WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconductor imaging surface

  1. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-06-24

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states.

  2. Direct imaging by atomic force microscopy of surface-localized self-assembled monolayers on a cuprate superconductor and surface X-ray scattering analysis of analogous monolayers on the surface of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schougaard, Steen B.; Reitzel, Niels; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A self-assembled monolayer of CF3(CF2)(3)(CH2)(11)NH2 atop the (001) surface of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x was imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images provide direct 2D-structural evidence for the epitaxial 5.5 angstrom square root 2 x root 2R45 degrees unit...... was studied by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and specular X-ray reflectivity. Structural differences and similarities between the water-supported and superconductor-localized monolayers are discussed....

  3. Simulating atomic-scale phenomena on surfaces of unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisel, Andreas; Andersen, Brian [Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Choubey, Peayush; Hirschfeld, Peter [Univ. of Florida (United States); Berlijn, Tom [CNMS and CSMD, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Interest in atomic scale effects in superconductors has increased because of two general developments: First, the discovery of new materials as the cuprate superconductors, heavy fermion and Fe-based superconductors where the coherence length of the cooper pairs is as small to be comparable to the lattice constant, rendering small scale effects important. Second, the experimental ability to image sub-atomic features using scanning-tunneling microscopy which allows to unravel numerous physical properties of the homogeneous system such as the quasi particle excitation spectra or various types of competing order as well as properties of local disorder. On the theoretical side, the available methods are based on lattice models restricting the spatial resolution of such calculations. In the present project we combine lattice calculations using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations describing the superconductor with wave function information containing sub-atomic resolution obtained from ab initio approaches. This allows us to calculate phenomena on surfaces of superconductors as directly measured in scanning tunneling experiments and therefore opens the possibility to identify underlying properties of these materials and explain observed features of disorder. It will be shown how this method applies to the cuprate material Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} and a Fe based superconductor.

  4. Direct imaging by atomic force microscopy of surface-localized self-assembled monolayers on a cuprate superconductor and surface X-ray scattering analysis of analogous monolayers on the surface of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schougaard, Steen B. [Departement de Chimie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Case postale 8888, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3P8 (Canada); Texas Materials Institute, Center for Nano and Molecular Science and Engineering, Department Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78722 (United States)], E-mail: schougaard.steen@uqam.ca; Reitzel, Niels; Bjornholm, Thomas [Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Kjaer, Kristian [Max-Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Muehlenberg, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Jensen, Torben R. [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Shmakova, Olga E.; Colorado, Ramon; Lee, T. Randall [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Choi, J.-H.; Markert, John T.; Derro, David; Lozanne, Alex de [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1081 (United States); McDevitt, John T. [Texas Materials Institute, Center for Nano and Molecular Science and Engineering, Department Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78722 (United States)

    2007-09-14

    A self-assembled monolayer of CF{sub 3}(CF{sub 2}){sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}NH{sub 2} atop the (001) surface of the high-temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} was imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images provide direct 2D-structural evidence for the epitaxial 5.5 A square {radical}2 x {radical}2R45{sup o} unit cell previously predicted for alkyl amines by molecular modeling [J.E. Ritchie, C.A. Wells, J.-P. Zhou, J. Zhao, J.T. McDevitt, C.R. Ankrum, L. Jean, D.R. Kanis, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120 (1998) 2733]. Additionally, the 3D structure of an analogous Langmuir monolayer of CF{sub 3}(CF{sub 2}){sub 9}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}NH{sub 2} on water was studied by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and specular X-ray reflectivity. Structural differences and similarities between the water-supported and superconductor-localized monolayers are discussed.

  5. Surface texturing of superconductors by controlled oxygen pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, N.; Goretta, K.C.; Dorris, S.E.

    1999-01-05

    A method of manufacture of a textured layer of a high temperature superconductor on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing an untextured high temperature superconductor material having a characteristic ambient pressure peritectic melting point, heating the superconductor to a temperature below the peritectic temperature, establishing a reduced pO{sub 2} atmosphere below ambient pressure causing reduction of the peritectic melting point to a reduced temperature which causes melting from an exposed surface of the superconductor and raising pressure of the reduced pO{sub 2} atmosphere to cause solidification of the molten superconductor in a textured surface layer. 8 figs.

  6. Fermi Surface of the Most Dilute Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Zhu, Zengwei; Fauqué, Benoît; Behnia, Kamran

    2013-04-01

    The origin of superconductivity in bulk SrTiO3 is a mystery since the nonmonotonous variation of the critical transition with carrier concentration defies the expectations of the crudest version of the BCS theory. Here, employing the Nernst effect, an extremely sensitive probe of tiny bulk Fermi surfaces, we show that, down to concentrations as low as 5.5×1017cm-3, the system has both a sharp Fermi surface and a superconducting ground state. The most dilute superconductor currently known therefore has a metallic normal state with a Fermi energy as little as 1.1 meV on top of a band gap as large as 3 eV. The occurrence of a superconducting instability in an extremely small, single-component, and barely anisotropic Fermi surface implies strong constraints for the identification of the pairing mechanism.

  7. Observability of surface currents in p-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu; Golubov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    A general approach is formulated to describe spontaneous surface current distribution in a chiral p-wave superconductor. We use the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism in the Ricatti parametrization to describe various types of the superconductor surface, including arbitrary roughness and metallic behavior of the surface layer. We calculate angle resolved distributions of the spontaneous surface currents and formulate the conditions of their observability. We argue that local measurements of these currents by muon spin rotation technique may provide an information on the underlying pairing symmetry in the bulk superconductor.

  8. Magneto-optical imaging of exotic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, C. J.; Losco, J.; Konczykowski, M.; Pari, P.; Shibauchi, T.; Shishido, H.; Matsuda, Y.

    2009-02-01

    We have constructed a novel compact cryostat for optical measurements at temperatures below 2 K. The desktop cryostat, small enough to be placed under the objective of a standard commercial polarized light microscope, functions in a single shot mode, with a five hour autonomy at 1.5 K. Central to its conception are four charcoal pumps for adsorption and desorption of He contained in a closed circuit, and novel thermal switches allowing for thermalization of the pumps and of the two 1 K pots. The latter are connected to the 1" diameter sample holder through braids. Sample access is immediate, through the simple removal of the optical windows. In this contribution, we shall present first results on magneto-optical imaging of flux penetration in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5.

  9. Imaging the anisotropic nonlinear Meissner effect in unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravel, Alexander P. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkov (Ukraine); Ghamsari, Behnood G.; Kurter, Cihan; Abrahams, John [CNAM, Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Jung, Philipp; Lukashenko, Alexander; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Physikalisches Institut and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Remillard, Stephen [Physics Department, Hope College, Holland, MI (United States); Anlage, Steven M. [CNAM, Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Physikalisches Institut and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We present measurements on the anisotropic nonlinear Meissner effect (aNLME). Using a laser scanning microscope we have directly imaged this effect in a self-resonant spiral patterned from a thin film of the d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ}. The spiral is excited at one of its resonant frequencies while a focused laser spot is scanned across its surface. The local illumination by the laser gives rise to a detectable change in the resonant properties. At low temperatures, the aNLME causes a direction dependent contribution to the critical current density. This makes it possible to image the directions of nodes and anti-nodes of the superconducting order parameter and the contribution of Andreev bound states associated with them. These two contributions to the photoresponse can be distinguished by their temperature dependence, which is consistent with theoretical predictions.

  10. Wetting, prewetting and surface transitions in type-I superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, J. O.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    1995-02-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau theory, which is quantitatively correct for classical superconductors, it is shown that a type-I superconductor can display an interface delocalization or “wetting” transition, in which a macroscopically thick superconducting layer intrudes from the surface into the bulk normal phase. The condition for this transition to occur is that the superconducting order parameter | ψ| 2 is enhanced at the surface. This corresponds to a negative surface extrapolation length b. The wetting transition takes place at bulk two-phase coexistence of normal and superconducting phases, at a temperature TD below the critical temperature Tc, and at magnetic field HD = Hc( TD). The field is applied parallel to the surface. Surprisingly, the order of the wetting transition is controlled by a bulk material constant, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. This is very unusual, since in other systems (fluids, Ising magnets,…) the order of the wetting transition depends on surface parameters that are difficult to determine or control. For superconductors, first-order wetting is predicted for 0 ≤ κ wetting for 0.374 wetting, the prewetting extension is also found. Unlike in standard wetting problems, the prewetting line does not terminate at a critical point but changes from first to second order at a tricritical point. Twinning-plane superconductivity (TPS) is reinterpreted as a prewetting phenomenon. The possibility of critical wetting in superconductors is especially interesting because this phenomenon has largely eluded experimental verification in any system until now. Furthermore, superconductors provide a realization of wetting in systems with short-range (exponentially decaying) interactions. This is very different from the usual long-range (algebraically decaying) interactions, such as van der Waals forces, and has important consequences for the wetting characteristics.

  11. Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, A V

    2014-01-01

    Superconductors is neither about basic aspects of superconductivity nor about its applications, but its mainstay is superconducting materials. Unusual and unconventional features of a large variety of novel superconductors are presented and their technological potential as practical superconductors assessed. The book begins with an introduction to basic aspects of superconductivity. The presentation is readily accessible to readers from a diverse range of scientific and technical disciplines, such as metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering, electronic and device engineering, and chemistry. The derivation of mathematical formulas and equations has been kept to a minimum and, wherever necessary, short appendices with essential mathematics have been added at the end of the text. The book is not meant to serve as an encyclopaedia, describing each and every superconductor that exists, but focuses on important milestones in their exciting development.

  12. Topological Superconductivity on the Surface of Fe-Based Superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Tang, Peizhe; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2016-07-22

    As one of the simplest systems for realizing Majorana fermions, the topological superconductor plays an important role in both condensed matter physics and quantum computations. Based on ab initio calculations and the analysis of an effective 8-band model with superconducting pairing, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional extended s-wave Fe-based superconductors such as Fe_{1+y}Se_{0.5}Te_{0.5} have a metallic topologically nontrivial band structure, and exhibit a normal-topological-normal superconductivity phase transition on the (001) surface by tuning the bulk carrier doping level. In the topological superconductivity (TSC) phase, a Majorana zero mode is trapped at the end of a magnetic vortex line. We further show that the surface TSC phase only exists up to a certain bulk pairing gap, and there is a normal-topological phase transition driven by the temperature, which has not been discussed before. These results pave an effective way to realize the TSC and Majorana fermions in a large class of superconductors.

  13. Fermi-surface reconstruction by stripe order in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, F; Chang, J; Doiron-Leyraud, N; Hassinger, E; Daou, R; Rondeau, M; Ramshaw, B J; Liang, R; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Pyon, S; Takayama, T; Takagi, H; Sheikin, I; Malone, L; Proust, C; Behnia, K; Taillefer, Louis

    2011-08-16

    The origin of pairing in a superconductor resides in the underlying normal state. In the cuprate high-temperature superconductor YBa(2)Cu(3)O(y) (YBCO), application of a magnetic field to suppress superconductivity reveals a ground state that appears to break the translational symmetry of the lattice, pointing to some density-wave order. Here we use a comparative study of thermoelectric transport in the cuprates YBCO and La(1.8-x)Eu(0.2)Sr(x)CuO(4) (Eu-LSCO) to show that the two materials exhibit the same process of Fermi-surface reconstruction as a function of temperature and doping. The fact that in Eu-LSCO this reconstruction coexists with spin and charge modulations that break translational symmetry shows that stripe order is the generic non-superconducting ground state of hole-doped cuprates.

  14. Investigation of surface magnetostatic wave propagation in ferrite superconductor structure

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, A A; Melkov, A A; Bobyl', A V; Suris, R A; Gal'perin, Y M; Iokhansen, T K

    2001-01-01

    Electrodynamic model describing dispersion properties of surface magnetostatic wave in ferrite/superconductor structure was suggested. On the basis of the model a new method of ascertaining superhigh frequency surface resistance R sub s of superconducting films in magnetic fields was developed. The calculated values agree with the results obtained by the Tauber method, making up R sub s =0.20-1.96 m Ohm. A regulated incursion of wave phase amounting to about 1.5 pi with the change in penetration depth 2.0-0.8 mu m for YBCO film was attained for YIG/YBCO structures

  15. Imaging the anisotropic nonlinear meissner effect in nodal YBa2 Cu3 O7-δ thin-film superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravel, Alexander P; Ghamsari, B G; Kurter, C; Jung, P; Remillard, S; Abrahams, J; Lukashenko, A V; Ustinov, Alexey V; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-02-22

    We have directly imaged the anisotropic nonlinear Meissner effect in an unconventional superconductor through the nonlinear electrodynamic response of both (bulk) gap nodes and (surface) Andreev bound states. A superconducting thin film is patterned into a compact self-resonant spiral structure, excited near resonance in the radio-frequency range, and scanned with a focused laser beam perturbation. At low temperatures, direction-dependent nonlinearities in the reactive and resistive properties of the resonator create photoresponse that maps out the directions of nodes, or of bound states associated with these nodes, on the Fermi surface of the superconductor. The method is demonstrated on the nodal superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ and the results are consistent with theoretical predictions for the bulk and surface contributions.

  16. Surface barrier effect on magnetization of a current-carrying type-II superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genenko, Yu. A.; Freyhardt, H. C.

    2000-10-01

    Vortex penetration in and exit from ideal flux-filled current-carrying superconductors are studied in the frame of the modified Meissner state model accounting for the vortex interactions with the sample surface, transport current, external field and the other vortices inside the sample. The generalized Silsbee's rule is first formulated and the M- H diagram of ideal current-carrying superconductors in a parallel field is estimated which is irreversible due to the surface effect alone. In general, magnetic behaviour of superconductors is shown to be more reversible in the presence of a transport current.

  17. Theoretical study of cathode surfaces and high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the work functions of BaO on W, Os, Pt, and alloys of Re-W, Os-W, and Ir-W that are in excellent agreement with experiment. The observed emission enhancement for alloy relative to tungsten dispenser cathodes is attributed to properties of the substrate crystal structure and explained by the smaller depolarization of the surface dipole on hexagonal as compared to cubic substrates. For Ba and BaO on W(100), the geometry of the adsorbates has been determined by a comparison of inverse photoemission spectra with calculated densities of unoccupied states based on the fully relativistic embedded cluster approach. Results are also discussed for models of scandate cathodes and the electronic structure of oxygen on W(100) at room and elevated temperatures. A detailed comparison is made for the surface electronic structure of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 as obtained with non-, quasi-, and fully relativistic cluster calculations.

  18. Surface superconductivity of dirty two-band superconductors: applications to MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhov, Denis A

    2005-02-25

    The minimal magnetic field H(c2) destroying superconductivity in the bulk of a superconductor is smaller than the magnetic field H(c3) needed to destroy surface superconductivity if the surface of a superconductor coincides with one of the crystallographic planes and is parallel to the external magnetic field. While for a dirty single-band superconductor the ratio of H(c3) to H(c2) is a universal temperature-independent constant 1.6946, for dirty two-band superconductors this is not the case. I show that in the latter case the interaction of the two bands leads to a novel scenario with the ratio H(c3)/H(c2) varying with temperature and taking values larger and smaller than 1.6946. The results are applied to MgB(2) and compared with recent experiments (A. Rydh, cond-mat/0307445).

  19. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-02-01

    Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  20. Conversion electron surface imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, G M; Wehner, A

    1999-01-01

    A method of imaging the Moessbauer absorption over the surface of a sample based on counting conversion electrons emitted from the surface following resonant absorption of gamma radiation is described. This Conversion Electron Surface Imaging (CESI) method is somewhat analogous to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), particularly chemical shift imaging, and similar tomographic reconstruction techniques are involved in extracting the image. The theory behind the technique and a prototype device is described, as well as the results of proof-of-principle experiments which demonstrate the function of the device. Eventually this same prototype device will be part of a system to determine the spatial variation of the Moessbauer spectrum over the surface of a sample. Applications include imaging of variations of surface properties of steels and other iron containing alloys, as well as other surfaces over which sup 5 sup 7 Fe has been deposited.

  1. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvis, J.A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Facultad de ingeniería y Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Central, Bogotá (Colombia); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Suderow, H., E-mail: hermann.suderow@uam.es [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The observation of vortex cores is reviewed, with emphasis in new experiments. • Vortex cores are follow superconducting gap and Fermi surface shapes. • The vortex core shape influences vortex dynamics. - Abstract: Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  2. Surface barrier and bulk pinning in MgB$_2$ superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Pissas, M.; Moraitakis, E.; Stamopoulos, D.; Papavassiliou, G.; V. Psycharis; Koutandos, S.

    2001-01-01

    We present a modified method of preparation of the new superconductor MgB$_2$. The polycrystalline samples were characterized using x-ray and magnetic measurements. The surface barriers control the isothermal magnetization loops in powder samples. In bulk as prepared samples we always observed symmetric magnetization loops indicative of the presence of a bulk pinning mechanism. Magnetic relaxation measurements in the bulk sample reveal a crossover of surface barrier to bulk pinning.

  3. Topologically protected surface states in a centrosymmetric superconductor β-PdBi2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, M; Okawa, K; Kanou, M; Sanjo, H; Okuda, T; Sasagawa, T; Ishizaka, K

    2015-01-01

    The topological aspects of electrons in solids can emerge in real materials, as represented by topological insulators. In theory, they show a variety of new magneto-electric phenomena, and especially the ones hosting superconductivity are strongly desired as candidates for topological superconductors. While efforts have been made to develop possible topological superconductors by introducing carriers into topological insulators, those exhibiting indisputable superconductivity free from inhomogeneity are very few. Here we report on the observation of topologically protected surface states in a centrosymmetric layered superconductor, β-PdBi2, by utilizing spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Besides the bulk bands, several surface bands are clearly observed with symmetrically allowed in-plane spin polarizations, some of which crossing the Fermi level. These surface states are precisely evaluated to be topological, based on the Z2 invariant analysis in analogy to three-dimensional strong topological insulators. β-PdBi2 may offer a solid stage to investigate the topological aspect in the superconducting condensate.

  4. dc-magnetic-field dependence of the surface impedance of a multilayer superconductor system in the mixed state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagantsev, A. K.; Traito, K. B.

    1993-10-01

    We study the electrodynamics of a superlattice that consists of two kinds of layers: the layers of a type-II superconductor and the layers of a normal metal in a perpendicular magnetic field. The problem is treated in the framework of London electrodynamics taking into account simultaneously the nonlocality of the intervortex interaction and the Abrikosov vortex elasticity. The dependence of the surface impedance Z on the dc-magnetic-field induction BCB1/2 for large fields, the coefficients A and C being nonequal, with the crossover AB1/2-->CB1/2 at B~=Hc1. The type-(i) dependence characteristic of a uniform superconductor converts into a type-(ii) dependence as one diminishes the thickness of the superconductor layers. The physical origin of this conversion is explained. It is suggested that observed dependence in multilayer superconductor systems Z~B1/2 is due to the effect discussed in the paper.

  5. Surface imaging microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Bankman, Isaac N.

    2008-04-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of microscopic objects are becoming increasingly important for battlespace CBRNE sensing. Potential applications of microscopic 3D shape observations include characterization of biological weapon particles and manufacturing of micromechanical components. Aerosol signatures of stand-off lidar systems, using elastic backscatter or polarization, are dictated by the aerosol particle shapes and sizes that must be well characterized in the lab. A low-cost, fast instrument for 3D surface shape microscopy will be a valuable point sensor for biological particle sensing applications. Both the cost and imaging durations of traditional techniques such as confocal microscopes, atomic force microscopes, and electron scanning microscopes are too high. We investigated the feasibility of a low-cost, fast interferometric technique for imaging the 3D surface shape of microscopic objects at frame rates limited only by the camera in the system. The system operates at two laser wavelengths producing two fringe images collected simultaneously by a digital camera, and a specialized algorithm we developed reconstructs the surface map of the microscopic object. The current implementation assembled to test the concept and develop the new 3D reconstruction algorithm has 0.25 micron resolution in the x and y directions, and about 0.1 micron accuracy in the z direction, as tested on a microscopic glass test object manufactured with etching techniques. We describe the interferometric instrument, present the reconstruction algorithm, and discuss further development.

  6. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoss, Stephen; Stahl, Claudia; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Intelligente Systeme, Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The penetration of magnetic flux into the high-temperature superconductor YBCO has been observed using a new high-resolution technique based on X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Superconductors coated with thin soft magnetic layers of CoFeB are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope providing cooling of the sample down to 83 K under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electrical currents create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor which leads to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. X-ray absorption measurements with circular polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor via the ferromagnetic layer. In this work we present first images taken at 83K with high spatial resolution in the nanoscale.

  7. A New First-Principles Calculation of Field-Dependent RF Surface Impedance of BCS Superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    There is a need to understand the intrinsic limit of radiofrequency (RF) surface impedance that determines the performance of superconducting RF cavities in particle accelerators. Here we present a field-dependent derivation of Mattis-Bardeen theory of the RF surface impedance of BCS superconductors based on the shifted density of states resulting from coherently moving Cooper pairs. Our theoretical prediction of the effective BCS RF surface resistance (Rs) of niobium as a function of peak surface magnetic field amplitude agrees well with recently reported record low loss resonant cavity measurements from JLab and FNAL with carefully, yet differently, prepared niobium material. The surprising reduction in resistance with increasing field is explained to be an intrinsic effect.

  8. Topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions in chains of magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Chain of magnetic atoms on the surface of a BCS superconductor is a versatile platform for the realization of one-dimensional superconductors with Majorana bound states that lends itself to high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy studies. In this talk, I will describe experimental efforts to realize this platform using self-assembled chains of Fe atoms on the surface of Pb (110) and to directly visualize Majorana quasi-particle bound states at their edges. Using spin-polarized STM studies, we show that Fe chains are ferromagnetic while tunneling into Pb's substrate demonstrates signatures of strong spin-orbit interaction at its surface. Comparison of experimental measurements of structure and normal state electronic structure with DFT calculations suggest that these are triple zigzag chains with an odd number of band-crossings at the Fermi level. The onset of superconductivity in the Pb strongly modifies the low energy density of states of the Fe chains and induces a zero energy state at their ends. I will describe how these observations are consistent with the formation of a topological superconducting phase with Majorana edge states. Work supported by ONR, NSF-DMR, NSF-MRSEC, ARO-MURI, and LPS-ARO grants.

  9. Coupled wire model of symmetric Majorana surfaces of topological superconductors II: 32-fold periodic topological orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Sahoo, Sharmistha; Teo, Jeffrey

    We mimic the massless surface Majorana's of topological superconductors by coupled wire models in two spatial dimensions, and introduce many-body gapping interactions that preserve time reversal symmetry. Coupling with a Z2 gauge theory, the symmetric gapped surface generically carries a non-trivial GN topological order, where N is the number of Majorana species and GN is some SO(r)1 or SO(3)3 -like topological state. These form a 32-fold periodic class GN ≅GN + 32 , and a Z32 relative tensor product structure GN1⊗bGN2 ≅GN1 +N2 by anyon condensation. We present the anyon structures of these topological states, and understand the topological orders through bulk-boundary correspondence and the Wilson structures on a torus geometry.

  10. Fermi surface deformation in a simple iron-based superconductor, FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldea, Amalia; Watson, Matthew; Kim, Timur; Haghighirad, Amir; McCollam, Alix; Hoesch, Moritz; Schofield, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the field superconductivity is the identification of the normal state out of which superconductivity emerges. FeSe is one of the simplest and most intriguing iron-based superconductors, since in its bulk form it undergoes a structural transition before it becomes superconducting, whereas its single-layer form is believed to be a high-temperature superconductor. The nature of the structural transition, occurring in the absence of static magnetism, is rather unusual and how the electronic structure is stabilized by breaking of the rotational symmetry is the key to understand the superconductivity in bulk FeSe. Here we report angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on FeSe that gives direct access to the band structure and orbital-dependent effects. We complement our studies on bulk FeSe with low-temperature angular-dependent quantum oscillation measurements using applied magnetic fields that are sufficiently strong to suppress superconductivity and reach the normal state. These studies reveal a strong deformation of Fermi surface through the structural transition driven by electronic correlations and orbital-dependent effects. . This work was supported by EPSRC, UK (EP/I004475/1), Diamond Light Source, UK and HFML, Nijmegen.

  11. Magnetic Fields above the Surface of aSuperconductor with Internal Magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRl

    2007-06-26

    The author presents a method for calculating the magnetic fields near a planar surface of a superconductor with a given intrinsic magnetization in the London limit. He computes solutions for various magnetic domain boundary configurations and derives relations between the spectral densities of the magnetization and the resulting field in the vacuum half space, which are useful if the magnetization can be considered as a statistical quantity and its features are too small to be resolved individually. The results are useful for analyzing and designing magnetic scanning experiments. Application to existing data from such experiments on Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} show that a domain wall would have been detectable, but the magnetic field of randomly oriented small domains and small defects may have been smaller than the experimental noise level.

  12. Topological connection between the stability of Fermi surfaces and topological insulators and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Z. D.

    2014-02-01

    A topology-intrinsic connection between the stabilities of Fermi surfaces (FSs) and topological insulators/superconductors (TIs/TSCs) is revealed. First, through revealing the topological difference of the roles played by the time-reversal (or particle-hole) symmetry respectively on FSs and TIs/TSCs, a one-to-one relation between the topological types of FSs and TIs/TSCs is rigorously derived by two distinct methods with one relying on the direct evaluation of topological invariants and the other on K theory. Secondly, we propose and prove a general index theorem that relates the topological charge of FSs on the natural boundary of a TI/TSC to its bulk topological number. In the proof, FSs of all codimensions for all symmetry classes and topological types are systematically constructed by Dirac matrices. Moreover, implications of the general index theorem on the boundary quasiparticles are also addressed.

  13. In vitro studies of cells grown on the superconductor PrO(x)FeAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoguang; Xie, Yuxuan; Yang, Wenrong; Zheng, Rongkun; Stevens, Frankie; Korkmaz, Emine; Weiss, Anthony S; Ringer, Simon P; Braet, Filip

    2009-06-01

    The recent discovery of arsenic-based high temperature superconductors has reignited interest in the study of superconductor: biological interfaces. However, the new superconductor materials involve the chemistry of arsenic and their toxicity remains unclear [Hand, E., 2008. Nature 452 (24), 922]. In this study the possible adverse effects of this new family of superconductors on cells have been examined. Cell culture studies in conjunction with microscopy and viability assays were employed to examine the influence of arsenic-based superconductor PrO(x)FeAs (x=0.75) material in vitro. Imaging data revealed that cells were well adhered and spread on the surface of the superconductor. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies showed that cells were unaffected during the time-course of the experiments, providing support for the biocompatibility aspects of PrO(x)FeAs-based superconductor material.

  14. Majorana fermions and exotic surface Andreev bound states in topological superconductors: application to Cu(x)Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Timothy H; Fu, Liang

    2012-03-09

    The recently discovered superconductor Cu(x)Bi2Se3 is a candidate for three-dimensional time-reversal-invariant topological superconductors, which are predicted to have robust surface Andreev bound states hosting massless Majorana fermions. In this work, we analytically and numerically find the linearly dispersing Majorana fermions at k=0, which smoothly evolve into a new branch of gapless surface Andreev bound states near the Fermi momentum. The latter is a new type of Andreev bound states resulting from both the nontrivial band structure and the odd-parity pairing symmetry. The tunneling spectra of these surface Andreev bound states agree well with a recent point-contact spectroscopy experiment [S. Sasaki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 217001 (2011)] and yield additional predictions for low temperature tunneling and photoemission experiments.

  15. Image Interpolation Through Surface Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling; LI Xue-mei

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing an HR (high-resolution) image which preserves the image intrinsic structures from its LR ( low-resolution) counterpart is highly challenging. This paper proposes a new surface reconstruction algorithm applied to image interpolation. The interpolation surface for the whole image is generated by putting all the quadratic polynomial patches together. In order to eliminate the jaggies of the edge, a new weight function containing edge information is incorporated into the patch reconstruction procedure as a constraint. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that our method produces better results across a wide range of scenes in terms of both quantitative evaluation and subjective visual quality.

  16. The gold/high temperature superconductor interface; metallicity of the near surface region and a search for the proximity effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessau, D.S.; Shen, Z.; Wells, B.O.; Spicer, W.E. (Stanford Electronics Labs, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (USA)); List, R.S.; Arko, A.J.; Bartlett, R.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA)); Olson, C.G. (Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (USA)); Mitzi, D.B.; Eom, C.B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Geballe, T.H. (Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (USA))

    1991-05-01

    We have used high resolution photoemission spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of a wide variety of gold/high temperature superconductor interfaces, the majority of which were formed by low-temperature (20 K) gold evaporations on cleaved high quality single crystals. For {ital c}-axis interfaces formed on the 123 family of superconductors, we find that the gold deposition essentially destroys the metallicity of the superconducting substrate in the near surface region ({similar to}5 A), while the near surface region of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} remains metallic. We have also used photoemission spectroscopy to search for a proximity-effect induced superconducting gap in gold overlayers on {ital c}-axis single crystals and {ital a}-axis thin films, though no such effect was found.

  17. The gold/high temperature superconductor interface: Metallicity of the near surface region and a search for the proximity effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessau, D.S.; Shen, Z.X.; Wells, B.O.; Spicer, W.E. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Electronics Labs.); List, R.S.; Arko, A.J.; Bartlett, R.J.; Fisk, Z.; Cheong, S.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Olson, C.G. (Ames Lab., IA (USA)); Mitzi, D.B.; Eom, C.B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Geballe, T.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Physics); Schirber, J.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (U

    1990-01-01

    We have used high resolution photoemission spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of a wide variety of gold/high temperature superconductor interfaces, the majority of which were formed by low-temperature (20K) gold evaporations on cleaved high quality single crystals. For c-axis interfaces formed on the 123 family of superconductors, we find that the gold deposition essentially destroys the metallicity of the superconducting substrate in the near surface region ({approximately}5{angstrom}), while the near surface region of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} remains metallic. We have also used photoemission spectroscopy to search for a proximity-effect superconducting gap in gold overlayers on c-axis single crystals and a-axis thin films, though no such effect was found. 30 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  19. Chiral superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallin, Catherine; Berlinsky, John

    2016-05-01

    Chiral superconductivity is a striking quantum phenomenon in which an unconventional superconductor spontaneously develops an angular momentum and lowers its free energy by eliminating nodes in the gap. It is a topologically non-trivial state and, as such, exhibits distinctive topological modes at surfaces and defects. In this paper we discuss the current theory and experimental results on chiral superconductors, focusing on two of the best-studied systems, Sr2RuO4, which is thought to be a chiral triplet p-wave superconductor, and UPt3, which has two low-temperature superconducting phases (in zero magnetic field), the lower of which is believed to be chiral triplet f-wave. Other systems that may exhibit chiral superconductivity are also discussed. Key signatures of chiral superconductivity are surface currents and chiral Majorana modes, Majorana states in vortex cores, and the possibility of half-flux quantum vortices in the case of triplet pairing. Experimental evidence for chiral superconductivity from μSR, NMR, strain, polar Kerr effect and Josephson tunneling experiments are discussed.

  20. Large area bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  1. Distinct fermi surface topology and nodeless superconducting gap in a (Tl0.58Rb0.42)Fe1.72Se2 superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Daixiang; Liu, Shanyu; Jia, Xiaowen; He, Junfeng; Peng, Yingying; Zhao, Lin; Yu, Li; Liu, Guodong; He, Shaolong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Hangdong; Dong, Chiheng; Fang, Minghu; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Qinjun; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Shenjin; Yang, Feng; Xu, Zuyan; Chen, Chuangtian; Zhou, X J

    2011-03-11

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out to study the electronic structure and superconducting gap of the (Tl0.58Rb0.42)Fe1.72Se2 superconductor with a T(c) = 32  K. The Fermi surface topology consists of two electronlike Fermi surface sheets around the Γ point which is distinct from that in all other iron-based superconductors reported so far. The Fermi surface around the M point shows a nearly isotropic superconducting gap of ∼12  meV. The large Fermi surface near the Γ point also shows a nearly isotropic superconducting gap of ∼15  meV, while no superconducting gap opening is clearly observed for the inner tiny Fermi surface. Our observed new Fermi surface topology and its associated superconducting gap will provide key insights and constraints into the understanding of the superconductivity mechanism in iron-based superconductors.

  2. Fundamental properties of molecules on surfaces. Molecular switching and interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatter, Nino

    2016-12-14

    In this thesis, we investigate individual molecular switches and metal-organic complexes on surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) at low temperatures. One focus addresses the switching ability and mechanism of diarylethene on Ag(111). The other focus lies on resolving and tuning magnetic interactions of individual molecules with superconductors. 4,4'-(4,4'-(perfluorocyclopent-1-ene-1,2-diyl)bis (5-methylthiophene-4,2-diyl)dip yridine (PDTE) is a prototypical photochromic switch. We can induce a structural change of individual PDTE molecules on Ag(111) with the STM tip. This change is accompanied by a reduction of the energy gap between the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the induced switching corresponds to a ring-closing reaction from an open isomer in a flat adsorption configuration to a ring-closed isomer with its methyl groups in a cis configuration. The final product is thermodynamically stabilized by strong dispersion interactions with the surface. A linear dependence of the switching threshold with the tip-sample distance with a minimal threshold of 1.4 V is found, which we assign to a combination of an electric-field induced process and a tunneling-electron contribution. DFT calculations suggest a large activation barrier for a ring-closing reaction from the open flat configuration into the closed cis configuration. The interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors is studied on manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) adsorbed on Pb(111). We find triplets of Shiba states inside the superconducting gap. Different adsorption sites of MnPc provide a large variety of exchange coupling strengths, which lead to a collective energy shift of the Shiba triplets. We can assign the splitting of the Shiba states to be an effect of magnetic anisotropy in the system. A quantum phase transition from a ''Kondo screened'' to a &apos

  3. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The field limit of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied with taking effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the product of the superheating field for ideal flat surface and a suppression factor that contains effects of nano-defects. A nano-defect is modeled by a triangular groove with a depth smaller than the penetration depth. An analytical formula for the suppression factor of bulk and multilayer superconductors are derived in the framework of the London theory. As an immediate application, the suppression factor of the dirty Nb processed by the electropolishing is evaluated by using results of surface topographic study. The estimat...

  4. Monitoring of Spectral Map Changes from Normal State to Superconducting State in High-TC Superconductor Films Using Raman Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. González-Solís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have explored the chemical structure of TlBa2Ca2Cu3O9 high-TC superconductor films with Tl-1223 phase to monitor spectral map changes from normal state to superconducting state using the technique of Raman imaging. Raman images were performed for 12 different temperatures in the 77–293 K range. At room temperature, the Raman images were characterized by a single color but as the temperature dropped a new color appeared and when the temperature of 77 K is reached and the superconducting state is assured, the Raman images were characterized by the red, green, and blue colors. Our study could suggest that the superconducting state emerged around 133 K, in full agreement with those reported in the literature. A cross-checking was done applying principal component analysis (PCA to other sets of Raman spectra of our films measured at different temperatures. PCA result showed that the spectra can be grouped into two temperature ranges, one in the 293–153 K range and the other in the 133–77 K range suggesting that transition to the superconducting state occurred at some temperature around 133 K. This is the first report of preliminary results evaluating the usefulness of Raman imaging in determination of transition temperature of superconductor films.

  5. Interferometry to Image Surface Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Guy

    2016-04-01

    I present in this lecture the technique of interferometric imaging at optical/infrared wavelengths. The technique has matured since the pioneering work of Michelson at the end of the XIXth—beginning of the XXth when he first resolved the surface of a star, Betelgeuse, with his colleague Pease. Images were obtained for the first time 20 years ago with the COAST instrument and interferometers have made constant progress to reach the minimum level where blind image reconstruction can be achieved. I briefly introduce the topic to recall why studying the surface and close environment of stars is important in some fields of stellar physics. I introduce the theory of imaging with telescopes and interferometers. I discuss the nature of interferometric data in this wavelength domain and give a few insights on the importance of getting access to visibility phases to obtain information on asymmetries of stellar surfaces. I then present the issue of aperture synthesis with a small number of telescopes, a signature of optical/infrared interferometers compared to the radio domain. Despite the impossibility to measure the phase of visibilities because of turbulence I show that useful information can be recovered from the closure phase. I eventually introduce the principles of image reconstruction and I discuss some recent results on several types of stars.

  6. Measurement of Frequency, Temperature, RF Field Dependence of Surface Resistance of Superconductors Using a Half Wave Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyekyoung; Delayen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    A theory of surface resistance of superconductor was rigorously formulated by Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer more than 50 years ago. Since then the accelerator community has been used the theory as a guideline to improve the surface resistance of the superconducting cavity. It has been observed that the surface resistance is dependent on frequency, temperature and rf field strength, and surface preparation. To verify these dependences, a well-controlled study is required. Although many different types of cavities have been tested, the typical superconducting cavities are built for specific frequencies of their application. They do not provide data other than at its own frequency. A superconducting half wave cavity is a cavity that enables us to collect the surface resistance data across frequencies of interest for particle accelerators and evaluate preparation techniques. This paper will present the design of the half wave cavity, its electromagnetic mode characteristics and experimental results. Research supported by NSF Award PHY-1416051.

  7. Anomalous peak-effect in type-II superconductors: A competition between bulk pinning and a surface barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimov, I.L. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Nizhny Novgorod University, Gagarin Avenue 23, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ainbinder, R.M. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Nizhny Novgorod University, Gagarin Avenue 23, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: romain@inbox.ru; Vodolazov, D.Yu. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2007-01-15

    In this work, the joint influence of the surface barrier and bulk pinning on the magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I {sub c} for bulk type-II superconductors is investigated. It is shown that in the weak magnetic field H {sub 0}, there is a section in the dependence I {sub c}(H {sub 0}) in which I {sub c} increases with the growth of H {sub 0}; this increase results in a pronounced peak in the dependence I {sub c}(H {sub 0}) - the anomalous peak-effect. This effect is explained by the combined influence of the surface barrier and bulk pinning. Two well-known models - the Bean model and the Kim-Anderson model - of the critical state were analysed in order to describe the anomalous peak-effect quantitatively.

  8. Surface-emitting superconductor laser spectroscopy for characterizing normal and sickled red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gourley, M.F. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have developed a new intracavity laser technique that uses a living or a fixed cell as an integral component of the laser. The cells are placed on an AlGaAs/GaAs surface-emitting semiconductor wafer and covered with a glass dielectric mirror to form a laser resonator. In this arrangement, the cells serve as optical waveguides (or lens elements) to confine (or focus) light generated in the resonator by the semiconductor. Because of the high transparency, the cells aid the lasing process to generate laser light. This ultra sensitive laser provides a novel imaging/spectroscopic technique for histologic examination which we demonstrate with normal and sickled human red blood cells. Extremely high contrast microscopic images of the cells are observed near 830-850 nm. These images correspond to electromagnetic modes of cell structures and are sensitive to shape of the cell. Using a high resolution spectrometer, we resolve the light emitted from these images into very narrow spectral peaks associated with the lasing modes. Analysis of the spectra reveals that the distribution of peaks is quite different for normal and sickled red blood cells. This technique, in a more developed form, may be useful for the rapid analysis of other kinds of normal and abnormal cells.

  9. Evidence for three-dimensional Fermi-surface topology of the layered electron-doped iron superconductor Ba(Fe1 xCox)2As2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilmercati, P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fedorov, A. V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vobornik, I. [TASC National Laboratory, Trieste, Italy; Manju, U. [TASC National Laboratory, Trieste, Italy; Panaccione, G. [TASC National Laboratory, Trieste, Italy; Goldoni, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Italy; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Jin, Rongying [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL; Mannella, Norman [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure of electron doped iron-arsenide superconductors Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} has been measured with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy. The data reveal a marked photon energy dependence of points in momentum space where the bands cross the Fermi energy, a distinctive and direct signature of three-dimensionality in the Fermi surface topology. By providing a unique example of high temperature superconductivity hosted in layered compounds with three-dimensional electronic structure, these findings suggest that the iron-arsenides are unique materials, quite different from the cuprates high temperature superconductors.

  10. Fermi surface and extended van Hove singularity in the noncuprate superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, D.H.; Schmidt, M.; Cummins, T.R.; Schuppler, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lichtenberg, F.; Bednorz, J.G. [IBM Research Division, Zuerich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    We mapped the Fermi surface of the first copper-free layered perovskite superconductor, Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} by high-resolution ({approx_equal}22 meV) angle-resolved photoemission. Three bands cross the Fermi energy, consistent with band structure calculations; one around {Gamma} and two around {bar {ital X}}. The highlight is the observation of an extended van Hove singularity located 17meV below the Fermi level. It extends around {bar {ital M}} for {approx_equal}0.2 A{sup {minus}1} along {Gamma}-{bar {ital M}}-{Gamma} and {bar {ital X}}-{bar {ital M}}-{bar {ital X}} in the projected Brillouin zone. This raises important questions related to the possible role of a van Hove singularity for oxide superconductivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Phonon dispersions and Fermi surfaces nesting explaining the variety of charge ordering in titanium-oxypnictides superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kousuke; Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    There has been a puzzle between experiments and theoretical predictions on the charge ordering of layered titanium-oxypnictides superconductors. Unconventional mechanisms to explain this discrepancy have been argued so far, even affecting the understanding of superconductivity on the compound. We provide a new theoretical prediction, by which the discrepancy itself is resolved without any complicated unconventional explanation. Phonon dispersions and changes of nesting vectors in Fermi surfaces are clarified to lead to the variety of superlattice structures even for the common crystal structures when without CDW, including orthorhombic 2 × 2 × 1 one for BaTi2As2O, which has not yet been explained successfully so far, being different from tetragonal for BaTi2Sb2O and BaTi2Bi2O. The electronic structure analysis can naturally explain experimental observations about CDW including most latest ones without any cramped unconventional mechanisms. PMID:27430418

  12. Structural and elemental analysis of melt-processible high-temperature superconductors by surface science and x-ray diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, A.M.; Sheng, Z.Z.; El Ali, A.; Mooney, G.D.; Nelson, A.J.; Goral, J.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1988-11-15

    We report the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis (wavelength dispersive and energy dispersive spectroscopies), secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and x-ray diffraction measurements on a series of melt-processed high critical-temperature superconductors. The superconductors were synthesized through a melt reaction between TbBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ and nonstoichiometric rare-earth Ba-Cu-O oxides. The melt-processed samples are dense, largely void-free superconductors with critical temperatures in the 90--95 K range. Microprobe and SIMS data show the absence of Tb in surfaces of the interiors of samples which had been fractured to expose the interior regions. Comparative microprobe and SEM data are included for conventionally prepared sintered samples. Comparative x-ray diffraction studies are presented which show that the melt-processed samples studied have diffraction patterns nearly identical to those of sintered (rare earth)Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ samples. In two of the three Y-based melt-processed superconductors studied, the compound stoichiometry from microprobe analysis is Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/. The evidence presented indicates that the TbBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ decomposes during the melt reaction.

  13. Egypt satellite images for land surface characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    Satellite images provide information on the land surface properties. From optical remote sensing images in the blue, green, red and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum it is possible to identify a large number of surface features. The report briefly describes different satellite...

  14. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  15. Direct stigmatic imaging with curved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtial, Johannes; Oxburgh, Stephen; Tyc, Tomáš

    2015-03-01

    We study the possibilities of direct (using one intersection with each light ray) stigmatic imaging with a curved surface that can change ray directions in an arbitrary way. By purely geometric arguments we show that the only possible case of such imaging is the trivial one where the image of any point is identical to the point itself and the surface does not perform any change of the ray direction at all. We also discuss an example of a curved surface which performs indirect stigmatic imaging after twice intersecting each light ray.

  16. 373 K Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Kostadinov, Ivan Zahariev

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence of superconductors with critical temperatures above $373\\:K$ is presented. In a family of different compounds we demonstrate the superconductor state, the transition to normal state above $387\\:K$, an intermediate $242\\:K$ superconductor, susceptibility up to $350\\:K$, $I-V$ curves at $4.2\\:K$ in magnetic field of $12\\:T$ and current up to $60\\:A$, $300\\:K$ Josephson Junctions and Shapiro steps with radiation of $5\\:GHz$ to $21\\:THz$, $300\\:K$ tapes tests with high currents up to $3000\\:A$ and many $THz$ images of coins and washers. Due to a pending patent, the exact chemical characterization and technological processes for these materials are temporarily withheld and will be presented elsewhere.

  17. Superconductor Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, Stephen E.; Burlone, Dominick A.; Morgan; Carol W.

    1999-02-02

    A superconducting conductor fabricated from a plurality of wires, e.g., fine silver wires, coated with a superconducting powder. A process of applying superconducting powders to such wires, to the resulting coated wires and superconductors produced therefrom.

  18. Emergent nesting of the Fermi surface from local-moment description of iron-pnictide high-Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose P.; Araujo, Miguel A. N.; Sacramento, Pedro D.

    2014-07-01

    We uncover the low-energy spectrum of a t-J model for electrons on a square lattice of spin-1 iron atoms with 3dxz and 3dyz orbital character by applying Schwinger-boson-slave-fermion mean-field theory and by exact diagonalization of one hole roaming over a 4 × 4 × 2 lattice. Hopping matrix elements are set to produce hole bands centered at zero two-dimensional (2D) momentum in the free-electron limit. Holes can propagate coherently in the t-J model below a threshold Hund coupling when long-range antiferromagnetic order across the d + = 3d(x + iy)z and d - = 3d(x - iy)z orbitals is established by magnetic frustration that is off-diagonal in the orbital indices. This leads to two hole-pocket Fermi surfaces centered at zero 2D momentum. Proximity to a commensurate spin-density wave (cSDW) that exists above the threshold Hund coupling results in emergent Fermi surface pockets about cSDW momenta at a quantum critical point (QCP). This motivates the introduction of a new Gutzwiller wavefunction for a cSDW metal state. Study of the spin-fluctuation spectrum at cSDW momenta indicates that the dispersion of the nested band of one-particle states that emerges is electron-type. Increasing Hund coupling past the QCP can push the hole-pocket Fermi surfaces centered at zero 2D momentum below the Fermi energy level, in agreement with recent determinations of the electronic structure of mono-layer iron-selenide superconductors.

  19. Surface Imaging of Ei-Eridani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, T.; Piskunov, N. E.; Poutanen, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Tuominen, I.

    We present maps of the temperature distribution on the spotted RS CVn-type binary EI Eri (HD 26337), obtained by means of the surface imaging technique described in the Colloquium (Piskunov, 1991). Images were calculated for two separate lines for two epochs of observation. For one epoch we also calculated an image using a blend of several lines. The reliability of the maps is confirmed by comparing the simultaneous photometric observations with the light curves calculated from the temperature maps.

  20. Observation of Dirac surface states in the noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benia, H. M.; Rampi, E.; Trainer, C.; Yim, C. M.; Maldonado, A.; Peets, D. C.; Stöhr, A.; Starke, U.; Kern, K.; Yaresko, A.; Levy, G.; Damascelli, A.; Ast, C. R.; Schnyder, A. P.; Wahl, P.

    2016-09-01

    Materials with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have in recent years become a subject of intense research due to their potential applications in spintronics and quantum information technology. In particular, in systems which break inversion symmetry, SOC facilitates the Rashba-Dresselhaus effect, leading to a lifting of spin degeneracy in the bulk and intricate spin textures of the Bloch wave functions. Here, by combining angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy measurements with relativistic first-principles band structure calculations, we examine the role of SOC in single crystals of noncentrosymmetric BiPd. We report the detection of several Dirac surface states, one of which exhibits an extremely large spin splitting. Unlike the surface states in inversion-symmetric systems, the Dirac surface states of BiPd have completely different properties at opposite faces of the crystal and are not trivially linked by symmetry. The spin splitting of the surface states exhibits a strong anisotropy by itself, which can be linked to the low in-plane symmetry of the surface termination.

  1. Bogoliubov Fermi Surfaces in Superconductors with Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agterberg, D. F.; Brydon, P. M. R.; Timm, C.

    2017-03-01

    It is commonly believed that, in the absence of disorder or an external magnetic field, there are three possible types of superconducting excitation gaps: The gap is nodeless, it has point nodes, or it has line nodes. Here, we show that, for an even-parity nodal superconducting state which spontaneously breaks time-reversal symmetry, the low-energy excitation spectrum generally does not belong to any of these categories; instead, it has extended Bogoliubov Fermi surfaces. These Fermi surfaces can be visualized as two-dimensional surfaces generated by "inflating" point or line nodes into spheroids or tori, respectively. These inflated nodes are topologically protected from being gapped by a Z2 invariant, which we give in terms of a Pfaffian. We also show that superconducting states possessing these Fermi surfaces can be energetically stable. A crucial ingredient in our theory is that more than one band is involved in the pairing; since all candidate materials for even-parity superconductivity with broken time-reversal symmetry are multiband systems, we expect these Z2-protected Fermi surfaces to be ubiquitous.

  2. Nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Sweccha

    2017-01-01

    The testing and further development of a prototype nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, with a focus on surface modification and detailed characterization of the biosensor chip and in-field and at-line applicability in the food industry is described. Furthermore, a simp

  3. Nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Sweccha

    2017-01-01

    The testing and further development of a prototype nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, with a focus on surface modification and detailed characterization of the biosensor chip and in-field and at-line applicability in the food industry is described. Furthermore, a

  4. A star role for stripes[Charge order in high-temperature superconductors in magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, John [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)

    2002-06-01

    New images of magnetic and charge order in copper-oxide compounds are providing important clues about the nature of high-temperature superconductors. Visual images can have a powerful impact on the viewer, and this is certainly the case when the images are atomic-scale pictures of the surface of a high-temperature copper-oxide superconductor. The unusual properties of these materials have vexed condensed-matter theorists for the last 15 years. Now a new flurry of theoretical papers has been stimulated by the latest images of a cuprate superconductor, which reveal that an applied magnetic field can induce 'stripes' of charge. The experimental results provide intriguing and important clues to the nature of these ever-surprising materials - although the theorists have still to agree on their meaning. (U.K.)

  5. Hall Effect in the Vortex Lattice of d-Wave Superconductors with Anisotropic Fermi Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Wataru; Ueki, Hikaru; Kita, Takafumi

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of the augmented quasiclassical theory of superconductivity with the Lorentz force, we study the magnetic field dependence of the charge distribution due to the Lorentz force in a d-wave vortex lattice with anisotropic Fermi surfaces. Owing to the competition between the energy-gap and Fermi surface anisotropies, the charge profile in the vortex lattice changes dramatically with increasing magnetic field because of the overlaps of each nearest vortex-core charge. In addition, the accumulated charge in the core region may reverse its sign as a function of magnetic field. This strong field dependence of the vortex-core charge cannot be observed in the model with an isotropic Fermi surface.

  6. Imaging interferometry to measure surface rotation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travaillot, Thomas; Dohn, Søren; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a polarized-light imaging interferometer to measure the rotation field of reflecting surfaces. This setup is based on a homemade prism featuring a birefringence gradient. The arrangement is presented before focusing on the homemade prism and its manufacturing process....... The dependence of the measured optical phase on the rotation of the surface is derived, thus highlighting the key parameters driving the sensitivity. The system’s capabilities are illustrated by imaging the rotation field at the surface of a tip-loaded polymer specimen....

  7. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  8. Direct imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Karademir, Ertugrul; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, we report on dark field imaging of localized surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in plasmonic waveguiding bands formed by plasmonic coupled cavities. We image the light scattered from SPPs in the plasmonic cavities excited by a tunable light source. Tuning the excitation wavelength, we measure the localization and dispersion of the plasmonic cavity mode. Dark field imaging has been achieved in the Kretschmann configuration using a supercontinuum white-light laser equipped with an acoustooptic tunable filter. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection and dark field imaging measurements are correlated and found to be in agreement with finite-difference time-domain calculations.

  9. Surface superconductivity in the heavy-fermion superconductor UPt{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, N. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Laboratory, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (The Netherlands); Tholence, J.L. [Centre de Recherche sur les Tres Basses Temperatures-Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Huxley, A.; Flouquet, J. [DRFMC-Centre des Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, BP 85X, 38041 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    1996-11-01

    We present a study of the surface critical field {ital H}{sub {ital c}3}({Phi},{Theta},{ital T}) measured for two needlelike whiskers of UPt{sub 3}. Dominant surface effects were observed in the angular dependence of the critical field by means of ac-resistivity measurements. These surface superconductivity effects show a surprisingly nonlinear thermal variation of {ital H}{sub {ital c}3} contrary to behavior expected from conventional theory, where {ital H}{sub {ital c}3}/{ital H}{sub {ital c}2}=1.69 is predicted. The ratio {ital H}{sub {ital c}3}/{ital H}{sub {ital c}2} is strongly depressed from its initial value 1.7 when going from the {ital A} to the {ital C} phase as the temperature is decreased. It seems to remain constant in the {ital C} phase for even lower {ital T}. Nevertheless, for temperatures close to {ital T}{sub {ital c}+} it is possible to describe the angular behavior of {ital H}{sub {ital c}3}({Theta},{Phi}) with a standard model by introducing an effective-mass anisotropy of the heavy quasiparticles. These results are compared to recent {ital H}{sub {ital c}3} calculations for different representations of the order parameter and seem to provide a direct evidence for the suppression of one component of the order parameter at the surface. The restrictions imposed by these measurements on the choice of the representations of the unconventional order parameter will be discussed by also taking into account the limitations imposed due to the temperature dependence of the basal plane {ital H}{sub {ital c}2} modulation. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Intrinsic-surface-tag image authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palm, R.G.; DeVolpi, A.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this work is to further the development of a unique treaty limited item (TLI) intrinsic surface tag for arms control applications. This tag's unique feature is the ability to capture the sub-micron scale topography of the TLI surface. The surface topography is captured by plastic castings of the surface as digitally imaged by an electron microscope. Tag authentication is accomplished by comparing digital castings images obtained in two different inspections. Surface replication experiments are described, as these experiments from the basis for the authentication algorithm. Both the experiments and the authentication algorithm are analyzed using the modulation transfer function. Recommendations for future improvements in tag authentication are also suggested by the modulation transfer function analysis. 4 refs.

  11. Intrinsic-surface-tag image authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palm, R.G.; DeVolpi, A.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this work is to further the development of a unique treaty limited item (TLI) intrinsic surface tag for arms control applications. This tag`s unique feature is the ability to capture the sub-micron scale topography of the TLI surface. The surface topography is captured by plastic castings of the surface as digitally imaged by an electron microscope. Tag authentication is accomplished by comparing digital castings images obtained in two different inspections. Surface replication experiments are described, as these experiments from the basis for the authentication algorithm. Both the experiments and the authentication algorithm are analyzed using the modulation transfer function. Recommendations for future improvements in tag authentication are also suggested by the modulation transfer function analysis. 4 refs.

  12. Superconductor cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Arnaud; Schmidt, Frank; Marzahn, Erik

    2010-05-04

    A superconductor cable is described, having a superconductive flexible cable core (1) , which is laid in a cryostat (2, 3, 4), in which the cable core (1) runs in the cryostat (2, 3, 4) in the form of a wave or helix at room temperature.

  13. Single reconstructed Fermi surface pocket in an underdoped single-layer cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M K; Harrison, N; McDonald, R D; Ramshaw, B J; Modic, K A; Barišić, N; Greven, M

    2016-01-01

    The observation of a reconstructed Fermi surface via quantum oscillations in hole-doped cuprates opened a path towards identifying broken symmetry states in the pseudogap regime. However, such an identification has remained inconclusive due to the multi-frequency quantum oscillation spectra and complications accounting for bilayer effects in most studies. We overcome these impediments with high-resolution measurements on the structurally simpler cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), which features one CuO2 plane per primitive unit cell. We find only a single oscillatory component with no signatures of magnetic breakdown tunnelling to additional orbits. Therefore, the Fermi surface comprises a single quasi-two-dimensional pocket. Quantitative modelling of these results indicates that a biaxial charge density wave within each CuO2 plane is responsible for the reconstruction and rules out criss-crossed charge stripes between layers as a viable alternative in Hg1201. Lastly, we determine that the characteristic gap between reconstructed pockets is a significant fraction of the pseudogap energy.

  14. Investigation of local nonlinear electrodynamic response of surface states in cuprate superconductors at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mircea, Dragos I.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2004-03-01

    Traditionally, the Andreev Bound States (ABS) have been studied by means of tunneling experiments and global electromagnetic resonant techniques. The zero bias conductance peak and the strong upturn in the penetration depth at low temperature are considered strong evidence for the existence of ABS. The nonlinear inductance arising from the current-dependent penetration depth leads to a nonlinear electrodynamic response that can be probed with our non-resonant near-field microwave microscope [S. C. Lee and S. M. Anlage, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 1893 (2003)]. In the experiment, microwave currents have been applied locally along different directions on the surface of YBCO films exposing the (110) surface in order to investigate the angular dependence of the second and third order harmonics generated by the sample. The temperature and the angular dependence measured for different levels of the applied microwave power, will be presented and compared with the theoretical predictions. This low-temperature anisotropic nonlinear behavior is relevant for the study of ABS as well as for identifying the existence of local pairing states with symmetry different from that of the bulk order parameter.

  15. Surface resistance of thin perovskite films - high-temperature superconductors and giant magnetoresistance manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofland, S.E. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Phys.; Dominguez, M. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Phys.; Tyagi, S.D. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Phys.; Bhagat, S.M. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Phys.; Robson, M.C. [Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Kwon, C. [Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Trajanovic, Z. [Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Takeuchi, I. [Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Ramesh, R. [Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)]|[Dept. of Materials Research and Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Venkatesan, T. [Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)]|[Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-11-15

    We present a systematic study of the surface resistance of perovskite thin films and bulk samples at microwave frequencies. The d.c. resistivity {rho} of the various samples spans three orders of magnitude. For bulk samples, we obtain the usual {rho}{sup 1/2} dependence of R{sub s}. For {rho} < 1 {mu}{Omega} cm, R{sub s} displays conventional behavior, i.e. R{sub s} {proportional_to} {rho}. However, for {rho} > 1 {mu}{Omega} cm, R{sub s} is not proportional to {rho} but to the conductivity {sigma}. Using this fact, we have made the first direct observation of a peak in {sigma}{sub 1}, just below T{sub c} in a-axis films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. (orig.)

  16. Surface critical magnetic field c3() of a bulk superconductor MgB2 using two-band Ginzburg–Landau theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I N Askerzade

    2003-09-01

    Two-band Ginzburg–Landau (TB G–L) equations for a bulk MgB2 were solved analytically to determine the temperature dependence of surface critical magnetic field Hc3(). It is shown that c3() has the same temperature dependence with c2(), similar to the case of a single-band superconductor, c3()=1.66 c2(). We use an elimination procedure for the decoupling of G–L equations of two-band superconductivity, which eases the calculations. It is expected that the temperature dependence for c3() gives positive curvature near c.

  17. Imaging standing surface plasmons by photon tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, A.; Lereu, A. L.; Wig, A.; Meriaudeau, F.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2005-04-01

    We present a direct method for optically exciting and imaging delocalized standing surface plasmons in thin metal films. We show theoretically that when imaging the field of the plasmons with a photon scanning tunneling microscope, the presence of the dielectric probe has a negligible effect on the surface modes of the metal film. We demonstrate that plasmon interference can be sustained in arbitrarily large regions of the metal film in comparison to the excitation wavelength. This knowledge can be important when seeking the relative distance between two scattering centers such as the presence of micron or submicron structures.

  18. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......, but they do not provide quantitative information about surface roughness. Laser profilometry and AFM on the other hand provide quantitative roughness data from two different scales, laser profilometer from 1 mm and atomic force microscope from 90 microm scale. AFM is a powerful technique but other imaging...

  19. Superconductor Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gömöry, F

    2014-01-01

    Superconductors used in magnet technology could carry extreme currents because of their ability to keep the magnetic flux motionless. The dynamics of the magnetic flux interaction with superconductors is controlled by this property. The cases of electrical transport in a round wire and the magnetization of wires of various shapes (circular, elliptical, plate) in an external magnetic field are analysed. Resistance to the magnetic field penetration means that the field produced by the superconducting magnet is no longer proportional to the supplied current. It also leads to a dissipation of electromagnetic energy. In conductors with unequal transverse dimensions, such as flat cables, the orientation with respect to the magnetic field plays an essential role. A reduction of magnetization currents can be achieved by splitting the core of a superconducting wire into fine filaments; however, new kinds of electrical currents that couple the filaments consequently appear. Basic formulas allowing qualitative analyses ...

  20. Surface Coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Taimy Ricardo Ferro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, has become a vital tool for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases, especially in the Nervisos Central System and the Musculos keletal System. Coils(RF are an essential component in the generation of these images, are responsible for exciting thespins of nuclei in a sample and/or detect the resultant signal coming from them. The use of surface RF coils has increased considerably, because they have a high signal to noise ratio, a parameter that defines the quality of the image. In the present work, there was realized the theoretical design and practical implementation of a circular surface RF coil. The experimental prototype was optimized to be used in the tomograph Giroimag03  built in Medical Biophysics Center

  1. Processing ISS Images of Titan's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jason; McEwen, Alfred; Fussner, Stephanie; Turtle, Elizabeth; West, Robert; Porco, Carolyn; Knowles, Ben; Dawson, Doug

    2005-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the Cassini-Huygens mission, in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, is to understand the surface and atmosphere of Titan. Surface investigations are primarily accomplished with RADAR, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), and the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) [1]. The latter two use methane "windows", regions in Titan's reflectance spectrum where its atmosphere is most transparent, to observe the surface. For VIMS, this produces clear views of the surface near 2 and 5 microns [2]. ISS uses a narrow continuum band filter (CB3) at 938 nanometers. While these methane windows provide our best views of the surface, the images produced are not as crisp as ISS images of satellites like Dione and Iapetus [3] due to the atmosphere. Given a reasonable estimate of contrast (approx.30%), the apparent resolution of features is approximately 5 pixels due to the effects of the atmosphere and the Modulation Transfer Function of the camera [1,4]. The atmospheric haze also reduces contrast, especially with increasing emission angles [5].

  2. Simultaneous imaging of MR angiographic image and brain surface image using steady-state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takane, Atsushi; Tsuda, Munetaka (Hitachi Ltd., Katsuta, Ibaraki (Japan)); Koizumi, Hideaki; Koyama, Susumu; Yoshida, Takeyuki

    1993-09-01

    Synthesis of a brain surface image and an angiographic image representing brain surface vasculatures can be useful for pre-operational contemplation of brain surgery. Both brain surface images and brain surface vasculature images were successfully acquired simultaneously utilizing both FID signals and time-reversed FID signals created under steady-state free precession (SSFP). This simultaneous imaging method has several advantages. No positional discrepancies between both images and prolongation of scan time are anticipated because of concurrent acquisition of the two kinds of image data. Superimposition and stereo-display of both images enable understanding of their spatial relationship, and therefore afford a useful means for pre-operational simulation of brain surgery. (author).

  3. Polarized neutron imaging and three-dimensional calculation of magnetic flux trapping in bulk of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treimer, Wolfgang; Ebrahimi, Omid; Karakas, Nursel; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2012-05-17

    Polarized neutron radiography was used to study the three-dimensional magnetic flux distribution inside of single-crystal and polycrystalline Pb cylinders with large (cm3) volume and virtually zero demagnetization. Experiments with single crystals being in the Meissner phase (Tsurface of the cylinder. In the direction along the cylinder axis the trapped flux was nearly constant. The expelled field outside of the samples followed 1/R dependence. These measurements provided a unique and detailed picture of macroscopic superconducting samples, confirming the existence of both uniform bulk Meissner expulsion in single crystals and bulk flux trapping with nearly-Bean-model profiles due to flux pinning in polycrystalline samples.

  4. Surface driven biomechanical breast image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiben, Björn; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Hipwell, John H.; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Buelow, Thomas; Williams, Norman R.; Keshtgar, M.; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Biomechanical modelling enables large deformation simulations of breast tissues under different loading conditions to be performed. Such simulations can be utilised to transform prone Magnetic Resonance (MR) images into a different patient position, such as upright or supine. We present a novel integration of biomechanical modelling with a surface registration algorithm which optimises the unknown material parameters of a biomechanical model and performs a subsequent regularised surface alignment. This allows deformations induced by effects other than gravity, such as those due to contact of the breast and MR coil, to be reversed. Correction displacements are applied to the biomechanical model enabling transformation of the original pre-surgical images to the corresponding target position. The algorithm is evaluated for the prone-to-supine case using prone MR images and the skin outline of supine Computed Tomography (CT) scans for three patients. A mean target registration error (TRE) of 10:9 mm for internal structures is achieved. For the prone-to-upright scenario, an optical 3D surface scan of one patient is used as a registration target and the nipple distances after alignment between the transformed MRI and the surface are 10:1 mm and 6:3 mm respectively.

  5. Recent progress on carbon-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Goto, Hidenori; Hamao, Shino; Kambe, Takashi; Terao, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Saki; Zheng, Lu; Miao, Xiao; Okamoto, Hideki

    2016-08-24

    This article reviews new superconducting phases of carbon-based materials. During the past decade, new carbon-based superconductors have been extensively developed through the use of intercalation chemistry, electrostatic carrier doping, and surface-proving techniques. The superconducting transition temperature T c of these materials has been rapidly elevated, and the variety of superconductors has been increased. This review fully introduces graphite, graphene, and hydrocarbon superconductors and future perspectives of high-T c superconductors based on these materials, including present problems. Carbon-based superconductors show various types of interesting behavior, such as a positive pressure dependence of T c. At present, experimental information on superconductors is still insufficient, and theoretical treatment is also incomplete. In particular, experimental results are still lacking for graphene and hydrocarbon superconductors. Therefore, it is very important to review experimental results in detail and introduce theoretical approaches, for the sake of advances in condensed matter physics. Furthermore, the recent experimental results on hydrocarbon superconductors obtained by our group are also included in this article. Consequently, this review article may provide a hint to designing new carbon-based superconductors exhibiting higher T c and interesting physical features.

  6. Mirror Surface Reconstruction from a Single Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miaomiao; Hartley, Richard; Salzmann, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    This paper tackles the problem of reconstructing the shape of a smooth mirror surface from a single image. In particular, we consider the case where the camera is observing the reflection of a static reference target in the unknown mirror. We first study the reconstruction problem given dense correspondences between 3D points on the reference target and image locations. In such conditions, our differential geometry analysis provides a theoretical proof that the shape of the mirror surface can be recovered if the pose of the reference target is known. We then relax our assumptions by considering the case where only sparse correspondences are available. In this scenario, we formulate reconstruction as an optimization problem, which can be solved using a nonlinear least-squares method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on both synthetic and real images. We then provide a theoretical analysis of the potential degenerate cases with and without prior knowledge of the pose of the reference target. Finally we show that our theory can be similarly applied to the reconstruction of the surface of transparent object.

  7. Ultrafast Imaging of Surface Plasmons Propagating on a Gold Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Hu, Dehong; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-05-13

    We record time-resolved nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (tr-PEEM) images of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from a lithographically patterned rectangular trench on a flat gold surface. Our tr-PEEM scheme involves a pair of identical, spatially separated, and interferometrically-locked femtosecond laser pulses. Power dependent PEEM images provide experimental evidence for a sequential coherent nonlinear photoemission process, in which one laser source creates a PSP polarization state through a linear interaction, and the second subsequently probes the prepared state via two photon photoemission. The recorded time-resolved movies of a PSP allow us to directly measure various properties of the surface-bound wave packet, including its carrier wavelength (785 nm) and group velocity (0.95c). In addition, tr-PEEM in concert with finite-difference time domain simulations together allow us to set a lower limit of 75 μm for the decay length of the PSP on a 100 nm thick gold film.

  8. Ferromagnetic superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huxley, Andrew D.

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Review of ferromagnetic superconductors. • Covers UGe{sub 2}, URhGe and UCoGe and briefly other materials. • The focus is on experimental data and the pairing mechanism. - Abstract: The co-existence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism is of potential interest for spintronics and high magnetic field applications as well as a fascinating fundamental state of matter. The recent focus of research is on a family of ferromagnetic superconductors that are superconducting well below their Curie temperature, the first example of which was discovered in 2000. Although there is a ‘standard’ theoretical model for how magnetic pairing might bring about such a state, why it has only been seen in a few materials that at first sight appear to be very closely related has yet to be fully explained. This review covers the current state of knowledge of the magnetic and superconducting properties of these materials with emphasis on how they conform and differ from the behaviour expected from the ‘standard’ model and from each other.

  9. Consistent Reconstruction of Cortical Surfaces from Longitudinal Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and consistent reconstruction of cortical surfaces from longitudinal human brain MR images is of great importance in studying subtle morphological changes of the cerebral cortex. This paper presents a new deformable surface method for consistent and accurate reconstruction of inner, central and outer cortical surfaces from longitudinal MR images. Specifically, the cortical surfaces of the group-mean image of all aligned longitudinal images of the same subject are first reconstructed ...

  10. Consistent Reconstruction of Cortical Surfaces from Longitudinal Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Yaping; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and consistent reconstruction of cortical surfaces from longitudinal human brain MR images is of great importance in studying longitudinal subtle change of the cerebral cortex. This paper presents a novel deformable surface method for consistent and accurate reconstruction of inner, central and outer cortical surfaces from longitudinal brain MR images. Specifically, the cortical surfaces of the group-mean image of all aligned longitudinal images of the same subject are first reconstr...

  11. Anomalous asymmetry in the Fermi surface of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu4O8 revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Khasanov, R.; Sassa, Y.; Bendounan, A.; Paihes, S.; Chang, J.; Mesot, J.; Keller, H.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Shi, M.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Kaminski, A.

    2009-09-15

    We use microprobe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the Fermi surface and band dispersion of the CuO{sub 2} planes in the high-temperature superconductor, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}. We find a strong in-plane asymmetry of the electronic structure between directions along a and b axes. The saddle point of the antibonding band lies at a significantly higher energy in the a direction ({pi},0) than the b direction (0,{pi}), whereas the bonding band displays the opposite behavior. We demonstrate that the abnormal band shape is due to a strong asymmetry of the bilayer band splitting, likely caused by a nontrivial hybridization between the planes and chains. This asymmetry has an important implication for interpreting key properties of the Y-Ba-Cu-O family, especially the superconducting gap, transport, and results of inelastic neutron scattering.

  12. Modified Entropic Gravitation in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2011-01-01

    Verlinde recently developed a theoretical account of gravitation in terms of an entropic force. The central element in Verlinde's derivation is information and its relation with entropy through the holographic principle. The application of this approach to the case of superconductors requires to take into account that information associated with superconductor's quantum vacuum energy is not stored on Planck size surface elements, but in four volume cells with Planck-Einstein size. This has profound consequences on the type of gravitational force generated by the quantum vacuum condensate in superconductors, which is closely related with the cosmological repulsive acceleration responsible for the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Remarkably this new gravitational type force depends on the level of breaking of the weak equivalence principle for cooper pairs in a given superconducting material, which was previously derived by the author starting from similar principles. It is also shown that this new gravit...

  13. Method for Surface Scanning in Medical Imaging and Related Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for surface scanning in medical imaging is provided. The surface scanning apparatus comprises an image source, a first optical fiber bundle comprising first optical fibers having proximal ends and distal ends, and a first optical coupler for coupling an image from the image...

  14. Ferromagnetic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Andrew D.

    2015-07-01

    The co-existence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism is of potential interest for spintronics and high magnetic field applications as well as a fascinating fundamental state of matter. The recent focus of research is on a family of ferromagnetic superconductors that are superconducting well below their Curie temperature, the first example of which was discovered in 2000. Although there is a 'standard' theoretical model for how magnetic pairing might bring about such a state, why it has only been seen in a few materials that at first sight appear to be very closely related has yet to be fully explained. This review covers the current state of knowledge of the magnetic and superconducting properties of these materials with emphasis on how they conform and differ from the behaviour expected from the 'standard' model and from each other.

  15. Superconductor cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Arnaud; Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE

    2009-12-15

    A superconductor cable includes a superconductive cable core (1) and a cryostat (2) enclosing the same. The cable core (1) has a superconductive conductor (3), an insulation (4) surrounding the same and a shielding (5) surrounding the insulation (4). A layer (3b) of a dielectric or semiconducting material is applied to a central element (3a) formed from a normally conducting material as a strand or tube and a layer (3c) of at least one wire or strip of superconductive material is placed helically on top. The central element (3a) and the layer (3c) are connected to each other in an electrically conducting manner at the ends of the cable core (1).

  16. Scanning instrumentation for measuring magnetic field trapping in high Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, R. C.; Helton, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Computerized scanning instrumentation measures and displays trapped magnetic fields across the surface of high Tc superconductors at 77 K. Data are acquired in the form of a raster scan image utilizing stepping motor stages for positioning and a cryogenic Hall probe for magnetic field readout. Flat areas up to 45 mm in diameter are scanned with 0.5-mm resolution and displayed as false color images.

  17. Observability of surface Andreev bound states in a topological insulator in proximity to an s-wave superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelder, M; Golubov, A A; Asano, Y; Brinkman, A

    2015-08-12

    To guide experimental work on the search for Majorana zero-energy modes, we calculate the superconducting pairing symmetry of a three-dimensional topological insulator in combination with an s-wave superconductor. We show how the pairing symmetry changes across different topological regimes. We demonstrate that a dominant p-wave pairing relation is not sufficient to realise a Majorana zero-energy mode useful for quantum computation. Our main result is the relation between odd-frequency pairing and Majorana zero energy modes by using Green functions techniques in three-dimensional topological insulators in the so-called Majorana regime. We discuss thereafter how the pairing relations in the different regimes can be observed in the tunneling conductance of an s-wave proximised three-dimensional topological insulator. We discuss the necessity to incorporate a ferromagnetic insulator to localise the zero-energy bound state to the interface as a Majorana mode.

  18. Gesture recognition by instantaneous surface EMG images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Weidong; Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Li, Jiajun

    2016-11-15

    Gesture recognition in non-intrusive muscle-computer interfaces is usually based on windowed descriptive and discriminatory surface electromyography (sEMG) features because the recorded amplitude of a myoelectric signal may rapidly fluctuate between voltages above and below zero. Here, we present that the patterns inside the instantaneous values of high-density sEMG enables gesture recognition to be performed merely with sEMG signals at a specific instant. We introduce the concept of an sEMG image spatially composed from high-density sEMG and verify our findings from a computational perspective with experiments on gesture recognition based on sEMG images with a classification scheme of a deep convolutional network. Without any windowed features, the resultant recognition accuracy of an 8-gesture within-subject test reached 89.3% on a single frame of sEMG image and reached 99.0% using simple majority voting over 40 frames with a 1,000 Hz sampling rate. Experiments on the recognition of 52 gestures of NinaPro database and 27 gestures of CSL-HDEMG database also validated that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods. Our findings are a starting point for the development of more fluid and natural muscle-computer interfaces with very little observational latency. For example, active prostheses and exoskeletons based on high-density electrodes could be controlled with instantaneous responses.

  19. Gesture recognition by instantaneous surface EMG images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Weidong; Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Li, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Gesture recognition in non-intrusive muscle-computer interfaces is usually based on windowed descriptive and discriminatory surface electromyography (sEMG) features because the recorded amplitude of a myoelectric signal may rapidly fluctuate between voltages above and below zero. Here, we present that the patterns inside the instantaneous values of high-density sEMG enables gesture recognition to be performed merely with sEMG signals at a specific instant. We introduce the concept of an sEMG image spatially composed from high-density sEMG and verify our findings from a computational perspective with experiments on gesture recognition based on sEMG images with a classification scheme of a deep convolutional network. Without any windowed features, the resultant recognition accuracy of an 8-gesture within-subject test reached 89.3% on a single frame of sEMG image and reached 99.0% using simple majority voting over 40 frames with a 1,000 Hz sampling rate. Experiments on the recognition of 52 gestures of NinaPro database and 27 gestures of CSL-HDEMG database also validated that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods. Our findings are a starting point for the development of more fluid and natural muscle-computer interfaces with very little observational latency. For example, active prostheses and exoskeletons based on high-density electrodes could be controlled with instantaneous responses. PMID:27845347

  20. Observation of Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic atomic chains on a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadj-Perge, Stevan; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Jeon, Sangjun; Seo, Jungpil; MacDonald, Allan H.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    2014-10-01

    Majorana fermions are predicted to localize at the edge of a topological superconductor, a state of matter that can form when a ferromagnetic system is placed in proximity to a conventional superconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction. With the goal of realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor, we have fabricated ferromagnetic iron (Fe) atomic chains on the surface of superconducting lead (Pb). Using high-resolution spectroscopic imaging techniques, we show that the onset of superconductivity, which gaps the electronic density of states in the bulk of the Fe chains, is accompanied by the appearance of zero-energy end-states. This spatially resolved signature provides strong evidence, corroborated by other observations, for the formation of a topological phase and edge-bound Majorana fermions in our atomic chains.

  1. Topological matter. Observation of Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic atomic chains on a superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadj-Perge, Stevan; Drozdov, Ilya K; Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Jeon, Sangjun; Seo, Jungpil; MacDonald, Allan H; Bernevig, B Andrei; Yazdani, Ali

    2014-10-31

    Majorana fermions are predicted to localize at the edge of a topological superconductor, a state of matter that can form when a ferromagnetic system is placed in proximity to a conventional superconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction. With the goal of realizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor, we have fabricated ferromagnetic iron (Fe) atomic chains on the surface of superconducting lead (Pb). Using high-resolution spectroscopic imaging techniques, we show that the onset of superconductivity, which gaps the electronic density of states in the bulk of the Fe chains, is accompanied by the appearance of zero-energy end-states. This spatially resolved signature provides strong evidence, corroborated by other observations, for the formation of a topological phase and edge-bound Majorana fermions in our atomic chains.

  2. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Sullivan, James [Pulmonary Laboratories, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV{sub torso} = ΔV{sub thorax} + ΔV{sub abdomen}) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP{sub v} = ΔV{sub thorax}/ΔV{sub torso}) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume

  3. High-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The present book aims at describing the phenomenon of superconductivity and high-temperature superconductors discovered by Bednorz and Muller in 1986. The book covers the superconductivity phenomenon, structure of high-Tc superconductors, critical currents, synthesis routes for high Tc materials, superconductivity in cuprates, the proximity effect and SQUIDs, theories of superconductivity and applications of superconductors.

  4. Determining the in-plane Fermi surface topology in high T(c) superconductors using angle-dependent magnetic quantum oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, N; McDonald, R D

    2009-05-13

    We propose a quantum oscillation experiment by which the rotation of an underdoped YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6+x) sample about two different axes with respect to the orientation of the magnetic field can be used to infer the shape of the in-plane cross-section of corrugated Fermi surface cylinder(s). Deep corrugations in the Fermi surface are expected to give rise to nodes in the quantum oscillation amplitude that depend on the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic induction B. Because the symmetries of electron and hole cylinders within the Brillouin zone are expected to be very different, the topology can provide essential clues as to the broken symmetry responsible for the observed oscillations. The criterion for the applicability of this method to the cuprate superconductors (as well as other layered metals) is that the difference in quantum oscillation frequency 2ΔF between the maximum (belly) and minimum (neck) extremal cross-sections of the corrugated Fermi surface exceeds |B|.

  5. Scanning X-ray microscopy of superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoss, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Zahn, Patrick; Bayer, Jonas [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic flux distribution arising from a high-T{sub c} superconductor is detected and visualized with high spatial resolution using scanning x-ray microscopy (SXM). Therefore, we introduce a sensor layer, namely, an amorphous, soft-magnetic CoFeB cover layer. The magnetic stray fields of the supercurrents lead to a local reorientation of the magnetic moments in the ferromagnet, which is visualized using the large x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect of the Co and Fe L3-edge. We show that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer corresponds to the in-plane magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and can hence be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors with high spatial resolution. Using the total electron yield (TEY) mode the surface structure and the magnetic domains can be imaged simultaneously and can be correlated. The measurements are carried out at our scanning x-ray microscope MAXYMUS at Bessy II, Berlin with the new low temperature setup.

  6. Analysis of the levitation force of pure and starch/polystyrene/MWCNT added bulk MgB2 superconductors using frozen image model under zero field cooling condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, D.; Dey, T. K.

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of superconducting levitation force between permanent magnet and polycrystalline samples of pure and MgB2 added with starch, polystyrene (PS) and multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) have been performed under zero field cooling (ZFC) condition at 20 K in both descending and ascending modes. For this, the bulk pellets were synthesized by conventional solid state sintering technique. The XRD data indicate well developed MgB2 phase. However, a decrease in lattice parameter 'a = b' have been observed for doped MgB2 samples. Superconducting transition temperature of MgB2 also decreases with starch/PS/MWCNT addition. Unlike MWCNT, the addition of starch/polystyrene is found to enhance the levitation force of MgB2 superconductor. The levitation force between PM and investigated pellets in ZFC condition is explained well in terms of the updated version of modified frozen image model and the magnetic moment originated due to vertical motion of the superconductors have been estimated. It may be noted that except for MWCNT, addition of starch/PS in MgB2 improves the magnetic moment generated by vertical movement of pure MgB2. However, this improvement is more pronounced for 1 wt.% of PS added MgB2, which indicates more flux trapping and hence better levitation properties in 1 wt.% of PS added MgB2. The vertical stiffness estimated for pure and starch/PS/MWCNT doped MgB2 samples indicate that the levitation force are more sensitive in the region close to the PM.

  7. Interpretation of the method of images in estimating superconducting levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque 15, E28911 Leganes (Spain)], E-mail: jlperez@ing.uc3m.es; Garcia-Prada, Juan Carlos [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque 15, E28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2007-12-01

    Among different papers devoted to superconducting levitation of a permanent magnet over a superconductor using the method of images, there is a discrepancy of a factor of two when estimating the lift force. This is not a minor matter but an interesting fundamental question that contributes to understanding the physical phenomena of 'imaging' on a superconductor surface. We solve it, make clear the physical behavior underlying it, and suggest the reinterpretation of some previous experiments.

  8. Interpretation of the method of images in estimating superconducting levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis; Garcia-Prada, Juan Carlos

    2007-12-01

    Among different papers devoted to superconducting levitation of a permanent magnet over a superconductor using the method of images, there is a discrepancy of a factor of two when estimating the lift force. This is not a minor matter but an interesting fundamental question that contributes to understanding the physical phenomena of "imaging" on a superconductor surface. We solve it, make clear the physical behavior underlying it, and suggest the reinterpretation of some previous experiments.

  9. Majorana Fermions and Topology in Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Topological superconductors are novel classes of quantum condensed phases, characterized by topologically nontrivial structures of Cooper pairing states. On the surfaces of samples and in vortex cores of topological superconductors, Majorana fermions, which are particles identified with their own anti-particles, appear as Bogoliubov quasiparticles. The existence and stability of Majorana fermions are ensured by bulk topological invariants constrained by the symmetries of the systems. Majorana...

  10. Generation of the J/sub c/, H/sub c/, T/sub c/ surface for commercial superconductor using reduced-state parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents a method for calculating the J/sub C/, H/sub C/, T/sub C/ surface for Type II Superconductors. The method requires that one knows T/sub C/ at zero current and field, H/sub c2/ at zero current and temperature, and J/sub c/ at at least one temperature and field. The theory presented in this report agrees with the measured data quite well over virtually the entire J/sub c/, H/sub c/, T/sub c/ surface given the value of J/sub c/ versus H at one or two temperatures. This report presents calculated and measured values of J/sub c/ versus T and B for niobium titanium, niobium zirconium, niobium tin, niobium titanium tin, niobium tantalum tin, vanadium zirconium hafnium, and vanadium gallium. Good agreement of theory with measured data was obtained for commercial niobium titanium and niobium tin. 76 refs., 26 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Nanostructured surfaces for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petefish, Joseph W.

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has achieved widespread recognition as a sensitive, label-free, and versatile optical method for monitoring changes in refractive index at a metal-dielectric interface. Refractive index deviations of 10-6 RIU are resolvable using SPR, and the method can be used in real-time or ex-situ. Instruments based on carboxymethyl dextran coated SPR chips have achieved commercial success in biological detection, while SPR sensors can also be found in other fields as varied as food safety and gas sensing. Chapter 1 provides a physical background of SPR sensing. A brief history of the technology is presented, and publication data are included that demonstrate the large and growing interest in surface plasmons. Numerous applications of SPR sensors are listed to illustrate the broad appeal of the method. Surface plasmons (SPs) and surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) are formally defined, and important parameters governing their spatial behavior are derived from Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. Physical requirements for exciting SPs with incident light are discussed, and SPR imaging is used to illustrate the operating principle of SPR-based detection. Angle-tunable surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of polymer vibrational modes via grating-coupled SPR is demonstrated in Chapter 2. Over 10-fold enhancement of C-H stretching modes was found relative to the absorbance of the same film in the absence of plasmon excitation. Modeling results are used to support and explain experimental observations. Improvements to the grating coupler SEIRA platform in Chapter 2 are explored in Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 displays data for two sets of multipitch gratings: one set with broadly distributed resonances with the potential for multiband IR enhancement and the other with finely spaced, overlapping resonances to form a broadband IR enhancement device. Diffraction gratings having multiple periods were fabricated using a Lloyd

  12. Fine uniform filament superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Li, Qi; Roberts, Peter R.; Antaya, Peter D.; Seuntjens, Jeffrey M.; Hancock, Steven; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Christopherson, Craig J.; Garrant, Jennifer H.; Craven, Christopher A.

    2002-01-01

    A multifilamentary superconductor composite having a high fill factor is formed from a plurality of stacked monofilament precursor elements, each of which includes a low density superconductor precursor monofilament. The precursor elements all have substantially the same dimensions and characteristics, and are stacked in a rectilinear configuration and consolidated to provide a multifilamentary precursor composite. The composite is thereafter thermomechanically processed to provide a superconductor composite in which each monofilament is less than about 50 microns thick.

  13. Plenoptic Imager for Automated Surface Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollar, Byron; Milder, Andrew; Milder, Andrew; Mayo, Michael

    2010-01-01

    An electro-optical imaging device is capable of autonomously determining the range to objects in a scene without the use of active emitters or multiple apertures. The novel, automated, low-power imaging system is based on a plenoptic camera design that was constructed as a breadboard system. Nanohmics proved feasibility of the concept by designing an optical system for a prototype plenoptic camera, developing simulated plenoptic images and range-calculation algorithms, constructing a breadboard prototype plenoptic camera, and processing images (including range calculations) from the prototype system. The breadboard demonstration included an optical subsystem comprised of a main aperture lens, a mechanical structure that holds an array of micro lenses at the focal distance from the main lens, and a structure that mates a CMOS imaging sensor the correct distance from the micro lenses. The demonstrator also featured embedded electronics for camera readout, and a post-processor executing image-processing algorithms to provide ranging information.

  14. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  15. Photothermal measurements of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kino, G.S.; Studenmund, W.R.; Fishman, I.M. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A photothermal technique has been used to measure diffusion and critical temperature in high temperature superconductors. The technique is particularly suitable for determining material quality and inhomogeneity.

  16. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  17. High resolution imaging of surface patterns of single bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greif, Dominik; Wesner, Daniel [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Regtmeier, Jan, E-mail: jan.regtmeier@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Anselmetti, Dario [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    We systematically studied the origin of surface patterns observed on single Sinorhizobium meliloti bacterial cells by comparing the complementary techniques atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Conditions ranged from living bacteria in liquid to fixed bacteria in high vacuum. Stepwise, we applied different sample modifications (fixation, drying, metal coating, etc.) and characterized the observed surface patterns. A detailed analysis revealed that the surface structure with wrinkled protrusions in SEM images were not generated de novo but most likely evolved from similar and naturally present structures on the surface of living bacteria. The influence of osmotic stress to the surface structure of living cells was evaluated and also the contribution of exopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by imaging two mutant strains of the bacterium under native conditions. AFM images of living bacteria in culture medium exhibited surface structures of the size of single proteins emphasizing the usefulness of AFM for high resolution cell imaging.

  18. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, I.; Schasfoort, R.B.M.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on th

  19. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on th

  20. Modified entropic gravitation in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Clovis Jacinto de, E-mail: clovis.de.matos@esa.int [European Space Agency, 8-10 rue Mario Nikis, 75015 Paris (France)

    2012-01-15

    Verlinde recently developed a theoretical account of gravitation in terms of an entropic force. The central element in Verlinde's derivation is information and its relation with entropy through the holographic principle. The application of this approach to the case of superconductors requires to take into account that information associated with superconductor's quantum vacuum energy is not stored on Planck size surface elements, but in four volume cells with Planck-Einstein size. This has profound consequences on the type of gravitational force generated by the quantum vacuum condensate in superconductors, which is closely related with the cosmological repulsive acceleration responsible for the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Remarkably this new gravitational type force depends on the level of breaking of the weak equivalence principle for cooper pairs in a given superconducting material, which was previously derived by the author starting from similar principles. It is also shown that this new gravitational force can be interpreted as a surface force. The experimental detection of this new repulsive gravitational-type force appears to be challenging.

  1. Image enlargement using biharmonic Said-Ball surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaban, A.; Kherd, A.; Jameel, A. F.; Akhadkulov, H.; Alipiah, F. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of biharmonic cubic Said-Ball surfaces in image enlargement area. Resizing an image through up sampling or down sampling is generally common for making smaller image fit a bigger screen in full screen mode or reducing a higher resolution image to a smaller resolution. However due to some limitation, this paper will focus on image enlargement based on scaling factor of two. We use biharmonic cubic Said-Ball subject to a given four boundary curves condition respectively. We implement and evaluate the performance of the proposed method based on peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) indicator using well-known gray-scale test images.

  2. Structural and electronic properties and the fermi surface of the new non-centrosymmetric superconductors: 3.6 K CaIrSi3 and 2.3 K CaPtSi3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, V. V.; Shein, I. R.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2010-09-01

    Ab initio FLAPW-GGA calculations have been performed to investigate structural properties, electronic band structure, and Fermi surface topology of the newly discovered non-centrosymmetric superconductors: 3.6 K CaIrSi3 and 2.3 K CaPtSi3. As a result, the peculiarities of the crystal structure, electronic bands, total and site-projected l-decomposed densities of states, and the shape of the Fermi surface for CaIrSi3 and CaPtSi3 were obtained and analyzed.

  3. Excitations in Topological Superfluids and Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao

    In this thesis I present the theoretical work on Fermionic surface states, and %the bulk Bosonic collective excitations in topological superfluids and superconductors. Broken symmetries %Bulk-edge correspondence in topological condensed matter systems have implications for the spectrum of Fermionic excitations confined on surfaces or topological defects. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  4. Oxidation of the Si(100) surface promoted by Sr overlayer - An X-ray photoemission study. [high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarwi, A.; Fan, W. C.; Ignatiev, A.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of strontium films with the underlaying Si (100) surface and the Sr-promoted low-temperature oxidation of Si were investigated, using XPS, at three different Sr coverages (theta): theta = 0.55 monolayer (ML), theta = 1 ML, and theta = 1.85 ML. Oxygen adsorption was studied both at room temperature and at 500 C, and at oxygen exposures up to 2 x 10 to the 6th L (1 L = 10 to the -6th torr) and 2 x 10 to the 5th L, respectively. The XPS spectra of the Si2p, O1s, and Sr3d core levels were measured for the atomically clean Si, the Sr-covered Si, and for the Sr-covered Si after each oxygen exposure. Results indicate that Sr interacts with the Si(100) surface forming a strong ionic bond, and that Sr promotes the oxidation of the Si (100) surface.

  5. Nonlinear optical microscopy for imaging thin films and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilowitz, L.B.; McBranch, D.W.; Robinson, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    We have used the inherent surface sensitivity of second harmonic generation to develop an instrument for nonlinear optical microscopy of surfaces and interfaces. We have demonstrated the use of several nonlinear optical responses for imaging thin films. The second harmonic response of a thin film of C{sub 60} has been used to image patterned films. Two photon absorption light induced fluorescence has been used to image patterned thin films of Rhodamine 6G. Applications of nonlinear optical microscopy include the imaging of charge injection and photoinduced charge transfer between layers in semiconductor heterojunction devices as well as across membranes in biological systems.

  6. Ionization of Rydberg H atoms at band-gap metal surfaces via surface and image states

    CERN Document Server

    So, E; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01

    Wavepacket propagation calculations are reported for the interaction of a Rydberg hydrogen atom ($n=2-8)$ with Cu(111) and Cu(100) surfaces (represented by a Chulkov potential), in comparison with a Jellium surface. Both copper surfaces have a projected band gap at the surface in the energy range degenerate with some or all of the Rydberg energies. The charge transfer of the Rydberg electron to the surface is found to be enhanced for $n$ values at which there is a near-degeneracy between the Rydberg energy level and an image state or a surface state of the surface. The enhancement is facilitated by the strong overlap of the surface image-state orbital lying outside the surface and the orbital of the incoming Rydberg atom. These calculations point to the possibility of using Rydberg-surface collisions as a probe of surface electronic structure.

  7. Forward model theoretical basis for a superconducting imaging surface magnetoencephalography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharajh, K [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Volegov, P L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kraus, R H [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2004-02-21

    A novel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system was designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that incorporates a helmet-shaped superconductor in order to increase the signal to noise ratio. The magnetic field perturbations caused by the superconducting surface must be included in the forward physics for accurate source localization. In this paper, the theoretical basis for the forward model that calculates the field of any magnetic source in the presence of an arbitrarily shaped superconducting surface is presented. Appropriate magnetic field integral equations are derived that provide a description of the physics of the forward model. These equations are derived starting from Maxwell's equations in the presence of inhomogeneous media, with the appropriate boundary conditions for a superconductor. A discretized version of this equation is then compared with known analytic solutions for simple superconducting surface geometries.

  8. Vortex loops entry into type-II superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Samokhvalov, A V

    1996-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution, the magnetic flux, and the free energy of an Abrikosov vortex loop near a flat surface of type--II superconductors are calculated in the London approximation. The shape of such a vortex line is a semicircle of arbitrary radius. The interaction of the vortex half--ring and an external homogeneous magnetic field applied along the surface is studied. The magnitude of the energy barrier against the vortex expansion into superconductor is found. The possibilities of formation of an equilibrium vortex line determined by the structure of the applied magnetic field by creating the expanding vortex loops near the surface of type--II superconductor are discussed.

  9. Fabrication of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Ma, Beihai; Li, Meiya

    2003-06-17

    A method of forming a biaxially aligned superconductor on a non-biaxially aligned substrate substantially chemically inert to the biaxially aligned superconductor comprising is disclosed. A non-biaxially aligned substrate chemically inert to the superconductor is provided and a biaxially aligned superconductor material is deposited directly on the non-biaxially aligned substrate. A method forming a plume of superconductor material and contacting the plume and the non-biaxially aligned substrate at an angle greater than 0.degree. and less than 90.degree. to deposit a biaxially aligned superconductor on the non-biaxially aligned substrate is also disclosed. Various superconductors and substrates are illustrated.

  10. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction from multistatic SAR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigling, Brian D; Moses, Randolph L

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses reconstruction of three-dimensional surfaces from multiple bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Techniques for surface reconstruction from multiple monostatic SAR images already exist, including interferometric processing and stereo SAR. We generalize these methods to obtain algorithms for bistatic interferometric SAR and bistatic stereo SAR. We also propose a framework for predicting the performance of our multistatic stereo SAR algorithm, and, from this framework, we suggest a metric for use in planning strategic deployment of multistatic assets.

  11. Coherence and aberration effects in surface plasmon polariton imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Berthel, Martin; Jiang, Quanbo; Chartrand, Camille; Bellessa, Joel; Huant, Serge; Genet, Cyriaque; Drezet, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally coherent imaging of surface plasmon polaritons using either leakage radiation microscopy through a thin metal film or interference microscopy through a thick metal film. Using a rigorous modal formalism based on scalar Whittaker potentials we develop a systematic analytical and vectorial method adapted to the analysis of coherent imaging involving surface plasmon polaritons. The study includes geometrical aberrations due index mismatch which played an...

  12. Smooth embeddings with Stein surface images

    CERN Document Server

    Gompf, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    A simple characterization is given of open subsets of a complex surface that smoothly perturb to Stein open subsets. As applications, complex 2-space C^2 contains domains of holomorphy (Stein open subsets) that are exotic R^4's, and others homotopy equivalent to the 2-sphere but cut out by smooth, compact 3-manifolds. Pseudoconvex embeddings of Brieskorn spheres and other 3-manifolds into complex surfaces are constructed, as are pseudoconcave holomorphic fillings (with disagreeing contact and boundary orientations). Pseudoconcave complex structures on Milnor fibers are found. A byproduct of this construction is a simple polynomial expression for the signature of the (p,q,npq-1) Milnor fiber. Akbulut corks in complex surfaces can always be chosen to be pseudoconvex or pseudoconcave submanifods. The main theorem is expressed via Stein handlebodies (possibly infinite), which are defined holomorphically in all dimensions by extending Stein theory to manifolds with noncompact boundary.

  13. Using parabolic mirrors for complete imaging of apple surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Automated imaging systems offer the potential to inspect the quality and safety of fruits consumed by the public. One problem that has hindered adoption of automated technologies has been the inability to image 100% of the surface of an individual fruit. A particular problem is that both the stem a...

  14. Fermi surface topology and the upper critical field in two-band superconductors: application to MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, T; Schopohl, N

    2003-07-04

    Recent measurements of the anisotropy of the upper critical field B(c2) on MgB2 single crystals have shown a puzzling strong temperature dependence. Here, we present a calculation of the upper critical field based on a detailed modeling of band structure calculations that takes into account both the unusual Fermi surface topology and the two gap nature of the superconducting order parameter. Our results show that the strong temperature dependence of the B(c2) anisotropy can be understood as an interplay of the dominating gap on the sigma band, which possesses a small c-axis component of the Fermi velocity, with the induced superconductivity on the pi-band possessing a large c-axis component of the Fermi velocity. We provide analytic formulas for the anisotropy ratio at T=0 and T=T(c) and quantitatively predict the distortion of the vortex lattice based on our calculations.

  15. Single-molecule imaging of protein adsorption mechanisms to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareh, Shannon Kian; Wang, Yan Mei

    2011-07-01

    Protein-surface interactions cause the desirable effect of controlled protein adsorption onto biodevices as well as the undesirable effect of protein fouling. The key to controlling protein-surface adsorptions is to identify and quantify the main adsorption mechanisms: adsorptions that occur (1) while depositing a protein solution onto dry surfaces and (2) after the deposition onto wet surfaces. Bulk measurements cannot reveal the dynamic protein adsorption pathways and thus cannot differentiate between the two adsorption mechanisms. We imaged the interactions of single streptavidin molecules with hydrophobic fused-silica surfaces in real-time. We observed both adsorbed proteins on surfaces and diffusing proteins near surfaces and analyzed their adsorption kinetics. Our analysis shows that the protein solution deposition process is the primary mechanism of streptavidin adsorption onto surfaces at the subnanomolar to nanomolar protein concentrations. Furthermore, we found that hydrophilic fused-silica surfaces can prevent the adsorption of streptavidin molecules. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Coherence and aberration effects in surface plasmon polariton imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berthel, Martin; Chartrand, Camille; Bellessa, Joel; Huant, Serge; Genet, Cyriaque; Drezet, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally coherent imaging of surface plasmon polaritons using either leakage radiation microscopy through a thin metal film or interference microscopy through a thick metal film. Using a rigorous modal formalism based on scalar Whittaker potentials we develop a systematic analytical and vectorial method adapted to the analysis of coherent imaging involving surface plasmon polaritons. The study includes geometrical aberrations due index mismatch which played an important role in the interpretation of recent experiments using leakage radiation microscopy. We compare our theory with experiments using classical or quantum near-field scanning optical microscopy probes and show that the approach leads to a full interpretation of the recorded optical images.

  17. Coherence and aberration effects in surface plasmon polariton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthel, Martin; Jiang, Quanbo; Chartrand, Camille; Bellessa, Joel; Huant, Serge; Genet, Cyriaque; Drezet, Aurélien

    2015-09-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally coherent imaging of surface plasmon polaritons using either leakage radiation microscopy through a thin metal film or interference microscopy through a thick metal film. Using a rigorous modal formalism based on scalar Whittaker potentials, we develop a systematic analytical and vectorial method adapted to the analysis of coherent imaging involving surface plasmon polaritons. The study includes geometrical aberrations due index mismatch which played an important role in the interpretation of recent experiments using leakage radiation microscopy. We compare our theory with experiments using classical or quantum near-field scanning optical microscopy probes and show that the approach leads to a full interpretation of the recorded optical images.

  18. Near-field thermal imaging of nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, A.; Wischnath, U. F.; Welker, J.; Huth, O.; Rüting, F.; Biehs, S.-A.

    2008-11-01

    We show that a near-field scanning thermal microscope, which essentially detects the local density of states of the thermally excited electromagnetic modes at nanometer distances from some material, can be employed for nanoscale imaging of structures on that material's surface. This finding is explained theoretically by an approach which treats the surface structure perturbatively.

  19. Top surface morphologies of melt growth processed Y{sub 1.5}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−y} bulk superconductors with corner or edge seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.-J., E-mail: cjkim2@kaeri.re.kr [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-Daero 1045, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, S.A. [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-Daero 1045, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H.-W. [College of Energy, Material and Chemical Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, 1600 Chungjeol-ro, Chunan, Chungnam 330-708 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, B.-H.; Park, S.-D. [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-Daero 1045, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Corner or edge seeding modifies top surface morphologies of YBCO superconductors. •Numbers and a shape of facet lines on top surfaces depend on seeding technique. •Facet lines are straight but often have a curvature. •Unreacted regions form on top surfaces owing to a low growth rate of a 〈1 0 0〉 direction. •Magnetic flux density and levitation forces are dependent on top surface morphology. -- Abstract: A corner or edge seeding was attempted to control top surface morphologies (facet lines) of top-seeded melt growth (TSMG) processed Y{sub 1.5}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−y} (Y1.5) bulk superconductors. The orientation and numbers of facet lines were successfully modified using the corner/edge seeding with adjusted seed orientations. Most of the facet lines developed on the top surfaces were nearly straight, whereas some of them often had curvatures when the facet lines met the edges with high angles. The size of the growth area of Y123 on the top surfaces was dependent not only on the seeding method but also on the seed orientation. The unreacted regions were often observed on the local parts of the top surfaces, which are attributed to the difference in a growth rate among growth planes. The top surface with the corner seeding where the 〈1 1 0〉 growth direction is parallel to the diagonal of the Y123 compact showed the highest magnetic flux density and magnetic levitation forces owing to the largest growth area of Y123.

  20. Superconductor terahertz metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Cao, Wei; Xing, Qirong; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We characterize the behaviour of split ring resonators made up of high-transition temperature YBCO superconductor using terahertz time domain spectroscopy. The superconductor metamaterial shows sharp change in the transmission spectrum at the fundamental inductive-capacitive resonance and the dipole resonance as the temperature dips below the transition temperature. Our results reveal that the high performance of such a metamaterial is limited by material imperfections and defects such as cracks, voids and secondary phases which play dominant role in partially impeding the flow of current causing dissipation of energy and electrical resistance to appear in the superconductor film.

  1. Challenges in imaging cell surface receptor clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medda, Rebecca; Giske, Arnold; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy offers unique tools for visualizing and resolving cellular structures at the molecular level. STED microscopy is a purely optical method where neither complex sample preparation nor mathematical post-processing is required. Here we present the use of STED microscopy for imaging receptor cluster composition. We use two-color STED to further determine the distribution of two different receptor subunits of the family of receptor serine/threonine kinases in the presence or absence of their ligands. The implications of receptor clustering on the downstream signaling are discussed, and future challenges are also presented.

  2. Development of superconductor bulk for superconductor bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Current carrying capacity is one of the most important issues in the consideration of superconductor bulk materials for engineering applications. There are numerous applications of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors e.g. magnetic levitation train, flywheel energy storage system, levitation transportation, lunar telescope, centrifugal device, magnetic shielding materials, bulk magnets etc. Accordingly, to obtain YBCO materials in the form of large, single crystals without weak-link problem is necessary. A top seeded melt growth (TSMG) process was used to fabricate single crystal YBCO bulk superconductors. The seeded and infiltration growth (IG) technique was also very promising method for the synthesis of large, single-grain YBCO bulk superconductors with good superconducting properties. 5 wt.% Ag doped Y211 green compacts were sintered at 900 .deg. C {approx} 1200 .deg.C and then a single crystal YBCO was fabricated by an infiltration method. A refinement and uniform distribution of the Y211 particles in the Y123 matrix were achieved by sintering the Ag-doped samples. This enhancement of the critical current density was ascribable to a fine dispersion of the Y211 particles, a low porosity and the presence of Ag particles. In addition, we have designed and manufactured large YBCO single domain with levitation force of 10-13 kg/cm{sup 2} using TSMG processing technique.

  3. Generation and near-field imaging of Airy surface plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Minovich, Alexander; Janunts, Norik; Pertsch, Thomas; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the generation and near-field imaging of nondiffracting surface waves - plasmonic Airy beams, propagating on the surface of a gold metal film. The Airy plasmons are excited by an engineered nanoscale phase grating, and demonstrate significant beam bending over their propagation. We show that the observed Airy plasmons exhibit self-healing properties, suggesting novel applications in plasmonic circuitry and surface optical manipulation.

  4. Non-destructive photoacoustic imaging of metal surface defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Jeesu; Yun, Jong Pil; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-11-01

    The detection of metal surface defects is important in achieving the goals of product quality enhancement and manufacturing cost reduction. Identifying the defects with visual inspection is difficult, inaccurate, and time-consuming. Thus, several inspection methods using line cameras, magnetic field, and ultrasound have been proposed. However, identifying small defects on metal surfaces remains a challenge. To deal with this problem, we propose the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) as a new non-destructive imaging tool to detect metal surface defects. We successfully visualized two types of cracks (i.e., unclassified and seam cracks) in metal plate samples using PAI. In addition, we successfully extracted cracked edges from height-encoded photoacoustic maximum amplitude projection images using the Laplacian of Gaussian filtering method, and then, quantified the detected edges for a statistical analysis. We concluded that PAI can be useful in detecting metal surface defects reducing the defect rate and manufacturing cost during metal production.

  5. Surfaces in Three-Dimensional Digital Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    pipi -l n n the desired subsets.EJ Proposition 3. Let =Pl’""" ’Pn be any path of orientable surface points. There exist connected subsets B’ and C’ of...a B’ , B! isi l-±Pi ’ Pi-i Pi-i PiPi -I i a connected subset of Sn[I U N1 (pj)] if B! is a connected Si- subset of S5[i U N (pj)], and similarly for

  6. Registering multiple range images based on distance metric of surface-to-surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongbin; XIE Feng

    2005-01-01

    In most conventional algorithms of registering multiple range images, the pose parameters are estimated by using the distance sum between closest point pairs as the objective function. These algorithms have the problems of inexact point correspondence, registration accuracy, and sensitivity to initial registration parameters. Due to the scanner settings, scanner distance, and surface slopes, two or more 3D data sets are unlikely to be acquired such that the 3D data points exactly correspond, and also each point in the data set may represent different surface areas. This paper proposes a novel registration algorithm based on a distance metric of surface-to-surface. The algorithm uses triangle meshes to represent the surfaces. Based on surface sampling and the point-to-surface distances, the integration calculation of the mean distance between surfaces is derived and reduced to a simple formula. The method was tested on synthetic and real range images.

  7. Electrodynamics of Metallic Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dressel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and experimental aspects of the microwave, terahertz, and infrared properties of superconductors are discussed. Electrodynamics can provide information about the superconducting condensate as well as about the quasiparticles. The aim is to understand the frequency dependence of the complex conductivity, the change with temperature and time, and its dependence on material parameters. We confine ourselves to conventional metallic superconductors, in particular, Nb and related nitrides and review the seminal papers but also highlight latest developments and recent experimental achievements. The possibility to produce well-defined thin films of metallic superconductors that can be tuned in their properties allows the exploration of fundamental issues, such as the superconductor-insulator transition; furthermore it provides the basis for the development of novel and advanced applications, for instance, superconducting single-photon detectors.

  8. Topological superconductors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Ando, Yoichi

    2017-04-03

    This review elaborates pedagogically on the fundamental concept, basic theory, expected properties, and materials realizations of topological superconductors. The relation between topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions are explained, and the difference between dispersive Majorana fermions and a localized Majorana zero mode is emphasized. A variety of routes to topological superconductivity are explained with an emphasis on the roles of spin-orbit coupling. Present experimental situations and possible signatures of topological superconductivity are summarized with an emphasis on intrinsic topological superconductors.

  9. Layered nickel based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Filip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Tuson [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kurita, Nobuyuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimczuk, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Movshovich, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, J D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sefat, A S [ORNL; Mandrus, D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    We review the properties of Ni-based superconductors which contain Ni{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X=As, P, Bi, Si, Ge, B) planes, a common structural element to the recently discovered FeAs superconductors. We also compare the properties ofthe Ni-and Fe-based systems from a perspective ofelectronic structure as well as structure-property relations.

  10. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  11. 3D reconstruction of concave surfaces using polarisation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohaib, A.; Farooq, A. R.; Ahmed, J.; Smith, L. N.; Smith, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for improved shape recovery using polarisation-based photometric stereo. The majority of previous research using photometric stereo involves 3D reconstruction using both the diffuse and specular components of light; however, this paper suggests the use of the specular component only as it is the only form of light that comes directly off the surface without subsurface scattering or interreflections. Experiments were carried out on both real and synthetic surfaces. Real images were obtained using a polarisation-based photometric stereo device while synthetic images were generated using PovRay® software. The results clearly demonstrate that the proposed method can extract three-dimensional (3D) surface information effectively even for concave surfaces with complex texture and surface reflectance.

  12. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green\\'s functions along the surface instead of simulated Green\\'s functions. The key assumptions are that the scattering bodies are within the depth interrogated by the surface waves, and the Green\\'s functions are recorded with dense receiver sampling along the free surface. This natural migration takes into account all orders of multiples, mode conversions and non-linear effects of surface waves in the data. The natural imaging formulae are derived for both active source and ambient-noise data, and computer simulations show that natural migration can effectively image near-surface heterogeneities with typical ambient-noise sources and geophone distributions.

  13. Surface quality studies of high T$_{c}$ superconductors of the Hg , Tl and Hg$_{x}$Tl$_{1-x}$-families RBS and resonant C and O backscattering studies

    CERN Document Server

    Vantomme, A; Correia, J G; Bryntse, I; Johansson, L G; Loureiro, S M; Le Floc'h, S; Toulemonde, T; Bordet, P; Bougerol-Chaillout, C

    2002-01-01

    The composition, crystallinity, uniformity, purity, and thermal stability of cuprate superconductors have been studied by Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry, and 3.045 MeV He$^{+}$ oxygen non-Rutherford resonant scattering. Further experiments have been performed with 1.75 MeV H$^{+}$carbon non-Rutherford resonant scattering. Three sets of samples were studied : HgBa$_{2}$CuO$_{(4+\\delta)}$ (Hg1201), Hg$_{x}$T1$_{1-x}$Ba$_{2}$Ca$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{(2n+\\delta)}$ (Hg,T1-1223) and T1$_{1.85}$Ba$_{2}$CuO$_{6}$/LaA10$_{3}$ (T1-2201), either in bulk or as an epitaxial thin film. It was observed that the superconductors exhibit a metal deficiency near the surface, which is largely compensated by excess oxygen. Moreover, the samples are significantly contaminated with carbon within the probing region of the H$^+$ beam. The thermal stability and surface degradation were studied in both oxidizing ambient and vacuum. As a general trend, the heavy metal deficiency — and consequently the compensating o...

  14. Three-dimensional surface imaging system for assessing human obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bugao; Yu, Wurong; Yao, Ming; Pepper, M. Reese; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H.

    2009-10-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity suggests a need to develop a convenient, reliable, and economical tool for assessment of this condition. Three-dimensional (3-D) body surface imaging has emerged as an exciting technology for the estimation of body composition. We present a new 3-D body imaging system, which is designed for enhanced portability, affordability, and functionality. In this system, stereo vision technology is used to satisfy the requirement for a simple hardware setup and fast image acquisition. The portability of the system is created via a two-stand configuration, and the accuracy of body volume measurements is improved by customizing stereo matching and surface reconstruction algorithms that target specific problems in 3-D body imaging. Body measurement functions dedicated to body composition assessment also are developed. The overall performance of the system is evaluated in human subjects by comparison to other conventional anthropometric methods, as well as air displacement plethysmography, for body fat assessment.

  15. A 3D surface imaging system for assessing human obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B.; Yu, W.; Yao, M.; Yao, X.; Li, Q.; Pepper, M. R.; Freeland-Graves, J. H.

    2009-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity suggests a need to develop a convenient, reliable and economical tool for assessment of this condition. Three-dimensional (3D) body surface imaging has emerged as an exciting technology for estimation of body composition. This paper presents a new 3D body imaging system, which was designed for enhanced portability, affordability, and functionality. In this system, stereo vision technology was used to satisfy the requirements for a simple hardware setup and fast image acquisitions. The portability of the system was created via a two-stand configuration, and the accuracy of body volume measurements was improved by customizing stereo matching and surface reconstruction algorithms that target specific problems in 3D body imaging. Body measurement functions dedicated to body composition assessment also were developed. The overall performance of the system was evaluated in human subjects by comparison to other conventional anthropometric methods, as well as air displacement plethysmography, for body fat assessment.

  16. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and dev

  17. Surface plasmon resonance imaging for parallelized detection of protein biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliarik, Marek; Párová, Lucie; Vaisocherová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    2009-05-01

    We report a novel high-throughput surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for rapid and parallelized detection of protein biomarkers. The biosensor is based on a high-performance SPR imaging sensor with polarization contrast and internal referencing which yields a considerably higher sensitivity and resolution than conventional SPR imaging systems (refractive index resolution 2 × 10-7 RIU). We combined the SPR imaging biosensor with microspotting to create an array of antibodies. DNA-directed protein immobilization was utilized for the spatially resolved attachment of antibodies. Using Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) as model protein biomarker, we demonstrated the potential for simultaneous detection of proteins in up to 100 channels.

  18. Coastal Digital Surface Model on Low Contrast Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, A.-M.; Assenbaum, M.; De la Torre, Y.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2015-08-01

    Coastal sandy environments are extremely dynamic and require regular monitoring that can easily be achieved by using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) including a drone and a photo camera. The acquired images have low contrast and homogeneous texture. Using these images and with very few, if any, ground control points (GCPs), it is difficult to obtain a digital surface model (DSM) by classical correlation and automatic interest points determination approach. A possible response to this problem is to work with enhanced, contrast filtered images. To achieve this, we use and tune the free open-source software MicMac.

  19. Sub-diffraction Imaging via Surface Plasmon Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-08

    lithography to microscopy . The difficulty to improve the resolution beyond the diffraction limit stems from the inability of conventional optics to access... super - resolution has been demonstrated by utilizing conformal multi-layer structures with hyperbolic dispersion[6-9]. These structures, however, are...Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Imaging Systems, Optics at Surface, Surface Plasmons REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10

  20. Stability of magnetic tip/superconductor levitation systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. K. Alqadi

    2015-01-01

    The vertical stability of a magnetic tip over a superconducting material is investigated by using the critical state and the frozen image models. The analytical expressions of the stiffness and the vibration frequency about the equilibrium position are derived in term of the geometrical parameters of the magnet/superconductor system. It is found that the stability of the system depends on the shape of the superconductor as well as its thickness.

  1. Method to improve superconductor cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, A.R.

    1984-03-08

    A method is disclosed of making a stranded superconductor cable having improved flexing and bending characteristics. In such method, a plurality of superconductor strands are helically wound around a cylindrical portion of a mandrel which tapers along a transitional portion to a flat end portion. The helically wound strands form a multistrand hollow cable which is partially flattened by pressure rollers as the cable travels along the transitional portion. The partially flattened cable is impacted with repeated hammer blows as the hollow cable travels along the flat end portion. The hammer blows flatten both the internal and the external surfaces of the strands. The cable is fully flattened and compacted by two sets of pressure rollers which engage the flat sides and the edges of the cable after it has traveled away from the flat end portion of the mandrel. The flattened internal surfaces slide easily over one another when the cable is flexed or bent so that there is very little possibility that the cable will be damaged by the necessary flexing and bending required to wind the cable into magnet coils.

  2. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  3. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Oshiumi, Taro; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Kazushi; Wu, Xiaoyang; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Mihara, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA) combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA) with a surface acoustic wave (SAW). SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs). The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs) of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  4. A Novel Algorithm of Surface Eliminating in Undersurface Optoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhulina Yulia V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the task of optoacoustic imaging of the objects located under the surface covering them. In this paper, we suggest the algorithm of the surface eliminating based on the fact that the intensity of the image as a function of the spatial point should change slowly inside the local objects, and will suffer a discontinuity of the spatial gradients on their boundaries. The algorithm forms the 2-dimensional curves along which the discontinuity of the signal derivatives is detected. Then, the algorithm divides the signal space into the areas along these curves. The signals inside the areas with the maximum level of the signal amplitudes and the maximal gradient absolute values on their edges are put equal to zero. The rest of the signals are used for the image restoration. This method permits to reconstruct the picture of the surface boundaries with a higher contrast than that of the surface detection technique based on the maximums of the received signals. This algorithm does not require any prior knowledge of the signals' statistics inside and outside the local objects. It may be used for reconstructing any images with the help of the signals representing the integral over the object's volume. Simulation and real data are also provided to validate the proposed method.

  5. Surface Reconstruction and Image Enhancement via $L^1$-Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Dobrev, Veselin

    2010-01-01

    A surface reconstruction technique based on minimization of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Convergence of the method is established, and an interior-point algorithm solving the associated linear programming problem is introduced. The reconstruction algorithm is illustrated on various test cases including natural and urban terrain data, and enhancement oflow-resolution or aliased images. Copyright © by SIAM.

  6. FIBER ORIENTATION DISTRIBUTION OF PAPER SURFACE CALCULATED BY IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshiharu Enomae; Yoon-Hee Han; Akira Isogai

    2004-01-01

    Anisotropy of paper is an important parameter of paper structure. Image analysis technique was improved for accurate fiber orientation in paper surfaces. Image analysis using Fast Fourier Transform was demonstrated to be an effective means to determine fiber orientation angle and its intensity. Binarization process of micrograph images of paper surface and precise calculation for average Fourier coefficients as an angular distribution by interpolation developed were found to improve the accuracy. This analysis method was applied to digital optical micrographs and scanning electron micrographs of paper. A laboratory handsheet showed a large deviation in the average value of fiber orientation angle, but some kinds of machine-made paper showed about 90 degrees in the orientation angle with very small deviations as expected. Korea and Japanese paper made in the traditional ways showed its own characteristic depending on its hand making processes.

  7. Investigation of synthetic aperture methods in ultrasound surface imaging using elementary surface types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, W; Pierce, S G; Rowe, P

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging methods have been employed widely in recent research in non-destructive testing (NDT), but uptake has been more limited in medical ultrasound imaging. Typically offering superior focussing power over more traditional phased array methods, these techniques have been employed in NDT applications to locate and characterise small defects within large samples, but have rarely been used to image surfaces. A desire to ultimately employ ultrasonic surface imaging for bone surface geometry measurement prior to surgical intervention motivates this research, and results are presented for initial laboratory trials of a surface reconstruction technique based on global thresholding of ultrasonic 3D point cloud data. In this study, representative geometry artefacts were imaged in the laboratory using two synthetic aperture techniques; the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) employing full and narrow synthetic apertures, respectively. Three high precision metallic samples of known geometries (cuboid, sphere and cylinder) which featured a range of elementary surface primitives were imaged using a 5MHz, 128 element 1D phased array employing both SAFT and TFM approaches. The array was manipulated around the samples using a precision robotic positioning system, allowing for repeatable ultrasound derived 3D surface point clouds to be created. A global thresholding technique was then developed that allowed the extraction of the surface profiles, and these were compared with the known geometry samples to provide a quantitative measure of error of 3D surface reconstruction. The mean errors achieved with optimised SAFT imaging for the cuboidal, spherical and cylindrical samples were 1.3mm, 2.9mm and 2.0mm respectively, while those for TFM imaging were 3.7mm, 3.0mm and 3.1mm, respectively. These results were contrary to expectations given the higher information content associated with the TFM images. However, it was

  8. Factors affecting characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    Three major factors affect the characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors in terms of their levitation properties during interaction with permanent magnets. First, the appropriate parameter for the permanent magnet is internal magnetization, not the value of the magnetic field measured at the magnet`s surface. Second, although levitation force grows with superconductor thickness and surface area, for a given permanent magnet size, comparison of levitation force between samples is meaningful when minimum values are assigned to the superconductor size parameters. Finally, the effect of force creep must be considered when time-averaging the force measurements. In addition to levitational force, the coefficient of friction of a levitated rotating permanent magnet may be used to characterize the superconductor.

  9. Velocity Map Imaging the Scattering Plane of Gas Surface Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, David J; Leng, Joseph G; Greaves, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D sacattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was demonstrated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the systems capabilities the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a PTFE surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  10. Lightning in superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestgården, J I; Shantsev, D V; Galperin, Y M; Johansen, T H

    2012-01-01

    Crucially important for application of type-II superconductor films is the stability of the vortex matter--magnetic flux lines penetrating the material. If some vortices get detached from pinning centres, the energy dissipated by their motion will facilitate further depinning, and may trigger a massive electromagnetic breakdown. Up to now, the time-resolved behaviour of these ultra-fast events was essentially unknown. We report numerical simulation results revealing the detailed dynamics during breakdown as within nanoseconds it develops branching structures in the electromagnetic fields and temperature, with striking resemblance of atmospheric lightning. During a dendritic avalanche the superconductor is locally heated above its critical temperature, while electrical fields rise to several kV/m as the front propagates at instant speeds near up to 100 km/s. The numerical approach provides an efficient framework for understanding the ultra-fast coupled non-local dynamics of electromagnetic fields and dissipation in superconductor films.

  11. Recovering Epipolar Geometry from Images of Smooth Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    We present four methods for recovering the epipolar geometry from images of smooth surfaces. Existing methods for recovering epipolar geometry use corresponding feature points that cannot be found in such images. The first method is based on finding corresponding characteristic points created by illumination (ICPM - illumination characteristic points method). The second method is based on correspondent tangency points created by tangents from epipoles to outline of smooth bodies (OTPM - outline tangent points method). These two methods are exact and give correct results for real images, because positions of the corresponding illumination characteristic points and corresponding outline are known with small errors. But the second method is limited either to special type of scenes or to restricted camera motion. We also consider two else methods, termed CCPM (curve characteristic points method) and CTPM (curve tangent points method), for search epipolar geometry for images of smooth bodies based on a set of leve...

  12. Magnetic irreversibility in granular superconductors: ac susceptibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F.; Obradors, X.; Fontcuberta, J. (ICMAB, CSIC, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)); Vallet, M.; Gonzalez-Calbet, J. (Lab. Magnetismo Aplicado, RENFE-U.C. Madrid, Las Matas (Spain))

    1991-12-01

    Ac susceptibility measurements of a ceramic weak-coupled superconductor in very low ac fields (2mG, 111Hz) are reported. We present evidence for the observation of the magnetic irreversibility following a ZFC-FC thermal cycling by means of ac susceptibilty measurements. It is shown that this technique also reflect local magnetic field effects in granular superconductors, as previously suggested in microwave surface resistance and I-V characteristics. (orig.).

  13. Experimental demonstration of vortex pancake in high temperature superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-xian; ZHANG Yu-heng

    2006-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the existence of the vortex pancake in high temperature superconductor experimentally,a configuration in which the current and voltage electrodes lies separately on the top and bottom surface is used.The E-j relation obtained with this electrodes spatial configuration is different from the expected E-j behavior of the stiff vortex line model.Thus,the current results support the existence of the vortex pancake in high temperature superconductor.

  14. Bi-based superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S E Mousavi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   In this paper, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BCSCCO system superconductor is made by the solid state reaction method. The effect of doping Pb, Cd, Sb, Cu and annealing time on the critical temperature and critical current density have been investigated. The microstructure and morphology of the samples have been studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray. The results show that the fraction of Bi-2223 phase in the Bi- based superconductor, critical temperature and critical current density depend on the annealing temperature, annealing time and the kind and amount of doping .

  15. Physical Vacuum in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2009-01-01

    Although experiments carried out by Jain et al. showed that the Cooper pairs obey the strong equivalence principle, The measurement of the Cooper pairs inertial mass by Tate et al. revealed an anomalous excess of mass. In the present paper we interpret these experimental results in the framework of an electromagnetic model of dark energy for the superconductors' vacuum. We argue that this physical vacuum is associated with a preferred frame. Ultimately from the conservation of energy for Cooper pairs we derive a model for a variable vacuum speed of light in the superconductors physical vacuum in relation with a possible breaking of the weak equivalence principle for Cooper pairs.

  16. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2016-09-06

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green\\'s functions computed from the shot gathers. Migrating shot gathers recorded by 2D and 3D land surveys validates the effectiveness of detecting nearsurface heterogeneities by natural migration. The implication is that more accurate hazard maps can be created by migrating surface waves in land surveys.

  17. High resolution surface plasmon microscopy for cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoul, F.; Monier, K.; Roland, T.; Elezgaray, J.; Berguiga, L.

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a new non-labeling high resolution microscopy method for cellular imaging. This method called SSPM (Scanning Surface Plasmon Microscopy) pushes down the resolution limit of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) to sub-micronic scales. High resolution SPRi is obtained by the surface plasmon lauching with a high numerical aperture objective lens. The advantages of SPPM compared to other high resolution SPRi's rely on three aspects; (i) the interferometric detection of the back reflected light after plasmon excitation, (ii) the twodimensional scanning of the sample for image reconstruction, (iii) the radial polarization of light, enhancing both resolution and sensitivity. This microscope can afford a lateral resolution of - 150 nm in liquid environment and - 200 nm in air. We present in this paper images of IMR90 fibroblasts obtained with SSPM in dried environment. Internal compartments such as nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, cellular and nuclear membrane can be recognized without labelling. We propose an interpretation of the ability of SSPM to reveal high index contrast zones by a local decomposition of the V (Z) function describing the response of the SSPM.

  18. Ultra Low Surface Brightness Imaging with the Dragonfly Telephoto Array

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Roberto G

    2014-01-01

    We describe the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, a robotic imaging system optimized for the detection of extended ultra low surface brightness structures. The array consists of eight Canon 400mm f/2.8 telephoto lenses coupled to eight science-grade commercial CCD cameras. The lenses are mounted on a common framework and are co-aligned to image simultaneously the same position on the sky. The system provides an imaging capability equivalent to a 0.4m aperture f/1.0 refractor with a 2.6 deg X 1.9 deg field of view. The system has no obstructions in the light path, optimized baffling, and internal optical surfaces coated with a new generation of anti-reflection coatings based on sub-wavelength nanostructures. As a result, the array's point spread function has a factor of ~10 less scattered light at large radii than well-baffled reflecting telescopes. The Dragonfly Telephoto Array is capable of imaging extended structures to surface brightness levels below 30 mag/arcsec^2 in 10h integrations (without binning or foregro...

  19. Electronic transport in unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    The author investigates the electron transport coefficients in unconventional superconductors at low temperatures, where charge and heat transport are dominated by electron scattering from random lattice defects. He discusses the features of the pairing symmetry, Fermi surface, and excitation spectrum which are reflected in the low temperature heat transport. For temperatures {kappa}{sub B}T {approx_lt} {gamma} {much_lt} {Delta}{sub 0}, where {gamma} is the bandwidth of impurity induced Andreev states, certain eigenvalues become universal, i.e., independent of the impurity concentration and phase shift. Deep in the superconducting phase ({kappa}{sub B}T {approx_lt} {gamma}) the Wiedemann-Franz law, with Sommerfeld`s value of the Lorenz number, is recovered. He compares the results for theoretical models of unconventional superconductivity in high-{Tc} and heavy fermion superconductors with experiment. The findings show that impurities are a sensitive probe of the low-energy excitation spectrum, and that the zero-temperature limit of the transport coefficients provides an important test of the order parameter symmetry.

  20. Path planning on satellite images for unmanned surface vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe-Ming Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of autonomous surface vehicles has been a field of increasing research interest. There are two major areas in this field: control theory and path planning. This study focuses on path planning, and two objectives are discussed: path planning for Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs and implementation of path planning in a real map. In this paper, satellite thermal images are converted into binary images which are used as the maps for the Finite Angle A * algorithm (FAA *, an advanced A * algorithm that is used to determine safer and suboptimal paths for USVs. To plan a collision-free path, the algorithm proposed in this article considers the dimensions of surface vehicles. Furthermore, the turning ability of a surface vehicle is also considered, and a constraint condition is introduced to improve the quality of the path planning algorithm, which makes the traveled path smoother. This study also shows a path planning experiment performed on a real satellite thermal image, and the path planning results can be used by an USV

  1. Surface imaging of metallic material fractures using optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutiu, Gheorghe; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Demian, Dorin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-09-10

    We demonstrate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform topography of metallic surfaces after being subjected to ductile or brittle fracturing. Two steel samples, OL 37 and OL 52, and an antifriction Sn-Sb-Cu alloy were analyzed. Using an in-house-built swept source OCT system, height profiles were generated for the surfaces of the two samples. Based on such profiles, it can be concluded that the first two samples were subjected to ductile fracture, while the third one was subjected to brittle fracture. The OCT potential for assessing the surface state of materials after fracture was evaluated by comparing OCT images with images generated using an established method for such investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis of cause of fracture is essential in response to damage of machinery parts during various accidents. Currently the analysis is performed using SEM, on samples removed from the metallic parts, while OCT would allow in situ imaging using mobile units. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the OCT capability to replace SEM has been demonstrated. SEM is a more costly and time-consuming method to use in the investigation of surfaces of microstructures of metallic materials.

  2. Quantitative surface evaluation by matching experimental and simulated ronchigram images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantún Montiel, Juana Rosaura; Cordero Dávila, Alberto; González García, Jorge

    2011-09-01

    To estimate qualitatively the surface errors with Ronchi test, the experimental and simulated ronchigrams are compared. Recently surface errors have been obtained quantitatively matching the intersection point coordinates of ronchigrama fringes with x-axis . In this case, gaussian fit must be done for each fringe, and interference orders are used in Malacara algorithm for the simulations. In order to evaluate surface errors, we added an error function in simulations, described with cubic splines, to the sagitta function of the ideal surface. We used the vectorial transversal aberration formula and a ruling with cosinusoidal transmittance, because these rulings reproduce better experimental ronchigram fringe profiles. Several error functions are tried until the whole experimental ronchigrama image is reproduced. The optimization process was done using genetic algorithms.

  3. Microscopic Image of Martian Surface Material on a Silicone Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger version of Figure 1 This image taken by the Optical Microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows soil sprinkled from the lander's Robot Arm scoop onto a silicone substrate. The substrate was then rotated in front of the microscope. This is the first sample collected and delivered for instrumental analysis onboard a planetary lander since NASA's Viking Mars missions of the 1970s. It is also the highest resolution image yet seen of Martian soil. The image is dominated by fine particles close to the resolution of the microscope. These particles have formed clumps, which may be a smaller scale version of what has been observed by Phoenix during digging of the surface material. The microscope took this image during Phoenix's Sol 17 (June 11), or the 17th Martian day after landing. The scale bar is 1 millimeter (0.04 inch). Zooming in on the Martian Soil In figure 1, three zoomed-in portions are shown with an image of Martian soil particles taken by the Optical Microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The left zoom box shows a composite particle. The top of the particle has a green tinge, possibly indicating olivine. The bottom of the particle has been reimaged at a different focus position in black and white (middle zoom box), showing that this is a clump of finer particles. The right zoom box shows a rounded, glassy particle, similar to those which have also been seen in an earlier sample of airfall dust collected on a surface exposed during landing. The shadows at the bottom of image are of the beams of the Atomic Force Microscope. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Spray-Deposited Superconductor/Polymer Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Tran, Sang Q.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1993-01-01

    Coatings that exhibit the Meissner effect formed at relatively low temperature. High-temperature-superconductor/polymer coatings that exhibit Meissner effect deposited onto components in variety of shapes and materials. Simple, readily available equipment needed in coating process, mean coatings produced economically. Coatings used to keep magnetic fields away from electronic circuits in such cryogenic applications as magnetic resonance imaging and detection of infrared, and in magnetic suspensions to provide levitation and/or damping of vibrations.

  5. Surface Functionalization for Enhanced Fluorescence Detection, Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging and Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fasoli, Jennifer Betsy

    2015-01-01

    This work presents several high throughput imaging and analysis techniques performed by fluorescence detection and surface plasmon resonance biosensing. The microarray fabrication methods introduced in this thesis, as well as the DNA functionalization on planar and nanoparticle surfaces, enable and facilitate the real-time study of adsorption events via DNA- DNA hybridization and protein-DNA interaction. Silica deposited on polyolefin film serves as the base for the development of DNA mic...

  6. Manufacturing of Superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Bay, Niels

    Superconducting tapes based on the ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTS) is a new promising product for high current applications such as electro-magnets and current transmission cables. The tapes are made by the oxide powder in tube (OPIT) method implying drawing and rolling of silver tu...

  7. Calibration of Surface Plasmon Resonance Imager for Biochemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ktari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Surface Plasmon Resonance imager (SPRi based on immobilized T4-phage for bacteria detection. First, we present the sensitivity of the SPR imager towards refractive index variation for biosensor application. The SPR imager can be calibrated versus different percentage of triethylene glycol mixture in ultrapure water. The system can be used as a refractometer with sensitivity below 5×10−5 in the range of 1.33300–1.34360. Second, bacteriophage (T4-phage can be physisorbed on gold microarray spots for bacteria detection. The kinetic physisorption of different concentrations of T4-phages can be observed in real time. Finally, two types of bacteria such as E. coli (gram negative and Lactobacillus (gram positive were used for positive and negative tests. The results show a selectivity of T4-phage toward E. coli with a detection limit below 104 CFU/mL and with good reproducibility.

  8. Anterior Segment Imaging in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally S. Ong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in anterior segment imaging have transformed the way ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is diagnosed and monitored. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM has been reported to be useful primarily in the assessment of intraocular invasion and metastasis. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM shows enlarged and irregular nuclei with hyperreflective cells in OSSN lesions and this has been found to correlate with histopathology findings. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT demonstrates thickened hyperreflective epithelium with an abrupt transition between abnormal and normal epithelium in OSSN lesions and this has also been shown to mimic histopathology findings. Although there are limitations to each of these imaging modalities, they can be useful adjunctive tools in the diagnosis of OSSN and could greatly assist the clinician in the management of OSSN patients. Nevertheless, anterior segment imaging has not replaced histopathology’s role as the gold standard in confirming diagnosis.

  9. Surface characterization and antifouling properties of nanostructured gold chips for imaging surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, S.; Pellacani, P.; Beek, van T.A.; Zuilhof, H.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) optical sensing is a label-free technique for real-time monitoring of biomolecular interactions. Recently, a portable imaging SPR (iSPR) prototype instrument, featuring a nanostructured gold chip, has been developed. In the present work, we investigated the crucial

  10. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans

    2014-01-01

    Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide...... and excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging...

  11. Mapping cardiac surface mechanics with structured light imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughner, Jacob I; Zhang, Song; Li, Hao; Shao, Connie C; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-09-15

    Cardiovascular disease often manifests as a combination of pathological electrical and structural heart remodeling. The relationship between mechanics and electrophysiology is crucial to our understanding of mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the treatment of cardiac disease. While several technologies exist for describing whole heart electrophysiology, studies of cardiac mechanics are often limited to rhythmic patterns or small sections of tissue. Here, we present a comprehensive system based on ultrafast three-dimensional (3-D) structured light imaging to map surface dynamics of whole heart cardiac motion. Additionally, we introduce a novel nonrigid motion-tracking algorithm based on an isometry-maximizing optimization framework that forms correspondences between consecutive 3-D frames without the use of any fiducial markers. By combining our 3-D imaging system with nonrigid surface registration, we are able to measure cardiac surface mechanics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In conclusion, we demonstrate accurate cardiac deformation at over 200,000 surface points of a rabbit heart recorded at 200 frames/s and validate our results on highly contrasting heart motions during normal sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation.

  12. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in “digital” diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM’s development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity.

  13. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  14. Hyperspectral imaging system for whole corn ear surface inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Hruska, Zuzana; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2013-05-01

    Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus (A.flavus) and Aspergillus parasitiucus fungi that grow naturally in corn. Very serious health problems such as liver damage and lung cancer can result from exposure to high toxin levels in grain. Consequently, many countries have established strict guidelines for permissible levels in consumables. Conventional chemical-based analytical methods used to screen for aflatoxin such as thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are time consuming, expensive, and require the destruction of samples as well as proper training for data interpretation. Thus, it has been a continuing effort within the research community to find a way to rapidly and non-destructively detect and possibly quantify aflatoxin contamination in corn. One of the more recent developments in this area is the use of spectral technology. Specifically, fluorescence hyperspectral imaging offers a potential rapid, and non-invasive method for contamination detection in corn infected with toxigenic A.flavus spores. The current hyperspectral image system is designed for scanning flat surfaces, which is suitable for imaging single or a group of corn kernels. In the case of a whole corn cob, it is preferred to be able to scan the circumference of the corn ear, appropriate for whole ear inspection. This paper discusses the development of a hyperspectral imaging system for whole corn ear imaging. The new instrument is based on a hyperspectral line scanner using a rotational stage to turn the corn ear.

  15. Optimal image interpolation using local low-order surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Steven C.; Claypoole, Roger L., Jr.; Magee, Eric P.; Loomis, John S.

    2002-05-01

    Desirable features of any digital image resolution- enhancement algorithm include exact interpolation (for 'distortionless' or 'lossless' processing) adjustable resolution, adjustable smoothness, and ease of computation. A given low-order polynomial surface (linear, quadratic, cubic, etc.) optimally fit by least squares to a given local neighborhood of a pixel to be interpolated can enable all of these features. For example, if the surface is cubic, if a pixel and the 5-by-5 pixel array surrounding it are selected, and if interpolation of this pixel must yield a 4- by-4 array of sub-pixels, then the 10 coefficients that define the surface may be determined by the constrained least squares solution of 25 linear equations in 10 unknowns, where each equation sets the surface value at a pixel center equal to the pixel gray value and where the constraint is that the mean of the surface values at the sub-pixel centers equals the gray value of the interpolated pixel. Note that resolution is adjustable because the interpolating surface for each pixel may be subdivided arbitrarily, that smoothness is adjustable (within each pixel) because the polynomial order and number neighboring pixels may be selected, and that the most computationally demanding operation is solving a relatively small number of simultaneous linear equations for each pixel.

  16. Charge order in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulut, Sinan; Kampf, Arno P. [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Atkinson, Bill A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by widespread experimental evidence of charge orders in underdoped cuprate superconductors, we study a three band model of a cuprate plane. Our calculations start from a pseudogap-like normal system with a reconstructed Fermi surface, and we search for charge instabilities. From the charge susceptibilities, we identify a charge ordering instability with an ordering wavevector, q*, that matches experimental results not only with respect to the doping dependence but more importantly regarding its magnitude and direction. Namely, q* points along the Brillouin zone axes. Thus, our results clarify the discrepancy between many recent theoretical calculations and the experiments. We extend this calculation towards possible loop current instabilities and the charge ordering pattern in bilayer systems.

  17. Iron-based superconductors: A new family to find the origin of high Tc superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-xin Yao

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of iron-based superconductors in 2008 [1],a new tide of study on high Tc superconductors spreads worldwide quickly.After a few years' intensive study,many new compounds of iron-based superconductors have been found and their properties have been disclosed.The great achievement is attributed to the modern experimental techniques,fast developing numerical methods and improved theories during the study of cuprate superconductors or more generally strongly correlated electron systems.For instance,the Fermi surface,band structure and superconducting gap for a new compound could be measured quickly by modern ARPES technique [2].

  18. Ambient-pressure organic superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jack M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

  19. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2017-03-06

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  20. Introduction to Holographic Superconductor Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Li, Li-Fang; Yang, Run-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    In the last years it has been shown that some properties of strongly coupled superconductors can be potentially described by classical general relativity living in one higher dimension, which is known as holographic superconductors. This paper gives a quick and introductory overview of some holographic superconductor models with s-wave, p-wave and d-wave orders in the literature from point of view of bottom-up, and summarizes some basic properties of these holographic models in various regimes. The competition and coexistence of these superconductivity orders are also studied in these superconductor models.

  1. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  2. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  3. Full Elastic Waveform Search Engine for Near Surface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    For processing land seismic data, the near-surface problem is often very complex and may severely affect our capability to image the subsurface. The current state-of-the-art technology for near surface imaging is the early arrival waveform inversion that solves an acoustic wave-equation problem. However, fitting land seismic data with acoustic wavefield is sometimes invalid. On the other hand, performing elastic waveform inversion is very time-consuming. Similar to a web search engine, we develop a full elastic waveform search engine that includes a large database with synthetic elastic waveforms accounting for a wide range of interval velocity models in the CMP domain. With each CMP gather of real data as an entry, the search engine applies Multiple-Randomized K-Dimensional (MRKD) tree method to find approximate best matches to the entry in about a second. Interpolation of the velocity models at CMP positions creates 2D or 3D Vp, Vs, and density models for the near surface area. The method does not just return one solution; it gives a series of best matches in a solution space. Therefore, the results can help us to examine the resolution and nonuniqueness of the final solution. Further, this full waveform search method can avoid the issues of initial model and cycle skipping that the method of full waveform inversion is difficult to deal with.

  4. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  5. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  6. High-speed particle image velocimetry near surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker

    2013-06-24

    Multi-dimensional and transient flows play a key role in many areas of science, engineering, and health sciences but are often not well understood. The complex nature of these flows may be studied using particle image velocimetry (PIV), a laser-based imaging technique for optically accessible flows. Though many forms of PIV exist that extend the technique beyond the original planar two-component velocity measurement capabilities, the basic PIV system consists of a light source (laser), a camera, tracer particles, and analysis algorithms. The imaging and recording parameters, the light source, and the algorithms are adjusted to optimize the recording for the flow of interest and obtain valid velocity data. Common PIV investigations measure two-component velocities in a plane at a few frames per second. However, recent developments in instrumentation have facilitated high-frame rate (>1 kHz) measurements capable of resolving transient flows with high temporal resolution. Therefore, high-frame rate measurements have enabled investigations on the evolution of the structure and dynamics of highly transient flows. These investigations play a critical role in understanding the fundamental physics of complex flows. A detailed description for performing high-resolution, high-speed planar PIV to study a transient flow near the surface of a flat plate is presented here. Details for adjusting the parameter constraints such as image and recording properties, the laser sheet properties, and processing algorithms to adapt PIV for any flow of interest are included.

  7. Scanning Michelson interferometer for imaging surface acoustic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, J V; Tikka, P T; Salomaa, M M

    2000-05-01

    A scanning homodyne Michelson interferometer is constructed for two-dimensional imaging of high-frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) fields in SAW devices. The interferometer possesses a sensitivity of ~10(-5)nm/ radicalHz , and it is capable of directly measuring SAW's with frequencies ranging from 0.5 MHz up to 1 GHz. The fast scheme used for locating the optimum operation point of the interferometer facilitates high measuring speeds, up to 50,000 points/h. The measured field image has a lateral resolution of better than 1 mu;m . The fully optical noninvasive scanning system can be applied to SAW device development and research, providing information on acoustic wave distribution that cannot be obtained by merely electrical measurements.

  8. Microwave Spectroscopy of Superconductors with a Scanning Low Temperature Near-Field Microwave Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Atif; Anlage, Steven

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a new tool to study the microwave conductivity and other properties of superconductors: The Cryogenic scanning near-field microwave microscope integrated with STM feedback. This instrument allows localized spectroscopic measurements of these materials in a non-destructive way, at both low and high frequencies. We will discuss results that show it high spatial resolution on metal and superconducting films in the frequency range of 7-11 GHz and compare it to simultaneously-acquired topography of the surface using a scanning tunneling microscope. The high spatial resolution allows us to image the grains and grain boundaries in superconductors, while facilitating local spectroscopy. The instrument allows us to study the electronic properties from STM and the microwave spectroscopic properties of the materials from the microwave microscope simultaneously, and independently of each other. We will also discuss a model of the microscope, which gives a quantitative understanding of the frequency shift and Q, demonstrating that this microscope is qualitatively similar to our earlier version.^1 We shall present images of superconducting films in the critical state and discuss the possibility of imaging magnetic vortices at microwave frequencies. Reference: 1 [D.E.Steinhauer, C.P.vlahacos, S.K.Dutta, B.J.Feenstra, F.C.Wellstood, and Steven M.Anlage, "Quantitative Imaging of Sheet Resistance with a Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscope," Appl. Phys. Lett. 72, 861 (1998)].

  9. Current fluctuations in unconventional superconductor junctions with impurity scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burset, Pablo; Lu, Bo; Tamura, Shun; Tanaka, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    The order parameter of bulk two-dimensional superconductors is classified as nodal if it vanishes for a direction in momentum space, or gapful if it does not. Each class can be topologically nontrivial if Andreev bound states are formed at the edges of the superconductor. Nonmagnetic impurities in the superconductor affect the formation of Andreev bound states and can drastically change the tunneling spectra for small voltages. Here, we investigate the mean current and its fluctuations for two-dimensional tunnel junctions between normal-metal and unconventional superconductors by solving the quasiclassical Eilenberger equation self-consistently, including the presence of nonmagnetic impurities in the superconductor. As the impurity strength increases, we find that superconductivity is suppressed for almost all order parameters since (i) at zero applied bias, the effective transferred charge calculated from the noise-current ratio tends to the electron charge e , and (ii) for finite bias, the current-voltage characteristics follows that of a normal-state junction. There are notable exceptions to this trend. First, gapful nontrivial (chiral) superconductors are very robust against impurity scattering due to the linear dispersion relation of their surface Andreev bound states. Second, for nodal nontrivial superconductors, only px-wave pairing is almost immune to the presence of impurities due to the emergence of odd-frequency s -wave Cooper pairs near the interface. Due to their anisotropic dependence on the wave vector, impurity scattering is an effective pair-breaking mechanism for the remaining nodal superconductors. All these behaviors are neatly captured by the noise-current ratio, providing a useful guide to find experimental signatures for unconventional superconductivity.

  10. Deformable Surface 3D Reconstruction from Monocular Images

    CERN Document Server

    Salzmann, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    Being able to recover the shape of 3D deformable surfaces from a single video stream would make it possible to field reconstruction systems that run on widely available hardware without requiring specialized devices. However, because many different 3D shapes can have virtually the same projection, such monocular shape recovery is inherently ambiguous. In this survey, we will review the two main classes of techniques that have proved most effective so far: The template-based methods that rely on establishing correspondences with a reference image in which the shape is already known, and non-rig

  11. Processing of Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Josephson Edge Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical behavior of epitaxial superconductor-normal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson edge junctions is strongly affected by processing conditions. Ex-situ processes, utilizing photoresist and polyimide/photoresist mask layers, are employed for ion milling edges for junctions with Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxide (YBCO) electrodes and primarily Co-doped YBCO interlayers.

  12. Topology of nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Ken; Sato, Masatoshi; Gomi, Kiyonori

    2016-05-01

    Topological classification in our previous paper [K. Shiozaki and M. Sato, Phys. Rev. B 90, 165114 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.165114] is extended to nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors. Using the twisted equivariant K theory, we complete the classification of topological crystalline insulators and superconductors in the presence of additional order-two nonsymmorphic space-group symmetries. The order-two nonsymmorphic space groups include half-lattice translation with Z2 flip, glide, twofold screw, and their magnetic space groups. We find that the topological periodic table shows modulo-2 periodicity in the number of flipped coordinates under the order-two nonsymmorphic space group. It is pointed out that the nonsymmorphic space groups allow Z2 topological phases even in the absence of time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries. Furthermore, the coexistence of the nonsymmorphic space group with time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries provides novel Z4 topological phases, which have not been realized in ordinary topological insulators and superconductors. We present model Hamiltonians of these new topological phases and analytic expressions of the Z2 and Z4 topological invariants. The half-lattice translation with Z2 spin flip and glide symmetry are compatible with the existence of boundaries, leading to topological surface gapless modes protected by the order-two nonsymmorphic symmetries. We also discuss unique features of these gapless surface modes.

  13. Magnetic chains on a triplet superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, P D

    2015-11-11

    The topological state of a two-dimensional triplet superconductor may be changed by an appropriate addition of magnetic impurities. A ferromagnetic magnetic chain at the surface of a superconductor with spin-orbit coupling may eliminate the edge states of a finite system giving rise to localized zero modes at the edges of the chain. The coexistence/competition between the two types of zero modes is considered. The reduction of the system to an effective 1d system gives partial information on the topological properties but the study of the two sets of zero modes requires a two-dimensional treatment. Increasing the impurity density from a magnetic chain to magnetic islands leads to a finite Chern number. At half-filling small concentrations are enough to induce chiral modes.

  14. Laser induced plasma plume imaging and surface morphology of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Siraj, K. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)], E-mail: ksiraj@uet.edu.pk; Rafique, M.S.; Bhatti, K.A.; Latif, A.; Jamil, H.; Basit, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)

    2009-04-15

    Shot-to-shot variation in the characteristics of laser produced plasma plume and surface profile of N-type silicon (1 1 1) are investigated. In order to produce plasma, a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 mJ, 9-14 ns) is tightly focused on silicon target in air at room temperature. Target was exposed in such a way that number of laser shots was increased from point to point in ascending order starting from single shot at first point. Target was moved 2 mm after each exposure. In order to investigate shot-to-shot variation in the time integrated emission intensity regions within the plasma plume, a computer controlled CCD based image capture system was employed. Various intensity regimes were found depending strongly on the number of incident laser pulses. Plasma plume length was also found to vary with the number of pulses. The topographic analysis of the irradiated Si was performed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) which shows the primary mechanisms like thermal or non-thermal ablation depend on the number of shots. Surface morphological changes were also studied in terms of ripple formation, ejection, debris and re-deposition of material caused by laser beam at sample surface. The micrographs show ripples spacing versus wavelength dependence rule [{lambda} {approx} {lambda}/(1 - sin {theta})]. Intensity variations with number of shots are correlated with the surface morphology of the irradiated sample.

  15. Local model for magnet-superconductor mechanical interaction: Experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Jimenez, Efren; Perez-Diaz, Jose-Luis; Garcia-Prada, Juan Carlos

    2011-03-01

    Several models exist for calculating superconducting repulsion forces in the Meissner state that are based on the method of images. The method of images, however, is limited to a small number of geometrical configurations that can be solved exactly, and the physical interpretation of the method is under discussion. A general local model based on the London equations and Maxwell's equations has been developed to describe the mechanics of the superconductor-permanent magnet system. Due to its differential form, this expression can be easily implemented in a finite elements analysis and, consequently, is easily applicable to any shape of superconductor in the Meissner state. It can solve both forces and torques. This paper reports different experiments undertaken in order to test the model's validity. The vertical forces and the angle of equilibrium between a magnet and a superconductor were measured, and a positive agreement between the experiments and theoretical calculations was found.

  16. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A. Anil; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Ming Fang

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and (2) to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices - obvious advantages versus practical difficulties - needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models - a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B) - shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance - conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant - will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T

  17. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F. [Prairie View A& M Univ., Texas (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  18. Observation of selective surface element substitution in FeTe0.5Se0.5 superconductor thin film exposed to ambient air by synchrotron radiation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian; Liu, Chen; Zhao, Jia-Li; Lei, Tao; Wang, Jia-Ou; Qian, Hai-Jie; Wu, Rui; Yan, Lei; Guo, Hai-Zhong; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2016-09-01

    A systematic investigation of oxidation on a superconductive FeTe0.5Se0.5 thin film, which was grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3 (001) by pulsed laser deposition, has been carried out. The sample was exposed to ambient air for one month for oxidation. Macroscopically, the exposed specimen lost its superconductivity due to oxidation. The specimen was subjected to in situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements following cycles of annealing and argon ion etching treatments to unravel what happened in the electronic structure and composition after exposure to air. By the spectroscopic measurements, we found that the as-grown FeTe0.5Se0.5 superconductive thin film experienced an element selective substitution reaction. The oxidation preferentially proceeds through pumping out the Te and forming Fe-O bonds by O substitution of Te. In addition, our results certify that in situ vacuum annealing and low-energy argon ion etching methods combined with spectroscopy are suitable for depth element and valence analysis of layered structure superconductor materials. Project supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 1G2009312311750101) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375228, 11204303, and U1332105).

  19. Disappearance of nodal gap across the insulator-superconductor transition in a copper-oxide superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingying; Meng, Jianqiao; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Yue; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; He, Shaolong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Qinjun; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Shenjin; Yang, Feng; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Lee, T K; Zhou, X J

    2013-01-01

    The parent compound of the copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors is a Mott insulator. Superconductivity is realized by doping an appropriate amount of charge carriers. How a Mott insulator transforms into a superconductor is crucial in understanding the unusual physical properties of high-temperature superconductors and the superconductivity mechanism. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurement on heavily underdoped Bi₂Sr₂-xLaxCuO(₆+δ) system. The electronic structure of the lightly doped samples exhibit a number of characteristics: existence of an energy gap along the nodal direction, d-wave-like anisotropic energy gap along the underlying Fermi surface, and coexistence of a coherence peak and a broad hump in the photoemission spectra. Our results reveal a clear insulator-superconductor transition at a critical doping level of ~0.10 where the nodal energy gap approaches zero, the three-dimensional antiferromagnetic order disappears, and superconductivity starts to emerge. These observations clearly signal a close connection between the nodal gap, antiferromagnetism and superconductivity.

  20. Impact of EUVL mask surface roughness on an actinic blank inspection image and a wafer image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Terasawa, Tsuneo

    2012-11-01

    An impact of EUVL mask surface roughness on actinic inspection was studied. The background level (BGL) of an actinic inspection image is caused by the light scattered from the mask blank surface roughness. The BGL is found to be proportional to the square of the mask surface roughness measured by AFM. By using this proportionality coefficient, a global distribution of the surface roughness can be obtained at the same time while inspection a mask. On the other hand, any local variation of BGL indicates variation of the mask surface roughness at each pixel. Assuming that the roughness at a center pixel is 0.15 nm rms (SEMI standard specification) and those at the surrounding pixels are 0.1 nm rms, the signal intensity at the center pixel is found to be approximately the same as that of a 1.2 nm-high and 40 nm-wide programmed defect. In that case, CD error on a wafer image due to the reflectivity loss by the roughness is found to be not critical. This means that the local roughness should be less than 0.15 nm rms, and that the inspection system can detect such a local variation of the roughness with 100 % probability.

  1. Testability issues in Superconductor Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Arun, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging technology for solutions in high-end applications in computing and telecommunication is superconductor electronics. A system-level study has been carried out to verify the feasibility of DfT in superconductor electronics. In this paper, we present how this can be realized to monitor

  2. Building Detection Using Aerial Images and Digital Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, J.; Cui, S.; Reinartz, P.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper a method for building detection in aerial images based on variational inference of logistic regression is proposed. It consists of three steps. In order to characterize the appearances of buildings in aerial images, an effective bag-of-Words (BoW) method is applied for feature extraction in the first step. In the second step, a classifier of logistic regression is learned using these local features. The logistic regression can be trained using different methods. In this paper we adopt a fully Bayesian treatment for learning the classifier, which has a number of obvious advantages over other learning methods. Due to the presence of hyper prior in the probabilistic model of logistic regression, approximate inference methods have to be applied for prediction. In order to speed up the inference, a variational inference method based on mean field instead of stochastic approximation such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo is applied. After the prediction, a probabilistic map is obtained. In the third step, a fully connected conditional random field model is formulated and the probabilistic map is used as the data term in the model. A mean field inference is utilized in order to obtain a binary building mask. A benchmark data set consisting of aerial images and digital surfaced model (DSM) released by ISPRS for 2D semantic labeling is used for performance evaluation. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  4. Meissner holes in iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Mohan, Shyam; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Nakajima, Yasuyuki

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic flux penetrates into a superconductor in the form of quantized vortices. This process is usually described by the Bean model, and the flux front forms a regular pattern reflecting the shape of the sample. However, a novel form of flux penetration accompanying wiggling fronts between vortices and antivortices has been observed in YBa2Cu3O7-δ upon remagnetization [1]. Such a phenomenon is ascribed to the presence of special arrangements of vortices at the front accompanying flux free regions and excess current around it. The flux free region is called as `Mesissner hole'. We have performed extensive magneto-optical imagings of iron-based superconductor single crystals and found similar anomalous features for the first time in superconductors other than 123-type cuprates [2]. Implications of this finding will be discussed with possible origins of the anomalous vortex arrangements. [1] V. K. Vlasko-Vlasov et al., Phys. Rev. B 56, 5622 (1997). [2] S. Mohan, Y. Tsuchiya, Y. Nakajima, and T. Tamegai, Phys. Rev. B 84, 18050X (2011).

  5. Coupling spin qubits via superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, Martin; Flensberg, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We show how superconductors can be used to couple, initialize, and read out spatially separated spin qubits. When two single-electron quantum dots are tunnel coupled to the same superconductor, the singlet component of the two-electron state partially leaks into the superconductor via crossed...... Andreev reflection. This induces a gate-controlled singlet-triplet splitting which, with an appropriate superconductor geometry, remains large for dot separations within the superconducting coherence length. Furthermore, we show that when two double-dot singlet-triplet qubits are tunnel coupled...... to a superconductor with finite charging energy, crossed Andreev reflection enables a strong two-qubit coupling over distances much larger than the coherence length....

  6. Critical Doping for the Onset of Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Charge-Density-Wave Order in the Cuprate Superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Badoux

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4} (LSCO was measured in magnetic fields large enough to access the normal state at low temperatures, for a range of Sr concentrations from x=0.07 to x=0.15. For x=0.11, 0.12, 0.125, and 0.13, S/T decreases upon cooling to become negative at low temperatures. The same behavior is observed in the Hall coefficient R_{H}(T. In analogy with other hole-doped cuprates at similar hole concentrations p, the negative S and R_{H} show that the Fermi surface of LSCO undergoes a reconstruction caused by the onset of charge-density-wave modulations. Such modulations have indeed been detected in LSCO by x-ray diffraction in precisely the same doping range. Our data show that in LSCO this Fermi-surface reconstruction is confined to 0.085

  7. Matching Images to Models: Camera Calibration for 3-D Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robin D.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Cheeseman. Peter C.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we described a system which recursively recovers a super-resolved three dimensional surface model from a set of images of the surface. In that paper we assumed that the camera calibration for each image was known. In this paper we solve two problems. Firstly, if an estimate of the surface is already known, the problem is to calibrate a new image relative to the existing surface model. Secondly, if no surface estimate is available, the relative camera calibration between the images in the set must be estimated. This will allow an initial surface model to be estimated. Results of both types of estimation are given.

  8. Nanostructure-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špašková, Barbora; Lynn, Nicholas S.; Slabý, Jiří Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2017-06-01

    There remains a need for the multiplexed detection of biomolecules at extremely low concentrations in fields of medical diagnostics, food safety, and security. Surface plasmon resonance imaging is an established biosensing approach in which the measurement of the intensity of light across a sensor chip is correlated with the amount of target biomolecules captured by the respective areas on the chip. In this work, we present a new approach for this method allowing for enhanced bioanalytical performance via the introduction of nanostructured sensing chip and polarization contrast measurement, which enable the exploitation of both amplitude and phase properties of plasmonic resonances on the nanostructures. Here we will discuss a complex theoretical analysis of the sensor performance, whereby we investigate aspects related to both the optical performance as well as the transport of the analyte molecules to the functionalized surfaces. This analysis accounts for the geometrical parameters of the nanostructured sensing surface, the properties of functional coatings, and parameters related to the detection assay. Based on the results of the theoretical analysis, we fabricated sensing chips comprised of arrays of gold nanoparticles (by electron-beam lithography), which were modified by a biofunctional coating to allow for the selective capturing of the target biomolecules in the regions with high sensitivity. In addition, we developed a compact optical reader with an integrated microfluidic cell, allowing for the measurement from 50 independent sensing channels. The performance of this biosensor is demonstrated through the sensitive detection of short oligonucleotides down to the low picomolar level.

  9. Towards a quantitative description of tunneling conductance of superconductors: Application to LiFeAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisel, A.; Nelson, R.; Berlijn, T.; Ku, W.; Aluru, Ramakrishna; Chi, Shun; Zhou, Haibiao; Singh, Udai Raj; Wahl, Peter; Liang, Ruixing; Hardy, Walter N.; Bonn, D. A.; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Andersen, Brian M.

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of iron-based superconductors, a number of theories have been put forward to explain the qualitative origin of pairing, but there have been few attempts to make quantitative, material-specific comparisons to experimental results. The spin-fluctuation theory of electronic pairing, based on first-principles electronic structure calculations, makes predictions for the superconducting gap. Within the same framework, the surface wave functions may also be calculated, allowing, e.g., for detailed comparisons between theoretical results and measured scanning tunneling topographs and spectra. Here we present such a comparison between theory and experiment on the Fe-based superconductor LiFeAs. Results for the homogeneous surface as well as impurity states are presented as a benchmark test of the theory. For the homogeneous system, we argue that the maxima of topographic image intensity may be located at positions above either the As or Li atoms, depending on tip height and the setpoint current of the measurement. We further report the experimental observation of transitions between As- and Li-registered lattices as functions of both tip height and setpoint bias, in agreement with this prediction. Next, we give a detailed comparison between the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images of transition-metal defects with experiment. Finally, we discuss possible extensions of the current framework to obtain a theory with true predictive power for scanning tunneling microscopy in Fe-based systems.

  10. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound

  11. High temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2010-01-01

    This essential reference provides the most comprehensive presentation of the state of the art in the field of high temperature superconductors. This growing field of research and applications is currently being supported by numerous governmental and industrial initiatives in the United States, Asia and Europe to overcome grid energy distribution issues. The technology is particularly intended for densely populated areas. It is now being commercialized for power-delivery devices, such as power transmission lines and cables, motors and generators. Applications in electric utilities include current limiters, long transmission lines and energy-storage devices that will help industries avoid dips in electric power.

  12. Antenna applications of superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. C.

    1991-09-01

    The applicability of superconductors to antennas is examined. Potential implementations that are examined are superdirective arrays; electrically small antennas; tuning and matching of these two; high-gain millimeter-wavelength arrays; and kinetic inductance slow wave structures for array phasers and traveling wave array feeds. It is thought that superdirective arrays and small antennas will not benefit directly, but their tuning/matching networks will undergo major improvements. Miniaturization of antennas will not be aided, but much higher gain millimeter-wave arrays will be realizable. Kinetic inductance slow-wave lines appear advantageous for improved array phasers and time delay, as well as for traveling-wave array feeds.

  13. Research and development of MRI surface coil for TMJ MR imaging; Modulated Helmholtz surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukimoto, Yoshiaki; Kukimoto, Kyoko (Kameda General Hospital, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan)); Shirakawa, Toyomi

    1989-12-01

    Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are a major cause of jaw pain and dysfunction as well as other related clinical symptoms. TMJ diagnosis is the abnormal position and appearance of the disk. Most X-ray-based methods are useful for evaluating bony abnormalities, but their reduced soft-tissue contrast often makes the diagnostic evaluation of TMJ disorders difficult. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very recent addition to the medical diagnostic of TMJ diseases. MR imaging can produce high-quality tomographic images of greater soft-tissue contrast without ionizing radiation or known biological hazards. MR system was circular type Simens Magnetom 1.5 tesla. Display matrix was 256x256. A Modulated Helmholtz type coil of 17 cm in diameter was developed in Kameda General Hospital in order to increase signal to noise ratio in the area of bilateral TMJs. The distance between two coils was 16-20 cm. The head was placed in supine position in the center of two surface coils. A Modulated Helmholtz type coil: 1. Modulated Helmholtz type coil was used as an emitter and a receiver. 2. Modulated Helmholtz type coil had a pair of 17 cm coils, which were movable according to head width of each patient. 3. MR imaging of bilateral TMJs was taken at once because of no necessity to reset a surfacecoil. 4. It was easy to set positioning of the head. (author).

  14. Erbium luminescence imaging of infrared surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, E.; Tchebotareva, A. L.; Polman, A.

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to spatially map the propagation and damping of infrared surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on metal films using optically active erbium ions as a probe of the SPP field. The bound SPP mode propagating along the Ag/glass interface of a 96nm thick Ag film on glass is excited by illuminating a subwavelength hole array in the metal with 1.49μm light. By imaging the 1.53μm photoluminescence of Er ions positioned in the glass at a distance of 60nm from the Ag/glass interface in a confocal microscope, a SPP beam was observed to propagate along a broad stripe waveguide, with a characteristic propagation length of 76μm. This technique provides a useful tool to study the characteristics of SPP modes at metal-dielectric interfaces in a wide range of geometries.

  15. Progress in 193-nm top-surface imaging process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John M.; Rao, Veena; Zhang, Guojing; Pawloski, Adam R.; Fonseca, Carlos A.; Chambers, Janet; Holl, Susan M.; Das, Siddhartha; Henderson, Craig C.; Wheeler, David R.

    1998-06-01

    The maturity and acceptance of top surface imaging (TSI) technology has been hampered by several factors including inadequate resist sensitivity and silylation contrast, defects and line edge roughness and equipment performance/reliability issues. We found that the use of a chemically amplified resist can improve the sensitivity by a factor of 1.5 - 2X, without compromising line edge roughness. While the post-silylation contrast of this chemically amplified material is poor ((gamma) > 10) and the use of advanced silylation chemistries (disilanes) can further reduce the dose-to-size and increase the contrast. We have also demonstrated that using sulfur dioxide in the plasma etch process can improve the sidewall passivation of the resist lines, thus reducing the overall line edge roughness. Finally, we have been able to successfully use the TSI process to pattern deep sub-micron polysilicon and metal patterns.

  16. Multiframe image point matching and 3-d surface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, R Y

    1983-02-01

    This paper presents two new methods, the Joint Moment Method (JMM) and the Window Variance Method (WVM), for image matching and 3-D object surface reconstruction using multiple perspective views. The viewing positions and orientations for these perspective views are known a priori, as is usually the case for such applications as robotics and industrial vision as well as close range photogrammetry. Like the conventional two-frame correlation method, the JMM and WVM require finding the extrema of 1-D curves, which are proved to theoretically approach a delta function exponentially as the number of frames increases for the JMM and are much sharper than the two-frame correlation function for both the JMM and the WVM, even when the image point to be matched cannot be easily distinguished from some of the other points. The theoretical findings have been supported by simulations. It is also proved that JMM and WVM are not sensitive to certain radiometric effects. If the same window size is used, the computational complexity for the proposed methods is about n - 1 times that for the two-frame method where n is the number of frames. Simulation results show that the JMM and WVM require smaller windows than the two-frame correlation method with better accuracy, and therefore may even be more computationally feasible than the latter since the computational complexity increases quadratically as a function of the window size.

  17. Ultrasonic image restoration based on support vector machine for surfacing interface testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Shuangsheng; Gang Tie; Chi Dazhao

    2007-01-01

    In order to restore the degraded ultrasonic C-scan image for testing surfacing interface, a method based on support vector regression (SVR) network is proposed. By using the image of a simulating defect, the network is trained and a mapping relationship between the degraded and restored image is founded. The degraded C-scan image of Cu-Steel surfacing interface is processed by the trained network and improved image is obtained. The result shows that the method can effectively suppress the noise and deblur the defect edge in the image, and provide technique support for quality and reliability evaluation of the surfacing weld.

  18. Flux pinning in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  19. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  20. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  1. Materials design for new superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M R

    2016-07-01

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed here, with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues.

  2. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  3. Materials design for new superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed here, with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues.

  4. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    10-1-0422 TITLE: Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early PRINCIPAL...DATES COVERED 1 July 2010 - 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Photoacoustic ...upon request). Aim 2) Prioritize ovarian cancer-associated surface proteins for their utility as molecular photoacoustic imaging targets and

  5. Odd-parity topological superconductors: theory and application to CuxBi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Berg, Erez

    2010-08-27

    Topological superconductors have a full pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface Andreev bound states. In this Letter, we provide a sufficient criterion for realizing time-reversal-invariant topological superconductors in centrosymmetric superconductors with odd-parity pairing. We next study the pairing symmetry of the newly discovered superconductor CuxBi2Se3 within a two-orbital model, and find that a novel spin-triplet pairing with odd parity is favored by strong spin-orbit coupling. Based on our criterion, we propose that CuxBi2Se3 is a good candidate for a topological superconductor. We close by discussing experimental signatures of this new topological phase.

  6. Structural classification and a binary structure model for superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Based on structural and bonding features, a new classification scheme of superconductors is proposed to classify conductors can be partitioned into two parts, a superconducting active component and a supplementary component.Partially metallic covalent bonding is found to be a common feature in all superconducting active components, and the electron states of the atoms in the active components usually make a dominant contribution to the energy band near the Fermi surface. Possible directions to explore new superconductors are discussed based on the structural classification and the binary structure model.

  7. Nonlinear response of superconductors to alternating fields and currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    This report discusses the following topics on superconductivity: nonlinearities in hard superconductors such as surface impedance of a type II superconductimg half space and harmonic generation and intermodulation due to alternating transport currents; and nonlinearities in superconducting weak links such as harmonic generation by a long Josephson Junction in a superconducting slab.

  8. Manufacturing a Superconductor in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John

    1989-01-01

    Described is the manufacture of a superconductor from a commercially available kit using equipment usually available in schools or easily obtainable. The construction is described in detail including equipment, materials, safety procedures, tolerances, and manufacture. (Author/CW)

  9. Magnetic excitations in iron chalcogenide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Fujita, Masaki

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering experiments in iron chalcogenide superconductors are reviewed to make a survey of the magnetic excitations in FeSe, FeSe1-x Te x and alkali-metal-doped Ax Fe2-y Se2 (A = K, Rb, Cs, etc). In FeSe, the intimate relationship between the spin fluctuations and superconductivity can be seen universally for the variations in the off-stoichiometry, the Co-substitution and applied pressure. The isovalent compound FeTe has a magnetic ordering with different wave vector from that of other Fe-based magnetic materials. The transition temperature Tc of FeSe increases with Te substitution in FeSe1-x Te x with small x, and decreases in the vicinity of the end member FeTe. The spin fluctuations are drastically modified by the Te substitution. In the vicinity of the end member FeTe, the low-energy part of the spin fluctuation is dominated by the wave vector of the ordered phase of FeTe; however, the reduction of Tc shows that it does not support superconductivity. The presence of same wave vector as that of other Fe-based superconductors in FeSe1-x Te x and the observation of the resonance mode demonstrate that FeSe1-x Te x belongs to the same group as most of other Fe-based superconductors in the entire range of x, where superconductivity is mediated by the spin fluctuations whose wave vector is the same as the nesting vector between the hole pockets and the electron pockets. On the other hand, the spin fluctuations differ for alkali-metal-doped Ax Fe2-y Se2 and FeSe or other Fe-based superconductors in their wave vector and strength in the low-energy part, most likely because of the different Fermi surfaces. The resonance mode with different wave vector suggests that Ax Fe2-y Se2 has an exceptional superconducting symmetry among Fe-based superconductors.

  10. Sub-wavelength surface IR imaging of soft-condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, James H; Meech, Stephen R; Kuo, Paulina; Vodopyanov, Konstantin; Reading, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Outlined here is a technique for sub-wavelength infrared surface imaging performed using a phase matched optical parametric oscillator laser and an atomic force microscope as the detection mechanism. The technique uses a novel surface excitation illumination approach to perform simultaneously chemical mapping and AFM topography imaging with an image resolution of 200 nm. This method was demonstrated by imaging polystyrene micro-structures.

  11. Superconductor stripes move on

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Differences in fundamental assumptions are behind much of the controversy among theorists over the cause of high-temperature superconductivity the absence of resistance to electrical current at temperatures as high as 130 K in layered copper-oxide compounds. One common assumption is that the charge carriers are distributed uniformly throughout the all-important CuO{sub 2} layers. However, there is growing experimental evidence that this is not the case and that 'stripes' of charge form in these puzzling materials. Now a significant step forward in the struggle to understand the behaviour of charge carriers in high-temperature superconductors has been made at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the US. (UK)

  12. Manufacturing of Superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Bay, Niels

    Superconducting tapes based on the ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTS) is a new promising product for high current applications such as electro-magnets and current transmission cables. The tapes are made by the oxide powder in tube (OPIT) method implying drawing and rolling of silver...... on the mechanical and thermal processes applied. One of the most crucial processes is probably the flat rolling process, where the round or square wire is rolled to form a thin tape (about 3 mm x 0.2 mm), while the density of the powder fibres increase and the fibres obtain their final geometry. For instance...... rolling a tape to a thickness of 250 µm may give a very high Je, whereas further reduction to 200 µm may be fatal. In the present work the flat rolling process is analysed systematically from a mechanical forming point of view. This work implies · Mechanical characterisation of the plastic parameters...

  13. Investigations on the electronic surface properties of the stoichiometric superconductor LiFeAs using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy; Untersuchung der elektronischen Oberflaecheneigenschaften des stoechiometrischen Supraleiters LiFeAs mittels Rastertunnelmikroskopie und -spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, Ronny

    2014-09-29

    This work presents scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy investigations on the stoichiometric superconductor lithium iron arsenide (LiFeAs). To reveal the electronic properties, measurements on defect-free surfaces as well as near defects have been performed. The former shows a shift of atomic position with respect to the applied bias voltage. Furthermore, temperature dependent spectroscopic measurements indicate the coupling of quasiparticles in the vicinity of the superconducting coherence peaks. LiFeAs surfaces influenced by atomic defects show a spacial variation of the superconducting gap. The defects can be characterized by their symmetry and thus can be assigned to a position in the atomic lattice. Detailed spectroscopic investigations of defects reveal their influence on the quasiparticle density of states. In particular, Fe-defects show a small effect on the superconductivity while As-defects strongly disturb the superconducting gap. Measurements in magnetic field have been performed for the determination of the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length ξ{sub GL}. For this purpose, a suitable fit-function has been developed in this work. This function allows to fit the differential conductance of a magnetic vortex at E{sub F}. The fit results in a coherence length of ξ{sub GL} = 3,9 nm which corresponds to an upper critical field of 21 Tesla. Besides measurements on a single vortex, investigation on the vortex lattice have been performed. The vortex lattice constant follows thereby the predicted behavior of a trigonal vortex lattice. However, for magnetic fields larger than 6 Tesla an increasing lattice disorder sets in, presumably due to vortex-vortex-interactions.

  14. Observations of surface waves interacting with ice using stereo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alexander J.; Bechle, Adam J.; Wu, Chin H.

    2014-06-01

    A powerful Automated Trinocular Stereo Imaging System (ATSIS) is used to remotely measure waves interacting with three distinct ice types: brash, frazil, and pancake. ATSIS is improved with a phase-only correlation matching algorithm and parallel computation to provide high spatial and temporal resolution 3-D profiles of the water/ice surface, from which the wavelength, frequency, and energy flux are calculated. Alongshore spatial frequency distributions show that pancake and frazil ices differentially attenuate at a greater rate for higher-frequency waves, causing a decrease in mean frequency. In contrast, wave propagation through brash ice causes a rapid increase in the dominant wave frequency, which may be caused by nonlinear energy transfer to higher frequencies due to collisions between the brash ice particles. Consistent to the results in frequency, the wavelengths in pancake and frazil ices increase but decrease in brash ice. The total wave energy fluxes decrease exponentially in both pancake and frazil ice, whereas the overall energy flux remain constant in the brash ice due to thin layer thickness. The spatial energy flux distributions also reveal that wave reflection occurs at the boundary of each ice layer, with reflection coefficient decaying exponentially away from the ice interface. Reflection is the strongest at the pancake/ice-free and frazil/brash interfaces and the weakest at the brash/ice-free interface. These high resolution observations measured by ATSIS demonstrate the spatially variable nature of waves propagating through ice.

  15. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped...... of the characteristic details of the images. A large proportion of the observed noise may be explained by the scanning actions of the feedback circuitry while a minor fraction of the image details may be explained by surface drift phenomena. As opposed to the method of deconvolution, conventional methods of filtering......Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...

  16. Multispectral UV imaging for surface analysis of MUPS tablets with special focus on the pellet distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikova, Anna; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Rades, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the present study the applicability of multispectral UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis for surface evaluation of MUPS tablets was investigated with respect to the differentiation of the API pellets from the excipients matrix, estimation of the drug content as well as p...... image analysis is a promising approach for the automatic quality control of MUPS tablets during the manufacturing process.......In the present study the applicability of multispectral UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis for surface evaluation of MUPS tablets was investigated with respect to the differentiation of the API pellets from the excipients matrix, estimation of the drug content as well...... on the tablet surface allowed an estimation of the true drug content in the respective MUPS tablet. In addition, the pellet distribution in the MUPS formulations could be estimated by UV image analysis of the tablet surface. In conclusion, this study revealed that UV imaging in combination with multivariate...

  17. High-temperature superconductors make major progress

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    This month's Nature Materials featured an important breakthrough for high-temperature superconductors. A new method has been found for processing Bi-2212 high-temperature superconducting round wire in order to drastically increase its critical current density. The result confirms that this conductor is a serious candidate for future very-high-field magnets.   This image shows the cross-section of two Bi-2212 wires. The bottom wire has less leakage and void porosity due to a heat treatment done at an overpressure of 100 bar - about 100 times the pressure used to produce the top wire (image from [Nature Materials, Vol. 13 (2014), 10.1038/nmat3887]). The workhorse for building superconducting accelerator magnets has been, so far, the Niobium-Titanium (Nb-Ti) alloy superconductor. But with Nb-Ti having reached its full potential, other conductors must be used to operate in higher magnetic fields beyond those reached with the LHC magnets. Today, the intermetallic Niobium-Tin (Nb3Sn) is th...

  18. SAR imaging simulation for an inhomogeneous undulated lunar surface based on triangulated irregular network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA WenZhe; XU Feng; JIN YaQiu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the statistics of the lunar cratered terrain, e.g., population, dimension and shape of craters, the terrain feature of cratered lunar surface is numerically generated. According to the Inhomogeneous distribution of the lunar surface slope, the triangulated irregular network (TIN) is employed to make the digital elevation of lunar surface model. The Kirchhoff approximation of surface scattering is then applied to simulation of lunar surface scattering. The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image for compre-hensive cratered lunar surface is numerically generated using back projection (BP) algorithm of SAR Imaging. Making use of the digital elevation and Clementlne UVVIS data at Apollo 15 landing site as the ground truth, an SAR Image at Apollo 15 landing site Is simulated. The image simulation is verified using real SAR image and echoes statistics.

  19. Feasibility study for image-guided kidney surgery: Assessment of required intraoperative surface for accurate physical to image space registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Anne B.; Clements, Logan W.; Herrell, S. Duke; Galloway, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A notable complication of applying current image-guided surgery techniques of soft tissue to kidney resections (nephrectomies) is the limited field of view of the intraoperative kidney surface. This limited view constrains the ability to obtain a sufficiently geometrically descriptive surface for accurate surface-based registrations. The authors examined the effects of the limited view by using two orientations of a kidney phantom to model typical laparoscopic and open partial nephrectomy views. Point-based registrations, using either rigidly attached markers or anatomical landmarks as fiducials, served as initial alignments for surface-based registrations. Laser range scanner (LRS) obtained surfaces were registered to the phantom’s image surface using a rigid iterative closest point algorithm. Subsets of each orientation’s LRS surface were used in a robustness test to determine which parts of the surface yield the most accurate registrations. Results suggest that obtaining accurate registrations is a function of the percentage of the total surface and of geometric surface properties, such as curvature. Approximately 28% of the total surface is required regardless of the location of that surface subset. However, that percentage decreases when the surface subset contains information from opposite ends of the surface and∕or unique anatomical features, such as the renal artery and vein. PMID:18841875

  20. Proposal to determine the Fermi-surface topology of a doped iron-based superconductor using bulk-sensitive Fourier-transform Compton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.J.; Lin, H.; Barbiellini, B.; Mijnarends, P.E.; Kaprzyk, S.; Markiewicz, R.S.; Bansil, A.

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out first-principles calculations of the Compton scattering spectra to demonstrate that the filling of the hole Fermi surface in LaO1−xFxFeAs produces a distinct signature in the Fourier-transformed Compton spectrum when the momentum transfer vector lies along the [100] direction. We

  1. Process for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor precursor between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to form a super conductor layer.

  2. Technical validation of the Di3D stereophotogrammetry surface imaging system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winder, R.J.; Darvann, Tron Andre; McKnight, W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the technical performance of a three-dimensional surface imaging system for geometric accuracy and maximum field of view. The system was designed for stereophotogrammetry capture of digital images from three-dimensional surfaces of the head, face, and neck...

  3. Effect of Rashba Spin-Orbit Interaction on the Stability of Spin-Vortex-Induced Loop Current in Hole-Doped Cuprate Superconductors: A Scenario for the Appearance of Magnetic Field Enhanced Charge Order and Fermi Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Tsubasa; Wakaura, Hikaru; Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-10-01

    Rashba type spin-orbit interaction is included in the model Hamiltonian for the spin-vortex-induced loop current (SVILC) mechanism of superconductivity for hole doped cuprate superconductors and its effects are investigated. We assume that a Rashba interaction appears around the small polarons formed by the doped holes in the bulk; its internal electric field is assumed to be in the direction perpendicular to the CuO2 plane and stabilizes the spin polarization lying in the CuO2 plane. We examine 4 × 4, 4 × 6, and 4 × 8 spin-vortex-quartet (SVQ) and perform Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the superconducting transition temperature Tc, where each SVQ is a n × m two dimensional region (in the units of the lattice constant) containing four holes, four spin-vortices, and four SVILCs. We find that the 4 × 6 SVQ is the most stable one among them with the highest Tc; in this case, the hole concentration per Cu atom is x = 0.167, which is close to the optimal doping value x = 0.170, suggesting that the optimal doping may be related to the stabilization of the superconducting state by the Rashba interaction. We also find that the 4 × 8 SVQ becomes more stable than the 4 × 6 SVQ in a current flowing situation; this indicates that the conversion from the 4 × 6 SVQs to 4 × 8 SVQs may occur upon the emergence of a macroscopic current by the application of a magnetic field. This conversion may explain the enhancement of the charge order around x = 0.125 and the Fermi surface reconstruction upon an application of a magnetic field.

  4. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kecheng Li; Douglas W. Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. Withthe thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration, and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  5. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KechengLi; DouglasW.Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. With the thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  6. Ferromagnet / superconductor oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    The growth of heterostructures combining oxide materials is a new strategy to design novel artificial multifunctional materials with interesting behaviors ruled by the interface. With the (re)discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, there has been renewed interest in heterostructures involving oxide superconductors and CMR ferromagnets where ferromagnetism (F) and superconductivity (S) compete within nanometric distances from the interface. In F/S/F structures involving oxides, interfaces are especially complex and various factors like interface disorder and roughness, epitaxial strain, polarity mismatch etc., are responsible for depressed magnetic and superconducting properties at the interface over nanometer length scales. In this talk I will focus in F/S/F structures made of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO). The high degree of spin polarization of the LCMO conduction band, together with the d-wave superconductivity of the YBCO make this F/S system an adequate candidate for the search of novel spin dependent effects in transport. We show that superconductivity at the interface is depressed by various factors like charge transfer, spin injection or ferromagnetic superconducting proximity effect. I will present experiments to examine the characteristic distances of the various mechanisms of superconductivity depression. In particular, I will discuss that the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the F layers, giving rise to a new giant magnetoresistance effect which might be of interest for spintronic applications. Work done in collaboration with V. Peña^1, Z. Sefrioui^1, J. Garcia-Barriocanal^1, C. Visani^1, D. Arias^1, C. Leon^1 , N. Nemes^2, M. Garcia Hernandez^2, S. G. E. te Velthuis^3, A. Hoffmann^3, M. Varela^4, S. J. Pennycook^4. Work supported by MCYT MAT 2005-06024, CAM GR- MAT-0771/2004, UCM PR3/04-12399 Work at Argonne supported by the Department of Energy, Basic

  7. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  8. Gravitoelectromagnetism and Dark Energy in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    De Matos, C J

    2006-01-01

    A gravitomagnetic analogue of the London moment in superconductors can explain the anomalous Cooper pair mass excess reported by Janet Tate. Ultimately the gravitomagnetic London moment is attributed to the breaking of the principle of general covariance in superconductors. This naturally implies non-conservation of classical energy-momentum. Possible relation with the manifestation of dark energy in superconductors is questioned.

  9. Surface estimation methods with phased-arrays for adaptive ultrasonic imaging in complex components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, S.; Calmon, P.; Calvo, M.; Le Jeune, L.; Iakovleva, E.

    2015-03-01

    Immersion ultrasonic testing of structures with complex geometries may be significantly improved by using phased-arrays and specific adaptive algorithms that allow to image flaws under a complex and unknown interface. In this context, this paper presents a comparative study of different Surface Estimation Methods (SEM) available in the CIVA software and used for adaptive imaging. These methods are based either on time-of-flight measurements or on image processing. We also introduce a generalized adaptive method where flaws may be fully imaged with half-skip modes. In this method, both the surface and the back-wall of a complex structure are estimated before imaging flaws.

  10. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols, Clouds, and Surface Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    record carefully calibrated all-sky images of vis-NIR polarization from the ground (Shaw et al. 2010), and we used data from that system and supporting...Polarization Imager (API) System In previous research we designed, built, and calibrated an all-sky polarization imager (API) instrument (Pust and Shaw...L. Pezzaniti, D. B. Chenault, and L. E. Roth, “Measured comparison of the crossover periods for mid- and long-wave IR (MWIR and LWIR ) polarimetric

  11. Contribution of polarimetric imaging for the characterization of fibrous surface properties at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlonias, Michel; Bigué, Laurent; Bueno, Marie-Ange

    2010-01-01

    The point in using polarimetric imaging for surface characterization is highlighted in this paper. A method for the evaluation of nonwoven surface properties at microscopic and macroscopic scales is described. This method is based on a polarimetric apparatus and various image processing operations are then performed depending on the studied scale. Polarimetric imaging applied to nonwovens, particularly degree of polarization imaging, highlights texture inhomogeneities. At both scales, image processing techniques were designed to analyze surface zones of different textures. At the macroscopic scale, a basic image processing was developed in order to detect the nonwoven manufacturing process defects. Moreover at the microscopic scale, i.e. at the fiber scale, image processing was adapted to evaluate fiber orientation within nonwovens, which is known to be an important information for mechanical behavior prediction.

  12. Quantitative comparisons of radar image, scatterometer, and surface roughness data from Pisgah Crater, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Engheta, N.

    1983-01-01

    The relationships between radar image brightness and backscatter coefficient, between the backscatter coefficient and surface roughness, and between surface roughness and geology, must be established in order to satisfy criteria for the quantitative use of radar images. Attention is presently given to the merits of calibrated radar images and scatterometers as sources of the backscatter coefficient, theories that yield the coefficient on the basis of known surface roughness (and vice versa), and the geologic interpretation of surface roughness and backscatter signatures. These considerations are discussed in the case of the Pisgah Crater and lava field in the Mojave Desert of California.

  13. Anisotropy of the Seebeck Coefficient in the Cuprate Superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y}: Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Bidirectional Charge Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cyr-Choinière

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y} is measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, at hole dopings p=0.11 and p=0.12, for heat currents along the a and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal structure. For both directions, S/T decreases and becomes negative at low temperature, a signature that the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction due to broken translational symmetry. Above a clear threshold field, a strong new feature appears in S_{b}, for conduction along the b axis only. We attribute this feature to the onset of 3D-coherent unidirectional charge-density-wave modulations seen by x-ray diffraction, also along the b axis only. Because these modulations have a sharp onset temperature well below the temperature where S/T starts to drop towards negative values, we infer that they are not the cause of Fermi-surface reconstruction. Instead, the reconstruction must be caused by the quasi-2D bidirectional modulations that develop at significantly higher temperature. The unidirectional order only confers an additional anisotropy to the already reconstructed Fermi surface, also manifest as an in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity.

  14. Anisotropy of the Seebeck Coefficient in the Cuprate Superconductor YBa2 Cu3 Oy : Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Bidirectional Charge Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr-Choinière, O.; Badoux, S.; Grissonnanche, G.; Michon, B.; Afshar, S. A. A.; Fortier, S.; LeBoeuf, D.; Graf, D.; Day, J.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, R.; Doiron-Leyraud, N.; Taillefer, Louis

    2017-07-01

    The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate YBa2 Cu3 Oy is measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, at hole dopings p =0.11 and p =0.12 , for heat currents along the a and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal structure. For both directions, S /T decreases and becomes negative at low temperature, a signature that the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction due to broken translational symmetry. Above a clear threshold field, a strong new feature appears in Sb, for conduction along the b axis only. We attribute this feature to the onset of 3D-coherent unidirectional charge-density-wave modulations seen by x-ray diffraction, also along the b axis only. Because these modulations have a sharp onset temperature well below the temperature where S /T starts to drop towards negative values, we infer that they are not the cause of Fermi-surface reconstruction. Instead, the reconstruction must be caused by the quasi-2D bidirectional modulations that develop at significantly higher temperature. The unidirectional order only confers an additional anisotropy to the already reconstructed Fermi surface, also manifest as an in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity.

  15. Measuring grinding surface roughness based on the sharpness evaluation of colour images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaian, Y. I.; Jian, L. I. U.; Enhui, L. U.; Peng, A. O.

    2016-02-01

    Current machine vision-based detection methods for metal surface roughness mainly use the grey values of images for statistical analysis but do not make full use of the colour information and ignore the subjective judgment of the human vision system. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure surface roughness through the sharpness evaluation of colour images. Based on the difference in sharpness of virtual images of colour blocks that are formed on grinding surfaces with different roughness, an algorithm for evaluating the sharpness of colour images that is based on the difference of the RGB colour space was used to develop a correlation model between the sharpness and the surface roughness. The correlation model was analysed under two conditions: constant illumination and varying illumination. The effect of the surface textures of the grinding samples on the image sharpness was also considered, demonstrating the feasibility of the detection method. The results show that the sharpness is strongly correlated with the surface roughness; when the illumination and the surface texture have the same orientation, the sharpness clearly decreases with increasing surface roughness. Under varying illumination, this correlation between the sharpness and surface roughness was highly robust, and the sharpness of each virtual image increased linearly with the illumination. Relative to the detection method for surface roughness using gray level co-occurrence matrix or artificial neural network, the proposed method is convenient, highly accurate and has a wide measurement range.

  16. Three-dimensional Majorana fermions in chiral superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozii, Vladyslav; Venderbos, Jörn W F; Fu, Liang

    2016-12-01

    Using a systematic symmetry and topology analysis, we establish that three-dimensional chiral superconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling and odd-parity pairing generically host low-energy nodal quasiparticles that are spin-nondegenerate and realize Majorana fermions in three dimensions. By examining all types of chiral Cooper pairs with total angular momentum J formed by Bloch electrons with angular momentum j in crystals, we obtain a comprehensive classification of gapless Majorana quasiparticles in terms of energy-momentum relation and location on the Fermi surface. We show that the existence of bulk Majorana fermions in the vicinity of spin-selective point nodes is rooted in the nonunitary nature of chiral pairing in spin-orbit-coupled superconductors. We address experimental signatures of Majorana fermions and find that the nuclear magnetic resonance spin relaxation rate is significantly suppressed for nuclear spins polarized along the nodal direction as a consequence of the spin-selective Majorana nature of nodal quasiparticles. Furthermore, Majorana nodes in the bulk have nontrivial topology and imply the presence of Majorana bound states on the surface, which form arcs in momentum space. We conclude by proposing the heavy fermion superconductor PrOs4Sb12 and related materials as promising candidates for nonunitary chiral superconductors hosting three-dimensional Majorana fermions.

  17. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John M.

    2015-03-01

    The concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x=0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with the uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x=0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.

  18. Two-step flux penetration in classic antiferromagnetic superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Krzyszton, T.; Rogacki, K.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of antiferromagnetic order on the mixed state of a superconductor may result in creation of spin-flop domains along vortices. This may happen when an external magnetic field is strong enough to flip over magnetic moments in the vortex core from their ground state configuration. The formation of domain structure causes modification of the surface energy barrier, and creation of the new state in which magnetic flux density is independent of the applied field. The modified surface ...

  19. Multistrand superconductor cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Albert R.

    1985-01-01

    Improved multistrand Rutherford-type superconductor cable is produced by using strands which are preformed, prior to being wound into the cable, so that each strand has a variable cross section, with successive portions having a substantially round cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a rectangular cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a round cross section and so forth, in repetitive cycles along the length of the strand. The cable is wound and flattened so that the portions of rectangular cross section extend across the two flat sides of the cable at the strand angle. The portions of round cross section are bent at the edges of the flattened cable, so as to extend between the two flat sides. The rectangular portions of the strands slide easily over one another, so as to facilitate flexing and bending of the cable, while also minimizing the possibility of causing damage to the strands by such flexing or bending. Moreover, the improved cable substantially maintains its compactness and cross-sectional shape when the cable is flexed or bent.

  20. Terahertz Detection with Twin Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor Tunnel Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; WANG Ming-Jye; SHI Sheng-Cai; Hiroshi Mat-suo

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz detection with twin superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junctions, which are connected in parallel via an inductive thin-film superconducting microstrip line, is mainly studied. Firstly, we investigate the direct-detection response of a superconducting twin-junction device by means of a Fourier transform spectrometer. Secondly, we construct a direct-detection model of twin SIS tunnel junctions. The superconducting twin-junction device is then simulated in terms of the constructed model. The simulation result is found to be in good agreement with the measured one. In addition, we observe that the direct-detection response of the device is consistent with the noise temperature behaviour.

  1. High-Resolution MR Imaging with Strong Local "surface" Gradient Coils, and, Optimization of Spgr Techniques for Functional MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haoran

    In this thesis we discuss two specific topics in magnetic resonance imaging. The first concerns the technical requirements of high resolution MR imaging. Unique local "surface" gradient coils have been designed, constructed, integrated with a whole body MR imaging system, and used to acquire MR images demonstrating higher spatial resolution in three dimensions. The novel gradient coil design generates a strong linear gradient-field in three dimensions near the planar surface of the coil assembly for high resolution MR skin imaging. The rise times of the gradient coils were measured to be less than 250 mus, allowing rapid gradient coil switching. No significant eddy current effects have been found on the images. Images of a phantom and human skin with a field of view 3 cm by 3 cm and matrix size of 512 x 384 were obtained, corresponding to an in-plane resolution of 58 by 78 mu m. The resulting images represent a significant improvement in limiting spatial resolution compared to conventional MR images. The second topic of this thesis is functional MR imaging (FMRI). Functional MR imaging is based on the concept that neural activity in the cerebral cortex causes an increase in blood flow and a decrease in capillary deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, producing a signal enhancement in T2 ^*-weighted pulse sequences. The magnetic susceptibility of blood changes the oxygenation, changing the local T2^*. Spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) techniques both theoretically and experimentally have been optimized for functional MRI of human motor cortex. Experimental measurements have been performed and compared with the theoretical optimizations of signal to noise ratios of subtracted SPGR imaging. The experimental data are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. An FMRI of motor cortex stimulation with more than 5% intensity change has been observed using optimized techniques. Post imaging processing has been employed for displaying signal changes in the functional MR imaging.

  2. Surface Explorations: 3D Moving Images as Cartographies of Time.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, N.

    2016-01-01

    Moving images of travel and exploration have a long history. In this essay I will examine how the trope of navigation in 3D moving images can work towards an intimate and haptic encounter with other times and other places – elsewhen and elsewhere. The particular navigational construction of space in

  3. Local Surface Reconstruction from MER images using Stereo Workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongjoe; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2010-05-01

    The authors present a semi-automatic workflow that reconstructs the 3D shape of the martian surface from local stereo images delivered by PnCam or NavCam on systems such as the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission and in the future the ESA-NASA ExoMars rover PanCam. The process is initiated with manually selected tiepoints on a stereo workstation which is then followed by a tiepoint refinement, stereo-matching using region growing and Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LMA)-based bundle adjustment processing. The stereo workstation, which is being developed by UCL in collaboration with colleagues at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) within the EU FP7 ProVisG project, includes a set of practical GUI-based tools that enable an operator to define a visually correct tiepoint via a stereo display. To achieve platform and graphic hardware independence, the stereo application has been implemented using JPL's JADIS graphic library which is written in JAVA and the remaining processing blocks used in the reconstruction workflow have also been developed as a JAVA package to increase the code re-usability, portability and compatibility. Although initial tiepoints from the stereo workstation are reasonably acceptable as true correspondences, it is often required to employ an optional validity check and/or quality enhancing process. To meet this requirement, the workflow has been designed to include a tiepoint refinement process based on the Adaptive Least Square Correlation (ALSC) matching algorithm so that the initial tiepoints can be further enhanced to sub-pixel precision or rejected if they fail to pass the ALSC matching threshold. Apart from the accuracy of reconstruction, it is obvious that the other criterion to assess the quality of reconstruction is the density (or completeness) of reconstruction, which is not attained in the refinement process. Thus, we re-implemented a stereo region growing process, which is a core matching algorithm within the UCL

  4. Edge detection of remote sensing image based on nonlinear intensity of curved surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张连蓬; 刘国林; 江涛

    2003-01-01

    A new edge detector based on the nonlinear intensity of curved surface was proposed. The edge detector describes the largest curvature and the smallest curvature of curved surface, therefore it can reflect the real largest direction of image edge jump. By the new edge detector, it is convenient to calculate the curvature in any direction of the curved surface and the curvature can be used in the identification of edge direction and the feature extraction of objects on remote sensing image.

  5. Gutzwiller density functional studies of FeAs-based superconductors: structure optimization and evidence for a three-dimensional Fermi surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangtao; Qian, Yumin; Xu, Gang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong

    2010-01-29

    The electronic structures of FeAs compounds are sensitive to FeAs bonding, which is described unsuccessfully by the local density approximation (LDA). Treating the multiorbital fluctuations from ab inito LDA+Gutzwiller method, we can now predict the correct FeAs bond length and bonding strength, which will explain the observed "soft phonon." The bands are narrowed by a factor of 2 from their LDA widths. The d{3z{2}-r{2}} orbital is pushed up to cross the Fermi level, forming a three-dimensional Fermi surface, which reduces the anisotropy. The interorbital Hund's coupling J rather than U plays a crucial role in obtaining these results.

  6. Study on preprocessing of surface defect images of cold steel strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoye GE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The image preprocessing is an important part in the field of digital image processing, and it’s also the premise for the image detection of cold steel strip surface defects. The factors including the complicated on-site environment and the distortion of the optical system will cause image degradation, which will directly affects the feature extraction and classification of the images. Aiming at these problems, a method combining the adaptive median filter and homomorphic filter is proposed to preprocess the image. The adaptive median filter is effective for image denoising, and the Gaussian homomorphic filter can steadily remove the nonuniform illumination of images. Finally, the original and preprocessed images and their features are analyzed and compared. The results show that this method can improve the image quality effectively.

  7. Topological insulators and topological superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernevig, Andrei B

    2013-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook is the first pedagogical synthesis of the field of topological insulators and superconductors, one of the most exciting areas of research in condensed matter physics. Presenting the latest developments, while providing all the calculations necessary for a self-contained and complete description of the discipline, it is ideal for graduate students and researchers preparing to work in this area, and it will be an essential reference both within and outside the classroom. The book begins with simple concepts such as Berry phases, Dirac fermions, Hall conductance and its link to topology, and the Hofstadter problem of lattice electrons in a magnetic field. It moves on to explain topological phases of matter such as Chern insulators, two- and three-dimensional topological insulators, and Majorana p-wave wires. Additionally, the book covers zero modes on vortices in topological superconductors, time-reversal topological superconductors, and topological responses/field theory and topolo...

  8. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Bernard R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

  9. Superconductor stability, 1983: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three main topics have been discussed in this paper, namely, internally cooled superconductors, cooling by superfluid helium, and metastable magnets. The discussion of each has centered around a dominant idea, and it is fitting to highlight these ideas by way of conclusion. With regard to internally cooled superconductors, most of what we have learned in the last few years centers on the strong motion caused by the thermal expansion of helium. How naive were our early calculations that treated the helium as though it were incompressible. Our discussion of He-II was organized around the Gorter-Mellink relation and the solutions of the nonlinear diffusion equation it gives rise to. And our discussion of metastable magnets revolved around the fruitful concept of the MPZ. These three ideas are sturdy trunks that support much of the thought about superconductor stability that has flowered in the past several years.

  10. [Comparison of performances in retrieving impervious surface between hyperspectral (Hyperion) and multispectral (TM/ETM+) images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fei; Xu, Han-Qiu

    2014-04-01

    The retrieval of impervious surface is a hot topic in the remote sensing field in the past decade. Nevertheless, studies on retrieving impervious surface from hyperspectral image and the comparison of the performances in retrieving impervious surface between hyperspectral and multispectral images are rarely reported. Therefore, The present paper focuses on the characteristics of hyperspectral (EO-1 Hyperion) and multispectral (Landsat TM/ETM+) images and implements a complementary study on the comparison based on the retrieved impervious surface information between Hyperion and TM/ETM+ data. For up to 242 bands of Hyperion image, a further study was carried out to select feature bands for impervious surface retrieving using stepwise discriminant analysis. As a result, 11 feature bands were selected and a new image named Hyperion' was thus composed. The new Hyperion' image was used to investigate whether this band-reduced image could obtain higher accuracy in retrieving impervious surface. The three test regions were selected from Fuzhou, Guangzhou and Hangzhou of China, with date-coincident or nearly coincident image pairs of the used sensors. The linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) was employed to retrieve impervious surface and the results were accessed for their accuracy. The comparison shows that the Hyperion image has higher accuracy than TM/ETM+, and the Hyperion' composed of the selected 11 feature bands has the highest accuracy. The advantages of Hyperion in spectral and radiometric resolutions over TM/ETM+ are believed to be the main factors contributing to the higher accuracy. The high spectral and radiometric resolutions of Hyperion image allow the sensor to have higher sensitivity in distinguishing subtle spectral changes of ground objects. While, the highest accuracy the 11-band Hyperion' image achieved is owing to the significant reduction of the band dimension of the image and thus the band redundancy.

  11. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2002-01-01

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  12. Characterization of the heavy metal pyrochlore lattice superconductor CaIr2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Gibson, Quinn; Schoop, Leslie M; Luo, Huixia; Cava, R J

    2015-05-13

    We report the electronic properties of the cubic laves phase superconductor CaIr2(Tc = 5.8 K), in which the Ir atoms have a pyrochlore lattice. The estimated superconducting parameters obtained from magnetization and specific heat measurements indicate that CaIr2 is a weakly coupled BCS superconductor. Electronic band structure calculations show that the Ir d-states are dominant at the Fermi level, creating a complex Fermi surface that is impacted substantially by spin-orbit coupling.

  13. Holographic Multi-Band Superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Maity, Debaprasad

    2011-01-01

    We propose a gravity dual for the holographic superconductor with multi-band carriers. Moreover, the currents of these carriers are unified under a global non-Abelian symmetry, which is dual to the bulk non-Abelian gauge symmetry. We study the phase diagram of our model, and find it qualitatively agrees with the one for the realistic 2-band superconductor, such as MgB2. We also evaluate the holographic conductivities and find the expected mean-field like behaviors in some cases. However, for a wide range of the parameter space, we also find the non-mean-field like behavior with negative conductivities.

  14. High temperature superconductor current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  15. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Novel Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lupi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the coupling of Synchrotron Radiation and Michelson interferometry, one may obtain in the terahertz (THz range transmittance and reflectivity spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N up to 103. In this paper we review the application of this spectroscopic technique to novel superconductors with an increasing degree of complexity: the single-gap boron-doped diamond; the isotropic multiband V3Si, where superconductivity opens two gaps at the Fermi energy; the CaAlSi superconductor, isostructural to MgB2, with a single gap in the hexagonal ab plane and two gaps along the orthogonal c axis.

  16. Topological Aspects of Triplet Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ji-Rong; XU Dong-Hui; ZHANG Xin-Hui; LI Ran

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, using the φ-mapping theory, it is shown that two kinds of topological defects, i.e., the vortex lines and the monopoles exist in the helical configuration of magnetic field in triplet superconductors. And the inner topological structure of these defects is studied. Because the knot solitons in the triplet superconductors are characterized by the Hopf invariant, we also establish a relationship between the Hopf invariant and the linking number of knots family,and reveal the inner topological structure of the Hopf invariant.

  17. Holographic superconductors without translational symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Hua Bi

    2014-01-01

    A holographic superconductor is constructed in the background of a massive gravity theory. In the normal state without condensation, the conductivity exhibits a Drude peak that approaches a delta function in the massless gravity limit as studied by David Vegh. In the superconducting state, besides the infinite DC conductivity, the AC conductivity has Drude behavior at low frequency followed by a power law-fall. These results are in agreement with that found earlier by Horowitz and Santos, who studied a holographic superconductor with an implicit periodic potential beyond the probe limit. The results also agree with measurements on some cuprates.

  18. A detection instrument for enhanced-fluorescence and label-free imaging on photonic crystal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Ian D; Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Jones, Sarah I; Dorvel, Brian R; Chaudhery, Vikram; Vodkin, Lila O; Bashir, Rashid; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-07-20

    We report on the design and demonstration of an optical imaging system capable of exciting surface-bound fluorophores within the resonant evanescent electric field of a photonic crystal surface and gathering fluorescence emission that is directed toward the imaging objective by the photonic crystal. The system also has the ability to quantify shifts in the local resonance angle induced by the adsorption of biomolecules on the photonic crystal surface for label-free biomolecular imaging. With these two capabilities combined within a single detection system, we demonstrate label-free images self-registered to enhanced fluorescence images with 328x more sensitive fluorescence detection relative to a glass surface. This technique is applied to a DNA microarray where label-free quantification of immobilized capture DNA enables improved quality control and subsequent enhanced fluorescence detection of dye-tagged hybridized DNA yields 3x more genes to be detected versus commercially available microarray substrates.

  19. Novel response function resolves by image deconvolution more details of surface nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2010-01-01

    A novel method of image processing is presented which relies on deconvolution of data using the response function of the apparatus. It is revealed that all the surface structures observed by digital imaging are generated by a convolution of the response function of the apparatus with the surfaces......’ nanomorphology, which provided images of convoluted physical structures rather than images of real physical structures. In order to restore the genuine physical information on surface structures, a deconvolution using a novel response function of the feedback circuitry is required. At the highest resolution......, that is, atomic resolution, the effect of deconvolution is at its maximum, whereas images at lower resolution are sharpened by eliminating smoothing effects and shadow effects. The method is applied to measurements of imaging by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (in situ STM) at atomic resolution...

  20. Detection of surface cutting defect on magnet using Fourier image reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王福亮; 左博

    2016-01-01

    A magnet is an important component of a speaker, as it makes the coil move back forth, and it is commonly used in mobile information terminals. Defects may appear on the surface of the magnet while cutting it into smaller slices, and hence, automatic detection of surface cutting defect detection becomes an important task for magnet production. In this work, an image-based detection system for magnet surface defect was constructed, a Fourier image reconstruction based on the magnet surface image processing method was proposed. The Fourier transform was used to get the spectrum image of the magnet image, and the defect was shown as a bright line in it. The Hough transform was used to detect the angle of the bright line, and this line was removed to eliminate the defect from the original gray image;then the inverse Fourier transform was applied to get the background gray image. The defect region was obtained by evaluating the gray-level differences between the original image and the background gray image. Further, the effects of several parameters in this method were studied and the optimized values were obtained. Experiment results show that the proposed method can detect surface cutting defects in a magnet automatically and efficiently.

  1. Nondestructive SEM for surface and subsurface wafer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propst, Roy H.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Davies, Brian G.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Johnson, Darryl G.; Oxford, William V.; Smith, Craig A.

    1987-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is considered as a tool for both failure analysis as well as device characterization. A survey is made of various operational SEM modes and their applicability to image processing methods on semiconductor devices.

  2. Image distortion due to refraction by planar surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arizaga, R; Cap, N; Rabal, H; Trivi, M [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC) and OPTIMO Dto de Ciencias Basicas, Fac. de Ingenieria UNLP, PO Box 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-01-15

    The term 'apparent depth' is commonly treated in textbooks as an issue easily understandable from the point of view of paraxial optical geometrical optics. Nevertheless, everyday life tells us that most of the time the observation of objects immersed in water is made under a great range of visual angles where the paraxial approximation is not valid. Here we developed a non-paraxial treatment to calculate the position and shape of the image of objects immersed in liquids of different refractive indices. The approach was focused on the parametric positions of the images of a single point at different viewing angles. Then we calculated how the image of an extended object is distorted. By using the Matlab software, it is possible to visualize the images for different geometrical conditions. We also include the analysis for refractive index with negative values as is the case of metamaterials.

  3. Clinical Validation of two Surface Imaging Systems for Patient Positioning in Percutaneous Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Wiencierz, Manfred; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Precise patient positioning and thus precise positioning of the planning target volume (PTV) is a prerequisite for effective treatment in percutaneous radiation therapy. Conventional imaging modalities used to ensure exact positioning for treatment typically involve additional radiation exposure of the patient. A different approach to patient alignment without additional exposure is provided by optical 3D surface scanning and registration systems. We investigated two systems Catalyst and AlignRT, which allowed us to generate and validate surface images of 50 patients undergoing irradiation on a Tomotherapy system. We compared the positions proposed by these two surface imaging systems (SIS) with the actual adjustments in patient positions made on the basis of MVCT scans. With the two SIS, the surface of every single patient was repeatedly recorded throughout treatment. In addition, we performed a systematic analysis of both systems using a body phantom. At least 10 surface images were available from each pati...

  4. Feasibility study for image guided kidney surgery: assessment of required intraoperative surface for accurate image to physical space registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Anne B.; Clements, Logan W.; Herrell, S. Duke; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Currently, the removal of kidney tumor masses uses only direct or laparoscopic visualizations, resulting in prolonged procedure and recovery times and reduced clear margin. Applying current image guided surgery (IGS) techniques, as those used in liver cases, to kidney resections (nephrectomies) presents a number of complications. Most notably is the limited field of view of the intraoperative kidney surface, which constrains the ability to obtain a surface delineation that is geometrically descriptive enough to drive a surface-based registration. Two different phantom orientations were used to model the laparoscopic and traditional partial nephrectomy views. For the laparoscopic view, fiducial point sets were compiled from a CT image volume using anatomical features such as the renal artery and vein. For the traditional view, markers attached to the phantom set-up were used for fiducials and targets. The fiducial points were used to perform a point-based registration, which then served as a guide for the surface-based registration. Laser range scanner (LRS) obtained surfaces were registered to each phantom surface using a rigid iterative closest point algorithm. Subsets of each phantom's LRS surface were used in a robustness test to determine the predictability of their registrations to transform the entire surface. Results from both orientations suggest that about half of the kidney's surface needs to be obtained intraoperatively for accurate registrations between the image surface and the LRS surface, suggesting the obtained kidney surfaces were geometrically descriptive enough to perform accurate registrations. This preliminary work paves the way for further development of kidney IGS systems.

  5. Design of vector quantizer for image compression using self-organizing feature map and surface fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Arijit; Pal, Nikhil R; Chanda, Bhabatosh

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new scheme of designing a vector quantizer for image compression. First, a set of codevectors is generated using the self-organizing feature map algorithm. Then, the set of blocks associated with each code vector is modeled by a cubic surface for better perceptual fidelity of the reconstructed images. Mean-removed vectors from a set of training images is used for the construction of a generic codebook. Further, Huffman coding of the indices generated by the encoder and the difference-coded mean values of the blocks are used to achieve better compression ratio. We proposed two indices for quantitative assessment of the psychovisual quality (blocking effect) of the reconstructed image. Our experiments on several training and test images demonstrate that the proposed scheme can produce reconstructed images of good quality while achieving compression at low bit rates. Index Terms-Cubic surface fitting, generic codebook, image compression, self-organizing feature map, vector quantization.

  6. Imaging of Stellar Surfaces with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, A.; Schmitt, H. R.; van Belle, G. T.; Hutter, Clark; Mozurkewich, D.; Armstrong, J. T.; Baines, E. K.; Restaino, S. R.

    The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) has a unique layout which is particularly well-suited for high-resolution interferometric imaging. By combining the NPOI layout with a new data acquisition and fringe tracking system we are progressing toward a imaging capability which will exceed any other interferometer in operation. The project, funded by the National Science Foundation, combines several existing advances and infrastructure at NPOI with modest enhancements. For optimal imaging there are several requirements that should be fulfilled. The observatory should be capable of measuring visibilities on a wide range of baseline lengths and orientations, providing complete UV coverage in a short period of time. It should measure visibility amplitudes with good SNR on all baselines as critical imaging information is often contained in low-amplitude visibilities. It should measure the visibility phase on all baselines. The technologies which can achieve this are the NPOI Y-shaped array with (nearly) equal spacing between telescopes and an ability for rapid configuration. Placing 6-telescopes in a row makes it possible to measure visibilities into the 4th lobe of the visibility function. By arranging the available telescopes carefully we will be able to switch, every few days, between 3 different 6-station chains which provide symmetric coverage in the UV (Fourier) plane without moving any telescopes, only by moving beam relay mirrors. The 6-station chains are important to achieve the highest imaging resolution, and switching rapidly between station chains provides uniform coverage. Coherent integration techniques can be used to obtain good SNR on very small visibilities. Coherently integrated visibilities can be used for imaging with standard radio imaging packages such as AIPS. The commissioning of one additional station, the use of new data acquisition hardware and fringe tracking algorithms are the enhancements which make this project possible.

  7. Numerical analysis of thermally actuated magnets for magnetization of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Quan; Yan Yu; Rawlings, Colin; Coombs, Tim, E-mail: ql229@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity Group, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street. Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    Superconductors, such as YBCO bulks, have extremely high potential magnetic flux densities, comparing to rare earth magnets. Therefore, the magnetization of superconductors has attracted broad attention and contribution from both academic research and industry. In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to magnetize superconductors. Unusually, instead of using high magnetic fields and pulses, repeatedly magnetic waves with strength of as low as rare earth magnets are applied. These magnetic waves, generated by thermally controlling a Gadolinium (Gd) bulk with a rare earth magnet underneath, travel over the flat surface of a YBCO bulk and get trapped little by little. Thus, a very small magnetic field can be used to build up a very large magnetic field. In this paper, the modelling results of thermally actuated magnetic waves are presented showing how to transfer sequentially applied thermal pulses into magnetic waves. The experiment results of the magnetization of YBCO bulk are also presented to demonstrate how superconductors are progressively magnetized by small magnetic field

  8. Nature of the superconductor-insulator transition in disordered superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubi, Yonatan; Meir, Yigal; Avishai, Yshai

    2007-10-18

    The interplay of superconductivity and disorder has intrigued scientists for several decades. Disorder is expected to enhance the electrical resistance of a system, whereas superconductivity is associated with a zero-resistance state. Although superconductivity has been predicted to persist even in the presence of disorder, experiments performed on thin films have demonstrated a transition from a superconducting to an insulating state with increasing disorder or magnetic field. The nature of this transition is still under debate, and the subject has become even more relevant with the realization that high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductors are intrinsically disordered. Here we present numerical simulations of the superconductor-insulator transition in two-dimensional disordered superconductors, starting from a microscopic description that includes thermal phase fluctuations. We demonstrate explicitly that disorder leads to the formation of islands where the superconducting order is high. For weak disorder, or high electron density, increasing the magnetic field results in the eventual vanishing of the amplitude of the superconducting order parameter, thereby forming an insulating state. On the other hand, at lower electron densities or higher disorder, increasing the magnetic field suppresses the correlations between the phases of the superconducting order parameter in different islands, giving rise to a different type of superconductor-insulator transition. One of the important predictions of this work is that in the regime of high disorder, there are still superconducting islands in the sample, even on the insulating side of the transition. This result, which is consistent with experiments, explains the recently observed huge magneto-resistance peak in disordered thin films and may be relevant to the observation of 'the pseudogap phenomenon' in underdoped high-T(c) superconductors.

  9. Three-dimensional surface imaging in plastic surgery: foundation, practical applications, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jessica B; Small, Kevin H; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface imaging has gained clinical acceptance in plastic and reconstructive surgery. In contrast to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging, three-dimensional surface imaging relies on triangulation in stereophotography to measure surface x, y, and z coordinates. This study reviews the past, present, and future directions of three-dimensional topographic imaging in plastic surgery. Historically, three-dimensional imaging technology was first used in a clinical setting in 1944 to diagnose orthodontologic conditions. Karlan established its use in the field of plastic surgery in 1979, analyzing contours and documenting facial asymmetries. Present use of three-dimensional surface imaging has focused on standardizing patient topographic measurements to enhance preoperative planning and to improve postoperative outcomes. Various measurements (e.g., volume, surface area, vector distance, curvature) have been applied to breast, body, and facial topography to augment patient analysis. Despite the rapid progression of the clinical applications of three-dimensional imaging, current use of this technology is focused on the surgeon's perspective and secondarily the patient's perspective. Advancements in patient simulation may improve patient-physician communication, education, and satisfaction. However, a communal database of three-dimensional surface images integrated with emerging three-dimensional printing and portable information technology will validate measurements and strengthen preoperative planning and postoperative outcomes. Three-dimensional surface imaging is a useful adjunct to plastic and reconstructive surgery practices and standardizes measurements to create objectivity in a subjective field. Key improvements in three-dimensional imaging technology may significantly enhance the quality of plastic and reconstructive surgery in the near future.

  10. Chemistry of high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    This review volume contains the most up-to-date articles on the chemical aspects of high temperature oxide superconductors. These articles are written by some of the leading scientists in the field and includes a comprehensive list of references. This is an essential volume for researchers working in the fields of ceramics, materials science and chemistry.

  11. High Temperature Superconductor Machine Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2011-01-01

    A versatile testing platform for a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) machine has been constructed. The stationary HTS field winding can carry up to 10 coils and it is operated at a temperature of 77K. The rotating armature is at room temperature. Test results and performance for the HTS field...

  12. Development of superconductor application technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, G. W.; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H. G.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Won, D. Y.; Jang, K. I.; Kwon, S. C.; Kim, W. J.; Ji, Y. A.; Yang, S. W.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. D.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, D. M.; Park, H. W.; Yu, J. K.; Lee, I. S.; Kim, J. J.; Choi, H. S.; Chu, Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, D. H.

    1997-09-01

    Fabrication of high Tc bulk superconductor and its application, fabrication of superconducting wire for electric power device and analysis for cryogenic system were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies for electric power system. High quality YBaCuO bulk superconductor was fabricated by controlling initial powder preparation process and prototype flywheel energy storage device was designed basically. The superconducting levitation force measuring device was made to examine the property of prepared superconductor specimen. Systematic studies onthe method of starting powder preparation, mechanical fabrication process, heat treatment condition and analysis of plastic deformation were carried out to increase the stability and reproducibility of superconducting wire. A starting power with good reactivity and fine particle size was obtained by mechanical grinding, control of phase assemblage, and emulsion drying method. Ag/BSCCO tape with good cross sectional shape and Jc of 20,000 A/cm{sup 2} was fabricated by applying CIP packing procedure. Multifilamentary wire with Jc of 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} was fabricated by rolling method using square billet as starting shape. The joining of the multifilamentary wire was done by etching and pressing process and showed 50% of joining efficiency. Analysis on the heat loss in cryostat for high Tc superconducting device was carried out for optimum design of the future cryogenic system. (author). 66 refs., 104 figs.

  13. Spatial characterization of nanotextured surfaces by visual color imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Murthy, Swathi; Madsen, Morten H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using an ordinary color camera to characterize nanostructures from the visual color of the structures. The method provides a macroscale overview image from which micrometer-sized regions can be analyzed independently, hereby revealing long-range spatial variations of the struc......We present a method using an ordinary color camera to characterize nanostructures from the visual color of the structures. The method provides a macroscale overview image from which micrometer-sized regions can be analyzed independently, hereby revealing long-range spatial variations...

  14. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, Shweta; Kant, Rama, E-mail: rkant@chemistry.du.ac.in

    2013-10-01

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  15. Surface height map estimation from a single image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Zhong, Guoqiang; Qi, Lin; Dong, Junyu; Pham, Tuan D.; Mao, Jianzhou

    2017-02-01

    Surface height map estimation is an important task in high-resolution 3D reconstruction. This task differs from general scene depth estimation in the fact that surface height maps contain more high frequency information or fine details. Existing methods based on radar or other equipments can be used for large-scale scene depth recovery, but might fail in small-scale surface height map estimation. Although some methods are available for surface height reconstruction based on multiple images, e.g. photometric stereo, height map estimation directly from a single image is still a challenging issue. In this paper, we present a novel method based on convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for estimating the height map from a single image, without any equipments or extra prior knowledge of the image contents. Experimental results based on procedural and real texture datasets show the proposed algorithm is effective and reliable.

  16. Ocean Surface Current Vectors from MODIS Terra/Aqua Sea Surface Temperature Image Pairs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellites that record imagery of the same sea surface area, at times separated by a few hours, can be used to estimate ocean surface velocity fields based on the...

  17. THREE DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN HEART SURFACE FROM SINGLE IMAGE- VIEW UNDER DIFFERENT ILLUMINATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeel Al-Surmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction from a single-view image is a longstanding issue in computer vision literature, especially in the medical field. Traditional medical imaging techniques that provide information about the heart and which are used to reconstruct the heart model, include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT images. However, in some cases, they are not available and the applications that use these techniques to model the human heart only produce acceptable results after a long process, which involves acquiring the input data, as well as the segmentation process, the matching process, effort and cost. Therefore, it would be useful to be able to use a 2D single image to reconstruct the 3D heart surface model. We introduce an image-based human heart surface reconstruction from a single image as input. To model the surface of the heart, the proposed method, first, detects and corrects the specular reflection from the heart’s surface, which causes deformation of the surface in the R3. Second, it extrudes the three axes for each image pixel (e.g., x, y and z axes from the input image, in which the z-axis is calculated using the intensity value. Finally, a 3D reconstruction of the heart surface is created to help the novice cardiac surgeon to reduce the period of time in learning cardiac surgery and to enhance their perception of the operating theatre. The experimental results for images of the heart show the efficiency of the proposed method compared to the existing methods.

  18. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed TLS survey protocol and data processing workflow, details on waveform and multi-echo approaches for ground point detection, and a discussion on error analysis and challenges for measuring marsh surface elevation with TLS.

  19. Magnetic Signals of High-Temperature Superconductor Bulk During the Levitation Force Measurement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Qian, Nan; Che, Tong; Zheng, Botian; Jin, Liwei; Deng, Zigang

    2017-05-01

    In order to study the commonly neglected magnetic field information in the course of levitation force measurement process in a superconducting maglev system, a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire magnetic signals of a bulk high-Tc superconductor on both the top and the bottom surface. Working conditions including field cooling (FC) and zero field cooling were investigated for these vertical down and up motions above a permanent magnet guideway performed on a HTS maglev measurement system. We have discussed the magnetic flux variation process based on the Bean model. A magnetic hysteresis effect similar to the levitation force hysteresis loop of the bulk superconductor was displayed and analyzed in this paper. What is more valuable, there exists some available magnetic flux on the top surface of the bulk superconductor, and the proportion is as high as 62.42% in the FC condition, which provides an experimental hint to design the superconductor bulk and the applied field for practical use in a more efficient way. In particular, this work reveals real-time magnetic flux variation of the bulk superconductor in the levitation application, which is the other important information in contrast to the macroscopic levitation and guidance force investigations in previous studies, and it enriches the existing research methods. The results are significant for understanding the magnetic characteristic of superconductors, and they can contribute to optimize the present HTS maglev system design.

  20. Magnetic Signals of High-Temperature Superconductor Bulk During the Levitation Force Measurement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Qian, Nan; Che, Tong; Zheng, Botian; Jin, Liwei; Deng, Zigang

    2017-02-01

    In order to study the commonly neglected magnetic field information in the course of levitation force measurement process in a superconducting maglev system, a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire magnetic signals of a bulk high-Tc superconductor on both the top and the bottom surface. Working conditions including field cooling (FC) and zero field cooling were investigated for these vertical down and up motions above a permanent magnet guideway performed on a HTS maglev measurement system. We have discussed the magnetic flux variation process based on the Bean model. A magnetic hysteresis effect similar to the levitation force hysteresis loop of the bulk superconductor was displayed and analyzed in this paper. What is more valuable, there exists some available magnetic flux on the top surface of the bulk superconductor, and the proportion is as high as 62.42% in the FC condition, which provides an experimental hint to design the superconductor bulk and the applied field for practical use in a more efficient way. In particular, this work reveals real-time magnetic flux variation of the bulk superconductor in the levitation application, which is the other important information in contrast to the macroscopic levitation and guidance force investigations in previous studies, and it enriches the existing research methods. The results are significant for understanding the magnetic characteristic of superconductors, and they can contribute to optimize the present HTS maglev system design.

  1. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATION OF SURFACE AREA FROM DIGITAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Ziegel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J. Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius. For general shapes bounds for the asymptotic expected relative worst case error are given. A simulation example is discussed for surface area estimation based on 2×2×2-configurations.

  2. AFM imaging of bacteria in liquid media immobilized on gelatin coated mica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, M.J.; Sullivan, C.J.; Hoyt, P.R.; Pelletier, D.A.; Wu, S.; Allison, D.P

    2003-10-15

    Immobilization of particulates, especially biomolecules and cells, onto surfaces is critical for imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM). In this paper, gelatin coated mica surfaces are shown to be suitable for immobilizing and imaging both gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus, and gram negative, Escherichia coli, bacteria in both air and liquid environments. Gelatin coated surfaces are shown to be superior to poly-L-lysine coated surfaces that are commonly used for the immobilization of cells. This cell immobilization technique is being developed primarily for live cell imaging of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The genome of R. palustris has been sequenced and the organism is the target of intensive studies aimed at understanding genome function. Images of R. palustris grown both aerobically and anaerobically in liquid media are presented. Images in liquid media show the bacteria is rod shaped and smooth while images in air show marked irregularity and folding of the surface. Significant differences in the vertical dimension are also apparent with the height of the bacteria in liquid being substantially greater than images taken in air. In air immobilized bacterial flagella are clearly seen while in liquid this structure is not visible. Additionally, significant morphological differences are observed that depend on the method of bacterial growth.

  3. Automatic Detection of Steel Ball's Surface Flaws Based on Image Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zheng-lin; TAN Wei; YANG Dong-lin; CAO Guo-hua

    2007-01-01

    A new method to detect steel ball's surface flaws is presented based on computer techniques of image processing and pattern recognition. The steel ball's surface flaws is the primary factor causing bearing failure. The high efficient and precision detections for the surface flaws of steel ball can be conducted by the presented method, including spot, abrasion, burn, scratch and crack, etc. The design of main components of the detecting system is described in detail including automatic feeding mechanism, automatic spreading mechanism of steel ball's surface, optical system of microscope, image acquisition system, image processing system. The whole automatic system is controlled by an industrial control computer, which can carry out the recognition of flaws of steel ball's surface effectively.

  4. Characterization of E coli biofim formations on baby spinach leaf surfaces using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunjeong; Baek, Insuck; Oh, Mirae; Kim, Sungyoun; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial biofilm formed by pathogens on fresh produce surfaces is a food safety concern because the complex extracellular matrix in the biofilm structure reduces the reduction and removal efficacies of washing and sanitizing processes such as chemical or irradiation treatments. Therefore, a rapid and nondestructive method to identify pathogenic biofilm on produce surfaces is needed to ensure safe consumption of fresh, raw produce. This research aimed to evaluate the feasibility of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging for detecting Escherichia.coli (ATCC 25922) biofilms on baby spinach leaf surfaces. Samples of baby spinach leaves were immersed and inoculated with five different levels (from 2.6x104 to 2.6x108 CFU/mL) of E.coli and stored at 4°C for 24 h and 48 h to induce biofilm formation. Following the two treatment days, individual leaves were gently washed to remove excess liquid inoculums from the leaf surfaces and imaged with a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system equipped with UV-A (365 nm) and violet (405 nm) excitation sources to evaluate a spectral-image-based method for biofilm detection. The imaging results with the UV-A excitation showed that leaves even at early stages of biofilm formations could be differentiated from the control leaf surfaces. This preliminary investigation demonstrated the potential of fluorescence imaging techniques for detection of biofilms on leafy green surfaces.

  5. Perspectives for in situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopic Imaging of Proteins at HOPG surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Møller, Per

    1996-01-01

    potentials on in situ potentiostatic control and releases nm size HOPG scrap bits. These are clearly different in shape from the ex situ imaged molecular-size structures. Laccase could not, however, be imaged by in situ STM, most likely due to structural incompatibility between hydrophobic HOPG surface...

  6. Dynamic Image Forces Near a Metal Surface and the Point-Charge Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabovich, A. M.; Voitenko, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of charge motion governed by image force attraction near a plane metal surface is considered and solved self-consistently. The temporal dispersion of metal dielectric permittivity makes the image forces dynamic and, hence, finite, contrary to the results of the conventional approach. Therefore, the maximal attainable velocity turns out…

  7. Microscope Image of a Martian Soil Surface Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is the closest view of the material underneath NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This sample was taken from the top centimeter of the Martian soil, and this image from the lander's Optical Microscope demonstrates its overall composition. The soil is mostly composed of fine orange particles, and also contains larger grains, about a tenth of a millimeter in diameter, and of various colors. The soil is sticky, keeping together as a slab of material on the supporting substrate even though the substrate is tilted to the vertical. The fine orange grains are at or below the resolution of the Optical Microscope. Mixed into the soil is a small amount&mdashabout 0.5 percent&mdashof white grains, possibly of a salt. The larger grains range from black to almost transparent in appearance. At the bottom of the image, the shadows of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) beams are visible. This image is 1 millimeter x 2 millimeters. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Preparation and characterization of MgB2 superconductor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shashwati Sen; D K Aswal; Ajay Singh; T V Chandrasekhar Rao; K P Muthe; J C Vyas; L C Gupta; S K Gupta; V C Sahni

    2002-05-01

    The MgB2 superconductor, synthesized using solid-state and liquid-phase sintering methods, have been characterized for various properties. The upper critical field, irreversibility line and critical current density have been determined using magnetization data. The current–voltage characteristics recorded under an applied magnetic field revealed the existence of vortex glass transition. The surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that MgB2 is sensitive to atmospheric degradation.

  9. Stereological estimation of surface area from digital images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Kiderlen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J. Ra....... For general shapes bounds for the asymptotic expected relative worst case error are given. A simulation example is discussed for surface area estimation based on 2×2×2-configurations.......A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J....... Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius...

  10. Imaging Freeform Optical Systems Designed with NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Fortunately, an all-reflective corrector avoids the issues of chromatic aberration, which are severe for a refractive corrector over this...with NURBS Freeform Surfaces,” OSA Freeform Optics Conference, Renewable Energy and Environment Congress (2013). 16. M. P. Chrisp, B. Primeau, M

  11. Josephson Current in Superconductor-Ferromagnet/Insulator/d-Wave Superconductor Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Wei; DONG Zheng-Chao

    2005-01-01

    Solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation, the energy levels of bound states are obtained in the ferromagnetic superconductor. The Josephson currents in a ferromagnetic superconductor/Insulator/d-wave superconductor junction are calculated as a function of the exchange field, temperature, and insulating barrier strength. It is found that the Josephson critical current is always suppressed by the presence of exchange field h and depends on crystalline axis orientation of d-wave superconductor.

  12. Frequency dependent magnetization of superconductor strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Kailash Prasad [Landcare Research, Palmerston North (New Zealand); Raj, Ashish [Computer Science in Radiology, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, NY (United States); Brandt, Ernst Helmut [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, POB 800665, D-70506 Stuttgart (Germany); Sastry, Pamidi V P S S, E-mail: thakurk@landcareresearch.co.nz, E-mail: asr2004@med.cornell.edu, E-mail: ehb@mf.mpg.de, E-mail: pamidi@caps.fsu.edu [Center for Advanced Power Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The frequency dependence of magnetic ac loss of thin superconductor strip subjected to an ac magnetic field perpendicular to the surface of the strip is investigated by incorporating a flux creep model into the critical state model of Brandt and Indenbom. It is found that the reduced ac loss exhibits a maximum value at a frequency f{sub m}, which is a rapidly varying function of the applied ac magnetic field. At low magnetic field, f{sub m} becomes zero, and ac loss decreases with frequency as a power law ({approx}f{sup -2/n}). Whereas at high magnetic field f{sub m} becomes infinite and ac loss increases with frequency, still following the power law ({approx}f{sup 1/n}). The analytical results are substantiated with experimental data and the results of a 2D finite element simulation.

  13. Advances in the Simultaneous Multiple Surface optical design method for imaging and non-imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Classical imaging optics has been developed over centuries in many areas, such as its paraxial imaging theory and practical design methods like multi-parametric optimization techniques. Although these imaging optical design methods can provide elegant solutions to many traditional optical problems, there are more and more new design problems, like solar concentrator, illumination system, ultra-compact camera, etc., that require maximum energy transfer efficiency, or ultra-compact optical stru...

  14. Iron-Based Superconductors as Odd-Parity Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangping Hu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Parity is a fundamental quantum number used to classify a state of matter. Materials rarely possess ground states with odd parity. We show that the superconducting state in iron-based superconductors is classified as an odd-parity s-wave spin-singlet pairing state in a single trilayer FeAs/Se, the building block of the materials. In a low-energy effective model constructed on the Fe square bipartite lattice, the superconducting order parameter in this state is a combination of an s-wave normal pairing between two sublattices and an s-wave η pairing within the sublattices. The state has a fingerprint with a real-space sign inversion between the top and bottom As/Se layers. The results suggest that iron-based superconductors are a new quantum state of matter, and the measurement of the odd parity can help to establish high-temperature superconducting mechanisms.

  15. Optimal Image Stitching for Concrete Bridge Bottom Surfaces Aided by 3d Structure Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahui; Yao, Jian; Liu, Kang; Lu, Xiaohu; Xia, Menghan

    2016-06-01

    Crack detection for bridge bottom surfaces via remote sensing techniques is undergoing a revolution in the last few years. For such applications, a large amount of images, acquired with high-resolution industrial cameras close to the bottom surfaces with some mobile platform, are required to be stitched into a wide-view single composite image. The conventional idea of stitching a panorama with the affine model or the homographic model always suffers a series of serious problems due to poor texture and out-of-focus blurring introduced by depth of field. In this paper, we present a novel method to seamlessly stitch these images aided by 3D structure lines of bridge bottom surfaces, which are extracted from 3D camera data. First, we propose to initially align each image in geometry based on its rough position and orientation acquired with both a laser range finder (LRF) and a high-precision incremental encoder, and these images are divided into several groups with the rough position and orientation data. Secondly, the 3D structure lines of bridge bottom surfaces are extracted from the 3D cloud points acquired with 3D cameras, which impose additional strong constraints on geometrical alignment of structure lines in adjacent images to perform a position and orientation optimization in each group to increase the local consistency. Thirdly, a homographic refinement between groups is applied to increase the global consistency. Finally, we apply a multi-band blending algorithm to generate a large-view single composite image as seamlessly as possible, which greatly eliminates both the luminance differences and the color deviations between images and further conceals image parallax. Experimental results on a set of representative images acquired from real bridge bottom surfaces illustrate the superiority of our proposed approaches.

  16. A rapid method for creating qualitative images indicative of thick oil emulsion on the ocean's surface from imaging spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, K. Eric; Swayze, Gregg A.; Leifer, Ira; McCubbin, Ian B.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Green, Robert O.; Lundeen, Sarah R.; Sarture, Charles M.; Steele, Denis; Ryan, Thomas; Bradley, Eliza S.; Roberts, Dar A.; ,

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a method to create color-composite images indicative of thick oil:water emulsions on the surface of clear, deep ocean water by using normalized difference ratios derived from remotely sensed data collected by an imaging spectrometer. The spectral bands used in the normalized difference ratios are located in wavelength regions where the spectra of thick oil:water emulsions on the ocean's surface have a distinct shape compared to clear water and clouds. In contrast to quantitative analyses, which require rigorous conversion to reflectance, the method described is easily computed and can be applied rapidly to radiance data or data that have been atmospherically corrected or ground-calibrated to reflectance. Examples are shown of the method applied to Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer data collected May 17 and May 19, 2010, over the oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico.

  17. Super-resolution Imaging by Evanescent Wave Coupling to Surface States on Effective Gain Media

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrotra, Prateek; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Higher resolution demands for semiconductor lithography may be fulfilled by higher numerical aperture (NA) systems. However, NAs more than the photoresist refractive index (~1.7) cause surface confinement of the image. In this letter we describe how evanescent wave coupling to effective gain medium surface states beneath the imaging layer can counter this problem. At {\\lambda}=193 nm a layer of sapphire on SiO2 counters image decay by an effective-gain-medium resonance phenomena allowing evanescent interferometric lithography to create high aspect ratio structures at NAs of 1.85 (26-nm) and beyond.

  18. An Extension to a Filter Implementation of Local Quadratic Surface for Image Noise Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    1999-01-01

    Based on regression analysis this paper gives a description for simple image filter design. Specifically 3x3 filter implementations of a quadratic surface, residuals from this surface, gradients and the Laplacian are given. For the residual a 5x5 filter is given also. It is shown that the 3x3...

  19. Imaging of surface plasmon polariton interference using phase-sensitive scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the surface plasmon polariton interference, generated via a ‘buried’ gold grating, and imaged using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM). The phase-resolved PSTM measurement unravels the complex surface plasmon polariton interference fields at the gold-air

  20. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  1. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  2. Confocal Image 3D Surface Measurement with Optical Fiber Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhao; ZHU Sheng-cheng; LI Bing; TAN Yu-shan

    2004-01-01

    A whole-field 3D surface measurement system for semiconductor wafer inspection is described.The system consists of an optical fiber plate,which can split the light beam into N2 subbeams to realize the whole-field inspection.A special prism is used to separate the illumination light and signal light.This setup is characterized by high precision,high speed and simple structure.

  3. Current status of iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamihara, Yoichi, E-mail: kamihara_yoichi@appi.keio.ac.jp [Keio University, Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Current status of iron-based superconductors is summarized. Although short range magnetic ordering and magnetic phase separation of Fe are controversial, (long range) magnetic and electronic phase diagrams of iron based superconductors can be classified into two-type. Antiferromagnetic ordering of itinerant Fe does not coexist with superconducting phase of SmFeAsO{sub 1 - x}F{sub x}. The very large H{sub c2} of iron-based superconductors attract us to attempts at applications.

  4. Current status of iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamihara, Yoichi

    2012-03-01

    Current status of iron-based superconductors is summarized. Although short range magnetic ordering and magnetic phase separation of Fe are controversial, (long range) magnetic and electronic phase diagrams of iron based superconductors can be classified into two-type. Antiferromagnetic ordering of itinerant Fe does not coexist with superconducting phase of SmFeAsO1 - xFx. The very large H c2 of iron-based superconductors attract us to attempts at applications.

  5. A Road Towards High Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2013-0040 A Road Towards High Temperature Superconductors Guy Deutscher Tel Aviv University Research... Superconductors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-10-1-3011 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 10-3011 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S...issue in trying to make useful high temperature superconductors is obviously to discover superconductivity at higher temperatures. But there is also

  6. Holographic complexity in gauge/string superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Momeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following a methodology similar to [1], we derive a holographic complexity for two dimensional holographic superconductors (gauge/string superconductors with backreactions. Applying a perturbation method proposed by Kanno in Ref. [2], we study behaviors of the complexity for a dual quantum system near critical points. We show that when a system moves from the normal phase (T>Tc to the superconductor phase (T

  7. 15 MeV proton irradiation effects on Bi-based high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinejad, N.; Sohrabi, D. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Research School; Bolori, F. [Karaj Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Nowadays, superconducting magnetic coils are used in some tokamaks such as EAST, KSTAR, JT-60, and T-15 to generate strong magnetic fields and also in ITER magnetic fields of about 13 tesla will be produced with the help of superconductors. The tokamak superconductors are exposed to the variety of radiations (neutron, ions beam, and gamma) from plasma nuclear reactions which will affect some of the superconductor properties. Therefore, study of the irradiation effects on the superconductor structure and properties are very crucial from technological and scientific point of view. One of the superconductor irradiation effects to be investigated under different conditions of energy and dosage is the potential resistance of the material used in tokamak reactor magnetic coils against activation by radiation. In this work, pellets of high T{sub c} Bi-based superconductors have been prepared and after measurement of parameters, a sample of pellet has been irradiated with 15 MeV protons using Karaj cyclotron facility. The sample's parameters have been measured again after irradiation treatment. X-ray diffraction patterns and SEM images of the sample before and after irradiation treatment have been studied.

  8. Automatic analysis of image of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Hu, K; Cai, N; Su, W; Xiong, H; Lou, Z; Lin, T; Hu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Some computer applications for cell characterization in medicine and biology, such as analysis of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC (El Tor Vibrio of Cholera), operate with cell samples taken from very small areas of interest. In order to perform texture characterization in such an application, only a few texture operators can be employed: the operators should be insensitive to noise and image distortion and be reliable in order to estimate texture quality from images. Therefore, we introduce wavelet theory and mathematical morphology to analyse the cellular surface micro-area image obtained by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). In order to describe the quality of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC, we propose a fully automatic computerized method. The image analysis process is carried out in two steps. In the first, we decompose the given image by dyadic wavelet transform and form an image approximation with higher resolution, by doing so, we perform edge detection of given images efficiently. In the second, we introduce many operations of mathematical morphology to obtain morphological quantitative parameters of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC. The obtained results prove that the method can eliminate noise, detect the edge and extract the feature parameters validly. In this work, we have built automatic analytic software named "EVC.CELL".

  9. Research on impervious surface dynamic changes based on Landsat satellite images in Nantong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiu; Li, Jia; Duan, Ping; Wang, Jinliang; Zhang, Chi

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the decision tree classification based on the CART algorithm (Classification and Regression Tree) is used to extract the impervious surface area of Nantong city in Jiangsu Province in China. Impervious surface dynamic change nearly 25 years in Nantong city is researched using four periods Landsat images of 1990, 2003, 2008, and 2014. The results show that the classification precision based on the CART algorithm is higher, which can more accurately extract the impervious surface. During the 25 years, the trend of the impervious surface of Nantong is increased year by year. Urban construction and expansion is one of the driving forces of the impervious surface increase.

  10. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging.

  11. Stochastic dual-plane on-axis digital holographic imaging on irregular surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengpeng; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-10

    An imaging method based on dual-plane on-axis digital holography is proposed for the situation in which an object is on the irregular surface of a transparent medium. Light propagation of the object on the uneven surface of the medium is analyzed and simulated. The diffracted pattern of the object is deformed or destroyed by the refracted light of the medium. Dual-plane on-axis digital holography is used to eliminate the twin image. In order to retrieve the information lost in the reconstructed image due to destructive interference, the object is illuminated by a stochastic beam that is a speckle wave produced by a ground glass. Simulated and experimental results are presented, to demonstrate that the proposed method can be used for imaging on the irregular surface of a transparent medium.

  12. Structural phase transitions in high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarenko, H.M. [Toulon Univ., 83 - Le Garde (France). Lab. des Materiaux Multiphases et Interfaces; Nihoul, G.E. [Toulon Univ., 83 - Le Garde (France). Lab. des Materiaux Multiphases et Interfaces

    1995-11-01

    This chapter is devoted to the study of the order-disorder like phase transitions which occur in the high-temperature superconductors (HTS). We mainly consider Lanthanium based compounds like La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} or La{sub 2-x}M{sub x}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} (where M is an alkali atom Ba, Sr, Ca, Na, K, ..) and Yttrium based superconductors like YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+{delta}}. Different kinds of ordered structures were found in these compounds by X-ray and neutron diffraction, as well as by High Resolution Electron Microscopy imaging and are described. The theoretical models, which describe the structural evolution as temperature and/or concentration of the different components vary, are considered in detail. The relation between structural instabilities and high-temperature superconductivity is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Permanent magnet with MgB2 bulk superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akiyasu; Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru; Kishio, Kohji

    2014-07-01

    Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)—materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2 K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB2) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3 T at 20 K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (cryocoolers, making MgB2 bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

  14. Effect of crystalline lens surfaces and refractive index on image quality by model simulation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meimei Kong; Zhishan Gao; Lei Chen; Xinhua Li

    2008-01-01

    The surfaces and refractive index of crystalline lens play an important role in the optical performance of human eye.On the basis of two eye models,which are widely applied at present,the effect of lens surfaces and its refractive index distribution on optical imaging is analyzed with the optical design software ZEMAX (Zemax Development Co.,San Diego,USA).The result shows that good image quality can be provided by the aspheric lens surfaces or (and) the gradient-index (GRIN) distribution.It has great potential in the design of intraocular lens (IOL).The eye models with an intraocular implantation are presented.

  15. Tunable far-field acoustic imaging by two-dimensional sonic crystal with concave incident surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feng-Fu; Lu, Dan-Feng; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Ji, Chang-Ying; Shi, Qing-Fan

    2017-01-01

    An additional concave incident surface comprised of two-dimensional (2D) sonic crystals (SCs) is employed to tune the acoustic image in the far-field region. The tunability is realized through changing the curvature of the concave surface. To explain the tuning mechanism, a simple ray-trace analysis is demonstrated based on the wave-beam negative refractive law. Then, a numerical confirmation is carried out. Results show that both the position and the intensity of the image can be tuned by the introduced concave surface.

  16. Surface Investigation of Photo-Degraded Wood by Colour Monitoring, Infrared Spectroscopy, and Hyperspectral Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgia Agresti; Giuseppe Bonifazi; Luca Calienno; Giuseppe Capobianco; Angela Lo Monaco; Claudia Pelosi; Rodolfo Picchio; Silvia Serranti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the changes occurring on the surface of poplar wood exposed to artificial irradiation in a Solar Box. Colour changes were monitored with a reflectance spectrophotometer. Surface chemical modifications were evaluated by measuring the infrared spectra. Hyperspectral imaging was also applied to study the surface wood changes in the visible-near infrared and the short wave infrared wavelength ranges. The data obtained from the different techniques were co...

  17. Satellite image blind restoration based on surface fitting and multivariate model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin-bing; YANG Shi-zhi; WANG Xian-hua; QIAO Yan-li

    2009-01-01

    Owing to the blurring effect from atmosphere and camera system in the satellite imaging a blind image restoration algo-rithm is proposed which includes the modulation transfer function (MTF) estimation and the image restoration. In the MTF estimation stage, based on every degradation process of satellite imaging-chain, a combined parametric model of MTF is given and used to fit the surface of normalized logarithmic amplitude spectrum of degraded image. In the image restoration stage, a maximum a posteriori (MAP) based edge-preserving image restoration method is presented which introduces multivariate Laplacian model to characterize the prior distribution of wavelet coefficients of original image. During the image restoration, in order to avoid solving high nonlinear equations, optimization transfer algorithm is adopted to decom-pose the image restoration procedure into two simple steps: Landweber iteration and wavelet thresholding denoising. In the numerical experiment, the satellite image restoration results from SPOT-5 and high resolution camera (HR) of China & Brazil earth resource satellite (CBERS-02B) ane compared, and the proposed algorithm is superior in the image edge preservation and noise inhibition.

  18. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  19. SEM and AFM images of pyrite surfaces after bioleaching by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H-L; Chen, B-Y; Lan, Y-W; Cheng, Y-C

    2003-09-01

    The bioleaching mechanism of pyrite by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans was examined with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the pyrite surface. The presence of pyrite eliminated the lag phase during growth of this microorganism. This was due to the stimulatory effect on cell growth of the slight amount of Cu2+ that had leached from the pyrite. Zn2+ was found to be much more readily solubilized than Cu2+. The efficiency of bioleaching was four times higher than that of chemical leaching. SEM images provided evidence of direct cell attachment onto the pyrite surface, thereby enhancing the bioleaching rate. Furthermore, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were found on the pyrite surface after 4 days of oxidation. AFM images showed that the pyrite surface area positively correlated with the oxidation rate. A combination of direct and indirect mechanism is probably responsible for the oxidation of pyrite by T. thiooxidans.

  20. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  1. Near-surface Thermal Infrared Imaging of a Mixed Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, D. M.; Helliker, B. R.; Richardson, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Measurement of an organism's temperature is of basic physiological importance and therefore necessary for ecosystem modeling, yet most models derive leaf temperature from energy balance arguments or assume it is equal to air temperature. This is because continuous, direct measurement of leaf temperature outside of a controlled environment is difficult and rarely done. Of even greater challenge is measuring leaf temperature with the resolution required to understand the underlying energy balance and regulation of plant processes. To measure leaf temperature through the year, we have mounted a high-resolution, thermal infrared camera overlooking the canopy of a temperate deciduous forest. The camera is co-located with an eddy covariance system and a suite of radiometric sensors. Our camera measures longwave thermal infrared (λ = 7.5-14 microns) using a microbolometer array. Suspended in the canopy within the camera FOV is a matte black copper plate instrumented with fine wire thermocouples that acts as a thermal reference for each image. In this presentation, I will discuss the challenges of continuous, long-term field operation of the camera, as well as measurement sensitivity to physical and environmental parameters. Based on this analysis, I will show that the uncertainties in converting radiometric signal to leaf temperature are well constrained. The key parameter for minimizing uncertainty is the emissivity of the objects being imaged: measuring the emissivity to within 0.01 enables leaf temperature to be calculated to within 0.5°C. Finally, I will present differences in leaf temperature observed amongst species. From our two-year record, we characterize high frequency, daily, and seasonal thermal signatures of leaves and crowns, in relation to environmental conditions. Our images are taken with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to quantify the preferential heating of sunlit portions of the canopy and the cooling effect of wind gusts. Future work will

  2. Automatic extraction of complex surface models from range images using a trimmed-rational Bezier surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Pierre; Sekita, Iwao

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents a new method for the extraction of a rational Bezier surface from a set of data points. The algorithm is divided into four parts. First, a least median square fitting algorithm is used to extract a Bezier surface from the data set. Second, from this initial surface model an analysis of the data set is performed to eliminate outliers. Third, the algorithm then improves the fit over the residual points by modifying the weights of a rational Bezier surface using a non-linear optimization method. A further improvement of the fit is achieved using a new intrinsic parameterization technique. Fourth, an approximation of the region boundary is performed using a NURB with knots. Experimental results show that the current algorithm is robust and can precisely approximate complex surfaces.

  3. Electron Magnetic Resonance Fermi Surface Imaging. Applications to Organic Conductors and Sr2RuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, S.; Kovalev, A.; Mola, M. M.; Palassis, C.; Mao, Z. Q.; Maeno, Y.; Qualls, J. S.

    We report detailed angle dependent studies of the metallic state microwave (40 to 200 GHz) magneto-conductivity of single crystal samples of the α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 organic charge density wave conductor, and the perovskite superconductor Sr2RuO4. We observe series' of resonant absorptions which we attribute to periodic orbit resonances - a phenomenon closely related to cyclotron resonance. By performing measurements on several samples, and in different electromagnetic field configurations, we are able to couple to different orbital modes (+ harmonics), which derive from deformations (warpings) of the quasi-one and quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surfaces of these compounds. These studies provide vital information concerning interlayer dispersion which, in turn, affects the Fermi surface nesting characteristics which are believed to play a crucial role in the low temperature physics of these exotic materials.

  4. New Image Operator and Its Application in the Inner Surface Detection of Artillery Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑军; 徐春广; 肖定国; 张建民

    2003-01-01

    Aimed at the image detection on the ablation wearing, scrape wearing and rifling angle of the artillery body pipe, the character of the inner surface image of the pipe is discussed, the model for rifling, ablation wearing and scrape wearing is brought up, and a new image operator is proposed for these detection. This operator can detect the rifling angle in a high precision, and tell the ablation wearing from scrape wearing in the image, therefore the degree of ablation wearing and scrape wearing can be detected efficiently. This is useful for the artillery body pipe's producing process and life evaluation.

  5. Shielding superconductors with thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, Sam; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias U; Sethna, James P

    2015-01-01

    Determining the optimal arrangement of superconducting layers to withstand large amplitude AC magnetic fields is important for certain applications such as superconducting radiofrequency cavities. In this paper, we evaluate the shielding potential of the superconducting film/insulating film/superconductor (SIS') structure, a configuration that could provide benefits in screening large AC magnetic fields. After establishing that for high frequency magnetic fields, flux penetration must be avoided, the superheating field of the structure is calculated in the London limit both numerically and, for thin films, analytically. For intermediate film thicknesses and realistic material parameters we also solve numerically the Ginzburg-Landau equations. It is shown that a small enhancement of the superheating field is possible, on the order of a few percent, for the SIS' structure relative to a bulk superconductor of the film material, if the materials and thicknesses are chosen appropriately.

  6. Source estimation with surface-related multiples—fast ambiguity-resolved seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ning; Aravkin, Aleksandr; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Lin, Tim; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of obtaining a reliable seismic image without prior knowledge of the source wavelet, especially from data that contain strong surface-related multiples. Conventional reverse-time migration requires prior knowledge of the source wavelet, which is either technically or computationally challenging to accurately determine; inaccurate estimates of the source wavelet can result in seriously degraded reverse-time migrated images, and therefore wrong geological interpretations. To solve this problem, we present a `wavelet-free' imaging procedure that simultaneously inverts for the source wavelet and the seismic image, by tightly integrating source estimation into a fast least-squares imaging framework, namely compressive imaging, given a reasonably accurate background velocity model. However, this joint inversion problem is difficult to solve as it is plagued with local minima and the ambiguity with respect to amplitude scalings because of the multiplicative, and therefore nonlinear, appearance of the source wavelet in the otherwise linear formalism. We have found a way to solve this nonlinear joint-inversion problem using a technique called variable projection, and a way to overcome the scaling ambiguity by including surface-related multiples in our imaging procedure following recent developments in surface-related multiple prediction by sparse inversion. As a result, we obtain without prior knowledge of the source wavelet high-resolution seismic images, comparable in quality to images obtained assuming the true source wavelet is known. By leveraging the computationally efficient compressive-imaging methodology, these results are obtained at affordable computational costs compared with conventional processing work flows that include surface-related multiple removal and reverse-time migration.

  7. The Effect of Images on Surface Potential and Resistance Calculation of Grounding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTINS, A.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the grounding systems with a two layers soil, the calculation of the surface potential using the image method is sometimes impossible due to singularities, avoiding researchers to use the method for electrodes in the bottom layer. In the literature this problem solution is refereed as unreliable or solved with other more complex methods. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the surface potentials in a two. layer soil, for electrodes in the bottom layer, when images are at surface. The singularities in computing surface voltage, when the first image upwards lies at surface, are analysed and it's shown that a small change in top layer thickness allows an approximate solution. Surface potentials due to grid conductor are also considered and the values of resistance are compared with those from other methodologies. Singularities for a ground rod that crosses the two layers are also treated. The obtained values of resistance are not satisfactory, due to lower segments images that overlap the upper segments. This paper also proposes shifting the surface of the upper part of the ground rod, in the upper layer, or taking the modulus of the mutual resistance, to overcome this difficulty.

  8. Theoretical studies of unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groensleth, Martin Sigurd

    2008-07-01

    This thesis presents four research papers. In the first three papers we have derived analytical results for the transport properties in unconventional superconductors and ferromagnetic systems with multiple broken symmetries. In Paper I and parts of Paper II we have studied tunneling transport between two non-unitary ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductors, and found a novel interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity manifested in the Josephson effect as a spin- and charge-current in the absence of an applied voltage across the junction. The critical amplitudes of these currents can be adjusted by the relative magnetization direction on each side of the junction. Furthermore, in Paper II, we have found a way of controlling a spin-current between two ferromagnets with spin-orbit coupling. Paper III considers a junction consisting of a ferromagnet and a non-unitary ferromagnetic superconductor, and we show that the conductance spectra contains detailed information about the superconducting gaps and pairing symmetry of the Cooper-pairs. In the last paper we present a Monte Carlo study of an effective Hamiltonian describing orbital currents in the CuO2 layers of high-temperature superconductive cuprates. The model features two intrinsically anisotropic Ising models, coupled through an anisotropic next-nearest neighbor interaction, and an Ashkin-Teller nearest neighbor fourth order coupling. We have studied the specific heat anomaly, as well as the anomaly in the staggered magnetization associated with the orbital currents and its susceptibility. We have found that in a limited parameter regime, the specific heat anomaly is substantially suppressed, while the susceptibility has a non-analytical peak across the order-disorder transition. The model is therefore a candidate for describing the breakup of hidden order when crossing the pseudo-gap line on the under-doped side in the phase diagram of high-temperature superconductors. (Author) 64 refs., figs

  9. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  10. Generalized Superconductors and Holographic Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mahapatra, Subhash; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2013-01-01

    We study generalized holographic s-wave superconductors in four dimensional R-charged black hole backgrounds, in the probe limit. We first establish the superconducting nature of the boundary theory, and then study its optical properties. Numerical analysis indicates that a negative index of refraction appears at low frequencies in the theory, for certain temperature ranges, for specific values of the charge parameter. The corresponding cut-off values for these are numerically established in several cases.

  11. Holographic superconductors with Weyl corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Davood; Raza, Muhammad; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-10-01

    A quick review on the analytical aspects of holographic superconductors (HSCs) with Weyl corrections has been presented. Mainly, we focus on matching method and variational approaches. Different types of such HSC have been investigated — s-wave, p-wave and Stúckelberg ones. We also review the fundamental construction of a p-wave type, in which the non-Abelian gauge field is coupled to the Weyl tensor. The results are compared from numerics to analytical results.

  12. Surface Coil Intensity Correction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Spinal Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong; Lin, Wei; Ding, Xianjun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical application of phased-array surface coil intensity correction in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in spinal metastases. 3 phantoms and 50 patients with a corresponding total number of 80 spinal metastases were included in this study. Fast spin echo T1- and T2- weighted MRI with and without surface coil intensity correction was routinely performed for all phantoms and patients. Phantoms were evaluated by means of variance to mean ratio of signal intensity on both T1- and T2- weighted MRI obtained with and without surface coil intensity correction. Spinal metastases were evaluated by image quality scores; reading time per case on both T1- and T2- weighted MRI obtained with and without surface coil intensity correction. Spinal metastases were diagnosed more successfully on MRI with surface coil intensity correction than on MRI with conventional surface coil technique. The variance to mean ratio of signal intensity was 53.36% for original T1-weighted MRI and 53.58% for original T2-weighted MRI. The variance to mean ratio of signal intensity was reduced to 18.99% for T1-weighted MRI with surface coil intensity correction and 22.77% for T2-weighted MRI with surface coil intensity correction. The overall image quality scores (interface conspicuity of lesion and details of lesion) were significantly higher than those of the original MRI. The reading time per case was shorter for MRI with surface coil intensity correction than for MRI without surface coil intensity correction. Phased-array surface coil intensity correction in MRIs of spinal metastases provides improvements in image quality that leads to more successfully detection and assessment of spinal metastases than original MRI.

  13. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  14. Is a color superconductor topological?

    CERN Document Server

    Nishida, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    A fully gapped state of matter, whether insulator or superconductor, can be asked if it is topologically trivial or nontrivial. Here we investigate topological properties of superconducting Dirac fermions in 3D having a color superconductor as an application. In the chiral limit, when the pairing gap is parity even, the right-handed and left-handed sectors of the free space Hamiltonian have nontrivial topological charges with opposite signs. Accordingly, a vortex line in the superconductor supports localized gapless right-handed and left-handed fermions with the dispersion relations E=+/-vp_z (v is a parameter dependent velocity) and thus propagating in opposite directions along the vortex line. However, the presence of the fermion mass immediately opens up a mass gap for such localized fermions and the dispersion relations become E=+/-v(m^2+p_z^2)^(1/2). When the pairing gap is parity odd, the situation is qualitatively different. The right-handed and left-handed sectors of the free space Hamiltonian in the ...

  15. Fault current limiters using superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, W. T.; Power, A.

    Fault current limiters on power systems are to reduce damage by heating and electromechanical forces, to alleviate duty on switchgear used to clear the fault, and to mitigate disturbance to unfaulted parts of the system. A basic scheme involves a super-resistor which is a superconductor being driven to high resistance when fault current flows either when current is high during a cycle of a.c. or, if the temperature of the superconductive material rises, for the full cycle. Current may be commuted from superconductor to an impedance in parallel, thus reducing the energy dispersed at low temperature and saving refrigeration. In a super-shorted transformer the ambient temperature primary carries the power system current; the superconductive secondary goes to a resistive condition when excessive currents flow in the primary. A super-transformer has the advantage of not needing current leads from high temperature to low temperature; it behaves as a parallel super-resistor and inductor. The supertransductor with a superconductive d.c. bias winding is large and has small effect on the rate of fall of current at current zero; it does little to alleviate duty on switchgear but does reduce heating and electromechanical forces. It is fully active after a fault has been cleared. Other schemes depend on rapid recooling of the superconductor to achieve this.

  16. Identifying Surface Changes on HRSC Images of the Mars South Polar Residual CAP (sprc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS), Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board of the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004), including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007). The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004), spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003) and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004). Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015). HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and

  17. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  18. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  19. Wide-angle resonance of a photonic crystal surface mode under a surface termination and its influence on imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hengrun; Liu, Hongmei; Qing, Yun; Cheng, Lu-Teng; Song, Weiwei; Yang, Xu; Jiang, Wei; Rao, Wei-Feng

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a semi-analytical approach to the modulation transfer function (MTF) for negative-index flat lenses based on photonic crystals (PhCs). Contributions of various PhC modes to the MTF have been identified and analyzed. With a certain surface termination, a high-order PhC surface mode can be tamed to produce a broad angular resonance. As such, the isotropy of the image field can be significantly enhanced, resulting in an ideal image formation with nearly perfect outgoing circular wavefronts. Ray-optics analysis has also been utilized to assist the design of a negative-index flat lens. Finite-difference time domain simulations confirm the effectiveness of PhC lens designed by this semi-analytic approach to the MTF.

  20. Multiscale vascular surface model generation from medical imaging data using hierarchical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkers, Eric J; Taylor, Charles A

    2008-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of blood flow from image-based patient specific models can provide useful physiologic information for guiding clinical decision making. A novel method for the generation of image-based, 3-D, multiscale vascular surface models for CFD is presented. The method generates multiscale surfaces based on either a linear triangulated or a globally smooth nonuniform rational B-spline (NURB) representation. A robust local curvature analysis is combined with a novel global feature analysis to set mesh element size. The method is particularly useful for CFD modeling of complex vascular geometries that have a wide range of vasculature size scales, in conditions where 1) initial surface mesh density is an important consideration for balancing surface accuracy with manageable size volumetric meshes, 2) adaptive mesh refinement based on flow features makes an underlying explicit smooth surface representation desirable, and 3) semi-automated detection and trimming of a large number of inlet and outlet vessels expedites model construction.

  1. Heterostructures of Bi-4334 and MgB2 superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathi, M.; Singh, R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the studies on hetero structures of Bi-4334 and MgB2 superconductors. The two superconductors were arranged in the form of bulk multilayers using hydraulic pressure system. X-ray diffraction pattern and dc magnetization studies confirm the presence of both superconducting phases in this try-layer hetero structured sample. The d.c magnetization shows the superconducting onset at 77K and 39K for Bi-4334 and MgB2 phases respectively. Critical current density (Jc) is calculated from hysteresis loop of the sample in both in-plane field and out of plane field configurations. Inverted anisotropy in Jc is observed due to enhancement of ab-plane properties because of multilayer growth process. Morphology of the samples at surface and interface of two superconducting layers is discussed in view of Field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Andreev-Bragg Reflection from an Amperian Superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baireuther, P; Hyart, T; Tarasinski, B; Beenakker, C W J

    2015-08-28

    We show how an electrical measurement can detect the pairing of electrons on the same side of the Fermi surface (Amperian pairing), recently proposed by Patrick Lee for the pseudogap phase of high-Tc cuprate superconductors. Bragg scattering from the pair-density wave introduces odd multiples of 2k(F) momentum shifts when an electron incident from a normal metal is Andreev reflected as a hole. These Andreev-Bragg reflections can be detected in a three-terminal device, containing a ballistic Y junction between normal leads (1, 2) and the superconductor. The cross-conductance dI1/dV2 has the opposite sign for Amperian pairing than it has either in the normal state or for the usual BCS pairing.

  3. Unconventional superconductors under a rotating magnetic field. II. Thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, A. B.; Vekhter, I.

    2007-06-01

    We present a microscopic approach to the calculations of thermal conductivity in unconventional superconductors for a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields. Our work employs the nonequilibrium Keldysh formulation of the quasiclassical theory. We solve the transport equations using a variation of the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt method that accounts for the quasiparticle scattering on vortices. We focus on the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the direction of the field with the respect to the nodes of the order parameter, and discuss it in the context of experiments aiming to determine the shape of the gap from such anisotropy measurements. We consider quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surfaces with vertical line nodes and use our analysis to establish the location of gap nodes in heavy-fermion CeCoIn5 and the organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(NCS)2 .

  4. Dependence of stability of metastable superconductors on copper fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elrod, S. A.; Lue, J. W.; Miller, J. R.; Dresner, L.

    1980-12-01

    The stability of composite superconductors operating in the metastable regime depends upon such factors as matrix resistivity, cooled surface dimensions, fraction of critical current, and volume fraction of stabilizer. By assuming constant thermophysical properties, we developed analytic expressions for the energy and voltage of the minimum propagating zone (MPZ). With other factors held constant, these expressions have been used to predict composite superconductor stability as a function of copper fraction: lower copper fractions lead to higher MPZ energies. MPZ voltages have been measured for three NbTi/Cu composites having different copper fractions and different critical current densities for several magnetic fields and transport currents. Experimental MPZ voltages have been used to calculate an effective heat transfer coefficient, which is subsequently used to calculate the MPZ energy. The experimental MPZ energies support the theoretical expectation that lower copper fractions lead to higher stability in the metastable regime.

  5. The role of oxygen in quinternary superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, D.R.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The oxygen composition of the new generation of high temperature superconductors (HTSC) has been found to play a crucial role in determining the superconductivity of these materials. However, measurement of the oxygen stoichiometry in such samples has proven difficult due to the small scattering cross section of oxygen, a light element, which has caused the oxygen scattering signal to be overwhelmed by the far larger signals generated off the heavier elements present in the HTSC samples. It is for this reason that previous ion beam analysis of oxide crystals has often either made no attempt to determine the oxygen content or has used O({alpha},{alpha})O resonances such as that at {approx} 3.05 MeV to probe the crystal. This work continues tests of a new technique for probing oxygen which overcomes the problem of an insignificant O BS signal by exploiting the large nuclear resonance found to occur in the O(p,p)O cross-section near an energy of 3.5 MeV in order to produce a significant oxygen edge in the H{sup +} BS spectrum obtained for the HTSC sample. The use of a H{sup +} beam is preferable to a He{sup 2+} beam for such work due to its enhanced sensitivity to light elements. The quinternary superconductor used for this investigation was a good quality pure Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} (BISCO, 2212) crystal. The size of this crystal was 5x5xl mm{sup 3} with the [001] face perpendicular to the surface. Measurements were performed using the University of Melbourne nuclear microprobe. The sample was mounted on an aluminium target holder using a carbon base adhesive which provided good electrical contact and it was oriented inside the target chamber by means of a four axis precision eucentric goniometer. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Magneto-optical studies of magnetization processes in high-Tc superconductors structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasko-Vlasox, V. K.

    1998-12-02

    Magneto-optical imaging is a powerful tool for nondestructive quality control and scientific research through visualization of magnetic fields around any magnetic flux or current carrying sample. It allows real time observations of domain structures and their transformations in magnetics, static and dynamic field patterns due to inhomogeneous currents in electric circuits and superconductors, and reveals distortions of the fields due to defects. In addition to qualitative pictures showing different details in the intensities of the magneto-optical images, one can obtain quantitative maps of field distributions and retrieve values of the underlying currents or magnetization variations. In this review we discuss the advantages of magneto-optics for studies of superconductors, show its place among other techniques, and report recent results in magneto-optical investigations of high temperature superconductors (HTS).

  7. A phantom evaluation of a stereo-vision surface imaging system for radiotherapy patient setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Christoph; Metheany, Katherine G; Doppke, Karen; Chen, George T Y

    2005-09-01

    External beam irradiation requires precise positioning of the target relative to the treatment planning coordinate system. A three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system for patient positioning has recently been installed in one of our linear accelerator (linac) rooms. The device utilizes close-range photogrammetry to generate a 3D model of the patient's surface. This geometric model can be made to look like a digital camera image if wrapped with a gray-level image (texture mapping) that shows surface coloration. The system is calibrated to the linac coordinate system and has been designed as a patient setup device. To reproduce patient position in fractionated radiotherapy, the daily patient surface model is registered to a previously recorded reference surface. Using surface registration, the system calculates the rigid-body transformation that minimizes the distance between the treatment and the reference surface models in a region-of-interest (ROI). This transformation is expressed as a set of new couch coordinates at which the patient position best matches with the reference data. If respiratory motion is a concern, the surface can be obtained with a gated acquisition at a specified phase of the respiratory cycle. To analyze the accuracy of the system, we performed several experiments with phantoms to assess stability, alignment accuracy, precision of the gating function, and surface topology. The reproducibility of surface measurements was tested for periods up to 57 h. Each recorded frame was registered to the reference surface to calculate the required couch adjustment. The system stability over this time period was better than 0.5 mm. To measure the accuracy of the system to detect and quantify patient shift relative to a reference image, we compared the shift detected by the surface imaging system with known couch transitions in a phantom study. The maximum standard deviation was 0.75 mm for the three translational degrees of freedom, and less than 0

  8. Sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube-polymer composites using dynamic AFM methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Maria J; Misiego, Rocio; Smith, Kyle C; Avila, Alba; Pipes, Byron; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-05

    High-resolution sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks within polymer nanocomposites is demonstrated through electrical characterization techniques based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). We compare three techniques implemented in the single-pass configuration: DC-biased amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in terms of the physics of sub-surface image formation and experimental robustness. The methods were applied to study the dispersion of sub-surface networks of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in a polyimide (PI) matrix. We conclude that among these methods, the KPFM channel, which measures the capacitance gradient (∂C/∂d) at the second harmonic of electrical excitation, is the best channel to obtain high-contrast images of the CNT network embedded in the polymer matrix, without the influence of surface conditions. Additionally, we propose an analysis of the ∂C/∂d images as a tool to characterize the dispersion and connectivity of the CNTs. Through the analysis we demonstrate that these AFM-based sub-surface methods probe sufficiently deep within the SWNT composites, to resolve clustered networks that likely play a role in conductivity percolation. This opens up the possibility of dynamic AFM-based characterization of sub-surface dispersion and connectivity in nanostructured composites, two critical parameters for nanocomposite applications in sensors and energy storage devices.

  9. Building a dense surface map incrementally from semi-dense point cloud and RGB images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-shan LI; Rong XIONG; Shoudong HUANG; Yi-ming HUANG

    2015-01-01

    Building and using maps is a fundamental issue for bionic robots in fi eld applications. A dense surface map, which offers rich visual and geometric information, is an ideal representation of the environment for indoor/outdoor localization, navigation, and recognition tasks of these robots. Since most bionic robots can use only small light-weight laser scanners and cameras to acquire semi-dense point cloud and RGB images, we propose a method to generate a consistent and dense surface map from this kind of semi-dense point cloud and RGB images. The method contains two main steps: (1) generate a dense surface for every single scan of point cloud and its corresponding image(s) and (2) incrementally fuse the dense surface of a new scan into the whole map. In step (1) edge-aware resampling is realized by segmenting the scan of a point cloud in advance and resampling each sub-cloud separately. Noise within the scan is reduced and a dense surface is generated. In step (2) the average surface is estimated probabilistically and the non-coincidence of different scans is eliminated. Experiments demonstrate that our method works well in both indoor and outdoor semi-structured environments where there are regularly shaped ob jects.

  10. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  11. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Wang, R; Tomasi, D, E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  12. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S.E.; Tomasi, D.; Solis, S.E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A.O.

    2011-07-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  13. Normal appearance of the prostate and seminal tract: MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Moo Sang; Choi, Pil Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Yeon Hee; Choi, Hak Yong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    To assess the ability of MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil for the depiction of normal anatomical structure of prostate and its adjacent organs. MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil was performed in 23 male patients(age ; 20-75) to evaluate various prostatic and vasovesicular disorders, i. e, 14 cases of ejaculatory problems, 3 cases of hypogonadism, and 4 cases of prostatic cancers and 2 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia. MR images were obtained with axial, sagittal and coronal fast spin echo long TR/TE images and axial spin echo short TR/TE images. Field of views was 10-12 cm and scan thickness was 3-5 mm. Depiction of normal anatomcial structures was excellent in all cases. On T2WI, zonal anatomy of the prostate and prostatic urethra, urethral crest, and ejaculatory duct were cleary visualized. On T1WI, periprostatic fat plane is more cleary visualized. On transverse images, periprostatic structures were well visualized on T1WI,and on T2WI, anterior fibromuscular stroma, transition zone and peripheral zone could be readily differentiated. Coronal images were more helpful in visualization of both central and peripheral zones. Vas deferens, ejaculatory duct and vermontanum were also more easily defined on these images. Sagittal images was helpful in the depiction of anterior fibromuscular stroma, central zone and peripheral zone with prostatic urethra and ejaculatory duct in a single plane. High resolution MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil can readily visualize the normal anatomy of the prostate and its related structures and may be useful in the evaluation of various diseases of prostate and vasvesicular system.

  14. GROUND SURFACE VISUALIZATION USING RED RELIEF IMAGE MAP FOR A VARIETY OF MAP SCALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chiba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008 to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  15. Ground Surface Visualization Using Red Relief Image Map for a Variety of Map Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, T.; Hasi, B.

    2016-06-01

    There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008) to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  16. Method for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael Eugene (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination. In operation, an imaging detector is provided. Additionally, a back surface contact (e.g. a delta-doped layer, etc.) is grown on the imaging detector utilizing a process that is performed at a temperature less than 450 degrees Celsius.

  17. A despeckle filter for the Cassini SAR images of Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Solomonidou, Anezina; Bampasidis, Georgios; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe; Coustenis, Athena; Moussas, Xenophon; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    Cassini carries a multimode Ku-band (13.78 GHz) radar instrument designed to probe the surface of Titan and that of other targets in the Saturn system in four operating modes: imaging, altimetry, scatterometry, and radiometry. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode is used at altitudes under ~4000 km, resulting in spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to >1 km. Images are acquired either left or right of nadir using 2-7 looks. A swath 120-450 km wide is created from 5 antenna beams. SAR coverage is dependent on spacecraft range and orbital geometry. Radar backscatter variations in SAR images can be interpreted in terms of variations of surface slope, near-surface roughness, or near-surface dielectric properties. The images obtained using SAR revealed that Titan has very complex surface (Elachi et al. 2005). A filtering technique is applied to obtain the restored image. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays "real" structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. Our method is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images. The TSPR (Total Sum Preserving Regularization) filter used here is based on a membrane model Markov random field approximation with a Gaussian conditional probability density function optimized by a synchronous local iterative method. The final form of despeckling gives a sum-preserving regularization for the pixel values of the image. The TSPR method preserves the mean values of local homogeneous regions and decreases the standard deviation up to six times (Bratsolis and Sigelle, 2003). The despeckle filter can be used as intermediate stage for the extraction of meaningful regions that correspond to structural units in the scene or distinguish objects of interest (Bratsolis, 2009). References E. Bratsolis, and M. Sigelle, "Fast SAR Image

  18. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ∼50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  19. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ˜50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  20. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helas, G.; Andreae, M. O.

    2008-10-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  1. High-speed image acquisition technology in quality detection of workpiece surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaihua; Jin, Zexuan; Wang, Wenjie; Chen, Nian

    2016-11-01

    High-speed image acquisition technology has a great significance to improve the effciency of the workpiece surface quality detection, image quality directly affects the final test results. Aiming at the high-speed image acquisition of workpiece surface quality online detection, a workpiece image high-speed online acquisition method was produced. A high-speed online image acquisition sequence was designed. The quantitative relationship between the positioning accuracy in the high speed online image acquisition, motion blur, exposure time and the speed of workpiece was analyzed. The effect between the vibration between transfer mechanism and workpiece was analyzed. Fast trigger was implemented by photoelectric sensor. The accurate positioning was implemented by using the high accuracy time delay module. The motion blur was controlled by reducing the exposure time. A high-speed image acquisition system was designed based on the high-speed image acquisition method. The positioning accuracy was less than 0.1 mm, and the motion blur was less than one pixel.

  2. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint at 0. 2 T with surface coils; Clinical evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Imanaka, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Akira (Tsurumi Univ., Yokohama (Japan). School of Dental Medicine)

    1991-09-01

    MR imaging of 138 patients (276 temporomandibular joints, TMJs) were made at 0.2 T with surface coil from January 1990 to December 1990. One hundred and ninety out of 276 TMJs presented suggestive signs and symptoms of internal derangements of the TMJs. Double-contrast arthrotomography of 108 patients (117 TMJs) were made from January 1990 to December 1990. Thirty-eight out of 276 TMJs were studied with both MR imaging and double-contrast arthrotomography. Ninety TMJs were normal with superior disk position by MR images. Seventy TMJs showed anterior disk displacement with reduction and 78 TMJs showed anterior disk displacement without reduction by MR images. Two TMJs were arthrotomographically normal with superior disk position. Eight TMJs showed anterior disk displacement with reduction, 61 TMJs showed anterior disk displancement without reduction and 32 TMJs showed anterior disk displacement associated with perforation of the posterior attachment of the disk. MR imaging at 0.2 T was effective measures for diagnosis of internal derangements of the TMJ. Double-contrast arthrotomography was superior to MR imaging in detecting capsular adhesions and perforation of the posterior attachment of the disk. Concerning information on the disk position, diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging was equal to double-contrast arthrotomography. When internal derangement of the TMJ is suspected by clinical findings, our first choice of imaging is MR imaging. When osteoarthrosis of the TMJ is suspected by routine radiographs, the first choice of imaging is tomography and/or double-contrast arthrotomography. (author).

  3. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction Using 3-dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Tomita, MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D surface imaging technologies allow for digital quantification of complex breast tissue. We performed 11 unilateral breast reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP flaps (5 immediate, 6 delayed using 3D surface imaging for easier surgery planning and 3D-printed molds for shaping the breast neoparenchyma. A single- or double-pedicle flap was preoperatively planned according to the estimated tissue volume required and estimated total flap volume. The DIEP flap was then intraoperatively shaped with a 3D-printed mold that was based on a horizontally inverted shape of the contralateral breast. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as satisfactory, as confirmed by the postoperative 3D measurements of bilateral breasts. We believe that DIEP flap reconstruction assisted with 3D surface imaging and a 3D-printed mold is a simple and quick method for rebuilding a symmetric breast.

  4. Effect of optical surface flatness performance on spatial-light-modulator-based imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongqiang; Wan, Yuhong; Man, Tianlong; Han, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Spatial light modulator (SLM) has various of applications in the field of imaging, beam shaping, adaptive optics and so on. While SLM is used as an aberration correction element in super-resolution microscopy, the surface flatness of SLM could affect the imaging performance of the system due to the higher sensitivity to aberrations of these kind microscopic techniques. In this paper, the optical surface flatness of SLM is measured experimentally by employing the image plane digital holography. The topography of SLM is retrieved from the captured hologram. Aiming to the application of SLM as an adaptive correction element in super resolution microscopy, the aberrations introduced by the surface flatness of SLM are further evaluated and corrected in the same optical system.

  5. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  6. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Jichuan [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Electronic and Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 Xiaolingwei, Nanjing 210094 (China); Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Xu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdxu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Glorieux, Christ, E-mail: xdxu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Matsuda, Osamu [Division of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Cheng, Liping [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  7. Theory and Application of Shapelets to the Analysis of Surface Self-assembly Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Suderman, Robert; Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

    2014-01-01

    A method for quantitative analysis of local pattern strength and defects in surface self-assembly imaging is presented and applied to images of stripe and hexagonal ordered domains. The presented method uses "shapelet" functions which were originally developed for quantitative analysis of images of galaxies ($\\propto 10^{20}\\mathrm{m}$). In this work, they are used instead to quantify the presence of translational order in surface self-assembled films ($\\propto 10^{-9}\\mathrm{m}$) through reformulation into "steerable" filters. The resulting method is both computationally efficient (with respect to the number of filter evaluations), robust to variation in pattern feature shape, and, unlike previous approaches, is applicable to a wide variety of pattern types. An application of the method is presented which uses a nearest-neighbour analysis to distinguish between uniform (defect-free) and non-uniform (strained, defect-containing) regions within imaged self-assembled domains, both with striped and hexagonal pat...

  8. Indications of chemical bond contrast in AFM images of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Hatem; Koleini, Mohammad; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2017-02-01

    The origin of bond-resolved atomic force microscope images remains controversial. Moreover, most work to date has involved planar, conjugated hydrocarbon molecules on a metal substrate thereby limiting knowledge of the generality of findings made about the imaging mechanism. Here we report the study of a very different sample; a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. A procedure to obtain a passivated hydrogen-functionalized tip is defined and evolution of atomic force microscopy images at different tip elevations are shown. At relatively large tip-sample distances, the topmost atoms appear as distinct protrusions. However, on decreasing the tip-sample distance, features consistent with the silicon covalent bonds of the surface emerge. Using a density functional tight-binding-based method to simulate atomic force microscopy images, we reproduce the experimental results. The role of the tip flexibility and the nature of bonds and false bond-like features are discussed.

  9. Indications of chemical bond contrast in AFM images of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Hatem; Koleini, Mohammad; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of bond-resolved atomic force microscope images remains controversial. Moreover, most work to date has involved planar, conjugated hydrocarbon molecules on a metal substrate thereby limiting knowledge of the generality of findings made about the imaging mechanism. Here we report the study of a very different sample; a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. A procedure to obtain a passivated hydrogen-functionalized tip is defined and evolution of atomic force microscopy images at different tip elevations are shown. At relatively large tip-sample distances, the topmost atoms appear as distinct protrusions. However, on decreasing the tip-sample distance, features consistent with the silicon covalent bonds of the surface emerge. Using a density functional tight-binding-based method to simulate atomic force microscopy images, we reproduce the experimental results. The role of the tip flexibility and the nature of bonds and false bond-like features are discussed. PMID:28194036

  10. Simulation of Specular Surface Imaging Based on Computer Graphics: Application on a Vision Inspection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulin Ralph

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at detecting surface defects on reflecting industrial parts. A machine vision system, performing the detection of geometric aspect surface defects, is completely described. The revealing of defects is realized by a particular lighting device. It has been carefully designed to ensure the imaging of defects. The lighting system simplifies a lot the image processing for defect segmentation and so a real-time inspection of reflective products is possible. To bring help in the conception of imaging conditions, a complete simulation is proposed. The simulation, based on computer graphics, enables the rendering of realistic images. Simulation provides here a very efficient way to perform tests compared to the numerous attempts of manual experiments.

  11. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1995-01-01

    A composition and method of preparing YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T.sub.c. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  12. Electromagnetic Dark Energy and Gravitoelectrodynamics of Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that Beck's electromagnetic model of dark energy in superconductors can account for the gravitomagnetic London moment, which has been conjectured by the author to explain the Cooper pair's mass excess reported by Cabrera and Tate. A new Einstein-Planck regime for gravitation in condensed matter is proposed as a natural scale to host the gravitoelectrodynamic properties of superconductors.

  13. Gravitational force between two electrons in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2007-01-01

    The attractive gravitational force between two electrons in superconductors is deduced from the Eddington-Dirac large number relation, together with Beck and Mackey electromagnetic model of vacuum energy in superconductors. This force is estimated to be weaker than the gravitational attraction between two electrons in the vacuum.

  14. High temperature superconductors: A technological revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to demonstrate the Meissner effect through magnetic levitation, to demonstrate one application of the Meissner effect, the low friction magnetic rotation bearing, and to demonstrate magnetic flux penetration and the Type II nature of ceramic superconductors via the stacking of the superconductor disks. Experimental equipment and procedures are described.

  15. A Multi-Channel Method for Retrieving Surface Temperature for High-Emissivity Surfaces from Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinke Zhong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface temperature (ST of high-emissivity surfaces is an important parameter in climate systems. The empirical methods for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from hyperspectral thermal infrared (HypTIR images require spectrally continuous channel data. This paper aims to develop a multi-channel method for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from space-borne HypTIR data. With an assumption of land surface emissivity (LSE of 1, ST is proposed as a function of 10 brightness temperatures measured at the top of atmosphere by a radiometer having a spectral interval of 800–1200 cm−1 and a spectral sampling frequency of 0.25 cm−1. We have analyzed the sensitivity of the proposed method to spectral sampling frequency and instrumental noise, and evaluated the proposed method using satellite data. The results indicated that the parameters in the developed function are dependent on the spectral sampling frequency and that ST of high-emissivity surfaces can be accurately retrieved by the proposed method if appropriate values are used for each spectral sampling frequency. The results also showed that the accuracy of the retrieved ST is of the order of magnitude of the instrumental noise and that the root mean square error (RMSE of the ST retrieved from satellite data is 0.43 K in comparison with the AVHRR SST product.

  16. A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    critical geometrical details; re- casting the FDTD update equations on a grid conformal to a curvilinear coordinate system (e.g., cylindrical); and...Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Approved for public release; distribution unlimited...A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations by Traian Dogaru and DaHan Liao Sensors

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  18. Modeling the Images of Relativistic Jets Lensed by Galaxies with Different Mass Surface Density Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Larchenkova, T. I.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Lyskova, N. S.

    2011-01-01

    The images of relativistic jets from extragalactic sources produced by gravitational lensing by galaxies with different mass surface density distributions are modeled. In particular, the following models of the gravitational lens mass distribution are considered: a singular isothermal ellipsoid, an isothermal ellipsoid with a core, two- and three-component models with a galactic disk, halo, and bulge. The modeled images are compared both between themselves and with available observations. Dif...

  19. Pelvic varices diagnosed with endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullo, G.; Russ, P.D. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Dept. of Radiology, Denver, Colorado (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Pelvic varices are a well-recognized cause of pain, especially in multiparous women, and are often associated with pelvic congestion syndrome. These dilated veins have been imaged using positive-contrast venography and ultrasonography (US). We present a case of painless pelvic varices that presented as an amorphous, non-specific-appearing parametrial and pericervical mass on computed tomography (CT), but which were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an endorectal surface coil. (author)

  20. Bulk superconductivity in Type II superconductors near the second critical field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Helffer, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    We consider superconductors of Type II near the transition from the ‘bulk superconducting’ to the ‘surface superconducting’ state. We prove a new L∞ estimate on the order parameter in the bulk, i.e. away from the boundary. This solves an open problem posed by Aftalion and Serfaty [AS].......We consider superconductors of Type II near the transition from the ‘bulk superconducting’ to the ‘surface superconducting’ state. We prove a new L∞ estimate on the order parameter in the bulk, i.e. away from the boundary. This solves an open problem posed by Aftalion and Serfaty [AS]....

  1. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°.

  2. Image potential resonances of the aluminum (100) surface; Bildpotentialresonanzen der Aluminium-(100)-Oberflaeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Matthias

    2011-07-08

    Image-potential resonances on the (100) surface of pure Aluminum are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are conducted both energy- and time-resolved using the method of two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The main attention of the theoretical examination and extensive numerical calculations is devoted to the interaction between surface and bulk states. Image-potential resonances on Al(100) are a system in which a complete series of discrete Rydberg states strongly couples to a continuum of states. As a simple metal it also provides a good opportunity to test theoretical models of the structure of the potential at metal surfaces. This work represents the first high-resolution investigation of image-potential resonances with such strong resonance character. For the first time, it is demonstrated experimentally that isolated image-potential resonances exist on an Aluminum surface. On the (100) surface of Aluminum the second through fifth image-potential resonance are resolved and both, their energies and lifetimes are measured. The binding energies of the image-potential resonances form a Rydberg series of states {epsilon}{sub n}=-(0,85 eV)/((n+a){sup 2}). Within the accuracy of the measurement it is not necessary to introduce a quantum defect a (a=0.022{+-}0.035). Using angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy the effective mass of electrons in the second image-potential resonance is measured to 1.01{+-}0.11 electron masses. The lifetimes of the resonances increase as {tau}{sub n} = (1.0{+-}0.2)fs.n{sup 3} starting from n=2. Calculations using the density matrix formalism show that the experimentally observed lifetimes can be explained well by electrons decaying into the bulk. The effect of resonance trapping leads to extended lifetimes in the process. Contrary to common theoretical models of image-potential states at metal surfaces the first image-potential resonance cannot be observed in two-photon photoemission on Al(100

  3. Cortical Surface Reconstruction via Unified Reeb Analysis of Geometric and Topological Outliers in Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yonggang; Lai, Rongjie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel system for the automated reconstruction of cortical surfaces from T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. At the core of our system is a unified Reeb analysis framework for the detection and removal of geometric and topological outliers on tissue boundaries. Using intrinsic Reeb analysis, our system can pinpoint the location of spurious branches and topological outliers, and correct them with localized filtering using information from both image intensity distributions and geometric regularity. In this system, we have also developed enhanced tissue classification with Hessian features for improved robustness to image inhomogeneity, and adaptive interpolation to achieve sub-voxel accuracy in reconstructed surfaces. By integrating these novel developments, we have a system that can automatically reconstruct cortical surfaces with improved quality and dramatically reduced computational cost as compared with the popular FreeSurfer software. In our experiments, we demonstrate on 40 simulated MR images and the MR images of 200 subjects from two databases: the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and International Consortium of Brain Mapping (ICBM), the robustness of our method in large scale studies. In comparisons with FreeSurfer, we show that our system is able to generate surfaces that better represent cortical anatomy and produce thickness features with higher statistical power in population studies. PMID:23086519

  4. In situ scanning FTIR microscopy and IR imaging of Pt electrode surface towards CO adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙世刚; 洪双进; 陈声培; 卢国强; 戴鸿平; 肖晓银

    1999-01-01

    In situ scanning FTIR microscopy was built up for the first time in the present work, which consists of an FTIR apparatus, an IR microscope, an X-Y mapping stage, and the specially designed electrochemical IR cell and computer software. It has been demonstrated that this new space-resolvd in situ IR technique can be used to study vibration properties of micro-area, and to perform IR imaging of electrode surface. The chemical image obtained using this technique fur CO adsorption on Pt electrode illustrated, at a space-resolution of 10-2 cm, the inhomogeneity and the distribution of reactivity of micro-area of electrode surface.

  5. Portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for detection of biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won; Lee, Kangjin; Millner, Patricia; Sharma, Manan; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2008-04-01

    A rapid nondestructive technology is needed to detect bacterial contamination on the surfaces of food processing equipment to reduce public health risks. A portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was used to evaluate potential detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel typically used in the manufacture of food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures, such as E. coli, Pseudomonas pertucinogena, Erwinia chrysanthemi, and Listeria innocula. Following a 1-week exposure, biofilm formations were assessed using fluorescence imaging. In addition, the effects on biofilm formation from both tryptic soy broth (TSB) and M9 medium with casamino acids (M9C) were examined. TSB grown cells enhance biofilm production compared with M9C-grown cells. Hyperspectral fluorescence images of the biofilm samples, in response to ultraviolet-A (320 to 400 nm) excitation, were acquired from approximately 416 to 700 nm. Visual evaluation of individual images at emission peak wavelengths in the blue revealed the most contrast between biofilms and stainless steel coupons. Two-band ratios compared with the single-band images increased the contrast between the biofilm forming area and stainless steel coupon surfaces. The 444/588 nm ratio images exhibited the greatest contrast between the biofilm formations and stainless coupon surfaces.

  6. Joint Beamforming and Feature Detection for Enhanced Visualization of Spinal Bone Surfaces in Ultrasound Images

    CERN Document Server

    Mehdizadeh, Saeed; Kiss, Gabriel; Johansen, Tonni F; Holm, Sverre

    2016-01-01

    We propose a framework for extracting the bone surface from B-mode images employing the eigenspace minimum variance (ESMV) beamformer and a ridge detection method. We show that an ESMV beamformer with a rank-1 signal subspace can preserve the bone anatomy and enhance the edges, despite an image which is less visually appealing due to some speckle pattern distortion. The beamformed images are post-processed using the phase symmetry (PS) technique. We validate this framework by registering the ultrasound images of a vertebra (in a water bath) against the corresponding Computed Tomography (CT) dataset. The results show a bone localization error in the same order of magnitude as the standard delay-and-sum (DAS) technique, but with approximately 20% smaller standard deviation (STD) of the image intensity distribution around the bone surface. This indicates a sharper bone surface detection. Further, the noise level inside the bone shadow is reduced by 60%. In in-vivo experiments, this framework is used for imaging ...

  7. Perceptual assignment of opacity to translucent surfaces: the role of image blur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish; Anderson, Barton L

    2002-01-01

    In constructing the percept of transparency, the visual system must decompose the light intensity at each image location into two components one for the partially transmissivc surface, the other for the underlying surface seen through it. Theories of perceptual transparency have typically assumed that this decomposition is defined quantitatively in terms of the inverse of some physical model (typically, Metelli's 'episcotister model'). In previous work, we demonstrated that the visual system uses Michelson contrast as a critical image variable in assigning transmittance to transparent surfaces not luminance differences as predicted by Metelli's model [F Metelli, 1974 Scientific American 230(4) 90 98]. In this paper, we study the contribution of another variable in determining perceived transmittance, namely, the image blur introduced by the light-scattering properties of translucent surfaces and materials. Experiment 1 demonstrates that increasing the degree of blur in the region of transparency leads to a lowering in perceived transmittance, even if Michelson contrast remains constant in this region. Experiment 2 tests how this addition of blur affects apparent contrast in the absence of perceived transparency. The results demonstrate that, although introducing blur leads to a lowering in apparent contrast, the magnitude of this decrease is relatively small, and not sufficient to explain the decrease in perceived transmittance observed in experiment 1. The visual system thus takes the presence of blur in the region of transparency as an additional image cue in assigning transmittance to partially transmissive surfaces.

  8. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

  9. Two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness is reviewed mainly from the experimental point of view. The superconducting systems treated here involve a variety of materials and forms: elemental metal ultrathin films and atomic layers on semiconductor surfaces; interfaces and superlattices of heterostructures made of cuprates, perovskite oxides, and rare-earth metal heavy-fermion compounds; interfaces of electric-double-layer transistors; graphene and atomic sheets of transition metal dichalcogenide; iron selenide and organic conductors on oxide and metal surfaces, respectively. Unique phenomena arising from the ultimate two dimensionality of the system and the physics behind them are discussed.

  10. Image current heating on a metal surface due to charged bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintian E. Lin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available When charged particles pass through a metal pipe, they are accompanied by an image current on the metal surface. With intense short bunches passing near or even into the metal surface, the peak image current density can be very high. This current may result in substantial temperature rise on the surface, especially in high peak current, multibunch operation. In this paper, we derive an explicit formula for the surface temperature rise due to this previously unrecognized pulsed heating effect and show that this effect dominates the proposed linear coherent light source collimator spoiler and wire scanner heating. Without proper account, it can result in component and instrument failures. The result also applies to optical transition radiation screens, profile screens, wire scanners, exit windows, and targets, which the beam crosses.

  11. Perfect optical vortex enhanced surface plasmon excitation for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonglei; Min, Changjun; Du, Luping; Yuan, X.-C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose an all-optical technique for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM) with perfect optical vortex (POV). POV can improve the efficiency of the excitation of surface plasma and reduce the background noise of the excited fluorescence. The plasmonic standing wave patterns are excited by POV with fractional topological charges for accurate phase shift of {-2π/3, 0, and 2π/3}. The imaging resolution of less than 200 nm was produced. This PSIM technique is expected to be used as a wide field, super resolution imaging technique in dynamic biological imaging.

  12. Mean shift texture surface detection based on WT and COM feature image selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan-fang; SHI Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    Mean shift is a widely used clustering algorithm in image segmentation. However, the segmenting results are not so good as expected when dealing with the texture surface due to the influence of the textures. Therefore, an approach based on wavelet transform (WT), co-occurrence matrix (COM) and mean shift is proposed in this paper. First, WT and COM are employed to extract the optimal resolution approximation of the original image as feature image. Then, mean shift is successfully used to obtain better detection results. Finally, experiments are done to show this approach is effective.

  13. A portable UV-fluorescence multispectral imaging system for the analysis of painted surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Nevin, Austin; Farina, Andrea; Toniolo, Lucia; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2008-08-01

    A portable fluorescence multispectral imaging system was developed and has been used for the analysis of artistic surfaces. The imaging apparatus exploits two UV lamps for fluorescence excitation and a liquid crystal tunable filter coupled to a low-noise charge coupled device as the image detector. The main features of the system are critically presented, outlining the assets, drawbacks, and practical considerations of portability. A multivariate statistical treatment of spectral data is further considered. Finally, the in situ analysis with the new apparatus of recently restored Renaissance wall paintings is presented.

  14. Investigation of drug distribution in tablets using surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkala, Tamás; Farkas, Attila; Vajna, Balázs; Farkas, István; Marosi, György

    2013-03-25

    This paper reports the first application of surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging on pharmaceutical tablets containing the active ingredient (API) in very low concentrations. Taking advantage of the extremely intensive Raman signals in the presence of silver colloids, image aquisition time was radically decreased. Moreover, the investigation of drug distribution below the detection limit of regular micro-Raman spectrometry was made feasible. The characteristics of different manufacturing technologies could be revealed at very low API concentrations by using chemometric methods for processing and evaluating the large number of varying spectra provided with this imaging method.

  15. Reverse process of usual optical analysis of boson-exchange superconductors: impurity effects on s- and d-wave superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2015-03-04

    We performed a reverse process of the usual optical data analysis of boson-exchange superconductors. We calculated the optical self-energy from two (MMP and MMP+peak) input model electron-boson spectral density functions using Allen's formula for one normal and two (s- and d-wave) superconducting cases. We obtained the optical constants including the optical conductivity and the dynamic dielectric function from the optical self-energy using an extended Drude model, and finally calculated the reflectance spectrum. Furthermore, to investigate impurity effects on optical quantities we added various levels of impurities (from the clean to the dirty limit) in the optical self-energy and performed the same reverse process to obtain the optical conductivity, the dielectric function, and reflectance. From these optical constants obtained from the reverse process we extracted the impurity-dependent superfluid densities for two superconducting cases using two independent methods (the Ferrel-Glover-Tinkham sum rule and the extrapolation to zero frequency of -ϵ1(ω)ω(2)); we found that a certain level of impurities is necessary to get a good agreement on results obtained by the two methods. We observed that impurities give similar effects on various optical constants of s- and d-wave superconductors; the greater the impurities the more distinct the gap feature and the lower the superfluid density. However, the s-wave superconductor gives the superconducting gap feature more clearly than the d-wave superconductor because in the d-wave superconductors the optical quantities are averaged over the anisotropic Fermi surface. Our results supply helpful information to see how characteristic features of the electron-boson spectral function and the s- and d-wave superconducting gaps appear in various optical constants including raw reflectance spectrum. Our study may help with a thorough understanding of the usual optical analysis process. Further systematic study of experimental

  16. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    OpenAIRE

    Andreae, M. O.; G. Helas

    2008-01-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly...

  17. Snell's law for surface electrons: Refraction of an electron gas imaged in real space

    OpenAIRE

    Repp, Jascha; Meyer, Gerhard; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2003-01-01

    On NaCl(100)/Cu(111) an interface state band is observed that descends from the surface-state band of the clean copper surface. This band exhibits a Moire-pattern-induced one-dimensional band gap, which is accompanied by strong standing-wave patterns, as revealed in low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy images. At NaCl island step edges, one can directly see the refraction of these standing waves, which obey Snell's refraction law.

  18. Snell's law for surface electrons: refraction of an electron gas imaged in real space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, Jascha; Meyer, Gerhard; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2004-01-23

    On NaCl(100)/Cu(111) an interface state band is observed that descends from the surface-state band of the clean copper surface. This band exhibits a Moiré-pattern-induced one-dimensional band gap, which is accompanied by strong standing-wave patterns, as revealed in low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy images. At NaCl island step edges, one can directly see the refraction of these standing waves, which obey Snell's refraction law.

  19. Monthly Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are monthly composites, and were...

  20. Theoretical study on the two-band degenerate-gaps superconductors: Application to SrPt3P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Hou, Li-Chao; Zhao, Bin-Peng

    2016-09-01

    We study the magnetic properties of two-band degenerate-gaps superconductors with two-band isotropic Ginzburg-Landau theory. The exact solutions of upper critical field and London penetration depth are obtained, and the calculations reproduce the experimental data of the recently observed superconducting crystal SrPt3P in a broad temperature range. It directly underlies that SrPt3P is a multi-band superconductor with equal gaps in two Fermi surface sheets.

  1. Impurity scattering rate and coherence factor in vortex core of sign-reversing s -wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Yusuke

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the impurity scattering rates for quasiparticles in vortex cores of sign-reversing s -wave superconductors as a probe to detect the internal phase difference of the order parameters among different Fermi surfaces. The impurity scattering rates and coherence factors are related to quasiparticle interference effect by the scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy technique. With use of the Born and Kramer-Pesch approximations for the Andreev bound states, we show that the sign-reversed forward scatterings are dominant in vortex cores. Owing to the coherence factor in vortex cores of ±s -wave superconductors, the impurity scattering rate of the Andreev bound states has a characteristic distribution on the Fermi surfaces. For comparison, the impurity scattering rates in vortex cores of s -wave and d -wave superconductors are also discussed.

  2. Surface scanning through a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid for clinical microwave breast imaging exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Microwave tomographic image quality can be improved significantly with prior knowledge of the breast surface geometry. The authors have developed a novel laser scanning system capable of accurately recovering surface renderings of breast-shaped phantoms immersed within a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid which resides completely external to the tank (and the aqueous environment) and overcomes the challenges associated with the optical distortions caused by refraction from the air, tank wall, and liquid bath interfaces. Methods: The scanner utilizes two laser line generators and a small CCD camera mounted concentrically on a rotating gantry about the microwave imaging tank. Various calibration methods were considered for optimizing the accuracy of the scanner in the presence of the optical distortions including traditional ray tracing and image registration approaches. In this paper, the authors describe the construction and operation of the laser scanner, compare the efficacy of several calibration methods-including analytical ray tracing and piecewise linear, polynomial, locally weighted mean, and thin-plate-spline (TPS) image registrations-and report outcomes from preliminary phantom experiments. Results: The results show that errors in calibrating camera angles and position prevented analytical ray tracing from achieving submillimeter accuracy in the surface renderings obtained from our scanner configuration. Conversely, calibration by image registration reliably attained mean surface errors of less than 0.5 mm depending on the geometric complexity of the object scanned. While each of the image registration approaches outperformed the ray tracing strategy, the authors found global polynomial methods produced the best compromise between average surface error and scanner robustness. Conclusions: The laser scanning system provides a fast and accurate method of three dimensional surface capture in the aqueous environment commonly found in microwave breast

  3. High spatial resolution quantitative MR images: an experimental study of dedicated surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensanne, D [Laboratoire de Chimie Bioinorganique Medicale, Imagerie therapeutique et diagnostique, JE 2400-CNRS FR 2599, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Josse, G [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Evaluation sur la Peau et les Epitheliums de Revetement, Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, 2, rue Viguerie, BP 3071 31025 Toulouse Cedex 3 (France); Lagarde, J M [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Evaluation sur la Peau et les Epitheliums de Revetement, Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, 2, rue Viguerie, BP 3071 31025 Toulouse Cedex 3 (France); Vincensini, D [Laboratoire de Chimie Bioinorganique Medicale, Imagerie therapeutique et diagnostique, JE 2400-CNRS FR 2599, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2006-06-07

    Measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T{sub 2}) by quantitative MR imaging represents a potentially efficient tool to evaluate the physicochemical properties of various media. However, noise in MR images is responsible for uncertainties in the determination of T{sub 2} relaxation times, which limits the accuracy of parametric tissue analysis. The required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the T{sub 2} relaxation behaviour specific to each tissue. Thus, we have previously shown that keeping the uncertainty in T{sub 2} measurements within a limit of 10% implies that SNR values be greater than 100 and 300 for mono- and biexponential T{sub 2} relaxation behaviours, respectively. Noise reduction can be obtained either by increasing the voxel size (i.e., at the expense of spatial resolution) or by using high sensitivity dedicated surface coils (which allows us to increase SNR without deteriorating spatial resolution in an excessive manner). However, surface coil sensitivity is heterogeneous, i.e., it- and hence SNR-decreases with increasing depth, and the more so as the coil radius is smaller. The use of surface coils is therefore limited to the analysis of superficial structure such as the hypodermic tissue analysed here. The aim of this work was to determine the maximum limits of spatial resolution and depth compatible with reliable in vivo T{sub 2} quantitative MR images using dedicated surface coils available on various clinical MR scanners. The average thickness of adipose tissue is around 15 mm, and the results obtained have shown that obtaining reliable biexponential relaxation analysis requires a minimum achievable voxel size of 13 mm{sup 3} for a conventional volume birdcage coil and only of 1.7 mm{sup 3} for the smallest available surface coil (23 mm in diameter). Further improvement in spatial resolution allowing us to detect low details in MR images without deteriorating parametric T{sub 2} images can be obtained by image filtering. By using the non

  4. Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Roberts, Michael S.; McNaughton, James L.

    2009-05-01

    We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this investigation was to determine a minimal number of spectral bands suitable to differentiate microbial biofilm formation from the four background materials typically used during food processing. Ultimately, the resultant spectral information will be used in development of handheld portable imaging devices that can be used as visual aid tools for sanitation and safety inspection (microbial contamination) of the food processing surfaces. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells were grown in low strength M9 minimal medium on various surfaces at 22 +/- 2 °C for 2 days for biofilm formation. Biofilm autofluorescence under UV excitation (320 to 400 nm) obtained by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system showed broad emissions in the blue-green regions of the spectrum with emission maxima at approximately 480 nm for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella biofilms. Fluorescence images at 480 nm revealed that for background materials with near-uniform fluorescence responses such as stainless steel and formica cutting board, regardless of the background intensity, biofilm formation can be distinguished. This suggested that a broad spectral band in the blue-green regions can be used for handheld imaging devices for sanitation inspection of stainless, cutting board, and formica surfaces. The non-uniform fluorescence responses of granite make distinctions between biofilm and background difficult. To further investigate potential detection of the biofilm formations on granite surfaces with multispectral approaches, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using the hyperspectral fluorescence image data. The resultant PCA score images revealed distinct contrast between

  5. Noncentrosymmetric superconductors in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhin, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    We study the fermionic boundary modes (Andreev bound states) in a time-reversal invariant one-dimensional superconductor. In the presence of a substrate, spatial inversion symmetry is broken and the electronic properties are strongly affected by an antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling. We assume an arbitrary even number of nondegenerate bands crossing the Fermi level. We show that there is only one possible pairing symmetry in one dimension, an analog of s -wave pairing. The zero-energy Andreev bound states are present if the sign of the gap function in an odd number of the bands is different from all other bands.

  6. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  7. Holographic superconductors with hyperscaling violation

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, ZhongYing

    2013-01-01

    We investigate holographic superconductors in asympototically geometries with hyperscaling violation. The mass of the scalar field decouples from the UV dimension of the dual scalar operator and can be chosen as negative as we want, without disturbing the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We first numerically find that the scalar condenses below a critical temperature and a gap opens in the real part of the conductivity, indicating the onset of superconductivity. We further analytically explore the effects of the hyperscaling violation on the superconducting transition temperature. We find that the critical temperature increases with the increasing of hyperscaling violation.

  8. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  9. Superconductor lunar telescopes --Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R.; Shore, S.; Oliversen, R.; Stolarik, J.; Segal, K.; Hojaji, H.

    1994-01-01

    We propose a new type of telescope designed specifically for the lunar environment of high vacuum and low temperature. Large area UV-Visible-IR telescope arrays can be built with ultra-light-weight replica optics. High T(sub c) superconductors provide support, steering, and positioning. Advantages of this approach are light-weight payload compatible with existing launch vehicles, configurable large area optical arrays, no excavation or heavy construction, and frictionless electronically controlled mechanisms. We have built a prototype and will be demonstarting some of its working characteristics.

  10. Generalized superconductors and holographic optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Subhash; Phukon, Prabwal; Sarkar, Tapobrata [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology,Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2014-01-24

    We study generalized holographic s-wave superconductors in four dimensional R-charged black hole and Lifshitz black hole backgrounds, in the probe limit. We first establish the superconducting nature of the boundary theories, and then study their optical properties. Numerical analysis indicates that a negative Depine-Lakhtakia index may appear at low frequencies in the theory dual to the R-charged black hole, for certain temperature ranges, for specific values of the charge parameter. The corresponding cut-off values for these are numerically established in several cases. Such effects are seen to be absent in the Lifshitz background where this index is always positive.

  11. Atomic-scale studies of impurities in superconductors with a scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Materials Research Lab.

    2001-04-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy with a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope (STM) have been used to study the local variation of electronic states on the atomic scale in both low-T{sub c} and high-T{sub c} superconductors. These experiments provide an atomic-scale perspective of impurity scattering by directly probing the localized excitations that are induced by individual impurities. (orig.)

  12. Texture- and deformability-based surface recognition by tactile image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnobish, Anwesha; Pal, Monalisa; Tibarewala, D N; Konar, Amit; Pal, Kunal

    2016-08-01

    Deformability and texture are two unique object characteristics which are essential for appropriate surface recognition by tactile exploration. Tactile sensation is required to be incorporated in artificial arms for rehabilitative and other human-computer interface applications to achieve efficient and human-like manoeuvring. To accomplish the same, surface recognition by tactile data analysis is one of the prerequisites. The aim of this work is to develop effective technique for identification of various surfaces based on deformability and texture by analysing tactile images which are obtained during dynamic exploration of the item by artificial arms whose gripper is fitted with tactile sensors. Tactile data have been acquired, while human beings as well as a robot hand fitted with tactile sensors explored the objects. The tactile images are pre-processed, and relevant features are extracted from the tactile images. These features are provided as input to the variants of support vector machine (SVM), linear discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbour (kNN) for classification. Based on deformability, six household surfaces are recognized from their corresponding tactile images. Moreover, based on texture five surfaces of daily use are classified. The method adopted in the former two cases has also been applied for deformability- and texture-based recognition of four biomembranes, i.e. membranes prepared from biomaterials which can be used for various applications such as drug delivery and implants. Linear SVM performed best for recognizing surface deformability with an accuracy of 83 % in 82.60 ms, whereas kNN classifier recognizes surfaces of daily use having different textures with an accuracy of 89 % in 54.25 ms and SVM with radial basis function kernel recognizes biomembranes with an accuracy of 78 % in 53.35 ms. The classifiers are observed to generalize well on the unseen test datasets with very high performance to achieve efficient material

  13. A neural network for enhancing boundaries and surfaces in synthetic aperture radar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingolla, Ennio; Ross, William; Grossberg, Stephen

    1999-04-01

    A neural network system for boundary segmentation and surface representation, inspired by a new local-circuit model of visual processing in the cerebral cortex, is used to enhance images of range data gathered by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor. Boundary segmentation is accomplished by an improved Boundary Contour System (BCS) model which completes coherent boundaries that retain their sensitivity to image contrasts and locations. A Feature Contour System (FCS) model compensates for local contrast variations and uses the compensated signals to diffusively fill-in surface regions within the BCS boundaries. Image noise pixels that are not supported by BCS boundaries are hereby eliminated. More generally, BCS/FCS processing normalizes input dynamic range, reduces noise, and enhances contrasts between surface regions. BCS/FCS processing hereby makes structures such as motor vehicles, roads, and buildings more salient to human observers than in original imagery. The new BCS model improves image enhancement with significant reductions in processing time and complexity over previous BCS applications. The new system also outperforms several established techniques for image enhancement.

  14. Closer look at the effect of AFM imaging conditions on the apparent dimensions of surface nanobubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Schönherr, Holger

    2013-01-15

    To date, TM AFM (tapping mode or intermittent contact mode atomic force microscopy) is the most frequently applied direct imaging technique to visualize surface nanobubbles at the solid-aqueous interface. On one hand, AFM is the only profilometric technique that provides estimates of the bubbles' nanoscopic dimensions. On the other hand, the nanoscopic contact angles of surface nanobubbles estimated from their apparent dimensions that are deduced from AFM "height" images of nanobubbles differ markedly from the macrocopic water contact angles on the identical substrates. Here we show in detail how the apparent bubble height and width of surface nanobubbles on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) depend on the free amplitude of the cantilever oscillations and the amplitude setpoint ratio. (The role of these two AFM imaging parameters and their interdependence has not been studied so far for nanobubbles in a systematic way.) In all experiments, even with optimal scanning parameters, nanobubbles at the HOPG-water interface appeared to be smaller in the AFM images than their true size, which was estimated using a method presented herein. It was also observed that the severity of the underestimate increased with increasing bubble height and radius of curvature. The nanoscopic contact angle of >130° for nanobubbles on HOPG extrapolated to zero interaction force was only slightly overestimated and hence significantly higher than the macroscopic contact angle of water on HOPG (63 ± 2°). Thus, the widely reported contact angle discrepancy cannot be solely attributed to inappropriate AFM imaging conditions.

  15. Thiolene-based microfluidic flow cells for surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Gareth; Oseki, Takao; Baba, Akira; Patton, Derek; Kaneko, Futao; Mao, Leidong; Locklin, Jason

    2011-06-01

    Thiolene-based microfluidic devices have been coupled with surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) to provide an integrated platform to study interfacial interactions in both aqueous and organic solutions. In this work, we develop a photolithographic method that interfaces commercially available thiolene resin to gold and glass substrates to generate microfluidic channels with excellent adhesion that leave the underlying sensor surface free from contamination and readily available for surface modification through self-assembly. These devices can sustain high flow rates and have excellent solvent compatibility even with several organic solvents. To demonstrate the versatility of these devices, we have conducted nanomolar detection of streptavidin-biotin interactions using in situ SPRI.

  16. Influence of color coatings on aircraft surface ice detection based on multi-wavelength imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Jing-chang; Yu, Zhi-jing; Gao, Jian-shu; Zheng, Da-chuan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a simple aircraft surface ice detection system is proposed based on multi-wavelength imaging. Its feasibility is proved by the experimental results. The influence of color coatings of aircraft surface is investigated. The results show that the ice area can be clearly distinguished from the red, white, gray and blue coatings painted aluminum plates. Due to the strong absorption, not enough signals can be detected for the black coatings. Thus, a deep research is needed. Even though, the results of this paper are helpful to the development of aircraft surface ice detection.

  17. Imaging of Mechanical Properties of Soft Matter. From Heterogeneous Polymer Surfaces to Single Biomolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter M.; Gosa, Maria; Vancso, G. Julius

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the atomic force microscope (AFM) has evolved from a high resolution imaging tool to an enabling platform for physical studies at the nanoscale including quantitative mapping of mechanical characteristics of surfaces providing simultaneous topography and mechanical property maps acro

  18. First-Principle Calculation for Scanning-Tunneling-Microscopic Images of a Monolayer Graphite Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向荣; 押山淳; 岡田晋; 芶清泉

    2003-01-01

    We have applied first-principle total-energy electronic structure calculations in the local density approximation to calculate the scanning tunnelling microscopy images of a monolayer graphite surface near the Fermi level. The results obtained agree well with the observation, which has not been interpreted before.

  19. High resolution imaging of dielectric surfaces with an evanescent field optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, van N.F.; Segerink, F.B.; Bölger, B.

    1992-01-01

    An evanescent field optical microscope (EFOM) is presented which employs frustrated total internal reflection o­n a localized scale by scanning a dielectric tip in close proximity to a sample surface. High resolution images of dielectric gratings and spheres containing both topographic and dielectri

  20. Development of a biosensor microarray towards food screening using imaging surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebe, S.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Giesbers, M.; Norde, W.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the possibilities of implementing direct and competitive immunoassay formats for small and large molecule detection on a microarray, using IBIS imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) system. First, IBIS iSPR optics performance was evaluated. Using a glycerol calibration c

  1. Multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging platform for label-free detection of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonellae are among the leading causes of foodborne outbreaks in the United States, and more rapid and efficient detection methods are needed. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an emerging optical technique, which allows for rapid and label-free screening of multiple targets simultaneous...

  2. Development of a biosensor microarray towards food screening, using imaging surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, Sabina Rebe; Bremer, Maria G. E. G.; Giesbers, Marcel; Norde, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the possibilities of implementing direct and competitive immunoassay formats for small and large molecule detection on a microarray, using IBIS imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) system. First, IBIS iSPR optics performance was evaluated. Using a glycerol calibration c

  3. Image analysis from surface scanning with an absolute eddy current coil; Analyse d`images obtenues par balayage de surface avec un capteur ponctuel courants de Foucault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attaoui, P.

    1994-10-19

    The aim of this work is to implement processing and analysis tools applied to eddy current imaging. These cartographies are issued from steam generator tubes testing using an absolute coil. The first is to eliminate the perturbations due to probe lift-off changes which generate low frequency oscillations on the image. The principle of the processing is to rebuild a complete surface of the noise using only the points around the defect area. The geometric origin of these perturbations led to a model based on sinusoidal functions. The method consists of gradually decomposing the image into a sum of basic sinusoidal surfaces. In order to take into account all kind of cartographies (especially rolling zone) some preprocessing must be applied. The results obtained with this `cartography flattening`are satisfactory and the phase of analysis could begin with good condition of signal ratio. The second part of this work dealt with the choice and the perfection of image processing tools which would fit the most with the defect characterization. The aim of this characterization is to give the orientation and main size of the detected defect. A morphological skeleton representation has been chosen to illustrate the defect architecture and to allow sizing. A set of tools has been elaborated to obtain an (automatic) processing according to threshold. The results for single defect are satisfactory since the sizing error is around {+-} 25% and orientation is nearly always correctly given. The processing for area with several defects is more complex and new complementary research directions are proposed. (author).

  4. Iterative Blind Deconvolution Algorithm for Deblurring PSP Image of Rotating Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James

    2015-11-01

    Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure unsteady surface pressures on rotating bodies, with iterative image deblurring schemes being developed to correct for image blur at high rotation rates. A significant amount of rotational blur can occur in PSP images acquired in the lifetime mode when the time scale of luminescent decay is long relative to the rotational speed. Image deblurring schemes have been developed to address this problem, but are not currently able to handle strong pressure gradients. Since the local point spread function at each point on the rotor depends on the unknown pressure, restoring such an image is a spatially-varying blind deconvolution problem. An iterative scheme based on the lifetime decay characteristics of PSP has been developed for restoring this image. The scheme estimates the spatially-varying blur kernel without filtering the blurred image and then restores it using classical iterative regularization tools. The resulting scheme is evaluated using computationally-generated pressure fields with strong gradients, as well as experimental data with strong gradients in luminescent lifetime due to a nitrogen jet. Factors such as convergence, image noise, and regularization-iteration count are studied in this work. Funded by the U.S. Government under Agreement No. W911W6-11-2-0010 through the Georgia Tech Vertical Lift Research Center of Excellence.

  5. Electrical resistivity imaging in transmission between surface and underground tunnel for fault characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Boyle, A.; Grychtol, B.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.; Adler, A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrical resistivity images supply information on sub-surface structures and are classically performed to characterize faults geometry. Here we use the presence of a tunnel intersecting a regional fault to inject electrical currents between surface and the tunnel to improve the image resolution at depth. We apply an original methodology for defining the inversion parametrization based on pilot points to better deal with the heterogeneous sounding of the medium. An increased region of high spatial resolution is shown by analysis of point spread functions as well as inversion of synthetics. Such evaluations highlight the advantages of using transmission measurements by transferring a few electrodes from the main profile to increase the sounding depth. Based on the resulting image we propose a revised structure for the medium surrounding the Cernon fault supported by geological observations and muon flux measurements.

  6. Imaging of surface spin textures on bulk crystals by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamine, Hiroshi; Okumura, So; Farjami, Sahar; Murakami, Yasukazu; Nishida, Minoru

    2016-11-22

    Direct observation of magnetic microstructures is vital for advancing spintronics and other technologies. Here we report a method for imaging surface domain structures on bulk samples by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Complex magnetic domains, referred to as the maze state in CoPt/FePt alloys, were observed at a spatial resolution of less than 100 nm by using an in-lens annular detector. The method allows for imaging almost all the domain walls in the mazy structure, whereas the visualisation of the domain walls with the classical SEM method was limited. Our method provides a simple way to analyse surface domain structures in the bulk state that can be used in combination with SEM functions such as orientation or composition analysis. Thus, the method extends applications of SEM-based magnetic imaging, and is promising for resolving various problems at the forefront of fields including physics, magnetics, materials science, engineering, and chemistry.

  7. Analysis of carotid lumen surface morphology using three-dimensional ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Bernard; Beletsky, Vadim; Spence, J David; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: bcychiu@alumni.uwo.ca, E-mail: vados@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: dspence@robarts.ca, E-mail: gep@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: afenster@imaging.robarts.ca

    2009-03-07

    Carotid plaque surface irregularity and ulcerations play an important role in the risk of ischemic stroke. Ulcerated or fissured plaque, characterized by irregular surface morphology, exposes thrombogenic materials to the bloodstream, possibly leading to life- or brain-threatening thrombosis and embolization. Therefore, the quantification of plaque surface irregularity is important to identify high-risk plaques that would likely lead to vascular events. Although a number of studies have characterized plaque surface irregularity using subjective classification schemes with two or more categories, only a few have quantified surface irregularity using an objective and continuous quantity, such as Gaussian or mean curvature. In this work, our goal was to use both Gaussian and mean curvatures for identifying ulcers from 3D carotid ultrasound (US) images of human subjects. Before performing experiments using patient data, we verified the numerical accuracy of the surface curvature computation method using discrete spheres and tori with different sampling intervals. We also showed that three ulcers of the vascular phantom with 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm diameters were associated with high Gaussian and mean curvatures, and thus, were easily detected. Finally, we demonstrated the application of the proposed method for detecting ulcers on luminal surfaces, which were segmented from the 3D US images acquired for two human subjects.

  8. Analysis of carotid lumen surface morphology using three-dimensional ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bernard; Beletsky, Vadim; Spence, J. David; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2009-03-01

    Carotid plaque surface irregularity and ulcerations play an important role in the risk of ischemic stroke. Ulcerated or fissured plaque, characterized by irregular surface morphology, exposes thrombogenic materials to the bloodstream, possibly leading to life- or brain-threatening thrombosis and embolization. Therefore, the quantification of plaque surface irregularity is important to identify high-risk plaques that would likely lead to vascular events. Although a number of studies have characterized plaque surface irregularity using subjective classification schemes with two or more categories, only a few have quantified surface irregularity using an objective and continuous quantity, such as Gaussian or mean curvature. In this work, our goal was to use both Gaussian and mean curvatures for identifying ulcers from 3D carotid ultrasound (US) images of human subjects. Before performing experiments using patient data, we verified the numerical accuracy of the surface curvature computation method using discrete spheres and tori with different sampling intervals. We also showed that three ulcers of the vascular phantom with 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm diameters were associated with high Gaussian and mean curvatures, and thus, were easily detected. Finally, we demonstrated the application of the proposed method for detecting ulcers on luminal surfaces, which were segmented from the 3D US images acquired for two human subjects.

  9. Imaging of acute injuries of the articular surfaces (chondral, osteochondral and subchondral fractures)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohndorf, K. [Department of Radiology, Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    Fractures involving the articulating surfaces of bone are a common cause of chronic disability after joint injury. Acute fractures of the articular surface typically run parallel to the surface and are confined to the cartilage and/or the immediate subchondral cancellous bone. They should be distinguished from vertical or oblique bone fractures with intra-articular extension. This article reviews the mechanism of acute articular surface injuries, as well as their incidence, clinical presentation, radiologic appearance and treatment. A classification is presented based on direct inspection (arthroscopy) and imaging (especially MRI), emphasizing the distinction between lesions with intact (subchondral impaction and subchondral bone bruises) and disrupted (chondral, osteochondral lesions) cartilage. Hyaline cartilage, subchondral bone plate and subchondral cancellous bone are to be considered an anatomic unit. Subchondral articular surface lesions, osteochondral fractures and solely chondral fractures are different manifestations of impaction injuries that affect the articulating surface. Of the noninvasive imaging modalities, conventional radiography and MRI provide the most relevant information. The appropriate use of short tau inversion recovery, T1-weighted and T2-weighted (turbo) spin-echo as well as gradient-echo sequences, enables MRI to classify the various acute articular surface lesions with great accuracy and provides therapeutic guidance. (orig.)

  10. Near-infrared imaging of barred halo-dominated low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, M.; Das, M.; Ninan, J. P.; Manoj, P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a near-infrared (NIR) imaging study of barred low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies using the TIFR1 NIR Spectrometer and Imager. LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated, late-type spirals that have low-luminosity stellar discs but large neutral hydrogen (H I) gas discs. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey images of a very large sample of LSB galaxies derived from the literature, we found that the barred fraction is only 8.3 per cent. We imaged 25 barred LSB galaxies in the J, H, KS wavebands and 29 in the KS band. Most of the bars are much brighter than their stellar discs, which appear to be very diffuse. Our image analysis gives deprojected mean bar sizes of Rb/R25 = 0.40 and ellipticities e ≈ 0.45, which are similar to bars in high surface brightness galaxies. Thus, although bars are rare in LSB galaxies, they appear to be just as strong as bars found in normal galaxies. There is no correlation of Rb/R25 or e with the relative H I or stellar masses of the galaxies. In the (J - KS) colour images most of the bars have no significant colour gradient which indicates that their stellar population is uniformly distributed and confirms that they have low dust content.

  11. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  12. Development of a three-dimensional surface imaging system for melanocytic skin lesion evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosca, Androniki; Kokolakis, Athanasios; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Zabulis, Xenophon; Marnelakis, Ioannis; Ripoll, Jorge; Stephanidis, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    Even though surface morphology is always taken into account when assessing clinically pigmented skin lesions, it is not captured by most modern imaging systems using digital imaging. Our aim is to develop a novel three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique to record detailed information of the surface anatomy of melanocytic lesions that will enable improved classification through digital imaging. The apparatus consists of three high-resolution cameras, a light source, and accompanying software. Volume measurements of specific phantoms using volumetric tubes render slightly lower values than those obtained by our 3D imaging system (mean%±SD, 3.8%±0.98, P<0.05). To examine the reproducibility of the method, sequential imaging of melanocytic lesions is carried out. The mean%±SD differences of area, major axis length, volume, and maximum height are 2.1%±1.1, 0.9%±0.8, 3.8%±2.9, and 2.5%±3.5, respectively. Thirty melanocytic lesions are assessed, including common and dysplastic nevi and melanomas. There is a significant difference between nevi and melanomas in terms of variance in height and boundary asymmetry (P<0.001). Moreover, dysplastic nevi have significantly higher variances in pigment density values than common nevi (P<0.001). Preliminary data suggest that our instrument has great potential in the evaluation of the melanocytic lesions. However, these findings should be confirmed in larger-scale studies.

  13. Controlled-resonant surface tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-03-18

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonant surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan, and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types, including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 μm based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  14. Surface topography analysis and performance on post-CMP images (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jusang; Bello, Abner F.; Kakita, Shinichiro; Pieniazek, Nicholas; Johnson, Timothy A.

    2017-03-01

    Surface topography on post-CMP processing can be measured with white light interference microscopy to determine the planarity. Results are used to avoid under or over polishing and to decrease dishing. The numerical output of the surface topography is the RMS (root-mean-square) of the height. Beyond RMS, the topography image is visually examined and not further quantified. Subjective comparisons of the height maps are used to determine optimum CMP process conditions. While visual comparison of height maps can determine excursions, it's only through manual inspection of the images. In this work we describe methods of quantifying post-CMP surface topography characteristics that are used in other technical fields such as geography and facial-recognition. The topography image is divided into small surface patches of 7x7 pixels. Each surface patch is fitted to an analytic surface equation, in this case a third order polynomial, from which the gradient, directional derivatives, and other characteristics are calculated. Based on the characteristics, the surface patch is labeled as peak, ridge, flat, saddle, ravine, pit or hillside. The number of each label and thus the associated histogram is then used as a quantified characteristic of the surface topography, and could be used as a parameter for SPC (statistical process control) charting. In addition, the gradient for each surface patch is calculated, so the average, maximum, and other characteristics of the gradient distribution can be used for SPC. Repeatability measurements indicate high confidence where individual labels can be lower than 2% relative standard deviation. When the histogram is considered, an associated chi-squared value can be defined from which to compare other measurements. The chi-squared value of the histogram is a very sensitive and quantifiable parameter to determine the within wafer and wafer-to-wafer topography non-uniformity. As for the gradient histogram distribution, the chi-squared could

  15. Comparison of MESSENGER Optical Images with Thermal and Radar Data for the Surface of MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, D. T.; Coman, E. I.; Chabot, N. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; Harmon, J. K.; Neish, C.

    2010-12-01

    Images collected by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its three Mercury flybys cover nearly the entire surface of the planet that was not imaged by Mariner 10. The MESSENGER data now allow us to observe features at optical wavelengths that were previously known only through remote sensing in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For example, the Mariner 10 infrared (IR) radiometer made measurements along a track on the night side of Mercury during the spacecraft's first encounter in 1974. Analysis of the IR radiometer data identified several thermal anomalies that we have correlated to craters with extensive rays or ejecta deposits, including Xiao Zhao and Eminescu. The thermal properties are consistent with a greater exposure of bare rock (exposed in steep walls or as boulders and cobbles) in and around these craters compared with the lower-thermal-inertia, finer-grained regolith of the surrounding older surface. The portion of Mercury not viewed by Mariner 10 has also been imaged by Earth-based radar. The radar backscatter gives information on the wavelength-scale surface roughness. Arecibo S-band (12.6-cm wavelength) radar observations have produced images of Eminescu and also revealed two spectacular rayed craters (Debussy and Hokusai) that have since been imaged by MESSENGER. We are examining radial profiles for these craters, extracted from both the radar images and MESSENGER narrow-angle camera mosaics, that extend from the crater center outwards to a distance of several crater diameters. Comparison of optical and radar profiles for the craters, as well as similar profiles for lunar craters, can provide insight into ejecta deposition, the effect of surface gravity on the cratering process, and space weathering.

  16. Quantification of liver fibrosis via second harmonic imaging of the Glisson's capsule from liver surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuoyu; Kang, Chiang Huen; Gou, Xiaoli; Peng, Qiwen; Yan, Jie; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Cheng, Chee Leong; He, Yuting; Kang, Yuzhan; Xia, Wuzheng; So, Peter T C; Welsch, Roy; Rajapakse, Jagath C; Yu, Hanry

    2016-04-01

    Liver surface is covered by a collagenous layer called the Glisson's capsule. The structure of the Glisson's capsule is barely seen in the biopsy samples for histology assessment, thus the changes of the collagen network from the Glisson's capsule during the liver disease progression are not well studied. In this report, we investigated whether non-linear optical imaging of the Glisson's capsule at liver surface would yield sufficient information to allow quantitative staging of liver fibrosis. In contrast to conventional tissue sections whereby tissues are cut perpendicular to the liver surface and interior information from the liver biopsy samples were used, we have established a capsule index based on significant parameters extracted from the second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of capsule collagen from anterior surface of rat livers. Thioacetamide (TAA) induced liver fibrosis animal models was used in this study. The capsule index is capable of differentiating different fibrosis stages, with area under receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) up to 0.91, making it possible to quantitatively stage liver fibrosis via liver surface imaging potentially with endomicroscopy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Filamentous Biopolymers on Surfaces: Atomic Force Microscopy Images Compared with Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Filament Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Norbert; Klenin, Konstantin; Kirmse, Robert; Bussiek, Malte; Herrmann, Harald; Hafner, Mathias; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarly on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i) For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii) For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a ‘trapping’ mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these ‘ideal’ adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica (‘ideal’ trapping) and on glass (‘ideal’ equilibrated) with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions. PMID:19888472

  18. Filamentous biopolymers on surfaces: atomic force microscopy images compared with Brownian dynamics simulation of filament deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Mücke

    Full Text Available Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarily on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a 'trapping' mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these 'ideal' adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica ('ideal' trapping and on glass ('ideal' equilibrated with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions.

  19. Research on synthetic aperture radar imaging technology of one-dimensional layered rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Wei-Jie; Tong Chuang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A quick and exact imaging method for one-dimensional layered rough surfaces is proposed in this paper to study the scattering characteristics of a layered medium that exists widely in nature.The boundary integral equations of layered rough surfaces are solved by using the propagation-inside-layer expansion combined with the forward and backward spectral acceleration method (PILE+FB-SA),and the back scattering data are obtained.Then,a conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging procedure called back projection method is used to generate a two-dimensional (2D) image of the layered rough surfaces.Combined with the relative dielectric permittivity of realistic soil,the random rough surfaces with Gauss spectrum are used to simulate the layered medium with rough interfaces.Since the back scattering data are computed by using the fast numerical method,this method can be used to study layered rough surfaces with any parameter,which has a great application value in the detection and remote sensing areas.

  20. Losses of Superconductor Journal Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y. H.; Hull, J. R.; Han, S. C.; Jeong, N. H.; Oh, J. M.; Sung, T. H.

    2004-06-01

    A high-temperature superconductor (HTS) journal bearing was studied for rotational loss. Two HTS bearings support the rotor at top and bottom. The rotor weight is 4 kg and the length is about 300 mm. Both the top and bottom bearings have two permanent magnet (PM) rings with an iron pole piece separating them. Each HTS journal bearing is composed of six pieces of superconductor blocks of size 35×25×10 mm. The HTS blocks are encased in a cryochamber through which liquid nitrogen flows. The inner spool of the cryochamber is made from G-10 to reduce eddy current loss, and the rest of the cryochamber is stainless steel. The magnetic field from the PM rings is < 10 mT on the stainless part. The rotational drag was measured over the same speed range at several chamber pressures. Results indicate that a chamber pressure of 0.4 mtorr is sufficiently low to minimize windage loss, and the 10 mT design criterion for the magnetic field on the stainless part of the cryochamber is too high.

  1. Superconductor bearings, flywheels and transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Floegel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Goebel, B.; Wippich, D.; Schirrmeister, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of high temperature superconductors (HTS) and of bulk superconducting magnet devices, their use in bearings, in flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) and linear transport magnetic levitation (Maglev) systems. We report and review the concepts of multi-seeded REBCO bulk superconductor fabrication. The multi-grain bulks increase the averaged trapped magnetic flux density up to 40% compared to single-grain assembly in large-scale applications. HTS magnetic bearings with permanent magnet (PM) excitation were studied and scaled up to maximum forces of 10 kN axially and 4.5 kN radially. We examine the technology of the high-gradient magnetic bearing concept and verify it experimentally. A large HTS bearing is tested for stabilizing a 600 kg rotor of a 5 kWh/250 kW flywheel system. The flywheel rotor tests show the requirement for additional damping. Our compact flywheel system is compared with similar HTS-FESS projects. A small-scale compact YBCO bearing with in situ Stirling cryocooler is constructed and investigated for mobile applications. Next we show a successfully developed modular linear Maglev system for magnetic train operation. Each module levitates 0.25t at 10 mm distance during one-day operation without refilling LN2. More than 30 vacuum cryostats containing multi-seeded YBCO blocks are fabricated and are tested now in Germany, China and Brazil.

  2. High Temperature Superconductor Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079328; de Rijk, Gijs; Dhalle, Marc

    2016-11-10

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding $20T$. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and development before they can be applied in a practical accelerator magnet. In order to study HTS in detail, a five tesla demonstrator magnet named Feather-M2 is designed and constructed. The magnet is based on ReBCO coated conductor, which is assembled into a $10kA$ class Roebel cable. A new and optimized Aligned Block layout is used, which takes advantage of the anisotropy of the conductor. This is achieved by providing local alignment of the Roebel cable in the coil windings with the magnetic field lines. A new Network Model capable of analyzing transient electro-magnetic and thermal phenomena in coated conductor cables and coils is developed. This model is necessary to solve critical issues in coated conductor ac...

  3. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  4. Note: Velocity map imaging the scattering plane of gas surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, D. J.; Messider, T. M.; Leng, J. G.; Greaves, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D scattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a dielectric surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was validated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the system's capabilities, the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a polytetrafluoroethylene surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  5. Image method for induced surface charge from many-body system of dielectric spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; de Pablo, Juan J.; Freed, Karl F.

    2016-09-01

    Charged dielectric spheres embedded in a dielectric medium provide the simplest model for many-body systems of polarizable ions and charged colloidal particles. We provide a multiple scattering formulation for the total electrostatic energy for such systems and demonstrate that the polarization energy can be rapidly evaluated by an image method that generalizes the image methods for conducting spheres. Individual contributions to the total electrostatic energy are ordered according to the number of polarized surfaces involved, and each additional surface polarization reduces the energy by a factor of (a/R)3ɛ, where a is the sphere radius, R the average inter-sphere separation, and ɛ the relevant dielectric mismatch at the interface. Explicit expressions are provided for both the energy and the forces acting on individual spheres, which can be readily implemented in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations of polarizable charged spheres, thereby avoiding costly computational techniques that introduce a surface charge distribution that requires numerical solution.

  6. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles for biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Win, Khin Yin; Liu, Shuhua; Teng, Choon Peng; Zheng, Yuangang; Han, Ming-Yong

    2013-04-21

    In this article, the very recent progress of various functional inorganic nanomaterials is reviewed including their unique properties, surface functionalization strategies, and applications in biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics. The proper surface functionalization renders them with stability, biocompatibility and functionality in physiological environments, and further enables their targeted use in bioapplications after bioconjugation via selective and specific recognition. The surface-functionalized nanoprobes using the most actively studied nanoparticles (i.e., gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and magnetic nanoparticles) make them an excellent platform for a wide range of bioapplications. With more efforts in recent years, they have been widely developed as labeling probes to detect various biological species such as proteins, nucleic acids and ions, and extensively employed as imaging probes to guide therapeutics such as drug/gene delivery and photothermal/photodynamic therapy.

  7. Carbon dots of different composition and surface functionalization: cytotoxicity issues relevant to fluorescence cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Anilkumar, Parambath; Cao, Li; Liu, Jia-Hui; Luo, Pengju G; Tackett, Kenneth N; Sahu, Sushant; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2011-11-01

    Nanoscale carbon particles have emerged as versatile precursors for a new class of highly fluorescent nanomaterials that resemble semiconductor quantum dots. The surface-passivated fluorescent carbon nanoparticles, dubbed 'carbon dots', were already demonstrated for their potential optical bioimaging applications in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we conducted a systematic cytotoxicity evaluation on the carbon dots prepared by various combinations of precursor carbon nanoparticles and molecules for the particle surface functionalization. The results suggested that the cytotoxicity of carbon dots was dependent on the selection of surface passivation molecules. Those dots showing more significant cytotoxicity at higher concentrations were also evaluated for their effects on the fluorescence imaging of live cells. The implications of the results on the eventual use of carbon dots as cell imaging agents are discussed.

  8. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles for biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Win, Khin Yin; Liu, Shuhua; Teng, Choon Peng; Zheng, Yuangang; Han, Ming-Yong

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the very recent progress of various functional inorganic nanomaterials is reviewed including their unique properties, surface functionalization strategies, and applications in biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics. The proper surface functionalization renders them with stability, biocompatibility and functionality in physiological environments, and further enables their targeted use in bioapplications after bioconjugation via selective and specific recognition. The surface-functionalized nanoprobes using the most actively studied nanoparticles (i.e., gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and magnetic nanoparticles) make them an excellent platform for a wide range of bioapplications. With more efforts in recent years, they have been widely developed as labeling probes to detect various biological species such as proteins, nucleic acids and ions, and extensively employed as imaging probes to guide therapeutics such as drug/gene delivery and photothermal/photodynamic therapy.

  9. Terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors: spectrum, generation, nonlinear and quantum phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savel' ev, Sergey; Yampol' skii, V A; Rakhmanov, A L; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    The recent growing interest in terahertz (THz) and sub-THz science and technology is due to its many important applications in physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology and medicine, including THz imaging, spectroscopy, tomography, medical diagnosis, health monitoring, environmental control, as well as chemical and biological identification. We review the problem of linear and nonlinear THz and sub-THz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and their excitations produced by moving Josephson vortices. We start by discussing the coupled sine-Gordon equations for the gauge-invariant phase difference of the order parameter in the junctions, taking into account the effect of breaking the charge neutrality, and deriving the spectrum of Josephson plasma waves. We also review surface and waveguide Josephson plasma waves. The spectrum of these waves is presented, and their excitation is discussed. We review the propagation of weakly nonlinear Josephson plasma waves below the plasma frequency, {omega}{sub J}, which is very unusual for plasma-like excitations. In close analogy to nonlinear optics, these waves exhibit numerous remarkable features, including a self-focusing effect and the pumping of weaker waves by a stronger one. In addition, an unusual stop-light phenomenon, when {partial_derivative}{omega}/{partial_derivative}k {approx} 0, caused by both nonlinearity and dissipation, can be observed in the Josephson plasma waves. At frequencies above {omega}{sub J}, the current-phase nonlinearity can be used for transforming continuous sub-THz radiation into short, strongly amplified, pulses. We also present quantum effects in layered superconductors, specifically, the problem of quantum tunneling of fluxons through stacks of Josephson junctions. Moreover, the nonlocal sine-Gordon equation for Josephson vortices is reviewed. We discuss the Cherenkov and transition radiations of the Josephson plasma waves produced by moving Josephson vortices, either in a single

  10. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 k) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  11. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, S.E.; Poeppel, R.B.; Prorok, B.C.; Lanagan, M.T.; Maroni, V.A.

    1995-11-21

    An article and method of manufacture (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor are disclosed. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. 5 figs.

  12. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  13. Tuning non-equilibrium superconductors with lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentef, Michael A.; Kollath, Corinna [HISKP, University of Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Kemper, Alexander F. [LBL Berkeley (United States); Georges, Antoine [Ecole Polytechnique and College de France, Paris (France)

    2015-07-01

    The study of the real-time dynamics dynamics of solids perturbed by short laser pulses is an intriguing opportunity of ultrafast materials science. Previous theoretical work on pump-probe photoemission spectroscopy revealed spectroscopic signatures of electron-boson coupling, which are reminiscent of features observed in recent pump-probe photoemission experiments on cuprate superconductors. Here we investigate the ordered state of electron-boson mediated superconductors subject to laser driving using Migdal-Eliashberg theory on the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh contour. We extract the characteristic time scales on which the non-equilibrium superconductor reacts to the perturbation, and their relation to the coupling boson and the underlying order.

  14. Magneto-optical Kerr-effect at low temperatures. Investigation of superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, Patrick; Bayer, Jonas [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstrasse 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Innovative Surfaces FINO, Aalen University, Beethovenstrasse 1, 73430 Aalen (Germany); Stahl, Claudia; Ruoss, Stephen; Graefe, Joachim; Schuetz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstrasse 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Institute for Innovative Surfaces FINO, Aalen University, Beethovenstrasse 1, 73430 Aalen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    With XMCD microscopy it is possible to visualize the critical current density of the superconductor YBCO with high spatial resolution. Therefore, soft magnetic CoFeB is introduced as sensor layer. The magnetic stray fields of the supercurrents lead to a local reorientation of the magnetic moments in the ferromagnet, which are then imaged via X-ray microscopy. These experiments have to be carried out at the scanning X-ray microscope MAXYMUS at the synchrotron Bessy II in Berlin. For that purpose pre-characterization of the sensor is highly desirable: Magnetic interactions between the superconductor and the ferromagnetic sensor layer have been investigated at low temperatures using Kerr-effect measurements. Therefore hysteresis loops are obtained by a sophisticated magnet and field ramping setup within the NanoMOKE3 system. The results are used to optimize the ferromagnetic sensor layer for XMCD microscopy of superconductors.

  15. Accuracy of surface tension measurement from drop shapes: the role of image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantarian, Ali; Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-11-01

    Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA) has been extensively used for surface tension measurement. In essence, ADSA works by matching a theoretical profile of the drop to the extracted experimental profile, taking surface tension as an adjustable parameter. Of the three main building blocks of ADSA, i.e. edge detection, the numerical integration of the Laplace equation for generating theoretical curves and the optimization procedure, only edge detection (that extracts the drop profile line from the drop image) needs extensive study. For the purpose of this article, the numerical integration of the Laplace equation for generating theoretical curves and the optimization procedure will only require a minor effort. It is the aim of this paper to investigate how far the surface tension accuracy of drop shape techniques can be pushed by fine tuning and optimizing edge detection strategies for a given drop image. Two different aspects of edge detection are pursued here: sub-pixel resolution and pixel resolution. The effect of two sub-pixel resolution strategies, i.e. spline and sigmoid, on the accuracy of surface tension measurement is investigated. It is found that the number of pixel points in the fitting procedure of the sub-pixel resolution techniques is crucial, and its value should be determined based on the contrast of the image, i.e. the gray level difference between the drop and the background. On the pixel resolution side, two suitable and reliable edge detectors, i.e. Canny and SUSAN, are explored, and the effect of user-specified parameters of the edge detector on the accuracy of surface tension measurement is scrutinized. Based on the contrast of the image, an optimum value of the user-specified parameter of the edge detector, SUSAN, is suggested. Overall, an accuracy of 0.01mJ/m(2) is achievable for the surface tension determination by careful fine tuning of edge detection algorithms.

  16. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  17. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Downscaling of Aircraft-, Landsat-, and MODIS-based Land Surface Temperature Images with Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, W.; Gowda, P. H.; Oommen, T.; Howell, T. A.; Hernandez, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) images are required to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) at a field scale for irrigation scheduling purposes. Satellite sensors such as Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) can offer images at several spectral bandwidths including visible, near-infrared (NIR), shortwave-infrared, and thermal-infrared (TIR). The TIR images usually have coarser spatial resolutions than those from non-thermal infrared bands. Due to this technical constraint of the satellite sensors on these platforms, image downscaling has been proposed in the field of ET remote sensing. This paper explores the potential of the Support Vector Machines (SVM) to perform downscaling of LST images derived from aircraft (4 m spatial resolution), TM (120 m), and MODIS (1000 m) using normalized difference vegetation index images derived from simultaneously acquired high resolution visible and NIR data (1 m for aircraft, 30 m for TM, and 250 m for MODIS). The SVM is a new generation machine learning algorithm that has found a wide application in the field of pattern recognition and time series analysis. The SVM would be ideally suited for downscaling problems due to its generalization ability in capturing non-linear regression relationship between the predictand and the multiple predictors. Remote sensing data acquired over the Texas High Plains during the 2008 summer growing season will be used in this study. Accuracy assessment of the downscaled 1, 30, and 250 m LST images will be made by comparing them with LST data measured with infrared thermometers at a small spatial scale, upscaled 30 m aircraft-based LST images, and upscaled 250 m TM-based LST images, respectively.

  19. Retrieval of Temperature and Species Distributions from Multispectral Image Data of Surface Flame Spread in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annen, K. D.; Conant, John A.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2001-01-01

    Weight, size, and power constraints severely limit the ability of researchers to fully characterize temperature and species distributions in microgravity combustion experiments. A powerful diagnostic technique, infrared imaging spectrometry, has the potential to address the need for temperature and species distribution measurements in microgravity experiments. An infrared spectrum imaged along a line-of-sight contains information on the temperature and species distribution in the imaged path. With multiple lines-of-sight and approximate knowledge of the geometry of the combustion flowfield, a three-dimensional distribution of temperature and species can be obtained from one hyperspectral image of a flame. While infrared imaging spectrometers exist for collecting hyperspectral imagery, the remaining challenge is retrieving the temperature and species information from this data. An initial version of an infrared analysis software package, called CAMEO (Combustion Analysis Model et Optimizer), has been developed for retrieving temperature and species distributions from hyperspectral imaging data of combustion flowfields. CAMEO has been applied to the analysis of multispectral imaging data of flame spread over a PMMA surface in microgravity that was acquired in the DARTFire program. In the next section of this paper, a description of CAMEO and its operation is presented, followed by the results of the analysis of microgravity flame spread data.

  20. AFM imaging and analysis of local mechanical properties for detection of surface pattern of functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, Petr, E-mail: petr.knotek@upce.cz [University of Pardubice, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Joint Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry of IMC ASCR and University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Chanova, Eliska; Rypacek, Frantisek [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovskeho sq. 2, 162 06 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01

    In this work we evaluate the applicability of different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes, such as Phase Shift Imaging, Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy (AFAM) and Force Spectroscopy, for mapping of the distribution pattern of low-molecular-weight biomimetic groups on polymer biomaterial surfaces. Patterns with either random or clustered spatial distribution of bioactive peptide group derived from fibronectin were prepared by surface deposition of functional block copolymer nano-colloids and grafted with RGDS peptide containing the sequence of amino acids arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine (conventionally labeled as RGDS) and carrying biotin as a tag. The biotin-tagged peptides were labeled with 40 nm streptavidin-modified Au nanospheres. The peptide molecules were localized through the detection of bound Au nanospheres by AFM, and thus, the surface distribution of peptides was revealed. AFM techniques capable of monitoring local mechanical properties of the surface were proved to be the most efficient for identification of Au nano-markers. The efficiency was successfully demonstrated on two different patterns, i.e. random and clustered distribution of RGDS peptides on structured surface of the polymer biomaterial. Highlights: ► Bioactive peptides for cell adhesion on PLA-b-PEO biomimetic surface were visualized. ► The biotin-tagged RGDS peptides were labeled with streptavidin-Au nanospheres. ► The RGDS pattern was detected using different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes. ► Phase Shift Image was proved to be suitable method for studying peptide distribution.