Cu-Co system and Stokes movement velocity of Co and Fe droplets in Cu matrix were made to analyze the experimental results.

  18. Study on Supercooling Point and Freezing Point in Floral Organs of Apricot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Under the environment of an artificial climate chamber, supercooling point (SCP) and freezing point (FP) in flower and young fruit at different development stages and freezing injuries of floral organs were studied. The apricot cultivars tested were Kety, Golden Sun and Honghebao. With the development of flower buds, SCP and FP increased, which indicated that their cold resistance decreased. SCP and FP varied with different floral organs. For different apricot cultivars, it was found that, the lower SCP or FP in floral organs was, the more resistant capacity the cultivar had, and the larger the temperature interval from SCP to FP was. SCP was not a constant value, but a range. Frequency distribution of SCP in petals was more dispersing than that in stamens and pistils. Floral organs could maintain a supercooling state to avoid ice formation, but they were sensitive to freezing. Once floral organs froze, they turned brown after thawing.

  19. The water supercooled regime as described by four common water models

    CERN Document Server

    Malaspina, David C; Pereyra, Rodolfo G; Szleifer, Igal; Carignano, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01

    The temperature scale of simple water models in general does not coincide with the natural one. Therefore, in order to make a meaningful evaluation of different water models a temperature rescaling is necessary. In this paper we introduce a rescaling using the melting temperature and the temperature corresponding to the maximum of the heat capacity to evaluate four common water models (TIP4P-Ew, TIP4P-2005, TIP5P-Ew and Six-Sites) in the supercooled regime. Although all the models show the same general qualitative behavior, the TIP5P-Ew appears as the best representation of the supercooled regime when the rescaled temperature is used. We also analyze, using thermodynamic arguments, the critical nucleus size for ice growth. Finally, we speculate on the possible reasons why atomistic models do not usually crystalize while the coarse grained mW model do crystallize.

  20. The Influence of Constitutional Supercooling on the Distribution of Te-particles in Melt-Grown CZT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Alvine, Kyle J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bliss, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Jean A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-03

    A section of a vertical gradient freeze Cd0.9Zn0.1Te boule approximately 2100-mm3 with a planar area of 300-mm2 was prepared and examined using transmitted IR microscopy at various magnifications to determine the three-dimensional spatial and size distributions of Te-particles over large longitudinal and radial length scales. Te-particle density distributions were determined as a function of longitudinal and radial positions in these strips and exhibited a multi-modal lognormal size density distribution that indicated a slight preference for increasing size with longitudinal growth time, while showing a pronounced cellular network structure. Higher magnification images revealed a typical Rayleigh-instability pearl string morphology with large and small satellite droplets. This study includes solidification experiments in small crucibles of 30:70 mixtures of Cd:Te performed over a wide range of cooling rates that clearly demonstrated a growth instability with Te-particle capture that is suggested to be responsible for one of the peaks in the size distribution using size discrimination visualization. The results are discussed with regard to a manifold Te-particle genesis history as Te-particle direct capture from melt-solid growth instabilities due to constitutional supercooling and as Te-particle formation from the breakup of Te-ribbons via a Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  1. Evidence of the existence of the low-density liquid phase in supercooled, confined water

    OpenAIRE

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Majolino, Domenico; Venuti, Valentina; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    By confining water in a nanoporous structure so narrow that the liquid could not freeze, it is possible to study properties of this previously undescribed system well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature TH = 231 K. Using this trick, we were able to study, by means of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrational spectra (HOH bending and OH-stretching modes) of deeply supercooled water in the temperature range 183 < T < 273 K. We observed, upon decreasing temperature, the bui...

  2. Quark-gluon plasma freeze-out from a supercooled state?

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, T

    1994-01-01

    The quark-gluon plasma, formed in the first 3 fm/c of the heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC, supercooles due to nucleation and develops soon a negative pressure in the bag model. The negative pressure yields mechanical instability which may lead to a sudden timelike deflagration to a (super)heated hadron gas. The resulting freeze-out times are shorter than those of the standard nucleation scenario.

  3. Behavior of Supercooled Aqueous Solutions Stemming from Hidden Liquid-Liquid Transition in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-01-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two...

  4. Direct measurement of the surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol by optical scanning a film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fang; Zhang Guo-Feng; Dong Shuang-Li; Sun Jian-Hu; Chen Rui-Yun; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2009-01-01

    The surface dynamics of supercooled liquid-glycerol is studied by scanning the thickness of the glycerol film with single photon detection. Measurements are performed at room temperature well above the glycerol's glass transition temperature. It is shown that the surface dynamics of the glycerol film is very sensitive to the temperature. The linear relationship between the thickness of the film and the viscosity predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) law is also presented experimentally.

  5. Liquid–liquid transition in supercooled water suggested by microsecond simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yaping; Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The putative liquid–liquid phase transition in supercooled water has been used to explain many anomalous behaviors of water. However, no direct experimental verification of such a phase transition has been accomplished, and theoretical studies from different simulations contradict each other. We investigated the putative liquid–liquid phase transition using the Water potential from Adaptive Force Matching for Ice and Liquid (WAIL). The simulation reveals a first-order phase transition in the ...

  6. The Flow Induced by the Coalescence of Two Initially Stationary Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobari, M. R.; Tryggvason, G.

    1994-01-01

    The coalescence of two initially stationary drops of different size is investigated by solving the unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations numerically, using a Front-Tracking/Finite Difference method. Initially, the drops are put next to each other and the film between them ruptured. Due to surface tension forces, the drops coalesce rapidly and the fluid from the small drop is injected into the larger one. For low nondimensional viscosity, or Ohnesorge number, little mixing takes place and the small drop fluid forms a blob near the point where the drops touched initially. For low Ohnesorge number, on the other hand, the small drop forms a jet that penetrates far into the large drop. The penetration depth also depends on the size of the drops and shows that for a given fluid of sufficiently low viscosity, there is a maximum penetration depth for intermediate size ratios.

  7. Real-time observation of the isothermal crystallization kinetics in a deeply supercooled liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, M.; Cormier, L.; Hennet, L.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.

    2017-01-01

    Below the melting temperature Tm, crystals are the stable phase of typical elemental or molecular systems. However, cooling down a liquid below Tm, crystallization is anything but inevitable. The liquid can be supercooled, eventually forming a glass below the glass transition temperature Tg. Despite their long lifetimes and the presence of strong barriers that produces an apparent stability, supercooled liquids and glasses remain intrinsically a metastable state and thermodynamically unstable towards the crystal. Here we investigated the isothermal crystallization kinetics of the prototypical strong glassformer GeO2 in the deep supercooled liquid at 1100 K, about half-way between Tm and Tg. The crystallization process has been observed through time-resolved neutron diffraction for about three days. Data show a continuous reorganization of the amorphous structure towards the alpha-quartz phase with the final material composed by crystalline domains plunged into a low-density, residual amorphous matrix. A quantitative analysis of the diffraction patterns allows determining the time evolution of the relative fractions of crystal and amorphous, that was interpreted through an empirical model for the crystallization kinetics. This approach provides a very good description of the experimental data and identifies a predator-prey-like mechanism between crystal and amorphous, where the density variation acts as a blocking barrier. PMID:28255173

  8. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  9. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  10. Log-normal spray drop distribution...analyzed by two new computer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald S. Walton

    1968-01-01

    Results of U.S. Forest Service research on chemical insecticides suggest that large drops are not as effective as small drops in carrying insecticides to target insects. Two new computer programs have been written to analyze size distribution properties of drops from spray nozzles. Coded in Fortran IV, the programs have been tested on both the CDC 6400 and the IBM 7094...

  11. Surfactant and nonlinear drop dynamics in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovsky, Joseph Charles

    2000-11-01

    Large amplitude drop dynamics in microgravity were conducted during the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission carried onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (20 October-5 November 1995). Centimeter- sized drops were statically deformed by acoustic radiation pressure and released to oscillate freely about a spherical equilibrium. Initial aspect ratios of up to 2.0 were achieved. Experiments using pure water and varying aqueous concentrations of Triton-X 100 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were performed. The axisymmetric drop shape oscillations were fit using the degenerate spherical shape modes. The frequency and decay values of the fundamental quadrupole and fourth order shape mode were analyzed. Several large amplitude nonlinear oscillation dynamics were observed. Shape entrainment of the higher modes by the fundamental quadrupole mode occurred. Amplitude- dependent effects were observed. The nonlinear frequency shift, where the oscillation frequency is found to decrease with larger amplitudes, was largely unaffected by the presence of surfactants. The percentage of time spent in the prolate shape over one oscillation cycle was found to increase with oscillation amplitude. This prolate shape bias was also unaffected by the addition of surfactants. These amplitude-dependent effects indicate that the nonlinearities are a function of the bulk properties and not the surface properties. BSA was found to greatly enhance the surface viscoelastic properties by increasing the total damping of the oscillation, while Triton had only a small influence on damping. The surface concentration of BSA was found to be diffusion-controlled over the time of the experiments, while the Triton diffusion rate was very rapid. Using the experimental frequency and decay values, the suface viscoelastic properties of surface dilatational viscosity ( ks ) and surface shear viscosity ( ms ) were found for varying surfactant concentrations using the transcendental equation of Lu

  12. Protocol for Measuring the Thermal Properties of a Supercooled Synthetic Sand-water-gas-methane Hydrate Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Susuki, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Tsuji, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-21

    Methane hydrates (MHs) are present in large amounts in the ocean floor and permafrost regions. Methane and hydrogen hydrates are being studied as future energy resources and energy storage media. To develop a method for gas production from natural MH-bearing sediments and hydrate-based technologies, it is imperative to understand the thermal properties of gas hydrates. The thermal properties' measurements of samples comprising sand, water, methane, and MH are difficult because the melting heat of MH may affect the measurements. To solve this problem, we performed thermal properties' measurements at supercooled conditions during MH formation. The measurement protocol, calculation method of the saturation change, and tips for thermal constants' analysis of the sample using transient plane source techniques are described here. The effect of the formation heat of MH on measurement is very small because the gas hydrate formation rate is very slow. This measurement method can be applied to the thermal properties of the gas hydrate-water-guest gas system, which contains hydrogen, CO2, and ozone hydrates, because the characteristic low formation rate of gas hydrate is not unique to MH. The key point of this method is the low rate of phase transition of the target material. Hence, this method may be applied to other materials having low phase-transition rates.

  13. Coalescence and noncoalescence of sessile drops: impact of surface forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Hanske, Christoph; Fery, Andreas; Riegler, Hans

    2014-06-17

    Due to capillarity, sessile droplets of identical liquids will instantaneously fuse when they come in contact at their three-phase lines. However, with drops of different, completely miscible liquids, instantaneous coalescence can be suppressed. Instead, the drops remain in a state of noncoalescence for some time, with the two drop bodies connected only by a thin neck. The reason for this noncoalescence is the surface tension difference, Δγ, between the liquids. If Δγ is sufficiently large, then it induces a sufficiently strong Marangoni flow, which keeps the main drop bodies temporarily separated. Studies with spreading drops have revealed that the boundary between instantaneous coalescence and noncoalescence is sharp (Karpitschka, S.; Riegler, H. J. Fluid. Mech. 2014, 743, R1). The boundary is a function of two parameters only: Δγ and Θ(a), the arithmetic mean of the contact angles in the moment of drop-drop contact. It appears plausible that surface forces (the disjoining pressure) could also influence the coalescence behavior. However, in experiments with spreading drops, surface forces always promote coalescence and their influence might be obscured. Therefore, we present here coalescence experiments with partially wetting liquids and compare the results to the spreading case. We adjust different equilibrium contact angles (i.e., different surface forces) with different substrate surface coatings. As for spreading drops, we observe a sharp boundary between regimes of coalescence and noncoalescence. The boundary follows the same power law relation for both partially and completely wetting cases. Therefore, we conclude that surface forces have no significant, explicit influence on the coalescence behavior of sessile drops from different miscible liquids.

  14. 单个水滴蒸发过冷过程的特性分析%Characteristic analysis of single water droplet in evaporative supercooled process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫俊海; 张小松; 周斌

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the movement and evaporation characteristics of single water droplet in low temperature and low humidity ratio air, a mathematical model of water droplet heat and mass transfer and movement process was proposed. The evaporation process of droplet in supercooled stage was simulated through theoretical model, results from modeling basically tally with experiment of hanging single water droplet. The temperature, diameter, velocity and trajectory of water droplet during evaporation and motion process and the influence of the initial parameters of droplet and air velocity were investigated. The numerical results show that at a certain spray angle and with same dropping height the smaller droplet diameter can shorten movement distance at horizontal direction and the super-cooled time of water droplet, meanwhile decrease the corresponding velocity of water droplet faster. The lower initial temperature of water droplet or the higher velocity of air can improve the cooling rate of water droplet and the water droplet can be cooled to supercooled state in a very short dropping height. In addition, the higher the initial temperature of water droplet and the air velocity are, the faster the diameter of water droplet reduces. Thus, the precooled water droplets can not only improve the ice-making efficiency but also reduce the evaporative loss of water droplet.%为分析单个水滴在低温、低湿空气中的运动和蒸发特性,建立了描述整个传热传质及运动过程的数学模型,并通过对悬挂水滴的蒸发冷却实验验证了该模型的有效性.通过模拟计算获得了水滴温度、直径、速度和运动轨迹的变化规律,以及水滴初始参数和空气速度对制冰效率的影响.结果表明,水滴在某一喷射角度下,直径越小,同样的下落高度水滴水平飞行的距离越短,而相应的速度衰减则越快,同时水滴蒸发过冷所需的时间越短.另外,水滴初始温度越低和逆流空气速度越高,

  15. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  16. Drop floating on a granular raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  17. Low arc drop hybrid mode thermionic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K.

    1977-01-01

    The hybrid mode operation for the reduction of plasma drops is being investigated. This report discusses the results obtained from two molybdenum emitter converters. One converter had a molybdenum collector and the other a nickel collector. The molybdenum collector converter was operated in a hybrid mode (at an interelectrode distance of 1.7 mm) and produced a minimum barrier index of 1.96 eV at an emitter temperature of 1500 K. The arc drop was calculated to be 0.14 eV, using the published results for a molybdenum collector. On the other hand, the nickel collector converter was operated in a conventional ignited mode (at an interelectrode distance of 0.5 mm) and produced a minimum barrier index of 2.1 eV at an emitter temperature of 1700 K. It is tentatively concluded that a large-gap operation of the hybrid mode converter permits the diffusion of cesium ions to a distance in the order of one millimeter for an effective neutralization of electron space charge. By employing a low work function collector (1.55 eV) in a hybrid mode converter with an arc drop of 0.14 eV, it appears that a barrier index as low as 1.69 eV could be achieved.

  18. Drop stability in wind: theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyon

    2015-11-01

    Water drops may remain pinned on a solid substrate against external forcing due to contact angle hysteresis. Schmucker and White investigated this phenomenon experimentally in a high Reynolds number regime, by measuring the critical wind velocity at which partially wetting water drops depin inside a wind tunnel. Due to the unsteady turbulent boundary layer, droplets are observed to undergo vortex-shedding induced oscillations. By contrast, the overall elongation of the drop prior to depinning occurs on a much slower timescale with self-similar droplet shapes at the onset. Based on these observations, a simple, quasi-static model of depinning droplet is developed by implementing the phenomenological description of the boundary layer. The resultant model successfully captures the critical onset of droplet motion and is the first of on-going studies that connect the classical boundary layer theory with droplet dynamics.

  19. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  20. Techniques for Generating Centimetric Drops in Microgravity and Application to Cavitation Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kobel, Philippe; de Bosset, Aurèle; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Farhat, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the techniques and physical parameters used to produce stable centimetric water drops in microgravity, and to study single cavitation bubbles inside such drops (Parabolic Flight Campaigns, European Space Agency ESA). While the main scientific results have been presented in a previous paper, we shall herein provide the necessary technical background, with potential applications to other experiments. First, we present an original method to produce and capture large stable drops in microgravity. This technique succeeded in generating quasi-spherical water drops with volumes up to 8 ml, despite the residual g-jitter. We find that the equilibrium of the drops is essentially dictated by the ratio between the drop volume and the contact surface used to capture the drop, and formulate a simple stability criterion. In a second part, we present a setup for creating and studying single cavitation bubbles inside those drops. In addition, we analyze the influence of the bubble size and position on the...

  1. Thermal infrared mapping of the Leidenfrost drop evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wciślik, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents an author complementary study on the Leidenfrost drop evaporation. The research was conducted under ambient conditions and in the film boiling regime. Large water drops were placed on the copper substrate of the constant temperature Tw ranging from 297.6 to 404oC. The initial single drop diameter and its mass was D0 ≈ 1cm and m0 ≈ 1g respectively. One of the obtained results, for each Tw are the drop thermal images versus time. They were used to calculate an average temperature over the drop upper surface (Td). For an exemplary heating surface temperature of Tw = 297.6oC the average drop temperature is approximately 11oC lower than the saturation one and equals Td = 88,95oC. This value is estimated for the first 200s of evaporation and with time step size Δt = 0,5s. The drop upper surface temperature is highly variable and indicates strong convection inside it. This is due to the complex nature of heat and mass transfer. The maximum standard deviation from Td = 88,95oC is SD = 1.21.

  2. Dropwise condensation: experiments and simulations of nucleation and growth of water drops in a cooling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, R N; Stevens, F; Langford, S C; Dickinson, J T

    2006-10-10

    Dropwise condensation of water vapor from a naturally cooling, hot water reservoir onto a hydrophobic polymer film and a silanized glass slide was studied by direct observation and simulations. The observed drop growth kinetics suggests that smallest drops grow principally by the diffusion of water adsorbed on the substrate to the drop perimeter, while drops larger than about 50 microm in diameter grow principally by direct deposition from the vapor onto the drop surface. Drop coalescence plays a critical role in determining the drop-size distribution and stimulates the nucleation of new, small drops on the substrates. Simulations of drop growth incorporating these growth mechanisms provide a good description of the observed drop-size distribution. Because of the large role played by coalescence, details of individual drop growth make little difference to the final drop-size distribution. The rate of condensation per unit substrate area is especially high for the smallest drops and may help account for the high heat transfer rates associated with dropwise condensation relative to filmwise condensation in heat exchange applications.

  3. Dynamically slow processes in supercooled water confined between hydrophobic plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, Giancarlo [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Santos, Francisco de los, E-mail: gfranzese@ub.ed, E-mail: fdlsant@ugr.e [Departamento de Electromagnetismo y Fisica de la Materia, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2009-12-16

    We study the dynamics of water confined between hydrophobic flat surfaces at low temperature. At different pressures, we observe different behaviors that we understand in terms of the hydrogen bond dynamics. At high pressure, the formation of the open structure of the hydrogen bond network is inhibited and the surfaces can be rapidly dried (dewetted) by formation of a large cavity with decreasing temperature. At lower pressure we observe strong non-exponential behavior of the correlation function, but with no strong increase of the correlation time. This behavior can be associated, on the one hand, to the rapid ordering of the hydrogen bonds that generates heterogeneities and, on the other hand, to the lack of a single timescale as a consequence of the cooperativity in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point that characterizes the phase diagram at low temperature of the water model considered here. At very low pressures, the gradual formation of the hydrogen bond network is responsible for the large increase of the correlation time and, eventually, the dynamical arrest of the system, with a strikingly different dewetting process, characterized by the formation of many small cavities.

  4. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikfeldt, K T; Huang, C; Nilsson, A; Pettersson, L G M

    2011-06-07

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P∕2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (T(W)) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)] are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing T(W), consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P∕2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P∕2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching T(W). Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  5. Evidence of the existence of the low-density liquid phase in supercooled, confined water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Majolino, Domenico; Venuti, Valentina; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2007-01-09

    By confining water in a nanoporous structure so narrow that the liquid could not freeze, it is possible to study properties of this previously undescribed system well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature TH = 231 K. Using this trick, we were able to study, by means of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrational spectra (HOH bending and OH-stretching modes) of deeply supercooled water in the temperature range 183 < T < 273 K. We observed, upon decreasing temperature, the building up of a new population of hydrogen-bonded oscillators centered around 3,120 cm(-1), the contribution of which progressively dominates the spectra as one enters into the deeply supercooled regime. We determined that the fractional weight of this spectral component reaches 50% just at the temperature, TL approximately 225 K, where the confined water shows a fragile-to-strong dynamic cross-over phenomenon [Ito, K., Moynihan, C. T., Angell, C. A. (1999) Nature 398:492-494]. Furthermore, the fact that the corresponding OH stretching spectral peak position of the low-density-amorphous solid water occurs exactly at 3,120 cm(-1) [Sivakumar, T. C., Rice, S. A., Sceats, M. G. (1978) J. Chem. Phys. 69:3468-3476.] strongly suggests that these oscillators originate from existence of the low-density-liquid phase derived from the occurrence of the first-order liquid-liquid (LL) phase transition and the associated LL critical point in supercooled water proposed earlier by a computer molecular dynamics simulation [Poole, P. H., Sciortino, F., Essmann, U., Stanley, H. E. (1992) Nature 360:324-328].

  6. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  7. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also pr

  8. New identities for sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Hajirahimi, Maryam; Fatollahi, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    A new set of mathematical identities is presented for axi-symmetric sessile drops on flat and curved substrates. The geometrical parameters, including the apex curvature and height, and the contact radius, are related by the identities. The validity of the identities are checked by various numerical solutions both for flat and curved substrates.

  9. Egg Drop: An Invention Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an activity designed to stimulate elementary and junior high students to become actively engaged in thinking creatively rather than only analytically, convergently, or repetitively. The activity requires students to devise means of dropping an egg from a height without it breaking. (JR)

  10. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Guéna, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe; Cazabat, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    22 pages 9 figures; Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  11. ``Quantum'' interference with bouncing drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    In a series of recent papers (most recently) Yves Couder and collaborators have explored the dynamics of walking drops on the surface of a vibrated bath of silicon oil and have demonstrated a close analogy to quantum phenomena. The bouncing drop together with the surface wave that it excites seems to be very similar to the pilot wave envisaged by de Broglie for quantum particles. In particular, have studied a double slit experiment with walking drops, where an interference pattern identical to the quantum version is found even though it is possible to follow the orbits of the drops and unambigously determine which slit it goes through, something which in quantum mechanics would be ruled out by the Heisenberg uncertainly relations. We have repeated the experiment and present a somewhat more complicated picture. Theoretically, we study a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localised ``particle'' being simultaneously guided by the wave. We present simple solutions to such a field theory and discuss the fundamental difficulties met by such a theory in order to comply with quantum mechanics.

  12. Drops, contact lines, and electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannetje, 't D.J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the behaviour of drops and contact lines under the influence of electric fields, and how these can answer fundamental and industrial questions. Our focus is on studying the varying balance of the electric field, hysteresis forces and inertia as the speed of a contact line chan

  13. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu'ena, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, Anne-Marie; Gu\\'{e}na, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  14. Drops spreading on flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somszor, Katarzyna; Boulogne, François; Sauret, Alban; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous media are encountered in many engineered systems such as textile, paper and insulating materials. In most of these materials, fibers are randomly oriented and form a complex network in which drops of wetting liquid tend to accumulate at the nodes of the network. Here we investigate the role of the fiber flexibility on the spreading of a small volume of liquid on a pair of crossed flexible fibers. A drop of silicone oil is dispensed at the point of contact of the fibers and we characterize the liquid morphologies as we vary the volume of liquid, the angle between the fibers, and the length and bending modulus of the fibers. Drop morphologies previously reported for rigid fibers, i.e. a drop, a column and a mixed morphology, are also observed on flexible fibers with modified domains of existence. Moreover, at small inclination angles of the fibers, a new behavior is observed: the fibers bend and collapse. Depending on the volume, the liquid can adopt a column or a mixed morphology on the collapsed fibers. We rationalize our observations with a model based on energetic considerations. Our study suggests that the fiber flexibility adds a rich variety of behaviors that can be crucial for industrial applications.

  15. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...

  16. Crystallization Behavior and Relaxation Dynamics of Supercooled S‑Ketoprofen and the Racemic Mixture along an Isochrone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrjanowicz, Karolina; Kaminski, Kamil; Paluch, Marian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study crystallization behavior and molecular dynamics in the supercooled liquid state of the pharmaceutically important compound ketoprofen at various thermodynamic conditions. Dielectric relaxation for a racemic mixture was investigated in a wide range of temperatures and press......In this paper, we study crystallization behavior and molecular dynamics in the supercooled liquid state of the pharmaceutically important compound ketoprofen at various thermodynamic conditions. Dielectric relaxation for a racemic mixture was investigated in a wide range of temperatures...... of pure enantiomers and their 50–50 equimolar mixture in the metastable supercooled liquid state. Crystallization kinetic studies revealed that at the same isochronal conditions the behavior of the S-enantiomer and R,S-racemic mixture of ketoprofen is entirely different. This was examined in the context...

  17. In-situ High-energy X-ray Diffraction Study of the Local Structure of Supercooled Liquid Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. W.; Kim, T. H.; Sieve, B.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, D. S.; Kelton, K. F.; Goldman, A. I.

    2005-01-01

    While changes in the coordination number for liquid silicon upon supercooling, signaling an underlying liquid-liquid phase transition, have been predicted, x-ray and neutron measurements have produced conflicting reports. In particular some studies have found an increase in the first shell coordination as temperature decreases in the supercooled regime, while others have reported increases in the coordination number with decreasing temperature. Employing the technique of electrostatic levitation coupled with high energy x-ray diffraction (125 keV), and rapid data acquisition (100ms collection times) using an area detector, we have obtained high quality structural data more deeply into the supercooled regime than has been possible before. No change in coordination number is observed in this temperature region, calling into question previous experimental claims of structural evidence for the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition.

  18. Studies of a dynamic type ice storage system using supercooled water; Kareikyakusui riyo dainamikku gata shochikunetsu shisutemu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, S.; Hashimoto, A.; Miura, N. [Kanagawa Inst. of Tech., Kanagawa (Japan); Ikemoto, Y.

    1999-11-25

    An ice storage system using supercooled water was constructed and the performance was tested. The system was consisted of a storage tank with the volume of 1.2 m{sup 3} in which slurry-ice was stared, a spiral double-tube heat exchanger 22 m long for making supercooled water by brine, a refrigerating machine of the rated capacity of 2.2 kW, reservoirs for cold and hot brine, heaters, and pumps. The system was able to be operated for more than 5 hours without freezing mostly if the degree of supercooling was less than about 2 degree C. The COPs based on the power of the refrigerating machine and system were about 1.3 and 0.7, respectively. (author)

  19. Chosen thermodynamic experiments: depression of the freezing point of water with salt and supercooled water

    OpenAIRE

    Krnc, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The diploma thesis presents two interesting thermodynamic experiments which were executed and described by Joseph Black in 18th Century. These are: depression of the freezing point of water with salt and supercooled water. We meet water in three states of matter in nature: in the state of ice, liquid water, and water steam. Phase crossing from water to ice (and vice versa from ice to water) is done with normal air pressure with the state temperature of 0°C. If we add certain matters to wat...

  20. Slow dynamics and local quasi-equilibrium-relaxation in supercooled colloidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RubI, J M; SantamarIa-Holek, I; Perez-Madrid, A [Department de Fisica Fonamental, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-06-09

    We present a Fokker-Planck description of supercooled colloidal systems exhibiting slow relaxation dynamics. Assuming the existence of a local quasi-equilibrium state during the relaxation of the system, we derive a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation for the non-stationary conditional probability. A generalized Stokes-Einstein relation containing the temperature of the system at local quasi-equilibrium instead of the temperature of the bath is obtained. Our results explain experiments showing that the diffusion coefficient is not proportional to the inverse of the effective viscosity at frequencies related to the diffusion timescale.

  1. Experimental investigations on prototype heat storage units utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Dragsted, Janne; Fan, Jianhua;

    2016-01-01

    was filled with 220 kg SAT mixture thickened with 1% carboxymethyl cellulose. The heat exchange capacity rate during the charging of the unit with the extra water was significantly higher than for the unit with the thickening agent due to the different levels of convection. The SAT mixtures in the units were......Laboratory tests of two heat storage units based on the principle of stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) mixtures were carried out. One unit was filled with 199.5 kg of SAT with 9% extra water to avoid phase separation of the incongruently melting salt hydrate. The other unit...

  2. The role of drop velocity in statistical spray description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, J. F.; El-Wakil, M. M.; Myers, P. S.; Uyehara, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    The justification for describing a spray by treating drop velocity as a random variable on an equal statistical basis with drop size was studied experimentally. A double-exposure technique using fluorescent drop photography was used to make size and velocity measurements at selected locations in a steady ethanol spray formed by a swirl atomizer. The size-velocity data were categorized to construct bivariate spray density functions to describe the spray immediately after formation and during downstream propagation. It was found that a statistical treatment of drop velocity was supported by the data. Spray density function shapes and modal characteristics depended strongly on position and the amount of droplet-gas interaction that had occurred. Bimodal density functions were formed by environmental interaction during downstream propagation. Large differences were also found between spatial mass density and mass flux size distributions at the same location.

  3. Fast H-DROP: A thirty times accelerated version of H-DROP for interactive SVM-based prediction of helical domain linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Tambi; Ide, Soichiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Ebina, Teppei; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    Efficient and rapid prediction of domain regions from amino acid sequence information alone is often required for swift structural and functional characterization of large multi-domain proteins. Here we introduce Fast H-DROP, a thirty times accelerated version of our previously reported H-DROP (Helical Domain linker pRediction using OPtimal features), which is unique in specifically predicting helical domain linkers (boundaries). Fast H-DROP, analogously to H-DROP, uses optimum features selected from a set of 3000 ones by combining a random forest and a stepwise feature selection protocol. We reduced the computational time from 8.5 min per sequence in H-DROP to 14 s per sequence in Fast H-DROP on an 8 Xeon processor Linux server by using SWISS-PROT instead of Genbank non-redundant (nr) database for generating the PSSMs. The sensitivity and precision of Fast H-DROP assessed by cross-validation were 33.7 and 36.2%, which were merely 2% lower than that of H-DROP. The reduced computational time of Fast H-DROP, without affecting prediction performances, makes it more interactive and user-friendly. Fast H-DROP and H-DROP are freely available from http://domserv.lab.tuat.ac.jp/.

  4. Fast H-DROP: A thirty times accelerated version of H-DROP for interactive SVM-based prediction of helical domain linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Tambi; Ide, Soichiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Ebina, Teppei; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2016-12-01

    Efficient and rapid prediction of domain regions from amino acid sequence information alone is often required for swift structural and functional characterization of large multi-domain proteins. Here we introduce Fast H-DROP, a thirty times accelerated version of our previously reported H-DROP (Helical Domain linker pRediction using OPtimal features), which is unique in specifically predicting helical domain linkers (boundaries). Fast H-DROP, analogously to H-DROP, uses optimum features selected from a set of 3000 ones by combining a random forest and a stepwise feature selection protocol. We reduced the computational time from 8.5 min per sequence in H-DROP to 14 s per sequence in Fast H-DROP on an 8 Xeon processor Linux server by using SWISS-PROT instead of Genbank non-redundant (nr) database for generating the PSSMs. The sensitivity and precision of Fast H-DROP assessed by cross-validation were 33.7 and 36.2%, which were merely 2% lower than that of H-DROP. The reduced computational time of Fast H-DROP, without affecting prediction performances, makes it more interactive and user-friendly. Fast H-DROP and H-DROP are freely available from http://domserv.lab.tuat.ac.jp/.

  5. Buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through an axisymmetric ring constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2010-08-01

    Bond number maximum versus the drop-to-total ring radius ratio is caused by the transitions from squeezing to dripping for the loss of a drop steady state on a constriction. The initial stages of drop dripping are numerically simulated using a boundary-integral method for slightly supercritical Bond numbers. For very large ratios of the drop-to-hole radii, however, a sharp maximum in the critical Bond number is reached, as there is a transition from the drop passing through the inside hole to dripping over the outside edge of the ring for Bond numbers above the critical line. Drop squeezing and trapping mechanisms are also observed experimentally, and the measured critical Bond numbers and trapped drop shapes compare favorably to theoretical calculations from the Young-Laplace algorithm.

  6. Fragile-to-strong crossover in supercooled water: A comparison between TIP4P and TIP4P/2005 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marzio, M.; Camisasca, G.; Rovere, M.; Gallo, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present recent simulation results on the dynamics of supercooled water with the TIP4P/2005 potential. We find that the dynamical behaviour of the translational motion of the molecules is well interpreted in terms of the Mode Coupling Theory, as it was found for supercooled TIP4P water. We compare the results of the two models and in particular we find also in TIP4P/2005 a crossover from a fragile to a strong regime. We connect this crossover to the crossing of the Widom line emanating from the liquid-liquid critical point.

  7. Many Drops Interactions I: Simulation of Coalescence, Flocculation and Fragmentation of Multiple Colliding Drops with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH is a Lagrangian mesh-free formalism and has been useful to model continuous fluid. This formalism is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations by replacing the fluid with a set of particles. These particles are interpolation points from which properties of the fluid can be determined. In this study, the SPH method is applied to simulate the hydrodynamics interaction of many drops, showing some settings for the coalescence, fragmentation and flocculation problem of equally sized liquid drops in three-dimensional spaces. For small velocities the drops interact only through their deformed surfaces and the flocculation of the droplets arises. This result is very different if the collision velocity is large enough for the fragmentation of droplets takes place. We observe that for velocities around 15 mm/ms the coalescence of droplets occurs. The velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown.

  8. Remote Sensing of Supercooled Cloud Layers in Cold Climate Using Ground Based Integrated Sensors System and Comparison with Pilot Reports and model forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudala, Faisal; Wu, Di; Gultepe, Ismail; Anderson, Martha; turcotte, marie-france

    2017-04-01

    In-flight aircraft icing is one of the major weather hazards to aviation . It occurs when an aircraft passes through a cloud layer containing supercooled drops (SD). The SD in contact with the airframe freezes on the surface which degrades the performance of the aircraft.. Prediction of in-flight icing requires accurate prediction of SD sizes, liquid water content (LWC), and temperature. The current numerical weather predicting (NWP) models are not capable of making accurate prediction of SD sizes and associated LWC. Aircraft icing environment is normally studied by flying research aircraft, which is quite expensive. Thus, developing a ground based remote sensing system for detection of supercooled liquid clouds and characterization of their impact on severity of aircraft icing one of the important tasks for improving the NWPs based predictions and validations. In this respect, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) in cooperation with the Department of National Defense (DND) installed a number of specialized ground based remote sensing platforms and present weather sensors at Cold Lake, Alberta that includes a multi-channel microwave radiometer (MWR), K-band Micro Rain radar (MRR), Ceilometer, Parsivel distrometer and Vaisala PWD22 present weather sensor. In this study, a number of pilot reports confirming icing events and freezing precipitation that occurred at Cold Lake during the 2014-2016 winter periods and associated observation data for the same period are examined. The icing events are also examined using aircraft icing intensity estimated using ice accumulation model which is based on a cylindrical shape approximation of airfoil and the Canadian High Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS) model predicted LWC, median volume diameter and temperature. The results related to vertical atmospheric profiling conditions, surface observations, and the Canadian High Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS) model

  9. Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid drop impact

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Tran, Tuan; Keij, Diederik L; Winkels, Koen G; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface an air bubble can be entrapped. Here we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: For large drop impact velocity and large droplets the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for small impact velocity and small droplets capillary forces minimize the entrained bubble. However, we demonstrate experimentally, theoretically, and numerically that in between there is an optimum, leading to maximal air bubble entrapment. Our results have a strong bearing on various applications in printing technology, microelectronics, immersion lithography, diagnostics, or agriculture.

  10. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  11. Orientational dynamics and energy landscape features of thermotropic liquid crystals: An analogy with supercooled liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman Jana; Biman Bagchi

    2007-09-01

    Recent optical kerr effect (OKE) studies have revealed that orientational relaxation of rodlike nematogens near the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase boundary and also in the nematic phase exhibit temporal power law decay at intermediate times. Such behaviour has drawn an intriguing analogy with supercooled liquids. Here, we have investigated the single-particle and collective orientational dynamics of a family of model system of thermotropic liquid crystals using extensive computer simulations. Several remarkable features of glassy dynamics are on display including non-exponential relaxation, dynamical heterogeneity, and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the orientational relaxation time. Over a temperature range near the I-N phase boundary, the system behaves like a fragile glass-forming liquid. Using proper scaling, we construct the usual relaxation time versus inverse temperature plot and explicitly demonstrate that one can successfully define a density dependent fragility of liquid crystals. The fragility of liquid crystals shows a temperature and density dependence which is remarkably similar to the fragility of glass forming supercooled liquids. Energy landscape analysis of inherent structures shows that the breakdown of the Arrhenius temperature dependence of relaxation rate occurs at a temperature that marks the onset of the growth of the depth of the potential energy minima explored by the system.

  12. Measuring ice and liquid water content in moderately supercooled clouds with Cloudnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühl, Johannes; Seifert, Patric; Myagkov, Alexander; Albert, Ansmann

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between ice nuclei and clouds is an important topic in weather and climate research. Recent laboratory experiments and field in-situ field campaigns present more and more detailed measurements of ice nucleating particles (INP) at temperatures close to 0°C. This brings moderately supercooled mixed-phase clouds into the focus of current cloud research. One current example is the European Union BACCHUS project. A major goal of BACCHUS is the analysis of the anthropogenic impact on ice nucleation. Within this project, we use the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) and the Cloudnet framework in order to get quantitative insight into the formation of ice in mixed-phase layered clouds with cloud top temperature (CTT) from -40 to 0°C. Depolarization measurements from lidar and radar show a clear dependence between particle shape and the temperature under which the particles have been formed. The special focus of this work is on the CTT range from -10 to 0°C. An algorithm is presented to decide between ice and liquid water precipitation falling from the clouds showing that between 10% and 30% of all layered clouds show ice precipitation with CTT between -5 and 0°C. For these slightly supercooled clouds an average ice-water-content between 10e-7 and 10e-8 [kg per cubic meter] is found.

  13. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  14. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid–liquid transition in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A., E-mail: anisimov@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid–liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid–liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H{sub 2}O-NaCl and H{sub 2}O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid–liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of “reaction” between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  15. Liquid-liquid transition in supercooled water suggested by microsecond simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2013-07-23

    The putative liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled water has been used to explain many anomalous behaviors of water. However, no direct experimental verification of such a phase transition has been accomplished, and theoretical studies from different simulations contradict each other. We investigated the putative liquid-liquid phase transition using the Water potential from Adaptive Force Matching for Ice and Liquid (WAIL). The simulation reveals a first-order phase transition in the supercooled regime with the critical point at ~207 K and 50 MPa. Normal water is high-density liquid (HDL). Low-density liquid (LDL) emerges at lower temperatures. The LDL phase has a density only slightly larger than that of the ice-Ih and shows more long-range order than HDL. However, the transformation from LDL to HDL is spontaneous across the first-order phase transition line, suggesting the LDL configuration is not poorly formed nanocrystalline ice. It has been demonstrated in the past that the WAIL potential provides reliable predictions of water properties such as melting temperature and temperature of maximum density. Compared with other simple water potentials, WAIL is not biased by fitting to experimental properties, and simulation with this potential reflects the prediction of a high-quality first-principle potential energy surface.

  16. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: The experimental and data analysis perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschin, A.; Bartolini, P.; Eramo, R.; Righini, R.; Torre, R.

    2014-08-01

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information.

  17. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Tyagi, M. [NCNR and University of Maryland; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  18. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ristenpart, W D; Belmonte, A; Dollar, F; Stone, H A

    2009-01-01

    Oppositely charged drops have long been assumed to experience an attractive force that favors their coalescence. In this fluid dynamics video we demonstrate the existence of a critical field strength above which oppositely charged drops do not coalesce. We observe that appropriately positioned and oppositely charged drops migrate towards one another in an applied electric field; but whereas the drops coalesce as expected at low field strengths, they are repelled from one another after contact at higher field strengths. Qualitatively, the drops appear to `bounce' off one another. We directly image the transient formation of a meniscus bridge between the bouncing drops.

  19. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  20. Dancing drops over vibrating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Helbig, Markus; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Bestehorn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We study the motion of a liquid drop on a solid plate simultaneously submitted to horizontal and vertical harmonic vibrations. The investigation is done via a phase field model earlier developed for describing static and dynamic contact angles. The density field is nearly constant in every bulk region (ρ = 1 in the liquid phase, ρ ≈ 0 in the vapor phase) and varies continuously from one phase to the other with a rapid but smooth variation across the interfaces. Complicated explicit boundary conditions along the interface are avoided and captured implicitly by gradient terms of ρ in the hydrodynamic basic equations. The contact angle θ is controlled through the density at the solid substrate ρ S , a free parameter varying between 0 and 1 [R. Borcia, I.D. Borcia, M. Bestehorn, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066307 (2008)]. We emphasize the swaying and the spreading modes, earlier theoretically identified by Benilov and Billingham via a shallow-water model for drops climbing uphill along an inclined plane oscillating vertically [E.S. Benilov, J. Billingham, J. Fluid Mech. 674, 93 (2011)]. The numerical phase field simulations will be completed by experiments. Some ways to prevent the release of the dancing drops along a hydrophobic surface into the gas atmosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  1. Water Penetration through a Superhydrophobic Mesh During a Drop Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seunggeol; Sen, Prosenjit; Nam, Youngsuk; Lee, Choongyeop

    2017-01-06

    When a water drop impacts a mesh having submillimeter pores, a part of the drop penetrates through the mesh if the impact velocity is sufficiently large. Here we show that different surface wettability, i.e., hydrophobicity and superhydrophobicity, leads to different water penetration dynamics on a mesh during drop impact. We show, despite the water repellence of a superhydrophobic surface, that water can penetrate a superhydrophobic mesh more easily (i.e., at a lower impact velocity) over a hydrophobic mesh via a penetration mechanism unique to a superhydrophobic mesh. On a superhydrophobic mesh, the water penetration can occur during the drop recoil stage, which appears at a lower impact velocity than the critical impact velocity for water penetration right upon impact. We propose that this unique water penetration on a superhydrophobic mesh can be attributed to the combination of the hydrodynamic focusing and the momentum transfer from the water drop when it is about to bounce off the surface, at which point the water drop retrieves most of its kinetic energy due to the negligible friction on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  2. New directions for gravitational wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Raymond Y

    2009-01-01

    "Millikan oil drops" are drops of superfluid helium coated with electrons, and levitated in a strong, inhomogeneous magnetic field. When the temperature of the system becomes very low compared to the cyclotron gap energy, the system remains in its quantum ground state. Two such levitated charged drops can have their charge-to-mass ratio critically adjusted so that the forces of gravity and electricity between the drops are in balance. Then it is predicted that the amount of scattered electromagnetic and gravitational radiation from the drops are equalized, along with these two kinds of forces. The cross sections for the scattering of the two kinds of radiation can become large, hard-sphere cross-sections at the first Mie resonance, due to the hard-wall boundary conditions on the surfaces of the spheres for both kinds of radiations. An efficient quantum transduction process between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation by such a pair of drops is predicted at microwave frequencies, and a Hertz-like experi...

  3. Freezing avoidance by supercooling in Olea europaea cultivars: the role of apoplastic water, solute content and cell wall rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Nadia S; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    Plants can avoid freezing damage by preventing extracellular ice formation below the equilibrium freezing temperature (supercooling). We used Olea europaea cultivars to assess which traits contribute to avoid ice nucleation at sub-zero temperatures. Seasonal leaf water relations, non-structural carbohydrates, nitrogen and tissue damage and ice nucleation temperatures in different plant parts were determined in five cultivars growing in the Patagonian cold desert. Ice seeding in roots occurred at higher temperatures than in stems and leaves. Leaves of cold acclimated cultivars supercooled down to -13 °C, substantially lower than the minimum air temperatures observed in the study site. During winter, leaf ice nucleation and leaf freezing damage (LT50 ) occurred at similar temperatures, typical of plant tissues that supercool. Higher leaf density and cell wall rigidity were observed during winter, consistent with a substantial acclimation to sub-zero temperatures. Larger supercooling capacity and lower LT50 were observed in cold-acclimated cultivars with higher osmotically active solute content, higher tissue elastic adjustments and lower apoplastic water. Irreversible leaf damage was only observed in laboratory experiments at very low temperatures, but not in the field. A comparative analysis of closely related plants avoids phylogenetic independence bias in a comparative study of adaptations to survive low temperatures.

  4. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on the supercooling ability and mining of antifreeze proteins of the Chinese white wax scale insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shu-Hui; Yang, Pu; Sun, Tao; Qi, Qian; Wang, Xue-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Ying; Liu, Bo-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, can survive at extremely low temperatures, and some overwintering individuals exhibit supercooling at temperatures below -30°C. To investigate the deep supercooling ability of E. pela, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to delineate the major gene and protein families responsible for the deep supercooling ability of overwintering females. Gene Ontology (GO) classification and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis indicated that genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium, and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways and pathways associated with the biosynthesis of soluble sugars, sugar alcohols and free amino acids were dominant. Proteins responsible for low-temperature stress, such as cold acclimation proteins, glycerol biosynthesis-related enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) were identified. However, no antifreeze proteins (AFPs) were identified through sequence similarity search methods. A random forest approach identified 388 putative AFPs in the proteome. The AFP gene ep-afp was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein exhibited a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.97°C, suggesting its potential role in the deep supercooling ability of E. pela.

  5. Elastic properties of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk glass in supercooled liquid region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishiyama, N.; Inoue, A.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2001-01-01

    In situ ultrasonic measurements for the Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk glass in three states: Glassy solid, supercooled liquid, and crystalline, have been performed. It is found that velocities of both longitudinal and transverse waves and elastic moduli (shear modulus, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, and L...

  6. Star-shaped Oscillations of Leidenfrost Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-organized, star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a heated, curved surface. We observe modes with $n = 2-13$ lobes around the drop periphery. We find that both the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations depend only on the capillary length of the liquid, and are independent of the drop radius and substrate temperature. However, the number of observed modes depend sensitively on the liquid viscosity. The dominant frequency of pressure variations under the drop is approximately twice that the drop oscillation frequency, consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. Our results suggest that the star-shaped oscillations are hydrodynamic in origin, and are driven by capillary waves beneath the drop. The exact mechanism by which the vapor flow initiates the capillary waves is likely related to static "brim waves" in levitated, viscous drops.

  7. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  8. Improving Earthquake Stress Drop Measurements - What can we Really Resolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Ruhl, C. J.; Kozlowska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake stress drop is fundamental to understanding the physics of the rupture process. Although it is superficially simple to calculate an estimate of stress drop from the corner frequency of the radiated spectrum, it is much harder to be certain that measurements are reliable and accurate. The same is true of other measurements of stress drop and radiated energy. The large number of studies of earthquake stress drop, the high variability in results (~0.1-100 MPa), the large uncertainties, and the ongoing scaling controversy are evidence for this. We investigate the resolution and uncertainties of stress drops calculated using an empirical Green's function (EGF) approach. Earthquakes in 3 sequences at Parkfield, California are recorded by multiple borehole stations and have abundant smaller earthquakes to use as EGFs (Abercrombie, 2014). The earthquakes in the largest magnitude cluster (M~2.1) exhibit clear temporal variation of stress drop. Independent studies obtained a similar pattern implying that it is resolvable for these well-recorded, simple sources. The borehole data reveal a similar temporal pattern for another sequence, not resolvable in an earlier study using surface recordings. The earthquakes in the third sequence have complex sources; corner frequency measurements for this sequence are highly variable and poorly resolved. We use the earthquakes in the first cluster to quantify the uncertainties likely to arise in less optimal settings. The limited signal bandwidth and the quality of the EGF assumption are major sources of error. Averaging across multiple stations improves the resolution, as does using multiple good EGFs (Abercrombie, 2015). We adapt the approach to apply to larger data sets. We focus on New Zealand, with the aim of resolving stress drop variability in a variety of tectonic settings. We investigate stacking over stations and multiple EGFs, and compare earthquakes (M~3-6) from both the overlying and the subducting plates.

  9. Supercooled Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    53) study by Egelstaff et al Emulsion samples have also been briefly studied but background difficulties have made resolution of the results...Angell, L., Angell, C. A. ., Phys. Chem. (to be published) 52. Bosio, L., Chen, S.-H., Teixeira, 3. Phys. Rev. A (in press) 53. Egelstaff , P. A., Polo, 3

  10. Electrohydrodynamics of a particle-covered drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouriemi, Malika; Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a drop nearly-completely covered with a particle monolayer in a uniform DC electric field. The weakly conducting fluid system consists of a silicon oil drop suspended in castor oil. A broad range of particle sizes, conductivities, and shapes is explored. In weak electric fields, the presence of particles increases drop deformation compared to a particle-free drop and suppresses the electrohydrodynamic flow. Very good agreement is observed between the measured drop deformation and the small deformation theory derived for surfactant-laden drops (Nganguia et al., 2013). In stronger electric fields, where drops are expected to undergo Quincke rotation (Salipante and Vlahovska, 2010), the presence of the particles greatly decreases the threshold for rotation and the stationary tilted drop configuration observed for clean drop is replaced by a spinning drop with either a wobbling inclination or a very low inclination. These behaviors resemble the predicted response of rigid ellipsoids in uniform electric fields. At even stronger electric fields, the particles can form dynamic wings or the drop implodes. The similar behavior of particle-covered and surfactant-laden drops provides new insights into understanding stability of Pickering emulsions. Supported by NSF-CBET 1437545.

  11. Local Condensation Curve from Dropwise to Glacial Region on Large Vertical Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Tadao; Shimada, Ryohachi; Takeyama, Toshiro

    The existence of several regimes of condensation heat transfer is well known. Regimes are given academic names as dropwise, transition, film and glacial condensation along the condensation curve showing the relationship between heat flux and surface subcooling. In case of comparatively large vertical surface, the lower part on the gravitational direction is affected by condensate from the upper part, and will be covered by water stream like a rivulet. It has no longer an existence as dropwise condition, and it is absolutely impossible that heat transfer problems under constant temperature or constant heat flux take place. The reason is why as follows, heat transfer of film condensation is some orders of magnitude less than dropwise condensation, and various regimes exist together simultaneously. In the present paper we shall try to observe the coexisting appearance of regimes in steam condensation at atmospheric pressure and make researches in the local condensation curve from top to bottom on the same surface, that is divided into eight parts in the rear side. The main results are shown as follows (1) Enhancement of heat transfer by wiping of drops appears toward somewhat lower position from top. (2) Frazil ice is observed in the supercooled liquid film flowing down on glacial condensation. (3) The regime of glacial condensation describes a thermal hysteresis loop.

  12. Why do couples drop-out from IVF treatment? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberg, M F G; Eijkemans, M J C; Heijnen, E M E W; Broekmans, F J; de Klerk, C; Fauser, B C J M; Macklon, N S

    2008-09-01

    Cumulative IVF pregnancy rates are compromised by the large number of couples who drop-out of treatment before achieving pregnancy. The aim of this study was to identify the role of the treatment strategy applied, and potential other factors that influence the decision of couples to discontinue treatment. The incidence of drop-out from IVF treatment and factors related to drop-out were studied in a cohort of IVF patients aged dropped out of IVF treatment. The physical or psychological burden of treatment was the most frequent cause of drop-out (28%). The application of a mild treatment strategy (mild ovarian stimulation along with the transfer of a single embryo) significantly reduced the chance of drop-out (hazard ratio (HR) 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.31-0.96). When a mild IVF strategy was employed, the association between the baseline anxiety score and drop-out was reduced by >50%. The presence of severe male subfertility (HR 4.80; 95% CI, 1.63-14.13) and the failure to achieve embryo transfer (odds ratio 0.41; 95% CI, 0.24-0.72) were also related to drop-out. Reducing drop-out rate is crucial to further improve the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of IVF treatment. An important factor determining the risk of drop-out is the burden of the treatment strategy. The application of a mild treatment strategy and managing patient's expectations might reduce drop-out rates.

  13. The Reasons Why Farm Children Drop Out of School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Alberto

    To study the relationship between the school and the rural family, and particularly to establish reasons for student dropout, a questionnaire was administered in 1973 to 103 students who dropped out of school in 2 large rural towns in the Veneto, Italy. Responses indicated that about 60% of the adolescents left school to help out the family or…

  14. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  15. Evaporative supercooling characteristics of single water droplet in ice-slurry production system with evaporative supercooled water%蒸发式过冷水制冰中单个水滴的蒸发过冷特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫俊海; 张小松

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the evaporation characteristics of single water droplet in low temperature and low humidity ratio air in ice production system with evaporative supercooled water, a mathematical model of evaporative supercooling process of single water droplet was proposed. The evaporation process of droplet in supercooling stage was simulated with theoretical model and the results are basically consistent with the experiment on suspended single water droplet, so it is feasible to predict the evaporative supercooling characteristics of small water droplet by the mathematical model. The influence of initial diameter and temperature of water droplet, air temperature, humidity ratio of air, and air velocity on the temperature of water droplet during its evaporative supercooling process was analyzed. The numerical results show that smaller diameter and lower temperature of water droplet and larger air velocity can increase the cooling rate of water droplet and shorten the supercooling time reaching steady state evaporation stage. Additionally, lowering the temperature or humidity ratio of air can not only improve the cooling rate of water droplet, but also increase the supercooling degree of water droplet reaching steady state evaporation stage. The investigation of evaporative supercooling process of water droplet can provide a foundation for improving the efficiency of ice production and optimal design for ice-making system with evaporative supercooled water.%为分析蒸发式过冷水制冰中单个水滴在此低温低湿空气环境中的蒸发特性,建立了水滴蒸发过冷过程的数理模型.通过悬挂水滴实验与模拟结果的对比,验证了模型的有效性.因此利用该数学模型预测微小直径水滴的蒸发特性是可行的.通过模拟计算获得了水滴初始直径、初始水温、空气温度、空气含湿量和空气流速对水滴蒸发过冷过程的影响.结果表明,水滴初始直径越小、温度越低或空气流速越大,

  16. Using Peltier cells to study solid-liquid-vapour transitions and supercooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torzo, Giacomo [ICIS-CNR and Physics Department of Padova University, Padova (Italy); Soletta, Isabella [Liceo Scientifico Fermi, Alghero (Italy); Branca, Mario [Chemical Department of Sassari University, Sassari (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    We propose an apparatus for teaching experimental thermodynamics in undergraduate introductory courses, using thermoelectric modules and a real-time data acquisition system. The device may be made at low cost, still providing an easy approach to the investigation of liquid-solid and liquid-vapour phase transitions and of metastable states (supercooling). The thermoelectric module (a technological evolution of the thermocouple) is by itself an interesting subject that offers a clear example of both thermo-electric (Seebeck effect) and electro-thermal (Peltier effect) energy transformation. We report here some cooling/heating measurements for several liquids and mixtures, including water, salt/water, ethanol/water and sodium acetate, showing how to evaluate the phenomena of freezing point depression and elevation, and how to evaluate the water latent heat.

  17. Using Peltier cells to study solid liquid vapour transitions and supercooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torzo, Giacomo; Soletta, Isabella; Branca, Mario

    2007-05-01

    We propose an apparatus for teaching experimental thermodynamics in undergraduate introductory courses, using thermoelectric modules and a real-time data acquisition system. The device may be made at low cost, still providing an easy approach to the investigation of liquid solid and liquid vapour phase transitions and of metastable states (supercooling). The thermoelectric module (a technological evolution of the thermocouple) is by itself an interesting subject that offers a clear example of both thermo-electric (Seebeck effect) and electro-thermal (Peltier effect) energy transformation. We report here some cooling/heating measurements for several liquids and mixtures, including water, salt/water, ethanol/water and sodium acetate, showing how to evaluate the phenomena of freezing point depression and elevation, and how to evaluate the water latent heat.

  18. The glass crossover from mean-field Spin-Glasses to supercooled liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Tommaso

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic-Beta-Relaxation provides a characterisation of the glass crossover in discontinuous Spin-Glasses and supercoooled liquid. Notably it can be derived through a rigorous computation from a dynamical Landau theory. In this paper, I will discuss the precise meaning of this connection in a language that does not require familiarity with statistical field theory. I will discuss finite-size corrections in mean-field Spin-Glass models and loop corrections in finite-dimensional models that are both described by the dynamical Landau theory considered. Then I will argue that the same Landau theory can be associated to supercooled liquid described by Mode-Coupling Theory invoking a physical principle of time-scale invariance.

  19. A maximum-entropy approach to the adiabatic freezing of a supercooled liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestipino, Santi

    2013-04-28

    I employ the van der Waals theory of Baus and co-workers to analyze the fast, adiabatic decay of a supercooled liquid in a closed vessel with which the solidification process usually starts. By imposing a further constraint on either the system volume or pressure, I use the maximum-entropy method to quantify the fraction of liquid that is transformed into solid as a function of undercooling and of the amount of a foreign gas that could possibly be also present in the test tube. Upon looking at the implications of thermal and mechanical insulation for the energy cost of forming a solid droplet within the liquid, I identify one situation where the onset of solidification inevitably occurs near the wall in contact with the bath.

  20. Discrimination of micrometre-sized ice and super-cooled droplets in mixed-phase cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Greenaway, R. S.; Field, P.; Johnson, D. W.

    Preliminary experimental results are presented from an aircraft-mounted probe designed to provide in situ data on cloud particle shape, size, and number concentration. In particular, the probe has been designed to facilitate discrimination between super-cooled water droplets and ice crystals of 1-25 μm size within mixed-phase clouds and to provide information on cloud interstitial aerosols. The probe acquires spatial light scattering data from individual particles at throughput rates of several thousand particles per second. These data are logged at 100 ms intervals to allow the distribution and number concentration of each particle type to be determined with 10 m spatial resolution at a typical airspeed of 100 m s -1. Preliminary results from flight data recorded in altocumulus castellanus, showing liquid water phase, mixed phase, and ice phase are presented to illustrate the probe's particle discrimination capabilities.

  1. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relative roles of volume and surface nucleation in the freezing of water droplets. Nucleation experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled liquid water aerosols with radii between about 1 and 3 μ m. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rate between 234.8 and 236.2 K are derived with help of a microphysical model from aerosol compositions and size distributions based on infrared extinction measurements in the aerosol flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process and has implications for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models.

  2. Volume and structural analysis of super-cooled water under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duki, Solomon F.; Tsige, Mesfin

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by recent experimental study of super-cooled water at high pressure [1], we performed atomistic molecular dynamic simulations study on bulk water molecules at isothermal-isobaric ensemble. These simulations are performed at temperatures that range from 40 K to 380 K using two different cooling rates, 10K/ns and 10K/5ns, and pressure that ranges from 1atm to 10000 atm. Our analysis for the variation of the volume of the bulk sample against temperature indicates a downward concave shape for pressures above certain values, as reported in [1]. The same downward concave behavior is observed at high pressure on the mean-squared-displacements (MSD) of the water molecules when the MSD is plotted against time. To get further insight on the effect of the pressure on the sample we have also performed a structural analysis of the sample.[4pt] [1] O. Mishima, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144503 (2010);

  3. Water and its relatives: the stable, supercooled and particularly the stretched, regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Meadley, Stacey L

    2014-01-01

    While the water molecule is simple, its condensed phase liquid behavior is so complex that no consensus description has emerged despite three centuries of effort. Here we identify features of its behavior that are the most peculiar, hence suggest ways forward. We examine the properties of water at the boundaries of common experience, including stable states at high pressure, the supercooled state at normal and elevated pressure, and the stretched ("negative pressure") state, out to the limits of mechanical stability. The familiar anomalies at moderate pressures (viscosity and density (TMD) behavior, etc.), are not explained by H-bond breaking, according to common bond-breaking criteria. A comparison of data on the TMD, at both positive and negative pressures, with the predictions of popular pair potential models, shows dramatic discrepancies appearing in the stretched liquid domain. This prompts questions on the second critical point (TC2) hypothesis that has been guiding much current thinking. We turn to rel...

  4. Crystallization behavior of supercooled smectic cholesteryl myristate nanoparticles containing phospholipids as stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Koch, Michel; Drechsler, M;

    2005-01-01

    Supercooled smectic nanoparticles based on physiological cholesterol esters are under investigation as a potential novel carrier system for lipophilic drugs. The present study investigates the very complex crystallization behavior of such nanoparticles stabilized with the aid of phospholipids....... Phospholipid and phospholipid/bile salt stabilized cholesteryl myristate dispersions were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization and characterized by particle size measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. To obtain fractions with very small smectic...... nanoparticles, selected dispersions were ultracentrifuged. A mixture of cholesteryl myristate and the phospholipid used for the stabilization of the dispersions was also investigated by light microscopy. The nanoparticles usually display a bimodal crystallization event which depends on the thermal treatment...

  5. Local structure of equilibrium and supercooled Ti-Zr-Ni liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Hyers, R.; Rathz, T.; Rogers, J.; Robinson, D.; Goldman, A.; Kelton, K.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, we reported the results of experimental in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction studies of electrostatically levitated equilibrium and supercooled metallic elements and alloy liquids, showing evidence for icosahedral short-range ordering (ISRO). In this paper, these studies are extended to binary Ti-Zr and ternary Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. From a cluster-based analysis of the x-ray structure factors, it is concluded that ISRO in the binary alloys becomes progressively more dominant, and the coherence length of the order becomes longer, with the addition of Ni, especially near the concentration of 21 at. % Ni. The effect of chemical interactions among Ti/Zr-Ni and the atomic size on the stabilization of the ISRO is discussed.

  6. Stable glass transformation to supercooled liquid via surface-initiated growth front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallen, Stephen F; Traynor, Katherine; McMahon, Robert J; Ediger, M D; Mates, Thomas E

    2009-02-13

    Highly stable glasses of tris-naphthylbenzene transform into a liquid when annealed above the glass transition temperature T_{g}. In contrast to the predictions of standard models, the observed transformation is spatially inhomogeneous. Secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments on isotopically labeled multilayer films show that the liquid grows into the stable glass with sharp growth fronts initiated at the free surface and at the interface with the substrate. For the free surface, the growth velocity is constant in time and has the same temperature dependence as self-diffusion in the equilibrium supercooled liquid. These stable glasses are packed so efficiently that surfaces and interfaces are required to initiate the transformation to the liquid even well above T_{g}.

  7. Electron Correlation Microscopy: A New Technique for Studying Local Atom Dynamics Applied to a Supercooled Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Zhang, Pei; Besser, Matthew F; Kramer, Matthew Joseph; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Electron correlation microscopy (ECM) is a new technique that utilizes time-resolved coherent electron nanodiffraction to study dynamic atomic rearrangements in materials. It is the electron scattering equivalent of photon correlation spectroscopy with the added advantage of nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have applied ECM to a Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass, heated inside a scanning transmission electron microscope into a supercooled liquid to measure the structural relaxation time τ between the glass transition temperature T g and the crystallization temperature, T x . τ determined from the mean diffraction intensity autocorrelation function g 2(t) decreases with temperature following an Arrhenius relationship between T g and T g +25 K, and then increases as temperature approaches T x . The distribution of τ determined from the g 2(t) of single speckles is broad and changes significantly with temperature.

  8. Vibrating-Wire, Supercooled Liquid Water Content Sensor Calibration and Characterization Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael C.; Bognar, John A.; Guest, Daniel; Bunt, Fred

    2016-01-01

    NASA conducted a winter 2015 field campaign using weather balloons at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate a validation database for the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System. The weather balloons carried a specialized, disposable, vibrating-wire sensor to determine supercooled liquid water content aloft. Significant progress has been made to calibrate and characterize these sensors. Calibration testing of the vibrating-wire sensors was carried out in a specially developed, low-speed, icing wind tunnel, and the results were analyzed. The sensor ice accretion behavior was also documented and analyzed. Finally, post-campaign evaluation of the balloon soundings revealed a gradual drift in the sensor data with increasing altitude. This behavior was analyzed and a method to correct for the drift in the data was developed.

  9. Deformation behavior of Zr-based bulk metallic glass and composite in the supercooled liquid region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) with a composition of (Zr75Cu25)78.5Ta4Ni10Al7.5 and a bulk metallic glass matrix composite (BMGC) with a composition of (Zr75Cu25)74.5Ta8Ni10Al7.5 have been prepared by copper-mold casting. The compres-sive deformation behavior of the BMG and BMGC was investigated in the super-cooled region at different temperatures and various strain rates ranging from 8×10-4s-1 to 8×10-2s-1. It was found that both the strain rate and test temperature signifi-cantly affect the deformation behavior of the two alloys. The deformation follows Newtonian flow at low strain rates but non-Newtonian flow at high strain rates. The deformation mechanism for the two kinds of alloys was discussed in terms of the transition state theory.

  10. Correlation between supercooled liquid relaxation and glass poisson’s ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Q.J.; Hu, L.N.; Zhou, C.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a correlation between the supercooled liquid (SL) relaxation and glass Poisson’s ratio (v) by comparing the activation energy ratio (r) of the α and the slow β relaxations and the v values for both metallic and nonmetallic glasses. Poisson’s ratio v generally increases with an increase...... in the ratio r and this relation can be described by the empirical function v = 0.5 − A ∗ exp(−B ∗ r), where A and B are constants. This correlation might imply that glass plasticity is associated with the competition between the α and the slow β relaxations in SLs. The underlying physics of this correlation...

  11. Egg Drop Competition Involving Only Toothpicks and Glue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Stephen

    2004-04-01

    The Winston Science Egg Drop Competition is held annually in November, one of a large group of science competitions organized by Lehman Marks of the Winston School in Dallas, TX. The rules for the competition state that the egg package may be constructed of toothpicks and glue only, with a mass limit of 50 g, not including the egg. Once the egg is placed inside the package, it is dropped from a height of 8 m. The winning entry is the one that makes impact in the least amount of time while still protecting the egg. Timing is electronic.

  12. Effects of atmospheric dynamics and aerosols on the fraction of supercooled water clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiming; Lv, Qiaoyi; Zhang, Min; Wang, Tianhe; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Beidou

    2017-02-01

    Based on 8 years of (January 2008-December 2015) cloud phase information from the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Cloud Product (GOCCP), aerosol products from CALIPSO and meteorological parameters from the ERA-Interim products, the present study investigates the effects of atmospheric dynamics on the supercooled liquid cloud fraction (SCF) during nighttime under different aerosol loadings at global scale to better understand the conditions of supercooled liquid water gradually transforming to ice phase. Statistical results indicate that aerosols' effect on nucleation cannot fully explain all SCF changes, especially in those regions where aerosols' effect on nucleation is not a first-order influence (e.g., due to low ice nuclei aerosol frequency). By performing the temporal and spatial correlations between SCFs and different meteorological factors, this study presents specifically the relationship between SCF and different meteorological parameters under different aerosol loadings on a global scale. We find that the SCFs almost decrease with increasing of aerosol loading, and the SCF variation is closely related to the meteorological parameters but their temporal relationship is not stable and varies with the different regions, seasons and isotherm levels. Obviously negative temporal correlations between SCFs versus vertical velocity and relative humidity indicate that the higher vertical velocity and relative humidity the smaller SCFs. However, the patterns of temporal correlation for lower-tropospheric static stability, skin temperature and horizontal wind are relatively more complex than those of vertical velocity and humidity. For example, their close correlations are predominantly located in middle and high latitudes and vary with latitude or surface type. Although these statistical correlations have not been used to establish a certain causal relationship, our results may provide a unique point of view

  13. Drop shaping by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Alexander L; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamic response of a falling drop hit by a laser pulse. Combining high-speed with stroboscopic imaging we report that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a milli-Joule nanosecond laser-pulse deforms and propels forward at several meters per second, until it eventually fragments. We show that the drop motion results from the recoil momentum imparted at the drop surface by water vaporization. We measure the propulsion speed and the time-deformation law of the drop, complemented by boundary integral simulations. We explain the drop propulsion and shaping in terms of the laser pulse energy and drop surface tension. These findings are crucial for the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in lithography machines.

  14. Unstable Leidenfrost Drops on Roughened Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, Jonathan B

    2010-01-01

    Drops placed on a surface with a temperature above the Leidenfrost point float atop an evaporative vapor layer. In this fluid dynamics video, it is shown that for roughened surfaces the Leidenfrost point depends on the drop size, which runs contrary to previous claims of size independence. The thickness of the vapor layer is known to increase with drop radius, suggesting that the surface roughness will not be able to penetrate the vapor layer for drops above a critical size. This size dependence was experimentally verified: at a given roughness and temperature, drops beneath a critical size exhibited transition boiling while drops above the critical size were in the Leidenfrost regime. These Leidenfrost drops were unstable; upon evaporation down to the critical size the vapor film suddenly collapsed.

  15. Persistence of memory in drop breakup: the breakdown of universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Pankaj; Cohen, Itai; Zhang, Wendy W; Siegel, Michael; Howell, Peter; Basaran, Osman A; Nagel, Sidney R

    2003-11-14

    A low-viscosity drop breaking apart inside a viscous fluid is encountered when air bubbles, entrained in thick syrup or honey, rise and break apart. Experiments, simulations, and theory show that the breakup under conditions in which the interior viscosity can be neglected produces an exceptional form of singularity. In contrast to previous studies of drop breakup, universality is violated so that the final shape at breakup retains an imprint of the initial and boundary conditions. A finite interior viscosity, no matter how small, cuts off this form of singularity and produces an unexpectedly long and slender thread. If exterior viscosity is large enough, however, the cutoff does not occur because the minimum drop radius reaches subatomic dimensions first.

  16. Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

  17. Breaking through the Glass Ceiling: The Correlation Between the Self-Diffusivity in and Krypton Permeation through Deeply Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Methanol Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2010-03-28

    Molecular beam techniques, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to explore the relationship between krypton permeation through and the self-diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol at temperatures near (100-115 K) the glass transition temperature, Tg (103 K). Layered films, consisting of CH3OH and CD3OH, are deposited ontop of a monolayer of Kr on a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate at 25 K. Concurrent Kr TPD and RAIRS spectra are acquired during the heating of the composite film to temperatures above Tg. The CO vibrational stretch is sensitive to the local molecular environment and is used to determine the supercooled liquid diffusivity from the intermixing of the isotopic layers. We find that the Kr permeation and the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid are directly and quantitatively correlated. These results validate the rare gas permeation technique as a tool for probing the diffusivity of supercooled liquids.

  18. Breaking through the glass ceiling: The correlation between the self-diffusivity in and krypton permeation through deeply supercooled liquid nanoscale methanol films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2010-03-01

    Molecular beam techniques, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to explore the relationship between krypton permeation through and the self-diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol at temperatures (100-115 K) near the glass transition temperature, Tg (103 K). Layered films, consisting of CH3OH and CD3OH, are deposited on top of a monolayer of Kr on a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate at 25 K. Concurrent Kr TPD and RAIRS spectra are acquired during the heating of the composite film to temperatures above Tg. The CO vibrational stretch is sensitive to the local molecular environment and is used to determine the supercooled liquid diffusivity from the intermixing of the isotopic layers. We find that the Kr permeation and the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid are directly and quantitatively correlated. These results validate the rare-gas permeation technique as a tool for probing the diffusivity of supercooled liquids.

  19. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  20. Impact of ultra-viscous drops: air-film gliding and extreme wetting

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, K.

    2017-01-23

    A drop impacting on a solid surface must push away the intervening gas layer before making contact. This entails a large lubricating air pressure which can deform the bottom of the drop, thus entrapping a bubble under its centre. For a millimetric water drop, the viscous-dominated flow in the thin air layer counteracts the inertia of the drop liquid. For highly viscous drops the viscous stresses within the liquid also affect the interplay between the drop and the gas. Here the drop also forms a central dimple, but its outer edge is surrounded by an extended thin air film, without contacting the solid. This is in sharp contrast with impacts of lower-viscosity drops where a kink in the drop surface forms at the edge of the central disc and makes a circular contact with the solid. Larger drop viscosities make the central air dimple thinner. The thin outer air film subsequently ruptures at numerous random locations around the periphery, when it reaches below 150 nm thickness. This thickness we measure using high-speed two-colour interferometry. The wetted circular contacts expand rapidly, at orders of magnitude larger velocities than would be predicted by a capillary-viscous balance. The spreading velocity of the wetting spots is independent of the liquid viscosity. This may suggest enhanced slip of the contact line, assisted by rarefied-gas effects, or van der Waals forces in what we call extreme wetting. Myriads of micro-bubbles are captured between the local wetting spots.

  1. HIV Patients Drop Out in Indonesia: Associated Factors and Potential Productivity Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiatma YM. Siregar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: this study reported various factors associated with a higher probability of HIV patients drop out, and potential productivity loss due to HIV patients drop out. Methods: we analyzed data of 658 HIV patients from a database in a main referral hospital in Bandung city, West Java, Indonesia from 2007 to 2013. First, we utilized probit regression analysis and included, among others, the following variables: patients’ status (active or drop out, CD4 cell count, TB and opportunistic infection (OI, work status, sex, history of injecting drugs, and support from family and peers. Second, we used the drop out data from our database and CD 4 cell count decline rate from another study to estimate the productivity loss due to HIV patients drop out. Results: lower CD4 cell count was associated with a higher probability of drop out. Support from family/peers, living with family, and diagnosed with TB were associated with lower probability of drop out. The productivity loss at national level due to treatment drop out (consequently, due to CD4 cell count decline can reach US$365 million (using average wage. Conclusion: first, as lower CD 4 cell count was associated with higher probability of drop out, we recommend (to optimize early ARV initiation at a higher CD 4 cell count, involving scaling up HIV service at the community level. Second, family/peer support should be further emphasized to further ensure treatment success. Third, dropping out from ART will result in a relatively large productivity loss.

  2. HIV Patients Drop Out in Indonesia: Associated Factors and Potential Productivity Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Adiatma Ym; Pitriyan, Pipit; Wisaksana, Rudi

    2016-07-01

    this study reported various factors associated with a higher probability of HIV patients drop out, and potential productivity loss due to HIV patients drop out. we analyzed data of 658 HIV patients from a database in a main referral hospital in Bandung city, West Java, Indonesia from 2007 to 2013. First, we utilized probit regression analysis and included, among others, the following variables: patients' status (active or drop out), CD4 cell count, TB and opportunistic infection (OI), work status, sex, history of injecting drugs, and support from family and peers. Second, we used the drop out data from our database and CD 4 cell count decline rate from another study to estimate the productivity loss due to HIV patients drop out. lower CD4 cell count was associated with a higher probability of drop out. Support from family/peers, living with family, and diagnosed with TB were associated with lower probability of drop out. The productivity loss at national level due to treatment drop out (consequently, due to CD4 cell count decline) can reach US$365 million (using average wage). first, as lower CD 4 cell count was associated with higher probability of drop out, we recommend (to optimize) early ARV initiation at a higher CD 4 cell count, involving scaling up HIV service at the community level. Second, family/peer support should be further emphasized to further ensure treatment success. Third, dropping out from ART will result in a relatively large productivity loss.

  3. Creation of nano eye-drops and effective drug delivery to the interior of the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Yoshikazu; Aoyagi, Shigenobu; Tanaka, Yuji; Sato, Kota; Inada, Satoshi; Koseki, Yoshitaka; Onodera, Tsunenobu; Oikawa, Hidetoshi; Kasai, Hitoshi

    2017-03-01

    Nano eye-drops are a new type of ophthalmic treatment with increased potency and reduced side effects. Compounds in conventional eye-drops barely penetrate into the eye because the cornea, located at the surface of eye, has a strong barrier function for preventing invasion of hydrophilic or large-sized materials from the outside. In this work, we describe the utility of nano eye-drops utilising brinzolamide, a commercially available glaucoma treatment drug, as a target compound. Fabrication of the nanoparticles of brinzolamide prodrug increases the eye penetration rate and results in high drug efficacy, compared with that of commercially available brinzolamide eye-drops formulated as micro-sized structures. In addition, the resulting nano eye-drops were not toxic to the corneal epithelium after repeated administration for 1 week. The nano eye-drops may have applications as a next-generation ophthalmic treatment.

  4. Interface Tracking Simulation of Drops Rising through Liquids in a Vertical Pipe Using Three Coordinate Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Hayashi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interface tracking simulations of single drops rising through a vertical pipe are carried out using three coordinate systems, i.e. cylindrical, general curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates, to investigate the effects of coordinate system and spatial resolution on the accuracy of predictions. Experiments of single drops in a vertical pipe are also conducted to obtain experimental data for comparisons with simulations. The drop shape observed are spheroidal and deformed spheroidal at low values of the diameter ratio, Λ, of the sphere-volume equivalent diameter of a drop to the pipe diameter, whereas they take bullet-shapes at large Λ. The conclusions obtained are as follows: (1 the effects of coordinate system on drop shape are small at low Λ. At large Λ, the effects are also small for drops in a low viscosity system, whereas non-physical shape distortion takes place when the Cartesian coordinates are used with low spatial resolution for drops in a high viscosity system, and (2 the drop terminal velocity and the velocity profile in the liquid film between a bullet-shaped drop and a pipe wall are well predicted using all the coordinate systems tested even at low spatial resolution.

  5. Dynamics of Drop Formation in an Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notz; Basaran

    1999-05-01

    The effect of an electric field on the formation of a drop of an inviscid, perfectly conducting liquid from a capillary which protrudes from the top plate of a parallel-plate capacitor into a surrounding dynamically inactive, insulating gas is studied computationally. This free boundary problem which is comprised of the surface Bernoulli equation for the transient drop shape and the Laplace equation for the velocity potential inside the drop and the electrostatic potential outside the drop is solved by a method of lines incorporating the finite element method for spatial discretization. The finite element algorithm employed relies on judicious use of remeshing and element addition to a two-region adaptive mesh to accommodate large domain deformations, and allows the computations to proceed until the thickness of the neck connecting an about to form drop to the rest of the liquid in the capillary is less than 0.1% of the capillary radius. The accuracy of the computations is demonstrated by showing that in the absence of an electric field predictions made with the new algorithm are in excellent agreement with boundary integral calculations (Schulkes, R. M. S. M. J. Fluid Mech. 278, 83 (1994)) and experimental measurements on water drops (Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. Phys. Fluids 7(6), 1184 (1995)). In the presence of an electric field, the algorithm predicts that as the strength of the applied field increases, the mode of drop formation changes from simple dripping to jetting to so-called microdripping, in accordance with experimental observations (Cloupeau, M., and Prunet-Foch, B. J. Aerosol Sci. 25(6), 1021 (1994); Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. J. Fluid Mech. 326, 239 (1996)). Computational predictions of the primary drop volume and drop length at breakup are reported over a wide range of values of the ratios of electrical, gravitational, and inertial forces to surface tension force. In contrast to previously mentioned cases where both the flow rate in the tube

  6. Footprint Geometry and Sessile Drop Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H.

    2016-11-01

    How does a sessile drop resonate if its footprint is square (square drop)? In this talk, we discuss the two distinct families of observed modes in our experiments. One family (spherical modes) is identified with the natural modes of capillary spherical caps, and the other (grid modes) with Faraday waves on a square bath (square Faraday waves). A square drop exhibits grid or spherical modes depending on its volume, and the two families of modes arise depending on how wavenumber selection of footprint geometry and capillarity compete. For square drops, a dominant effect of footprint constraint leads to grid modes which are constrained response; otherwise the drops exhibit spherical modes, the characteristic of sessile drops on flat plates. Chun-Ti Chang takes his new position at National Taiwan University on Aug. 15th, 2016. Until then, Chun-Ti Chang is affiliated with Technical University Dortmund, Germany.

  7. Sepsis from dropped clips at laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Sarwat E-mail: sarwathussain@hotmail.com

    2001-12-01

    We report seven patients in whom five dropped surgical clips and two gallstones were visualized in the peritoneal cavity, on radiological studies. In two, subphrenic abscesses and empyemas developed as a result of dropped clips into the peritoneal cavity during or following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In one of these two, a clip was removed surgically from the site of an abscess. In two other patients dropped gallstones, and in three, dropped clips led to no complications. These were seen incidentally on studies done for other indications. Abdominal abscess secondary to dropped gallstones is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We conclude that even though dropped surgical clips usually do not cause problems, they should be considered as a risk additional to other well-known causes of post-LC abdominal sepsis.

  8. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  9. Stability of a compound sessile drop at the axisymmetric configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chatain, Dominique; Anna, Shelley L; Garoff, Stephen

    2016-01-15

    The equilibrium configuration of compound sessile drops has been calculated previously in the absence of gravity. Using the Laplace equations, we establish seven dimensionless parameters describing the axisymmetric configuration in the presence of gravity. The equilibrium axisymmetric configuration can be either stable or unstable depending on the fluid properties. A stability criterion is established by calculating forces on a perturbed Laplacian shape. In the zero Bond number limit, the stability criterion depends on the density ratio, two ratios of interfacial tensions, the volume ratio of the two drops, and the contact angle. We use Surface Evolver to examine the stability of compound sessile drops at small and large Bond numbers and compare with the zero Bond number approximation. Experimentally, we realize a stable axisymmetric compound sessile drop in air, where the buoyancy force exerted by the air is negligible. Finally, using a pair of fluids in which the density ratio can be tuned nearly independently of the interfacial tensions, the stability transition is verified for the axisymmetric configuration. Even though the perturbations are different for the theory, simulations and experiments, both simulations and experiments agree closely with the zero Bond number approximation, exhibiting a small discrepancy at large Bond number.

  10. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K., E-mail: richard.bowles@usask.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5C9 (Canada)

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  11. Water drop impact onto oil covered solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ningli; Chen, Huanchen; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2016-11-01

    Droplet impact onto an oily surface can be encountered routinely in industrial applications; e.g., in spray cooling. It is not clear from literature what impact an oil film may have on the impact process. In this work, water drop impact onto both hydrophobic (glass) and hydrophilic (OTS) substrates which were covered by oil films (silicone) of different thickness (5um-50um) and viscosity (5cst-100cst) were performed. The effects of drop impact velocity, film thickness, and viscosity of the oil film and wettability of the substrate were studied. Our results show that when the film viscosity and impact velocity is low, the water drop deformed into the usual disk shape after impact, and rebounded from the surface. Such rebound phenomena disappears, when the viscosity of oil becomes very large. With the increase of the impact velocity, crown and splashing appears in the spreading phase. The crown and splashing behavior appears more easily with the increase of film thickness and decrease of its viscosity. It was also found that the substrate wettability can only affect the impact process in cases which drop has a large Webber number (We = 594), and the film's viscosity and thickness are small. This work was support by National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Project Number is 51506084.

  12. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercooled under-ice ocean boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Miles G.; Stevens, Craig L.; Smith, Inga J.; Robinson, Natalie J.

    2016-04-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercooled seawater. The data show that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. Platelet growth in supercooled water under thick ice appears to be rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the underside of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  13. Pressure Induced Liquid-to-Liquid Transition in Zr-based Supercooled Melts and Pressure Quenched Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmowski, W.; Gierlotka, S.; Wang, Z.; Yokoyama, Y.; Palosz, B.; Egami, T.

    2017-07-26

    Through high-energy x-ray diffraction and atomic pair density function analysis we find that Zr-based metallic alloy, heated to the supercooled liquid state under hydrostatic pressure and then quenched to room temperature, exhibits a distinct glassy structure. The PDF indicates that the Zr-Zr distances in this glass are significantly reduced compared to those quenched without pressure. Annealing at the glass transition temperature at ambient pressure reverses structural changes and the initial glassy state is recovered. This result suggests that pressure causes a liquid-to-liquid phase transition in this metallic alloy supercooled melt. Such a pressure induced transition is known for covalent liquids, but has not been observed for metallic liquids. The High Pressure Quenched glasses are stable in ambient conditions after decompression.

  14. Mass Remaining During Evaporation of Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    to> \\fyj Greek Symbols P Contact angle of sessile drop . n Droplet shape factor = h/d 6 Non-dimensional time = t/i V Air kinematic viscosity...factor n, = h / d (where h = maximum height of the drop ), which can also be directly related to the contact angle (P) of the drop , that is r| = (l-cos(P...three drop size (initial mass or volume) conditions with all other conditions the same. These runs have a constant contact angle , (3 = 16.5° ± 1.5

  15. Rapid Drop Dynamics During Superhydrophobic Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Boreyko, Jonathan; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2008-11-01

    Rapid drop motion is observed on superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation; condensate drops with diameter of order 10 μm can move at above 100G and 0.1 m/s. When water vapor condenses on a horizontal superhydrophobic surface, condensate drops move in a seemingly random direction. The observed motion is attributed to the energy released through coalescence of neighboring condensate drops. A scaling analysis captured the initial acceleration and terminal velocity. Our work is a step forward in understanding the dynamics of superhydrophobic condensation occurring in both natural water-repellant plants and engineered dropwise condensers.

  16. Numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    A vibrated drop constitutes a very rich physical system, blending both interfacial and volume phenomena. A remarkable experimental study was performed by M. Costalonga highlighting sessile drop motion subject to horizontal, vertical and oblique vibration. Several intriguing phenomena are observed such as drop walking and rapid droplet ejection. We perform three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drops where the phenomena described above are computed using the massively parallel multiphase code BLUE. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  17. Impact force of a falling drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Dan; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Xavier Boutillon Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Controlling droplet deposition is crucial in many industrial processes such as spraying pesticides on crops, inkjet printing or spray coating. Therefore, the dynamics of drop impacts have been extensively studied for more than one century. However, few literature describe the impacting force of a drop on a solid flat surface, although it might be a way to measure the size distribution of a collection of falling drops. We investigated experimentally how the instantaneous force at impact depends on impact velocity and drop radius. We also propose a new model to understand our observations. Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, CNRS, ESPCI, Paris France & Ladhyx, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France.

  18. Drops moving along and across a filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    The present work is devoted to the experimental study of oil drop motion both along and across a filament due to the air jet blowing. In case of drop moving along the filament, phenomena such as drop stick-slip motion, shape oscillations, shedding of a tail along the filament, the tail capillary instability and drop recoil motion were observed which were rationalized in the framework of simplified models. Experiments with cross-flow of the surrounding gas relative to the filament with an oil drop on it were conducted, with air velocity in the range of 7.23 to 22.7 m s-1. The Weber number varied from 2 to 40 and the Ohnesorge number varied from 0.07 to 0.8. The lower and upper critical Weber numbers were introduced to distinguish between the beginning of the drop blowing off the filament and the onset of the bag-stamen breakup. The range of the Weber number between these two critical values is filled with three types of vibrational breakup: V1 (a balloon-like drop being blown off), V2 (a drop on a single stamen being blown off), and V3 (a drop on a double stamen being blown off). The Weber number/Ohnesorge number plane was delineated into domains of different breakup regimes. The work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  19. Drop deformation by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Klein, Alexander L; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Lohse, Detlef; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2015-01-01

    A free-falling absorbing liquid drop hit by a nanosecond laser-pulse experiences a strong recoil-pressure kick. As a consequence, the drop propels forward and deforms into a thin sheet which eventually fragments. We study how the drop deformation depends on the pulse shape and drop properties. We first derive the velocity field inside the drop on the timescale of the pressure pulse, when the drop is still spherical. This yields the kinetic-energy partition inside the drop, which precisely measures the deformation rate with respect to the propulsion rate, before surface tension comes into play. On the timescale where surface tension is important the drop has evolved into a thin sheet. Its expansion dynamics is described with a slender-slope model, which uses the impulsive energy-partition as an initial condition. Completed with boundary integral simulations, this two-stage model explains the entire drop dynamics and its dependance on the pulse shape: for a given propulsion, a tightly focused pulse results in a...

  20. Two-structure thermodynamics for the TIP4P/2005 model of water covering supercooled and deeply stretched regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, John W.; Singh, Rakesh S.; Sparano, Evan M.; Ricci, Francesco; González, Miguel A.; Valeriani, Chantal; Abascal, José L. F.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.; Caupin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising frameworks for understanding the anomalies of cold and supercooled water postulates the existence of two competing, interconvertible local structures. If the non-ideality in the Gibbs energy of mixing overcomes the ideal entropy of mixing of these two structures, a liquid-liquid phase transition, terminated at a liquid-liquid critical point, is predicted. Various versions of the "two-structure equation of state" (TSEOS) based on this concept have shown remarkable agreement with both experimental data for metastable, deeply supercooled water and simulations of molecular water models. However, existing TSEOSs were not designed to describe the negative pressure region and do not account for the stability limit of the liquid state with respect to the vapor. While experimental data on supercooled water at negative pressures may shed additional light on the source of the anomalies of water, such data are very limited. To fill this gap, we have analyzed simulation results for TIP4P/2005, one of the most accurate classical water models available. We have used recently published simulation data, and performed additional simulations, over a broad range of positive and negative pressures, from ambient temperature to deeply supercooled conditions. We show that, by explicitly incorporating the liquid-vapor spinodal into a TSEOS, we are able to match the simulation data for TIP4P/2005 with remarkable accuracy. In particular, this equation of state quantitatively reproduces the lines of extrema in density, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric heat capacity. Contrary to an explanation of the thermodynamic anomalies of water based on a "retracing spinodal," the liquid-vapor spinodal in the present TSEOS continues monotonically to lower pressures upon cooling, influencing but not giving rise to density extrema and other thermodynamic anomalies.

  1. Non-contact property measurements of liquid and supercooled ceramics with a hybrid electrostatic-aerodynamic levitation furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi; Paradis, Paul-Francois; 石川 毅彦; 依田 真一

    2005-01-01

    The use of an hybrid pressurized electrostatic-aerodynamic levitation furnace and procedures developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency overcame the contamination problems associated with the processing of ceramics under extreme temperature conditions. This made possible property measurements over wide temperature ranges that cover the superheated as well as the supercooled states. In this study, samples of various ceramics were levitated and their densities were found as a function ...

  2. Correlation for Sessile Drop Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Zion, Peter; Pursell, Christopher; Wassom, Gregory; Mandelkorn, Brenton; Nkinthorn, Chris

    2016-11-01

    To better understand how the evaporation of sessile drops and small puddles is controlled by the vapor phase transport mechanisms of mass diffusion and buoyancy-induced convection, the evaporation rates of eight liquids evaporating under a broad range of ambient conditions were correlated with physical and geometrical properties. Examination of the correlation provides valuable insight into how the roles of diffusive and convective transport change with physical and geometrical parameters. The correlation predicts measured evaporation rates to within a root-mean-square error of 7.3%. The correlation is composed of two terms, a term which provides the rate of evaporation under diffusion-only conditions, and a term which provides the influence of convection. This second term suggests the manner in which the processes of diffusion and convection are coupled. Both processes are dependent on the distribution of the vapor, through the molar concentration gradient for diffusion and through the mass density gradient for convection. The term representing the influence of convection is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of diffusivity, indicating the tendency of diffusive transport to reduce convection by making the vapor distribution more uniform. Financial support was provided by the ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  3. Molecular dynamics of the supercooled pharmaceutical agent posaconazole studied via differential scanning calorimetry and dielectric and mechanical spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrjanowicz, K; Kaminski, K; Wlodarczyk, P; Grzybowska, K; Tarnacka, M; Zakowiecki, D; Garbacz, G; Paluch, M; Jurga, S

    2013-10-07

    This paper presents comprehensive studies on the molecular dynamics of a pharmaceutically important substance, posaconazole. In order to characterize relaxation dynamics in the supercooled liquid and glassy states, dielectric and mechanical spectroscopies were applied. Dielectric data have indicated multiple relaxation processes that appear above and below the glass transition temperature Tg (τα=100 s) of posaconazole. From the curvature of the dielectric log10(τα) versus inverse of temperature dependence, we determine so-called "fragility", being a very popular parameter for classifying the structural dynamics of supercooled liquids and polymers. From the calculations, we get m=150, which means that is one of the most fragile glass-forming liquids. In this paper, the relaxation dynamics of supercooled posaconazole extracted from the dielectric response function was also confronted with shear-mechanical relaxation. Finally, we have also presented a direct comparison of the fragility and the number of dynamically correlated molecules Nc determined from dynamic calorimetry curves and dielectric and mechanical spectroscopies, showing a clear deviation in the picture of glass-transition dynamics generated by calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques.

  4. Improvements of the experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids using horizontal capillary tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinš Václav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental apparatus with a horizontal capillary tube for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids, i.e. liquids in a metastable state below the equilibrium freezing point, was designed and tested in the previous study [V. Vinš et al., EPJ Web Conf. 92, 02108 (2015]. In this work, recent modifications of both the experimental setup and the measurement analysis are described. The main aim is to improve the accuracy and the reproducibility of measured surface tension and to achieve higher degrees of supercooling. Temperature probes measuring the temperature of cooling medium near the horizontal capillary tube were calibrated in the relevant temperature range from – 31 °C to + 45 °C. An additional pressure transducer was installed in the helium distribution setup at the position close to the capillary tube. The optical setup observing the liquid meniscus at the open end of the horizontal capillary tube together with the video analysis were thoroughly revised. The red laser illuminating the liquid meniscus, used at the original apparatus, was replaced by a fiber optic light source, which significantly improved the quality of the meniscus image. The modified apparatus was used for the measurement of surface tension of supercooled water at temperatures down to – 11 °C. The new data have a lower scatter compared to the previous horizontal measurements and show a good agreement with the other data obtained with a different measurement technique based on the modified capillary rise method.

  5. Microphysical Effects of Cloud Seeding in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Observed from NOAA Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the satellite retrieval methodology, the spectral characteristics and cloud microphysical properties were analyzed that included brightness temperatures of Channels 4 and 5, and their brightness temperature difference (BTD), the particle effective radius of seeded cloud track caused by an operational cloud seeding and the microphysical effects of cloud seeding were revealed by the comparisons of their differences inside and outside the seeded track. The cloud track was actually a cloud channel reaching 1.5-km deep and 14-km wide lasting for more than 80 min. The effective radius of ambient clouds was 10-15μm, while that within the cloud track ranged from 15 to 26 μm. The ambient clouds were composed of supercooled droplets, and the composition of the cloud within the seeding track was ice. With respect to the rather stable reflectance of two ambient sides around the track, the visible spectral reflectance in the cloud track varied at least 10%, and reached a maximum of 35%, the reflectance of 3.7 μm in the seeded track relatively decreased at least 10%. As cloud seeding advanced, the width and depth were gradually increased. Simultaneously the cloud top temperature within the track became progressively warmer with respect to the ambient clouds,and the maximum temperature differences reached 4.2 and 3.9℃ at the first seeding position for Channels 4 and 5. In addition, the BTD in the track also increased steadily to a maximum of 1.4℃, compared with 0.2-0.4℃ of the ambient clouds. The evidence that the seeded cloud became thinner comes from the visible image showing a channel, the warming of the cloud tops, and the increase of BTD in the seeded track.The seeded cloud became thinner mainly because the cloud top descended and it lost water to precipitation throughout its depth. For this cloud seeding case, the glaciation became apparent at cloud tops about 22min after seeding. The formation of a cloud track in the supercooled stratiform clouds was

  6. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  7. Self-Excited Drop Oscillations in Electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Decre, Michel M.J.; Mugele, Frieder

    2007-01-01

    We studied millimeter-sized aqueous sessile drops in an ambient oil environment in a classical electrowetting configuration with a wire-shaped electrode placed at a variable height above the substrate. Within a certain range of height and above a certain threshold voltage, the drop oscillates period

  8. Static shapes of levitated viscous drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, L.; Lister, J. R.; Lange, U.

    2005-06-01

    We consider the levitation of a drop of molten glass above a spherical porous mould, through which air is injected with constant velocity. The glass is assumed to be sufficiently viscous compared to air that motion in the drop is negligible. Thus static equilibrium shapes are determined by the coupling between the lubricating pressure in the supporting air cushion and the Young-Laplace equation. The upper surface of the drop is under constant atmospheric pressure; the static shape of the lower surface of the drop is computed using lubrication theory for the thin air film. Matching of the sessile curvature of the upper surface to the curvature of the mould gives rise to a series of capillary "brim" waves near the edge of the drop which scale with powers of a modified capillary number. Several branches of static solutions are found, such that there are multiple solutions for some drop volumes, but no physically reasonable solutions for other drop volumes. Comparison with experiments and full Navier-Stokes calculations suggests that the stability of the process can be predicted from the solution branches for the static shapes, and related to the persistence of brim waves to the centre of the drop. This suggestion remains to be confirmed by a formal stability analysis.

  9. University Drop-Out: An Italian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloc, Filippo; Maruotti, Antonello; Petrella, Lea

    2010-01-01

    University students' drop-out is a crucial issue for the universities' efficiency evaluation and funding. In this paper, we analyze the drop-out rate of the Economics and Business faculty of Sapienza University of Rome. We use administrative data on 9,725 undergraduates students enrolled in three-years bachelor programs from 2001 to 2007 and…

  10. Many Drops Make a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya S. Mudgal

    2014-03-01

    greater knowledge, better skills and disseminate this knowledge through this journal to influence as many physicians and their patients as possible. They have taken the knowledge of their teachers, recognized their giants and are now poised to see further than ever before. My grandmother often used to quote to me a proverb from India, which when translated literally means “Many drops make a lake”. I cannot help but be amazed by the striking similarities between the words of Newton and this Indian saying. Therefore, while it may seem intuitive, I think it must be stated that it is vital for the betterment of all our patients that we recognize our own personal lakes to put our drops of knowledge into. More important is that we recognize that it is incumbent upon each and every one of us to contribute to our collective lakes of knowledge such as ABJS. And finally and perhaps most importantly we need to be utterly cognizant of never letting such lakes of knowledge run dry.... ever.

  11. Factors Influencing Adult Learners' Decision to Drop Out or Persist in Online Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ji-Hye Park; Hee Jun Choi

    2009-01-01

    ...), and internal factors (i.e., satisfaction and relevance as sub-dimensions of motivation). Quantitative data were collected from 147 learners who had dropped out of or finished one of the online courses offered from a large Midwestern university...

  12. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: LES predictions compared to DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results have been compared from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS.

  13. Influence of Computational Drop Representation in LES of a Droplet-Laden Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Radhakrishnan, Senthilkumaran

    2013-01-01

    Multiphase turbulent flows are encountered in many practical applications including turbine engines or natural phenomena involving particle dispersion. Numerical computations of multiphase turbulent flows are important because they provide a cheaper alternative to performing experiments during an engine design process or because they can provide predictions of pollutant dispersion, etc. Two-phase flows contain millions and sometimes billions of particles. For flows with volumetrically dilute particle loading, the most accurate method of numerically simulating the flow is based on direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the governing equations in which all scales of the flow including the small scales that are responsible for the overwhelming amount of dissipation are resolved. DNS, however, requires high computational cost and cannot be used in engineering design applications where iterations among several design conditions are necessary. Because of high computational cost, numerical simulations of such flows cannot track all these drops. The objective of this work is to quantify the influence of the number of computational drops and grid spacing on the accuracy of predicted flow statistics, and to possibly identify the minimum number, or, if not possible, the optimal number of computational drops that provide minimal error in flow prediction. For this purpose, several Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a mixing layer with evaporating drops have been performed by using coarse, medium, and fine grid spacings and computational drops, rather than physical drops. To define computational drops, an integer NR is introduced that represents the ratio of the number of existing physical drops to the desired number of computational drops; for example, if NR=8, this means that a computational drop represents 8 physical drops in the flow field. The desired number of computational drops is determined by the available computational resources; the larger NR is, the less computationally

  14. Convective mass transfer from a submerged drop in a thin falling film

    CERN Document Server

    Landel, Julien R; McEvoy, H; Dalziel, Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    We study the fluid mechanics of removing a passive tracer contained in small, viscous drops attached to a flat inclined substrate using thin gravity-driven film flows. A convective mass transfer establishes across the drop-film interface and the tracer in the drop diffuses into the film flow. The Peclet number for the tracer in the film is large. The Peclet number Pe_d in the drop varies from 0.01 to 1. The characteristic transport time in the drop is much larger than in the film. We model the mass transfer of the tracer from the drop bulk into the film using an empirical model based on Newton's law of cooling. This model is supported by a theoretical model solving the quasi-steady 2D advection-diffusion equation in the film coupled with a time-dependent 1D diffusion equation in the drop. We find excellent agreement between our experimental data and the 2 models, which predict an exponential decrease in time of the tracer concentration in the drop. The results are valid for all drop and film Peclet numbers st...

  15. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  16. Temperature Effect on Photovoltaic Modules Power Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Mohammed Aish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar module could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic power generation. Changing in powers due to higher temperatures (25oC, 35oC, and 45oC have been done for three types of solar modules: monocrystalline , polycrystalline, and copper indium gallium (di selenide (CIGS. The Prova 200 solar panel analyzer is used for the professional testing of three solar modules at different ambient temperatures; 25oC, 35oC, and 45oC and solar radiation range 100-1000 W/m2. Copper indium gallium (di selenide module has the lowest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.38%/oC while monocrystalline module has the highest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.54%/oC, while polycrystalline module has a percentage power drop of 0.49%/oC.

  17. Pressure drop in CIM disk monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelic, Igor; Nemec, Damjan; Podgornik, Ales; Koloini, Tine

    2005-02-11

    Pressure drop analysis in commercial CIM disk monolithic columns is presented. Experimental measurements of pressure drop are compared to hydrodynamic models usually employed for prediction of pressure drop in packed beds, e.g. free surface model and capillary model applying hydraulic radius concept. However, the comparison between pressure drop in monolith and adequate packed bed give unexpected results. Pressure drop in a CIM disk monolithic column is approximately 50% lower than in an adequate packed bed of spheres having the same hydraulic radius as CIM disk monolith; meaning they both have the same porosity and the same specific surface area. This phenomenon seems to be a consequence of the monolithic porous structure which is quite different in terms of the pore size distribution and parallel pore nonuniformity compared to the one in conventional packed beds. The number of self-similar levels for the CIM monoliths was estimated to be between 1.03 and 2.75.

  18. Universality in freezing of an asymmetric drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Md Farhad; Waghmare, Prashant R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the evidence of universality in conical tip formation during the freezing of arbitrary-shaped sessile droplets. The focus is to demonstrate the relationship between this universality and the liquid drop shape. We observe that, in the case of asymmetric drops, this universal shape is achieved when the tip reconfigures by changing its location, which subsequently alters the frozen drop shape. The proposed "two-triangle" model quantifies the change in the tip configuration as a function of the asymmetry of the drop that shows a good agreement with the experimental evidence. Finally, based on the experimental and theoretical exercise, we propose the scaling dependence between the variations in the tip configuration and the asymmetry of the drop.

  19. Patients dropping out of treatment in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlino, M; Martucci, G; Musella, V; Bolzan, M; de Girolamo, G

    1995-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the extent and the specific features of drop-out for patients having a first contact with an university psychiatric outpatient clinic in Italy over the course of 1 year and to determine which variables were associated with early termination of treatment. Of the 158 patients selected for this study, there was an overall 3-month drop-out rate following the first visit of 63%. Of the 59 patients who had returned once after the initial contact, 28 interrupted subsequently the treatment, although the therapist's plan included further visits. The overall drop-out rate at 3 months was thus 82%. The only 2 variables associated with drop-out rates were the patients' perception of the severity of their disorder and the psychiatric history: continuing patients were more frequently in agreement with the clinician's judgment as compared with those who dropped out and were more likely to have already been in psychiatric treatment.

  20. MOTION AND DEFORMATION OF VISCOUS DROP IN STOKES FLOW NEAR RIGID WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hua-jian; ZHANG Hui-sheng

    2005-01-01

    A boundary integral method was developed for simulating the motion and deformation of a viscous drop in an axisymmetric ambient Stokes flow near a rigid wall and for direct calculating the stress on the wall. Numerical experiments by the method were performed for different initial stand-off distances of the drop to the wall, viscosity ratios, combined surface tension and buoyancy parameters and ambient flow parameters. Numerical results show that due to the action of ambient flow and buoyancy the drop is compressed and stretched respectively in axial and radial directions when time goes. When the ambient flow action is weaker than that of the buoyancy the drop raises and bends upward and the stress on the wall induced by drop motion decreases when time advances. When the ambient flow action is stronger than that of the buoyancy the drop descends and becomes flatter and flatter as time goes. In this case when the initial stand-off distance is large the stress on the wall increases as the drop evolutes but when the stand-off distance is small the stress on the wall decreases as a result of combined effects of ambient flow, buoyancy and the stronger wall action to the flow. The action of the stress on the wall induced by drop motion is restricted in an area near the symmetric axis, which increases when the initial stand-off distance increases.When the initial stand-off distance increases the stress induced by drop motion decreases substantially. The surface tension effects resist the deformation and smooth the profile of the drop surfaces. The drop viscosity will reduce the deformation and migration of the drop.

  1. Dropping rates of elaiosome-bearing seeds during transport by ants ( Formica polyctena Foerst.): Implications for distance dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Stanislav N.; Gorb, Elena V.

    1999-09-01

    In a deciduous forest, foraging ants collect elaiosome-bearing seeds and carry them to their nests. Some of the seeds reach the nest and are concentrated there. Others may be dropped by ants during transport. The dropped seeds enter the soil seed pool. However, they might be repeatedly removed by other ant individuals and carried again in the direction of the nest. Rates of seed dropping and repeated removals must be known to evaluate the effect of ant workers on dispersal distance of seeds. The rate of seed dropping is predicted to depend on size of seeds and of elaiosomes, both of which vary among plant species, and on the size of the ant workers. Mark-recapture experiments were used to evaluate dropping rates of seeds of five myrmecochorous and diplochorous plants ( Chelidonium majus L., Asarum europaeum L., Viola matutina Klok., V. mirabilis L., V. hirta L.) during their transport by the ant Formica polyctena Foerst. In the series of species A. europaeum - V. hirta - V. mirabilis - Ch. majus - V. matutina, the dropping rate increased. Small workers dropped seeds of A. europaeum more often than did large ones, while seeds of V. hirta were dropped by ants of different size classes with the same frequency. Across species, dropping rates of seeds were negatively correlated with the rate at which ants removed them from the depot. The number of seeds which reach the nests is the other important parameter of seed dispersal. This parameter depends on dropping rates: seeds with lower dropping rates have higher chances of being deposited in nests. Diplochores usually produce many small seeds, which are characterised by low removal rates and high dropping rates during transport by ants. Obligate myrmecochores produce rather few large seeds, which have high removal rates and low dropping rates. To analyse the significance of seed dropping in the dispersal distance of seeds, a computer simulation based on two factors [(i) seed number produced by a plant; (ii) dropping rate

  2. Experimental studies on seasonal heat storage based on stable supercooling of a sodium acetate water mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Dragsted, Janne; Fan, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    to transfer heat to and from the module have been tested. Further, a solidification start method, based on a strong cooling of a small part of the salt water mixture in the module by boiling CO2 in a small brass tank in good thermal contact to the outer side of the module wall, has been tested. Tests......Laboratory tests of a 230 l seasonal heat storage module with a sodium acetate water mixture have been carried out. The aim of the tests is to elucidate how best to design a seasonal heat storage based on the salt water mixture, which supercools in a stable way. The module can be a part...... of a seasonal heat storage, that will be suitable for solar heating systems which can fully cover the yearly heat demand of Danish low energy buildings. The tested module has approximately the dimensions 2020 mm x 1285 mm x 80 mm. The module material is steel and the wall thickness is 2 mm. Different methods...

  3. Supercooling Self-Assembly of Magnetic Shelled Core/Shell Supraparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaotong; Yan, Bingyun; Wu, Fengluan; Zhang, Jinlong; Qu, Shuxin; Zhou, Shaobing; Weng, Jie

    2016-09-14

    Molecular self-assembly has emerged as a powerful technique for controlling the structure and properties of core/shell structured supraparticles. However, drug-loading capacities and therapeutic effects of self-assembled magnetic core/shell nanocarriers with magnetic nanoparticles in the core are limited by the intervention of the outer organic or inorganic shell, the aggregation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the narrowed inner cavity, etc. Here, we present a self-assembly approach based on rebalancing hydrogen bonds between components under a supercooling process to form a new core/shell nanoscale supraparticle with magnetic nanoparticles as the shell and a polysaccharide as a core. Compared with conventional iron oxide nanoparticles, this magnetic shelled core/shell nanoparticle possesses an optimized inner cavity and a loss-free outer magnetic property. Furthermore, we find that the drug-loaded magnetic shelled nanocarriers showed interesting in vitro release behaviors at different pH conditions, including "swelling-broken", "dissociating-broken", and "bursting-broken" modes. Our experiments demonstrate the novel design of the multifunctional hybrid nanostructure and provide a considerable potential for the biomedical applications.

  4. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuntao [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Dibble, Collin J. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Petrik, Nikolay G. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Smith, R. Scott [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Joly, Alan G. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Tonkyn, Russell G. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Kay, Bruce D. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Kimmel, Greg A. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2016-04-26

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond timescale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ~1010 K/s for temperature increases of ~100 – 200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (~5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-mortem analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ~ ± 3% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ~ ± 5 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  5. Boson peak, Ioffe-Regel Crossover, and Liquid-Liquid phase transition in Supercooled Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep

    We have investigated the onset of Boson peak in a model of liquid water which exhibits a clear first-order phase transition between a low-density liquid phase and a high-density liquid phase of water at low temperature and high pressure. We find that the at low pressures, the onset of Boson peak coincides with the Widom-line of the system. At high pressures, the onset occurs at the transition temperature between the two liquids. Furthermore, we show that at both low and high pressure, the frequency of the Boson peak coincides with the Ioffe-Regel crossover of the transverse phonons, suggesting that the breakdown of Debye behavior is a general feature of Ioffe-Regel limit crossover in supercooled water. The frequency of the Boson peak is weakly pressure dependent and decreases with increasing pressure. Our work bridges gap between the experimental results on the Boson peak nanoconfined water and the behavior that one would expect from a bulk system.

  6. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relative roles of volume and surface nucleation were investigated for the homogeneous freezing of pure water droplets. Experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled water aerosols with maximum volume densities at radii between 1 and 3 μm. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rates between 234.8 and 236.2 K were derived using a microphysical model and aerosol phase compositions and size distributions determined from infrared extinction measurements in the flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process. The implications of surface nucleation for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models are considered.

  7. Understanding the nonlinear dynamics of driven particles in supercooled liquids in terms of an effective temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Carsten F. E., E-mail: c.schroer@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 28/30, 48149 Münster (Germany); NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 10, 48149 Münster (Germany); Heuer, Andreas, E-mail: andheuer@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 28/30, 48149 Münster (Germany); Center of Nonlinear Science, Corresstraße 2, 48149 Münster (Germany); Center for Multiscale Theory and Computation, Corrensstraße 40, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2015-12-14

    In active microrheology, the mechanical properties of a material are tested by adding probe particles which are pulled by an external force. In case of supercooled liquids, strong forcing leads to a thinning of the host material which becomes more pronounced as the system approaches the glass transition. In this work, we provide a quantitative theoretical description of this thinning behavior based on the properties of the Potential Energy Landscape (PEL) of a model glass-former. A key role plays the trap-like nature of the PEL. We find that the mechanical properties in the strongly driven system behave the same as in a quiescent system at an enhanced temperature, giving rise to a well-characterized effective temperature. Furthermore, this effective temperature turns out to be independent of the chosen observable and individually shows up in the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the system. Based on this underlying theoretical understanding, we can estimate its dependence on temperature and force by the PEL-properties of the quiescent system. We furthermore critically discuss the relevance of effective temperatures obtained by scaling relations for the description of out-of-equilibrium situations.

  8. Dynamic heterogeneity in crossover spin facilitated model of supercooled liquid and fractional Stokes-Einstein relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo-Woo; Kim, Soree; Jung, YounJoon, E-mail: yjjung@snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-28

    Kinetically constrained models have gained much interest as models that assign the origins of interesting dynamic properties of supercooled liquids to dynamical facilitation mechanisms that have been revealed in many experiments and numerical simulations. In this work, we investigate the dynamic heterogeneity in the fragile-to-strong liquid via Monte Carlo method using the model that linearly interpolates between the strong liquid-like behavior and the fragile liquid-like behavior by an asymmetry parameter b. When the asymmetry parameter is sufficiently small, smooth fragile-to-strong transition is observed both in the relaxation time and the diffusion constant. Using these physical quantities, we investigate fractional Stokes-Einstein relations observed in this model. When b is fixed, the system shows constant power law exponent under the temperature change, and the exponent has the value between that of the Frederickson-Andersen model and the East model. Furthermore, we investigate the dynamic length scale of our systems and also find the crossover relation between the relaxation time. We ascribe the competition between energetically favored symmetric relaxation mechanism and entropically favored asymmetric relaxation mechanism to the fragile-to-strong crossover behavior.

  9. Understanding the nonlinear dynamics of driven particles in supercooled liquids in terms of an effective temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Carsten F. E.; Heuer, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    In active microrheology, the mechanical properties of a material are tested by adding probe particles which are pulled by an external force. In case of supercooled liquids, strong forcing leads to a thinning of the host material which becomes more pronounced as the system approaches the glass transition. In this work, we provide a quantitative theoretical description of this thinning behavior based on the properties of the Potential Energy Landscape (PEL) of a model glass-former. A key role plays the trap-like nature of the PEL. We find that the mechanical properties in the strongly driven system behave the same as in a quiescent system at an enhanced temperature, giving rise to a well-characterized effective temperature. Furthermore, this effective temperature turns out to be independent of the chosen observable and individually shows up in the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the system. Based on this underlying theoretical understanding, we can estimate its dependence on temperature and force by the PEL-properties of the quiescent system. We furthermore critically discuss the relevance of effective temperatures obtained by scaling relations for the description of out-of-equilibrium situations.

  10. Molecular dynamics of supercooled ionic liquids studied by light scattering and dielectric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Florian; Gabriel, Jan; Weigl, Peter; Blochowicz, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    We investigate molecular dynamics of two supercooled room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) above of their glass transition temperature by means of dynamic light scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy from nanoseconds up to ≈105s . We show that a direct comparison of the raw data of these two techniques allows us to identify the reorientation of ions in the dielectric data, giving experimental evidence to a very recently proposed model of Gainaru et al. [1], stating that the conductivity process in ionic liquids takes place through a reorientational step of ions escaping their cage formed by surrounding counterions. Within this approach we can also understand the apparent decoupling of time constants from dielectric spectroscopy and light scattering, often found in ionic liquids, in a very natural way. Furthermore, as a consequence of knowing the reorientational part of the dielectric spectrum, we are able to show that two more processes contribute to these spectra, which are due to electrode polarization effects. The relative position of all three contributions vary among the systems and may overshadow each other, thus complicating the data analysis and favor misinterpretations.

  11. Liquid-liquid coexistence and crystallization in supercooled ST2 water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fausto; Palmer, Jeremy; Debenedetti, Pablo; Car, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    We have computed the free energy landscape of ST2 water in the supercooled regime (228.6 K and 2.4 kbar) using several state-of-the-art computational techniques, including umbrella sampling and metadynamics. Such results conclusively demonstrate coexistence between two liquid phases, a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (HDL), which are metastable with respect to cubic ice. We show that the three phases have distinct structural features characterized by the local structure index and ring statistics. We also find that ice nucleation, should it occur, does so from the low-density liquid. Interestingly, we find that the number of 6-member rings increases monotonically along the path from HDL to LDL, while non-monotonic behavior is observed near the saddle point along the LDL-ice Ic path. This behavior indicates a complex re-arrangement of the H-bond network, followed by progressive crystallization. DOE: DE-SC0008626 (F. M. and R.C.)

  12. Unraveling the microscopic pathway of homogeneous water crystallization at supercooled conditions from direct simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fausto; Palmer, Jeremy; Singh, Rakesh; Debenedetti, Pablo; Car, Roberto

    By means of unbiased classical molecular dynamics simulations, we identify the microscopic pathways of spontaneous homogeneous crystallization in supercooled ST2 water. By introducing a new order parameter, we are able to monitor formation/disruption of locally ordered regions characterized by small ice clusters with intermediate range order. When two of these regions are close each other, they percolate and form a larger ordered region. The process is slow enough to allow for polymorphic selection in favor of cubic ice (Ic). The formation of an ice nucleus requires percolation of many small clusters so that the transformations at the interface of the nucleus do not involve its core, thus guaranteeing the stability of the nucleus. The growth of the crystalline nucleus is fast and involves direct transformation of interfacial liquid molecules as well as percolation of small Ic/Ih clusters. The growth is too fast to allow conversion of Ih into Ic sites, originating the formation of a stacking fault in the final crystal. We recognize Euclidean structures in the oxygen configuration of the second shell in Ic and Ih clusters. This new point of view allows us to explain the source of the ordered stacking fault geometry.

  13. Control rod drop surveillance using two friction coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Blázquez, Juan; Vallejo, I.; García-Berrocal Sánchez, Agustin; Balbás Antón, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    In the case of large burnup, a control rod (CR) guide tube in the pressurized water reactor of a commercial nuclear power plant might bend. As a consequence, a CR drop experiment may indicate an event of a CR partially inserted and whether the CR should be deemed inoperable. Early prevention of such an event can be achieved by measuring two friction coefficients: the hydraulic coefficient and the sliding coefficient. The hydraulic coefficient hardly changes, so that the curvature of the guide...

  14. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  15. Interaction of Drops on a Soft Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract eachother due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  16. Conically shaped drops in electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Howard A.; Brenner, Michael P.; Lister, John R.

    1996-11-01

    When an electric field is applied to a dielectric liquid containing a suspended immiscible fluid drop, the drop deforms into a prolate ellipsoidal shape. Above a critical field strength the drop develops conical ends, as first observed by Zeleny [Phys. Rev. 10, 1 (1917)] and Wilson & Taylor [Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 22, 728 (1925)] for, respectively, the case of conducting drops and soap films in air. The case of two dielectric liquids was studied recently using a slender drop approximation by Li, Halsey & Lobkovsky [Europhys. Lett 27, 575 (1994)]. In this presentation we further develop the slender body approximation to obtain coupled ordinary differential equations for the electric field and the drop shape. Analytical formulae are derived which approximately give the cone angle as a function of the dielectric constant ratio between the two fluids, and the minimum applied electric field at which conical tips first form as a function of the dielectric constant ratio. Finally, drops shapes are calculated numerically and compared with the common prolate shape assumption.

  17. Vibration-induced drop atomization and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, A.

    2003-02-01

    A liquid drop placed on a vibrating diaphragm will burst into a fine spray of smaller secondary droplets if it is driven at the proper frequency and amplitude. The process begins when capillary waves appear on the free surface of the drop and then grow in amplitude and complexity as the acceleration amplitude of the diaphragm is slowly increased from zero. When the acceleration of the diaphragm rises above a well-defined critical value, small secondary droplets begin to be ejected from the free-surface wave crests. Then, quite suddenly, the entire volume of the drop is ejected from the vibrating diaphragm in the form of a spray. This event is the result of an interaction between the fluid dynamical process of droplet ejection and the vibrational dynamics of the diaphragm. During droplet ejection, the effective mass of the drop diaphragm system decreases and the resonance frequency of the system increases. If the initial forcing frequency is above the resonance frequency of the system, droplet ejection causes the system to move closer to resonance, which in turn causes more vigorous vibration and faster droplet ejection. This ultimately leads to drop bursting. In this paper, the basic phenomenon of vibration-induced drop atomization and drop bursting will be introduced, demonstrated, and characterized. Experimental results and a simple mathematical model of the process will be presented and used to explain the basic physics of the system.

  18. Drop Impact on Liquid Surfaces: Formation of Lens and Spherical Drops at the Air-Liquid Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Yakhshi-Tafti, Ehsan; Kumar, Ranganathan; 10.1016/j.jcis.2010.06.029

    2010-01-01

    Droplets at the air-liquid interface of immiscible liquids usually form partially-submerged lens shapes (e.g. water on oil). In addition to this structure, we showed that droplets released from critical heights above the target liquid can sustain the impact and at the end maintain a spherical ball-shape configuration above the surface, despite undergoing large deformation. Spherical drops are unstable and will transform into the lens mode due to slight disturbances. Precision dispensing needles with various tip diameter sizes were used to release pendant drops of deionized water onto the surface of fluorocarbon liquid (FC-43, 3M). A cubic relationship was found between the nozzle tip diameter and the released droplet diameter. Drop impact was recorded by a high speed camera at a rate of 2000 frames per second. In order for the water drops to sustain the impact and retain a spherical configuration at the surface of the target liquid pool, it is required that they be of a critical size and be released from a ce...

  19. Terminal Effect of Drop Coalescence on Single Drop Mass Transfer Measurements and Its Minimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For the mass transfer to single drops during the stage of steady buoyancy-driven motion, experimental measurement is complicated with the terminal effect of additional mass transfer during drop formation and coa lescence at the drop collector. Analysis reveals that consistent operating conditions and experimental procedure are of critical significance for minimizing the terminal effect of drop coalescence on the accuracy of mass transfer measurements. The novel design of a totally-closed extraction column is proposed for this purpose, which guaran tees that the volumetric rate of drop phase injection is exactly equal to that of withdrawal of drops. Tests in two extraction systems demonstrate that the experimental repeatability is improved greatly and the terminal effect of mass transfer during drop coalescence is brought well under control.

  20. Laplacian drop shapes and effect of random perturbations on accuracy of surface tension measurement for different drop constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical drop shapes are calculated for three drop constellations: pendant drops, constrained sessile drops, and unconstrained sessile drops. Based on total Gaussian curvature, shape parameter and critical shape parameter are discussed as a function of different drop sizes and surface tensions. The shape parameter is linked to physical parameters for every drop constellation. The as yet unavailable detailed dimensional analysis for the unconstrained sessile drop is presented. Results show that the unconstrained sessile drop shape depends on a dimensionless volume term and the contact angle. Random perturbations are introduced and the accuracy of surface tension measurement is assessed for precise and perturbed profiles of the three drop constellations. It is concluded that pendant drops are the best method for accurate surface tension measurement, followed by constrained sessile drops. The unconstrained sessile drops come last because they tend to be more spherical at low and moderate contact angles. Of course, unconstrained sessile drops are the only option if contact angles are to be measured.

  1. Preparation and Supercooling Modification of Salt Hydrate Phase Change Materials Based on CaCl₂·2H₂O/CaCl₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Dong, Zhijun; Memon, Shazim Ali; Bao, Xiaohua; Cui, Hongzhi

    2017-06-23

    Salt hydrates have issues of supercooling when they are utilized as phase change materials (PCMs). In this research, a new method was adopted to prepare a salt hydrate PCM (based on a mixture of calcium chloride dihydrate and calcium chloride anhydrous) as a novel PCM system to reduce the supercooling phenomenon existing in CaCl₂·6H₂O. Six samples with different compositions of CaCl₂ were prepared. The relationship between the performance and the proportion of calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl₂·2H₂O) and calcium chloride anhydrous (CaCl₂) was also investigated. The supercooling degree of the final PCM reduced with the increase in volume of CaCl₂·2H₂O during its preparation. The PCM obtained with 66.21 wt % CaCl₂·2H₂O reduced the supercooling degree by about 96.8%. All six samples, whose ratio of CaCl₂·2H₂O to (CaCl₂ plus CaCl₂·2H₂O) was 0%, 34.03%, 53.82%, 76.56%, 90.74%, and 100% respectively, showed relatively higher enthalpy (greater than 155.29 J/g), and have the possibility to be applied in buildings for thermal energy storage purposes. Hence, CaCl₂·2H₂O plays an important role in reducing supercooling and it can be helpful in adjusting the solidification enthalpy. Thereafter, the influence of adding different percentages of Nano-SiO₂ (0.1 wt %, 0.3 wt %, 0.5 wt %) in reducing the supercooling degree of some PCM samples was investigated. The test results showed that the supercooling of the salt hydrate PCM in Samples 6 and 5 reduced to 0.2 °C and 0.4 °C respectively. Finally, the effect of the different cooling conditions, including frozen storage (-20 °C) and cold storage (5 °C), that were used to prepare the salt hydrate PCM was considered. It was found that both cooling conditions are effective in reducing the supercooling degree of the salt hydrate PCM. With the synergistic action of the two materials, the performance and properties of the newly developed PCM systems were better especially in terms of reducing

  2. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  3. Deviation of viscous drops at chemical steps

    CERN Document Server

    Semprebon, Ciro; Filippi, Daniele; Perlini, Luca; Pierno, Matteo; Brinkmann, Martin; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic wetting experiments and numerical simulations of gravity driven liquid drops sliding on a plane substrate decorated with a linear chemical step. Surprisingly, the optimal direction to observe crossing is not the one perpendicular to the step, but a finite angle that depends on the material parameters. We computed the landscapes of the force acting on the drop by means of a contact line mobility model showing that contact angle hysteresis dominates the dynamics at the step and determines whether the drop passes onto the lower substrate. This analysis is very well supported by the experimental dynamic phase diagram in terms of pinning, crossing, sliding and sliding followed by pinning.

  4. New Hydrodynamic Mechanism for Drop Coarsening

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a new mechanism of drop coarsening due to coalescence only, which describes the late stages of phase separation in fluids. Depending on the volume fraction of the minority phase, we identify two different regimes of growth, where the drops are interconnected and their characteristic size grows linearly with time, and where the spherical drops are disconnected and the growth follows (time) 1/3. The transition between the two regimes is sharp and occurs at a well defined volume fraction of order 30%.

  5. On the Deepwater Horizon drop size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Peischl, J.; Brock, C. A.; McKeen, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations of the fate of gas and oil released following the Deepwater Horizon blowout in 2012 depend critically on the assumed drop size distributions. We use direct observations of surfacing time, surfacing location, and atmospheric chemical composition to infer an average drop size distribution for June 10, 2012, providing robust first-order constraints on parameterizations in models. We compare the inferred drop size distribution to published work on Deepwater Horizon and discuss the ability of this approach to determine the efficacy of subsurface dispersant injection.

  6. Modeling of water droplet in super-cooling water evaporative system for ice slurry production%蒸发式过冷水制冰液滴蒸发结晶的模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马善军; 李鹏辉; 孔令健; 李少华; 韩吉田

    2016-01-01

    Ice storage technology is considered as one of the most promising options to achieve the so-called “peak load leveling of power system” and to relieve the contradiction between the supply and demand of peak power currently encountered in China. Among the ice-producing methods being developed around the world, the evaporative supercooling water ice-making one is a new and efficient way for ice slurry production of large scale without ice blockage. Therefore, it is of significant importance to investigate the heat and mass transfer characteristics during the cooling and crystallization process of water droplets in the evaporative supercooling water ice-making chamber to the development of practical ice-making system. In order to analyze the heat and mass transfer characteristics of water droplets in an evaporative super-cooling water system for ice slurry production, we proposed a mathematical model for the cooling and crystallization process of a single water droplet falling in the evaporation chamber with large space, which comprehensively took into account the three different zones of entire liquid phase, solid-liquid interphase and entire solid phase during the cooling and crystallization process of a water droplet. The developed mathematical model was then validated by use of the theoretical and experimental results presented in the available literature and satisfactory agreement was achieved in between the model simulation results and the research ones reported in the literature, indicating the correctness of the mathematical model. The parameter variations of the water droplet with changes in some of the key system operating variables, such as the inlet size and temperature of water droplet, the flow rate and relative humidity of the cold air, were numerically determined by solving the developed mathematical model. Effects of the inlet size and temperature of water droplet, inlet temperature, flow rate and relative humidity of the cold air in the

  7. Supercool纤维牛仔面料的开发与生产实践%DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION PRACTICE OF SUPERCOOL DENIM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成海量; 张增强

    2015-01-01

    以48.6 tex赛络纺棉纱、48.6 tex赛络纺竹节纱为经纱,33.3 tex Supercool 吸湿排汗纤维为纬纱开发吸湿排汗牛仔面料。介绍了Supercool纤维的特性, Supercool纤维牛仔面料的规格设计、生产工艺流程,及各工序重要参数的选择和关键生产技术,指出了Supercool纤维牛仔面料开发的基本思路和产品的应用前景。%Taking 48. 6 tex Siro spun yarn plus 48. 6 tex Siro spun slub yarn as warp yarn and 33. 3 tex Supercool, moisture absorption and sweat discharge fiber as weft yarn to develop and porduce the moisture absorption and sweat discharge denim fabric. The article introduced the characteristics of the Supercool fiber, the specification designing of the Supercool Denim, production process, the selection of important parameters in each process and the key to production technology , and pointed out the basic idea of developing the Supercool Denim and the application prospect of the product.

  8. Research on Pressure Drop Performance of the Packing-Flotation Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiong-tian; ZHANG Min; LI Yan-feng; LU Yang

    2006-01-01

    A packing-flotation column was proposed to optimize the flotation environment A research system was established using a 100 mm diameter cyclonic micro-bubble flotation column to study fluid properties. Dry-plate and wet- plate pressure drops were studied and the corresponding pressure drop equations developed. The results show that the dry-plate pressure drop of the packing cyclonic micro-bubble flotation column is 10-15 times less than that of the chemical tower, which is principally shown in its relatively small resistance coefficient, 0.0207. The wet-plate pressure drop is 2-3 times higher than that of the chemical tower, which is largely caused by the separation materials and characteristics of the equipment. With flotation, the greater the pressure drop, the better the flotation environment.

  9. Large size metallic glass gratings by embossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Yi, J.; Zhao, D. Q.; Pan, M. X.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-09-01

    Bulk metallic glasses have excellent thermoforming ability in their wide supercooled liquid region. We show that large-size metallic glass grating (˜8 × 8 mm2) with fine periodicity and ultra smooth surface feature can be readily fabricated by hot embossing. The method for fabrication of gratings is proved to be much cheaper, and requires low pressure and short time (less than 30 s). The metallic glass gratings exhibit comparable optical properties such as rainbow-like spectrum when shone by fluorescent lamp light.

  10. Proceedings of the Second International Colloquium on Drops and Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecroissette, D. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Applications of bubble and drop technologies are discussed and include: low gravity manufacturing, containerless melts, microballoon fabrication, ink printers, laser fusion targets, generation of organic glass and metal shells, and space processing. The fluid dynamics of bubbles and drops were examined. Thermomigration, capillary flow, and interfacial tension are discussed. Techniques for drop control are presented and include drop size control and drop shape control.

  11. Spreading of liquid drops over porous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-07-01

    The spreading of small liquid drops over thin and thick porous layers (dry or saturated with the same liquid) has been investigated in the case of both complete wetting (silicone oils of different viscosities) and partial wetting (aqueous SDS solutions of different concentrations). Nitrocellulose membranes of different porosity and different average pore size have been used as a model of thin porous layers, glass and metal filters have been used as a model of thick porous substrates. The first problem under investigation has been the spreading of small liquid drops over thin porous layers saturated with the same liquid. An evolution equation describing the drop spreading has been deduced, which showed that both an effective lubrication and the liquid exchange between the drop and the porous substrates are equally important. Spreading of silicone oils over different nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes was carried out. The experimental laws of the radius of spreading on time confirmed the theory predictions. The spreading of small liquid drops over thin dry porous layers has also been investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The drop motion over a dry porous layer appears caused by the interplay of two processes: (a). the spreading of the drop over already saturated parts of the porous layer, which results in a growth of the drop base, and (b). the imbibition of the liquid from the drop into the porous substrate, which results in a shrinkage of the drop base and a growth of the wetted region inside the porous layer. As a result of these two competing processes the radius of the drop base goes through a maximum as time proceeds. A system of two differential equations has been derived to describe the time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the porous layer. This system includes two parameters, one accounts for the effective lubrication coefficient of the liquid over the wetted porous substrate, and

  12. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  13. How to Use Nose Drops Properly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use nose drops only as long as directed Store medications out of reach of children Copyright 2013, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced, displayed, modified, or distributed ...

  14. How to Use Eye Drops Properly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doses Use the exact number of drops recommended Store medications out of reach of children Copyright 2013, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced, displayed, modified, or distributed ...

  15. Drop impact of shear thickening liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Francois; Dijksman, J Frits; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    The impact of drops of concentrated non-Brownian suspensions (cornstarch and polystyrene spheres) onto a solid surface is investigated experimentally. The spreading dynamics and maxi- mal deformation of the droplet of such shear thickening liquids are found to be markedly different from the impact of Newtonian drops. A particularly striking observation is that the maximal de- formation is independent of the drop velocity and that the deformation suddenly stops during the impact phase. Both observations are due to the shear-thickening rheology of the suspensions, as is theoretically explained from a balance between the kinetic energy and the viscously-dissipated en- ergy, from which we establish a scaling relation between drop maximal deformation and rheological parameters of concentrated suspensions.

  16. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number.

  17. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J; Petrik, Nikolay G; Smith, R Scott; Joly, Alan G; Tonkyn, Russell G; Kay, Bruce D; Kimmel, Greg A

    2016-04-28

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ∼10(10) K/s for temperature increases of ∼100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (∼5 × 10(9) K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ∼±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ∼±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  18. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ˜1010 K/s for temperature increases of ˜100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (˜5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ˜±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ˜±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  19. Communication: Towards first principles theory of relaxation in supercooled liquids formulated in terms of cooperative motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Karl F

    2014-10-14

    A general theory of the long time, low temperature dynamics of glass-forming fluids remains elusive despite the almost 20 years since the famous pronouncement by the Nobel Laureate P. W. Anderson, "The deepest and most interesting unsolved problem in solid state theory is probably the theory of the nature of glass and the glass transition" [Science 267, 1615 (1995)]. While recent work indicates that Adam-Gibbs theory (AGT) provides a framework for computing the structural relaxation time of supercooled fluids and for analyzing the properties of the cooperatively rearranging dynamical strings observed in low temperature molecular dynamics simulations, the heuristic nature of AGT has impeded general acceptance due to the lack of a first principles derivation [G. Adam and J. H. Gibbs, J. Chem. Phys. 43, 139 (1965)]. This deficiency is rectified here by a statistical mechanical derivation of AGT that uses transition state theory and the assumption that the transition state is composed of elementary excitations of a string-like form. The strings are assumed to form in equilibrium with the mobile particles in the fluid. Hence, transition state theory requires the strings to be in mutual equilibrium and thus to have the size distribution of a self-assembling system, in accord with the simulations and analyses of Douglas and co-workers. The average relaxation rate is computed as a grand canonical ensemble average over all string sizes, and use of the previously determined relation between configurational entropy and the average cluster size in several model equilibrium self-associating systems produces the AGT expression in a manner enabling further extensions and more fundamental tests of the assumptions.

  20. Cold tolerance and supercooling capacity in overwintering adults of elm leaf beetle Xanthogaleruca luteola (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudi, Sh; Moharramipour, S

    2011-12-01

    Elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola (Muller) is one of the key pests of elm trees all over the world, and survives winter in reproductive diapause in sheltered locations. Seasonal variation of whole body supercooling points (SCPs), LT50 (temperature at which 50% of the test individuals die) and survival rate after exposure to subzero temperatures were determined in field collected adults during October 2008 to May 2009 and October 2009 to May 2010. The SCP of adults decreased significantly from October (median=-13.8°C) to January (median=-20.7°C) in first year, relatively similar results was observed in the second year. The lowest LT50 was observed in overwintering adults collected in January (-16.81°C) in the first year and December (-15.59°C) in the second year. Mortality at -15°C for 24 h was >70% in early autumn in both years whereas it decreased to lower than 45% in early winter, the highest mortality (100%) was observed in adults collected in May in both years. Cold acclimated adults (30 d, 5°C) in November 2008 exhibited significantly higher SCP (-12.21±0.64°C) than nonacclimated adults (-15.57±1.35°C). A 30-d exposure to 5°C caused >20% mortality in November, while <9% mortality was observed in adults collected in December and January 2008. Overwintering adults died upon freezing and the lower lethal temperatures were within the range of SCP, indicating that X. luteola is a freeze intolerant insect.

  1. Fluid Flower : Microliquid Patterning via Drop Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Minhee

    2008-01-01

    In microfluidic technologies, direct patterning of liquid without resorting to micromachined solid structures has various advantages including reduction of the frictional dissipation and the fabrication cost. This fluid dynamics video illustrates the method to micropattern a liquid on a solid surface with drop impact. We experimentally show that a water drop impacting with the wettability-patterned solid retracts fast on the hydrophobic regions while being arrested on the hydrophilic areas.

  2. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis.

  3. Leaf Surface Wettability and Implications for Drop Shedding and Evaporation from Forest Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, W.; Ebner, M.; Traiser, C.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wettability and retention capacity of leaf surfaces are parameters that contribute to interception of rain, fog or dew by forest canopies. Contrary to common expectation, hydrophobicity or wettability of a leaf do not dictate the stickiness of drops to leaves. Crucial for the adhesion of drops is the contact angle hysteresis, the difference between leading edge contact angle and trailing edge contact angle for a running drop. Other parameters that are dependent on the static contact angle are the maximum volume of drops that can stick to the surface and the persistence of an adhering drop with respect to evaporation. Adaption of contact angle and contact angle hysteresis allow one to pursue different strategies of drop control, for example efficient water shedding or maximum retention of adhering water. Efficient water shedding is achieved if contact angle hysteresis is low. Retention of (isolated) large drops requires a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 65.5°, while maximum retention by optimum spacing of drops necessitates a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 111.6°. Maximum persistence with respect to evaporation is obtained if the static contact angle amounts to 77.5°, together with a high contact angle hysteresis. It is to be expected that knowledge of these parameters can contribute to the capacity of a forest to intercept water.

  4. Drop size distributions and related properties of fog for five locations measured from aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, J. Allen

    1994-01-01

    Fog drop size distributions were collected from aircraft as part of the Synthetic Vision Technology Demonstration Program. Three west coast marine advection fogs, one frontal fog, and a radiation fog were sampled from the top of the cloud to the bottom as the aircraft descended on a 3-degree glideslope. Drop size versus altitude versus concentration are shown in three dimensional plots for each 10-meter altitude interval from 1-minute samples. Also shown are median volume radius and liquid water content. Advection fogs contained the largest drops with median volume radius of 5-8 micrometers, although the drop sizes in the radiation fog were also large just above the runway surface. Liquid water content increased with height, and the total number of drops generally increased with time. Multimodal variations in number density and particle size were noted in most samples where there was a peak concentration of small drops (2-5 micrometers) at low altitudes, midaltitude peak of drops 5-11 micrometers, and high-altitude peak of the larger drops (11-15 micrometers and above). These observations are compared with others and corroborate previous results in fog gross properties, although there is considerable variation with time and altitude even in the same type of fog.

  5. Effect of viscosity ratio on the motion of drops flowing on an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberuee, M.; Mortazavi, S.

    2017-06-01

    The flow of two-dimensional drops on an inclined channel is studied by numerical simulations at finite Reynolds numbers. The effect of viscosity ratio on the behaviour of the two-phase medium is examined. The flow is driven by the acceleration due to gravity, and there is no pressure gradient along the flow direction. An implicit version of the finite difference/front-tracking method was developed and used in the present study. The lateral migration of a drop is studied first. It is found that the equilibrium position of a drop moves away from the channel floor as the viscosity ratio increases. However, the trend reverses beyond a certain viscosity ratio. Simulations with 40 drops in a relatively large channel show that there exists a limiting viscosity ratio where the drops behave like solid particles, and the effect of internal circulation of drops becomes negligible. This limiting condition resembles the granular flow regime except that the effect of interstitial fluid is present. The limiting viscosity ratio depends on the flow conditions (80 for Re=10 , and 200 for Re=20 ). There are two peaks in the areal fraction distribution of drops across the channel which is different from granular flow regime. It is also found that the peak in areal fraction distribution of drops moves away from the channel floor as the inclination angle of the channel increases.

  6. Surface temperature measurements of a levitated water drop during laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Cody; Tracey, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of high energy laser propagation and scattering in the maritime environment is problematic, due to the high liklihood of turbulence, fog, and rain or sea spray within the beam path. Laser interactions with large water drops (diameters of approximately 1-mm), such as those found in a light rain, have received relatively less attention. In this regime a high energy laser will rapidly heat and vaporize a water drop as it traverses the beam path, but the exact heating / vaporization rate, its dependence on impurities, and ancillary effects on the drop or surroundings are unclear. In this work we present surface temperature measurements of a water drop obtained using a FLIR IR camera. The drop is acoustically levitated, and subject to a continuous wave laser with a wavelength of 1070-nm and a mean irradiance of approximately 500 W/cm2. These measurements show that the steady-state surface temperature of the drop is well below the saturation temperature, yet based on the time history of the drop volume vaporization begins almost immediately upon laser strike. Inferences on the turbulence characteristics within the drop are also made from measurements of the fluctuations in the surface temperature. Supported by ONR, HEL-JTO, and USNA Trident Scholar Program.

  7. Drop Performance Test of CRDMs for JRTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Chung, Jong-Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun [POSCO Plandtec Co. Ltd, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan-Hee [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The drop test results of CRDMs with AC-type electromagnet show that the initial delay times are not satisfied with the requirement, 0.15 seconds. After the replacement of the electromagnet from AC-type to DCtype, the drop times of CARs and accelerations due to the impact of moving parts are satisfied with all requirements. As a result, it is found that four CRDMs to be installed at site have a good drop performance, and meet all performance requirements. A control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) is a device to control the position of a control absorber rod (CAR) in the core by using a stepping motor which is commanded by the reactor regulating system (RRS) to control the reactivity during the normal operation of the reactor. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the performances such as the stepping, drop, endurance, vibration, seismic and structural integrity for active components. Especially, the CAR drop curves are important data for the safety analysis. This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performances of a prototype and 4 CRDMs to be installed at site. The tests are carried out at a test rig simulating the actual reactor's conditions.

  8. Transition Mode Shapes in a Vibrating Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2000-11-01

    Vertical, time-periodic vibration of a diaphragm has been used to atomize a primary sessile drop into a fine spray of secondary droplets. The evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the sessile drop and the piezoelectrically-driven, low-mass diaphragm. The evolution of the free surface of the drop is characterized by the appearance of a hierarchy of surface waves that we investigated using high-speed imaging and laser vibrometry. At low-driving amplitudes, we see the appearance of time-harmonic axisymmetric waves on the drop's free surface induced by the motion of the contact line. As the vibration amplitude increases, azimuthal waves at the subharmonic of the forcing frequency appear around the periphery of the drop and propagate towards its center. A striking lattice mode emerges upon the breakdown of the axisymmetric wave pattern, followed by the appearance of the highly-agitated free surface of the pre-ejection mode shape. Subsequent to the breakdown of the lattice structure, the frequency of the most energetic mode is a subharmonic of the driving frequency. The complex interaction of the fundamental and subharmonic waves ultimately leads to the breakdown of the free surface and the atomization of the drop.

  9. Low voltage drop plasma switch for inverter and modulator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, D. M.; Poeschel, R. L.; Schumacher, R. W.

    1993-08-01

    A low forward voltage drop plasma switch has been developed for high-efficiency inverter and modulator applications. The switch, called the HOLLOTRON, is based on a grid-controlled, thermionic hollow-cathode discharge. A low forward voltage drop (10-20 V) is achieved by operating the hollow-cathode discharge in a static gas pressure of xenon. The dense plasma generated in the Ba-oxide dispenser hollow cathode is spread over a relatively large control grid area by a diverging magnetic field superimposed on the discharge. Interruption of the discharge current at high current densities (≳4 A/cm2) over the grid area is achieved by biasing the control grid sufficiently negative with respect to the plasma. The HOLLOTRON switch has demonstrated voltage stand-off of up to 20 kV, switching times of ≤0.3 μs, and pulse repetition frequencies of 20 kHz at 50% duty.

  10. Persistent Supercooling of Reproductive Shoots Is Enabled by Structural Ice Barriers Being Active Despite an Intact Xylem Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Kristian; Wagner, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular ice nucleation usually occurs at mild subzero temperatures in most plants. For persistent supercooling of certain plant parts ice barriers are necessary to prevent the entry of ice from already frozen tissues. The reproductive shoot of Calluna vulgaris is able to supercool down to below -22°C throughout all developmental stages (shoot elongation, flowering, fruiting) despite an established xylem conductivity. After localization of the persistent ice barrier between the reproductive and vegetative shoot at the base of the pedicel by infrared differential thermal analysis, the currently unknown structural features of the ice barrier tissue were anatomically analyzed on cross and longitudinal sections. The ice barrier tissue was recognized as a 250 μm long constriction zone at the base of the pedicel that lacked pith tissue and intercellular spaces. Most cell walls in this region were thickened and contained hydrophobic substances (lignin, suberin, and cutin). A few cell walls had what appeared to be thicker cellulose inclusions. In the ice barrier tissue, the area of the xylem was as much as 5.7 times smaller than in vegetative shoots and consisted of tracheids only. The mean number of conducting units in the xylem per cross section was reduced to 3.5% of that in vegetative shoots. Diameter of conducting units and tracheid length were 70% and 60% (respectively) of that in vegetative shoots. From vegetative shoots water transport into the ice barrier must pass pit membranes that are likely impermeable to ice. Pit apertures were about 1.9 μm x 0.7 μm, which was significantly smaller than in the vegetative shoot. The peculiar anatomical features of the xylem at the base of the pedicel suggest that the diameter of pores in pit membranes could be the critical constriction for ice propagation into the persistently supercooled reproductive shoots of C. vulgaris. PMID:27632365

  11. Static and dynamic length scales in supercooled liquids: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of water and tri-propylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klameth, F; Henritzi, P; Vogel, M

    2014-04-14

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study static and dynamic length scales in molecular supercooled liquids, in particular, water. For a determination of these scales, we use equilibrium configurations and pin appropriate subsets of molecules so as to obtain random matrices, cylindrical pores, and slit confinements. Static length scales ξ(s) are determined by analyzing overlap correlation functions for various fractions of pinned molecules or distances to the confining walls. For water in all confinements and for propylene oxide trimers in random geometry, a linear increase of ξ(s) with inverse temperature is found. Dynamic length scales ξ(d) are determined by analogous analysis of fraction-dependent or position-resolved correlation times of structural relaxation. While ξ(d) continuously grows upon cooling in the cylindrical and slit confinements, we find no evidence for a temperature dependence in random matrices, implying that molecular dynamics in parsed volumes is qualitatively different from that in bulk liquids. Finally, we study possible connections between the growth of the static and dynamic length scales and the slowdown of the structural relaxation of the supercooled bulk liquids. For water, we observe a linear relation between ln τ(α) and ξ(s)²/T in the whole accessible range down to the critical temperature of mode-coupling theory, T(c). In the weakly supercooled regime, the same relation holds also for ξ(d), as obtained from cylindrical and slit confinements, but deviations from this behavior are observed near T(c). The results are discussed in connection with random first-order theory and experimental studies of liquid dynamics in nanoscopic confinements and binary mixtures.

  12. Supercooling of the disordered vortex lattice in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Der Beek CJ; Colson; Indenbom; Konczykowski

    2000-05-01

    Time-resolved local induction measurements near the vortex lattice order-disorder transition in optimally doped Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) crystals show that the high-field, disordered phase can be quenched to fields as low as half the transition field. Over an important range of fields, the electrodynamical behavior of the vortex system is governed by the coexistence of ordered and disordered vortex phases in the sample. We interpret the results as supercooling of the high-field phase and the possible first-order nature of the order-disorder transition at the "second magnetization peak."

  13. Structural crossover in a supercooled metallic liquid and the link to a liquid-to-liquid phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, S.; Blodgett, M.; Kelton, K. F.; Ma, J. L.; Fan, J.; Wang, X.-L.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved synchrotron measurements were carried out to capture the structure evolution of an electrostatically levitated metallic-glass-forming liquid during free cooling. The experimental data shows a crossover in the liquid structure at ˜1000 K, about 115 K below the melting temperature and 150 K above the crystallization temperature. The structure change is characterized by a dramatic growth in the extended-range order below the crossover temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations have identified that the growth of the extended-range order was due to an increased correlation between solute atoms. These results provide structural evidence for a liquid-to-liquid-phase-transition in the supercooled metallic liquid.

  14. NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water

    OpenAIRE

    Mallamace, F.; Corsaro, C.; Broccio, M.; Branca, C.; González-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Chen, S. -H.; Stanley, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    Using NMR, we measure the proton chemical shift δ, of supercooled nanoconfined water in the temperature range 195 K < T < 350 K. Because δ is directly connected to the magnetic shielding tensor, we discuss the data in terms of the local hydrogen bond geometry and order. We argue that the derivative −(∂ ln δ/∂T)P should behave roughly as the constant pressure specific heat CP(T), and we confirm this argument by detailed comparisons with literature values of CP(T) in the range 290–370 K. We fin...

  15. Numerical and experimental verification of a theoretical model of ripple formation in ice growth under supercooled water film flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K; Farzaneh, M [NSERC/Hydro-Quebec/UQAC Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE) and Canada Research Chair on Engineering of Power Network Atmospheric Icing (INGIVRE), Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Yamaguchi, S [Snow and Ice Research Center, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Nagaoka, 940-0821 (Japan); Tsuji, H [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: kazuto.ueno@uqac.ca

    2010-04-15

    Little is known about morphological instability of a solidification front during the crystal growth of a thin film of flowing supercooled liquid with a free surface: for example, the ring-like ripples on the surface of icicles. The length scale of the ripples is nearly 1 cm. Two theoretical models for the ripple formation mechanism have been proposed. However, these models lead to quite different results because of differences in the boundary conditions at the solid-liquid interface and liquid-air surface. The validity of the assumption used in the two models is numerically investigated and some of the theoretical predictions are compared with experiments.

  16. Spreading of Electrolyte Drops on Charged Surfaces: Electric Double Layer Effects on Drop Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyeong; Sinha, Shayandev; Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Drop spreading is one of the most fundamental topics of wetting. Here we study the spreading of electrolyte drops on charged surfaces. The electrolyte solution in contact with the charged solid triggers the formation of an electric double layer (EDL). We develop a theory to analyze how the EDL affects the drop spreading. The drop dynamics is studied by probing the EDL effects on the temporal evolution of the contact angle and the base radius (r). The EDL effects are found to hasten the spreading behaviour - this is commensurate to the EDL effects causing a ``philic'' tendency in the drops (i.e., drops attaining a contact angle smaller than its equilibrium value), as revealed by some of our recent papers. We also develop scaling laws to illustrate the manner in which the EDL effects make the r versus time (t) variation deviate from the well known r ~tn variation, thereby pinpointing the attainment of different EDL-mediated spreading regimes.

  17. Vibrations of liquid drops in film boiling phenomena: the mathematical model

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Flattened liquid drops poured on a very hot surface evaporate quite slowly and float on a film of their own vapour. In the cavities of a surface, an unusual type of vibrational motions occurs. Large vibrations take place and different forms of dynamic drops are possible. They form elliptic patterns with two lobes or hypotrochoid patterns with three lobes or more. The lobes are turning relatively to the hot surface. We present a model of vibrating motions of the drops. Frequencies of the vibrations are calculated regarding the number of lobes. The computations agree with experiments.

  18. Ink-jet printer heads for ultra-small-drop protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E I; Cachau, R E

    2002-12-01

    Mass-produced automated piezoelectric driven picoliter delivery systems (printer heads) are fast, inexpensive, and reliable devices that are capable of delivering a very large range of volumes and are ideally suited for high-throughput protein crystallography studies. We used this technology to set up under-oil crystallization experiments with drop sizes from the 200-nL to 3-microL volume range, commonly used in protein crystallography, and show its application in setting ultra-small (2 nL) drops, the smallest drop volume reported to date for this type of assay.

  19. Charge and Size Distributions of Electrospray Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan L; de la Mora JF

    1997-02-15

    The distributions of charge q and diameter d of drops emitted from electrified liquid cones in the cone-jet mode are investigated with two aerosol instruments. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA, Vienna type) first samples the spray drops, selects those with electrical mobilities within a narrow band, and either measures the associated current or passes them to a second instrument. The drops may also be individually counted optically and sized by sampling them into an aerodynamic size spectrometer (API's Aerosizer). For a given cone-jet, the distribution of charge q for the main electrospray drops is some 2.5 times broader than their distribution of diameters d, with qmax/qmin approximately 4. But mobility-selected drops have relative standard deviations of only 5% for both d and q, showing that the support of the (q, d) distribution is a narrow band centered around a curve q(d). The approximate one-dimensionality of this support region is explained through the mechanism of jet breakup, which is a random process with only one degree of freedom: the wavelength of axial modulation of the jet. The observed near constancy of the charge over volume ratio (q approximately d3) shows that the charge is frozen in the liquid surface at the time scale of the breakup process. The charge over volume ratio of the primary drops varies between 98 and 55% of the ratio of spray current I over liquid flow rate Q, and decreases at increasing Q. I/Q is therefore an unreliable measure of the charge density of these drops.

  20. Shape oscillation of a levitated drop in an acoustic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ran, Weiyu

    2013-01-01

    A `star drop' refers to the patterns created when a drop, flattened by some force, is excited into shape mode oscillations. These patterns are perhaps best understood as the two dimensional analog to the more common three dimensional shape mode oscillations. In this fluid dynamics video an ultrasonic standing wave was used to levitate a liquid drop. The drop was then flattened into a disk by increasing the field strength. This flattened drop was then excited to create star drop patterns by exciting the drop at its resonance frequency. Different oscillatory modes were induced by varying the drop radius, fluid properties, and frequency at which the field strength was modulated.

  1. The Parkfield Stress Drop Controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2003-12-01

    Nadeau et al. (1995) found that the seismicity on the San Andreas fault at Parkfield is highly clustered. Individual clusters consist of a sequence of near periodically repeating small earthquakes of similar seismic moment. Nadeau and Johnston (1998) compared the moments and timing of these repeating earthquakes (Mw 1000 MPa) for the small earthquakes (Mw patches of high Δ σ would be resolvable by standard seismic methods. However, to date nobody has used seismic methods to determine source parameters for these controversial small earthquakes at Parkfield. We use closely located earthquakes of different sizes (for example, the sub-clusters of cluster CL14, Nadeau et al., 1995, Mw-0.2 to 1), recorded on the HRSN borehole network to analyse the source parameters. The smaller earthquakes are used as empirical Green's functions to resolve source processes of the larger events. Preliminary results from the earthquakes in cluster CL14 result in a source dimension of about 25 m and Δ σ of about 1 MPa for the Mw1 earthquakes, assuming that rupture velocity is the same as that for large earthquakes. We also resolve source-time functions for these earthquakes at most stations and so we can investigate the directivity and velocity of the rupture. Finally we compare the source parameter estimates from the seismic modeling, with those from recurrence and creep rate, and assess the validity of the various proposed models.

  2. Probing the nanoscale with high-speed interferometry of an impacting drop

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2017-02-28

    The simple phenomenon of a water drop falling onto a glass plate may seem like a trivial fluid mechanics problem. However, detailed imaging has shown that this process is highly complex and a small air-bubble is always entrapped under the drop when it makes contact with the solid. This bubble can interfere with the uniformity of spray coatings and degrade inkjet fabrication of displays etc. We will describe how we use high-speed interferometry at 5 million frames per second to understand the details of this process. As the impacting drop approaches the solid, the dynamics are characterized by a balance between the lubrication pressure in the thin air layer and the inertia of the bot-tom of the drop. This deforms the drop, forming a dimple at its bottom and making the drop touch the surface along a ring, thereby entrapping the air-layer, which is typically 1-3 mu m thick. This air-layer can be highly compressed and the deceleration of the bottom of the drop can be as large as 300,000 g. We describe how the thicknessevolution of the lubricating air-layer is extracted from following the interference fringes between frames. Two-color interferometry is also used to extract absolute layer thicknesses. Finally, we identify the effects of nanometric surface roughness on the first contact of the drop with the substrate. Here we need to resolve the 100 nm thickness changes occurring during 200 ns intervals, requiring these state of the art high-speed cameras. Surprisingly, we see a ring of micro-bubbles marking the first contact of the drop with the glass, only for microscope slides, which have a typical roughness of 20 nm, while such rings are absent for drop impacts onto molecularly smooth mica surfaces.

  3. Drops with non-circular footprints

    CERN Document Server

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D; Diez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. This type of drops is a consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to hysteresis effects of the contact angle since some parts of the contact line are wetting, while others are dewetting. Here, we obtain a peculiar drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate, and analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non--trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of...

  4. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  5. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  6. Drops with non-circular footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D.; González, Alejandro G.; Diez, Javier A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. These drops are consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to the hysteresis of the contact angle since there is a wetting process in some parts of the contact line, while a dewetting occurs in other parts. Here, we obtain a characteristic drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate. We analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non-trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and we compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equation, where we emulate the hysteretic effects with an appropriate spatial distribution of the static contact angle over the substrate.

  7. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Spencer D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  8. Liquid Drop Measuring Device for Analyzing Liquid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the correlation between certain properties of liquid and the properties of the corresponding liquid drop formed under given conditions, a liquid drop measuring device is utilized to monitor the drop formation process of the liquid sample with photoelectric measuring methods. The mechanical and optical characteristic of the liquid is explored with the optical fibers from the internal of the liquid drop during its formation. The drop head capacitor is utilized to monitor the growth process of the liquid drop to gain the drop volume information related to the physical property of liquid. The unique liquid drop trace containing the integrated properties of liquid is generated, and it is proved by experiment that for different liquids their liquid drop traces are different. The analysis on liquid properties and discrimination between different liquids can be proceeded with the liquid drop trace obtained by the liquid drop measuring device.

  9. Nature of the anomalies in the supercooled liquid state of the mW model of water

    CERN Document Server

    Holten, Vincent; Molinero, Valeria; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the supercooled liquid state of the mW model of water show anomalous behavior. Like in real water, the heat capacity and compressibility sharply increase upon supercooling. One of the possible explanations of these anomalies, the existence of a second (liquid-liquid) critical point, is not supported by simulations for this particular model. In this work, we reproduce the anomalies of the mW model with two thermodynamic scenarios: one based on a non-ideal "mixture" with two different types of local order of the water molecules, and one based on weak crystallization theory. We show that both descriptions accurately reproduce the model's basic thermodynamic properties. However, the coupling constant required for fitting the power laws implied by weak crystallization theory is found not to be physically meaningful. For the two-state approach, the direct computation of the low-density fraction of molecules in the mW model is in agreement with the prediction of the phenomenological e...

  10. A systematic experimental study on the evaporation rate of supercooled water droplets at subzero temperatures and varying relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberto, S.; Reutzsch, J.; Roth, N.; Weigand, B.

    2017-05-01

    Supercooled water droplets (SWD) are present in clouds at high altitude and subjected to very low temperatures and high relative humidity. These droplets exist in a metastable state. The understanding of the evaporation of SWD at these extreme conditions is of high interest to understand rain, snow, and hail generating mechanisms in clouds. This paper focuses on the experimental results of the measurements of the evaporation rates β of supercooled water droplets. For this purpose, single SWDs are trapped by means of optical levitation. During the evaporation process, the elastically scattered light in the forward regime is recorded and evaluated. Experiments have been performed for different relative humidities φ at three constant ambient temperatures, namely, {T_∞}=268.15; 263.15; 253.15 {{K}} ({t_∞} = -5; -10; -20°C). The experimental data agrees well with direct numerical simulations (DNS) carried out with the in-house code Free Surface 3D (FS3D) and shows that the use of a simplified model is permissible for these ambient conditions.

  11. Supercooling capacity and cold hardiness of the adults of the sycamore lace bug, corythucha ciliata (Hemiptera:Tingidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Wang, Feng; Xiao, Yu-Yu; Li, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Supercooling point (SCP) of female adults of Corythucha ciliata was significantly lower than that of male adults, with an average being -11.49 degrees C and -9.54 degrees C, respectively. Low temperature survival of adults of different ages indicated that there were differences in cold survival ability among age groups of adults. Nonlinear regression analysis found that the response of C. ciliata adults to exposure time under different low temperature regimes (above -5 degrees C) was best fitted by a logistic equation. Both low temperature and exposure time had significant effects on mortality of adults. Temperatures above 5 degrees C did not prevent C. ciliata adults from surviving. C. ciliata was shown to be a freeze-intolerant but chill-tolerant insect. C. ciliata could tolerate subzero temperatures by supercooling. Temperature around -8 degres C is a critical point for successful overwintering of C. ciliata adults, which can establish in the whole areas where Platanus trees are planted in China.

  12. Dynamics of supercooled liquid and plastic crystalline ethanol: Dielectric relaxation and AC nanocalorimetry distinguish structural α- and Debye relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Y. Z.; Young-Gonzales, A. R.; Richert, R.; Ediger, M. D.; Schick, C.

    2017-07-01

    Physical vapor deposition has been used to prepare glasses of ethanol. Upon heating, the glasses transformed into the supercooled liquid phase and then crystallized into the plastic crystal phase. The dynamic glass transition of the supercooled liquid is successfully measured by AC nanocalorimetry, and preliminary results for the plastic crystal are obtained. The frequency dependences of these dynamic glass transitions observed by AC nanocalorimetry are in disagreement with conclusions from previously published dielectric spectra of ethanol. Existing dielectric loss spectra have been carefully re-evaluated considering a Debye peak, which is a typical feature in the dielectric loss spectra of monohydroxy alcohols. The re-evaluated dielectric fits reveal a prominent dielectric Debye peak, a smaller and asymmetrically broadened peak, which is identified as the signature of the structural α-relaxation and a Johari-Goldstein secondary relaxation process. This new assignment of the dielectric processes is supported by the observation that the AC nanocalorimetry dynamic glass transition temperature, Tα, coincides with the dielectric structural α-relaxation process rather than the Debye process. The combined results from dielectric spectroscopy and AC nanocalorimetry on the plastic crystal of ethanol suggest the occurrence of a Debye process also in the plastic crystal phase.

  13. Effect of phase separation induced supercooling on magnetotransport properties of epitaxial La5/8−yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y≈0.4 thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Singh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of La5/8−yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y≈0.4 have been grown on single crystal SrTiO3 (001 by RF sputtering. The structural and surface characterizations confirm the epitaxial nature of these film. However, the difference between the ω-scan of the (002 and (110 peaks and the presence of pits/holes in the step-terrace type surface morphology suggests high density of defect in these films. Pronounced hysteresis between the field cooled cooling (FCC and field cooled warming (FCW magnetization measurements suggest towards the non-ergodic magnetic state. The origin of this nonergodicity could be traced to the magnetic liquid like state arising from the delicacy of the coexisting magnetic phases, viz., ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic-charge ordered (FM/AFM-CO. The large difference between the insulator metal transitions during cooling and warming cycles (TIMC ∼ 64 K and TIMW ∼ 123 K could be regarded as a manifestation of the nonergodicity leading to supercooling of the magnetic liquid while cooling. The nonergodicity and supercooling are weakened by the AFM-FM phase transition induced by an external magnetic field. TIM and small polaron activation energy corresponding the magnetic liquid state (cooling cycle vary nonlinearly with the applied magnetic field but become linear in the crystalline solid state (warming cycle. The analysis of the low temperature resistivity data shows that electron-phonon interaction is drastically reduced by the applied magnetic field. The resistivity minimum in the lower temperature region of the self-field warming curve has been explained in terms of the Kondo like scattering in the magnetically inhomogeneous regime.

  14. Heterogeneous nucleation from a supercooled ionic liquid on a carbon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoxia; Shen, Yan; Hung, Francisco R.; Santiso, Erik E.

    2016-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the nucleation of the crystal phase of the ionic liquid [dmim+][Cl-] from its supercooled liquid phase, both in the bulk and in contact with a graphitic surface of D = 3 nm. By combining the string method in collective variables [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)], with Markovian milestoning with Voronoi tessellations [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2589-2594 (2009)] and order parameters for molecular crystals [Santiso and Trout, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064109 (2011)], we computed minimum free energy paths, the approximate size of the critical nucleus, the free energy barrier, and the rates involved in these nucleation processes. For homogeneous nucleation, the subcooled liquid phase has to overcome a free energy barrier of ˜85 kcal/mol to form a critical nucleus of size ˜3.6 nm, which then grows into the monoclinic crystal phase. This free energy barrier becomes about 42% smaller (˜49 kcal/mol) when the subcooled liquid phase is in contact with a graphitic disk, and the critical nucleus formed is about 17% smaller (˜3.0 nm) than the one observed for homogeneous nucleation. The crystal formed in the heterogeneous nucleation scenario has a structure that is similar to that of the bulk crystal, with the exception of the layers of ions next to the graphene surface, which have larger local density and the cations lie with their imidazolium rings parallel to the graphitic surface. The critical nucleus forms near the graphene surface separated only by these layers of ions. The heterogeneous nucleation rate (˜4.8 × 1011 cm-3 s-1) is about one order of magnitude faster than the homogeneous rate (˜6.6 × 1010 cm-3 s-1). The computed free energy barriers and nucleation rates are in reasonable agreement with experimental and simulation values obtained for the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of other systems (ice, urea, Lennard-Jones spheres, and oxide glasses).

  15. Observations on the Freezing of Supercooled Pollen Washing Water by a New Electrodynamic Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Haijie; Pope, Francis D.; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological particles can act as efficient ice nuclei (IN) by initiating freezing events at temperatures warmer than the homogenous freezing temperature [1, 2]. For example, pollen grain particles can trigger freezing events at temperatures as warm as -5 °C in the contact freezing mode [3]. More recently pollen residues, which are released by washing pollen grains in water, were also observed to act as efficient IN in the immersion mode [4, 5]. In this study we developed a new cold electrodynamic balance (CEDB) system and investigated the freezing properties of single particles of supercooled pollen washing water (SPWW). The EDB technique allows for a contact free measurement of freezing events. The phase of the particle (liquid or frozen solid) can be distinguished via measuring the Mie scattering signal from the particle. Furthermore the size of liquid (spherical) particles can be determined. The freezing events are characterized through the loss of the regular Mie scattering signal from the levitated droplet as it changes state from liquid to a frozen solid. The statistical freezing probabilities of SPWW were obtained in the temperature range: -15 to -40 °C. Each temperature measurement point consists of the analysis of 30-100 droplets. Preliminary conclusions are that SPWW is IN active in the immersion mode. Further discussion will focus on the temperature range of the IN activity, the important variables (other than temperature) for IN activity, other likely modes of IN activity, and the implications of these results in terms of the atmospheric relevance of SPWW. This study was supported by the NERC. We acknowledge Professor Jonathan Reid and James Davis from the University of Bristol for providing information of the design of the warm EDB system. References: [1] Möhler, O., et al. (2007) Biogeosciences, 4, 1059-1071. [2] Prenni, A. J., et al. (2009) Nat. Geosci., 2, 401-404. [3] Diehl, K., et al. (2002) Atmos. Res., 61, 125-133. [4] Pummer, B. G

  16. Settling of copper drops in molten slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warczok, A.; Utigard, T. A.

    1995-02-01

    The settling of suspended metal and sulfide droplets in liquid metallurgical, slags can be affected by electric fields. The migration of droplets due to electrocapillary motion phenomena may be used to enhance the recovery of suspended matte/metal droplets and thereby to increase the recovery of pay metals. An experimental technique was developed for the purpose of measuring the effect of electric fields on the settling rate of metallic drops in liquid slags. Copper drops suspended in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Cu2O slags were found to migrate toward the cathode. Electric fields can increase the settling rate of 5-mm-diameter copper drops 3 times or decrease the settling until levitation by reversal of the electric field. The enhanced settling due to electric fields decreases with increasing Cu2O contents in the slag.

  17. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  18. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  19. Drop impact on a flexible fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Dressaire, Emilie; Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    When droplets impact fibrous media, the liquid can be captured by the fibers or contact then break away. Previous studies have shown that the efficiency of drop capture by a rigid fiber depends on the impact velocity and defined a threshold velocity below which the drop is captured. However, it is necessary to consider the coupling of elastic and capillary effects to achieve a greater understanding of the capture process for soft substrates. Here, we study experimentally the dynamics of a single drop impacting on a thin flexible fiber. Our results demonstrate that the threshold capture velocity depends on the flexibility of fibers in a non-monotonic way. We conclude that tuning the mechanical properties of fibers can optimize the efficiency of droplet capture.

  20. Secondary breakup of coal water slurry drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2011-11-01

    To investigate secondary atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), deformation and breakup of eight kinds of CWS drops are presented using high speed digital camera. Based on morphology, deformation and breakup regimes of CWS drops can be termed some different modes: deformation, multimode breakup (including two sub-modes: hole breakup and tensile breakup), and shear breakup. Correlations on the ranges of breakup modes are also obtained. The conventional Weber number and Ohnesorge number are found to be insufficient to classify all breakup modes of CWS drops, so two other non-dimensional numbers based on rheology of CWS are suggested to use in the deformation and breakup regime map. Finally, total breakup time is studied and correlated, which increases with Ohnesorge number.

  1. Water drops dancing on ice: how sublimation leads to drop rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Bernagozzi, I; Jung, S; Poulikakos, D; Marengo, M

    2013-07-05

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces but can also be induced through the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here we demonstrate that drop rebound can also originate from another physical phenomenon, the solid substrate sublimation. Through drop impact experiments on a superhydrophobic surface, a hot plate, and solid carbon dioxide (commonly known as dry ice), we compare drop rebound based on three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common (superhydrophobicity, evaporation, and sublimation), but lead to the same rebound phenomenon in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300 °C down to even below -79 °C. The formation and unprecedented visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop are also reported.

  2. The new Drop Tower catapult system

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Rath, Hans J.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of the "Drop Tower" began. Since then, the eye-catching tower with a height of 146 m and its characteristic glass roof has become the emblem of the technology centre in Bremen. The Drop Tower Bremen provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness. Items are considered weightless, when they are in "free fall", i.e. moving without propulsion within the gravity field of the earth. The height of the tower limits the simple "free fall" experiment period to max. 4.74 s. With the inauguration of the catapult system in December 2004, the ZARM is entering a new dimension. This world novelty will meet scientists' demands of extending the experiment period up to 9.5 s. Since turning the first sod on May 3rd, 1988, the later installation of the catapult system has been taken into account by building the necessary chamber under the tower. The catapult system is located in a chamber 10 m below the base of the tower. This chamber is almost completely occupied by 12 huge pressure tanks. These tanks are placed around the elongation of the vacuum chamber of the drop tube. In its centre there is the pneumatic piston that accelerates the drop capsule by the pressure difference between the vacuum inside the drop tube and the pressure inside the tanks. The acceleration level is adjusted by means of a servo hydraulic breaking system controlling the piston velocity. After only a quarter of a second the drop capsule achieves its lift-off speed of 175 km/h. With this exact speed, the capsule will rise up to the top of the tower and afterwards fall down again into the deceleration unit which has been moved under the drop tube in the meantime. The scientific advantages of the doubled experiment time are obvious: during almost 10 s of high

  3. Electrohydrodynamic removal of particles from drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudurupati, S.; Janjua, M.; Singh, P.; Aubry, N.

    2009-07-01

    A uniform electric field is used for cleaning drops of the particles they often carry on their surface. In a first step, particles migrate to either the drop’s poles or equator. This is due to the presence of an electrostatic force for which an analytical expression is derived. In a second step, particles concentrated near the poles are released into the ambient liquid via tip streaming, and those near the equator are removed by stretching the drop and breaking it into several droplets. In the latter case, particles are all concentrated in a small middle daughter droplet.

  4. Millikan "oil drop" stabilized by growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L K; Gertler, A W; Reiss, H

    1979-01-26

    A diffusion cloud chamber has been used to qualitatively study some dynamic properties of liquid drops by suspending them in an electric field at the plane of saturation (p/ps = 1, where p is the actual partial pressure of the vapor at a given elevation and ps is the equilibrium pressure at that temperature characteristic of that elevation). By varying the strength of the electric field, it is possible to change the size of the suspended droplets and even, if desired, to isolate a single drop.

  5. Transformation of the bridge during drop separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of flows during separation of pendant drops of liquids with significantly different physical properties (alcohol, water, glycerin, oil) has been studied by high-speed video recording. The dynamics of the processes involving the formation of bridges of two characteristic shapes—slightly nonuniform in thickness and with thinning of the upper and lower ends—has been investigated. It has been shown that the shape change of the separated bridge has a number of stages determined by the properties of the liquid. As a result, the bridge is transformed into a small drop—a satellite drop.

  6. Assessing the accuracy of contact angle measurements for sessile drops on liquid-repellent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-11-15

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased optical noise in the drop profile near the solid-liquid free surface and the progressive failure of simple geometric approximations. We demonstrate a systematic approach to determining the effective contact angle of drops on super-repellent surfaces. We use a perturbation solution of the Bashforth-Adams equation to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops of water, ethylene glycol, and diiodomethane on an omniphobic surface using direct measurements of the maximum drop width and height. The results and analysis can be represented in terms of a dimensionless Bond number that depends on the maximum drop width and the capillary length of the liquid to quantify the extent of gravity-induced sagging. Finally, we illustrate the inherent sensitivity of goniometric contact angle measurement techniques to drop dimensions as the apparent contact angle approaches 180°.

  7. A Validated All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model and Lewis Number Effects for a Binary Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    The differences between subcritical liquid drop and supercritical fluid drop behavior are discussed. Under subcritical, evaporative high emission rate conditions, a film layer is present in the inner part of the drop surface which contributes to the unique determination of the boundary conditions; it is this film layer which contributes to the solution's convective-diffusive character. In contrast, under supercritical condition as the boundary conditions contain a degree of arbitrariness due to the absence of a surface, and the solution has then a purely diffusive character. Results from simulations of a free fluid drop under no-gravity conditions are compared to microgravity experimental data from suspended, large drop experiments at high, low and intermediary temperatures and in a range of pressures encompassing the sub-and supercritical regime. Despite the difference between the conditions of the simulations and experiments (suspension vs. free floating), the time rate of variation of the drop diameter square is remarkably well predicted in the linear curve regime. The drop diameter is determined in the simulations from the location of the maximum density gradient, and agrees well with the data. It is also shown that the classical calculation of the Lewis number gives qualitatively erroneous results at supercritical conditions, but that an effective Lewis number previously defined gives qualitatively correct estimates of the length scales for heat and mass transfer at all pressures.

  8. [Predicting drop-out during the systems training for emotional predictability and problem solving (STEPPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, J B; de Groot, I W

    2016-01-01

    Drop-out is a complex problem in mental health care and in STEPPS. Research has revealed a variety of predicting factors and has produced contradictory results. To investigate whether the information available at the start of STEPPS can pinpoint predictors of drop-out. The ROM data for 150 patients were used to test the link between the following factors: age, gender, education, employment, substance abuse, anxiety, hostility, interpersonal relations, responsibility and social concordance with drop-out. The method used for testing was logistic regression analysis. Factors that contributed significantly to the prediction of drop-out were gender and employment status. These factors made up 16% of the explained variation (R2 Nagelkerkes) in drop-out. Gender was the strongest predictive factor. Concerning the other factors, no differences were found between groups (drop-out and non-dropouts). In its present form STEPPS does not suit a large number of the male participants. Drop-out during STEPPS is hard to predict on the basis of ROM-questionnaires. Future research should focus on preconditions and marginal conditions that influence patients to complete their training.

  9. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  10. Best Measuring Time for a Millikan Oil Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    In a Millikan oil drop experiment, there is a best measuring time for observing the drop, due to Brownian motion of the drop and the experimenter's reaction time. Derives an equation for the relative error in the measurement of the drop's excess charge, and obtains a formula for the best measuring time. (Author/MLH)

  11. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature…

  12. Velocity and pattern of ice propagation and deep supercooling in woody stems of Castanea sativa, Morus nigra and Quercus robur measured by IDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Gilbert; Xu, Bingcheng; Hacker, Juergen

    2010-08-01

    Infrared differential thermal analysis (IDTA) was used to monitor the velocity and pattern of ice propagation and deep supercooling of xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) during freezing of stems of Castanea sativa L., Morus nigra L. and Quercus robur L. that exhibit a macro- and ring-porous xylem. Measurements were conducted on the surface of cross- and longitudinal stem sections. During high-temperature freezing exotherms (HTEs; -2.8 to -9.4°C), initial freezing was mainly observed in the youngest year ring of the sapwood (94%), but occasionally elsewhere (older year rings: 4%; bark: 2%). Initially, ice propagated rapidly in the largest xylem conduits. This resulted in a distinct freezing pattern of concentric circles in C. sativa and M. nigra. During HTEs, supercooling of XPCs became visible in Q. robur stems, but not in the other species that have narrower pith rays. Intracellular freezing of supercooled XPCs of Q. robur became visible by IDTA during low-temperature freezing exotherms (<-17.4 °C). Infrared differential thermal analysis revealed the progress and the two-dimensional pattern of XPC freezing. XPCs did not freeze at once, but rather small cell groups appeared to freeze at random anywhere in the xylem. By IDTA, ice propagation and deep supercooling in stems can be monitored at meaningful spatial and temporal resolutions.

  13. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  14. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    CERN Document Server

    Thoraval, M -J; Etoh, T G; Thoroddsen, S T

    2012-01-01

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting onto a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 264506 (2012)]. These dynamics occur mostly within 50 {\\mu}s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million frames/sec. For a water drop impacting onto a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Re above about 12 000, up to 10 partial bubble-rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is about 20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into microbubbles. The different refractive index in the pool l...

  15. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  16. Scaling the drop size in coflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Hernandez, E; Gordillo, J M [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gundabala, V; Fernandez-Nieves, A [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)], E-mail: jgordill@us.es

    2009-07-15

    We perform extensive experiments with coflowing liquids in microfluidic devices and provide a closed expression for the drop size as a function of measurable parameters in the jetting regime that accounts for the experimental observations; this expression works irrespective of how the jets are produced, providing a powerful design tool for this type of experiments.

  17. Drop Shaping by Laser-Pulse Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.L.; Bouwhuis, W.; Visser, C.W.; Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, C.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Villermaux, E.; Lohse, D.; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    We show how the deposition of laser energy induces propulsion and strong deformation of an absorbing liquid body. Combining high speed with stroboscopic imaging, we observe that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a millijoule nanosecond laser pulse propels forward at several meters per second

  18. Thermocapillary motion of bubbles and drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of interface-driven motions of drops and bubbles. It is shown that even in the simplest cases, theory predicts exotic flow topologies. Attention is given to several unsolved problems that must be addressed both theoretically and experimentally.

  19. Equilibrium drop surface profiles in electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, F.; Buehrle, J.

    2007-01-01

    Electrowetting is becoming a more and more frequently used tool to manipulate liquids in various microfluidic applications. On the scale of the entire drop, the effect of electrowetting is to reduce the apparent contact angle of partially wetting conductive liquids upon application of an external vo

  20. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  1. Liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Inwon

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional model describing the motion of liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane (the so-called quasi-static approximation model). We prove existence and uniqueness of a solution and investigate its long time behavior for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous medium (i.e. constant and non-constant contact angle). We also obtain some homogenization results.

  2. Drop-Out Challenges: Pathways to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Evguenia; McKee, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an action research at an alternative high school which explores drop-out prevention strategies with first-year students. Student retention is extremely challenging for alternative schools. Because their mission is to provide a second chance to students who could not succeed in a regular setting, those schools regularly must…

  3. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  4. Standardisation of superheated drop and bubble detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhavere, F.; D' Errico, F

    2002-07-01

    This study presents an analysis of the commercially available superheated drop detectors and bubble detectors, performed in substantial accordance with the guidelines developed by the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO). The analysis was performed in terms of linearity, reproducibility, ageing, minimum detection thresholds, energy and angular dependence of the response and the influence of various climatic conditions. (author)

  5. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  6. An Efficient Algorithm to Solve the Problem of Dropped Call in CDMA Cellular Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the mobile environment, the dropped calls can be resulted from shadowing and rapid signal loss. As the cells shrink to accommodate an increasingly large demand for services, the dropped-call recovery procedure will become more important over the air interface. But in the current protocols, the recovery procedure is too simple to demonstrate the procedure. In this paper, we present a Transparent Reconnection Procedure (TRP) which is an efficient algorithm that can be adapted easily to the benefit of decreased dropped calls. In the simulation of a typical cellular system, it is shown that there are fewer dropped calls using TRP compared to the conventional procedure. This benefit comes at the expense of a slight increase (less than percent 1) in blocked call percentage. It depends on some relevant system parameters, the values of which are decided by the operators accordingly.

  7. Fault roughness and strength heterogeneity control earthquake size and stress drop

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2017-01-13

    An earthquake\\'s stress drop is related to the frictional breakdown during sliding and constitutes a fundamental quantity of the rupture process. High-speed laboratory friction experiments that emulate the rupture process imply stress drop values that greatly exceed those commonly reported for natural earthquakes. We hypothesize that this stress drop discrepancy is due to fault-surface roughness and strength heterogeneity: an earthquake\\'s moment release and its recurrence probability depend not only on stress drop and rupture dimension but also on the geometric roughness of the ruptured fault and the location of failing strength asperities along it. Using large-scale numerical simulations for earthquake ruptures under varying roughness and strength conditions, we verify our hypothesis, showing that smoother faults may generate larger earthquakes than rougher faults under identical tectonic loading conditions. We further discuss the potential impact of fault roughness on earthquake recurrence probability. This finding provides important information, also for seismic hazard analysis.

  8. An algorithm for selecting the most accurate protocol for contact angle measurement by drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z N

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an error analysis is performed to study real water drop images and the corresponding numerically generated water drop profiles for three widely used static contact angle algorithms: the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms and the axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) algorithm. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the numerically generated drop profiles based on the Laplace equation. A significant number of water drop profiles with different volumes, contact angles, and noise levels are generated, and the influences of the three factors on the accuracies of the three algorithms are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the above-mentioned three algorithms are complementary. In fact, the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms show low errors and are highly resistant to noise for water drops with small/medium volumes and contact angles, while for water drop with large volumes and contact angles just the ADSA-P algorithm can meet accuracy requirement. However, this algorithm introduces significant errors in the case of small volumes and contact angles because of its high sensitivity to noise. The critical water drop volumes of the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms corresponding to a certain contact angle error are obtained through a significant amount of computation. To improve the precision of the static contact angle measurement, a more accurate algorithm based on a combination of the three algorithms is proposed. Following a systematic investigation, the algorithm selection rule is described in detail, while maintaining the advantages of the three algorithms and overcoming their deficiencies. In general, static contact angles over the entire hydrophobicity range can be accurately evaluated using the proposed algorithm. The ease of erroneous judgment in static contact angle measurements is avoided. The proposed algorithm is validated by a static contact angle evaluation of real and numerically generated water drop

  9. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  10. Motion of Drops on Surfaces with Wettability Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, R. Shankar; McLaughlin, John B.; Moumen, Nadjoua; Qian, Dongying

    2002-01-01

    desiccator. This is done using an approximate line source of the vapor in the form of a string soaked in the alkylchlorosilane. Ordinarily, many fluids, including water, wet the surface of silicon quite well. This means that the contact angle is small. But the silanized surface resists wetting, with contact angles that are as large as 100 degs. Therefore, a gradient of wettability is formed on the silicon surface. The region near the string is highly hydrophobic, and the contact angle decreases gradually toward a small value at the hydrophilic end away from this region. The change in wettability occurs over a distance of several mm. The strip is placed on a platform within a Plexiglas cell. Drops of a suitable liquid are introduced on top of the strip near the hydrophobic end. An optical system attached to a video camera is trained on the drop so that images of the moving drop can be captured on videotape for subsequent analysis. We have performed preliminary experiments with water as well as ethylene glycol drops. Results from these experiments will be presented in the poster. Future plans include the refinement of the experimental system so as to permit images to be recorded from the side as well as the top, and the conduct of a systematic study in which the drop size is varied over a good range. Experiments will be conducted with different fluids so as to obtain the largest possible range of suitably defined Reynolds and Capillary numbers. Also, an effort will be initiated on theoretical modeling of this motion. The challenges in the development of the theoretical description lie in the proper analysis of the region in the vicinity of the contact line, as well as in the free boundary nature of the problem. It is known that continuum models assuming the no slip condition all the way to the contact line fail by predicting that the stress on the solid surface becomes singular as the contact line is approached. One approach for dealing with this issue has been to relax the no

  11. Packet Drop Avoidance for High-speed network transmission protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Guojun

    2004-05-01

    As network bandwidth continues to grow and longer paths are used to exchange large scientific data between storage systems and GRID computation, it has become increasingly obvious that there is a need to deploy a packet drop avoidance mechanism into network transmission protocols. Current end-to-end congestion avoidance mechanisms used in Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) have worked well on low bandwidth delay product networks, but with newer high-bandwidth delay networks they have shown to be inefficient and prone to unstable. This is largely due to increased network bandwidth coupled with changes in internet traffic patterns. These changes come from a variety of new network applications that are being developed to take advantage of the increased network bandwidth. This paper will examine the end-to-end congestion avoidance mechanism and perform a step-by-step analysis of its theory. In addition we will propose an alternative approach developed as part of a new network transmission protocol. Our alternative protocol uses a packet drop avoidance (PDA) mechanism built on top of the maximum burst size (MBS) theory combined with a real-time available bandwidth algorithm.

  12. Coalescence collision of liquid drops I: Off-center collisions of equal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH is used here to model off-center collisions of equal-size liquid drops in a three-dimensional space. In this study the Weber number is calculated for several conditions of the droplets dynamics and the velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown. For the permanent coalescence the evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown and also the approaching to equilibrium of the resulting drop. Depending of the Weber number three possible outcomes for the collision of droplets is obtained: permanent coalescence, flocculation and fragmentation. The fragmentation phenomena are modeled and the formation of small satellite drops can be seen. The ligament that is formed follows the “end pinching” mechanism and it is transformed into a flat structure.

  13. Coalescence collision of liquid drops II: Off-center collisions of unequal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method to simulate for first time in the three-dimensional space the hydrodynamic off-center collisions of unequal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. The Weber number for several conditions of the droplets dynamics is determined. Also the velocity vector fields inside the drops are shown in the collision process. The evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown for the permanent coalescence case. The resulting drops tend to deform, and depending of the Weber number two possible outcomes for the collision of droplets arise: either permanent coalescence or flocculation. In the permanent coalescence of the drops a fragmentation case is modeled, yielding the formation of little satellite droplets.

  14. NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, F; Corsaro, C; Broccio, M; Branca, C; González-Segredo, N; Spooren, J; Chen, S-H; Stanley, H E

    2008-09-02

    Using NMR, we measure the proton chemical shift delta, of supercooled nanoconfined water in the temperature range 195 K < T < 350 K. Because delta is directly connected to the magnetic shielding tensor, we discuss the data in terms of the local hydrogen bond geometry and order. We argue that the derivative -( partial differential ln delta/ partial differentialT)(P) should behave roughly as the constant pressure specific heat C(P)(T), and we confirm this argument by detailed comparisons with literature values of C(P)(T) in the range 290-370 K. We find that -( partial differential ln delta/ partial differentialT)(P) displays a pronounced maximum upon crossing the locus of maximum correlation length at approximately 240 K, consistent with the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis for water, which predicts that C(P)(T) displays a maximum on crossing the Widom line.

  15. Volumetric properties of magnesium silicate glasses and supercooled liquid at high pressure by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesher, Charles E.; Wang, Yanbin; Gaudio, Sarah; Clark, Alisha; Nishiyama, Nori; Rivers, Mark; (UCD); (UC)

    2009-06-01

    The volumetric properties of silicate glasses and supercooled liquid are examined at high pressures and temperatures using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and absorption. The high pressure X-ray microtomography (HPXMT) system at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (GeoSoilEnvironCARS 13-BM-D beamline) consists of two opposing anvils compressed within an X-ray-transparent containment ring supported by thrust bearings and loaded using a 250-ton hydraulic press. This system permits the pressure cell to rotate under the load, while collecting radiographs through at least 180{sup o} of rotation. The 13-BM-D beamline permits convenient switching between monochromatic radiation required for radiography and polychromatic radiation for pressure determination by energy dispersive diffraction. We report initial results on several refractory magnesium silicate glasses synthesized by levitation laser heating. Volume changes during room temperature compression of Mg-silicate glasses with 33 mol% and 38 mol% SiO2 up to 11.5 GPa give an isothermal bulk moduli of 93--100 GPa for a K' of 1. These values are consistent with ultrasonic measurements of more silica-rich glasses. The volumetric properties of amorphous MgSiO{sub 3} at 2 GPa were examined during annealing up to 1000 C. We consider the consequences of heating through the glass transition and the implications for thermal expansivity of supercooled liquids at high pressure. Our results illustrate the capabilities of HPXMT for studies of refractory glasses and liquids at high pressure and offer strategies for future studies of liquid densities within the melting interval for magmas in planet interiors.

  16. Pollination Drop in Juniperus communis: Response to Deposited Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaini, Serena; Nepi, Massimo; Guarnieri, Massimo; Piotto, Beti; Pacini, Ettore

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The pollination drop is a liquid secretion produced by the ovule and exposed outside the micropyle. In many gymnosperms, pollen lands on the surface of the pollination drop, rehydrates and enters the ovule as the drop retracts. The objective of this work was to study the formation of the pollination drop in Juniperus communis, its carbohydrate composition and the response to deposition of conspecific pollen, foreign pollen and other particulate material, in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of pollination drop retraction. Method Branches with female cones close to pollination drop secretion were collected. On the first day of pollination drop exposure, an eyelash mounted on a wooden stick with paraffin was used to collect pollen or silica gel particles, which were then deposited by contact with the drop. Volume changes in pollination drops were measured by using a stereomicroscope with a micrometer eyepiece 3 h after deposition. The volume of non-pollinated control drops was also recorded. On the first day of secretion, drops were also collected for sugar analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Key Results The pollination drop persisted for about 12 d if not pollinated, and formed again after removal for up to four consecutive days. After pollination with viable conspecific pollen, the drop retracted quickly and did not form again. Partial withdrawal occurred after deposition of other biological and non-biological material. Fructose was the dominant sugar; glucose was also present but at a much lower percentage. Conclusions Sugar analysis confirmed the general trend of fructose dominance in gymnosperm pollination drops. Complete pollination drop withdrawal appears to be triggered by a biochemical mechanism resulting from interaction between pollen and drop constituents. The results of particle deposition suggest the existence of a non-specific, particle-size-dependent mechanism that induces partial pollination drop withdrawal

  17. Semisupervised Community Detection by Voltage Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications show that semisupervised community detection is one of the important topics and has attracted considerable attention in the study of complex network. In this paper, based on notion of voltage drops and discrete potential theory, a simple and fast semisupervised community detection algorithm is proposed. The label propagation through discrete potential transmission is accomplished by using voltage drops. The complexity of the proposal is OV+E for the sparse network with V vertices and E edges. The obtained voltage value of a vertex can be reflected clearly in the relationship between the vertex and community. The experimental results on four real networks and three benchmarks indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective and flexible. Furthermore, this algorithm is easily applied to graph-based machine learning methods.

  18. SURVEY OF PACKET DROPPING ATTACK IN MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Janani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad-hoc NETwork (MANET is an application of wireless network with self-configuring mobile nodes. MANET does not require any fixed infrastructure. Its development never has any threshold range. Nodes in MANET can communicate with each other if and only if all the nodes are in the same range. This wide distribution of nodes makes MANET vulnerable to various attacks, packet dropping attack or black hole attack is one of the possible attack. It is very hard to detect and prevent. To prevent from packet dropping attack, detection of misbehavior links and selfish nodes plays a vital role in MANETs. In this paper, a omprehensive investigation on detection of misbehavior links and malicious nodes is carried out.

  19. Advances in superheated drop (bubble) detector techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d`Errico, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari; Alberts, W.G.; Matzke, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    State-of-the-art neutron dosemeters based on superheated drop (bubble) detectors are described. These are either active systems for area monitoring, which rely on the acoustical recording of drop vaporisations, or passive pen size ones for personal dosimetry, based on optical bubble counting. The technological solutions developed for the construction of robust devices for health physics applications are described with special emphasis on methods adopted to reduce mechanical shock and temperature sensitivity of the detectors. Finally, a review is given of some current research activities. In particular, a new approach to neutron spectrometry is presented which relies on the thermal effects for the definition of the response matrix of the system. (author).

  20. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  1. Diffraction and interference of walking drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Harris, Daniel M.; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-11-01

    A decade ago, Yves Couder and Emmanuel Fort discovered a wave-particle association on the macroscopic scale: a drop can bounce indefinitely on a vibrating bath of the same liquid and can be piloted by the waves that it generates. These walking droplets have been shown to exhibit several quantum-like features, including single-particle diffraction and interference. Recently, the original diffraction and interference experiments of Couder and Fort have been revisited and contested. We have revisited this system using an improved experimental set-up, and observed a strong dependence of the behavior on system parameters, including drop size and vibrational forcing. In both the single- and the double-slit geometries, the diffraction pattern is dominated by the interaction of the walking droplet with a planar boundary. Critically, in the double-slit geometry, the walking droplet is influenced by both slits by virtue of its spatially extended wave field. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  2. Measuring Pressure Drop Under Non Ideal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of measurement of the pressure drop (PD of cigarette filter rods and the draw resistance of cigarettes is defined in ISO 6565-2002 (1. This standard defines the calibration and use of a transfer standard to calibrate the measuring instrument and also defines the measurement procedure for cigarette and filter samples. The procedure described in the standard assumes that the measurement conditions are constant and that the sample is in equilibrium with the measurement environment.

  3. Impact of water drops on small targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, A.; Prunet-Foch, B.; Vignes-Adler, M.

    2002-10-01

    The collision of water drops against small targets was studied experimentally by means of a high-speed photography technique. The drop impact velocity was about 3.5 m/s. Drop diameters were in the range of 2.8-4.0 mm. The target was a stainless steel disk of 3.9 mm diameter. The drop spread beyond the target like a central cap surrounded by a thin, slightly conical lamella bounded by a thicker rim. By mounting a small obstacle near the target, surface-tension driven Mach waves in the flowing lamella were generated, which are formally equivalent to the familiar compressibility driven Mach waves in gas dynamics. From the measurement of the Mach angle, the values of some flow parameters could be obtained as functions of time, which provided insight into the flow structure. The liquid flowed from the central cap to the liquid rim through the thin lamella at constant momentum flux. At a certain stage of the process, most of the liquid accumulated in the rim and the internal part of the lamella became metastable. In this situation, a rupture wave propagating through the metastable internal part of the lamella caused the rim to retract while forming outwardly directed secondary jets. The jets disintegrated into secondary droplets due to the Savart-Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Prior to the end of the retraction, an internal circular wave of rupture was formed. It originated at the target and then it propagated to meet the retracting rim. Their meeting resulted in a crown of tiny droplets. A theoretical analysis of the ejection process is proposed.

  4. Probable warfarin interaction with menthol cough drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coderre, Karen; Faria, Claudio; Dyer, Earl

    2010-01-01

    Warfarin is a widely used and effective oral anticoagulant; however, the agent has an extensive drug and food interaction profile. We describe a 46-year-old African-American man who was receiving warfarin for a venous thromboembolism and experienced a decrease in his international normalized ratio (INR). No corresponding reduction had been made in his warfarin dosage, and no changes had been made in his concomitant drug therapy or diet. The patient's INR fell from a therapeutic value of 2.6 (target range 2-3) to 1.6 while receiving a weekly warfarin dose of 50 mg. His INR remained stable at 1.6 for 3 weeks despite incremental increases in his warfarin dose. The patient reported that he had been taking 8-10 menthol cough drops/day due to dry conditions at his workplace during the time period that the INR decreased. Five days after discontinuing the cough drops, his INR increased from 1.6 to 2.9. Over the subsequent 5 weeks, his INR was stabilized at a much lower weekly warfarin dose of 40 mg. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated that the decreased INR was probably related to the concomitant use of menthol cough drops during warfarin therapy. The mechanism for this interaction may be related to the potential for menthol to affect the cytochrome P450 system as an inducer and inhibitor of certain isoenzymes that would potentially interfere with the metabolism of warfarin. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of an interaction between warfarin and menthol. Patients receiving warfarin should be closely monitored, as they may choose to take over-the-counter products without considering the potential implications, and counseled about a possible interaction with menthol cough drops.

  5. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Mozumder; M. R. Ullah; Hossain, A.; Islam, M A

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot...

  6. Low-Pressure-Drop Shutoff Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornborrow, John

    1994-01-01

    Flapper valve remains open under normal flow conditions but closes upon sudden increases to high rate of flow and remains closed until reset. Valve is fluid/mechanical analog of electrical fuse or circuit breaker. Low-pressure-drop shutoff valve contains flapper machined from cylindrical surface. During normal flow conditions, flapper presents small cross section to flow. (Useful in stopping loss of fluid through leaks in cooling systems.)

  7. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  8. Drop impacts on electrospun nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    This work reports a study of drop impacts of polar and non-polar liquids onto electrospun nanofiber membranes (of 8-10 mm thickness and pore sizes of 3-6 nm) with an increasing degree of hydrophobicity. The nanofibers used were electrospun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), nylon 6/6, polycaprolactone (PCL) and Teflon. It was found that for any liquid/fiber pair there exists a threshold impact velocity (1.5 to 3 m/s) above which water penetrates membranes irrespective of their wettability. The low surface tension liquid left the rear side of sufficiently thin membranes as a millipede-like system of tiny jets protruding through a number of pores. For such a high surface tension liquid as water, jets immediately merged into a single bigger jet, which formed secondary drops due to capillary instability. An especially non-trivial result is that superhydrophobicity of the porous nano-textured Teflon skeleton with the interconnected pores is incapable of preventing water penetration due to drop impact, even at relatively low impact velocities close to 3.46 m/s. A theoretical estimate of the critical membrane thickness sufficient for complete viscous dissipation of the kinetic energy of penetrating liquid corroborates with the experimental data. The current work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  9. Cusp formation in drops inside Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Here, we report the formation of cusp in insulating drops inside compound Taylor cones. The action of the electrical shear stress acting on the outer interface, which is transmitted by viscous forces inside the Taylor cone, tends to deform the drop of insulating liquid placed inside. For appropriate values of the capillary number, the insulating drop develops a steady cusp angle which depends on both the capillary number and the conducting to insulating viscosity ratio. A self-similar analysis has been developed to qualitatively describe the flow inside these compounds Taylor cones. Any perturbation of the cusp gives rise to an intermittent emission of tiny droplets; this effect may recall the tip-streaming observed by G.I. Taylor in his four-roll mill device. This emission can be stabilized by an appropriate control of the injected flow rate of the insulating liquid. When the capillary number increases, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of nanocapsules, coaxial nanofibers and nanotubes (Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; JACS 126, 5376, 2004).

  10. Ultrafast Drop Movements Arising from Curvature Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-01-01

    We report experimental observation of a kind of fast spontaneous movements of water drops on surfaces of cones with diameters from 0.1 to 1.5 mm. The observed maximum speed (0.22 m/s) under ambient conditions were at least two orders of magnitude higher than that resulting from any known single spontaneous movement mechanism, for example, Marangoni effect due to gradient of surface tension. We trapped even higher spontaneous movement speeds (up to 125 m/s) in virtual experiments for drops on nanoscale cones by using molecular dynamics simulations. The underlying mechanism is found to be universally effective - drops on any surface either hydrophilic or hydrophobic with varying mean curvature are subject to driving forces toward the gradient direction of the mean curvature. The larger the mean curvature of the surface and the lower the contact angle of the liquid are, the stronger the driving force will be. This discovery can lead to more effective techniques for transporting droplets.

  11. Pressure Drop Control Using Multiple Orifice System in Compressible Pipe Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heuydong Kim; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Shigeru Matsuo; S. R. Raghunathan

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of an orifice system in producing pressure drops and the effect of compressibility on the pressure drop, computations using the mass-averaged implicit Navier-Stokes equations were applied to the axisymmetric pipe flows with the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 20.0. The standard k- ε turbulence model was employed to close the governing equations. Numerical calculations were carried out for some combinations of the multiple orifice configurations. The present CFD data showed that the orifice systems,which have been applied to incompressible flow regime to date, could not be used for the high operating pressure ratio flows. The orifice interval did not strongly affect the total pressure drop, but the orifice area ratio more than 2.5 led to relatively high pressure drops. The total pressure drop rapidly increased in the range of the operating pressure ratio from 1.5 to 4.0, but it nearly did not increase when the operating pressure ratio was over 4.0. In the compressible pipe flows through double and triple orifice systems, the total pressure drop was largely due to shock losses.

  12. Hydrodynamics coalescence collision of three liquid drops in 3D with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH has been useful to model continuous fluid. This method is employed to obtain approximate numerical solutions of the equations in fluid dynamics by replacing the fluid with a set of particles. These particles may be interpreted as corresponding to interpolation points from which properties of the fluid can be determined. The SPH method is particularly useful when the fluid motion produces a big deformation and a large velocity of the whole fluid. In this study, the SPH method is applied to simulate for the first time the hydrodynamic collision of three equal-size liquid drops in the three-dimensional space. Ranges of value for the droplets collision velocity are chosen giving rise to the following different results for the collision: permanent coalescence, fragmentation, and flocculation of the drops. The velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are presented. Three possible scenarios for fragmentation of liquid drops are shown. Multiple satellite drops arise from the ligaments on the surface of the formed bigger drop.

  13. Vortex-induced buckling of a viscous drop impacting a pool

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2017-07-20

    We study the intricate buckling patterns which can form when a viscous drop impacts a much lower viscosity miscible pool. The drop enters the pool by its impact inertia, flattens, and sinks by its own weight while stretching into a hemispheric bowl. Upward motion along the outer bottom surface of this bowl produces a vortical boundary layer which separates along its top and rolls up into a vortex ring. The vorticity is therefore produced in a fundamentally different way than for a drop impacting a pool of the same liquid. The vortex ring subsequently advects into the bowl, thereby stretching the drop liquid into ever thinner sheets, reaching the micron level. The rotating motion around the vortex pulls in folds to form multiple windings of double-walled toroidal viscous sheets. The axisymmetric velocity field thereby stretches the drop liquid into progressively finer sheets, which are susceptible to both axial and azimuthal compression-induced buckling. The azimuthal buckling of the sheets tends to occur on the inner side of the vortex ring, while their folds can be stretched and straightened on the outside edge. We characterize the total stretching from high-speed video imaging and use particle image velocimetry to track the formation and evolution of the vortex ring. The total interfacial area between the drop and the pool liquid can grow over 40-fold during the first 50 ms after impact. Increasing pool viscosity shows entrapment of a large bubble on top of the drop, while lowering the drop viscosity produces intricate buckled shapes, appearing at the earliest stage and being promoted by the crater motions. We also present an image collage of the most intriguing and convoluted structures observed. Finally, a simple point-vortex model reproduces some features from the experiments and shows variable stretching along the wrapping sheets.

  14. Simultaneous Synchrotron WAXD and Fast Scanning (Chip) Calorimetry: On the (Isothermal) Crystallization of HDPE and PA11 at High Supercoolings and Cooling Rates up to 200 °C s(-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dorien; Mathot, Vincent B F; Pijpers, Thijs F J; Verkinderen, Olivier; Portale, Giuseppe; Van Puyvelde, Peter; Goderis, Bart

    2015-06-01

    An experimental setup, making use of a Flash DSC 1 prototype, is presented in which materials can be studied simultaneously by fast scanning calorimetry (FSC) and synchrotron wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Accumulation of multiple, identical measurements results in high quality, millisecond WAXD patterns. Patterns at every degree during the crystallization and melting of high density polyethylene at FSC typical scanning rates from 20 up to 200 °C s(-1) are discussed in terms of the temperature and scanning rate dependent material crystallinities and crystal densities. Interestingly, the combined approach reveals FSC thermal lag issues, for which can be corrected. For polyamide 11, isothermal solidification at high supercooling yields a mesomorphic phase in less than a second, whereas at very low supercooling crystals are obtained. At intermediate supercooling, mixtures of mesomorphic and crystalline material are generated at a ratio proportional to the supercooling. This ratio is constant over the isothermal solidification time.

  15. Dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    The dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop in the presence of non-uniform DC electric field is investigated analytically and numerically. Considering the presence of bulk-insoluble surfactants at the drop interface, we first perform asymptotic solution for both low and high surface Péclet numbers, where the surface Péclet number signifies the strength of surface convection of surfactants as compared to the diffusion at the drop interface. Neglecting fluid inertia and interfacial charge convection effects, we obtain explicit expression for dielectrophoretic drop velocity for low and high Péclet numbers by assuming small deviation of drop shape from sphericity and small deviation of surfactant concentration from the equilibrium uniform distribution. We then depict a numerical solution, assuming spherical drop, for arbitrary values of Péclet number. Our analyses demonstrate that the asymptotic solution shows excellent agreement with the numerical solution in the limiting conditions of low and high Péclet numbers. The present analysis shows that the flow-induced redistribution of the surfactants at the drop interface generates Marangoni stress, owing to the influence of the surfactant distribution on the local interfacial tension, at the drop interface and significantly alters the drop velocity at steady state. For a perfectly conducting/dielectric drop suspended in perfectly dielectric medium, Marangoni stress always retards the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop as compared with a surfactant-free drop. For a leaky dielectric drop suspended in another leaky dielectric medium, in the low Péclet number limit, depending on the electrical conductivity and permittivity of both the liquids, the Marangoni stress may aid or retard the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop. The Marangoni stress also has the ability to move the drop in the opposite direction as compared with a surfactant-free drop. This non-intuitive reverse motion of the drop is

  16. Drop by drop scattering properties of a radar bin : a numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development and initial results of a numerical simulation of pseudo-radar observations computed as the sum of the electric field backscattered by each drop. Simulations are carried out for three successive radar bins with a gate length of 30 m and beam width of 1°. The first step is the simulation of a 100 m x 100 m x 100 m volume with all its drops. The 3D raindrop generator relies on the findings on the rainfall field very small scales (mm to few tens of m) spatio-temporal structure, of the HYDROP experiment and a recent analysis of 2D video disdrometer data in a Multifractal framework. More precisely: (i) The Liquid Water Content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. (ii) Within each 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops according to a pre-defined Drop Size Distribution (DSD) and located randomly uniformly. (iii) Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops uniformly distributed over the 50 x 50 x 50 m3 volume. Then the backscattered field by the drops located within a radar bin are computed as the sum a individual contribution. Antenna beam weighing is taken into account Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the "patches" size for rainfall, it appears that as theoretically expected we retrieved an exponential distribution for potential measure horizontal reflectivity. A much lower dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable to reproduce radar observations, and turbulence must be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  17. [Metaanalysis to estimate the expected drop out-rates reported in clinical trials on cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippschild, S; Hirsch, J; Krummenauer, F

    2014-02-01

    A realistic sample size calculation is crucial to achieve significant results in clinical trials. As an expected drop out-rate has to be included in the sample size calculation, current practice consists in the presumption of drop out-rates published in previous similar investigations. This approach may, however, result in severely over- or under-estimated sample sizes. Therefore this meta-analysis sought to aggregate the drop out-rates from published clinical trial reports on cataract surgery to derive a quantitative suggestion for the planning of future clinical trials. The data collection was a complete review of all prospective and retrospective studies in five journals of the years 2002-2012; trial-wise recall rates of subjects at follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after recruitment were documented. The primary endpoint of the meta-analysis was the reported drop out-rates after 6 months. 95 % confidence intervals were calculated for each trial, respectively; a median drop out-rate was estimated including its 95 % confidence interval. The drop-out-rate estimates were furthermore stratified by design characteristics of the reported studies. For randomised clinical trials on cataract surgery, the median drop out-rate increased during the follow-up period of 24 months from 4 % at three months to 17 % at 24 months after recruitment; for the six-month drop out-rate a median drop-out rate of 3 % (95 % CI 0 %; 14 %) was estimated. Drop out-rates in sample size calculations for clinical trials on cataract surgery were found to be over-estimated in general, ending up in the calculation of overly large patient numbers and thereby in both ethical and economic consequences. For randomised clinical trials on cataract surgery the median drop out-rate can be expected to be 5 % during a six-month follow-up and may rise up to 15 % during a 12-month trial period. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Pendant and Sessile Drops in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Brutin, David; Liu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Mourembles, Alexandre; Xie, Jing-Chang; Tadrist, Lounes

    2010-09-01

    The experiments regarding the contact angle behavior of pendant and sessile evaporating drops were carried out in microgravity environment. All the experiments were performed in the Drop Tower of Beijing, which could supply about 3.6 s of microgravity (free-fall) time. In the experiments, firstly, drops were injected to create before microgravity. The wettability at different surfaces, contact angles dependance on the surface temperature, contact angle variety in sessile and pendant drops were measured. Different influence of the surface temperature on the contact angle of the drops were found for different substrates. To verify the feasibility of drops creation in microgravity and obtain effective techniques for the forthcoming satellite experiments, we tried to inject liquid to create bigger drop as soon as the drop entering microgravity condition. The contact angle behaviors during injection in microgravity were also obtained.

  19. Rolling ferrofluid drop on the surface of a liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Sterr, V; Morozov, K I; Rehberg, I; Engel, A; Richter, R

    2008-01-01

    We report on the controlled transport of drops of magnetic liquid, which are swimming on top of a non-magnetic liquid layer. A magnetic field which is rotating in a vertical plane creates a torque on the drop. Due to surface stresses within the immiscible liquid beneath, the drop is propelled forward. We measure the drop speed for different field amplitudes, field frequencies and drop volumes. Simplifying theoretical models describe the drop either as a solid sphere with a Navier slip boundary condition, or as a liquid half-sphere. An analytical expression for the drop speed is obtained which is free of any fitting parameters and is well in accordance with the experimental measurements. Possible microfluidic applications of the rolling drop are also discussed.

  20. Simplified procedure for determining of drop and stilling basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R. Vatankhah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drops are used to effectively dissipate the surplus energy of the water flow. A closed conduit drop conveys water and stills it at its downstream. I-type pipe drop is one kind of the closed conduit drops which is used in irrigation networks as a typical hydraulic structure. Sump elevation is an important design parameter for I-type pipe drop. Similarly, in supercritical flow structures, such as open channel chutes, determination of stilling basin invert elevation is very important. At present, these key design parameters are determined by the momentum and energy equations using tedious trial-and-error procedure. In this study, square conduit drop, pipe drop, and rectangular stilling basin are considered, and three explicit equations have been developed by (multiple nonlinear regression technique to determine the sump and stilling basin invert elevations. Being very simple and accurate, these equations can be easily used to design the closed conduit drops and stilling basins by hydraulic engineers.

  1. Validation of a DNA mixture statistics tool incorporating allelic drop-out and drop-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Adele A; Tamariz, Jeannie; O'Connell, Kathleen; Ducasse, Nubia; Budimlija, Zoran; Prinz, Mechthild; Caragine, Theresa

    2012-12-01

    DNA mixture analysis is a current topic of discussion in the forensics literature. Of particular interest is how to approach mixtures where allelic drop-out and/or drop-in may have occurred. The Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) of The City of New York has developed and validated the Forensic Statistical Tool (FST), a software tool for likelihood ratio analysis of forensic DNA samples, allowing for allelic drop-out and drop-in. FST can be used for single source samples and for mixtures of DNA from two or three contributors, with or without known contributors. Drop-out and drop-in probabilities were estimated empirically through analysis of over 2000 amplifications of more than 700 mixtures and single source samples. Drop-out rates used by FST are a function of the Identifiler(®) locus, the quantity of template DNA amplified, the number of amplification cycles, the number of contributors to the sample, and the approximate mixture ratio (either unequal or approximately equal). Drop-out rates were estimated separately for heterozygous and homozygous genotypes. Drop-in rates used by FST are a function of number of amplification cycles only. FST was validated using 454 mock evidence samples generated from DNA mixtures and from items handled by one to four persons. For each sample, likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed for each true contributor and for each profile in a database of over 1200 non-contributors. A wide range of LRs for true contributors was obtained, as true contributors' alleles may be labeled at some or all of the tested loci. However, the LRs were consistent with OCME's qualitative assessments of the results. The second set of data was used to evaluate FST LR results when the test sample in the prosecution hypothesis of the LR is not a contributor to the mixture. With this validation, we demonstrate that LRs generated using FST are consistent with, but more informative than, OCME's qualitative sample assessments and that LRs for non

  2. Enlargement of Measurement Range of ERC Drop Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. PALUSKA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding of combustion process in large scale pulverized coal boilers can help with increasing of coal combustion efficiency and decreasing of pollutant emissions, such as nitrogen oxides and arguable carbon dioxide. This improvement cannot be performed without testing in laboratory conditions. For this purpose, a new testing facility called the drop tube has been built in the Energy Research Center (ERC of VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. This paper describes the methodology of pulverized coal thermo-kinetic properties determination with the use of the Drop Tube Test Facility and the first steps in improvement of this methodology. There is a new design of the sampling probe, an improved one, gas-tight double-wall design, implemented into the methodology lately. The intermediate space is vacuumed for the purpose of better isolating properties of the probe. Further, the probe is newly supplemented with a cryogenic control valve for smooth regulation of small flow rates of cooling media - liquid nitrogen. These innovations bring cooling media savings, especially thanks to increased efficiency of this media’s cooling potential. Furthermore, smoother regulation allows a sample cooling in an accurately defined point.

  3. Hydrodynamics and evaporation of a sessile drop of capillary size

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamics video of an evaporating sessile drop of capillary size is presented. The corresponding simulation represents the description taking into account jointly time dependent hydrodynamics, vapor diffusion and thermal conduction in an evaporating sessile drop. The fluid convection in the drop is driven by Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension. For the first time the evolution of the vortex structure in the drop during an evaporation process is obtained.

  4. Hydrodynamics and evaporation of a sessile drop of capillary size

    OpenAIRE

    Barash, L. Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamics video of an evaporating sessile drop of capillary size is presented. The corresponding simulation represents the description taking into account jointly time dependent hydrodynamics, vapor diffusion and thermal conduction in an evaporating sessile drop. The fluid convection in the drop is driven by Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension. For the first time the evolution of the vortex structure in the drop during an evaporation process...

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of drops and bubbles and chaotic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.; Leal, L. G.; Feng, Z. C.; Holt, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena associated with the dynamics of free drops and bubbles are investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. Although newly developed levitation and measurement techniques have been implemented, the full experimental validation of theoretical predictions has been hindered by interfering artifacts associated with levitation in the Earth gravitational field. The low gravity environment of orbital space flight has been shown to provide a more quiescent environment which can be utilized to better match the idealized theoretical conditions. The research effort described in this paper is a closely coupled collaboration between predictive and guiding theoretical activities and a unique experimental program involving the ultrasonic and electrostatic levitation of single droplets and bubbles. The goal is to develop and to validate methods based on nonlinear dynamics for the understanding of the large amplitude oscillatory response of single drops and bubbles to both isotropic and asymmetric pressure stimuli. The first specific area on interest has been the resonant coupling between volume and shape oscillatory modes isolated gas or vapor bubbles in a liquid host. The result of multiple time-scale asymptotic treatment, combined with domain perturbation and bifurcation methods, has been the prediction of resonant and near-resonant coupling between volume and shape modes leading to stable as well as chaotic oscillations. Experimental investigations of the large amplitude shape oscillation modes of centimeter-size single bubbles trapped in water at 1 G and under reduced hydrostatic pressure, have suggested the possibility of a low gravity experiment to study the direct coupling between these low frequency shape modes and the volume pulsation, sound-radiating mode. The second subject of interest has involved numerical modeling, using the boundary integral method, of the large amplitude shape oscillations of charged and uncharged drops in the presence

  6. How microstructures affect air film dynamics prior to drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der R.C.A.; Hendrix, M.H.W.; Tran, A.T.; Sun, C.; Tsai, P.A.; Lohse, D.

    2014-01-01

    When a drop impacts a surface, a dimple can be formed due to the increased air pressure beneath the drop before it wets the surface. We employ a high-speed color interferometry technique to measure the evolution of the air layer profiles under millimeter-sized drops impacting hydrophobic micropatter

  7. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  8. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  9. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  10. Dynamics of Ferrofluidic Drops Impacting Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bolleddula, D A; Alliseda, A; Bhosale, P; Berg, J C

    2010-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video illustrating the impact of ferrofluidic droplets on surfaces of variable wettability. Surfaces studied include mica, teflon, and superhydrophobic. A magnet is placed beneath each surface, which modifies the behavior of the ferrofluid by applying additional downward force apart from gravity resulting in reduced droplet size and increased droplet velocity. For the superhydrophobic droplet a jetting phenomena is shown which only occurs in a limited range of impact speeds, higher than observed before, followed by amplified oscillation due to magnetic field as the drop stabilizes on the surface.

  11. DNA Dynamics in A Water Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, A K

    2002-01-01

    Due to its polyionic character the DNA double helix is stable and biologically active only in salty aqueous media where its charge is compensated by solvent counterions. Monovalent metal ions are ubiquitous in DNA environment and they are usually considered as the possible driving force of sequence-dependent modulations of DNA structure that make it recognizable by proteins. In an effort to directly examine this hypothesis, MD simulations of DNA in a water drop surrounded by vacuum were carried out, which relieves the requirement of charge neutrality. Surprisingly, with zero concentration of counterions a dodecamer DNA duplex appears metastable and its structure remains similar to that observed in experiments.

  12. Workability of the supercooled liquid in the Zr{sub 65}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 15} bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Y.; Shibata, T.; Inoue, A.; Masumoto, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1997-12-19

    The workability of the supercooled liquid in metallic glass has been examined through the extrusion of a Zr{sub 6.5}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 15} at.% bulk glassy alloy with a wide supercooled liquid region. The metallic glass exhibited superplastic-like deformation behavior at high strain rates, resulting in an excellent workability. The working throughout a wide range of extrusion conditions was compatible with retaining the glass phase and the original strength. The extrusion maps and the expression between extrusion temperature, pressure and ram-speed have been established. Moreover, the features of working such as the Barus effect and the advantage of a small stepwise increase in strain rate have been revealed.

  13. Merging drops in a Teflon tube, and transferring fluid between them, illustrated by protein crystallization and drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerborn, A; Prastowo, A; Cook, P R; Walsh, E

    2015-01-01

    The ability to manipulate drops with small volumes has many practical applications. Current microfluidic devices generally exploit channel geometry and/or active external equipment to control drops. Here we use a Teflon tube attached to a syringe pump and exploit the properties of interfaces between three immiscible liquids to create particular fluidic architectures. We then go on to merge any number of drops (with volumes of micro- to nano-liters) at predefined points in time and space in the tube; for example, 51 drops were merged in a defined order to yield one large drop. Using a different architecture, specified amounts of fluid were transferred between 2 nl drops at specified rates; for example, 2.5 pl aliquots were transferred (at rates of ~500 fl s(-1)) between two drops through inter-connecting nano-channels (width ~40 nm). One proof-of-principle experiment involved screening conditions required to crystallize a protein (using a concentration gradient created using such nano-channels). Another demonstrated biocompatibility; drugs were mixed with human cells grown in suspension or on surfaces, and the treated cells responded like those grown conventionally. Although most experiments were performed manually, moderate high-throughput potential was demonstrated by mixing ~1000 different pairs of 50 nl drops in ~15 min using a robot. We suggest this reusable, low-cost, and versatile methodology could facilitate the introduction of microfluidics into workflows of many experimental laboratories.

  14. School Climate and Dropping Out of School in the Era of Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotok, Stephen; Ikoma, Sakiko; Bodovski, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09)--a large nationally representative sample of US high school students--we employed multilevel structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the relationship between school characteristics and the likelihood that a student will drop out of high school. We used a multifaceted…

  15. Why do couples drop-out from IVF treatment? A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.G. Verberg; M.J.C. Eijkemans (René); E.M. Heijnen; F.J.M. Broekmans (Frank); C. de Klerk (Cora); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); N.S. Macklon (Nick)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cumulative IVF pregnancy rates are compromised by the large number of couples who drop-out of treatment before achieving pregnancy. The aim of this study was to identify the role of the treatment strategy applied, and potential other factors that influence the decision of

  16. DNS of moderate-temperature gaseous mixing layers laden with multicomponent-fuel drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clercq, P. C. Le; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    A formulation representing multicomponent-fuel (MC-fuel) composition as a Probability Distribution Function (PDF) depending on the molar weight is used to construct a model of a large number of MC-fuel drops evaporating in a gas flow, so as to assess the extent of fuel specificity on the vapor composition.

  17. Prediction of dynamic and mixing characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers using DNS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) have been conducted of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, in order to assess the ability of LES to reproduce dynamic and mixing aspects of the DNS which affect combustion, independently of combustion models.

  18. PROGRAM DROP: A computer program for prediction of evaporation from freely falling multicomponent drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavin, P.M. [Gavin Consulting, Newark, OH (United States)

    1996-12-01

    PROGRAM DROP consists of a series of FORTRAN routine which together are used to model the evaporation of a freely falling, multicomponent drop composed of an arbitrary number of volatile species and a single nonvolatile, inert component. The physics underlying the model are clearly identified, and the model`s relationship to previous work in the literature is described. Test cases are used to illustrate the viability of the model and to highlight its potential usefulness in the accurate prediction of multicomponent droplet vaporization in a variety of applications.

  19. The protective effect of rapid cold-hardening develops more quickly in frozen versus supercooled larvae of the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarasaki, Yuta; Teets, Nicholas M; Denlinger, David L; Lee, Richard E

    2013-10-15

    During the austral summer, larvae of the terrestrial midge Belgica antarctica (Diptera: Chironomidae) experience highly variable and often unpredictable thermal conditions. In addition to remaining freeze tolerant year-round, larvae are capable of swiftly increasing their cold tolerance through the rapid cold-hardening (RCH) response. The present study compared the induction of RCH in frozen versus supercooled larvae. At the same induction temperature, RCH occurred more rapidly and conferred a greater level of cryoprotection in frozen versus supercooled larvae. Furthermore, RCH in frozen larvae could be induced at temperatures as low as -12°C, which is the lowest temperature reported to induce RCH. Remarkably, as little as 15 min at -5°C significantly enhanced larval cold tolerance. Not only is protection from RCH acquired swiftly, but it is also quickly lost after thawing for 2 h at 2°C. Because the primary difference between frozen and supercooled larvae is cellular dehydration caused by freeze concentration of body fluids, we also compared the effects of acclimation in dehydrated versus frozen larvae. Because slow dehydration without chilling significantly increased larval survival to a subsequent cold exposure, we hypothesize that cellular dehydration caused by freeze concentration promotes the rapid acquisition of cold tolerance in frozen larvae.

  20. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.