WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconductor imaging surface

  1. Superconductors and medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Guy

    2011-01-01

    After difficult beginnings in the 1970's, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved to become nowadays the jewel in the crown of medical technology. Superconductors have been a key factor for the extraordinary expansion of MRI which in turn represents about 75 % of their total market. After recalling some basic principles, this article traces their common history and refers to future developments. (author)

  2. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-06-24

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states.

  3. Direct imaging by atomic force microscopy of surface-localized self-assembled monolayers on a cuprate superconductor and surface X-ray scattering analysis of analogous monolayers on the surface of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schougaard, Steen B.; Reitzel, Niels; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A self-assembled monolayer of CF3(CF2)(3)(CH2)(11)NH2 atop the (001) surface of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x was imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images provide direct 2D-structural evidence for the epitaxial 5.5 angstrom square root 2 x root 2R45 degrees unit...... was studied by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and specular X-ray reflectivity. Structural differences and similarities between the water-supported and superconductor-localized monolayers are discussed....

  4. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-01-01

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states. (topical review)

  5. Simulating atomic-scale phenomena on surfaces of unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisel, Andreas; Andersen, Brian [Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Choubey, Peayush; Hirschfeld, Peter [Univ. of Florida (United States); Berlijn, Tom [CNMS and CSMD, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Interest in atomic scale effects in superconductors has increased because of two general developments: First, the discovery of new materials as the cuprate superconductors, heavy fermion and Fe-based superconductors where the coherence length of the cooper pairs is as small to be comparable to the lattice constant, rendering small scale effects important. Second, the experimental ability to image sub-atomic features using scanning-tunneling microscopy which allows to unravel numerous physical properties of the homogeneous system such as the quasi particle excitation spectra or various types of competing order as well as properties of local disorder. On the theoretical side, the available methods are based on lattice models restricting the spatial resolution of such calculations. In the present project we combine lattice calculations using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations describing the superconductor with wave function information containing sub-atomic resolution obtained from ab initio approaches. This allows us to calculate phenomena on surfaces of superconductors as directly measured in scanning tunneling experiments and therefore opens the possibility to identify underlying properties of these materials and explain observed features of disorder. It will be shown how this method applies to the cuprate material Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} and a Fe based superconductor.

  6. Surface electrostatic waves in bounded high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averkov, Yu.O.; Yakovenko, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    The dispersion relations of surface electrostatic waves propagating along the surface of semi bounded layered superconductor and in the slab of layered superconductor are theoretically investigated. An arbitrary inclination of superconductor layers to the interface of a vacuum - crystal and an arbitrary direction of propagation of surface waves in the plane of the interface are taking into account. The possibility of initiation of an absolute instability during the propagation of a non-relativistic plasma stream above the surface of the layered superconductor is shown

  7. Scanning laser microscope for imaging nanostructured superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Arai, Kohei; Akita, Yukio; Miyanari, Mitsunori; Minami, Yusuke; Yotsuya, Tsutomu; Kato, Masaru; Satoh, Kazuo; Uno, Mayumi; Shimakage, Hisashi; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    The nanofabrication of superconductors yields various interesting features in superconducting properties. A variety of different imaging techniques have been developed for probing the local superconducting profiles. A scanning pulsed laser microscope has been developed by the combination of the XYZ piezo-driven stages and an optical fiber with an aspheric focusing lens. The scanning laser microscope is used to understand the position-dependent properties of a superconducting MgB 2 stripline of length 100 μm and width of 3 μm under constant bias current. Our results show that the superconducting stripline can clearly be seen in the contour image of the scanning laser microscope on the signal voltage. It is suggested from the observed image that the inhomogeneity is relevant in specifying the operating conditions such as detection efficiency of the sensor.

  8. Scanning laser microscope for imaging nanostructured superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Arai, Kohei; Akita, Yukio; Miyanari, Mitsunori; Minami, Yusuke; Yotsuya, Tsutomu; Kato, Masaru; Satoh, Kazuo; Uno, Mayumi; Shimakage, Hisashi; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen

    2010-10-01

    The nanofabrication of superconductors yields various interesting features in superconducting properties. A variety of different imaging techniques have been developed for probing the local superconducting profiles. A scanning pulsed laser microscope has been developed by the combination of the XYZ piezo-driven stages and an optical fiber with an aspheric focusing lens. The scanning laser microscope is used to understand the position-dependent properties of a superconducting MgB 2 stripline of length 100 μm and width of 3 μm under constant bias current. Our results show that the superconducting stripline can clearly be seen in the contour image of the scanning laser microscope on the signal voltage. It is suggested from the observed image that the inhomogeneity is relevant in specifying the operating conditions such as detection efficiency of the sensor.

  9. THz detectors using surface Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We describe a proposal for THz detectors based on the excitation of surface waves, in layered superconductors, at frequencies lower than the Josephson plasma frequency ω J . These waves propagate along the vacuum-superconductor interface and are attenuated in both transverse directions out of the surface (i.e., towards the superconductor and towards the vacuum). The surface Josephson plasma waves are also important for the complete suppression of the specular reflection from a sample (Wood's anomalies, used for gratings) and produce a huge enhancement of the wave absorption, which can be used for the detection of THz waves

  10. Magneto-optical imaging of transport current densities in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Gunter, D.O.; Zhong, W.; Balachandran, U.; Haldar, P.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.K.; Nikitenko, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Direct imaging of the paths of transport currents in superconductors creates many new possibilities for exploring the basic features of vortex pinning mechanisms and for improving the performance of superconducting materials. A technique for imaging the path and magnitude of the transport current density flowing in superconductors is described. Results are given for a 37-filament BSCCO 2223 powder-in-tube wire, showing a highly inhomogeneous current path within the filaments

  11. Surface impedance of superconductors in wide frequency ranges for wake field calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovskii, V.G.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of the surface impedance of superconductors in wide frequency ranges for calculations of wake fields, generated by bunches of charged particles moving axially inside a metallic vacuum chambers, is solved. The case of specular electron reflection at the superconductor surface is considered. The expression for the surface impedance of superconductors suitable for numerical computation is derived [ru

  12. Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The chapter 6.3 p. 143 to 153 of this book deals with superconductors 19 items are briefly presented with address of manufacturer or laboratory to contact, mainly in the USA or Japan. In particular magnets, films, high temperature superconductors and various applications are presented [fr

  13. Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, A V

    2014-01-01

    Superconductors is neither about basic aspects of superconductivity nor about its applications, but its mainstay is superconducting materials. Unusual and unconventional features of a large variety of novel superconductors are presented and their technological potential as practical superconductors assessed. The book begins with an introduction to basic aspects of superconductivity. The presentation is readily accessible to readers from a diverse range of scientific and technical disciplines, such as metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering, electronic and device engineering, and chemistry. The derivation of mathematical formulas and equations has been kept to a minimum and, wherever necessary, short appendices with essential mathematics have been added at the end of the text. The book is not meant to serve as an encyclopaedia, describing each and every superconductor that exists, but focuses on important milestones in their exciting development.

  14. Surface impedance and optimum surface resistance of a superconductor with an imperfect surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex; Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-11-01

    We calculate a low-frequency surface impedance of a dirty, s -wave superconductor with an imperfect surface incorporating either a thin layer with a reduced pairing constant or a thin, proximity-coupled normal layer. Such structures model realistic surfaces of superconducting materials which can contain oxide layers, absorbed impurities, or nonstoichiometric composition. We solved the Usadel equations self-consistently and obtained spatial distributions of the order parameter and the quasiparticle density of states which then were used to calculate a low-frequency surface resistance Rs(T ) and the magnetic penetration depth λ (T ) as functions of temperature in the limit of local London electrodynamics. It is shown that the imperfect surface in a single-band s -wave superconductor results in a nonexponential temperature dependence of Z (T ) at T ≪Tc which can mimic the behavior of multiband or d -wave superconductors. The imperfect surface and the broadening of the gap peaks in the quasiparticle density of states N (ɛ ) in the bulk give rise to a weakly temperature-dependent residual surface resistance. We show that the surface resistance can be optimized and even reduced below its value for an ideal surface by engineering N (ɛ ) at the surface using pair-breaking mechanisms, particularly by incorporating a small density of magnetic impurities or by tuning the thickness and conductivity of the normal layer and its contact resistance. The results of this work address the limit of Rs in superconductors at T ≪Tc , and the ways of engineering the optimal density of states by surface nanostructuring and impurities to reduce losses in superconducting microresonators, thin-film strip lines, and radio-frequency cavities for particle accelerators.

  15. Imaging Josephson vortices on the surface superconductor Si(111)-(√7×√3)-In using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Kim, Howon; Kawakami, Takuto; Nagai, Yuki; Nakayama, Tomonobu; Hu, Xiao; Hasegawa, Yukio; Uchihashi, Takashi

    2014-12-12

    We have studied the superconducting Si(111)-(√7×√3)-In surface using a ³He-based low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. Zero-bias conductance images taken over a large surface area reveal that vortices are trapped at atomic steps after magnetic fields are applied. The crossover behavior from Pearl to Josephson vortices is clearly identified from their elongated shapes along the steps and significant recovery of superconductivity within the cores. Our numerical calculations combined with experiments clarify that these characteristic features are determined by the relative strength of the interterrace Josephson coupling at the atomic step.

  16. Distribution of local magnetic field of vortex lattice near anisotropic superconductor surface in inclined external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremova, S.A.; Tsarevskij, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic field distribution in a unit cell of the Abrikosov vortex lattice near the surface of monoaxial anisotropic type-ii superconductors in inclined external magnetic field has been found in the framework of London model for the cases when the symmetry axis is perpendicular and parallel to the superconductor surface interface. Distribution of local magnetic field as a function of the distance from the superconductor interface surface and external field inclination angle has been obtained. Using high-Tc superconductor Y-Ba-Cu-O by way of examples, it has been shown that the study of local magnetic field distribution function, depending on external magnetic field inclination angle towards the superconductor symmetry axis and towards the superconductor surface, can provide important data on anisotropic properties of the superconductor [ru

  17. Topological Superconductivity on the Surface of Fe-Based Superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Tang, Peizhe; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2016-07-22

    As one of the simplest systems for realizing Majorana fermions, the topological superconductor plays an important role in both condensed matter physics and quantum computations. Based on ab initio calculations and the analysis of an effective 8-band model with superconducting pairing, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional extended s-wave Fe-based superconductors such as Fe_{1+y}Se_{0.5}Te_{0.5} have a metallic topologically nontrivial band structure, and exhibit a normal-topological-normal superconductivity phase transition on the (001) surface by tuning the bulk carrier doping level. In the topological superconductivity (TSC) phase, a Majorana zero mode is trapped at the end of a magnetic vortex line. We further show that the surface TSC phase only exists up to a certain bulk pairing gap, and there is a normal-topological phase transition driven by the temperature, which has not been discussed before. These results pave an effective way to realize the TSC and Majorana fermions in a large class of superconductors.

  18. Suppression of surface barriers in superconductors by columnar defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshelev, A. E.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the influence of columnar defects in layered superconductors on the thermally activated penetration of pancake vortices through the surface barrier. Columnar defects, located near the surface, facilitate penetration of vortices through the surface barrier, by creating ''weak spots,'' through which pancakes can penetrate into the superconductor. Penetration of a pancake mediated by an isolated column, located near the surface, is a two-stage process involving hopping from the surface to the column and the detachment from the column into the bulk; each stage is controlled by its own activation barrier. The resulting effective energy is equal to the maximum of those two barriers. For a given external field there exists an optimum location of the column for which the barriers for the both processes are equal and the reduction of the effective penetration barrier is maximal. At high fields the effective penetration field is approximately 2 times smaller than in unirradiated samples. We also estimate the suppression of the effective penetration field by column clusters. This mechanism provides further reduction of the penetration field at low temperatures

  19. Surface resistance of superconductors - examples from Nb - O systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The observed surface resistance of most superconductors can be written as the sum of two terms. R/sub obs/ = R/sub BCS/ + R/sub res/. This paper is divided into three sections. The first section describes the BCS theory of surface resistance in terms of a simplified two-fluid model. The second section describes several possible causes of residual resistance including normal conducting materials, tunneling across cracks in the surface, and direct generation of phonons by the RF electric field. The last section describes recent experiments having to do with the effects of oxide layers on surface resistance. Layers grown in pure oxygen at room temperature were found to have little or no effect, but if these layers are heated to temperatures near 300 0 C, they can alter both the BCS resistance and the residual resistance. Heated oxide layers also increased the dependence of the residual resistance on ambient magnetic field. 31 references, 13 figures, 3 tables

  20. Fundamental studies of superconductors using scanning magnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtley, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    In this review I discuss the application of scanning magnetic imaging to fundamental studies of superconductors, concentrating on three scanning magnetic microscopies—scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM), scanning Hall bar microscopy (SHM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). I briefly discuss the history, sensitivity, spatial resolution, invasiveness and potential future developments of each technique. I then discuss a selection of applications of these microscopies. I start with static imaging of magnetic flux: an SSM study provides deeper understanding of vortex trapping in narrow strips, which are used to reduce noise in superconducting circuitry. Studies of vortex trapping in wire lattices, clusters and arrays of rings and nanoholes show fascinating ordering effects. The cuprate high-Tc superconductors are shown to have predominantly d-wave pairing symmetry by magnetic imaging of the half-integer flux quantum effect. Arrays of superconducting rings act as a physical analog for the Ising spin model, with the half-integer flux quantum effect helping to eliminate one source of disorder in antiferromagnetic arrangements of the ring moments. Tests of the interlayer tunneling model show that the condensation energy available from this mechanism cannot account for the high critical temperatures observed in the cuprates. The strong divergence in the magnetic fields of Pearl vortices allows them to be imaged using SSM, even for penetration depths of a millimeter. Unusual vortex arrangements occur in samples comparable in size to the coherence length. Spontaneous magnetization is not observed in Sr2RuO4, which is believed to have px ± ipy pairing symmetry, although effects hundreds of times bigger than the sensitivity limits had been predicted. However, unusual flux trapping is observed in this superconductor. Finally, unusual flux arrangements are also observed in magnetic superconductors. I then turn to vortex dynamics: imaging of vortices in rings of highly underdoped

  1. Fundamental studies of superconductors using scanning magnetic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirtley, J R [Center for Probing the Nanoscale, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-12-01

    In this review I discuss the application of scanning magnetic imaging to fundamental studies of superconductors, concentrating on three scanning magnetic microscopies-scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM), scanning Hall bar microscopy (SHM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). I briefly discuss the history, sensitivity, spatial resolution, invasiveness and potential future developments of each technique. I then discuss a selection of applications of these microscopies. I start with static imaging of magnetic flux: an SSM study provides deeper understanding of vortex trapping in narrow strips, which are used to reduce noise in superconducting circuitry. Studies of vortex trapping in wire lattices, clusters and arrays of rings and nanoholes show fascinating ordering effects. The cuprate high-T{sub c} superconductors are shown to have predominantly d-wave pairing symmetry by magnetic imaging of the half-integer flux quantum effect. Arrays of superconducting rings act as a physical analog for the Ising spin model, with the half-integer flux quantum effect helping to eliminate one source of disorder in antiferromagnetic arrangements of the ring moments. Tests of the interlayer tunneling model show that the condensation energy available from this mechanism cannot account for the high critical temperatures observed in the cuprates. The strong divergence in the magnetic fields of Pearl vortices allows them to be imaged using SSM, even for penetration depths of a millimeter. Unusual vortex arrangements occur in samples comparable in size to the coherence length. Spontaneous magnetization is not observed in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}, which is believed to have p{sub x} {+-} ip{sub y} pairing symmetry, although effects hundreds of times bigger than the sensitivity limits had been predicted. However, unusual flux trapping is observed in this superconductor. Finally, unusual flux arrangements are also observed in magnetic superconductors. I then turn to vortex dynamics: imaging of vortices

  2. Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekin, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter attempts to provide an introductory guide to interpreting handbook data on practical, high-current, superconducting materials, principally for magnet applications. An overview is given of the properties and operational limits of superconductive materials, as well as techniques used to fabricate practical superconducting wires. Topics considered include critical temperature, critical magnetic field, Type I and Type II superconductors, upper critical field values for practical materials, the temperature dependence of critical field and upper critical field, critical current, critical current density values for practical materials, the measurement of critical current, composite fabrication, stability, ac losses, eddy current loss, hysteretic loss, mechanical properties, critical current degradation, and superconducting materals selection and composite design

  3. Fluctuation diamagnetism near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmistrov, S.N.; Dubovskii, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    Fluctuations of the magnetic moment and of the specific heat near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors are studied. Fluctuations near a surface yield an additional contribution to the effect of the usual bulk fluctuations on the diamagnetic moment. Such an additional contribution has a singularity near a temperature T/sub c/3(H), which is higher than the bulk superconducting transition temperature in a magnetic field T/sub c/2(H). Depending on the strength of the magnetic field, the singularity of the additional contribution to the magnetic moment can be either logarithmic (strong fields) or of square-root type (weak fields). Experiments which could reveal the aforementioned anomalous behavior are discussed in detail

  4. Probing superconductors. Spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaguri, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in a cuprate triggered developments of various spectroscopic tools which have been utilized to elucidate electronic states of this mysterious compound. Particularly, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning-tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy are improved considerably. It is now possible to map the superconducting gap in both momentum and real spaces using these two techniques. Here we review spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy which is able to explore momentum-space phase structure of the superconducting gap, as well as real-space structure. Applications of this technique to a cuprate and an iron-based superconductor are discussed. (author)

  5. Macroscopic quantum coherence in a magnetic nanoparticle above the surface of a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky; Friedman

    2000-12-11

    We study macroscopic quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in a single-domain particle placed above the surface of a superconductor. Such a setup allows one to manipulate the height of the energy barrier, preserving the degeneracy of the ground state. The tunneling amplitude and the effect of the dissipation in the superconductor are computed.

  6. Macroscopic Quantum Coherence in a Magnetic Nanoparticle Above the Surface of a Superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Friedman, Jonathan R.

    2000-12-11

    We study macroscopic quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in a single-domain particle placed above the surface of a superconductor. Such a setup allows one to manipulate the height of the energy barrier, preserving the degeneracy of the ground state. The tunneling amplitude and the effect of the dissipation in the superconductor are computed.

  7. Macroscopic Quantum Coherence in a Magnetic Nanoparticle Above the Surface of a Superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Friedman, Jonathan R.

    2000-01-01

    We study macroscopic quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in a single-domain particle placed above the surface of a superconductor. Such a setup allows one to manipulate the height of the energy barrier, preserving the degeneracy of the ground state. The tunneling amplitude and the effect of the dissipation in the superconductor are computed

  8. Fermi-surface reconstruction by stripe order in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Francis

    2012-02-01

    The origin of pairing in a superconductor resides in the underlying normal state. In the cuprate high-temperature superconductor YBCO, application of a magnetic field to suppress superconductivity reveals a ground state that appears to break the translational symmetry of the lattice, pointing to some density-wave order [1,2,3]. In another cuprate, Eu-LSCO, the onset of stripe order - a modulation of spin and charge densities - at low temperature is well established [4]. By a comparative study of thermoelectric transport in the cuprates YBCO and Eu-LSCO, we show that the two materials exhibit a very similar process of Fermi-surface reconstruction as a function of temperature and doping [5,6]. This strongly suggests that Fermi-surface reconstruction is caused by stripe order in both cases, compelling evidence that stripe order is a generic tendency of hole-doped cuprates.[4pt] Work done in collaboration with J. Chang, N. Doiron-Leyraud, E. Hassinger, R. Daou, D. LeBoeuf, M. Rondeau, B. J. Ramshaw, R. Liang, D. A. Bonn, W. N. Hardy, S. Pyon, T. Takayama, H. Takagi, I. Sheikin, L. Malone, C. Proust, K. Behnia and L. Taillefer.[4pt] [1] N. Doiron-Leyraud et al., Nature 447, 565 (2007).[0pt] [2] D. LeBoeuf et al., Nature 450, 533 (2007).[0pt] [3] D. LeBoeuf et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 054506 (2011).[0pt] [4] J. Fink et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 092503 (2011).[0pt] [5] J. Chang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 057005 (2010).[0pt] [6] F. Lalibert'e et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 432 (2011).

  9. Topology and symmetry of surface Majorana arcs in cyclic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Takeshi; Nitta, Muneto

    2018-01-01

    We study the topology and symmetry of surface Majorana arcs in superconductors with nonunitary "cyclic" pairing. Cyclic p -wave pairing may be realized in a cubic or tetrahedral crystal, while it is a candidate for the interior P32 superfluids of neutron stars. The cyclic state is an admixture of full gap and nodal gap with eight Weyl points and the low-energy physics is governed by itinerant Majorana fermions. We here show the evolution of surface states from Majorana cone to Majorana arcs under rotation of surface orientation. The Majorana cone is protected solely by an accidental spin rotation symmetry and fragile against spin-orbit coupling, while the arcs are attributed to two topological invariants: the first Chern number and one-dimensional winding number. Lastly, we discuss how topologically protected surface states inherent to the nonunitary cyclic pairing can be captured from surface probes in candidate compounds, such as U1 -xThxBe13 . We examine tunneling conductance spectra for two competitive scenarios in U1 -xThxBe13 —the degenerate Eu scenario and the accidental scenario.

  10. SQCRAMscope imaging of transport in an iron-pnictide superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollar, Alicia; Taylor, Stephen; Palmstrom, Johanna; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Fisher, Ian; Lev, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We have recently introduced a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. We will report on the first use of the SQCRAMscope for imaging a strongly correlated material. Specifically, we will present measurements of electron transport in iron-pnictide superconductors across the electron nematic phase transition at T = 135 K.

  11. Quantitative XPS analysis of high Tc superconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonski, A.; Sanada, N.; Suzuki, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Nagoshi, M.

    1993-01-01

    The procedure of quantitative XPS analysis involving the relative sensitivity factors is most convenient to apply to high T c superconductor surfaces because this procedure does not require standards. However, a considerable limitation of such an approach is its relatively low accuracy. In the present work, a proposition is made to use for this purpose a modification of the relative sensitivity factor approach accounting for the matrix and the instrumental effects. The accuracy of this modification when applied to the binary metal alloys is 2% or better. A quantitative XPS analysis was made for surfaces of the compounds Bi 2 Sr 2 CuO 6 , Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 , and YBa 2 Cu 3 O Y . The surface composition determined for the polycrystalline samples corresponds reasonably well to the bulk stoichiometry. Slight deficiency of oxygen was found for the Bi-based compounds. The surface exposed on cleavage of the Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 single crystal was found to be enriched with bismuth, which indicates that the cleavage occurs along the BiO planes. This result is in agreement with the STM studies published in the literature

  12. Towards a complete Fermi surface in underdoped high Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil

    The discovery of magnetic quantum oscillations in underdoped high Tc superconductors raised many questions, and initiated a quest to understand the origin of the Fermi surface the like of which had not been seen since the very first discovery of quantum oscillations in elemental bismuth. While studies of the Fermi surface of materials are today mostly assisted by computer codes for calculating the electronic band structure, this was not the case in the underdoped high Tc materials. The Fermi surface was shown to reconstructed into small pockets, yet there was no hint of a viable order parameter. Crucial clues to understanding the origin of the Fermi surface were provided by the small value of the observed Fermi surface cross-section, the negative Hall coefficient and the small electronic heat capacity at high magnetic fields. We also know that the magnetic fields were likely to be too weak to destroy the pseudogap and that vortex pinning effects could be seen to persist to high magnetic fields at low temperatures. I will show that the Fermi surface that appears to fit best with the experimental observations is a small electron pocket formed by connecting the nodal `Fermi arcs' seen in photoemission experiments, corresponding to a density-wave state with two different orthogonal ordering vectors. The existence of such order has subsequently been detected by x-ray scattering experiments, thereby strengthening the case for charge ordering being responsible for reconstructing the Fermi surface. I will discuss new efforts to understand the relationship between the charge ordering and the pseudogap state, discussing the fate of the quasiparticles in the antinodal region and the dimensionality of the Fermi surface. The author acknowledges contributions from Suchitra Sebastian, Brad Ramshaw, Mun Chan, Yu-Te Hsu, Mate Hartstein, Gil Lonzarich, Beng Tan, Arkady Shekhter, Fedor Balakirev, Ross McDonald, Jon Betts, Moaz Altarawneh, Zengwei Zhu, Chuck Mielke, James Day, Doug

  13. Theoretical study of cathode surfaces and high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the work functions of BaO on W, Os, Pt, and alloys of Re-W, Os-W, and Ir-W that are in excellent agreement with experiment. The observed emission enhancement for alloy relative to tungsten dispenser cathodes is attributed to properties of the substrate crystal structure and explained by the smaller depolarization of the surface dipole on hexagonal as compared to cubic substrates. For Ba and BaO on W(100), the geometry of the adsorbates has been determined by a comparison of inverse photoemission spectra with calculated densities of unoccupied states based on the fully relativistic embedded cluster approach. Results are also discussed for models of scandate cathodes and the electronic structure of oxygen on W(100) at room and elevated temperatures. A detailed comparison is made for the surface electronic structure of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 as obtained with non-, quasi-, and fully relativistic cluster calculations.

  14. A high temperature superconductor tape RF receiver coil for a low field magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M C; Yan, B P; Lee, K H; Ma, Q Y; Yang, E S

    2005-01-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) thin films have been applied in making a low loss RF receiver coil for improving magnetic resonance imaging image quality. However, the application of these coils is severely limited by their limited field of view (FOV). Stringent fabrication environment requirements and high cost are further limitations. In this paper, we propose a simpler method for designing and fabricating HTS coils. Using industrial silver alloy sheathed Bi (2-x) Pb x Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) HTS tapes, a five-inch single-turn HTS solenoid coil has been developed, and human wrist images have been acquired with this coil. The HTS tape coil has demonstrated an enhanced FOV over a six-inch YBCO thin film surface coil at 77 K with comparable signal-to-noise ratio

  15. Quasiparticle scattering image in hidden order phases and chiral superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalmeier, Peter [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Akbari, Alireza, E-mail: alireza@apctp.org [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, and Max Planck POSTECH Center for Complex Phase Materials, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The technique of Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) has been successfully used to investigate the symmetry of unconventional superconducting gaps, also in heavy fermion compounds. It was demonstrated that QPI can distinguish between the d-wave singlet candidates in CeCoIn{sub 5}. In URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} presumably a chiral d-wave singlet superconducting (SC) state exists inside a multipolar hidden order (HO) phase. We show that hidden order leaves an imprint on the symmetry of QPI pattern that may be used to determine the essential question whether HO in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} breaks the in-plane rotational symmetry or not. We also demonstrate that the chiral d-wave SC gap leads to a crossover to a quasi-2D QPI spectrum below T{sub c} which sharpens the HO features. Furthermore we investigate the QPI image of chiral p-wave multigap superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • The chiral multigap structure of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} leads to rotation of QPI spectrum with bias voltage. • 5f band reconstruction in hidden order phase of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is obtained from two orbital model. • The chiral superconductivity in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} leads to quasi-2D quasiparticle interference (QPI).

  16. Transport properties of high-temperature superconductors: Surface vs bulk effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlachkov, L.; Koshelev, A.E.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate surface-related transport properties of high-temperature superconductors. We find the mean vortex velocity under applied transport current determined by the activation energies for vortex penetration and exit through the Bean-Livingston barrier. We determine the current distribution between the surfaces of superconductor and the field and current dependencies of the transport activation energies. For a three-dimensional superconductor the transport activation energy, U s 3D , is found to decrease with the external field, H, and transport current, J, as U s 3D ∝H -1/2 and U s 3D ∝J -1/2 , respectively. In the quasi-two-dimensional compounds, U s 2D decays logarithmically with field and current. The interplay between the surface and the bulk contributions to the transport properties, such as current-voltage characteristics, is discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. On the theory of type-I superconductor surface tension and twinning-plane-superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishonov, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    A correction is found to the surface tension in type-I superconductors which is proportional to the square root of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter. This correction is essential for obtaining the phase diagram and other thermodynamical variables of the narrow superconducting layer arising near the twinning plane in some metals

  18. Local antiferromagnetic exchange and collaborative Fermi surface as key ingredients of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangping; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cuprates, ferropnictides and ferrochalcogenides are three classes of unconventional high temperature superconductors, who share similar phase diagrams in which superconductivity develops after a magnetic order is suppressed, suggesting a strong interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, although the exact picture of this interplay remains elusive. Here we show that there is a direct bridge connecting antiferromagnetic exchange interactions determined in the parent compounds of these materials to the superconducting gap functions observed in the corresponding superconducting materials: in all high temperature superconductors, the Fermi surface topology matches the form factor of the pairing symmetry favored by local magnetic exchange interactions. We suggest that this match offers a principle guide to search for new high temperature superconductors. PMID:22536479

  19. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-01-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents

  20. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high- Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-10-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents.

  1. Surface transport properties of Fe-based superconductors: The influence of degradation and inhomogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecenik, T.; Gregor, M.; Sobota, R.; Truchly, M.; Satrapinskyy, L.; Kus, P.; Plecenik, A. [Department of Experimental Physics, FMPI, Comenius University, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kurth, F.; Holzapfel, B.; Iida, K. [Institute for Metallic Materials, IFW Dresden, P. O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-29

    Surface properties of Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} epitaxial superconducting thin films were inspected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM), and point contact spectroscopy (PCS). It has been shown that surface of Fe-based superconductors degrades rapidly if being exposed to air, what results in suppression of gap-like structure on PCS spectra. Moreover, SSRM measurements revealed inhomogeneous surface conductivity, what is consistent with strong dependence of PCS spectra on contact position. Presented results suggest that fresh surface and small probing area should be assured for surface sensitive measurements like PCS to obtain intrinsic properties of Fe-based superconductors.

  2. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvis, J.A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Facultad de ingeniería y Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Central, Bogotá (Colombia); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Suderow, H., E-mail: hermann.suderow@uam.es [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Altos Campos Magnéticos y Bajas Temperaturas, UAM, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The observation of vortex cores is reviewed, with emphasis in new experiments. • Vortex cores are follow superconducting gap and Fermi surface shapes. • The vortex core shape influences vortex dynamics. - Abstract: Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  3. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvis, J.A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The observation of vortex cores is reviewed, with emphasis in new experiments. • Vortex cores are follow superconducting gap and Fermi surface shapes. • The vortex core shape influences vortex dynamics. - Abstract: Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of high-temperature superconductor clean surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic spectra for the high temperature superconductors La 1.85 Sr 0.15 CuO 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x , and Bi 2 Sr 2-x Ca 1+x Cu 2 O 8+y and their impurity phases. The oxidation state of Cu in all of these materials was predominantly Cu 2+ . The O 1s emission for clean surfaces was a single broad peak near 529 eV derived from emission from inequivalent O sites in the superconductors. The valence bands were a -6 eV wide manifold of Cu 3d-O 2p hybrid bands in the ∼ 1-7 eV binding energy range, with very low emission at E F arising from antibonding Cu 3d-O 2p orbitals. Emission from grain boundary and other impurity phases appeared at 531 eV for the O 1s core level, and in general ∼ 1-2 eV higher energy than the superconductor peak for other core levels except for Cu 2p. Impurity phases appeared in the valence bands as a shoulder at ∼ 5 eV. The amount of impurities detected was shown to be dependent on the fracture properties of the superconductors. All of the materials were shown to be stable under vacuum. The products and spatial extent of chemical reactions with Ag, Al, Al oxide, Au, Bi, Bi oxide, CaF 2 , Cu, Fe, Si, and Si oxide overlayers on these materials also were examined. Au, CaF 2 , and metal oxides deposited by activated oxidation during evaporation were non-reactive and non-disruptive of the superconductor surfaces. Ag overlayers were unique in that they disrupted the superconductor during deposition, but exhibited no evidence of any chemical reactions. Overlayers with an affinity for oxygen withdrew O from the superconductor. The O loss occurred preferentially from Cu atoms in the superconductor and disrupted the planar bonding structure

  5. Surface barrier and bulk pinning in MgB$_2$ superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Pissas, M.; Moraitakis, E.; Stamopoulos, D.; Papavassiliou, G.; Psycharis, V.; Koutandos, S.

    2001-01-01

    We present a modified method of preparation of the new superconductor MgB$_2$. The polycrystalline samples were characterized using x-ray and magnetic measurements. The surface barriers control the isothermal magnetization loops in powder samples. In bulk as prepared samples we always observed symmetric magnetization loops indicative of the presence of a bulk pinning mechanism. Magnetic relaxation measurements in the bulk sample reveal a crossover of surface barrier to bulk pinning.

  6. Surface Andreev Bound States and Odd-Frequency Pairing in Topological Superconductor Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yukio; Tamura, Shun

    2018-04-01

    In this review, we summarize the achievement of the physics of surface Andreev bound states (SABS) up to now. The route of this activity has started from the physics of SABS of unconventional superconductors where the pair potential has a sign change on the Fermi surface. It has been established that SABS can be regarded as a topological edge state with topological invariant defined in the bulk Hamiltonian. On the other hand, SABS accompanies odd-frequency pairing like spin-triplet s-wave or spin-singlet p-wave. In a spin-triplet superconductor junction, induced odd-frequency pairing can penetrate into a diffusive normal metal (DN) attached to the superconductor. It causes so called anomalous proximity effect where the local density of states of quasiparticle in DN has a zero energy peak. When bulk pairing symmetry is spin-triplet px-wave, the anomalous proximity effect becomes prominent and the zero bias voltage conductance is always quantized independent of the resistance in DN and interface. Finally, we show that the present anomalous proximity effect is realized in an artificial topological superconducting system, where a nanowire with spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman field is put on the conventional spin-singlet s-wave superconductor.

  7. Atomic profile imaging of ceramic oxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.; Peng JuLin; Sellar, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Atomic surface profile imaging is an electron optical technique capable of revealing directly the surface crystallography of ceramic oxides. Use of an image-intensifier with a TV camera allows fluctuations in surface morphology and surface reactivity to be recorded and analyzed using digitized image data. This paper reviews aspects of the electron optical techniques, including interpretations based upon computer-simulation image-matching techniques. An extensive range of applications is then presented for ceramic oxides of commercial interest for advanced materials applications: including uranium oxide (UO 2 ); magnesium and nickel oxide (MgO,NiO); ceramic superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.7 ); barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ); sapphire (α-A1 2 O 3 ); haematite (α-Fe-2O 3 ); monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic monocrystalline forms of zirconia (ZrO 2 ), lead zirconium titanate (PZT + 6 mol.% NiNbO 3 ) and ZBLAN fluoride glass. Atomic scale detail has been obtained of local structures such as steps associated with vicinal surfaces, facetting parallel to stable low energy crystallographic planes, monolayer formation on certain facets, relaxation and reconstructions, oriented overgrowth of lower oxides, chemical decomposition of complex oxides into component oxides, as well as amorphous coatings. This remarkable variety of observed surface stabilization mechanisms is discussed in terms of novel double-layer electrostatic depolarization mechanisms, as well as classical concepts of the physics and chemistry of surfaces (ionization and affinity energies and work function). 46 refs., 16 figs

  8. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-T c superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the measured results of the two-dimensional flux density distribution of a YBCO bulk under applied AC magnetic fields with various frequency. Melt-processed oxide superconductors have been developed in order to obtain strong pinning forces. Various electric mechanical systems or magnetic levitation systems use those superconductors. The major problem is that cracks occur because the bulk superconductors are brittle. The bulk may break in magnetizing process after cracks make superconducting state instable. The trapped flux density and the permanent current characteristics of bulk superconductors have been analyzed, so as to examine the magnetizing processes or superconducting states of the bulk. In those studies, the two-dimensional surface flux density distributions of the bulk in static fields are discussed. On the other hand, the distributions in dynamic fields are little discussed. We attempted to examine the states of the bulk in the dynamic fields, and made a unique experimental device which has movable sensors synchronized with AC applied fields. As a result, the two-dimensional distributions in the dynamic fields are acquired by recombining the one-dimensional distributions. The dynamic states of the flux of the bulk and the influences of directions of cracks are observed from the distributions. In addition, a new method for measuring two-dimensional flux density distribution under dynamic magnetic fields is suggested

  9. Experiments on the rf surface resistance of the perovskite superconductors at 3 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, M.; Klein, N.; Mueller, G.; Piel, H.; Roeth, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Since the discovery of the perovskite superconductors many experiments to explore their physical properties have been performed and various potential applications have been considered. The high critical temperature of more than 90 K obtained with Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ (Y may be substituted by other rare earth elements) makes these superconductors interesting for applications in microwave technology. This has focused the authors interest on the investigation of their rf properties. Due to the sensitivity of the rf surface resistance to surface impurities and remaining non superconducting phases rf measurements are a good means to provide useful information about the quality of sample preparation and about physical properties of the superconductor itself. This contribution reports on the experimental determination of the rf surface resistance of Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ and Eu 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ in the normal and superconducting state at 3 GHz. In the first chapter the preparation of the ceramic samples and initial dc experiments are described. The main part of the paper describes the rf measurements which are performed in a superconducting niobium host cavity. The obtained results for both the surface resistance and the high field performance are discussed with respect to the preparation of the samples and regarding possible applications. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  10. Low temperature X-ray imaging of magnetic flux patterns in high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Bechtel, Michael; Schütz, Gisela; Albrecht, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We present X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) microscopy results obtained at liquid nitrogen temperatures on the high-Tc superconductor YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7-δ). The magnetic flux distribution arising from electric currents in the superconductor is detected and visualized using soft-magnetic Co40Fe40B20 (CoFeB) as sensor layer and XMCD as contrast mechanism. It has been shown that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer directly corresponds to magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and hence can be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors [Stahl et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 104515 (2014)]. The existing scanning UHV X-ray microscopy setup MAXYMUS at the synchrotron BESSY II in Berlin has been upgraded for that purpose: we use a nitrogen based MMR Micro Miniature Joule-Thompson Cryostat with temperature range from 75 K to 580 K. The capability of the method is demonstrated on two different superconducting samples, an optimally doped thin film and a melt-textured block.

  11. Low-energy excitations and Fermi surface topology of parent cobaltate superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Qian, D.; Foo, M.; Cava, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The essential framework for cuprate superconductivity is that of a spin-1/2 electron system in the vicinity of a half filled (Mott limit) lattice. Of all oxide superconductors, this framework is most closely matched in the sodium doped cobalt oxides except that it is realized on a triangular lattice. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle dynamics of the parent cobaltate superconductor. Results reveal a single hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy (∼15 m e ∼ 3m LDA ) quasiparticles with a negative effective hopping (t eff F (k → )∼v F ∼0.4±0.1 eV A) observed. ARPES data is consistent with bulk thermodynamic specific heat and quantum oscillation measurements

  12. Symmetry conditions of a nodal superconductor for generating robust flat-band Andreev bound states at its dirty surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Shingo; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2018-05-01

    We discuss the symmetry property of a nodal superconductor that hosts robust flat-band zero-energy states at its surface under potential disorder. Such robust zero-energy states are known to induce the anomalous proximity effect in a dirty normal metal attached to a superconductor. A recent study has shown that a topological index NZES describes the number of zero-energy states at the dirty surface of a p -wave superconductor. We generalize the theory to clarify the conditions required for a superconductor that enables NZES≠0 . Our results show that NZES≠0 is realized in a topological material that belongs to either the BDI or CII class. We also present two realistic Hamiltonians that result in NZES≠0 .

  13. Imaging of topological magnetic pinning in superconductor-ferrimagnet bilayer with scanning Hall microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchevsky, M; Higgins, M J; Bhattacharya, S; Fratello, V J

    2011-01-01

    In a superconducting film deposited on ferromagnetic substrate with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, vortex matter is confined by the magnetic potential landscape. Using scanning Hall microscopy we visualize flux accumulation and removal in a superconductor-ferrimagnet (S/F) bilayer prepared by rf sputtering of thin niobium film on bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet. Penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field in the S/F bilayer follows magnetic domain boundaries and is laterally guided by the garnet magnetization component along the field direction. Upon field removal, localization of the remnant flux at the disclination points of the labyrinthine domain pattern is observed. Our experiments show evidence for strong vortex pinning due the special topology of the domain pattern. Ac magnetic imaging of the transport current distribution in the bilayer reveals complex flow paths commensurate with the magnetic domain boundaries. Topological magnetic pinning can be a useful tool for enhancement and control of critical current in thin film superconductors.

  14. Imaging of topological magnetic pinning in superconductor-ferrimagnet bilayer with scanning Hall microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchevsky, M [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 12344 (United States); Higgins, M J [Princeton High School, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Bhattacharya, S [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Fratello, V J, E-mail: mmartchevskii@lbl.gov [Integrated Photonics, Inc., Hillsborough, NJ 08844 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    In a superconducting film deposited on ferromagnetic substrate with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, vortex matter is confined by the magnetic potential landscape. Using scanning Hall microscopy we visualize flux accumulation and removal in a superconductor-ferrimagnet (S/F) bilayer prepared by rf sputtering of thin niobium film on bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet. Penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field in the S/F bilayer follows magnetic domain boundaries and is laterally guided by the garnet magnetization component along the field direction. Upon field removal, localization of the remnant flux at the disclination points of the labyrinthine domain pattern is observed. Our experiments show evidence for strong vortex pinning due the special topology of the domain pattern. Ac magnetic imaging of the transport current distribution in the bilayer reveals complex flow paths commensurate with the magnetic domain boundaries. Topological magnetic pinning can be a useful tool for enhancement and control of critical current in thin film superconductors.

  15. Ginzburg-Landau equations for a d-wave superconductor with applications to vortex structure and surface problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Ren, Y.; Ting, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    The properties of a d x 2 -y 2 -wave superconductor in an external magnetic field are investigated on the basis of Gorkov's theory of weakly coupled superconductors. The Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations, which govern the spatial variations of the order parameter and the supercurrent, are microscopically derived. The single vortex structure and surface problems in such a superconductor are studied using these equations. It is shown that the d-wave vortex structure is very different from the conventional s-wave vortex: the s-wave and d-wave components, with the opposite winding numbers, are found to coexist in the region near the vortex core. The supercurrent and local magnetic field around the vortex are calculated. Far away from the vortex core, both of them exhibit a fourfold symmetry, in contrast to an s-wave superconductor. The surface problem in a d-wave superconductor is also studied by solving the GL equations. The total order parameter near the surface is always a real combination of s- and d-wave components, which means that the proximity effect cannot induce a time-reversal symmetry-breaking state at the surface

  16. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoss, Stephen; Stahl, Claudia; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Intelligente Systeme, Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The penetration of magnetic flux into the high-temperature superconductor YBCO has been observed using a new high-resolution technique based on X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Superconductors coated with thin soft magnetic layers of CoFeB are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope providing cooling of the sample down to 83 K under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electrical currents create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor which leads to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. X-ray absorption measurements with circular polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor via the ferromagnetic layer. In this work we present first images taken at 83K with high spatial resolution in the nanoscale.

  17. The Fermi surface of a superconductor: OsB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebbache, M. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Paris 7 - CNRS, UMR 7162, Paris (France)

    2009-07-15

    Osmium diboride has been known for some time as a low compressibility material and a superhard material. It is suitable for hard coating applications. It is also a superconductor below 2.1 K. Using first-principles calculations, the author investigated the geometry of its Fermi surface (FS) and calculated the related physical quantities. The theoretical results are used to predict the frequencies of the Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations. Comparison with recent measurements of the magneto-resistance oscillations in osmium diboride is made. The picture shows the FS of OsB{sub 2} consisting of three sheets: a pair of two nested ellipsoidal surfaces and a corrugated tubular surface. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Low-energy excitations and Fermi surface topology of parent cobaltate superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, M.Z. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: mzhasan@princeton.edu; Qian, D. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Foo, M.; Cava, R.J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2007-09-01

    The essential framework for cuprate superconductivity is that of a spin-1/2 electron system in the vicinity of a half filled (Mott limit) lattice. Of all oxide superconductors, this framework is most closely matched in the sodium doped cobalt oxides except that it is realized on a triangular lattice. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle dynamics of the parent cobaltate superconductor. Results reveal a single hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy ({approx}15 m{sub e} {approx} 3m{sub LDA}) quasiparticles with a negative effective hopping (t{sub eff} < 0). The observed ground state as given by the topology of the Fermi surface is found be very close to a collective charge instability with {radical}(3)x{radical}(3) symmetry. The measured electron dynamic parameters reveal the unusual character of the parent cobaltate class likely due to small and almost isotropic Fermi velocity (v{sub F}(k{sup {yields}}){approx}v{sub F}{approx}0.4{+-}0.1 eV A) observed. ARPES data is consistent with bulk thermodynamic specific heat and quantum oscillation measurements.

  19. Direct imaging of fractional oxygen Oδ in Hg-based high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoular, R.J.; Collin, G.; Colson, D.; Viallet, V.

    2002-01-01

    Maximum Entropy is applied to the crystallographic imaging of x-ray diffraction data in order to reveal reliable model-free weak electron density features (if any) in newly discovered high-T c superconductors. The use of suitably computed non-uniform priors turns out to be essential. The suggested maxentropic procedure shows that about .2 oxygen atoms [1.6 electrons] can unambiguously be evidenced near the much heavier mercury atoms [harboring 80 electrons each], and this from standard laboratory [non-synchrotron] x-ray data

  20. Fermi surface deformation in a simple iron-based superconductor, FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldea, Amalia; Watson, Matthew; Kim, Timur; Haghighirad, Amir; McCollam, Alix; Hoesch, Moritz; Schofield, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the field superconductivity is the identification of the normal state out of which superconductivity emerges. FeSe is one of the simplest and most intriguing iron-based superconductors, since in its bulk form it undergoes a structural transition before it becomes superconducting, whereas its single-layer form is believed to be a high-temperature superconductor. The nature of the structural transition, occurring in the absence of static magnetism, is rather unusual and how the electronic structure is stabilized by breaking of the rotational symmetry is the key to understand the superconductivity in bulk FeSe. Here we report angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on FeSe that gives direct access to the band structure and orbital-dependent effects. We complement our studies on bulk FeSe with low-temperature angular-dependent quantum oscillation measurements using applied magnetic fields that are sufficiently strong to suppress superconductivity and reach the normal state. These studies reveal a strong deformation of Fermi surface through the structural transition driven by electronic correlations and orbital-dependent effects. . This work was supported by EPSRC, UK (EP/I004475/1), Diamond Light Source, UK and HFML, Nijmegen.

  1. Magnetic imaging of unconventional superconductors by scanning SQUID microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hykel, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the development of a scanning SQUID/AFM microscope and measurements performed on different samples. The microscope can take topographic and magnetic images simultaneously. The magnetic resolution is of the order of 10 -4 Φ 0 √Hz and the spatial resolution of the SQUIDs used in this thesis goes up to 600 nm. The scanning range is 70 μm * 85 μm. The temperature range accessible is between 200 mK and 10 K at the time of writing. Measurements on a thin rhenium film (80 nm) give an estimate of the minimal pinning force of a vortex of about 3.9 * 10 -16 N. Furthermore, the penetration depth λ on this sample was determined as a function of temperature. For T → 0, λ →79 nm. We have for the first time shown local measurements of the domain structure of the superconducting ferromagnet UCoGe and determined the average domain size in the virgin state (10 μm). By magnetic imaging we were capable of determining the magnetic field difference above opposite domains along the c-axis to be 45 G and 16 G along the b-axis. Due to these magnetic field measurements we were able to give an upper limit for the domain wall width (∼ 1μm) and domain reconstruction depth (100 nm). This is supported by simple calculations leading to a domain wall width of several angstroms. Thus UCoGe can be considered an ideal Ising ferromagnet. Different possible domain structures for an Ising ferromagnet have been discussed. The complicated domain structure found in the zero field cooled virgin state corresponds to up domains embedded in larger down domains and vice versa. We have shown evidence for coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The weak Meissner effect can be explained by a spontaneous vortex state, put forward by other groups. Numerical simulations suggest that the strong magnetic background signal and the limited spatial and magnetic resolution of the used SQUID made it difficult to resolve the expected spontaneous vortex state. The relaxation of the

  2. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The field limit of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied with taking effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the pro...

  3. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-T{sub c} superconductor in external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K

    2004-10-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents.

  4. Magnetic Fields above the Surface of aSuperconductor with Internal Magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRl

    2007-06-26

    The author presents a method for calculating the magnetic fields near a planar surface of a superconductor with a given intrinsic magnetization in the London limit. He computes solutions for various magnetic domain boundary configurations and derives relations between the spectral densities of the magnetization and the resulting field in the vacuum half space, which are useful if the magnetization can be considered as a statistical quantity and its features are too small to be resolved individually. The results are useful for analyzing and designing magnetic scanning experiments. Application to existing data from such experiments on Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} show that a domain wall would have been detectable, but the magnetic field of randomly oriented small domains and small defects may have been smaller than the experimental noise level.

  5. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    The field limit of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of a type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied, taking the effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the product of the superheating field for an ideal flat surface and a suppression factor that contains the effects of nano-defects. A nano-defect is modeled by a triangular groove with a depth smaller than the penetration depth. An analytical formula for the suppression factor of bulk and multilayer superconductors is derived in the framework of the London theory. As an immediate application, the suppression factor of the dirty Nb processed by electropolishing is evaluated by using results of surface topographic study. The estimated field limit is consistent with the present record field of nitrogen-doped Nb cavities. Suppression factors of surfaces of other bulk and multilayer superconductors, and those after various surface processing technologies, can also be evaluated by using the formula.

  6. Magneto-optical imaging of magnetic flux distribution in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, K.; Murakamia, H.; Kawayama, I.; Doda, Y.; Tonouchi, M.; Chikumoto, N.

    2004-01-01

    Prototype systems of home-made magneto-optical microscopes were fabricated, and preliminary studies were carried out using Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ single crystals and an YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ superconductor vortex flow transistor. In the study using BSCCO crystals, we succeeded in the observation of magnetic flux penetration into half-peeled thin flake region on the crystal surface, and it was found that the magnetic fluxes penetrate in characteristic one-dimensional alignment almost along the crystal a-axis. On the other hand, in the study using the YBCO device clear changes in the generated magnetic field distribution could be detected corresponding to the current direction

  7. Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Surface Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirato, Richard; Polichar, Raulf

    1992-01-01

    In technique to detect surface contamination, object inspected illuminated by ultraviolet light to make contaminants fluoresce; low-light-level video camera views fluorescence. Image-processing techniques quantify distribution of contaminants. If fluorescence of material expected to contaminate surface is not intense, tagged with low concentration of dye.

  8. Chiral superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallin, Catherine; Berlinsky, John

    2016-05-01

    Chiral superconductivity is a striking quantum phenomenon in which an unconventional superconductor spontaneously develops an angular momentum and lowers its free energy by eliminating nodes in the gap. It is a topologically non-trivial state and, as such, exhibits distinctive topological modes at surfaces and defects. In this paper we discuss the current theory and experimental results on chiral superconductors, focusing on two of the best-studied systems, Sr2RuO4, which is thought to be a chiral triplet p-wave superconductor, and UPt3, which has two low-temperature superconducting phases (in zero magnetic field), the lower of which is believed to be chiral triplet f-wave. Other systems that may exhibit chiral superconductivity are also discussed. Key signatures of chiral superconductivity are surface currents and chiral Majorana modes, Majorana states in vortex cores, and the possibility of half-flux quantum vortices in the case of triplet pairing. Experimental evidence for chiral superconductivity from μSR, NMR, strain, polar Kerr effect and Josephson tunneling experiments are discussed.

  9. Fundamental properties of molecules on surfaces. Molecular switching and interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatter, Nino

    2016-12-14

    In this thesis, we investigate individual molecular switches and metal-organic complexes on surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) at low temperatures. One focus addresses the switching ability and mechanism of diarylethene on Ag(111). The other focus lies on resolving and tuning magnetic interactions of individual molecules with superconductors. 4,4'-(4,4'-(perfluorocyclopent-1-ene-1,2-diyl)bis (5-methylthiophene-4,2-diyl)dip yridine (PDTE) is a prototypical photochromic switch. We can induce a structural change of individual PDTE molecules on Ag(111) with the STM tip. This change is accompanied by a reduction of the energy gap between the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the induced switching corresponds to a ring-closing reaction from an open isomer in a flat adsorption configuration to a ring-closed isomer with its methyl groups in a cis configuration. The final product is thermodynamically stabilized by strong dispersion interactions with the surface. A linear dependence of the switching threshold with the tip-sample distance with a minimal threshold of 1.4 V is found, which we assign to a combination of an electric-field induced process and a tunneling-electron contribution. DFT calculations suggest a large activation barrier for a ring-closing reaction from the open flat configuration into the closed cis configuration. The interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors is studied on manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) adsorbed on Pb(111). We find triplets of Shiba states inside the superconducting gap. Different adsorption sites of MnPc provide a large variety of exchange coupling strengths, which lead to a collective energy shift of the Shiba triplets. We can assign the splitting of the Shiba states to be an effect of magnetic anisotropy in the system. A quantum phase transition from a ''Kondo screened'' to a &apos

  10. Large area bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  11. Fermi Surface and Band Structure of (Ca,La)FeAs2 Superconductor from Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xu; Liu De-Fa; Zhao Lin; Guo Qi; Mu Qing-Ge; Chen Dong-Yun; Shen Bing; Yi He-Mian; Huang Jian-Wei; He Jun-Feng; Peng Ying-Ying; Liu Yan; He Shao-Long; Liu Guo-Dong; Dong Xiao-Li; Zhang Jun; Ren Zhi-An; Zhou Xing-Jiang; Chen Chuang-Tian; Xu Zu-Yan

    2013-01-01

    The (Ca,R)FeAs 2 (R=La, Pr, etc.) superconductors with a signature of superconductivity transition above 40 K possess a new kind of block layers that consist of zig-zag As chains. We report the electronic structure of the new (Ca,La)FeAs 2 superconductor investigated by both band structure calculations and high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. Band structure calculations indicate that there are four hole-like bands around the zone center Γ(0,0) and two electron-like bands near the zone corner M(π, π) in CaFeAs 2 . In our angle-resolved photoemission measurements on (Ca 0.9 La 0.1 )FeAs 2 , we have observed three hole-like bands around the Γ point and one electron-like Fermi surface near the M(π, π) point. These results provide important information to compare and contrast with the electronic structure of other iron-based compounds in understanding the superconductivity mechanism in the iron-based superconductors. (express letter)

  12. Multifractural analysis of AFM images of Nb thin film surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altajskij, M.V; Chernenko, L.P.; Balebanov, V.M.; Erokhin, N.S.; Moiseev, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    The multifractal analysis of the atomic Force Microscope (AFM) images of the Niobium (Nb) thin film surfaces has been performed. These Nb films are being used for the measurements of the London penetration depth of stationary magnetic field by polarized neutron reflectometry. The analysis shows the behavior of Renyi dimensions of images (in the range of available scales 6-2000 nm), like the known multifractal p-model, with typical Hausdorff dimension of prevalent color in the range of 1.6-1.9. This indicates the fractal nature of film landscape on those scales. The perspective of new mechanism of order parameter suppression on superconductor-vacuum boundary, manifested in anomalous magnetic field penetration in discussed

  13. Some experimental and theoretical aspects of the surface impedance in bulk high-temperature superconductors at 10 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville, A.; Fawaz, H.; Gaillard, B. (Lab. d' Electronique des Milieux Condenses, Univ. de Provence, Centre Saint-Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France)); Noel, H.; Potel, M. (Lab. de Chimie Minerale, Univ. de Rennes, 35 (France)); Monnereau, O. (Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux, Univ. de Provence, Centre Saint-Charles, 13 - Marseille (France))

    1992-07-15

    After a presentation of the theoretical framework, and a short review of existing r.f. results in high-temperature superconductors, we present our own 10 GHz measurements on YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] single crystals and sintered samples. We use an electron spin resonance (ESR) heterodyne spectrometer and measurements of the reflection coefficient and resonant frequency of a cavity to get information not only on the surface resistance, R[sub S], as generally done, but also on the surface reactance, X[sub S]. The theoretical analysis of the frequency shift is made by adapting Slater's perturbation method to the present problem. In order to explain both the R[sub s] and X[sub S] results, and previous ESR observations, while keeping theoretical simplicity, we are led to suggest that in the normal state these materials show an unconventional skin effect, where the phenomenon is governed not by the d.c. conductivity, but by an effective (lower) conductivity, the other characteristics being unchanged. We briefly discuss the superconductor results and the validity of the two-fluid model. (orig.).

  14. The superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lad, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques for fabrication of a few important superconductors like Nb, Ti and Nb 3 Sn are described. Copper or bronze or both can be used as a matrix in the superconductor. Current densities obtained for different ratios of copper to superconductor are studied. The specifications of multi-filament Nb 3 Sn superconductors are given. The relative merits of the two superconductors are discussed. The temperature range obtained is approximately 3 0 K and a magnetic field of 9T(tesla) can be achieved. (A.K.)

  15. Surface cleaning and adsorbate layer formation: Dual role of alkylamines in the formation of self-assembled monolayers on cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, J.E.; Murray, W.R.; Kershan, K.; Diaz, V.; Tran, L.; McDevitt, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    The development of monolayer adsorption chemistry for superconductor surfaces is particularly important for a number of practical and fundamental reasons. As high-T c superconductors begin to approach the marketplace in areas of communications, power industries, medical applications, and scientific instrumentation, the development of new soft chemistry approaches for the surface modification of these technologically relevant electronic materials becomes increasingly important. Monolayer adsorption chemistry has been developed extensively for electronic materials such as metals, semiconductors, and insulators. These methodologies have been expanded recently to include a variety of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs). The authors describe a series of new X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), four-point conductivity, critical current, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), grazing angle infrared spectroscopy, and GE--MS experiments, which lead the suggestion that an entirely different mechanism is involved in the formation of HTSC-localized monolayers. According to the new model, the amine reagents serve two chemically distinct roles. In the initial phase, the degraded superconductor exteriors is etched away with the help of the amine compounds. The etching process proceeds to the point where fresh YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 is exposed, and only at this point do the amines adsorb and remain at the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 surface. As the adsorption process continues, there is an accumulation of an organized monolayer at the surface, which prevents further etching of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 material

  16. Kohn anomalies in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flatte, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The detailed behavior of phonon dispersion curves near momenta which span the electronic Fermi sea in a superconductor is presented. An anomaly, similar to the metallic Kohn anomaly, exists in a superconductor's dispersion curves when the frequency of the photon spanning the Fermi sea exceeds twice the superconducting energy gap. This anomaly occurs at approximately the same momentum but is stronger than the normal-state Kohn anomaly. It also survives at finite temperature, unlike the metallic anomaly. Determination of Fermi-surface diameters from the location of these anomalies, therefore, may be more successful in the superconducting phase than in the normal state. However, the superconductor's anomaly fades rapidly with increased phonon frequency and becomes unobservable when the phonon frequency greatly exceeds the gap. This constraint makes these anomalies useful only in high-temperature superconductors such as La 1.85 Sr 0.15 CuO 4

  17. Antiphase Fermi-surface modulations accompanying displacement excitation in a parent compound of iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kozo; Suzuki, Hakuto; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Someya, Takashi; Ogawa, Yu; Okada, Masaru; Fujisawa, Masami; Kanai, Teruto; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Itatani, Jiro; Nakajima, Masamichi; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Fujimori, Atsushi; Shin, Shik

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the transient electronic structure of BaFe2As2 , a parent compound of iron-based superconductors, by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In order to probe the entire Brillouin zone, we utilize extreme ultraviolet photons and observe photoemission intensity oscillation with the frequency of the A1 g phonon which is antiphase between the zone-centered hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) and zone-cornered electron FSs. We attribute the antiphase behavior to the warping in one of the zone-centered hole FSs accompanying the displacement of the pnictogen height and find that this displacement is the same direction as that induced by substitution of P for As, where superconductivity is induced by a structural modification without carrier doping in this system.

  18. Topological Insulators and Superconductors for Innovative Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 20120321 - 20150320 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Topological insulators and superconductors for innovative...locking, which hold promise for various innovative devices. Similarly, topological superconductors are associated with exotic surface states, which...298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report Title: Topological Insulators and Superconductors for Innovative Devices

  19. Organic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulaevskij, L.N.; Shchegolev, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    Main achievements in creating new organic conducting materials - synthetic metals and superconductors, are considered. The processes of superconductivity occurrence in organic materials are discussed. It is shown that conjugated bonds between C and H atoms in organic molecules play an important role in this case. At present ''crystal direction'' in organic superconductor synthesis is mainly developed. Later on, organic superconductor crystals are supposed to be introduced into usual polymers, e.g. polyethylene

  20. Evaluating superconductors for microwave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, B.; Bybokas, J.

    1989-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly obvious that some of the earliest applications for high Tc superconductors will be in the microwave market. While this is a major opportunity for the superconductor community, it also represents a significant challenge. At DC or low frequencies a superconductor can be easily characterized by simple measurements of resistivity and magnetic susceptibility versus temperature. These parameters are fundamental to superconductor characterization and various methods exist for measuring them. The only valid way to determine the microwave characteristics of a superconductor is to measure it at microwave frequencies. It is for this reason that measuring microwave surface resistance has emerged as one of the most demanding and telling tests for materials intended for high frequency applications. In this article, the theory of microwave surface resistance is discussed. Methods for characterizing surface resistance theoretically and by practical implementation are described

  1. MR imaging of brain surface structures: Surface anatomy scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katada, K.; Koga, S.; Asahina, M.; Kanno, T.; Asahina, K.

    1987-01-01

    Preoperative evaluation of brain surface anatomy, including cortical sulci and veins, relative to cerebral and cerebellar lesions is an important subject for surgeons. Until now, no imaging modality existed that allowed direct visualization of brain surface anatomy. A new MR imaging technique (surface anatomy scanning) was developed to visualize brain surface structures. The technique uses a spin-echo pulse sequence with long repetition and echo times, thick sections and a surface coil. Cortical sulci, fissures, veins, and intracranial lesions were clearly identified with this technique. Initial clinical results indicate that surface anatomy scanning is useful for lesion localization and for detailed evaluation of cortical and subcortical lesions

  2. Determining the in-plane Fermi surface topology in high Tc superconductors using angle-dependent magnetic quantum oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, N; McDonald, R D

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantum oscillation experiment by which the rotation of an underdoped YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x sample about two different axes with respect to the orientation of the magnetic field can be used to infer the shape of the in-plane cross-section of corrugated Fermi surface cylinder(s). Deep corrugations in the Fermi surface are expected to give rise to nodes in the quantum oscillation amplitude that depend on the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic induction B. Because the symmetries of electron and hole cylinders within the Brillouin zone are expected to be very different, the topology can provide essential clues as to the broken symmetry responsible for the observed oscillations. The criterion for the applicability of this method to the cuprate superconductors (as well as other layered metals) is that the difference in quantum oscillation frequency 2ΔF between the maximum (belly) and minimum (neck) extremal cross-sections of the corrugated Fermi surface exceeds |B|. (fast track communication)

  3. Macroscopic theory of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, W.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A macroscopic theory for bulk superconductors is developed in the framework of the theory for other magnetic materials, where ''magnetization'' current is separated from ''free'' current on the basis of scale. This contrasts with the usual separation into equilibrium and nonequilibrium currents. In the present approach magnetization, on a large macroscopic scale, results from the vortex current, while the Meissner current and other surface currents are surface contributions to the Maxwell j. The results are important for the development of thermodynamics in type-II superconductors. The advantage of the description developed here is that magnetization becomes a local concept and its associated magnetic field can be given physical meaning

  4. An inflatable surface coil for rectal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.F.; Hajek, P.C.; Baker, L.L.; Gylys-Morin, V.; Mattrey, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Surface coils have become ubiquitous in MR imaging of the body because of substantial gains in signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, there are some anatomic regions, such as the prostate, for which surface coils have insufficient depth sensitivity. The authors have developed an inflatable, distributed capacitance, passively decoupled surface coil which is collapsed for insertion and reinflated for imaging. Images of the prostate are dramatically improved due to proximity of the coil. Lesions in cadaver specimens were observed which were not seen with body coil imaging. Clinical trials are expected to begin in September

  5. Egypt satellite images for land surface characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    images used for mapping the vegetation cover types and other land cover types in Egypt. The mapping ranges from 1 km resolution to 30 m resolution. The aim is to provide satellite image mapping with land surface characteristics relevant for roughness mapping.......Satellite images provide information on the land surface properties. From optical remote sensing images in the blue, green, red and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum it is possible to identify a large number of surface features. The report briefly describes different satellite...

  6. Processing yttrium-barium-copper oxide superconductor zero gravity using a double float zone surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettit, D.R.; Peterson, D.E.; Kubat-Martin, K.A.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.; Coulter, Y.; Day, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    The effects of processing YBa 2 Cu 3 O x (Y123) superconductor in the near-zero gravity (0g) environment provided by the NASA KC-135 airplane flying on parabolic trajectories were studied. A new sheet float zone furnace, designed for this study, enabled fast temperature ramps. Up to an 18-gram sample was processed with each parabola. Samples of Y123 were processed as bulk sheets, composites containing Ag and Pd, and films deposited on single crystal Si and MgO substrates. The 0g-processed samples were multi-phase yet retained a localized Y123 stoichiometry where a single ground-based (1g) oxygen anneal at temperatures of 800 C recovered nearly 100-volume percent superconducting Y123. The 1g processed control samples remained multi-phase after the same ground-based anneal with less than 45 volume percent as superconducting Y123. The superconducting transition temperature was 91 K for both 0g and 1g processed samples. A 29 wt.% Ag/Y123 composite had a transition temperature of 93 K. Melt texturing of bulk Y123 in 0g produced aligned grains about a factor of three larger than in analogous 1g samples. Transport critical current densities were at or below 18 A/cm 2 , due to the formation of cracks caused by the rapid heating rates required by the short time at 0g. Y123 deposited on single crystal Si and MgO in 0g was 30 vol.% y123 without an anneal. A weak superconducting transition at 80 K on MgO showed that substrate interactions occurred

  7. Briefing on superconductor developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larbalestier, D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the author covers the technology of the new oxide superconductors and how they might relate to the existing superconductors. He discusses old-fashioned superconductors; the material science of superconductors; the new oxide superconductors; and the future of oxide superconductors. 13 figures, 1 table

  8. Oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cava, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    This article briefly reviews ceramic superconductors from historical and materials perspectives. It describes the factors that distinguish high-temperature cuprate superconductors from most electronic ceramics and places them in the context of other families of superconducting materials. Finally, it describes some of the scientific issues presently being actively pursued in the search for the mechanism for high-temperature superconductivity and the directions of research into new superconducting ceramics in recent years

  9. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  10. Application of high Tc superconductors as frequency selective surfaces: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawei Zhang; Yahya Rahmat-Samii; Fetterman, H.R.

    1993-01-01

    YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x and Tl 2 CaBa 2 Cu 2 O 8 high temperature superconducting thin films were utilized to fabricate frequency selective surfaces (FSS) at millimeter-wave frequencies (75--110 GHz). An analytical/numerical model was applied, using a Floquet expansion and the Method of Moments, to analyze bandstop superconducting frequency selective surfaces. Experimental results were compared with the model, and showed a good agreement with resonant frequency prediction with an accuracy of better than 1%. The use of the superconducting frequency selective surfaces as quasi-optical millimeter-wave bandpass filters was also demonstrated

  11. Investigations on the electronic surface properties of the stoichiometric superconductor LiFeAs using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    This work presents scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy investigations on the stoichiometric superconductor lithium iron arsenide (LiFeAs). To reveal the electronic properties, measurements on defect-free surfaces as well as near defects have been performed. The former shows a shift of atomic position with respect to the applied bias voltage. Furthermore, temperature dependent spectroscopic measurements indicate the coupling of quasiparticles in the vicinity of the superconducting coherence peaks. LiFeAs surfaces influenced by atomic defects show a spacial variation of the superconducting gap. The defects can be characterized by their symmetry and thus can be assigned to a position in the atomic lattice. Detailed spectroscopic investigations of defects reveal their influence on the quasiparticle density of states. In particular, Fe-defects show a small effect on the superconductivity while As-defects strongly disturb the superconducting gap. Measurements in magnetic field have been performed for the determination of the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length ξ GL . For this purpose, a suitable fit-function has been developed in this work. This function allows to fit the differential conductance of a magnetic vortex at E F . The fit results in a coherence length of ξ GL = 3,9 nm which corresponds to an upper critical field of 21 Tesla. Besides measurements on a single vortex, investigation on the vortex lattice have been performed. The vortex lattice constant follows thereby the predicted behavior of a trigonal vortex lattice. However, for magnetic fields larger than 6 Tesla an increasing lattice disorder sets in, presumably due to vortex-vortex-interactions.

  12. Continuum theory of the mixed-state and surface Joule effects in type-II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquet, T.; Mathieu, P.; Simon, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological theory of vortex motion, where the mixed state is regarded as a continuum, has been proposed by two of the authors in a short previous letter. Its outlines are recalled in this paper with further comments and arguments; in particular the basic equations and their implications are discussed at some length. This theory leads to a model of pinning, from which we argue that critical currents I c , in soft type-II samples of standard bulk homogeneity, should be governed essentially by surface defects. I c is interpreted as a physically well-defined part of the total transport current I, which is flowing over a small depth close to the surface. Thus, on the scale of an ordinary sample, this part of the transport current is superficial, the remaining part I-I c being uniformly distributed over the cross section. Coherently, an analysis of the dissipation in such samples predicts that the part VI c of the total Joule effect VI must arise as surface heat sources, while the Joule effect V(I-I c ), usually associated with the steady viscous flow of vortices, is uniformly distributed in the bulk. As a proof, we present a method, using second-sound acoustics, to detect and separate surface and volume heat sources. Experimental results give clear evidence of a surface Joule effect, and support the validity of our model of surface pinning in soft materials

  13. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  14. Direct images and unconventional dynamics of vortices in the high-Tc superconductors YBCO (123) and BSCCO (2212)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammel, P.L.; Bishop, D.; Murray, C.; Huse, D.

    1991-01-01

    Static imaging has been used to complement transport I-V measurements in inferring the phase diagram and structure of the mixed state of the high T c superconductors YBCO(123) and BSCCO (2212). High resolution Bitter patterns reveal the static structure of the flux lattice in the low field mixed state of BSCCO (2212). For B parallel c, the in-plane effective mass anisotropy is found to distort the lattice. Rotation of the field away from the c axis results in the appearance of a unique structure: a striking array of vortex chains. At low fields, the pattern is otherwise amorphous. Increasing the field above ∼ 20G results in an abrupt transition into an hexatic phase. At high fields, I-V curves with picovolt resolution imply critical behavior within the mixed state, consistent in both 123 and 2212 with a three-dimensional vortex glass transition well below T c . In 2212, a field and temperature dependent crossover in the effective dimensionality of the vortex lattice is also found

  15. Ceramic superconductors II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  16. MR imaging of brain surface structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katada, Kazuhiro; Anno, Hirofumi; Takesita, Gen; Koga, Sukehiko; Kanno, Tetuo; Sakakibara, Tatuo; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Saito, Sigeki.

    1989-01-01

    An imaging technique that permits direct and non-invasive visualization of brain surface structures was proposed. This technique (Surface anatomy scanning, SAS) consists of long TE-long TR spin echo sequence, thick slice and surface coil. Initial clinical trials in 31 patients with various cerebral pathology showed excellent visualization of sulci, gyri and major cortical veins on the lateral surface of the brain together with cortical and subcortical lesions. Our preliminary results indicate that the SAS is an effective method for the diagnosis and localization of cortical and subcortical pathology, and the possible application of SAS to the surgical and the radiation therapy planning is sugessted. (author)

  17. Critical current density of BiSrCaCuO superconductors: effect of surface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konczykowski, M.; Chikumoto, N.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of surface barriers on vortex motion in BiSrCaCuO-2212 high-temperature superconducting crystals is summarized. Characteristic features of this phenomenon appear in the hysteresis loop (shape of its ascending and descending branches), in the effect of 2.5 MeV electron irradiation, and in flux creep measurements (magnetization dependence to the crystal lateral dimension, size of the flux-creep barrier and the crossover as a function of temperature and time persistent current density). (A.B.). 25 refs., 3 figs

  18. Making superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, W.K.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described of producing composite rod or wire of increased strength and fineness wherein the composite is formed by reducing a lamina of two metals which have been rolled to form a cylindrical billet in which one of the metals is in expanded form. The composite produced can be encased in copper and fabricated to produce a superconductor. Alloys contemplated for producing superconductors are Nb 3 Sn, Nb 3 Ga, Nb 3 Ge, Nb 3 Si, Nb-Ti, V 3 Ga, V 3 Si, V 3 Sn, V 3 Al, and V 3 Ge laminated on bronze, Al, Cu, Ta, or combinations thereof. (author)

  19. [Surface coils for magnetic-resonance images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Alfredo Odón; Amador-Baheza, Ricardo; Rojas-Jasso, Rafael; Barrios-Alvarez, Fernando Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico, the development of this important medical imaging technology has been almost non-existing in our country. The very first surface coil prototypes for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging has been developed at the Center of Research in Medical Imaging and Instrumentation of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Iztapalapa). Two surface coil prototypes were built: a) a circular-shaped coil and b) a square-shaped coil for multiple regions of the body, such as heart, brain, knee, hands, and ankles. These coils were tested on the 1.5T imager of the ABC Hospital-Tacubaya, located in Mexico City. Brain images of healthy volunteers were obtained in different orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Since images showed a good-enough clinical quality for diagnosis, it is fair to say that these coil prototypes can be used in the clinical environment, and with small modifications, they can be made compatible with almost any commercial scanner. This type of development can offer new alternatives for further collaboration between the research centers and the radiology community, in the search of new applications and developments of this imaging technique.

  20. Partially gapped Fermi surface in the heavy-electron superconductor URu2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maple, M.B.; Chen, J.W.; Dalichaouch, Y.; Kohara, T.; Rossel, C.; Torikachvili, M.S.; McElfresh, M.W.; Thompson, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Transport, thermal, and magnetic data for the heavy electron system URu 2 Si 2 indicate that a charge- or spin-density-wave transition opens an energy gap of approx.11 meV over a portion of the Fermi surface below T 0 roughly-equal17.5 K and demonstrate that bulk superconductivity occurs below T/sub c/roughly-equal1.5 K. The pressure dependences of T 0 and T/sub c/ support this interpretation. The unusually large initial slope of the upper critical magnetic field (9.2 T/K) is consistent with the high values of the electronic-specific-heat coefficient and the electrical resistivity

  1. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface...

  2. A Toolbox for Imaging Stellar Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John

    2018-04-01

    In this talk I will review the available algorithms for synthesis imaging at visible and infrared wavelengths, including both gray and polychromatic methods. I will explain state-of-the-art approaches to constraining the ill-posed image reconstruction problem, and selecting an appropriate regularisation function and strength of regularisation. The reconstruction biases that can follow from non-optimal choices will be discussed, including their potential impact on the physical interpretation of the results. This discussion will be illustrated with example stellar surface imaging results from real VLTI and COAST datasets.

  3. Inhomogeneous superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkham, M.

    1978-01-01

    The coherence length xi and penetration depth lambda set the characteristic length scales in superconductors, typically 100 to 5,000 A. A lattice of flux lines, each carrying a single quantum, can penetrate type II superconductors, i.e., those for which kappa identical with lambda/xi > 1/√2. Inhomogeneities on the scale of the flux lattice spacing are required to pin the lattice to prevent dissipative flux motion. Recent work using voids as pinning centers has demonstrated this principle, but practical materials rely on cold-work, inclusions of second phases, etc., to provide the inhomogeneity. For stability against thermal fluctuations, the superconductor should have the form of many filaments of diameter 10 to 100 μm imbedded in a highly conductive normal metal matrix. Such wire is made by drawing down billets of copper containing rods of the superconductor. An alternative approach is the metallurgical one of Tsuei, which leads to thousands of superconducting filamentary segments in a copper matrix. The superconducting proximity effect causes the whole material to superconduct at low current densities. At high current densities, the range of the proximity effect is reduced so that the effective superconducting volume fraction falls below the percolation threshold, and a finite resistance arises from the copper matrix. But, because of the extremely elongated filaments, this resistance is orders of magnitude lower than that of the normal wire, and low enough to permit the possibility of technical applications

  4. Studies of superconductors using a low-temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirtley, J.R.; Feenstra, R.M.; Fein, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) capable of operating at temperatures as low as 0.4 K and fields as high as 8 T. We have used this STM to study the energy gap of the high-T/sub c/ superconductors La--Sr--Cu--O and Y--Ba--Cu--O. We find that the reduced gap for these oxide superconductors falls in the range 3<2Δ/k/sub B/T/sub c/<7, for polycrystalline, single-crystal, and thin-film samples. We have also simultaneously imaged the surface topography and superconducting energy gap for thin films of the granular superconductor NbN. We occasionally see regions with smaller best-fit gaps that correlate with surface topographical features, but have been unable so far to image flux vortices

  5. Imaging the Surfaces of Stars from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth; Rau, Gioia

    2018-04-01

    Imaging of Stellar Surfacess has been dominated to-date by ground-based observations, but space-based facilities offer tremendous potential for extending the wavelength coverage and ultimately the resolution of such efforts. We review the imaging accomplished so far from space and then talk about exciting future prospects. The earliest attempts from space indirectly produced surface maps via the Doppler Imaging Technique, using UV spectra obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Later, the first direct UV images were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), of Mira and Betelgeuse, using the Faint Object Camera (FOC). We will show this work and then investigate prospects for IR imaging with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The real potential of space-based Imaging of Stellar Surfacess, however, lies in the future, when large-baseline Fizeau interferometers, such as the UV-optical Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission, with a 30-element array and 500m max baseline, are flown. We describe SI and its science goals, which include 0.1 milli-arcsec spectral Imaging of Stellar Surfacess and the probing of internal structure and flows via asteroseismology.

  6. Chapter 27. Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, O.

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter author deals with superconductors and superconductivity. Different chemical materials used as high-temperature superconductors are presented. Some applications of superconductivity are presented.

  7. Ternary superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgi, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    Ternary superconductors constitute a class of superconducting compounds with exceptional properties such as high transition temperatures (≅ 15.2 K), extremely high critical fields (H c2 >60 Tesla), and the coexistence of superconductivity and long-range magnetic order. This has generated great interest in the scientific community and resulted in a large number of experimental and theoretical investigations in which many new ternary compounds have been discovered. A review of some of the properties of these ternary compounds is presented with particular emphasis on the ternary molybdenum chalcogenides and the ternary rare earth transition metal tetraborides. The effect of partial substitution of a second metal atom to form pseudoternary compounds is examined as well as some of the proposed correlations between the superconducting transition temperature and the structural and electronic properties of the ternary superconductors

  8. Superconductor Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gömöry, F [Bratislava, Inst. Elect. Eng. (Slovakia)

    2014-07-01

    Superconductors used in magnet technology could carry extreme currents because of their ability to keep the magnetic flux motionless. The dynamics of the magnetic flux interaction with superconductors is controlled by this property. The cases of electrical transport in a round wire and the magnetization of wires of various shapes (circular, elliptical, plate) in an external magnetic field are analysed. Resistance to the magnetic field penetration means that the field produced by the superconducting magnet is no longer proportional to the supplied current. It also leads to a dissipation of electromagnetic energy. In conductors with unequal transverse dimensions, such as flat cables, the orientation with respect to the magnetic field plays an essential role. A reduction of magnetization currents can be achieved by splitting the core of a superconducting wire into fine filaments; however, new kinds of electrical currents that couple the filaments consequently appear. Basic formulas allowing qualitative analyses of various flux dynamic cases are presented.

  9. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  10. Performance boundaries in Nb3Sn superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godeke, A.

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for High Energy Physics, Fusion, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, benefit from the extremely high current densities that can be achieved in superconductors compared to normal conducting materials. These magnets are usually constructed starting

  11. High Temperature Superconductor Bolometers for Planetary Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work is a design study of an instrument optimized for JPL's novel high temperature superconductor bolometers. The work involves designing an imaging...

  12. Electrodynamics of spin currents in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    In recent work we formulated a new set of electrodynamic equations for superconductors as an alternative to the conventional London equations, compatible with the prediction of the theory of hole superconductivity that superconductors expel negative charge from the interior towards the surface. Charge expulsion results in a macroscopically inhomogeneous charge distribution and an electric field in the interior, and because of this a spin current is expected to exist. Furthermore, we have recently shown that a dynamical explanation of the Meissner effect in superconductors leads to the prediction that a spontaneous spin current exists near the surface of superconductors (spin Meissner effect). In this paper we extend the electrodynamic equations proposed earlier for the charge density and charge current to describe also the space and time dependence of the spin density and spin current. This allows us to determine the magnitude of the expelled negative charge and interior electric field as well as of the spin current in terms of other measurable properties of superconductors. We also provide a 'geometric' interpretation of the difference between type I and type II superconductors, discuss how superconductors manage to conserve angular momentum, discuss the relationship between our model and Slater's seminal work on superconductivity, and discuss the magnitude of the expected novel effects for elemental and other superconductors. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Localized superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, M.; Lee, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    We study the effects of Anderson localization on superconductivity by using a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type trial wave function which pairs electrons in exact time-reversed eigenstates of the single-particle Hamiltonian. Within this approximation, and neglecting localization effects on the effective Coulomb repulsion and the electron-phonon coupling, we find that superconductivity persists below the mobility edge. In fact, Anderson's theorem is valid in the localized phase as long as rhoΔ 0 L/sup d/ > 1 (rho is the density of states averaged over +- Δ 0 of the Fermi energy, Δ 0 the BCS gap parameter, and L the localization length). Hence the gap order parameter Δ(r) remains uniform in space at the BCS value Δ 0 . The superfluid density and response to electromagnetic perturbations, however, show marked differences from the ''dirty superconductor'' regime. For rhoΔ 0 L/sup d/ < 1, Δ(r) fluctuates spatially and eventually drops to zero. In the limit when states are site localized, the system crosses over into the ''Anderson negative-U glass.'' Considerations beyond the trial wave-function approximation will speed up the destruction of superconductivity. The superconductor formed from localized states has the property that its quasiparticle excitations are also localized. Such excitations can be probed by observing the normal current in a tunneling junction

  14. Method for Surface Scanning in Medical Imaging and Related Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for surface scanning in medical imaging is provided. The surface scanning apparatus comprises an image source, a first optical fiber bundle comprising first optical fibers having proximal ends and distal ends, and a first optical coupler for coupling an image from the image...

  15. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Sullivan, James [Pulmonary Laboratories, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV{sub torso} = ΔV{sub thorax} + ΔV{sub abdomen}) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP{sub v} = ΔV{sub thorax}/ΔV{sub torso}) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume

  16. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guang; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James; Wei, Jie; Sullivan, James; Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV torso = ΔV thorax + ΔV abdomen ) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP v = ΔV thorax /ΔV torso ) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume differences measured using OSI

  17. Granularity effect on microwave surface resistance in high-Tc YBa2Cu3O7-x bulk and thin film superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarup, Ram; Gupta, A.K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the effect of variation of Josephson coupling strength in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) superconductor due to grain enlargement, grain orientation and magnetic field on microwave surface resistance (R s ). The coupling strength in the bulk samples has been increased by increasing the sample density from 4.4 to 5.3 g/cm 3 , whereas in thin films, the same could be increased by increasing the c-axis orientation of the grains. The value of R s (10 GHz, 65 K) in bulk samples has been found to decrease from 52 to 4 mΩ with the increase of the coupling strength from 0.06 to 0.43 and in thin films from 930 to 600 μΩ with increase of the coupling strength from 0.92 to 2.43. The effect of grain decoupling on microwave surface resistance was studied under dc and microwave magnetic fields. The surface resistance increases gradually with the application of dc and microwave magnetic fields due to grain decoupling and finally gets saturated beyond a certain critical field. (author)

  18. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green

  19. Spectroscopic Imaging Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Electronic Structure in the Superconducting and Pseudogap Phases of Cuprate High-Tc Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazuhiro; Schmidt, Andrew R.; Kim, Eun-Ah; Lawler, Michael J.; Lee, Dung Hai; Davis, J. C.; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    One of the key motivations for the development of atomically resolved spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (SI-STM) has been to probe the electronic structure of cuprate high temperature superconductors. In both the d-wave superconducting (dSC) and the pseudogap (PG) phases of underdoped cuprates, two distinct classes of electronic states are observed using SI-STM. The first class consists of the dispersive Bogoliubov quasiparticles of a homogeneous d-wave superconductor. These are detected below a lower energy scale |E|=Δ0 and only upon a momentum space (k-space) arc which terminates near the lines connecting k=±(π/a0,0) to k=±(0,π/a0). Below optimal doping, this ``nodal'' arc shrinks continuously with decreasing hole density. In both the dSC and PG phases, the only broken symmetries detected in the |E|≤Δ0 states are those of a d-wave superconductor. The second class of states occurs at energies near the pseudogap energy scale |E|˜ Δ1 which is associated conventionally with the ``antinodal'' states near k=±(π/a0,0) and k=±(0,π/a0). We find that these states break the expected 90°-rotational (C4) symmetry of electronic structure within CuO2 unit cells, at least down to 180°-rotational (C2) symmetry (nematic) but in a spatially disordered fashion. This intra-unit-cell C4 symmetry breaking coexists at |E|˜Δ1 with incommensurate conductance modulations locally breaking both rotational and translational symmetries (smectic). The characteristic wavevector Q of the latter is determined, empirically, by the k-space points where Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference terminates, and therefore evolves continuously with doping. The properties of these two classes of |E|˜Δ1 states are indistinguishable in the dSC and PG phases. To explain this segregation of k-space into the two regimes distinguished by the symmetries of their electronic states and their energy scales |E|˜Δ1 and |E|≤Δ0, and to understand how this impacts the electronic

  20. Scanning X-ray microscopy of superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoss, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Zahn, Patrick; Bayer, Jonas [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic flux distribution arising from a high-T{sub c} superconductor is detected and visualized with high spatial resolution using scanning x-ray microscopy (SXM). Therefore, we introduce a sensor layer, namely, an amorphous, soft-magnetic CoFeB cover layer. The magnetic stray fields of the supercurrents lead to a local reorientation of the magnetic moments in the ferromagnet, which is visualized using the large x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect of the Co and Fe L3-edge. We show that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer corresponds to the in-plane magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and can hence be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors with high spatial resolution. Using the total electron yield (TEY) mode the surface structure and the magnetic domains can be imaged simultaneously and can be correlated. The measurements are carried out at our scanning x-ray microscope MAXYMUS at Bessy II, Berlin with the new low temperature setup.

  1. Generation of the J/sub c/, H/sub c/, T/sub c/ surface for commercial superconductor using reduced-state parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents a method for calculating the J/sub C/, H/sub C/, T/sub C/ surface for Type II Superconductors. The method requires that one knows T/sub C/ at zero current and field, H/sub c2/ at zero current and temperature, and J/sub c/ at at least one temperature and field. The theory presented in this report agrees with the measured data quite well over virtually the entire J/sub c/, H/sub c/, T/sub c/ surface given the value of J/sub c/ versus H at one or two temperatures. This report presents calculated and measured values of J/sub c/ versus T and B for niobium titanium, niobium zirconium, niobium tin, niobium titanium tin, niobium tantalum tin, vanadium zirconium hafnium, and vanadium gallium. Good agreement of theory with measured data was obtained for commercial niobium titanium and niobium tin. 76 refs., 26 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Interpretation of the method of images in estimating superconducting levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis; Garcia-Prada, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Among different papers devoted to superconducting levitation of a permanent magnet over a superconductor using the method of images, there is a discrepancy of a factor of two when estimating the lift force. This is not a minor matter but an interesting fundamental question that contributes to understanding the physical phenomena of 'imaging' on a superconductor surface. We solve it, make clear the physical behavior underlying it, and suggest the reinterpretation of some previous experiments

  3. Focused surface coil for MR imaging of the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Sherry, C.S.; Youshimura, L.; Lokken, R.; Hyde, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A specially designed surface coil for pituitary MR imaging results in improved image quality over that achieved with conventional pituitary Mr imaging. The coil consists of connected planar pair coils with a variable intercoil distance to accommodate differences in head size. The sensitive field is focused deep to the surface between the two planar pairs. This arrangement optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio and allows better gradient magnification of the pituitary region. Fifteen subjects with a variety of pituitary disorders were imaged

  4. Superresolution Near-field Imaging with Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei; Liu, Zhaolun; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulas and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve

  5. First principles simulation on the K0.8Fe2Se2 high-temperature structural superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Rui; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim; Zhao, Guang-Lin; Bagayoko, Diola

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The superconductor K 0.8 Fe 2 Se 2 super cell size, shape, and atomic positions are fully optimized using first principles density functional theory method. • Each K atom donates 0.8 |e| with K vacancies in the supercell, each Fe atom donates 0.4 |e|, while each Se atom gains 0.7 |e| ∼ 0.8 |e|. • Fe atoms show magnetic moment fluctuation and possible strong spin-orbital coupling. -- Abstract: Since the synthesis of the first ones in 2008, iron-based high temperature superconductors have been the subject of many studies. This great interest is partly due to their higher, upper magnetic field, smaller Fermi surface around the Γ point, and a larger coherence length. This work is focused on A x Fe 2 Se 2 structural superconductor (FeSe, 11 hierarchy; A = K, Cs) as recently observed. ARPES data show novel, electronic structure and a hole-free Fermi surface which is different from previously observed Fermi surface images. We use ab initio density functional theory method to simulate the electronic structure of the novel superconductor A x Fe 2 Se 2 . We compare this electronic structure with those of other Fe-based superconductors

  6. Flux cutting in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments and theories of flux cutting in superconductors. The use of the flux line picture in free space is discussed. In superconductors cutting can either be by means of flux at an angle to other layers of flux, as in longitudinal current experiments, or due to shearing of the vortex lattice as in grain boundaries in YBCO. Experiments on longitudinal currents can be interpreted in terms of flux rings penetrating axial lines. More physical models of flux cutting are discussed but all predict much larger flux cutting forces than are observed. Also, cutting is occurring at angles between vortices of about one millidegree which is hard to explain. The double critical state model and its developments are discussed in relation to experiments on crossed and rotating fields. A new experiment suggested by Clem gives more direct information. It shows that an elliptical yield surface of the critical state works well, but none of the theoretical proposals for determining the direction of E are universally applicable. It appears that, as soon as any flux flow takes place, cutting also occurs. The conclusion is that new theories are required. (perspective)

  7. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Koshelev, Alexei E.; Glatz, Andreas; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-K.

    2015-03-01

    Unlike illusive magnetic field lines in vacuum, magnetic vortices in superconductors are real physical strings, which interact with the sample surface, crystal structure defects, and with each other. We address the complex and poorly understood process of vortex cutting via a comprehensive set of magneto-optic experiments which allow us to visualize vortex patterns at magnetization of a nearly twin-free YBCO crystal by crossing magnetic fields of different orientations. We observe a pronounced anisotropy in the flux dynamics under crossing fields and the filamentation of induced supercurrents associated with the staircase vortex structure expected in layered cuprates, flux cutting effects, and angular vortex instabilities predicted for anisotropic superconductors. At some field angles, we find formation of the vortex domains following a type-I phase transition in the vortex state accompanied by an abrupt change in the vortex orientation. To clarify the vortex cutting scenario we performed time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, which confirmed formation of sharp vortex fronts observed in the experiment and revealed a left-handed helical instability responsible for the rotation of vortices. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  8. Imaging method of brain surface anatomy structures using conventional T2-weighted MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Masahiko; Machida, Yoshio; Yoshida, Tadatoki; Katada, Kazuhiro.

    1992-01-01

    As a non-invasive technique for visualizing the brain surface structure by MRI, surface anatomy scanning (SAS) and the multislice SAS methods have been developed. Both techniques require additional MRI scanning to obtain images for the brain surface. In this paper, we report an alternative method to obtain the brain surface image using conventional T2-weighted multislice images without any additional scanning. The power calculation of the image pixel values, which is incorporated in the routine processing, has been applied in order to enhance the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contrast. We think that this method is one of practical approaches for imaging the surface anatomy of the brain. (author)

  9. High-resolution electron microscope image analysis approach for superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Lu, F.; Jia, C.; Hua, Z.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, an HREM (High-resolution electron microscope) image analysis approach has been developed. The image filtering, segmentation and particles extraction based on gray-scale mathematical morphological operations, are performed on the original HREM image. The final image is a pseudocolor image, with the background removed, relatively uniform brightness, filtered slanting elongation, regular shape for every kind of particle, and particle boundaries that no longer touch each other so that the superconducting material structure can be shown clearly

  10. High resolution imaging of surface patterns of single bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greif, Dominik; Wesner, Daniel; Regtmeier, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario

    2010-01-01

    We systematically studied the origin of surface patterns observed on single Sinorhizobium meliloti bacterial cells by comparing the complementary techniques atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Conditions ranged from living bacteria in liquid to fixed bacteria in high vacuum. Stepwise, we applied different sample modifications (fixation, drying, metal coating, etc.) and characterized the observed surface patterns. A detailed analysis revealed that the surface structure with wrinkled protrusions in SEM images were not generated de novo but most likely evolved from similar and naturally present structures on the surface of living bacteria. The influence of osmotic stress to the surface structure of living cells was evaluated and also the contribution of exopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by imaging two mutant strains of the bacterium under native conditions. AFM images of living bacteria in culture medium exhibited surface structures of the size of single proteins emphasizing the usefulness of AFM for high resolution cell imaging.

  11. Whole surface image reconstruction for machine vision inspection of fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, D. Y.; Lefcourt, A. M.; Kim, M. S.; Lo, Y. M.

    2007-09-01

    Automated imaging systems offer the potential to inspect the quality and safety of fruits and vegetables consumed by the public. Current automated inspection systems allow fruit such as apples to be sorted for quality issues including color and size by looking at a portion of the surface of each fruit. However, to inspect for defects and contamination, the whole surface of each fruit must be imaged. The goal of this project was to develop an effective and economical method for whole surface imaging of apples using mirrors and a single camera. Challenges include mapping the concave stem and calyx regions. To allow the entire surface of an apple to be imaged, apples were suspended or rolled above the mirrors using two parallel music wires. A camera above the apples captured 90 images per sec (640 by 480 pixels). Single or multiple flat or concave mirrors were mounted around the apple in various configurations to maximize surface imaging. Data suggest that the use of two flat mirrors provides inadequate coverage of a fruit but using two parabolic concave mirrors allows the entire surface to be mapped. Parabolic concave mirrors magnify images, which results in greater pixel resolution and reduced distortion. This result suggests that a single camera with two parabolic concave mirrors can be a cost-effective method for whole surface imaging.

  12. Fabrication and study of hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Jurbergs, D.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P.; Lo, K.; Grassi, J.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the first two classes of composite molecule/superconductor devices are reported. Consequently, light sensors based on organic dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from organic conductive polymer-coated superconductor microbridges are discussed. Moreover, the initial results related to the study of molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena are reported

  13. Fermi surface contours obtained from scanning tunneling microscope images around surface point defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotkevych-Sanina, N V; Kolesnichenko, Yu A; Van Ruitenbeek, J M

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the standing wave patterns in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, which occur around surface point defects. We consider arbitrary dispersion relations for the surface states and calculate the conductance for a system containing a small-size tunnel contact and a surface impurity. We find rigorous theoretical relations between the interference patterns in the real-space STM images, their Fourier transforms and the Fermi contours of two-dimensional electrons. We propose a new method for reconstructing Fermi contours of surface electron states, directly from the real-space STM images around isolated surface defects. (paper)

  14. Fine uniform filament superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Li, Qi; Roberts, Peter R.; Antaya, Peter D.; Seuntjens, Jeffrey M.; Hancock, Steven; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Christopherson, Craig J.; Garrant, Jennifer H.; Craven, Christopher A.

    2002-01-01

    A multifilamentary superconductor composite having a high fill factor is formed from a plurality of stacked monofilament precursor elements, each of which includes a low density superconductor precursor monofilament. The precursor elements all have substantially the same dimensions and characteristics, and are stacked in a rectilinear configuration and consolidated to provide a multifilamentary precursor composite. The composite is thereafter thermomechanically processed to provide a superconductor composite in which each monofilament is less than about 50 microns thick.

  15. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  16. Unconventional superconductivity in heavy fermionic and high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovik, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    Splitting of the superconducting transition and glass spectrum in heavy fermion companies and oxide superconductors are discussed. The multicomponent order parameter leads to splitting of transition due to magnetic field, impurities, orthorhombic distortion, etc... Linear specific heat in oxide superconductors may be explained in terms of the Fermi-surface arising in superconducting state if interband is pairing strong enough

  17. Spectroscopic scanning tunneling microscopy insights into Fe-based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Jennifer E

    2011-01-01

    In the first three years since the discovery of Fe-based high T c superconductors, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy have shed light on three important questions. First, STM has demonstrated the complexity of the pairing symmetry in Fe-based materials. Phase-sensitive quasiparticle interference (QPI) imaging and low temperature spectroscopy have shown that the pairing order parameter varies from nodal to nodeless s± within a single family, FeTe 1-x Se x . Second, STM has imaged C4 → C2 symmetry breaking in the electronic states of both parent and superconducting materials. As a local probe, STM is in a strong position to understand the interactions between these broken symmetry states and superconductivity. Finally, STM has been used to image the vortex state, giving insights into the technical problem of vortex pinning, and the fundamental problem of the competing states introduced when superconductivity is locally quenched by a magnetic field. Here we give a pedagogical introduction to STM and QPI imaging, discuss the specific challenges associated with extracting bulk properties from the study of surfaces, and report on progress made in understanding Fe-based superconductors using STM techniques.

  18. Free Surface Downgoing VSP Multiple Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maula, Fahdi; Dac, Nguyen

    2018-03-01

    The common usage of a vertical seismic profile is to capture the reflection wavefield (upgoing wavefield) so that it can be used for further well tie or other interpretations. Borehole Seismic (VSP) receivers capture the reflection from below the well trajectory, traditionally no seismic image information above trajectory. The non-traditional way of processing the VSP multiple can be used to expand the imaging above the well trajectory. This paper presents the case study of using VSP downgoing multiples for further non-traditional imaging applications. In general, VSP processing, upgoing and downgoing arrivals are separated during processing. The up-going wavefield is used for subsurface illumination, whereas the downgoing wavefield and multiples are normally excluded from the processing. In a situation where the downgoing wavefield passes the reflectors several times (multiple), the downgoing wavefield carries reflection information. Its benefit is that it can be used for seismic tie up to seabed, and possibility for shallow hazards identifications. One of the concepts of downgoing imaging is widely known as mirror-imaging technique. This paper presents a case study from deep water offshore Vietnam. The case study is presented to demonstrate the robustness of the technique, and the limitations encountered during its processing.

  19. Smooth embeddings with Stein surface images

    OpenAIRE

    Gompf, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple characterization is given of open subsets of a complex surface that smoothly perturb to Stein open subsets. As applications, complex 2-space C^2 contains domains of holomorphy (Stein open subsets) that are exotic R^4's, and others homotopy equivalent to the 2-sphere but cut out by smooth, compact 3-manifolds. Pseudoconvex embeddings of Brieskorn spheres and other 3-manifolds into complex surfaces are constructed, as are pseudoconcave holomorphic fillings (with disagreeing contact and...

  20. Surface displacement imaging by interferometry with a light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilhaire, Stefan; Grauby, Stephane; Jorez, Sebastien; Lopez, Luis David Patino; Rampnoux, Jean-Michel; Claeys, Wilfrid

    2002-01-01

    We present an imaging technique to measure static surface displacements of electronic components. A device is supplied by a transient current that creates a variation of temperature, thus a surface displacement. To measure the latter, a setup that is based on a Michelson interferometer is used. To avoid the phenomenon of speckle and the drawbacks inherent to it, we use a light emitting diode as the light source for the interferometer. The detector is a visible CCD camera that analyzes the optical signal containing the information of surface displacement of the device. Combining images, we extract the amplitude of the surface displacement. Out-of-plane surface-displacement images of a thermoelectric device are presented

  1. Superconductors with excess quasiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V.F.; Kopaev, Y.V.

    1981-01-01

    This review presents a systematic kinetic theory of nonequilibrium phenomena in superconductors with excess quasiparticles created by electromagnetic or tunnel injection. The energy distributions of excess quasiparticles and of nonequilibrium phonons, dependence of the order parameter on the power and frequency (or intensity) of the electromagnetic field, magnetic properties of nonequilibrium superconductors, I-V curves of superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions, and other properties are described in detail. The stability of superconducting states far from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated and it is shown that characteristic instabilities leading to the formation of nonuniform states of a new type or phase transitions of the first kind are inherent to superconductors with excess quasiparticles. The results are compared with experimental data

  2. Fabrication of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Ma, Beihai; Li, Meiya

    2003-06-17

    A method of forming a biaxially aligned superconductor on a non-biaxially aligned substrate substantially chemically inert to the biaxially aligned superconductor comprising is disclosed. A non-biaxially aligned substrate chemically inert to the superconductor is provided and a biaxially aligned superconductor material is deposited directly on the non-biaxially aligned substrate. A method forming a plume of superconductor material and contacting the plume and the non-biaxially aligned substrate at an angle greater than 0.degree. and less than 90.degree. to deposit a biaxially aligned superconductor on the non-biaxially aligned substrate is also disclosed. Various superconductors and substrates are illustrated.

  3. Calibrating AIS images using the surface as a reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. O.; Roberts, D. A.; Shipman, H. M.; Adams, J. B.; Willis, S. C.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A method of evaluating the initial assumptions and uncertainties of the physical connection between Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) image data and laboratory/field spectrometer data was tested. The Tuscon AIS-2 image connects to lab reference spectra by an alignment to the image spectral endmembers through a system gain and offset for each band. Images were calibrated to reflectance so as to transform the image into a measure that is independent of the solar radiant flux. This transformation also makes the image spectra directly comparable to data from lab and field spectrometers. A method was tested for calibrating AIS images using the surface as a reference. The surface heterogeneity is defined by lab/field spectral measurements. It was found that the Tuscon AIS-2 image is consistent with each of the initial hypotheses: (1) that the AIS-2 instrument calibration is nearly linear; (2) the spectral variance is caused by sub-pixel mixtures of spectrally distinct materials and shade, and (3) that sub-pixel mixtures can be treated as linear mixtures of pure endmembers. It was also found that the image can be characterized by relatively few endmembers using the AIS-2 spectra.

  4. Visual tritium imaging of In-Vessel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C. A.; Zweben, S. J.; Skinner, C. H.; Young, K. M.; Langish, S. W.; Nishi, M. F.; Shu, W. M.; Parker, J.; Isobe, K.

    2000-01-01

    A imaging detector has been developed for the purpose of providing a non-destructive, real time method of determining tritium concentrations on the surface of internal TFTR vacuum vessel components. The detector employs a green phosphor screen (P31, zinc sulfide: copper) with a wave length peak of 530 nm, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera linked to a computer, and a detection chamber for inserting components recovered from the vacuum vessel. This detector is capable of determining tritium concentrations on the surfaces. The detector provides a method of imaging tritium deposition on the surfaces in a fairly rapid fashion

  5. Visual tritium imaging of in-vessel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Zweben, S.J.; Skinner, C.H.; Young, K.M.; Langish, S.W.; Nishi, M.F.; Shu, W.M.; Parker, J.; Isobe, K.

    2000-01-01

    An imaging detector has been developed for the purpose of providing a non-destructive, real time method of determining tritium concentrations on the surface of internal TFTR vacuum vessel components. The detector employs a green phosphor screen (P31, zinc sulfide: copper) with a wave length peak of 530 nm, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera linked to a computer, and a detection chamber for inserting components recovered from the vacuum vessel. This detector is capable of determining tritium concentrations on the surfaces. The detector provides a method of imaging tritium deposition on the surfaces in a fairly rapid fashion

  6. Multiple interpretations of a pair of images of a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuet-Higgins, H. C.

    1988-07-01

    It is known that, if two optical images of a visually textured surface, projected from finitely separated viewpoints, allow more than one three-dimensional interpretation, then the surface must be part of a quadric passing through the two viewpoints. It is here shown that this quadric is either a plane or a ruled surface of a type first considered by Maybank (1985) in a study of ambiguous optic flow fields. In the latter case, three is the maximum number of distinct interpretations that the two images can sustain.

  7. 3D surface reconstruction using optical flow for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Nan; Yang, Yee-Hong; Pierson, R.

    1996-01-01

    The recovery of a 3D model from a sequence of 2D images is very useful in medical image analysis. Image sequences obtained from the relative motion between the object and the camera or the scanner contain more 3D information than a single image. Methods to visualize the computed tomograms can be divided into two approaches: the surface rendering approach and the volume rendering approach. A new surface rendering method using optical flow is proposed. Optical flow is the apparent motion in the image plane produced by the projection of the real 3D motion onto 2D image. In this paper, the object remains stationary while the scanner undergoes translational motion. The 3D motion of an object can be recovered from the optical flow field using additional constraints. By extracting the surface information from 3D motion, it is possible to get an accurate 3D model of the object. Both synthetic and real image sequences have been used to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method is suitable for the reconstruction of 3D models from ultrasound medical images as well as other computed tomograms

  8. Friction in levitated superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A type I superconductor levitated above a magnet of low symmetry has a unique equilibrium position about which it may oscillate freely. In contrast, a type II superconductor has a continuous range of stable equilibrium positions and orientations where it floats rigidly without swinging or orbiting as if it were stuck in sand. A strong internal friction conspicuously indicates the existence and unpinning of flux lines in oxide superconductors levitated above liquid nitrogen. It is shown how these effects follow from the hysteretic magnetization curves and how the energy is dissipated

  9. Shape of the nuclear magnetic resonance line in anisotropic superconductors with an irregular vortex lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, A.V.; Tsarevskij, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    For high-temperature superconductors the shape of a NMR spectrum line is built regarding for variation of inhomogeneity of irregular vortex lattice magnetic field near superconductor surface. It is shown that the shape of a NMR line is not simply widened but noticeably varies depending on the degree of irregularity of a superconductor vortex lattice. This variation is associated with a local symmetry decrease in an irregular vortex lattice of the superconductor. Taking into account these circumstances may considerably change conclusions about the type of a vortex lattice and superconductor parameters which are commonly gained from NMR line shape analysis [ru

  10. Stability of magnets levitated above superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.C.; Logothetis, E.M.; Soltis, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The stability of a permanent magnet levitated above a slab of hard superconductor is considered. The force on a dipole magnet over a perfectly diamagnetic disk is calculated. It is found that the radial component of the force is directed outward and is 10%--20% of the image (vertical) force near the edge. Estimates of the magnetic friction force due to flux motion in a hard superconductor are made using Bean's model. The magnitude of the magnetic friction is large enough to stabilize the magnet over most of the disk for typical values of the critical current in ceramic superconductors (∼10 3 A/cm 2 ), but too small for the highest values reported (>10 6 A/cm 2 ). It is conjectured that flux trapping due to inhomogeneities gives rise to transient restoring forces

  11. Development of superconductor bulk for superconductor bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Current carrying capacity is one of the most important issues in the consideration of superconductor bulk materials for engineering applications. There are numerous applications of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors e.g. magnetic levitation train, flywheel energy storage system, levitation transportation, lunar telescope, centrifugal device, magnetic shielding materials, bulk magnets etc. Accordingly, to obtain YBCO materials in the form of large, single crystals without weak-link problem is necessary. A top seeded melt growth (TSMG) process was used to fabricate single crystal YBCO bulk superconductors. The seeded and infiltration growth (IG) technique was also very promising method for the synthesis of large, single-grain YBCO bulk superconductors with good superconducting properties. 5 wt.% Ag doped Y211 green compacts were sintered at 900 .deg. C {approx} 1200 .deg.C and then a single crystal YBCO was fabricated by an infiltration method. A refinement and uniform distribution of the Y211 particles in the Y123 matrix were achieved by sintering the Ag-doped samples. This enhancement of the critical current density was ascribable to a fine dispersion of the Y211 particles, a low porosity and the presence of Ag particles. In addition, we have designed and manufactured large YBCO single domain with levitation force of 10-13 kg/cm{sup 2} using TSMG processing technique.

  12. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green\\'s functions along the surface instead of simulated Green\\'s functions. The key assumptions are that the scattering bodies are within the depth interrogated by the surface waves, and the Green\\'s functions are recorded with dense receiver sampling along the free surface. This natural migration takes into account all orders of multiples, mode conversions and non-linear effects of surface waves in the data. The natural imaging formulae are derived for both active source and ambient-noise data, and computer simulations show that natural migration can effectively image near-surface heterogeneities with typical ambient-noise sources and geophone distributions.

  13. Fractal Image Coding Based on a Fitting Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Bi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A no-search fractal image coding method based on a fitting surface is proposed. In our research, an improved gray-level transform with a fitting surface is introduced. One advantage of this method is that the fitting surface is used for both the range and domain blocks and one set of parameters can be saved. Another advantage is that the fitting surface can approximate the range and domain blocks better than the previous fitting planes; this can result in smaller block matching errors and better decoded image quality. Since the no-search and quadtree techniques are adopted, smaller matching errors also imply less number of blocks matching which results in a faster encoding process. Moreover, by combining all the fitting surfaces, a fitting surface image (FSI is also proposed to speed up the fractal decoding. Experiments show that our proposed method can yield superior performance over the other three methods. Relative to range-averaged image, FSI can provide faster fractal decoding process. Finally, by combining the proposed fractal coding method with JPEG, a hybrid coding method is designed which can provide higher PSNR than JPEG while maintaining the same Bpp.

  14. Superior MR images with electronically tuned and decoupled surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingwersen, H.; Freisen, L.; Friedrich, A.; Kess, H.; Krause, N.; Meissner, R.; Popp, W.

    1987-01-01

    In order to gain free positioning of surface coils in linearly polarized transmitting coils, it is absolutely necessary to electronically decouple both coils. For circularly polarized transmitting coils, decoupling is necessary in any case. In addition to the decoupling circuit automatic electronic tuning of the surface coils is used to gain the bast ratio of signal to noise. This combination of electronically decoupling and tuning of the surface coils yields intrinsic patient safety concerning local power deposition as well as free positioning and easy handling at the same time. Block diagrams, circuit schemes, and MR images obtained with several different surface coils are shown

  15. Time-dependent image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alducin, M.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Transient effects in the image potential induced by a point charge suddenly created in front of a metal surface are studied. The time evolution of the image potential is calculated using linear response theory. Two different time scales are defined: (i) the time required for the creation of the image potential and (ii) the time it takes to converge to its stationary value. Their dependence on the distance of the charge to the surface is discussed. The effect of the electron gas damping is also analyzed. For a typical metallic density, the order of magnitude of the creation time is 0.1 fs, whereas for a charge created close to the surface the convergence time is around 1-2 fs

  16. Image Reconstruction and Evaluation: Applications on Micro-Surfaces and Lenna Image Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mayyas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article develops algorithms for the characterization and the visualization of micro-scale features using a small number of sample points, with the goal of mitigating the measurement shortcomings, which are often destructive or time consuming. The popular measurement techniques that are used in imaging of micro-surfaces include the 3D stylus or interferometric profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, where both could represent the micro-surface characteristics in terms of 3D dimensional topology and greyscale image, respectively. Such images could be highly dense; therefore, traditional image processing techniques might be computationally expensive. We implement the algorithms in several case studies to rapidly examine the microscopic features of micro-surface of Microelectromechanical System (MEMS, and then we validate the results using a popular greyscale image; i.e., “Lenna” image. The contributions of this research include: First, development of local and global algorithm based on modified Thin Plate Spline (TPS model to reconstruct high resolution images of the micro-surface’s topography, and its derivatives using low resolution images. Second, development of a bending energy algorithm from our modified TPS model for filtering out image defects. Finally, development of a computationally efficient technique, referred to as Windowing, which combines TPS and Linear Sequential Estimation (LSE methods, to enhance the visualization of images. The Windowing technique allows rapid image reconstruction based on the reduction of inverse problem.

  17. Topological superconductors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Ando, Yoichi

    2017-07-01

    This review elaborates pedagogically on the fundamental concept, basic theory, expected properties, and materials realizations of topological superconductors. The relation between topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions are explained, and the difference between dispersive Majorana fermions and a localized Majorana zero mode is emphasized. A variety of routes to topological superconductivity are explained with an emphasis on the roles of spin-orbit coupling. Present experimental situations and possible signatures of topological superconductivity are summarized with an emphasis on intrinsic topological superconductors.

  18. Room temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleight, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    If the Holy Grail of room temperature superconductivity could be achieved, the impact on could be enormous. However, a useful room temperature superconductor for most applications must possess a T c somewhat above room temperature and must be capable of sustaining superconductivity in the presence of magnetic fields while carrying a significant current load. The authors will return to the subject of just what characteristics one might seek for a compound to be a room temperature superconductor. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  20. High-T/sub c/ superconductor and its use in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    Many of the proposed uses for the high-T/sub c/ superconductor involve the creation of a magnetic field using superconducting coils. This report will assess what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors and take a realistic look at their potential use in various kinds of superconducting magnets. Based on what is known about the high-T/sub c/ superconductors, one can make a ''wish list'' of things that will make such materials useful for magnets. Then, the following question is asked. If one had a high-T/sub c/ superconductor with the same properties as modern niobium-titanium superconductor, how would the superconductor work in a magnet environment? Finally, this report will show the potential impact of the ideal high-T/sub c/ superconductor on: 1) accelerator dipole and quadrupole magnets, 2) superconducting magnets for use in space, and 3) superconducting solenoids for magnetic resonance imaging. 78 refs., 11 tabs

  1. Superresolution Near-field Imaging with Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-10-21

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulas and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve superresolution imaging of subwavelength scatterers if they are located less than about 1/2 of the shear wavelength from the source line. We also show that the TRM operation for a single frequency is equivalent to natural migration, which uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration, and only costs O(N4) algebraic operations for poststack migration compared to O(N6) operations for natural prestack migration. Here, we assume the sources and receivers are on an N × N grid and there are N2 trial image points on the free surface. Our theoretical predictions of superresolution are validated with tests on synthetic data. The field-data tests suggest that hidden faults at the near surface can be detected with subwavelength imaging of surface waves by using the TRM operation if they are no deeper than about 1/2 the dominant shear wavelength.

  2. Determining Surface Infiltration Rate of Permeable Pavements with Digital Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Valeo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell phone images of pervious pavement surfaces were used to explore relationships between surface infiltration rates (SIR measured using the ASTM C1701 standard test and using a simple falling head test. A fiber-reinforced porous asphalt surface and a highly permeable material comprised of stone, rubber and a polymer binder (Porous Pave were tested. Images taken with a high-resolution cellphone camera were acquired as JPEG files and converted to gray scale images in Matlab® for analysis. The distribution of gray levels was compared to the surface infiltration rates obtained for both pavements with attention given to the mean of the distribution. Investigation into the relationships between mean SIR and parameters determined from the gray level distribution produced in the image analysis revealed that mean SIR measured in both pavements were proportional to the inverse of the mean of the distribution. The relationships produced a coefficient of determination over 85% using both the ASTM and the falling head test in the porous asphalt surface. SIR measurements determined with the ASTM method were highly correlated with the inverse mean of the distribution of gray levels in the Porous Pave material as well, producing coefficients of determination of over 90% and Kendall’s tau-b of roughly 70% for nonparametric data.

  3. STM Imaging of Localized Surface Plasmons on Individual Gold Nanoislands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy A; Banerjee, Progna; Nguyen, Duc; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin; Jain, Prashant K

    2018-04-19

    An optically modulated scanning tunneling microscopy technique developed for measurement of single-molecule optical absorption is used here to image the light absorption by individual Au nanoislands and Au nanostructures. The technique is shown to spatially map, with nanometer resolution, localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excited within the nanoislands. Electrodynamic simulations demonstrate the correspondence of the measured images to plasmonic near-field intensity maps. The optical STM imaging technique captures the wavelength, polarization, and geometry dependence of the LSP resonances and their corresponding near-fields. Thus, we introduce a tool for real-space, nanometer-scale visualization of optical energy absorption, transport, and dissipation in complex plasmonic nanostructures.

  4. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Large Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichman, P.B.; Lavely, E.M.; Ritzwoller, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The general theory of surface NMR imaging of large electromagnetically active systems is considered, motivated by geophysical applications. A general imaging equation is derived for the NMR voltage response, valid for arbitrary transmitter and receiver loop geometry and arbitrary conductivity structure of the sample. When the conductivity grows to the point where the electromagnetic skin depth becomes comparable to the sample size, significant diffusive retardation effects occur that strongly affect the signal. Accounting for these now allows more accurate imaging than previously possible. It is shown that the time constant T 1 may in principle be inferred directly from the diffusive tail of the signal. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Textural Analysis of Fatique Crack Surfaces: Image Pre-processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lauschmann

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available For the fatique crack history reconstitution, new methods of quantitative microfractography are beeing developed based on the image processing and textural analysis. SEM magnifications between micro- and macrofractography are used. Two image pre-processing operatins were suggested and proved to prepare the crack surface images for analytical treatment: 1. Normalization is used to transform the image to a stationary form. Compared to the generally used equalization, it conserves the shape of brightness distribution and saves the character of the texture. 2. Binarization is used to transform the grayscale image to a system of thick fibres. An objective criterion for the threshold brightness value was found as that resulting into the maximum number of objects. Both methods were succesfully applied together with the following textural analysis.

  6. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ohara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA with a surface acoustic wave (SAW. SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs. The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  7. Accounting for free-surface multiples in Marchenko imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Snieder, R; van der Neut, J.R.; Thorbecke, J.W.; Slob, E.C.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Imagine placing a receiver at any location in the earth and recording the response at that location to sources on the surface. In such a world, we could place receivers around our reservoir to better image the reservoir and understand its properties. Realistically, this is not a feasible approach

  8. Surface Reconstruction and Image Enhancement via $L^1$-Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Dobrev, Veselin

    2010-01-01

    A surface reconstruction technique based on minimization of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Convergence of the method is established, and an interior-point algorithm solving the associated linear programming problem is introduced. The reconstruction algorithm is illustrated on various test cases including natural and urban terrain data, and enhancement oflow-resolution or aliased images. Copyright © by SIAM.

  9. A Novel Algorithm of Surface Eliminating in Undersurface Optoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhulina Yulia V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the task of optoacoustic imaging of the objects located under the surface covering them. In this paper, we suggest the algorithm of the surface eliminating based on the fact that the intensity of the image as a function of the spatial point should change slowly inside the local objects, and will suffer a discontinuity of the spatial gradients on their boundaries. The algorithm forms the 2-dimensional curves along which the discontinuity of the signal derivatives is detected. Then, the algorithm divides the signal space into the areas along these curves. The signals inside the areas with the maximum level of the signal amplitudes and the maximal gradient absolute values on their edges are put equal to zero. The rest of the signals are used for the image restoration. This method permits to reconstruct the picture of the surface boundaries with a higher contrast than that of the surface detection technique based on the maximums of the received signals. This algorithm does not require any prior knowledge of the signals' statistics inside and outside the local objects. It may be used for reconstructing any images with the help of the signals representing the integral over the object's volume. Simulation and real data are also provided to validate the proposed method.

  10. Investigation of synthetic aperture methods in ultrasound surface imaging using elementary surface types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, W; Pierce, S G; Rowe, P

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging methods have been employed widely in recent research in non-destructive testing (NDT), but uptake has been more limited in medical ultrasound imaging. Typically offering superior focussing power over more traditional phased array methods, these techniques have been employed in NDT applications to locate and characterise small defects within large samples, but have rarely been used to image surfaces. A desire to ultimately employ ultrasonic surface imaging for bone surface geometry measurement prior to surgical intervention motivates this research, and results are presented for initial laboratory trials of a surface reconstruction technique based on global thresholding of ultrasonic 3D point cloud data. In this study, representative geometry artefacts were imaged in the laboratory using two synthetic aperture techniques; the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) employing full and narrow synthetic apertures, respectively. Three high precision metallic samples of known geometries (cuboid, sphere and cylinder) which featured a range of elementary surface primitives were imaged using a 5MHz, 128 element 1D phased array employing both SAFT and TFM approaches. The array was manipulated around the samples using a precision robotic positioning system, allowing for repeatable ultrasound derived 3D surface point clouds to be created. A global thresholding technique was then developed that allowed the extraction of the surface profiles, and these were compared with the known geometry samples to provide a quantitative measure of error of 3D surface reconstruction. The mean errors achieved with optimised SAFT imaging for the cuboidal, spherical and cylindrical samples were 1.3mm, 2.9mm and 2.0mm respectively, while those for TFM imaging were 3.7mm, 3.0mm and 3.1mm, respectively. These results were contrary to expectations given the higher information content associated with the TFM images. However, it was

  11. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and

  12. Wear-less floating contact imaging of polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, A; Rothuizen, H; Gotsmann, B; Duerig, U

    2010-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique is described combining two operating modes that previously were mutually exclusive: gentle imaging of delicate surfaces requiring slow dynamic AFM techniques, and passive feedback contact mode AFM enabling ultra-fast imaging. A high-frequency force modulation is used to excite resonant modes in the MHz range of a highly compliant cantilever force sensor with a spring constant of 0.1 N m -1 . The high-order mode acts as a stiff system for modulating the tip-sample distance and a vibration amplitude of 1 nm is sufficient to overcome the adhesion interaction. The soft cantilever provides a force-controlled support for the vibrating tip, enabling high-speed intermittent contact force microscopy without feedback control of the cantilever bending. Using this technique, we were able to image delicate polymer surfaces and to completely suppress the formation of the ripple wear patterns that are commonly observed in contact AFM.

  13. Three dimensional imaging of surface geometry in SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slowko, W.

    1997-01-01

    A great advantage of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is its ability of the surface topography in the way as a human eye is accustomed to see lights and shadows on macroobjects. However, SEM's can hardly display vertical dimensions of the structures. One of possible solutions is reconstruction of the surface profiles by directional detection of secondary electrons and proper signal processing. However, the surface profile still gives two dimensional information and the method should be extended to obtain fully three dimensional imaging. The extension consists in a simultaneous reconstruction of the surface profiles in two perpendicular directions (x and y) and their superposition. The solution proposed is based on a quadrupole detector system and a computer or analogue system for signal processing. Quantitative data of the surface topography can be displayed in many manners in the system of two or three co-ordinates with use of pseudo-colour for the altitude coding. (author)

  14. Distance of the image plane from metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, N.V.; Chen, C.T.; Weinert, M.

    1989-01-01

    The data base of surface-state energies on the metals Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, and Pt is assembled and, with the aid of a simple model, is used to estimate the distance of the image plane and its trends from surface to surface and metal to metal. The model combines a nearly-free-electron representation of the crystal with a Jones-Jennings-Jepsen ansatz for the saturated image barrier. The projected bulk-band gaps are taken from published determinations. Constraints are placed on the surface barrier parameters by appeal to the results of self-consistent first-principles slab calculations. The general experimental trend observed is for the image-plane distance z 0 to decrease in the sequence (111) to (001) to (110), in the same sense but not as rapidly as z J , the distance of the effective jellium edge. This trend is rationalized using a simple model of the tail of the surface charge density. Typical values for z 0 -z J fall in the range -0.2 to +0.5 a.u., with the larger values occurring for the 3d metals Cu and Ni

  15. Detection of cracks on concrete surfaces by hyperspectral image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno O.; Valença, Jonatas; Júlio, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    All large infrastructures worldwide must have a suitable monitoring and maintenance plan, aiming to evaluate their behaviour and predict timely interventions. In the particular case of concrete infrastructures, the detection and characterization of crack patterns is a major indicator of their structural response. In this scope, methods based on image processing have been applied and presented. Usually, methods focus on image binarization followed by applications of mathematical morphology to identify cracks on concrete surface. In most cases, publications are focused on restricted areas of concrete surfaces and in a single crack. On-site, the methods and algorithms have to deal with several factors that interfere with the results, namely dirt and biological colonization. Thus, the automation of a procedure for on-site characterization of crack patterns is of great interest. This advance may result in an effective tool to support maintenance strategies and interventions planning. This paper presents a research based on the analysis and processing of hyper-spectral images for detection and classification of cracks on concrete structures. The objective of the study is to evaluate the applicability of several wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum for classification of cracks in concrete surfaces. An image survey considering highly discretized wavelengths between 425 nm and 950 nm was performed on concrete specimens, with bandwidths of 25 nm. The concrete specimens were produced with a crack pattern induced by applying a load with displacement control. The tests were conducted to simulate usual on-site drawbacks. In this context, the surface of the specimen was subjected to biological colonization (leaves and moss). To evaluate the results and enhance crack patterns a clustering method, namely k-means algorithm, is being applied. The research conducted allows to define the suitability of using clustering k-means algorithm combined with hyper-spectral images highly

  16. Modified entropic gravitation in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Clovis Jacinto de

    2012-01-01

    Verlinde recently developed a theoretical account of gravitation in terms of an entropic force. The central element in Verlinde’s derivation is information and its relation with entropy through the holographic principle. The application of this approach to the case of superconductors requires to take into account that information associated with superconductor’s quantum vacuum energy is not stored on Planck size surface elements, but in four volume cells with Planck-Einstein size. This has profound consequences on the type of gravitational force generated by the quantum vacuum condensate in superconductors, which is closely related with the cosmological repulsive acceleration responsible for the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Remarkably this new gravitational type force depends on the level of breaking of the weak equivalence principle for cooper pairs in a given superconducting material, which was previously derived by the author starting from similar principles. It is also shown that this new gravitational force can be interpreted as a surface force. The experimental detection of this new repulsive gravitational-type force appears to be challenging.

  17. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2016-09-06

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green\\'s functions computed from the shot gathers. Migrating shot gathers recorded by 2D and 3D land surveys validates the effectiveness of detecting nearsurface heterogeneities by natural migration. The implication is that more accurate hazard maps can be created by migrating surface waves in land surveys.

  18. Stability of magnetic tip/superconductor levitation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alqadi, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The vertical stability of a magnetic tip over a superconducting material is investigated by using the critical state and the frozen image models. The analytical expressions of the stiffness and the vibration frequency about the equilibrium position are derived in term of the geometrical parameters of the magnet/superconductor system. It is found that the stability of the system depends on the shape of the superconductor as well as its thickness. (paper)

  19. Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Resources with in Superconductors Measured by Electron Tunneling; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 4: 147 - 148 ; August 15, 1960 Electron Tunneling Between Two Superconductors; Physical Review Letters, Vol. 5 Issue 10

  20. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  1. Superconductors at the nanoscale. From basic research to applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerdenweber, Roger [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Peter Gruenberg Inst.; Moshchalkov, Victor [KU Leuven (Belgium). Inst. for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry; Bending, Simon [Bath Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics; Tafuri, Francesco (ed.) [Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Aversa (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    By covering theory, design, and fabrication of nanostructured superconducting materials, this monograph is an invaluable resource for research and development. This book contains the following chapters: Tutorial on nanostructured superconductors; Imaging vortices in superconductors: from the atomic scale to macroscopic distances; Probing vortex dynamics on a single vortex level by scanning ac-susceptibility microscopy; STM studies of vortex cores in strongly confined nanoscale superconductors; Type-1.5 superconductivity; Direct visualization of vortex patterns in superconductors with competing vortex-vortex interactions; Vortex dynamics in nanofabricated chemical solution deposition high-temperature superconducting films; Artificial pinning sites and their applications; Vortices at microwave frequencies; Physics and operation of superconducting single-photon devices; Josephson and charging effect in mesoscopic superconducting devices; NanoSQUIDs: Basics and recent advances; Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} intrinsic Josephson junction stacks as emitters of terahertz radiation; Interference phenomena in superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids; Spin-orbit interactions, spin currents, and magnetization dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet hybrids; Superconductor/ferromagnet hybrids.

  2. Preliminary Study on Earthquake Surface Rupture Extraction from Uav Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X.; Wang, X.; Ding, X.; Wu, X.; Dou, A.; Wang, S.

    2018-04-01

    Because of the advantages of low-cost, lightweight and photography under the cloud, UAVs have been widely used in the field of seismic geomorphology research in recent years. Earthquake surface rupture is a typical seismic tectonic geomorphology that reflects the dynamic and kinematic characteristics of crustal movement. The quick identification of earthquake surface rupture is of great significance for understanding the mechanism of earthquake occurrence, disasters distribution and scale. Using integrated differential UAV platform, series images were acquired with accuracy POS around the former urban area (Qushan town) of Beichuan County as the area stricken seriously by the 2008 Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake. Based on the multi-view 3D reconstruction technique, the high resolution DSM and DOM are obtained from differential UAV images. Through the shade-relief map and aspect map derived from DSM, the earthquake surface rupture is extracted and analyzed. The results show that the surface rupture can still be identified by using the UAV images although the time of earthquake elapse is longer, whose middle segment is characterized by vertical movement caused by compression deformation from fault planes.

  3. Spectrally enhanced image resolution of tooth enamel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Short-wavelength 405 nm laser illumination of surface dental enamel using an ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) produced enhanced detail of dental topography. The surfaces of human extracted teeth and artificial erosions were imaged with 405 nm, 444 nm, 532 nm, or 635 nm illumination lasers. The obtained images were then processed offline to compensate for any differences in the illumination beam diameters between the different lasers. Scattering and absorption coefficients for a Monte Carlo model of light propagation in dental enamel for 405 nm were scaled from published data at 532 nm and 633 nm. The value of the scattering coefficient used in the model was scaled from the coefficients at 532 nm and 633 nm by the inverse third power of wavelength. Simulations showed that the penetration depth of short-wavelength illumination is localized close to the enamel surface, while long-wavelength illumination travels much further and is backscattered from greater depths. Therefore, images obtained using short wavelength laser are not contaminated by the superposition of light reflected from enamel tissue at greater depths. Hence, the SFE with short-wavelength illumination may make it possible to visualize surface manifestations of phenomena such as demineralization, thus better aiding the clinician in the detection of early caries.

  4. A monthly quality assurance procedure for 3D surface imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, H Omar; Klein, Eric E; Gokhroo, Garima; Santanam, Lakshmi

    2010-12-21

    A procedure for periodic quality assurance of a video surface imaging system is introduced. AlignRT is a video camera-based patient localization system that captures and compares images of a patient's topography to a DICOM-formatted external contour, then calculates shifts required to accurately reposition the patient. This technical note describes the tools and methods implemented in our department to verify correct and accurate operation of the AlignRT hardware and software components. The procedure described is performed monthly and complements a daily calibration of the system.

  5. Photothermal measurements of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, G.S.; Wu, X.D.; Kapitulnik, A.; Fishman, I.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a new photothermal technique to investigate electronic phase transitions of high temperature superconductors. The phase shift of the thermal wave yields the anisotropic thermal diffusivity coefficient of the sample. The amplitude of the photothermal signal is sensitive to electronic phase transitions of the second kind. The technique is completely noncontacting and nondestructive, and is well suited to measure small and fragile single-crystal high-T c superconductors. The measurements give good agreement with fluctuation theory near the transition temperature. They have studied diffusion in, and superconducting fluctuations of, single crystals of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 . Both systems show fluctuation effects beyond Gaussian fluctuations. While YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ behaves as a three-dimensional anisotropic superconductor, results on Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 indicate strong two-dimensional effects

  6. Stability of superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Takao; Kuroda, Tsuneo

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the stability of superconductors, we constructed a measurement system of the critical current density Jr property as function of temperature, magnetic strength, azimuth of magnetic field and distortion. LabView program automatically controlled the magnetic field, temperature, rotational displacement, load, multimeter and sample source in the system. The superconducting critical surface of Nb 3 Al wire was prepared by two methods: a low temperature diffusion method and a phase transformation method. Nb 3 Al prepared by two methods proved the temperature scaling law of magnetic pinning force density and parameters for fitting the pinning model were introduced. The tailing of Jc-T curve at the high temperature side was generated by pinning property of magnetic flux line. On measurement of AC magnetic susceptibility, a primary stack (JR filament) of RIT Nb 3 Al wire prepared by phase transformation connected electrically and the size corresponded to the effective core size, so that, large n value was shown in spite of high temperature treatment and it showed good distortion resistance. Nb 3 Al wire prepared by low temperature diffusion method indicated large anisotropy of Bc 2 and Jc in the rectangular wire. On V 3 Ga, the temperature scaling law of magnetic field was not established and it was observed the effective grain boundary pinning at the low magnetic field and the other pinning mechanism of which magnetic flux line synchronized in the high temperature field. The specific magnetic azimuth dependency showed in the neighborhood of the parallel magnetic field. Jc indicated the positive dependence of temperature in the peak magnetic field. Jc of Bi oxides tape conductor was measured and the results showed the magnetic field was governed by magnetic field dependence on the c axis direction. (S.Y.)

  7. Magnetic irreversibility in granular superconductors: ac susceptibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, F.; Obradors, X.; Fontcuberta, J.; Vallet, M.; Gonzalez-Calbet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Ac susceptibility measurements of a ceramic weak-coupled superconductor in very low ac fields (2mG, 111Hz) are reported. We present evidence for the observation of the magnetic irreversibility following a ZFC-FC thermal cycling by means of ac susceptibilty measurements. It is shown that this technique also reflect local magnetic field effects in granular superconductors, as previously suggested in microwave surface resistance and I-V characteristics. (orig.)

  8. Planetary surface photometry and imaging: progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Jay D

    2014-10-01

    Spacecraft have visited and returned many thousands of images and spectra of all of the planets, many of their moons, several asteroids, and a few comet nuclei during the golden age of planetary exploration. The signal in each pixel of each image or spectral channel is a measurement of the radiance of scattered sunlight into a specific direction. The information on the structure and composition of the surface that is contained in variation of the radiance with scattering geometry and wavelength, including polarization state, has only just begun to be exploited and is the topic of this review. The uppermost surfaces of these bodies are mainly composed of particles that are continuously generated by impacts of micrometeoroids and larger impactors. Models of light scattering by distributions of sizes and irregular shapes of particles and by closely packed particles within a surface are challenging. These are active topics of research where considerable progress has recently been made. We focus on the surfaces of bodies lacking atmospheres.These surfaces are diverse and their morphologies give evidence of their evolution by impacts and resurfacing by a variety of processes including down slope movement and electrostatic transport of particles, gravitational accumulation of debris, volatile outgassing and migration, and magnetospheric interactions. Sampling of scattering geometries and spatial resolution is constrained by spacecraft trajectories. However, the large number of archived images and spectra demand more quantitative interpretation. The scattering geometry dependence of the radiance is underutilized and promises constraints on the compositions and structure of the surface for materials that lack diagnostic wavelength dependence. The general problem is considered in terms of the lunar regolith for which samples have been returned to Earth.

  9. Localized surface plasmon enhanced cellular imaging using random metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taehwang; Lee, Wonju; Kim, Donghyun

    2017-02-01

    We have studied fluorescence cellular imaging with randomly distributed localized near-field induced by silver nano-islands. For the fabrication of nano-islands, a 10-nm silver thin film evaporated on a BK7 glass substrate with an adhesion layer of 2-nm thick chromium. Micrometer sized silver square pattern was defined using e-beam lithography and then the film was annealed at 200°C. Raw images were restored using electric field distribution produced on the surface of random nano-islands. Nano-islands were modeled from SEM images. 488-nm p-polarized light source was set to be incident at 60°. Simulation results show that localized electric fields were created among nano-islands and that their average size was found to be 135 nm. The feasibility was tested using conventional total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy while the angle of incidence was adjusted to maximize field enhancement. Mouse microphage cells were cultured on nano-islands, and actin filaments were selectively stained with FITC-conjugated phalloidin. Acquired images were deconvolved based on linear imaging theory, in which molecular distribution was sampled by randomly distributed localized near-field and blurred by point spread function of far-field optics. The optimum fluorophore distribution was probabilistically estimated by repetitively matching a raw image. The deconvolved images are estimated to have a resolution in the range of 100-150 nm largely determined by the size of localized near-fields. We also discuss and compare the results with images acquired with periodic nano-aperture arrays in various optical configurations to excite localized plasmonic fields and to produce super-resolved molecular images.

  10. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb 3 Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb 3 Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown

  11. An unconventional colour superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Mei

    2007-01-01

    Superfluidity, or superconductivity with mismatched Fermi momenta, appears in many systems such as charge-neutral dense quark matter, asymmetric nuclear matter, and in imbalanced cold atomic gases. The mismatch plays the role of breaking the Cooper pairing, and the pair-breaking state cannot be properly described in the framework of standard BCS theory. I give a brief review on recent theoretical developments in understanding unconventional colour superconductivity, including a gapless colour superconductor, chromomagnetic instabilities and the Higgs instability in the gapless phase. I also introduce a possible new framework for describing an unconventional colour superconductor

  12. Metal surface corrosion grade estimation from single image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijun; Qi, Lin; Sun, Huyuan; Fan, Hao; Dong, Junyu

    2018-04-01

    Metal corrosion can cause many problems, how to quickly and effectively assess the grade of metal corrosion and timely remediation is a very important issue. Typically, this is done by trained surveyors at great cost. Assisting them in the inspection process by computer vision and artificial intelligence would decrease the inspection cost. In this paper, we propose a dataset of metal surface correction used for computer vision detection and present a comparison between standard computer vision techniques by using OpenCV and deep learning method for automatic metal surface corrosion grade estimation from single image on this dataset. The test has been performed by classifying images and calculating the accuracy for the two different approaches.

  13. The new Fe-based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Zhiqiang

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of unconventional superconductivity in doped iron pnictides has ushered in a new era of high temperature superconductivity. The superconductivity of these materials occurs in close proximity to magnetic instability; superconductivity is achieved by suppressing a long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order through charge carrier doping or pressure. In this talk, I will first give a brief overview of the phase diagrams of iron-based superconductors, and then talk about our recent research on iron chalcogenide Fe 1+y (Te 1-x Se x ) superconductors, which is structurally the simplest of the Fe-based superconductors. Although the Fermi surface of iron chalcogenides is similar to iron pnictides, the parent compound Fe 1+y Te exhibits AFM order with in-plane magnetic wave-vector (π, 0). This contrasts the pnictide parent compounds where the magnetic order has an in-plane magnetic wave-vector (π, π) that connects hole and electron parts of the Fermi surface. Despite these differences, both the pnictide and chalcogenide Fe-superconductors exhibit superconducting spin resonances around (π, π), suggesting a common symmetry for their superconducting order parameter. A central question in this burgeoning field is therefore how (π, π) superconductivity can emerge from a (π, 0) magnetic instability. I will address this issue in my talk. I will show the phase diagram of electronic and magnetic properties we recently established for this system and discuss the relationship between magnetic coupling and electronic properties. Our results reveal that the magnetic soft mode evolving from the (π, 0)-type magnetic long-range order is associated with weak charge carrier localization. Bulk superconductivity occurs only as magnetic correlations near (π, 0) are strongly suppressed and the magnetic mode at (π, π) becomes dominant; this suggests a common magnetic origin for superconductivity in iron chalcogenide and pnictide superconductors. (author)

  14. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  15. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans

    2014-01-01

    and excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging......Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide...

  16. Classical spins in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, H [Tokyo Univ.; Maki, K

    1968-08-01

    It is shown that there exists a localized excited state in the energy gap in a superconductor with a classical spin. At finite concentration localized excited states around classical spins form an impurity band. The process of growth of the impurity band and its effects on observable quantities are investigated.

  17. Irradiation damage in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Most superconductors are quite sensitive to irradiation defects. Critical temperatures may be depressed, critical currents may be increased, by irradiation, but other behaviours may be encountered. In compounds, the sublattice in which defects are created is of significant importance. 24 refs

  18. Robustness of an artificially tailored fisheye imaging system with a curvilinear image surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gil Ju; Nam, Won Il; Song, Young Min

    2017-11-01

    Curved image sensors inspired by animal and insect eyes have provided a new development direction in next-generation digital cameras. It is known that natural fish eyes afford an extremely wide field of view (FOV) imaging due to the geometrical properties of the spherical lens and hemispherical retina. However, its inherent drawbacks, such as the low off-axis illumination and the fabrication difficulty of a 'dome-like' hemispherical imager, limit the development of bio-inspired wide FOV cameras. Here, a new type of fisheye imaging system is introduced that has simple lens configurations with a curvilinear image surface, while maintaining high off-axis illumination and a wide FOV. Moreover, through comparisons with commercial conventional fisheye designs, it is determined that the volume and required number of optical elements of the proposed design is practical while capturing the fundamental optical performances. Detailed design guidelines for tailoring the proposed optic system are also discussed.

  19. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  20. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2017-03-06

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  1. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Maiti, R.; Liu, X.; Gerhardt, L. C.; Lee, Z. S.; Byers, R.; Franklin, S. E.; Lewis, R.; Matcher, S. J.; Carré, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad and forearm skin as a function of applied pressure by utilizing two non-invasive techniques, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC). Skin deformation results of the human finger-pad and forearm skin were obtained while pressed against a transparent optical glass plate under the action of 0.5-24 N force and stretching naturally from 90° flexion to 180° full extension respectively. The obtained OCT images showed the deformation results beneath the skin surface, however, DIC images gave overall information of strain at the surface.

  2. Voltage current characteristics of type III superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorofejev, G.L.; Imenitov, A.B.; Klimenko, E.Y.

    1980-01-01

    An adequate description of voltage-current characteristics is important in order to understand the nature of high critical current for the electrodynamic construction of type-III superconductors and for commercial superconductor specification. Homogeneous monofilament and multifilament Nb-Ti, Nb-Zr,Nb 3 Sn wires were investigated in different ranges of magnetic field, temperature and current. The shape of the voltage-current characteristics of multifilament wires, and the parameter's dependence on temperature and magnetic field may be explained qualitatively by the longitudinal heterogeneous nature of the filaments. A method of attaining the complete specification of the wire's electro-physical properties is proposed. It includes the traditional description of a critical surface (i.e. the surface corresponding to a certain conventional effective resistivity in T,B,J-space) and a description of any increasing parameter that depends on B and T. (author)

  3. Voltage current characteristics of type III superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorofeiev, G L; Imenitov, A B; Klimenko, E Y [Gosudarstvennyi Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoi Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoi Ehnergii

    1980-06-01

    An adequate description of voltage-current characteristics is important in order to understand the nature of high critical current for the electrodynamic construction of type-III superconductors and for commercial superconductor specification. Homogeneous monofilament and multifilament Nb-Ti, Nb-Zr,Nb/sub 3/Sn wires were investigated in different ranges of magnetic field, temperature and current. The shape of the voltage-current characteristics of multifilament wires, and the parameter's dependence on temperature and magnetic field may be explained qualitatively by the longitudinal heterogeneous nature of the filaments. A method of attaining the complete specification of the wire's electro-physical properties is proposed. It includes the traditional description of a critical surface (i.e. the surface corresponding to a certain conventional effective resistivity in T,B,J-space) and a description of any increasing parameter that depends on B and T.

  4. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  5. Weak links in high critical temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Kirtley, John R.

    2005-11-01

    The traditional distinction between tunnel and highly transmissive barriers does not currently hold for high critical temperature superconducting Josephson junctions, both because of complicated materials issues and the intrinsic properties of high temperature superconductors (HTS). An intermediate regime, typical of both artificial superconductor-barrier-superconductor structures and of grain boundaries, spans several orders of magnitude in the critical current density and specific resistivity. The physics taking place at HTS surfaces and interfaces is rich, primarily because of phenomena associated with d-wave order parameter (OP) symmetry. These phenomena include Andreev bound states, the presence of the second harmonic in the critical current versus phase relation, a doubly degenerate state, time reversal symmetry breaking and the possible presence of an imaginary component of the OP. All these effects are regulated by a series of transport mechanisms, whose rules of interplay and relative activation are unknown. Some transport mechanisms probably have common roots, which are not completely clear and possibly related to the intrinsic nature of high-TC superconductivity. The d-wave OP symmetry gives unique properties to HTS weak links, which do not have any analogy with systems based on other superconductors. Even if the HTS structures are not optimal, compared with low critical temperature superconductor Josephson junctions, the state of the art allows the realization of weak links with unexpectedly high quality quantum properties, which open interesting perspectives for the future. The observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling and the qubit proposals represent significant achievements in this direction. In this review we attempt to encompass all the above aspects, attached to a solid experimental basis of junction concepts and basic properties, along with a flexible phenomenological background, which collects ideas on the Josephson effect in the presence

  6. Weak links in high critical temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Kirtley, John R

    2005-01-01

    The traditional distinction between tunnel and highly transmissive barriers does not currently hold for high critical temperature superconducting Josephson junctions, both because of complicated materials issues and the intrinsic properties of high temperature superconductors (HTS). An intermediate regime, typical of both artificial superconductor-barrier-superconductor structures and of grain boundaries, spans several orders of magnitude in the critical current density and specific resistivity. The physics taking place at HTS surfaces and interfaces is rich, primarily because of phenomena associated with d-wave order parameter (OP) symmetry. These phenomena include Andreev bound states, the presence of the second harmonic in the critical current versus phase relation, a doubly degenerate state, time reversal symmetry breaking and the possible presence of an imaginary component of the OP. All these effects are regulated by a series of transport mechanisms, whose rules of interplay and relative activation are unknown. Some transport mechanisms probably have common roots, which are not completely clear and possibly related to the intrinsic nature of high-T C superconductivity. The d-wave OP symmetry gives unique properties to HTS weak links, which do not have any analogy with systems based on other superconductors. Even if the HTS structures are not optimal, compared with low critical temperature superconductor Josephson junctions, the state of the art allows the realization of weak links with unexpectedly high quality quantum properties, which open interesting perspectives for the future. The observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling and the qubit proposals represent significant achievements in this direction. In this review we attempt to encompass all the above aspects, attached to a solid experimental basis of junction concepts and basic properties, along with a flexible phenomenological background, which collects ideas on the Josephson effect in the presence

  7. Image statistics and the perception of surface gloss and lightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juno; Anderson, Barton L

    2010-07-01

    Despite previous data demonstrating the critical importance of 3D surface geometry in the perception of gloss and lightness, I. Motoyoshi, S. Nishida, L. Sharan, and E. H. Adelson (2007) recently proposed that a simple image statistic--histogram or sub-band skew--is computed by the visual system to infer the gloss and albedo of surfaces. One key source of evidence used to support this claim was an experiment in which adaptation to skewed image statistics resulted in opponent aftereffects in observers' judgments of gloss and lightness. We report a series of adaptation experiments that were designed to assess the cause of these aftereffects. We replicated their original aftereffects in gloss but found no consistent aftereffect in lightness. We report that adaptation to zero-skew adaptors produced similar aftereffects as positively skewed adaptors, and that negatively skewed adaptors induced no reliable aftereffects. We further find that the adaptation effect observed with positively skewed adaptors is not robust to changes in mean luminance that diminish the intensity of the luminance extrema. Finally, we show that adaptation to positive skew reduces (rather than increases) the apparent lightness of light pigmentation on non-uniform albedo surfaces. These results challenge the view that the adaptation results reported by Motoyoshi et al. (2007) provide evidence that skew is explicitly computed by the visual system.

  8. Photometric imaging in particle size measurement and surface visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Niklas

    2011-09-30

    The aim of this paper is to give an insight into photometric particle sizing approaches, which differ from the typical particle size measurement of dispersed particles. These approaches can often be advantageous especially for samples that are moist or cohesive, when dispersion of particles is difficult or sometimes impossible. The main focus of this paper is in the use of photometric stereo imaging. The technique allows the reconstruction of three-dimensional images of objects using multiple light sources in illumination. The use of photometric techniques is demonstrated in at-line measurement of granules and on-line measurement during granulation and dry milling. Also, surface visualization and roughness measurements are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluctuoscopy of Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamov, Andrey

    2012-02-01

    The study of superconducting fluctuations (SF) is a subject of fundamental and practical importance. Since the moment of discovery SF became a noticeable part of research in the field of superconductivity (SC) and a variety of fluctuation effects have been detected. The interest to SF in SC was regenerated by the discovery of HTS, where, due to extremely short coherence length and low effective dimensionality of the electron system, SF manifest themselves in a wide range of temperatures. The characteristic feature of SF is their strong dependence on temperature and magnetic field. This allows to separate SFs from other contributions and to use them as a tool for characterization of SC systems (``fluctuoscopy'') for example to extract the values of Tc, Hc2(T) and phase-breaking time from experimental data. We present the complete results for fluctuation magneto-conductivity (FMC) and Nernst signal (FNS) of impure 2D superconductor in the whole phase diagram above the transition line Hc2(T), including the domain of quantum fluctuations. Along some line H0(T), in agreement with experimental findings, FMC becomes zero and beyond it remains small and negative. The corresponding surface in coordinates (T,H) becomes in particular non-trivial at low temperatures and close to Hc2(0), where it is trough-shaped. The observation of large FNS in HTS and conventional SC above Tc(H), has attracted much attention recently. The idea to attribute it to the entropy transport by analogy to vortices was proposed. On the other hand this giant effect, close to Tc(0), was explained in terms of SF. Our general results allow to successfully fit the available experimental data in a wide range of magnetic fields and temperatures, to extract the value of the ``ghost'' field and other parameters of SC. We offer also a qualitative consideration, which gives a natural explanation for the giant value of FNS attributing it to a strong dependence of the fluctuation Cooper pair (FCP) chemical

  10. Coincident photoelectron spectroscopy on superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the performed experiments of this thesis was to attempt to detect Cooper pairs as carriers of the superconducting current directly by means of the photoelectric effect. The method of the coincident photoelectron spectroscopy aims thereby at the detection of two coherently emitted electrons by the interaction with a photon. Because electrostatic analyzers typically cover only a very small spatial angle, which goes along with very low coincidence rates, in connection with this thesis a time-of-flight projection system has been developed, which maps nearly the whole spatial angle on a position-resolving detector. The pulsed light source in form of special synchrotron radiation necessary for the measurement has been adjusted so weak, that only single photons could arrive at the sample. Spectroscoped were beside test measurements on silver layers both a lead monocrystal as representative of the classical BCS superconductors and monocrystalline Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 from the family of the high-temperature superconductors. With excitation energies up to 40 eV could be shown that sufficiently smooth and clean surfaces in the superconducting phase exhibit within the resolving power of about 0.5 eV no recognizable differences in comparison to the normally conducting phase. Beside these studies furthermore the simple photoemission at the different samples and especially in the case of the lead crystal is treated, because here no comparable results are known. Thereby the whole momentum space is discussed and the Fermi surface established as three-dimensional model, by means of which the measurement results are discussed. in the theoretical descriptions different models for the Cooper-pair production are presented, whereby to the momentum exchange with the crystal a special role is attributed, because this can only occur in direct excitations via discrete lattice vectors.

  11. Surface flaw evaluation by vectorized eddy current testing image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Hisashi; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2006-01-01

    A method of eddy current testing (ECT) data mapping for surface breaking evaluation is studied. The multicoil ECT probe utilized in this paper consists of Transmit-Receive (TR) type sensors as array elements to obtain the information on crack directions. Switching two directional scans, U- and T- modes, gives two-dimensional vector mapping as ECT images. The ECT signals of the TR type sensor also give the information on crack directions from their variation displayed on the complex number plane. Extracting a complex number component of the signals makes it possible to visualize directions of numerically simulated proximate EDM slits. (author)

  12. Iron pnictide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co x Fe 1-x )PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr 2 Si 2 -type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba 0.6 K 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 , is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba 1-x K x )Fe 2 As 2 is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe 2 As 2 and EuFe 2 As 2 are characterised and the superconductors Sr 1-x K x Fe 2 As 2 and Ca 1-x Na x Fe 2 As 2 are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se 1-x Te x ) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr 3 Sc 2 O 5 Fe 2 As 2 are presented and Ba 2 ScO 3 FeAs and Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is given. Finally, the superconductor Sr 2 VO 3 FeAs is scrutinised and necessary prerequisites for superconductivity in this compound are suggested. (orig.)

  13. "Fluctuoscopy" of Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamov, A. A.

    Study of fluctuation phenomena in superconductors (SCs) is the subject of great fundamental and practical importance. Understanding of their physics allowed to clear up the fundamental properties of SC state. Being predicted in 1968, one of the fluctuation effects, namely paraconductivity, was experimentally observed almost simultaneously. Since this time, fluctuations became a noticeable part of research in the field of superconductivity, and a variety of fluctuation effects have been discovered. The new wave of interest to fluctuations (FL) in superconductors was generated by the discovery of cuprate oxide superconductors (high-temperature superconductors, HTS), where, due to extremely short coherence length and low effective dimensionality of the electron system, superconductive fluctuations manifest themselves in a wide range of temperatures. Moreover, anomalous properties of the normal state of HTS were attributed by many theorists to strong FL in these systems. Being studied in the framework of the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory and, more extensively, in diagrammatic microscopic approach, SC FLs side by side with other quantum corrections (weak localization, etc.) became a new tool for investigation and characterization of such new systems as HTS, disordered electron systems, granular metals, Josephson structures, artificial super-lattices, etc. The characteristic feature of SC FL is their strong dependence on temperature and magnetic fields in the vicinity of phase transition. This allows one to definitely separate the fluctuation effects from other contributions and to use them as the source of information about the microscopic parameters of a material. By their origin, SC FLs are very sensitive to relaxation processes, which break phase coherence. This allows using them for versatile characterization of SC. Today, one can speak about the " fluctuoscopy" of superconductive systems. In review, we present the qualitative picture both of thermodynamic

  14. Computer screen photo-excited surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, Daniel; Winquist, Fredrik; Lundström, Ingemar

    2008-09-12

    Angle and spectra resolved surface plasmon resonance (SPR) images of gold and silver thin films with protein deposits is demonstrated using a regular computer screen as light source and a web camera as detector. The screen provides multiple-angle illumination, p-polarized light and controlled spectral radiances to excite surface plasmons in a Kretchmann configuration. A model of the SPR reflectances incorporating the particularities of the source and detector explain the observed signals and the generation of distinctive SPR landscapes is demonstrated. The sensitivity and resolution of the method, determined in air and solution, are 0.145 nm pixel(-1), 0.523 nm, 5.13x10(-3) RIU degree(-1) and 6.014x10(-4) RIU, respectively, encouraging results at this proof of concept stage and considering the ubiquity of the instrumentation.

  15. Measuring condensate fraction in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Kee, Hae-Young

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of off-diagonal long-range order in superconductors shows that the spin-spin correlation function is significantly influenced by the order if the order parameter is anisotropic on a microscopic scale. Thus, magnetic neutron scattering can provide a direct measurement of the condensate fraction of a superconductor. It is also argued that recent measurements in high-temperature superconductors come very close to achieving this goal. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  16. Processing of Mixed Oxide Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    rapid changes world wide a major research centre on high Tc superconductors was awarded to Cambridge which involved moving the work and people to a...reports and paper is in the appendices. Separation Ceramic superconductors tend to be mixtures of phases, especially when first discovered. It would...properties of the superconducting state will in principle allow superconducting material to be levitated from the non superconductor and several designs

  17. Superconductor stability 90: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent developments in the field of stability of superconductors. The main topics dealt with are hydrodynamic phenomena in cable-in-conduit superconductors, namely, multiple stability, quench pressure, thermal expulsion, and thermal hydraulic quenchback, traveling normal zones in large, composite conductors, such as those intended for SMES, and the stability of vapor-cooled leads made of high-temperature superconductors. 31 refs., 5 figs

  18. Quantifying Uncertainty in Near Surface Electromagnetic Imaging Using Bayesian Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, D. B.; Ray, A.; Key, K.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscientists commonly use electromagnetic methods to image the Earth's near surface. Field measurements of EM fields are made (often with the aid an artificial EM source) and then used to infer near surface electrical conductivity via a process known as inversion. In geophysics, the standard inversion tool kit is robust and can provide an estimate of the Earth's near surface conductivity that is both geologically reasonable and compatible with the measured field data. However, standard inverse methods struggle to provide a sense of the uncertainty in the estimate they provide. This is because the task of finding an Earth model that explains the data to within measurement error is non-unique - that is, there are many, many such models; but the standard methods provide only one "answer." An alternative method, known as Bayesian inversion, seeks to explore the full range of Earth model parameters that can adequately explain the measured data, rather than attempting to find a single, "ideal" model. Bayesian inverse methods can therefore provide a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty inherent in trying to infer near surface conductivity from noisy, measured field data. This study applies a Bayesian inverse method (called trans-dimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo) to transient airborne EM data previously collected over Taylor Valley - one of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica. Our results confirm the reasonableness of previous estimates (made using standard methods) of near surface conductivity beneath Taylor Valley. In addition, we demonstrate quantitatively the uncertainty associated with those estimates. We demonstrate that Bayesian inverse methods can provide quantitative uncertainty to estimates of near surface conductivity.

  19. Reply to the ''Comment on 'Observation of trapped O2 in high-Tc metal oxide superconductors' ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.H.; Phillips, R.C.; Payne, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    Desorption of O 2 in certain high-T c superconductors was observed from scraping the surfaces of superconductors by Rosenberg and Wen. Their conclusion agrees with the results from the observation of O 2 trapping by a laser ablation of superconductors. However, the local heating due to the scraping process can possibly raise the local surface temperature significantly higher than the temperature of the bulk

  20. High Temperature Superconductor Resonator Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) infrared detectors were studied for years but never matured sufficiently for infusion into instruments. Several recent...

  1. Neutron Depolarization in Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuchenko, N. K.

    1995-04-01

    The dependences of neutron depolarization on applied magnetic field are deduced along the magnetization hysteresis loop in terms of the Bean model of the critical state. The depolarization in uniaxial superconductors with the reversible magnetization, including uniaxial magnetic superconductors, is also considered. A strong depolarization is expected if the neutrons travel along the vortex lines. On calcule la dépendance en champ magnétique de la dépolarisation des neutrons le long du cycle d'hystérésis en termes du modèle critique de Bean. On considère aussi la dépolarisation dans les supraconducteurs uniaxiaux en fonction de l'aimantation réversible, y compris pour les supraconducteurs magnétiques. On attend une forte dépolarisation si les neutrons se propagent le long des vortex.

  2. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  3. Radiation behavior of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, R.M.; Raymond, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    High energy neutron irradiations have been performed on Nb 3 Sn superconductors to assess their behavior in a fusion reactor environment. Irradiations were performed at 4.2 K and property measurements were made without warming the samples. The critical current I/sub c/ increased with irradiation to a level about 50% above the unirradiated value at the highest fluences reached in our experiments. These results are compared with the results of other low temperature irradiations of Nb 3 Sn

  4. Microwave impedance of epitaxial high-temperature superconductor films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkov, G.A.; Malyshev, V.Yu.; Bagada, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    In the 3 cm band dependences of the epitaxial HTS film surface resistance on the magnitude of ac and dc magnetic fields have been measured. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ films on sapphire were investigated. It was established that alternating magnetic field produces a stronger impact on the surface resistance than dc field. To explain experimental results the assumption is made that a HTS film is not an ideal superconductor and consists of series-connected sections of various types: sections of an ideal superconductor, sections of low and large resistance intragranular Josephson junctions, shunted by the ideal superconductor, and finally, sections of intergranular Josephson junctions few for epitaxial films. In these conditions the dependences of the surface resistance on dc magnetic field are caused by Abrikosov's vortices moving in ideal superconductive sections, and dependences on the amplitude of ac magnetic field are caused by switching of large resistance junctions to a low resistance state

  5. Strongly disordered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muttalib, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    We examine some universal effects of strong non-magnetic disorder on the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions in a superconductor. In particular we explicitly take into account the effect of slow diffusion of electrons in a disordered medium by working in an exact impurity eigenstate representation. We find that the normal diffusion of electrons characterized by a constant diffusion coefficient does not lead to any significant correction to the electron-phonon or the effective electron-electron interactions in a superconductor. We then consider sufficiently strong disorder where Anderson localization of electrons becomes important and determine the effect of localization on the electron-electron interactions. We find that due to localization, the diffusion of electrons becomes anomalous in the sense that the diffusion coefficient becomes scale dependent. This results in an increase in the effective electron-electron interaction with increasing disorder. We propose that this provides a natural explanation for the unusual sensitivity of the transition temperature T/sub c/ of the high T/sub c/ superconductors (T/sub c/ > 10 0 K) to damage effects

  6. BUILDING DETECTION USING AERIAL IMAGES AND DIGITAL SURFACE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a method for building detection in aerial images based on variational inference of logistic regression is proposed. It consists of three steps. In order to characterize the appearances of buildings in aerial images, an effective bag-of-Words (BoW method is applied for feature extraction in the first step. In the second step, a classifier of logistic regression is learned using these local features. The logistic regression can be trained using different methods. In this paper we adopt a fully Bayesian treatment for learning the classifier, which has a number of obvious advantages over other learning methods. Due to the presence of hyper prior in the probabilistic model of logistic regression, approximate inference methods have to be applied for prediction. In order to speed up the inference, a variational inference method based on mean field instead of stochastic approximation such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo is applied. After the prediction, a probabilistic map is obtained. In the third step, a fully connected conditional random field model is formulated and the probabilistic map is used as the data term in the model. A mean field inference is utilized in order to obtain a binary building mask. A benchmark data set consisting of aerial images and digital surfaced model (DSM released by ISPRS for 2D semantic labeling is used for performance evaluation. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  8. High-Tc superconductor quantum interference devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a superconductive quantum interferometric device for sensing a characteristic of a magnetic field. It comprises a substrate having a surface, the substrate being selected from the group which consists of strontium titanate, aluminum oxide, sapphire, ZrO 2 and mixtures thereof; a coating of MgO on the surface of the substrate; two identical thin-strip films of a high-critical temperature superconductor on the coating, each of the films having a pair of mutually parallel arms in the form of superconductor strips extending toward and aligned with super conductor strips forming corresponding arms of the other thin-strip film, and a crossbar strip connecting the arms of each thin-strip film at right angles to the arms, the high-critical-temperature superconductor being selected from the group which consists of yttrium-barium-calcium-copper-oxides, bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper-oxides, thallium-barium-copper-oxides, thallium-barium-calcium-copper-oxides, barium oxide: potassium oxide: bismuth oxides, and calcium oxide: zinc oxide: iron oxides; and insulating films on the coating between corresponding free ends of the arms thin-strip films, the insulating films being composed of a material selected from the group which consists of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, magnesium oxide and mixture thereof

  9. Positron annihilation studies on high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, C.S.; Bharathi, A.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of the positron annihilation studies on high temperature superconductors (HTSC), with results drawn mainly from our work, is presented. These include results of the studies on the temperature dependence of positron lifetime across T c , which have been carried out in the whole gamut of oxide superconductors. These experimental results are discussed in conjunction with the results of theoretically calculated positron density distribution, and it is shown that the observed temperature dependence of lifetime is intimately linked to the probing of the Cu-O network by the positrons. Results on the investigation of oxygen defects, which play a crucial role in HTSC, are presented. The most significant contribution of positrons to HTSC relates to the investigation of Fermi surface and the results of these studies, drawn from literature, are indicated. Some of our recent results in other novel superconducting materials, viz., the fullerenes and borocarbides are also presented. (author). 69 refs., 15 figs

  10. Theory of the electric current transmission coefficient in the superconductor-insulator-superconductor geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navani, R.

    1974-01-01

    Tunneling in the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (S'-I-S) geometry, where the two superconductors are not necessarily the same, is studied theoretically. Two different models of the S'-I-S geometry - which we call the ''initial model'' and the ''improved model'' are discussed. For the initial model the potential barrier is flat. In the improved model, however, the differing material properties of the three regions - S', I, and S - are taken into account in an approximate fashion. In addition, applied, contact, and image potentials in the insulator are included. The solid state material properties that are taken to be different are the effective electronic masses in the three regions and the Fermi energies in the two superconductors. The quasiparticle wave functions in the S', I, and S regions are determined for both models as solutions to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The electric current transmission coefficients (also the reflection coefficient for the initial model) are derived and their behavior is extensively analyzed. Their forms in the thick barrier limit - where L greater than or approximately equal to 5 A - are related to the BCS densities of states. The tunneling current density is found to depend strongly on the tunneling angle. A relation between the angular position of the tunneling current peak and the barrier thickness is given. Finally, it is shown that the choice of insulator material effects the tunneling current, and the effect is greater the thicker the insulating film

  11. Matching Images to Models: Camera Calibration for 3-D Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robin D.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Cheeseman. Peter C.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we described a system which recursively recovers a super-resolved three dimensional surface model from a set of images of the surface. In that paper we assumed that the camera calibration for each image was known. In this paper we solve two problems. Firstly, if an estimate of the surface is already known, the problem is to calibrate a new image relative to the existing surface model. Secondly, if no surface estimate is available, the relative camera calibration between the images in the set must be estimated. This will allow an initial surface model to be estimated. Results of both types of estimation are given.

  12. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T c superconductors

  13. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F. [Prairie View A& M Univ., Texas (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  14. Critical Doping for the Onset of Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Charge-Density-Wave Order in the Cuprate Superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Badoux

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4} (LSCO was measured in magnetic fields large enough to access the normal state at low temperatures, for a range of Sr concentrations from x=0.07 to x=0.15. For x=0.11, 0.12, 0.125, and 0.13, S/T decreases upon cooling to become negative at low temperatures. The same behavior is observed in the Hall coefficient R_{H}(T. In analogy with other hole-doped cuprates at similar hole concentrations p, the negative S and R_{H} show that the Fermi surface of LSCO undergoes a reconstruction caused by the onset of charge-density-wave modulations. Such modulations have indeed been detected in LSCO by x-ray diffraction in precisely the same doping range. Our data show that in LSCO this Fermi-surface reconstruction is confined to 0.085

  15. Direct Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: Results from the Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV-Optical, Space-Based Interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and stellar interiors (via asteroseismology) and of the Universe in general. SI is identified as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission'' in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory'' in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005). The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 mas resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. In this paper we will discuss the results of the SI Vision Mission Study, elaborating on the science goals of the SI Mission and a mission architecture that could meet those goals.

  16. Testability issues in Superconductor Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Arun, Arun J.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging technology for solutions in high-end applications in computing and telecommunication is superconductor electronics. A system-level study has been carried out to verify the feasibility of DfT in superconductor electronics. In this paper, we present how this can be realized to monitor

  17. Method for preparation of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, A.C.; McDougall, I.L.

    1975-07-10

    The invention deals with a method to prepare a superconductor consisting of a superconducting compound of at least two elements. It especially deals with superconductors which surround a superconducting intermetallic compounds of at least two elements, examples of which are Nb/sub 2/Sn and Nb/sub 3/Al.

  18. Nonmagnetic impurities in magnetic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetization and magnetic field arising around the nonmagnetic impurity in magnetic superconductor with triplet pairing are found. The relationship of these results with the data of recent (gm)sR experiments in heavy fermionic superconductor U 1 - x Th x Be 13 is presented

  19. Superconductor Digital-RF Receiver Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhanov, Oleg A.; Kirichenko, Dmitri; Vernik, Igor V.; Filippov, Timur V.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Webber, Robert; Dotsenko, Vladimir; Talalaevskii, Andrei; Tang, Jia Cao; Sahu, Anubhav; Shevchenko, Pavel; Miller, Robert; Kaplan, Steven B.; Sarwana, Saad; Gupta, Deepnarayan

    Digital superconductor electronics has been experiencing rapid maturation with the emergence of smaller-scale, lower-cost communications applications which became the major technology drivers. These applications are primarily in the area of wireless communications, radar, and surveillance as well as in imaging and sensor systems. In these areas, the fundamental advantages of superconductivity translate into system benefits through novel Digital-RF architectures with direct digitization of wide band, high frequency radio frequency (RF) signals. At the same time the availability of relatively small 4K cryocoolers has lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled digital electronic systems. Recently, we have achieved a major breakthrough in the development, demonstration, and successful delivery of the cryocooled superconductor digital-RF receivers directly digitizing signals in a broad range from kilohertz to gigahertz. These essentially hybrid-technology systems combine a variety of superconductor and semiconductor technologies packaged with two-stage commercial cryocoolers: cryogenic Nb mixed-signal and digital circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, room-temperature amplifiers, FPGA processing and control circuitry. The demonstrated cryocooled digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals in X-band and performing signal acquisition in HF to L-band at ˜30GHz clock frequencies.

  20. Indonesia sea surface temperature from TRMM Microwave Imaging (TMI) sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Y.; Setiawan, K. T.

    2018-05-01

    We analysis the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) data to monitor the sea surface temperature (SST) of Indonesia waters for a decade of 2005-2014. The TMI SST data shows the seasonal and interannual SST in Indonesian waters. In general, the SST average was highest in March-May period with SST average was 29.4°C, and the lowest was in June – August period with the SST average was 28.5°C. The monthly SST average fluctuation of Indonesian waters for 10 years tends to increase. The lowest SST average of Indonesia occurred in August 2006 with the SST average was 27.6° C, while the maximum occurred in May 2014 with the monthly SST average temperature was 29.9 ° C.

  1. Coupling spin qubits via superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, Martin; Flensberg, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We show how superconductors can be used to couple, initialize, and read out spatially separated spin qubits. When two single-electron quantum dots are tunnel coupled to the same superconductor, the singlet component of the two-electron state partially leaks into the superconductor via crossed...... Andreev reflection. This induces a gate-controlled singlet-triplet splitting which, with an appropriate superconductor geometry, remains large for dot separations within the superconducting coherence length. Furthermore, we show that when two double-dot singlet-triplet qubits are tunnel coupled...... to a superconductor with finite charging energy, crossed Andreev reflection enables a strong two-qubit coupling over distances much larger than the coherence length....

  2. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is

  3. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound

  4. Spontaneous Hall effect in a chiral p-wave superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusaki, Akira; Matsumoto, Masashige; Sigrist, Manfred

    2001-08-01

    In a chiral superconductor with broken time-reversal symmetry a ``spontaneous Hall effect'' may be observed. We analyze this phenomenon by taking into account the surface properties of a chiral superconductor. We identify two main contributions to the spontaneous Hall effect. One contribution originates from the Bernoulli (or Lorentz) force due to spontaneous currents running along the surfaces of the superconductor. The other contribution has a topological origin and is related to the intrinsic angular momentum of Cooper pairs. The latter can be described in terms of a Chern-Simons-like term in the low-energy field theory of the superconductor and has some similarities with the quantum Hall effect. The spontaneous Hall effect in a chiral superconductor is, however, nonuniversal. Our analysis is based on three approaches to the problem: a self-consistent solution of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation, a generalized Ginzburg-Landau theory, and a hydrodynamic formulation. All three methods consistently lead to the same conclusion that the spontaneous Hall resistance of a two-dimensional superconducting Hall bar is of order h/(ekFλ)2, where kF is the Fermi wave vector and λ is the London penetration depth; the Hall resistance is substantially suppressed from a quantum unit of resistance. Experimental issues in measuring this effect are briefly discussed.

  5. Superconductors go organic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, John; Mielke, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Superconductors made from organic molecules are revealing fascinating new physics and could offer huge technological potential as well. Solid-state physicists are simple people. They believe that basic research is best carried out on chemically simple materials. Traditionally they have focused on inorganic elements, alloys, and other straightforward compounds. This approach has provided some notable successes. For example, any physicist over 35 will remember the huge fuss surrounding the discovery of high-temperature cuprate superconductors in 1986, which led to the infamous 'Woodstock of physics' meeting the following year. Just before the cuprates were discovered, however, an alternative view had begun to emerge. Physical chemists such as Klaus Bechgaard, Peter Day, Gunzi Saito, Viktor Schegolev and Jack Williams were suggesting that the 'simple-materials-are-best' assumption was misplaced. They argued that some of the most exciting studies in solid-state physics can - and should - be attempted on crystalline organic materials. Although chemically complex, such materials are beautifully simple in other ways, and they can, for example, provide much more information about basic phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism than supposedly simple materials. Physicists eventually embraced these materials with enthusiasm, and the number of papers on crystalline organic metals overtook those on the high-temperature cuprate superconductors three years ago. The gap has widened ever since, and the fact that God and a billion years of evolution have produced a processor based on three-dimensional arrays of molecules, rather than silicon or gallium-arsenide chips, is taken as a good omen by those working in the field. (U.K.)

  6. Magnetic Scaling in Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, I.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson superconductor in a magnetic field B is considered in the approximation that magnetic-field fluctuations are neglected. A formulation of perturbation theory is presented in which multiloop calculations fully retaining all Landau levels are tractable. A 2-loop calculation shows that, near the zero-field critical point, the singular part of the free energy scales as F sing ∼ |t| 2-α F(B|t| -2ν ), where ν is the coherence-length exponent emdash a result which has hitherto been assumed on purely dimensional grounds. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. High temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2010-01-01

    This essential reference provides the most comprehensive presentation of the state of the art in the field of high temperature superconductors. This growing field of research and applications is currently being supported by numerous governmental and industrial initiatives in the United States, Asia and Europe to overcome grid energy distribution issues. The technology is particularly intended for densely populated areas. It is now being commercialized for power-delivery devices, such as power transmission lines and cables, motors and generators. Applications in electric utilities include current limiters, long transmission lines and energy-storage devices that will help industries avoid dips in electric power.

  8. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  9. Photothermal measurements of high T/sub c/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanton, J.T.; Mitzi, D.B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Kino, G.S.; Gazit, D.; Feigelson, R.S.; Center for Materials Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4085)

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate a photothermal method for making point measurements of the thermal conductivities of high T/sub c/ superconductors. Images made at room temperature on polycrystalline materials show the thermal inhomogeneities. Measurements on single-crystal Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O/sub x/ compounds reveal a very large anisotropy of about 7:1 in the thermal conductivity

  10. Pinning and creep in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yu.N.

    1994-01-01

    All superconductors can be separated into two large groups: type I and type II. The behaviour of these two groups in a magnetic field is quite different. The superconductors of type I, in a strong magnetic field, enter the intermediate state. Phenomenological picture of this state was given by Landau. The type II superconductors, in strong magnetic fields, form the mixed state (or Shubnikov phase). The microscopic picture of the mixed state was given by Abrikosov on the basis of Ginzburg-Landau equations. In ideal homogeneous superconductors the free energy is not changed if all the vortex structure is shifted on some distance u. The transport current will be proportional, therefore, to the electric field E. All the real superconductors, however, are inhomogeneous. Inhomogeneities interact with vortex lattice and pin it. In this new state the transport current below some critical value does not lead to the motion of the flux lattice and to the energy dissipation. The value of critical current strongly depends on the type of inhomogeneities, on the value of magnetic field and on temperature. In new layered superconductors, the critical current depends also on the orientation of the magnetic field B with respect to the layer planes. Temperature and quantum fluctuations lead to the transition between different metastable states in superconductors with current. As a result, the vortex lattice slowly moves (creep phenomenon). Below we will briefly discuss all these phenomena. (orig.)

  11. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  12. Superconductor fluxoid logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronov, A.A.; Kurin, V.V.; Levichev, M.Yu.; Ryndyk, D.A.; Vostokov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in superconductor logical devices. Our paper is devoted to the analysis of some new possibilities in this field. The main problems here are: minimization of time of logical operations and reducing of device scale. Josephson systems are quite appropriate for this purpose because of small size, short characteristic time and also small energy losses. Two different types of Josephson logic have been investigated during last years. The first type is based on hysteretic V-A characteristic of a single Josephson junction. Superconducting and resistive (with nonzero voltage) states are considered as logical zero and logical unit. The second one - rapid single flux quantum logic, has been developed recently and is based on SQUID-like bistability. Different logical states are the states with different number of magnetic flux quanta inside closed superconducting contour. Information is represented by voltage pulses with fixed ''area'' (∫ V(t)/dt). This pulses are generated when logical state of SQUID-like elementary cell changes. The fundamental role of magnetic flux quantization in this type of logic leads to the necessity of large enough self-inductance of superconductor contour and thus to limitations on minimal device dimensions. (orig.)

  13. Theory of disordered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysokinski, K.I.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of disorder on the superconducting transition temperature is discussed. The main steps on the way to complete theory of disordered superconductors follows the steps in the authors' understanding of disorder and its effect on the quasiparticles in metals. Loosely speaking one can distinguish three such steps. First is the study of weakly disordered systems and this resulted in famous, celebrated Anderson theorem. The second step is ultimately connected with the coherent potential approximation as a method to study the spectrum and transport in concentrated alloys. The discovery of the role of usually neglected interferences between scattered waves in disordered conductors leading to decrease in mobility and increase of the mutual interactions between quantum particles, known as localization and interaction effects has given the new impetus to the theory of superconductivity. This is third step to be discussed in this lecture. The authors limit themselves to homogeneous bulk superconductors. In this paper some experiments on thin films as well as on copper oxides related to the presented theory are briefly mentioned

  14. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  15. Ac losses of transposed superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, D.; Enderlein, G.; Lange, F.

    1975-01-01

    Eastham and Rhodes published results of loss measurements on transposed superconducting NbTi cables and concluded basing on an extrapolation to very large numbers of wires that transposed superconductors could be used favorably in cables for power transmission. There are some reasons to question the correctness of their extrapolation. Losses were calculated for transposed superconductors in self field and got results different from those of Eastham and Rhodes. Loss measurements were performed the results of which give evidence for the correctness of our calculations. The results lead to the conclusion that the use of transposed cables of irreversible type 2 superconductors for power transmission is not advantageous

  16. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease from ECG-triggered MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, M.W.; Laschinger, J.; Knapp, R.H.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Gronnemeyer, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional surface reconstruction images of the heart and great vessels were produced from contiguous sequences of electrocardiographically triggered MR images in 25 patients with congenital heart disease and in three healthy subjects. The imaging data were semiautomatically processed to separate the epicardial and endocardial surfaces and to define the outline of the enclosed blood volumes on a section by section basis. Images were obtained at 5-mm intervals in patients aged 3 months to 30 years with anomalies of the great vessels, tetralogy of Fallot, septal defects, pulmonary atresia, and other congenital heart malformations. The results were used to facilitate the surgical treatment of these patients and were compared with echocardiographic and cineradiographic studies, and with surgical findings or pathologic specimens. These surface reconstruction images were useful for communicating the results of diagnostic examinations to cardiac surgeons, for sizing and location of intracardiac defects, for imaging the pulmonary venous drainage, and for assessing regional and global function

  17. Quasiparticle current in superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tartakovskij, A.V.; Fistul', M.V.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the quasiparticle current in a superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor junction may significantly increase as a result of resonant passage of the quasiparticle along particular trajectories from periodically situated localized centers. A prediction of the theory is that with increasing junction resistance there should be a change from an excessive current to a insufficient current on the current-voltage characteristics (at high voltages). The effect of transparency of the boundaries on resonance tunneling in such junctions is also investigated

  18. Direct UV/Optical Imaging of Stellar Surfaces: The Stellar Imager (SI) Vision Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; Schrijver, Carolus; Karovska, Margarita; Mozurkewich, David

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/optical, space-based interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living with a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in thc Universe. SI is a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap. We discuss herein the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technologies needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  19. Anisotropy effects in superconductors with magnetic impurities. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entel, P.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of Fermi surface anisotropy on the specific heat jumps, ΔC, at the phase transition for superconductors containing magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities is discussed. In the framework of a simple two-band or two-zone model we find for small interband electron-phonon coupling constants characteristic maxima in the ΔC(Tsub(c))-curve. These departures from the corresponding ΔC-curve of a single-band isotropic superconductor are mostly pronounced for weak and strong interband Coulomb scattering of conduction electrons on nonmagnetic ions. There is only a small range of intermediate scattering rates for which the maxima are smeared out. (orig.) [de

  20. Structural classification and a binary structure model for superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Based on structural and bonding features, a new classification scheme of superconductors is proposed to classify conductors can be partitioned into two parts, a superconducting active component and a supplementary component.Partially metallic covalent bonding is found to be a common feature in all superconducting active components, and the electron states of the atoms in the active components usually make a dominant contribution to the energy band near the Fermi surface. Possible directions to explore new superconductors are discussed based on the structural classification and the binary structure model.

  1. Survey of potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, R.B.; Bourne, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors present a survey of the potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductor (HTSC) thin films. During the past four years there has been substantial speculation on this topic. The authors will cover only a small fraction of the potential electronic applications that have been identified. Their treatment is influenced by the developments over the past few years in materials and device development and in market analysis. They present their view of the most promising potential applications. Superconductors have two important properties that make them attractive for electronic applications. These are (a) low surface resistance at high frequencies, and (b) the Josephson effect

  2. Magnetic field penetration into superconductors with sharp edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhilichev, Yuriy N.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic field and surface currents induced within a superconductor are calculated assuming the field penetrates in it near sharp corners. Rounding the corners is used to keep the field less than a critical value. Analytical formulas for a corner radius are given for a wire of the rectangular cross-section and a cylinder in the external magnetic field. A boundary integral method is used to calculate the boundary of the Meissner domain when the external field penetrates deep into the superconductor. The effect of degree of penetration on the magnetic moment of superconducting cylinders and wires is discussed

  3. Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunctions from perovskite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Štrbík, V.; Beňačka, Š.; Gaži, Š.; Španková, M.; Šmatko, V.; Knoška, J.; Gál, N.; Chromik, Š.; Sojková, M.; Pisarčík, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunction. • Nanojunctions prepared by Ga"3"+ focused ion beam patterning. • Indication of triplet Cooper pair component in junction superconducting current. • Qualitative agreement with theoretical model. - Abstract: The lateral superconductor-ferromagnet–superconductor (SFS) nanojunctions based on high critical temperature superconductor YBa_2Cu_3O_x (YBCO) and half-metallic ferromagnet La_0_._6_7Sr_0_._3_3MnO_3 (LSMO) thin films were prepared to investigate a possible presence of long range triplet component (LRTC) of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. We applied Ga"3"+ focused ion beam patterning to create YBCO/LSMO/YBCO lateral type nanojunctions with LSMO length as small as 40 nm. The resistivity vs. temperature, critical current density vs. temperature and resistance vs. magnetic field dependence were studied to recognize the LRTC of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. A non-monotonic temperature dependence of junction critical current density and a decrease of the SFS nanojunction resistance in increased magnetic field were observed. Only weak manifestations of LRTC and some qualitative agreement with theory were found out in SFS nanojunctions realized from the perovskite materials. The presence of equal-spin triplet component of Cooper pairs in half-metallic LSMO ferromagnet is not such apparent as in SFS junctions prepared from low temperature superconductors NbTiN and half-metallic ferromagnet CrO_2.

  4. Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunctions from perovskite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Štrbík, V., E-mail: vladimir.strbik@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská Cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Beňačka, Š.; Gaži, Š.; Španková, M.; Šmatko, V. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská Cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Knoška, J. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22607, Hamburg (Germany); Gál, N.; Chromik, Š.; Sojková, M.; Pisarčík, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská Cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor nanojunction. • Nanojunctions prepared by Ga{sup 3+} focused ion beam patterning. • Indication of triplet Cooper pair component in junction superconducting current. • Qualitative agreement with theoretical model. - Abstract: The lateral superconductor-ferromagnet–superconductor (SFS) nanojunctions based on high critical temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) and half-metallic ferromagnet La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) thin films were prepared to investigate a possible presence of long range triplet component (LRTC) of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. We applied Ga{sup 3+} focused ion beam patterning to create YBCO/LSMO/YBCO lateral type nanojunctions with LSMO length as small as 40 nm. The resistivity vs. temperature, critical current density vs. temperature and resistance vs. magnetic field dependence were studied to recognize the LRTC of Cooper pairs in the LSMO. A non-monotonic temperature dependence of junction critical current density and a decrease of the SFS nanojunction resistance in increased magnetic field were observed. Only weak manifestations of LRTC and some qualitative agreement with theory were found out in SFS nanojunctions realized from the perovskite materials. The presence of equal-spin triplet component of Cooper pairs in half-metallic LSMO ferromagnet is not such apparent as in SFS junctions prepared from low temperature superconductors NbTiN and half-metallic ferromagnet CrO{sub 2}.

  5. Visualization of brain surface structures by weighted summation technique using multislice MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Yoshio; Hatanaka, Masahiko; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tadatoki; Katada, Kazuhiro.

    1991-01-01

    Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) technique which visualizes brain surface structures has been developed since 1987. In this paper, we propose a modified method called 'multislice SAS', which also generates such surface structure images, and has several advantages compared with conventional SAS technique. The conventional SAS technique uses a very long echo time sequence (e.g. SE(3000, 250)) with a thick slice and a surface coil to enhance CSF on the brain surface. Our modified technique also uses a long echo time sequence. But, added multislice images, each appropriately weighted, are used in stead of a thick slice and a surface coil. Our basic studies have shown that this modified method has the following advantage: Several surface images with slightly different summation directions are obtained, and they are used for stereographic display and cine display. This is very useful for visualizing the spatial relationship of brain surface structures. By choosing appropriate weighting, we can obtain clinically legible surface images. This technique dose not require a surface coil. It means that flexibility of selecting imaging direction is high. We can make a lot of modifications, because the original multislice images of weighted summation are arbitrary. And we also clarify some limitation or disadvantage of this modified method. In conclusion, we think that this technique is one of the practical approaches for surface anatomy imaging. (author)

  6. Josephson effect in point contacts between 'f-wave' superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoodi, R.; Shevchenko, S.N.; Kolesnichenko, Yu.A

    2002-01-01

    A stationary Josephson effect in point contacts between triplet superconductors is analyzed theoretically for most probable models of the order parameter in UPt 3 and Sr 2 RuO 4 . The consequence of misorientation of crystals in the superconducting banks on this effect is considered. We show that different models for the order parameter lead to quit different current-phase relations. For certain angles of misorientation a boundary between superconductors can generate a spontaneous current parallel to the surface. In a number of cases the state with a zero Josephson current and minimum of the free energy corresponds to a spontaneous phase difference. This phase difference depends on the misorientation angle and may possess any value. We conclude that experimental investigations of the current-phase relations of small junctions can be used for determination of the order parameter symmetry in the superconductors mentioned above

  7. Atomic hydrogen effects on high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantskevich, N.V.; Ulyashin, A.G.; Alifanov, A.V.; Stepanenko, A.V.; Fedotova, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic hydrogen effects on the properties of bulk high-temperature superconductors were investigated. It is shown that the insertion of the atomic hydrogen into the bulk of these materials from a DC plasma leads to the increase of the critical current density J c for YBaCuO(123) as well as for BiSrCaCuO(2223) high-temperature superconductors. It is found that the hydrogenation of the He implanted samples with following annealing leads to the optically detected blistering on the surface. It means that the textured thin subsurface layers of high-temperature superconductors can be formed by this method. The improvement of superconductivity by atomic hydrogen can be explained by the passivation of dangling bonds and defects on grain boundaries of these materials

  8. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    observed in high-resolution images of metallic nanocrystallites may be effectively deconvoluted, as to resolve more details of the crystalline morphology (see figure). Images of surface-crystalline metals indicate that more than a single atomic layer is involved in mediating the tunneling current......Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...... to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped...

  9. Magnetic excitations in iron chalcogenide superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Fujita, Masaki

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering experiments in iron chalcogenide superconductors are reviewed to make a survey of the magnetic excitations in FeSe, FeSe 1- x Te x and alkali-metal-doped A x Fe 2- y Se 2 ( A = K, Rb, Cs, etc). In FeSe, the intimate relationship between the spin fluctuations and superconductivity can be seen universally for the variations in the off-stoichiometry, the Co-substitution and applied pressure. The isovalent compound FeTe has a magnetic ordering with different wave vector from that of other Fe-based magnetic materials. The transition temperature T c of FeSe increases with Te substitution in FeSe 1- x Te x with small x , and decreases in the vicinity of the end member FeTe. The spin fluctuations are drastically modified by the Te substitution. In the vicinity of the end member FeTe, the low-energy part of the spin fluctuation is dominated by the wave vector of the ordered phase of FeTe; however, the reduction of T c shows that it does not support superconductivity. The presence of same wave vector as that of other Fe-based superconductors in FeSe 1- x Te x and the observation of the resonance mode demonstrate that FeSe 1- x Te x belongs to the same group as most of other Fe-based superconductors in the entire range of x , where superconductivity is mediated by the spin fluctuations whose wave vector is the same as the nesting vector between the hole pockets and the electron pockets. On the other hand, the spin fluctuations differ for alkali-metal-doped A x Fe 2- y Se 2 and FeSe or other Fe-based superconductors in their wave vector and strength in the low-energy part, most likely because of the different Fermi surfaces. The resonance mode with different wave vector suggests that A x Fe 2- y Se 2 has an exceptional superconducting symmetry among Fe-based superconductors.

  10. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  11. Kinetic equations in dirty superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic equations for superconductors in the dirty limit are derived using a method developed for superfluid systems, which allows a systematic expansion in small parameters; exact charge conservation is obeyed. (orig.)

  12. Hierarchical clustering of RGB surface water images based on MIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-25

    Nov 25, 2009 ... similar water-related images within a testing database of 126 RGB images. .... consequently treated by SVD-based PCA and the PCA outputs partitioned into .... green. Other colours, mostly brown and grey, dominate in.

  13. Bone surface enhancement in ultrasound images using a new Doppler-based acquisition/processing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Tang, Songyuan; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging has long been considered as a potential aid in orthopedic surgeries. US technologies are safe, portable and do not use radiations. This would make them a desirable tool for real-time assessment of fractures and to monitor fracture healing. However, image quality of US imaging methods in bone applications is limited by speckle, attenuation, shadow, multiple reflections and other imaging artifacts. While bone surfaces typically appear in US images as somewhat ‘brighter’ than soft tissue, they are often not easily distinguishable from the surrounding tissue. Therefore, US imaging methods aimed at segmenting bone surfaces need enhancement in image contrast prior to segmentation to improve the quality of the detected bone surface. In this paper, we present a novel acquisition/processing technique for bone surface enhancement in US images. Inspired by elastography and Doppler imaging methods, this technique takes advantage of the difference between the mechanical and acoustic properties of bones and those of soft tissues to make the bone surface more easily distinguishable in US images. The objective of this technique is to facilitate US-based bone segmentation methods and improve the accuracy of their outcomes. The newly proposed technique is tested both in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these preliminary experiments suggest that the use of the proposed technique has the potential to significantly enhance the detectability of bone surfaces in noisy ultrasound images.

  14. Bone surface enhancement in ultrasound images using a new Doppler-based acquisition/processing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Tang, Songyuan; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-17

    Ultrasound (US) imaging has long been considered as a potential aid in orthopedic surgeries. US technologies are safe, portable and do not use radiations. This would make them a desirable tool for real-time assessment of fractures and to monitor fracture healing. However, image quality of US imaging methods in bone applications is limited by speckle, attenuation, shadow, multiple reflections and other imaging artifacts. While bone surfaces typically appear in US images as somewhat 'brighter' than soft tissue, they are often not easily distinguishable from the surrounding tissue. Therefore, US imaging methods aimed at segmenting bone surfaces need enhancement in image contrast prior to segmentation to improve the quality of the detected bone surface. In this paper, we present a novel acquisition/processing technique for bone surface enhancement in US images. Inspired by elastography and Doppler imaging methods, this technique takes advantage of the difference between the mechanical and acoustic properties of bones and those of soft tissues to make the bone surface more easily distinguishable in US images. The objective of this technique is to facilitate US-based bone segmentation methods and improve the accuracy of their outcomes. The newly proposed technique is tested both in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these preliminary experiments suggest that the use of the proposed technique has the potential to significantly enhance the detectability of bone surfaces in noisy ultrasound images.

  15. Polymeric conductors and superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    The production of electrically conductive polymers which are flexible ans capable of being shaped by normal processes, is discussed. The relation between the structure of the polymer and its ability to transport electric charge is considered. The main problem is to combine high conductivity with good processability and it is shown that stacked-planar systems are superior to conjugated polymers. Good mechanical properties have yet to be achieved. In some way the rigid pi-bonded systems must be combined with a conventional sigma-bonded polymer without destroying its flexibility and tensile properties. The structure will contain a radical ion system to provide charge carriers but it is not yet known how to design the polymer structure to give high carrier mobility. Further work is required on organic superconductors in unravelling the relationship between charge carrier mobility and the supermolecular structure of polymers. (UK)

  16. Superconductor digital electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likharev, Konstantin K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of these notes is to offer a brief review of the history of superconductor digital electronics, and discuss prospects of its future development. Due to length restrictions, many important technical contributions could not be mentioned at all - with sincere apologies to their authors. Though an attempt has been made to give an unbiased review of the most important work all over the world, a special emphasis on the efforts in the former Soviet Union, which had not been discussed much in literature, and in which the author of this text took an active part, seemed excusable. Another important qualification is that the author phased out his own research in the field about 10 years ago, so that the last parts of the notes, devoted to present-time and future work, should be viewed as not much more than remarks by an (interested) outsider.

  17. Manufacturing of Superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Bay, Niels

    Superconducting tapes based on the ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTS) is a new promising product for high current applications such as electro-magnets and current transmission cables. The tapes are made by the oxide powder in tube (OPIT) method implying drawing and rolling of silver...... tubes containing ceramic powder. The final product is a composite tape, where ceramic superconducting fibres are embedded in a silver matrix. The critical current density Je [kA/cm 2 ] is the primary quality parameter of the product. The quality of the superconducting tape depends very much...... in the individual fibres. · The stresses and strains in the deformation zone are analysed. It is concluded that more detailed mechanical tests and a more detailed constitutive plasticity model is desirable in order to improve the precision of the numerical modelling. New test equipment is designed implying the new...

  18. Surface stress mediated image force and torque on an edge dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, R. M.; Divya, Iyer, Ganesh; Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2018-07-01

    The proximity of interfaces gives prominence to image forces experienced by dislocations. The presence of surface stress alters the traction-free boundary conditions existing on free-surfaces and hence is expected to alter the magnitude of the image force. In the current work, using a combined simulation of surface stress and an edge dislocation in a semi-infinite body, we evaluate the configurational effects on the system. We demonstrate that if the extra half-plane of the edge dislocation is parallel to the surface, the image force (glide) is not altered due to surface stress; however, the dislocation experiences a torque. The surface stress breaks the 'climb image force' symmetry, thus leading to non-equivalence between positive and negative climb. We discover an equilibrium position for the edge dislocation in the positive 'climb geometry', arising due to a competition between the interaction of the dislocation stress fields with the surface stress and the image dislocation. Torque in the climb configuration is not affected by surface stress (remains zero). Surface stress is computed using a recently developed two-scale model based on Shuttleworth's idea and image forces using a finite element model developed earlier. The effect of surface stress on the image force and torque experienced by the dislocation monopole is analysed using illustrative 3D models.

  19. High temperature superconductor current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimetz, B.; Liu, H.K.; Dou, S.X.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The use of superconductors in high electrical current applications (magnets, transformers, generators etc.) usually requires cooling with liquid Helium, which is very expensive. The superconductor itself produces no heat, and the design of Helium dewars is very advanced. Therefore most of the heat loss, i.e. Helium consumption, comes from the current lead which connects the superconductor with its power source at room temperature. The current lead usually consists of a pair of thick copper wires. The discovery of the High Temperature Superconductors makes it possible to replace a part of the copper with superconducting material. This drastically reduces the heat losses because a) the superconductor generates no resistive heat and b) it is a very poor thermal conductor compared with the copper. In this work silver-sheathed superconducting tapes are used as current lead components. The work comprises both the production of the tapes and the overall design of the leads, in order to a) maximize the current capacity ('critical current') of the superconductor, b) minimize the thermal conductivity of the silver clad, and c) optimize the cooling conditions

  20. Surface structure of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+delta) high-temperature superconductors studied using low-energy electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, P. A. P.; Shen, Z.-X.; Wells, B. O.; Mitzi, D. B.; Lindau, I.

    1988-12-01

    The surface structure of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+delta) has been studied using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Sharp diffraction spots indicative of a well-ordered surface are observed. The LEED patterns unequivocally show that this type of material preferentially cleaves along the a-b planes of the nearly tetragonal unit cell. A superstructure extending along one of the axes in the a-b plane (b) is found to have a periodicity of 27 + or - 0.5 A, in good agreement with earlier studies of the three-dimensional crystal structure. The superstructure at the surface is nonlocal in character and reflects the long-range superlattice of the bulk along the b axis. Intensity modulations of the diffraction spots oriented along the b axis are also reported and discussed in terms of the cell dimension of the unit cell along the b axis.

  1. Surface structure of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O/sub 8+//sub δ high-temperature superconductors studied using low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, P.A.P.; Shen, Z.; Wells, B.O.; Mitzi, D.B.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1988-01-01

    The surface structure of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O/sub 8+//sub δ has been studied using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Sharp diffraction spots indicative of a well-ordered surface are observed. The LEED patterns unequivocally show that this type of material preferentially cleaves along the a-b planes of the nearly tetragonal unit cell. A superstructure extending along one of the axes in the a-b plane (b) is found to have a periodicity of 27 +- 0.5 A, in good agreement with earlier studies of the three-dimensional crystal structure. We conclude that the superstructure at the surface is nonlocal in character and reflects the long-range superlattice of the bulk along the b axis. Intensity modulations of the diffraction spots oriented along the b axis are also reported and discussed in terms of the cell dimension of the unit cell along the b axis

  2. Technical validation of the Di3D stereophotogrammetry surface imaging system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winder, R.J.; Darvann, Tron Andre; McKnight, W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the technical performance of a three-dimensional surface imaging system for geometric accuracy and maximum field of view. The system was designed for stereophotogrammetry capture of digital images from three-dimensional surfaces of the head, face, and neck...

  3. High-temperature superconductors make major progress

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    This month's Nature Materials featured an important breakthrough for high-temperature superconductors. A new method has been found for processing Bi-2212 high-temperature superconducting round wire in order to drastically increase its critical current density. The result confirms that this conductor is a serious candidate for future very-high-field magnets.   This image shows the cross-section of two Bi-2212 wires. The bottom wire has less leakage and void porosity due to a heat treatment done at an overpressure of 100 bar - about 100 times the pressure used to produce the top wire (image from [Nature Materials, Vol. 13 (2014), 10.1038/nmat3887]). The workhorse for building superconducting accelerator magnets has been, so far, the Niobium-Titanium (Nb-Ti) alloy superconductor. But with Nb-Ti having reached its full potential, other conductors must be used to operate in higher magnetic fields beyond those reached with the LHC magnets. Today, the intermetallic Niobium-Tin (Nb3Sn) is th...

  4. Adaptive fringe-pattern projection for image saturation avoidance in 3D surface-shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Kofman, Jonathan

    2014-04-21

    In fringe-projection 3D surface-shape measurement, image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured images of fringe patterns, leading to phase and measurement errors. An adaptive fringe-pattern projection (AFPP) method was developed to adapt the maximum input gray level in projected fringe patterns to the local reflectivity of an object surface being measured. The AFPP method demonstrated improved 3D measurement accuracy by avoiding image saturation in highly-reflective surface regions while maintaining high intensity modulation across the entire surface. The AFPP method can avoid image saturation and handle varying surface reflectivity, using only two prior rounds of fringe-pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns.

  5. Distinction of heterogeneity on Au nanostructured surface based on phase contrast imaging of atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Mi; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2010-01-01

    The discrimination of the heterogeneity of different materials on nanostructured surfaces has attracted a great deal of interest in biotechnology as well as nanotechnology. Phase imaging through tapping mode of atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) can be used to distinguish the heterogeneity on a nanostructured surface. Nanostructures were fabricated using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO). An 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA) layer adsorbed onto the Au nanodots through self-assembly to improve the bio-compatibility. The Au nanostructures that were modified with 11-MUA and the concave surfaces were investigated using the TMAFM phase images to compare the heterogeneous and homogeneous nanostructured surfaces. Although the topography and phase images were taken simultaneously, the images were different. Therefore, the contrast in the TMAFM phase images revealed the different compositional materials on the heterogeneous nanostructure surface.

  6. Surface Distresses Detection of Pavement Based on Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang , Aiguo; Luo , Chagen; Zhou , Chao

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Pavement crack is the main form of early diseases of pavement. The use of digital photography to record pavement images and subsequent crack detection and classification has undergone continuous improvements over the past decade. Digital image processing has been applied to detect the pavement crack for its advantages of large amount of information and automatic detection. The applications of digital image processing in pavement crack detection, distresses classificati...

  7. Multispectral UV imaging for surface analysis of MUPS tablets with special focus on the pellet distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikova, Anna; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Rades, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the present study the applicability of multispectral UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis for surface evaluation of MUPS tablets was investigated with respect to the differentiation of the API pellets from the excipients matrix, estimation of the drug content as well as p...... image analysis is a promising approach for the automatic quality control of MUPS tablets during the manufacturing process....

  8. Downscaling of Aircraft, Landsat, and MODIS-bases Land Surface Temperature Images with Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) images are required to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) at a field scale for irrigation scheduling purposes. Satellite sensors such as Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) can offer images at s...

  9. Anisotropy of the Seebeck Coefficient in the Cuprate Superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y}: Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Bidirectional Charge Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cyr-Choinière

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y} is measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, at hole dopings p=0.11 and p=0.12, for heat currents along the a and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal structure. For both directions, S/T decreases and becomes negative at low temperature, a signature that the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction due to broken translational symmetry. Above a clear threshold field, a strong new feature appears in S_{b}, for conduction along the b axis only. We attribute this feature to the onset of 3D-coherent unidirectional charge-density-wave modulations seen by x-ray diffraction, also along the b axis only. Because these modulations have a sharp onset temperature well below the temperature where S/T starts to drop towards negative values, we infer that they are not the cause of Fermi-surface reconstruction. Instead, the reconstruction must be caused by the quasi-2D bidirectional modulations that develop at significantly higher temperature. The unidirectional order only confers an additional anisotropy to the already reconstructed Fermi surface, also manifest as an in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity.

  10. Robust surface registration using salient anatomical features for image-guided liver surgery: Algorithm and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Clements, Logan W.; Chapman, William C.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    A successful surface-based image-to-physical space registration in image-guided liver surgery (IGLS) is critical to provide reliable guidance information to surgeons and pertinent surface displacement data for use in deformation correction algorithms. The current protocol used to perform the image-to-physical space registration involves an initial pose estimation provided by a point based registration of anatomical landmarks identifiable in both the preoperative tomograms and the intraoperati...

  11. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainslie, M D; Fujishiro, H

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB 2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet–superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed. (topical review)

  12. The Application of Three-Dimensional Surface Imaging System in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqi; Yang, Xin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system has gained popularity worldwide in clinical application. Unlike computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, it has the ability to capture 3D images with both shape and texture information. This feature has made it quite useful for plastic surgeons. This review article is mainly focusing on demonstrating the current status and analyzing the future of the application of 3D surface imaging systems in plastic and reconstructive surgery.Currently, 3D surface imaging system is mainly used in plastic and reconstructive surgery to help improve the reliability of surgical planning and assessing surgical outcome objectively. There have already been reports of its using on plastic and reconstructive surgery from head to toe. Studies on facial aging process, online applications development, and so on, have also been done through the use of 3D surface imaging system.Because different types of 3D surface imaging devices have their own advantages and disadvantages, a basic knowledge of their features is required and careful thought should be taken to choose the one that best fits a surgeon's demand.In the future, by integrating with other imaging tools and the 3D printing technology, 3D surface imaging system will play an important role in individualized surgical planning, implants production, meticulous surgical simulation, operative techniques training, and patient education.

  13. Surface Explorations : 3D Moving Images as Cartographies of Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, N.

    2016-01-01

    Moving images of travel and exploration have a long history. In this essay I will examine how the trope of navigation in 3D moving images can work towards an intimate and haptic encounter with other times and other places – elsewhen and elsewhere. The particular navigational construction of space in

  14. Voltage current characteristics of type III superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofejev, G. L.; Imenitov, A. B.; Klimenko, E. Yu.

    1980-06-01

    An adequate description of voltage-current characteristics is important in order to understand the nature of high critical current for the electrodynamic construction of type-III superconductors and for commercial superconductor specification. Homogenious monofilament and multifilament Nb-Ti, Nb-Zr, Nb 3Sn wires were investigated in different ranges of magnetic field, temperature and current. The longitudinal electric field for homogenious wires may be described by E=J ρnexp- T c/T 0+ T/T 0+ B/B 0+ J/J 0, where To, Bo, Jo are the increasing parameters, which depend weakly on B and T, of the electric field. The shape of the voltage-current characteristics of multifilament wires, and the parameter's dependence on temperature and magnetic field may be explained qualitatively by the longitudinal heterogeneous nature of the filaments. A method of attaining the complete specification of the wire's electro-physical properties is proposed. It includes the traditional description of a critical surface (ie the surface corresponding to a certain conventional effective resistivity in T, B, J - space) and a description of any increasing parameter that depends on B and T.

  15. Temperature measurement of RE123 bulk superconductors on magnetizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kaneyama, M.; Oka, T.; Fujishiro, H.; Noto, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study on the magnetization behavior of to magnetize RE123 bulk superconductors to apply it as strong magnets. Through magnetizing process, the temperature of bulk superconductors is raised by pinning loss caused by the magnetic fluxes motion (e.g. flux jump of flux flow), and the trapped field is decreased. This paper presents the measurement of temperature changes of Sm123 bulk superconductors during the exciting process by iteratively magnetizing pulsed-field operation with reducing amplitudes (IMRA) method. Five thermocouples are put on the surface of Sm123 bulk superconductor of 46 mm in diameter. The temperatures at the center, on the growth sector boundary (GSB) line and in the sector region surrounded by GSB's line (inter-GSB region) are monitored. The temperature at a cold stage is also measured. A Hall sensor is attached near the center thermocouple to measure the trapped field. After a bulk superconductor is cooled by the GM type refrigerator until 40 K, iterative pulsed-fields of 2.32-5.42 T are applied by a magnetizing coil. When high magnetic field of 5.42 T is applied, a temperature of bulk superconductor reaches to 72.4 K and the magnetic field distribution has C form with which a part of circle is dented, and then, a trapped field is 2.28 T. When a lower magnetic field of 4.64 T is applied, a maximum temperature is 68.3 K and a trapped field is raised to 2.70 T, and moreover, the distribution becomes round shape like field-cooling method (FC). We showed clearly that heat generation by pinning loss was related to the mechanism of magnetic field capture

  16. Pendent_Drop: An ImageJ Plugin to Measure the Surface Tension from an Image of a Pendent Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Daerr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pendent drop method for surface tension measurement consists in analysing the shape of an axisymmetric drop hanging from a capillary tube. This software is an add-on for the public domain image processing software ImageJ which matches a theoretical profile to the contour of a pendent drop, either interactively or by automatically minimising the mismatch. It provides an estimate of the surface tension, drop volume and surface area from the best matching parameters. It can be used in a headless setup. It is hosted on http://fiji.sc/List_of_update_sites with the source code on https://github.com/adaerr/pendent-drop

  17. A trial fabrication of activity standard surface sources and positional standard surface sources for an imaging plate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Mikio

    2003-01-01

    An imaging plate system can detect low level activity, but quantitative analysis is difficult because there are no adequate standard surface sources. A new fabrication method was developed for standard surface sources by printing on a sheet of paper using an ink-jet printer with inks in which a radioactive material was mixed. The fabricated standard surface sources had high uniformity, high positional resolution arbitrary shapes and a broad intensity range. The standard sources were used for measurement of surface activity as an application. (H. Yokoo)

  18. Ferromagnet / superconductor oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    The growth of heterostructures combining oxide materials is a new strategy to design novel artificial multifunctional materials with interesting behaviors ruled by the interface. With the (re)discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, there has been renewed interest in heterostructures involving oxide superconductors and CMR ferromagnets where ferromagnetism (F) and superconductivity (S) compete within nanometric distances from the interface. In F/S/F structures involving oxides, interfaces are especially complex and various factors like interface disorder and roughness, epitaxial strain, polarity mismatch etc., are responsible for depressed magnetic and superconducting properties at the interface over nanometer length scales. In this talk I will focus in F/S/F structures made of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO). The high degree of spin polarization of the LCMO conduction band, together with the d-wave superconductivity of the YBCO make this F/S system an adequate candidate for the search of novel spin dependent effects in transport. We show that superconductivity at the interface is depressed by various factors like charge transfer, spin injection or ferromagnetic superconducting proximity effect. I will present experiments to examine the characteristic distances of the various mechanisms of superconductivity depression. In particular, I will discuss that the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the F layers, giving rise to a new giant magnetoresistance effect which might be of interest for spintronic applications. Work done in collaboration with V. Peña^1, Z. Sefrioui^1, J. Garcia-Barriocanal^1, C. Visani^1, D. Arias^1, C. Leon^1 , N. Nemes^2, M. Garcia Hernandez^2, S. G. E. te Velthuis^3, A. Hoffmann^3, M. Varela^4, S. J. Pennycook^4. Work supported by MCYT MAT 2005-06024, CAM GR- MAT-0771/2004, UCM PR3/04-12399 Work at Argonne supported by the Department of Energy, Basic

  19. Measuring stone surface area from a radiographic image is accurate and reproducible with the help of an imaging program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Abraham; Ganpule, Arvind; Muthu, V; Sabnis, R B; Desai, Mahesh

    2009-01-01

    The surface area of the stone from a radiographic image is one of the more suitable parameters defining stone bulk. The widely accepted method of measuring stone surface area is to count the number of square millimeters enclosed within a tracing of the stone outline on graph paper. This method is time consuming and cumbersome with potential for human error, especially when multiple measurements are needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and reproducibility of a commercially available imaging program, Adobe Photoshop 7.0 for the measurement of stone surface area. The instructions to calculate area using the software are simple and easy in a Windows-based format. The accuracy of the imaging software was estimated by measuring surface areas of shapes of known mathematical areas. The efficiency and reproducibility were then evaluated from radiographs of 20 persons with radiopaque upper-tract urinary stones. The surface areas of stone images were measured using both graph paper and imaging software. Measurements were repeated after 10 days to assess the reproducibility of the techniques. The time taken to measure the area by the two methods was also assessed separately. The accuracy of the imaging software was estimated to be 98.7%. The correlation coefficient between the two methods was R(2) = 0.97. The mean percentage variation using the imaging software was 0.68%, while it was 6.36% with the graph paper. The mean time taken to measure using the image analyzer and graph paper was 1.9 +/- 0.8 minutes and 4.5 +/- 1.08 minutes, respectively (P stone surface area from radiographs compared with manual measurements using graph paper.

  20. Surface regions of illusory images are detected with a slower processing speed than those of luminance-defined images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Milena; Manahilov, Velitchko

    2010-11-24

    Research has shown that the processing time for discriminating illusory contours is longer than for real contours. We know, however, little whether the visual processes, associated with detecting regions of illusory surfaces, are also slower as those responsible for detecting luminance-defined images. Using a speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) procedure, we measured accuracy as a function of processing time for detecting illusory Kanizsa-type and luminance-defined squares embedded in 2D static luminance noise. The data revealed that the illusory images were detected at slower processing speed than the real images, while the points in time, when accuracy departed from chance, were not significantly different for both stimuli. The classification images for detecting illusory and real squares showed that observers employed similar detection strategies using surface regions of the real and illusory squares. The lack of significant differences between the x-intercepts of the SAT functions for illusory and luminance-modulated stimuli suggests that the detection of surface regions of both images could be based on activation of a single mechanism (the dorsal magnocellular visual pathway). The slower speed for detecting illusory images as compared to luminance-defined images could be attributed to slower processes of filling-in of regions of illusory images within the dorsal pathway.

  1. Three-dimensional Majorana fermions in chiral superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozii, Vladyslav; Venderbos, Jörn W F; Fu, Liang

    2016-12-01

    Using a systematic symmetry and topology analysis, we establish that three-dimensional chiral superconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling and odd-parity pairing generically host low-energy nodal quasiparticles that are spin-nondegenerate and realize Majorana fermions in three dimensions. By examining all types of chiral Cooper pairs with total angular momentum J formed by Bloch electrons with angular momentum j in crystals, we obtain a comprehensive classification of gapless Majorana quasiparticles in terms of energy-momentum relation and location on the Fermi surface. We show that the existence of bulk Majorana fermions in the vicinity of spin-selective point nodes is rooted in the nonunitary nature of chiral pairing in spin-orbit-coupled superconductors. We address experimental signatures of Majorana fermions and find that the nuclear magnetic resonance spin relaxation rate is significantly suppressed for nuclear spins polarized along the nodal direction as a consequence of the spin-selective Majorana nature of nodal quasiparticles. Furthermore, Majorana nodes in the bulk have nontrivial topology and imply the presence of Majorana bound states on the surface, which form arcs in momentum space. We conclude by proposing the heavy fermion superconductor PrOs 4 Sb 12 and related materials as promising candidates for nonunitary chiral superconductors hosting three-dimensional Majorana fermions.

  2. Superconductors: The long road ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foner, S.; Orlando, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Before the discovery of high-temperature superconductors, progress in superconductivity was measured by quite small increases in critical temperature, often of less than one degree. Today, there is no reason to believe that the dramatic leaps in critical temperature inaugurated by superconducting ceramics are over. Researchers may find new high-temperature superconducting materials with less severe technical limitations than the ceramics we know today. And if the day ever comes when a superconductor can be reliably manufactured to operate effectively at room temperature, then superconductors will be incorporated in a broad range of everyday household devices - motors, appliances, even children's toys - with a large consumer market. High-temperature superconductors may also cause us to extensively revise our traditional theories about how superconductivity works. Should it run out that superconductivity in ceramics involves new physical mechanisms, then these mechanisms could lead to applications never considered before. The recent discoveries have already reinvigorated superconductivity research. What was once largely the domain of a relatively small group of scientists has become a genuinely multidisciplinary realm. Now physicists, materials scientists, chemists, metallurgists, ceramists, and solid-state electronics engineers are all focusing on superconductivity. The cross-fertilization of these disciplines should contribute to further discoveries of importance to the practical application of superconductors

  3. Image distortion due to refraction by planar surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arizaga, R; Cap, N; Rabal, H; Trivi, M

    2010-01-01

    The term 'apparent depth' is commonly treated in textbooks as an issue easily understandable from the point of view of paraxial optical geometrical optics. Nevertheless, everyday life tells us that most of the time the observation of objects immersed in water is made under a great range of visual angles where the paraxial approximation is not valid. Here we developed a non-paraxial treatment to calculate the position and shape of the image of objects immersed in liquids of different refractive indices. The approach was focused on the parametric positions of the images of a single point at different viewing angles. Then we calculated how the image of an extended object is distorted. By using the Matlab software, it is possible to visualize the images for different geometrical conditions. We also include the analysis for refractive index with negative values as is the case of metamaterials.

  4. Image distortion due to refraction by planar surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arizaga, R; Cap, N; Rabal, H; Trivi, M [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC) and OPTIMO Dto de Ciencias Basicas, Fac. de Ingenieria UNLP, PO Box 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-01-15

    The term 'apparent depth' is commonly treated in textbooks as an issue easily understandable from the point of view of paraxial optical geometrical optics. Nevertheless, everyday life tells us that most of the time the observation of objects immersed in water is made under a great range of visual angles where the paraxial approximation is not valid. Here we developed a non-paraxial treatment to calculate the position and shape of the image of objects immersed in liquids of different refractive indices. The approach was focused on the parametric positions of the images of a single point at different viewing angles. Then we calculated how the image of an extended object is distorted. By using the Matlab software, it is possible to visualize the images for different geometrical conditions. We also include the analysis for refractive index with negative values as is the case of metamaterials.

  5. Studies on ceramic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaklader, A.C.D.; Roemer, G.; Hardy, W.N.; Brewer, J.H.; Carolan, J.F.; Parsons, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The superconducting properties of both bulk specimens and sputtered thin films of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O x compound have been studied. The bulk specimens were fabricated by cold pressing and sintering, and also by hot-pressing (subsequent reheating). The dc resistivity measurements showed a sharp drop in the temperature range 92-87K in this material. Muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements of sintered discs in 3.4 kOe revealed the formation of a mixed state with an effective magnetic penetration depth λ ∼ 1365 angstrom at 6K, implying an effective charge carrier density of 6 x 10 21 cm -3 . The temperature dependence λ(T) is that of an ordinary s-wave superconductor. The resistivity of the thin film prepared from the compound by dc planar magnetron sputtering, showed a sharp drop to a very low value near 80K. The compound YBa 2 Cu 3 O x loses its superconducting properties, when either hot-pressed (in air) or oxidized at 500 degree C in high O 2 pressure, but this property can be restored when reheated in one atmosphere of O 2 above 900 degree C

  6. Application of image recognition algorithms for statistical description of nano- and microstructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mărăscu, V.; Dinescu, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest– Magurele (Romania); Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 405 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chiţescu, I. [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bucharest, 14 Academiei Street, Bucharest (Romania); Barna, V. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 405 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ioniţă, M. D.; Lazea-Stoyanova, A.; Mitu, B., E-mail: mitub@infim.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest– Magurele (Romania)

    2016-03-25

    In this paper we propose a statistical approach for describing the self-assembling of sub-micronic polystyrene beads on silicon surfaces, as well as the evolution of surface topography due to plasma treatments. Algorithms for image recognition are used in conjunction with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging of surfaces. In a first step, greyscale images of the surface covered by the polystyrene beads are obtained. Further, an adaptive thresholding method was applied for obtaining binary images. The next step consisted in automatic identification of polystyrene beads dimensions, by using Hough transform algorithm, according to beads radius. In order to analyze the uniformity of the self–assembled polystyrene beads, the squared modulus of 2-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2- D FFT) was applied. By combining these algorithms we obtain a powerful and fast statistical tool for analysis of micro and nanomaterials with aspect features regularly distributed on surface upon SEM examination.

  7. Application of image recognition algorithms for statistical description of nano- and microstructured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mărăscu, V.; Dinescu, G.; Chiţescu, I.; Barna, V.; Ioniţă, M. D.; Lazea-Stoyanova, A.; Mitu, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a statistical approach for describing the self-assembling of sub-micronic polystyrene beads on silicon surfaces, as well as the evolution of surface topography due to plasma treatments. Algorithms for image recognition are used in conjunction with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging of surfaces. In a first step, greyscale images of the surface covered by the polystyrene beads are obtained. Further, an adaptive thresholding method was applied for obtaining binary images. The next step consisted in automatic identification of polystyrene beads dimensions, by using Hough transform algorithm, according to beads radius. In order to analyze the uniformity of the self–assembled polystyrene beads, the squared modulus of 2-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2- D FFT) was applied. By combining these algorithms we obtain a powerful and fast statistical tool for analysis of micro and nanomaterials with aspect features regularly distributed on surface upon SEM examination.

  8. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Johannes S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Assaad, Fakher F. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Schnyder, Andreas P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground state degeneracy and a diverging density of states. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. Here, we employ Monte Carlo simulations combined with mean-field considerations to examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of d{sub xy}-wave superconductors. We find that attractive interactions induce a complex s-wave pairing instability together with a density wave instability. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism mixed with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. We discuss the implications of our findings for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  9. Superconductor stability, 1983: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three main topics have been discussed in this paper, namely, internally cooled superconductors, cooling by superfluid helium, and metastable magnets. The discussion of each has centered around a dominant idea, and it is fitting to highlight these ideas by way of conclusion. With regard to internally cooled superconductors, most of what we have learned in the last few years centers on the strong motion caused by the thermal expansion of helium. How naive were our early calculations that treated the helium as though it were incompressible. Our discussion of He-II was organized around the Gorter-Mellink relation and the solutions of the nonlinear diffusion equation it gives rise to. And our discussion of metastable magnets revolved around the fruitful concept of the MPZ. These three ideas are sturdy trunks that support much of the thought about superconductor stability that has flowered in the past several years

  10. Topological insulators and topological superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernevig, Andrei B

    2013-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook is the first pedagogical synthesis of the field of topological insulators and superconductors, one of the most exciting areas of research in condensed matter physics. Presenting the latest developments, while providing all the calculations necessary for a self-contained and complete description of the discipline, it is ideal for graduate students and researchers preparing to work in this area, and it will be an essential reference both within and outside the classroom. The book begins with simple concepts such as Berry phases, Dirac fermions, Hall conductance and its link to topology, and the Hofstadter problem of lattice electrons in a magnetic field. It moves on to explain topological phases of matter such as Chern insulators, two- and three-dimensional topological insulators, and Majorana p-wave wires. Additionally, the book covers zero modes on vortices in topological superconductors, time-reversal topological superconductors, and topological responses/field theory and topolo...

  11. Topological phase transition of Dirac superconductors in the presence of pseudo-scalar pairings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Morteza; Jafari, S. A.

    2018-06-01

    Motivated by recent developments in the field of topological superconductors, we show that there is a topological phase transition (TPT) for three dimensional Dirac superconductors (3DDS) in the presence of pseudo-scalar superconducting order parameter which leads to the appearance of a two dimensional Majorana sea (2DMS) on its surface. The perfect Andreev-Klein transmission, resonant peak with robust character in the differential conductance and 4π periodic Josephson current are experimental signatures of 2DMS.

  12. Imaging of Stellar Surfaces with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, A.; Schmitt, H. R.; van Belle, G. T.; Hutter, Clark; Mozurkewich, D.; Armstrong, J. T.; Baines, E. K.; Restaino, S. R.

    The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) has a unique layout which is particularly well-suited for high-resolution interferometric imaging. By combining the NPOI layout with a new data acquisition and fringe tracking system we are progressing toward a imaging capability which will exceed any other interferometer in operation. The project, funded by the National Science Foundation, combines several existing advances and infrastructure at NPOI with modest enhancements. For optimal imaging there are several requirements that should be fulfilled. The observatory should be capable of measuring visibilities on a wide range of baseline lengths and orientations, providing complete UV coverage in a short period of time. It should measure visibility amplitudes with good SNR on all baselines as critical imaging information is often contained in low-amplitude visibilities. It should measure the visibility phase on all baselines. The technologies which can achieve this are the NPOI Y-shaped array with (nearly) equal spacing between telescopes and an ability for rapid configuration. Placing 6-telescopes in a row makes it possible to measure visibilities into the 4th lobe of the visibility function. By arranging the available telescopes carefully we will be able to switch, every few days, between 3 different 6-station chains which provide symmetric coverage in the UV (Fourier) plane without moving any telescopes, only by moving beam relay mirrors. The 6-station chains are important to achieve the highest imaging resolution, and switching rapidly between station chains provides uniform coverage. Coherent integration techniques can be used to obtain good SNR on very small visibilities. Coherently integrated visibilities can be used for imaging with standard radio imaging packages such as AIPS. The commissioning of one additional station, the use of new data acquisition hardware and fringe tracking algorithms are the enhancements which make this project possible.

  13. Validation of phalanx bone three-dimensional surface segmentation from computed tomography images using laser scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVries, Nicole A.; Gassman, Esther E.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); Shivanna, Kiran H. [The University of Iowa, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); Magnotta, Vincent A. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Radiology, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); Grosland, Nicole M. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    To examine the validity of manually defined bony regions of interest from computed tomography (CT) scans. Segmentation measurements were performed on the coronal reformatted CT images of the three phalanx bones of the index finger from five cadaveric specimens. Two smoothing algorithms (image-based and Laplacian surface-based) were evaluated to determine their ability to represent accurately the anatomic surface. The resulting surfaces were compared with laser surface scans of the corresponding cadaveric specimen. The average relative overlap between two tracers was 0.91 for all bones. The overall mean difference between the manual unsmoothed surface and the laser surface scan was 0.20 mm. Both image-based and Laplacian surface-based smoothing were compared; the overall mean difference for image-based smoothing was 0.21 mm and 0.20 mm for Laplacian smoothing. This study showed that manual segmentation of high-contrast, coronal, reformatted, CT datasets can accurately represent the true surface geometry of bones. Additionally, smoothing techniques did not significantly alter the surface representations. This validation technique should be extended to other bones, image segmentation and spatial filtering techniques. (orig.)

  14. Validation of phalanx bone three-dimensional surface segmentation from computed tomography images using laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, Nicole A.; Gassman, Esther E.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A.; Shivanna, Kiran H.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the validity of manually defined bony regions of interest from computed tomography (CT) scans. Segmentation measurements were performed on the coronal reformatted CT images of the three phalanx bones of the index finger from five cadaveric specimens. Two smoothing algorithms (image-based and Laplacian surface-based) were evaluated to determine their ability to represent accurately the anatomic surface. The resulting surfaces were compared with laser surface scans of the corresponding cadaveric specimen. The average relative overlap between two tracers was 0.91 for all bones. The overall mean difference between the manual unsmoothed surface and the laser surface scan was 0.20 mm. Both image-based and Laplacian surface-based smoothing were compared; the overall mean difference for image-based smoothing was 0.21 mm and 0.20 mm for Laplacian smoothing. This study showed that manual segmentation of high-contrast, coronal, reformatted, CT datasets can accurately represent the true surface geometry of bones. Additionally, smoothing techniques did not significantly alter the surface representations. This validation technique should be extended to other bones, image segmentation and spatial filtering techniques. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional imaging of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilford, W.B.; Ullrich, C.G.; Moore, T.

    1988-01-01

    Both surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional image processing from CT data can provide accurate demonstration of skeletal anatomy. While realistic, surface contour images may obscure fine detail such as nondisplaced fractures, and thin bone may disappear. Volumetric processing can provide high detail, but the transparency effect is unnatural and may yield a confusing image. Comparison of both three-dimensional modes is presented to demonstrate those findings best shown with each and to illustrate helpful techniques to improve volumetric display, such as disarticulation of unnecessary anatomy, short-angle repeating rotation (dithering), and image combination into overlay displays

  16. Electronic Structure, Irreversibility Line and Magnetoresistance of Cu_0_._3Bi_2Se_3 Superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi He-Mian; Chen Chao-Yu; Sun Xuan; Xie Zhuo-Jin; Feng Ya; Liang Ai-Ji; Peng Ying-Ying; He Shao-Long; Zhao Lin; Liu Guo-Dong; Dong Xiao-Li; Zhang Jun; Zhou Xing-Jiang; Chen Chuang-Tian; Xu Zu-Yan; Gu Gen-Da

    2015-01-01

    Cu_xBi_2Se_3 is a superconductor that is a potential candidate for topological superconductors. We report our laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurement on the electronic structure of the Cu_xBi_2Se_3 superconductor, and a detailed magneto-resistance measurement in both normal and superconducting states. We find that the topological surface state of the pristine Bi_2Se_3 topological insulator remains robust after the Cu-intercalation, while the Dirac cone location moves downward due to electron doping. Detailed measurements on the magnetic field-dependence of the resistance in the superconducting state establishes an irreversibility line and gives a value of the upper critical field at zero temperature of ∼4000 Oe for the Cu_0_._3Bi_2Se_3 superconductor with a middle point T_c of 1.9K. The relation between the upper critical field H_c_2 and temperature T is different from the usual scaling relation found in cuprates and in other kinds of superconductors. Small positive magneto-resistance is observed in Cu_0_._3Bi_2Se_3 superconductors up to room temperature. These observations provide useful information for further study of this possible candidate for topological superconductors. (paper)

  17. Raman scattering of light off a superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuden, C.B.

    1976-01-01

    Raman scattering off a superconducting surface is formulated using Kubo's nonlinear response theory in a form suitable for systematic diagrammatic expansion. The effects of the sample surface are correctly taken into account. It is shown that in the presence of vacuum polarization processes, the contribution to the scattering efficiency from the density-density correlation function considered in the literature, is reduced. The relevant four-vertex parts, describing inelastic scattering of light by electronic excitations via intermediate interband states in a superconductor, are calculated. Frequency and temperature dependence of the relative scattering efficiency for the large momentum transfer (Pippard limit), and constant transition matrix elements, are obtained. The estimated magnitude of the total scattering efficiency is of the order of 10 -11

  18. Surface Reconstruction and Image Enhancement via $L^1$-Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Dobrev, Veselin; Guermond, Jean-Luc; Popov, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    A surface reconstruction technique based on minimization of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Convergence of the method is established, and an interior-point algorithm solving the associated linear programming problem is introduced

  19. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- δ, YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 , and the Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2+4 (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible

  20. Method of fabricating composite superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Y.; Shiraki, H.; Suzuki, E.; Yoshida, M.

    1977-01-01

    A method of making stabilized superconductors of a composition such as Nb 3 Sn is disclosed. The method includes forming a stock product comprising a tin base alloy as a core with a copper jacket and having a niobium tube clad thereon. The stock product is then embedded in a good thermally and electrically conducting matrix which is then coreduced until the desired size is obtained. This cold worked product is then submitted to a heat treatment to form superconductors of Nb 3 Sn

  1. Adsorbed radioactivity and radiographic imaging of surfaces of stainless steel and titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Haijo

    1997-11-01

    Type 304 stainless steel used for typical surface materials of spent fuel shipping casks and titanium were exposed in the spent fuel storage pool of a typical PWR power plant. Adsorption characteristics, effectiveness of decontamination by water cleaning and by electrocleaning, and swipe effectiveness on the metal surfaces were studied. A variety of environmental conditions had been manipulated to stimulate the potential 'weeping' phenomenon that often occurs with spent fuel shipping casks during transit. In a previous study, few heterogeneous effects of adsorbed contamination onto metal surfaces were observed. Radiographic images of cask surfaces were made in this study and showed clearly heterogeneous activity distributions. Acquired radiographic images were digitized and further analyzed with an image analysis computer package and compared to calibrated images by using standard sources. The measurements of activity distribution by using the radiographic image method were consistent with that using a HPGe detector. This radiographic image method was used to study the effects of electrocleaning for total and specified areas. The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of a film-screen system in contact with a radioactive metal surface was studied with neutron activated gold foils and showed more broad resolution properties than general diagnostic x-ray film-screen systems. Microstructure between normal areas and hot spots showed significant differences, and one hot spot appearing as a dot on the film image consisted of several small hot spots (about 10 μm in diameter). These hot spots were observed as structural defects of the metal surfaces.

  2. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah; Lin, Fan-Chi; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green's functions along

  3. Ocean Surface Current Vectors from MODIS Terra/Aqua Sea Surface Temperature Image Pairs, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellites that record imagery of the same sea surface area, at times separated by a few hours, can be used to estimate ocean surface velocity fields based on the...

  4. Four-channel surface coil array for sequential CW-EPR image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Emoto, Miho; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    This article describes a four-channel surface coil array to increase the area of visualization for continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. A 776-MHz surface coil array was constructed with four independent surface coil resonators and three kinds of switches. Control circuits for switching the resonators were also built to sequentially perform EPR image acquisition for each resonator. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were shifted using PIN diode switches to decouple the inductively coupled coils. To investigate the area of visualization with the surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed using a glass cell phantom filled with a solution of nitroxyl radicals. The area of visualization obtained with the surface coil array was increased approximately 3.5-fold in comparison to that with a single surface coil resonator. Furthermore, to demonstrate the applicability of this surface coil array to animal imaging, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed in a living mouse with an exogenously injected nitroxyl radical imaging agent.

  5. Critical fields in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnemore, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of various methods to obtain the critical fields of the high temperature superconductors from experimental data is undertaken in order to find definitions of these variables that are consistent with the models used to define them. Characteristic critical fields of H c1 , H c2 and H c that occur in the Ginsburg-Landau theory are difficult to determine experimentally in the high temperature superconductors because there are additional physical phenomena that obscure the results. The lower critical field is difficult to measure because there are flux pinning and surface barrier effects to flux entry; the upper critical field is difficult because fluctuation effects are large at this phase boundary; the thermodynamic critical field is difficult because fluctuations make it difficult to know the field where the magnetization integral should be terminated. In addition to these critical fields there are at least two other cross-over fields. There is the so called irreversibility line where the vortices transform from a rigid flux line lattice to a fluid lattice and there is a second cross-over field associated with the transition from the fluctuation to the Abrikosov vortex regime. The presence of these new physical effects may require new vocabulary

  6. Effects of surface-mapping corrections and synthetic-aperture focusing techniques on ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, B.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in ultrasonic imaging that can be obtained using algorithms that map the surface of targets are evaluated. This information is incorporated in the application of synthetic-aperture focusing techniques which also have the potential to improve image resolution. Images obtained using directed-beam (flat) transducers and the focused transducers normally used for synthetic-aperture processing are quantitatively compared by using no processing, synthetic-aperture processing with no corrections for surface variations, and synthetic-aperture processing with surface mapping. The unprocessed images have relatively poor lateral resolutions because echoes from two adjacent reflectors show interference effects which prevent their identification even if the spacing is larger than the single-hole resolution. The synthetic-aperture-processed images show at least a twofold improvement in lateral resolution and greatly reduced interference effects in multiple-hole images compared to directed-beam images. Perhaps more importantly, in images of test blocks with substantial surface variations portions of the image are displaced from their actual positions by several wavelengths. To correct for this effect an algorithm has been developed for calculating the surface variations. The corrected images produced using this algorithm are accurate within the experimental error. In addition, the same algorithm, when applied to the directed-beam data, produced images that are not only accurately positioned, but that also have a resolution comparable to conventional synthetic-aperture-processed images obtained from focused-transducer data. This suggests that using synthetic-aperture processing on the type of data normally collected during directed-beam ultrasonic inspections would eliminate the need to rescan for synthetic-aperture enhancement

  7. Hybrid surface platform for the simultaneous detection of proteins and DNA using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Piliarik, Marek; Ladd, J.; Taylor, A.; Shaoyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 11 (2008), s. 4231-4236 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * DNA-directed immobilization * protein array Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  8. Inter-granular current in iron-oxypnictide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamegai, T.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Nakajima, Y.; Kamihara, Y.; Hosono, H.

    2010-01-01

    Inter- and intragranular currents, J c inter and J c intra , in LaFePO 0.94 F 0.06 polycrystalline sample are evaluated by measuring the remanent-state field profile using magneto-optical imaging method. Obtained images show the absence of magnetic field modulation associated with the weak-link nature of grain boundaries, indicating that J c inter and J c intra are comparable in magnitude in contrast to other iron-arsenide superconductors. J c inter is estimated to be 2 x 10 4 A/cm 2 in the limit of T = 0 K, which is larger than the values in other iron-arsenide superconductors. Implication of these J c behavior is discussed in relation with possible pairing symmetries.

  9. Imaging of Ground Ice with Surface-Based Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    terrains. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), in particular, has been effective for imaging ground ice. ERT measures the ability of materials to...13 2.2.1 Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT...Engineer Research and Development Center ERT Electrical Resistivity Tomography GPS Global Positioning System LiDAR Light Detection and Ranging SIPRE

  10. Imaging Freeform Optical Systems Designed with NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    reflective, anastigmat 1 Introduction The imaging freeform optical systems described here are designed using non-uniform rational basis-spline (NURBS...code, but to succeed in designing NURBS freeform optical systems an optimization code is required. The motivation for developing the optical design

  11. Spatial characterization of nanotextured surfaces by visual color imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Murthy, Swathi; Madsen, Morten H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using an ordinary color camera to characterize nanostructures from the visual color of the structures. The method provides a macroscale overview image from which micrometer-sized regions can be analyzed independently, hereby revealing long-range spatial variations...

  12. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, Shweta; Kant, Rama, E-mail: rkant@chemistry.du.ac.in

    2013-10-01

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  13. Ptychographic x-ray imaging of surfaces on crystal truncation rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Barbour, Andi; Liu, Yaohua; You, Hoydoo, E-mail: hyou@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Diaz, Ana; Menzel, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI 5232 (Switzerland); Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Sciences, Safarik University, Kosice 04154 (Slovakia); Huang, Xiaojing [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Pierce, Michael S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-03-09

    Ptychography is a high-resolution imaging technique, which does not require lenses for image magnification and which provides phase contrast with high sensitivity. Here, we propose to use x-ray ptychography for the imaging of surface structure in crystalline samples. We show that ptychography can be used to image atomic step structures using coherent diffraction patterns recorded along the crystal truncation rod of a crystal surface. In a proof-of-concept experiment on a Pt (111) sample, we present ptychographic reconstructions showing features consistent with surface steps. Due to the penetration power of x-rays, this method could find interesting applications for the study of surface structures under buried interfaces or in harsh environments.

  14. Robust Imaging Methodology for Challenging Environments: Wave Equation Dispersion Inversion of Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Schuster, Gerard T.; Zeng, Zhaofa

    2017-01-01

    A robust imaging technology is reviewed that provide subsurface information in challenging environments: wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD) of surface waves for the shear velocity model. We demonstrate the benefits and liabilities of the method

  15. Microbial biofilm detection on food contact surfaces by macro-scale fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging methods were utilized to evaluate the potential of multispectral fluorescence methods for detection of pathogenic biofilm formations on four types of food contact surface materials: stainless steel, high density polyethylene (HDPE) commonly used for cutting boards,...

  16. Ptychographic x-ray imaging of surfaces on crystal truncation rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Barbour, Andi; Liu, Yaohua; You, Hoydoo; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Diaz, Ana; Menzel, Andreas; Komanicky, Vladimir; Huang, Xiaojing; Pierce, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ptychography is a high-resolution imaging technique, which does not require lenses for image magnification and which provides phase contrast with high sensitivity. Here, we propose to use x-ray ptychography for the imaging of surface structure in crystalline samples. We show that ptychography can be used to image atomic step structures using coherent diffraction patterns recorded along the crystal truncation rod of a crystal surface. In a proof-of-concept experiment on a Pt (111) sample, we present ptychographic reconstructions showing features consistent with surface steps. Due to the penetration power of x-rays, this method could find interesting applications for the study of surface structures under buried interfaces or in harsh environments

  17. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, Shweta; Kant, Rama

    2013-01-01

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  18. Hybrid crystals of cuprates and iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dai; Cong-Cong, Le; Xian-Xin, Wu; Jiang-Ping, Hu

    2016-07-01

    We propose two possible new compounds, Ba2CuO2Fe2As2 and K2CuO2Fe2Se2, which hybridize the building blocks of two high temperature superconductors, cuprates and iron-based superconductors. These compounds consist of square CuO2 layers and antifluorite-type Fe2 X 2 (X = As, Se) layers separated by Ba/K. The calculations of binding energies and phonon spectra indicate that they are dynamically stable, which ensures that they may be experimentally synthesized. The Fermi surfaces and electronic structures of the two compounds inherit the characteristics of both cuprates and iron-based superconductors. These compounds can be superconductors with intriguing physical properties to help to determine the pairing mechanisms of high T c superconductivity. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB921300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 1190020 and 11334012), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07000000).

  19. Numerical analysis of thermally actuated magnets for magnetization of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Quan; Yan Yu; Rawlings, Colin; Coombs, Tim, E-mail: ql229@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity Group, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street. Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    Superconductors, such as YBCO bulks, have extremely high potential magnetic flux densities, comparing to rare earth magnets. Therefore, the magnetization of superconductors has attracted broad attention and contribution from both academic research and industry. In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to magnetize superconductors. Unusually, instead of using high magnetic fields and pulses, repeatedly magnetic waves with strength of as low as rare earth magnets are applied. These magnetic waves, generated by thermally controlling a Gadolinium (Gd) bulk with a rare earth magnet underneath, travel over the flat surface of a YBCO bulk and get trapped little by little. Thus, a very small magnetic field can be used to build up a very large magnetic field. In this paper, the modelling results of thermally actuated magnetic waves are presented showing how to transfer sequentially applied thermal pulses into magnetic waves. The experiment results of the magnetization of YBCO bulk are also presented to demonstrate how superconductors are progressively magnetized by small magnetic field

  20. Numerical analysis of thermally actuated magnets for magnetization of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Quan; Yan Yu; Rawlings, Colin; Coombs, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Superconductors, such as YBCO bulks, have extremely high potential magnetic flux densities, comparing to rare earth magnets. Therefore, the magnetization of superconductors has attracted broad attention and contribution from both academic research and industry. In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to magnetize superconductors. Unusually, instead of using high magnetic fields and pulses, repeatedly magnetic waves with strength of as low as rare earth magnets are applied. These magnetic waves, generated by thermally controlling a Gadolinium (Gd) bulk with a rare earth magnet underneath, travel over the flat surface of a YBCO bulk and get trapped little by little. Thus, a very small magnetic field can be used to build up a very large magnetic field. In this paper, the modelling results of thermally actuated magnetic waves are presented showing how to transfer sequentially applied thermal pulses into magnetic waves. The experiment results of the magnetization of YBCO bulk are also presented to demonstrate how superconductors are progressively magnetized by small magnetic field

  1. Segmentation, surface rendering, and surface simplification of 3-D skull images for the repair of a large skull defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weibing; Shi, Pengfei; Li, Shuguang

    2009-10-01

    Given the potential demonstrated by research into bone-tissue engineering, the use of medical image data for the rapid prototyping (RP) of scaffolds is a subject worthy of research. Computer-aided design and manufacture and medical imaging have created new possibilities for RP. Accurate and efficient design and fabrication of anatomic models is critical to these applications. We explore the application of RP computational methods to the repair of a pediatric skull defect. The focus of this study is the segmentation of the defect region seen in computerized tomography (CT) slice images of this patient's skull and the three-dimensional (3-D) surface rendering of the patient's CT-scan data. We see if our segmentation and surface rendering software can improve the generation of an implant model to fill a skull defect.

  2. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATION OF SURFACE AREA FROM DIGITAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Ziegel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J. Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius. For general shapes bounds for the asymptotic expected relative worst case error are given. A simulation example is discussed for surface area estimation based on 2×2×2-configurations.

  3. Determination of forest road surface roughness by Kinect depth imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marinello

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Roughness is a dynamic property of the gravel road surface that affects safety, ride comfort as well as vehicle tyre life and maintenance costs. A rapid survey of gravel road condition is fundamental for an effective maintenance planning and definition of the intervention priorities.Different non-contact techniques such as laser scanning, ultrasonic sensors and photogrammetry have recently been proposed to reconstruct three-dimensional topography of road surface and allow extraction of roughness metrics. The application of Microsoft Kinect™ depth camera is proposed and discussed here for collection of 3D data sets from gravel roads, to be implemented in order to allow quantification of surface roughness.The objectives are to: i verify the applicability of the Kinect sensor for characterization of different forest roads, ii identify the appropriateness and potential of different roughness parameters and iii analyse the correlation with vibrations recoded by 3-axis accelerometers installed on different vehicles. The test took advantage of the implementation of the Kinect depth camera for surface roughness determination of 4 different forest gravel roads and one well-maintained asphalt road as reference. Different vehicles (mountain bike, off-road motorcycle, ATV vehicle, 4WD car and compact crossover were included in the experiment in order to verify the vibration intensity when travelling on different road surface conditions. Correlations between the extracted roughness parameters and vibration levels of the tested vehicles were then verified. Coefficients of determination of between 0.76 and 0.97 were detected between average surface roughness and standard deviation of relative accelerations, with higher values in the case of lighter vehicles.

  4. Stereological estimation of surface area from digital images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Kiderlen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J....... Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius...

  5. STM/STS measurements of the layered superconductor β-HfNCl1-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekino, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Akira; Shohara, Kazuhiro; Yamanaka, Shoji; Gabovich, Alexander M.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microcopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements have been carried out on SmSI (β) type HfNCl 1-x (x∼0.3) samples with T c =24K. The STM image on the cleaved surface of ab plane at 5 K clearly reveals a triangular arrangement of bright spots. The separation of the nearest-neighbor spots, 0.369 nm, is in agreement with the a lattice parameter. The STS measurements at 5 K reveal almost constant gap values 2Δ=20meV within the area of at least 10x10nm 2 , thus demonstrating a huge ratio 2Δ/k B T c =10. This ratio is very similar to that found in high-T c oxide and organic superconductors.

  6. AFM imaging of bacteria in liquid media immobilized on gelatin coated mica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, M.J.; Sullivan, C.J.; Hoyt, P.R.; Pelletier, D.A.; Wu, S.; Allison, D.P

    2003-10-15

    Immobilization of particulates, especially biomolecules and cells, onto surfaces is critical for imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM). In this paper, gelatin coated mica surfaces are shown to be suitable for immobilizing and imaging both gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus, and gram negative, Escherichia coli, bacteria in both air and liquid environments. Gelatin coated surfaces are shown to be superior to poly-L-lysine coated surfaces that are commonly used for the immobilization of cells. This cell immobilization technique is being developed primarily for live cell imaging of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The genome of R. palustris has been sequenced and the organism is the target of intensive studies aimed at understanding genome function. Images of R. palustris grown both aerobically and anaerobically in liquid media are presented. Images in liquid media show the bacteria is rod shaped and smooth while images in air show marked irregularity and folding of the surface. Significant differences in the vertical dimension are also apparent with the height of the bacteria in liquid being substantially greater than images taken in air. In air immobilized bacterial flagella are clearly seen while in liquid this structure is not visible. Additionally, significant morphological differences are observed that depend on the method of bacterial growth.

  7. Surface interpolation with radial basis functions for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.C.; Beatson, R.K.; Fright, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Radial basis functions are presented as a practical solution to the problem of interpolating incomplete surfaces derived from three-dimensional (3-D) medical graphics. The specific application considered is the design of cranial implants for the repair of defects, usually holes, in the skull. Radial basis functions impose few restrictions on the geometry of the interpolation centers and are suited to problems where interpolation centers do not form a regular grid. However, their high computational requirements have previously limited their use to problems where the number of interpolation centers is small (<300). Recently developed fast evaluation techniques have overcome these limitations and made radial basis interpolation a practical approach for larger data sets. In this paper radial basis functions are fitted to depth-maps of the skull's surface, obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT) data using ray-tracing techniques. They are used to smoothly interpolate the surface of the skull across defect regions. The resulting mathematical description of the skull's surface can be evaluated at any desired resolution to be rendered on a graphics workstation or to generate instructions for operating a computer numerically controlled (CNC) mill

  8. Biomechanical modeling constrained surface-based image registration for prostate MR guided TRUS biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, W.J.M. van de; Hu, Y.; Barentsz, J.O.; Karssemeijer, N.; Barratt, D.; Huisman, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Adding magnetic resonance (MR)-derived information to standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for guiding prostate biopsy is of substantial clinical interest. A tumor visible on MR images can be projected on ultrasound (US) by using MR-US registration. A common approach is to use surface-based

  9. Spectrally enhanced imaging of occlusal surfaces and artificial shallow enamel erosions with a scanning fiber endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-07-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope, originally developed for cancer diagnosis, was used to image dental occlusal surfaces as well as shallow artificially induced enamel erosions from human extracted teeth (n=40). Enhanced image resolution of occlusal surfaces was obtained using a short-wavelength 405-nm illumination laser. In addition, artificial erosions of varying depths were also imaged with 405-, 404-, 532-, and 635-nm illumination lasers. Laser-induced autofluorescence images of the teeth using 405-nm illumination were also obtained. Contrast between sound and eroded enamel was quantitatively computed for each imaging modality. For shallow erosions, the image contrast with respect to sound enamel was greatest for the 405-nm reflected image. It was also determined that the increased contrast was in large part due to volume scattering with a smaller component from surface scattering. Furthermore, images obtained with a shallow penetration depth illumination laser (405 nm) provided the greatest detail of surface enamel topography since the reflected light does not contain contributions from light reflected from greater depths within the enamel tissue. Multilayered Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to confirm the experimental results.

  10. Development of superconductor application technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, G W; Kim, C J; Lee, H G; Lee, H J; Kim, K B; Won, D Y; Jang, K I; Kwon, S C; Kim, W J; Ji, Y A; Yang, S W; Kim, W K; Park, S D; Lee, M H; Lee, D M; Park, H W; Yu, J K; Lee, I S; Kim, J J; Choi, H S; Chu, Y; Kim, Y S; Kim, D H

    1997-09-01

    Fabrication of high Tc bulk superconductor and its application, fabrication of superconducting wire for electric power device and analysis for cryogenic system were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies for electric power system. High quality YBaCuO bulk superconductor was fabricated by controlling initial powder preparation process and prototype flywheel energy storage device was designed basically. The superconducting levitation force measuring device was made to examine the property of prepared superconductor specimen. Systematic studies onthe method of starting powder preparation, mechanical fabrication process, heat treatment condition and analysis of plastic deformation were carried out to increase the stability and reproducibility of superconducting wire. A starting power with good reactivity and fine particle size was obtained by mechanical grinding, control of phase assemblage, and emulsion drying method. Ag/BSCCO tape with good cross sectional shape and Jc of 20,000 A/cm{sup 2} was fabricated by applying CIP packing procedure. Multifilamentary wire with Jc of 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} was fabricated by rolling method using square billet as starting shape. The joining of the multifilamentary wire was done by etching and pressing process and showed 50% of joining efficiency. Analysis on the heat loss in cryostat for high Tc superconducting device was carried out for optimum design of the future cryogenic system. (author). 66 refs., 104 figs.

  11. Superconductor with improved persistence characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekly, Z. J. J.; Strauss, B. P.

    1984-01-01

    In a multifilamentary superconductor, plural filaments are separated from one another by a ductile nonsuperconducting copper matrix. The niobium titanium filaments are arrayed through the copper, with one filament being substantially larger than the others, and preferably, centrally located in the wire. Preferably also, the other filaments are arrayed in an annular configuration about the periphery of the wire

  12. Ceramic high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquart, R.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution presents an overview treatment of the structure of the new superconductors (YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x ). Methods of powder production and processing technology are described, with current development projects by Dornier being taken into consideration. (orig.) [de

  13. Testing Superconductor Logic Integrated Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arun, A.J.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2005-01-01

    Superconductor logic has the potential of extremely low-power consumption and ultra-fast digital signal processing. Unfortunately, the obtained yield of the present processes is low and specific faults occur. This paper deals with fault-modelling, Design-for-Test structures, and ATPG for these

  14. High Temperature Superconductor Machine Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2011-01-01

    A versatile testing platform for a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) machine has been constructed. The stationary HTS field winding can carry up to 10 coils and it is operated at a temperature of 77K. The rotating armature is at room temperature. Test results and performance for the HTS field...

  15. Vortex lattices in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear

  16. Superconductors by powder metallurgy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickus, M.R.; Wang, J.L.F.

    1976-05-01

    Fabrication methods for Nb 3 Sn type compounds are described. Information is included on the Bell Telephone process, the General Electric tape process, superconductor stability, the bronze process, powder metallurgy multifilamentary tapes and wires, and current assessment of powder metallurgy superconducting wire

  17. Dynamics of vortices in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinan, E.

    1992-01-01

    We study the dynamics of vortices in type-II superconductors from the point of view of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. We outline a proof of existence, uniqueness and regularity of strong solutions for these equations. We then derive reduced systems of ODEs governing the motion of the vortices in the asymptotic limit of large Ginzburg-Landau parameter

  18. Development of superconductor application technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, G. W.; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H. G.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Won, D. Y.; Jang, K. I.; Kwon, S. C.; Kim, W. J.; Ji, Y. A.; Yang, S. W.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. D.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, D. M.; Park, H. W.; Yu, J. K.; Lee, I. S.; Kim, J. J.; Choi, H. S.; Chu, Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, D. H.

    1997-09-01

    Fabrication of high Tc bulk superconductor and its application, fabrication of superconducting wire for electric power device and analysis for cryogenic system were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies for electric power system. High quality YBaCuO bulk superconductor was fabricated by controlling initial powder preparation process and prototype flywheel energy storage device was designed basically. The superconducting levitation force measuring device was made to examine the property of prepared superconductor specimen. Systematic studies onthe method of starting powder preparation, mechanical fabrication process, heat treatment condition and analysis of plastic deformation were carried out to increase the stability and reproducibility of superconducting wire. A starting power with good reactivity and fine particle size was obtained by mechanical grinding, control of phase assemblage, and emulsion drying method. Ag/BSCCO tape with good cross sectional shape and Jc of 20,000 A/cm 2 was fabricated by applying CIP packing procedure. Multifilamentary wire with Jc of 10,000 A/cm 2 was fabricated by rolling method using square billet as starting shape. The joining of the multifilamentary wire was done by etching and pressing process and showed 50% of joining efficiency. Analysis on the heat loss in cryostat for high Tc superconducting device was carried out for optimum design of the future cryogenic system. (author). 66 refs., 104 figs

  19. Chemistry of high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    This review volume contains the most up-to-date articles on the chemical aspects of high temperature oxide superconductors. These articles are written by some of the leading scientists in the field and includes a comprehensive list of references. This is an essential volume for researchers working in the fields of ceramics, materials science and chemistry.

  20. Strain effects in oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, H.; Kuroda, T.; Sekine, H.; Yuyama, M.; Itoh, K.

    1991-01-01

    Strain sensitivities of superconducting properties are critical to high magnetic field applications of superconductors, since critical temperature, T c , upper critical field, H c2 , and critical current (density), I c (J c ), are all degraded under strains. Oxide superconductors so far known are all very fragile, thus requiring to be fabricated in the form of composite. In the case of practical metallic superconductors, such as Nb 3 Sn and V 3 Ga, the so-called bronze method has been developed where these superconducting intermetallics are enveloped in a ductile metallic sheath. Recently, a fabrication method similar to the bronze method has been developed for the Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O x superconductors using Ag tubes as sheath. In the present study mono- and multicore BiPbSrCaCuO tape conductors were prepared by means of this Ag-sheath composite method, and examined in terms of strain sensitivity by measuring their T c and I c (J c ) under bending or tensile strains. (orig.)

  1. Equivalent Coil Model for Computing Levitation Forces Between Permanent Magnets and High Temperatures Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavia Santos, S.; Garcia-Tabares, L.

    1998-05-01

    A new simple theory has been developed for the study of levitation forces between a permanent magnet and a HTc superconductor. This theory is based on the assumption that both, the magnet and the superconductor, can be modelled by an equivalent coil placed on their surface. While the current flowing through the permanent magnet is constant, the equivalent current through the superconductor can be iether corresponding to screen the overall flux or a constant current corresponding to critical current density when the superconductor is saturated. A test facility has been designed and built for measuring levitation forces at variable approaching speeds. Comparison between theoretical and experimental measurements are presented in the report as well as a general description of the test facility. (Author)

  2. Can positron 2D-ACAR resolve the electronic structure of high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, L.P.; Lynn, K.G.; Harshman, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the ability of the positron Two-Dimensional Angular Correlation Annihilation Radiation (2D-ACAR) technique to resolve the electronic structures of high-T c cuprate superconductors. Following a short description of the technique, discussions of the theoretical assumptions, data analysis and experimental considerations, in relation to the high-T c superconductors, are given. The authors briefly review recent 2D-ACAR experiments on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x , Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCuO 8+δ and La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 . The 2D-ACAR technique is useful in resolving the band crossings associated with the layers of the superconductors that are preferentially sampled by the positrons. Together with other Fermi surface measurements (namely angle-resolved photoemission), 2D-ACAR can resolve some of the electronic structures of high-T c cuprate superconductors

  3. Imaging of surface plasmon polariton interference using phase-sensitive scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the surface plasmon polariton interference, generated via a ‘buried’ gold grating, and imaged using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM). The phase-resolved PSTM measurement unravels the complex surface plasmon polariton interference fields at the gold-air

  4. The monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhe; Wang, Jian; Huang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    At present, the civil aviation airports use the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems to monitor the aircrafts, vehicles and the other moving objects. Surface surveillance radars can cover most of the airport scenes, but because of the terminals, covered bridges and other buildings geometry, surface surveillance radar systems inevitably have some small segment blind spots. This paper presents a monocular vision imaging technology model for airport surface surveillance, achieving the perception of scenes of moving objects such as aircrafts, vehicles and personnel location. This new model provides an important complement for airport surface surveillance, which is different from the traditional surface surveillance radar techniques. Such technique not only provides clear objects activities screen for the ATC, but also provides image recognition and positioning of moving targets in this area. Thereby it can improve the work efficiency of the airport operations and avoid the conflict between the aircrafts and vehicles. This paper first introduces the monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance and then the monocular vision measurement accuracy analysis of the model. The monocular visual imaging technology model is simple, low cost, and highly efficient. It is an advanced monitoring technique which can make up blind spot area of the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems.

  5. Magnetic Signals of High-Temperature Superconductor Bulk During the Levitation Force Measurement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Qian, Nan; Che, Tong; Zheng, Botian; Jin, Liwei; Deng, Zigang

    2017-05-01

    In order to study the commonly neglected magnetic field information in the course of levitation force measurement process in a superconducting maglev system, a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire magnetic signals of a bulk high-Tc superconductor on both the top and the bottom surface. Working conditions including field cooling (FC) and zero field cooling were investigated for these vertical down and up motions above a permanent magnet guideway performed on a HTS maglev measurement system. We have discussed the magnetic flux variation process based on the Bean model. A magnetic hysteresis effect similar to the levitation force hysteresis loop of the bulk superconductor was displayed and analyzed in this paper. What is more valuable, there exists some available magnetic flux on the top surface of the bulk superconductor, and the proportion is as high as 62.42% in the FC condition, which provides an experimental hint to design the superconductor bulk and the applied field for practical use in a more efficient way. In particular, this work reveals real-time magnetic flux variation of the bulk superconductor in the levitation application, which is the other important information in contrast to the macroscopic levitation and guidance force investigations in previous studies, and it enriches the existing research methods. The results are significant for understanding the magnetic characteristic of superconductors, and they can contribute to optimize the present HTS maglev system design.

  6. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols, Clouds, and Surface Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    values found in this region only during episodes of intense wildfire smoke. Detailed analysis of the aerosols in this smoke plume and their effect...Continuous outdoor operation of an all-sky polarization imager,” Proc. SPIE 7672 (Polarization: Measurement, Analysis , and Remote Sensing IX), 76720A-1-7, 7...Pust, “ Lunar corona in ice wave cloud,” 10th International Meeting on Light and Color in Nature, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, 16-20 June 2010. 2

  7. A rapid method for creating qualitative images indicative of thick oil emulsion on the ocean's surface from imaging spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, K. Eric; Swayze, Gregg A.; Leifer, Ira; McCubbin, Ian B.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Green, Robert O.; Lundeen, Sarah R.; Sarture, Charles M.; Steele, Denis; Ryan, Thomas; Bradley, Eliza S.; Roberts, Dar A.; ,

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a method to create color-composite images indicative of thick oil:water emulsions on the surface of clear, deep ocean water by using normalized difference ratios derived from remotely sensed data collected by an imaging spectrometer. The spectral bands used in the normalized difference ratios are located in wavelength regions where the spectra of thick oil:water emulsions on the ocean's surface have a distinct shape compared to clear water and clouds. In contrast to quantitative analyses, which require rigorous conversion to reflectance, the method described is easily computed and can be applied rapidly to radiance data or data that have been atmospherically corrected or ground-calibrated to reflectance. Examples are shown of the method applied to Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer data collected May 17 and May 19, 2010, over the oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Comparison of optical design methods of freeform surfaces for imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agócs, Tibor

    2015-09-01

    Optical systems based on freeform optical components offer many advantages over conventional systems in imaging applications, e.g. superior image quality, compact and lightweight designs. There are a few well established manufacturing method that can be used for the generation of freeform surfaces with low surface form error and low surface roughness, in the case of freeform mirrors e.g. diamond turning, nickel plating and post-polishing. Metrology is evolving rapidly, although developments are still needed in order to verify the manufactured surface with the necessary accuracy. Optical design methods of freeform surfaces are also lagging behind, many algorithms address non-imaging applications, but in the field of imaging (image-forming) only a few exists and works with various limitations. We compare the available techniques in freeform optical design for imaging and explore the advantages, disadvantages and boundary conditions of the different methods. We also intend to identify the most useful concepts and investigate how they can be embedded into commercially available optical design software.

  9. Thin plate spline feature point matching for organ surfaces in minimally invasive surgery imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bingxiong; Sun, Yu; Qian, Xiaoning

    2013-03-01

    Robust feature point matching for images with large view angle changes in Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is a challenging task due to low texture and specular reflections in these images. This paper presents a new approach that can improve feature matching performance by exploiting the inherent geometric property of the organ surfaces. Recently, intensity based template image tracking using a Thin Plate Spline (TPS) model has been extended for 3D surface tracking with stereo cameras. The intensity based tracking is also used here for 3D reconstruction of internal organ surfaces. To overcome the small displacement requirement of intensity based tracking, feature point correspondences are used for proper initialization of the nonlinear optimization in the intensity based method. Second, we generate simulated images from the reconstructed 3D surfaces under all potential view positions and orientations, and then extract feature points from these simulated images. The obtained feature points are then filtered and re-projected to the common reference image. The descriptors of the feature points under different view angles are stored to ensure that the proposed method can tolerate a large range of view angles. We evaluate the proposed method with silicon phantoms and in vivo images. The experimental results show that our method is much more robust with respect to the view angle changes than other state-of-the-art methods.

  10. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  11. Reconstruction of pseudo three-dimensional dental image from dental panoramic radiograph and tooth surface shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, Masataka; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kagiyama, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Masakazu; Takada, Kenji; Azuma, Hiroko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional volume data set is useful for diagnosis in dental treatments. However, to obtain three-dimensional images of a dental arch in general dental clinics is difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional dental images from a dental panoramic radiograph and a tooth surface shape which can be obtained from three dimensional shape measurement of a dental impression. The proposed method finds an appropriate curved surface on which the dental panoramic radiograph is mapped by comparing a virtual panoramic image made from a tooth surface shape to a real panoramic radiograph. The developed pseudo three-dimensional dental images give clear impression of patient's dental condition. (author)

  12. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The CEOS-Land Surface Imaging Constellation Portal for GEOSS: A resource for land surface imaging system information and data access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Thomas; Gallo, Kevin P.; Bailey, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites is an international group that coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth, and provides the space component of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOS Virtual Constellations concept was implemented in an effort to engage and coordinate disparate Earth observing programs of CEOS member agencies and ultimately facilitate their contribution in supplying the space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements of the GEOSS. The CEOS initially established Study Teams for four prototype constellations that included precipitation, land surface imaging, ocean surface topography, and atmospheric composition. The basic mission of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation [1] is to promote the efficient, effective, and comprehensive collection, distribution, and application of space-acquired image data of the global land surface, especially to meet societal needs of the global population, such as those addressed by the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) of agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water, and weather. The LSI Constellation Portal is the result of an effort to address important goals within the LSI Constellation mission and provide resources to assist in planning for future space missions that might further contribute to meeting those goals.

  14. MALDI-MS Imaging Analysis of Fungicide Residue Distributions on Wheat Leaf Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annangudi, Suresh P; Myung, Kyung; Avila Adame, Cruz; Gilbert, Jeffrey R

    2015-05-05

    Improved retention and distribution of agrochemicals on plant surfaces is an important attribute in the biological activity of pesticide. Although retention of agrochemicals on plants after spray application can be quantified using traditional analytical techniques including LC or GC, the spatial distribution of agrochemicals on the plants surfaces has received little attention. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging technology has been widely used to determine the distribution of proteins, peptides and metabolites in different tissue sections, but its application to environmental research has been limited. Herein, we probed the potential utility of MALDI imaging in characterizing the distribution of three commercial fungicides on wheat leaf surfaces. Using this MALDI imaging method, we were able to detect 500 ng of epoxiconazole, azoxystrobin, and pyraclostrobin applied in 1 μL drop on the leaf surfaces using MALDI-MS. Subsequent dilutions of pyraclostrobin revealed that the compound can be chemically imaged on the leaf surfaces at levels as low as 60 ng of total applied in the area of 1 μL droplet. After application of epoxiconazole, azoxystrobin, and pyraclostrobin at a field rate of 100 gai/ha in 200 L water using a track sprayer system, residues of these fungicides on the leaf surfaces were sufficiently visualized. These results suggest that MALDI imaging can be used to monitor spatial distribution of agrochemicals on leaf samples after pesticide application.

  15. High Tc superconductors at microwave frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruener, G.

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses various experiments conducted in the micro- and millimeter wave spectral range on thin film and single crystal specimens of the high temperature oxide superconductors. For high quality film the surface resistance R s is, except at low temperatures, due to thermally excited carriers, with extrinsic effects playing only a secondary role. Because of the low loss various passive microwave components, such as resonators, delay lines and filters, with performance far superior to those made of normal metals can be fabricated. The conductivity measured at millimeter wave frequencies displays a peak below T c . Whether this is due to coherence factors or due to the change of the relaxation rate when the materials enter the superconducting state remains to be seen

  16. Correlations, dimensionality and instabilities in organic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, D.; Wzietek, P.; Bourbonnais, C.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the role of Coulombic repulsion in organic superconductors exhibiting quasi-one-dimensional transport properties. A recent investigation in high magnetic fields shows that the charge localization occurring at low temperature in a 1-D half-fillled band is suppressed by the 1-D to 2-D (3-D) cross-over in selenium compounds. However, a localization around 30K in the non-ordered phase can be reactivated by the application of a high transverse magnetic field. This phenomenon provides an interpretation for the large transverse magnetoresistance observed in quasi-1-D conductors with open Fermi surfaces. The intermediate (strong) coupling limit is valid for the spin degree of freedom whereas the charge is governed by the strength of the Umklapp scattering varying by a large factor from sulfur to selenium compounds and under pressure. ((orig.))

  17. Spectroscopic views of high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendin, G.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper progress in the field of photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, inverse photoemission, and infrared- and optical reflectivity applied to high-T c superconductors in analyzed in terms of correlation effects, transport properties and Fermi liquid behavior. For the CuO 2 based materials, a picture emerges of localized holes in copper 3d levels and itinerant holes in oxygen 2p-like bands. A Fermi liquid picture and a superconducting gap is indicated by angle-resolved photoemission, infrared absorption, and NMR. A Fermi surface is indicated by positron annihilation. Infrared absorption revels strongly frequency and temperature dependent scattering and polaronic behavior for frequencies below 0.1 eV. Infrared absorption indicates a maximum superconducting gas of 2Δ/K B T c = 8 and suggests that ordinary samples may show a range of gaps 2 B T c B = 5

  18. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Alvarellos, J E; Chacon, E; GarcIa-Gonzalez, P

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z 0 ), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z 0 , and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description

  19. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  20. Spontaneous reorientation is guided by perceived surface distance, not by image matching or comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ah Lee

    Full Text Available Humans and animals recover their sense of position and orientation using properties of the surface layout, but the processes underlying this ability are disputed. Although behavioral and neurophysiological experiments on animals long have suggested that reorientation depends on representations of surface distance, recent experiments on young children join experimental studies and computational models of animal navigation to suggest that reorientation depends either on processing of any continuous perceptual variables or on matching of 2D, depthless images of the landscape. We tested the surface distance hypothesis against these alternatives through studies of children, using environments whose 3D shape and 2D image properties were arranged to enhance or cancel impressions of depth. In the absence of training, children reoriented by subtle differences in perceived surface distance under conditions that challenge current models of 2D-image matching or comparison processes. We provide evidence that children's spontaneous navigation depends on representations of 3D layout geometry.

  1. Dust Plate, Retina, Photograph: Imaging on Experimental Surfaces in Early Nineteenth-Century Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Chitra

    2015-09-01

    This article explores the entangled histories of three imaging techniques in early nineteenth-century British physical science, techniques in which a dynamic event (such as a sound vibration or an electric spark) was made to leave behind a fixed trace on a sensitive surface. Three categories of "sensitive surface" are examined in turn: first, a metal plate covered in fine dust; second, the retina of the human eye; and finally, a surface covered with a light-sensitive chemical emulsion (a photographic plate). For physicists Michael Faraday and Charles Wheatstone, and photographic pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot, transient phenomena could be studied through careful observation and manipulation of the patterns wrought on these different surfaces, and through an understanding of how the imaging process unfolded through time. This exposes the often-ignored materiality and temporality of epistemic practices around nineteenth-century scientific images said to be "drawn by nature."

  2. Fusion of MODIS and landsat-8 surface temperature images: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazaymeh, Khaled; Hassan, Quazi K

    2015-01-01

    Here, our objective was to develop a spatio-temporal image fusion model (STI-FM) for enhancing temporal resolution of Landsat-8 land surface temperature (LST) images by fusing LST images acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS); and implement the developed algorithm over a heterogeneous semi-arid study area in Jordan, Middle East. The STI-FM technique consisted of two major components: (i) establishing a linear relationship between two consecutive MODIS 8-day composite LST images acquired at time 1 and time 2; and (ii) utilizing the above mentioned relationship as a function of a Landsat-8 LST image acquired at time 1 in order to predict a synthetic Landsat-8 LST image at time 2. It revealed that strong linear relationships (i.e., r2, slopes, and intercepts were in the range 0.93-0.94, 0.94-0.99; and 2.97-20.07) existed between the two consecutive MODIS LST images. We evaluated the synthetic LST images qualitatively and found high visual agreements with the actual Landsat-8 LST images. In addition, we conducted quantitative evaluations of these synthetic images; and found strong agreements with the actual Landsat-8 LST images. For example, r2, root mean square error (RMSE), and absolute average difference (AAD)-values were in the ranges 084-0.90, 0.061-0.080, and 0.003-0.004, respectively.

  3. Topological insulators/superconductors: Potential future electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hor, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    A new material called topological insulator has been discovered and becomes one of the fastest growing field in condensed matter physics. Topological insulator is a new quantum phase of matter which has Dirac-like conductivity on its surface, but bulk insulator through its interior. It is considered a challenging problem for the surface transport measurements because of dominant internal conductance due to imperfections of the existing crystals of topological insulators. By a proper method, the internal bulk conduction can be suppressed in a topological insulator, and permit the detection of the surface currents which is necessary for future fault-tolerant quantum computing applications. Doped topological insulators have depicted a large variety of bulk physical properties ranging from magnetic to superconducting behaviors. By chemical doping, a TI can change into a bulk superconductor. Nb x Bi 2 Se 3 is shown to be a superconductor with T c ∼ 3.2 K, which could be a potential candidate for a topological superconductor

  4. Nanoscale imaging of surface piezoresponse on GaN epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Meijers, R.; Lueth, H.

    2007-01-01

    Surfaces of GaN films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) with implemented piezoelectric force microscopy technique. A model of PFM based on the surface depletion region in GaN films is discussed. The local piezoelectric effect of the low frequency regime was found to be in phase with the applied voltage on large domains, corresponding to a Ga-face of the GaN layer. Low piezoresponse is obtained within the inter-domain regions. The use of frequencies near a resonance frequency enhances very much the resolution of piezo-imaging, but only for very low scanning speed the piezo-imaging can follow the local piezoelectric effect. An inversion of the PFM image contrast is obtained for frequencies higher than the resonance frequencies. The effect of a chemical surface treatment on the topography and the piezoresponse of the GaN films was also investigated. Textured surfaces with very small domains were observed after the chemical treatment. For this kind of surfaces, piezo-induced torsion rather than bending of the AFM cantilever dominates the contrast of the PFM images. A small memory effect was observed, and explained by surface charging and confinement of the piezoelectric effect within the carrier depletion region at the GaN surface

  5. Atomic imaging of an InSe single-crystal surface with atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Uosaki, Kohei; Koinuma, Michio

    1993-01-01

    The atomic force microscope was employed to observed in air the surface atomic structure of InSe, one of III-VI compound semiconductors with layered structures. Atomic arrangements were observed in both n-type and p-type materials. The observed structures are in good agreement with those expected from bulk crystal structures. The atomic images became less clear by repeating the imaging process. Wide area imaging after the imaging of small area clearly showed that a mound was created at the sp...

  6. Iron-Based Superconductors as Odd-Parity Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangping Hu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Parity is a fundamental quantum number used to classify a state of matter. Materials rarely possess ground states with odd parity. We show that the superconducting state in iron-based superconductors is classified as an odd-parity s-wave spin-singlet pairing state in a single trilayer FeAs/Se, the building block of the materials. In a low-energy effective model constructed on the Fe square bipartite lattice, the superconducting order parameter in this state is a combination of an s-wave normal pairing between two sublattices and an s-wave η pairing within the sublattices. The state has a fingerprint with a real-space sign inversion between the top and bottom As/Se layers. The results suggest that iron-based superconductors are a new quantum state of matter, and the measurement of the odd parity can help to establish high-temperature superconducting mechanisms.

  7. Digital image processing: Cylindrical surface plane development of CAREM fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caccavelli, J; Cativa Tolosa, S; Gommes, C

    2012-01-01

    As part of the development of fuel pellets (FPs) for nuclear reactor CAREM-25, is necessary to systematize the analysis of the mechanical integrity of the FPs that is now done manually by a human operator. Following specifications and standards of reference for this purpose, the FPs should be inspected visually for detecting material discontinuities in the FPs surfaces to minimize any deterioration, loss of material and excessive breakage during operation and load of fuel bars. The material discontinuities are classified into two defects: surface cracks and chips. For each of these surface defects exist acceptance criteria that determine if the fuel pellet (FP) as a whole is accepted or rejected. One criteria for surface cracks is that they do not exceed one third (1/3) of the circumferential surface of the FP. The FP has cylindrical shape, so some of these acceptance criteria make difficult to analyze the FP in a single photographic image. Depending on the axial rotation of the FP, the crack could not be entirely visualized on the picture frame. Even a single crack that appears in different parts of the FP rotated images may appear to be different cracks in the FP when it is actually one. For this reason it is necessary, for the automatic detection and measurement of surface defects, obtain the circumferential surface of the FP into a single image in order to decide the acceptance or reject of the FP. As the FP shape is cylindrical, it is possible to obtain the flat development of the cylindrical surface (surface unrolling) of the FPs into a single image combining the image set of the axial rotation of the FP. In this work, we expose the procedure to implement the flat development of the cylindrical surface (surface unrolling). Starting from a photographic image of the FP surface, which represents the projection of a cylinder in the plane, we obtain three-dimensional information of each point on the cylindrical surface of the FP (3D-mapping). Then, we can

  8. NSSEFF Designing New Higher Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0083 NSSEFF - DESIGINING NEW HIGHER TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Meigan Aronson THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NSSEFF - DESIGINING NEW HIGHER TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0191 5c...materials, identifying the most promising candidates. 15. SUBJECT TERMS TEMPERATURE, SUPERCONDUCTOR 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  9. Applications of superconductors to electric motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews previous experience in applying superconductors to electric motors and examines the difficulties encountered. While motors and generators have a common basis, several significant differences exist. The application of high temperature superconductors to the major electric motor types is discussed and expected difficulties are presented. The limitations imposed by various motor designs are reflected in a statement of the desired material properties for high temperature superconductor electric motor applications

  10. Holographic complexity in gauge/string superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Momeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following a methodology similar to [1], we derive a holographic complexity for two dimensional holographic superconductors (gauge/string superconductors with backreactions. Applying a perturbation method proposed by Kanno in Ref. [2], we study behaviors of the complexity for a dual quantum system near critical points. We show that when a system moves from the normal phase (T>Tc to the superconductor phase (T

  11. Clinical usefulness of a newly-developed head and neck surface coil for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Morio; Kogure, Takashi; Hayashi, Sanshin

    1995-01-01

    To obtain correct diagnosis at early stages of cervical lymph node swelling, especially cases with suspected epipharyngeal carcinoma, and cerebral arterial sclerotic diseases, high-quality MR images visualizing the entire head and neck structures and vessels are of crucial importance. When obtaining images of head and neck regions using a head coil, signal intensity (SI) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of regions below the hypopharynx are weakened. Moreover, when obtaining images of head and neck regions using an anterior neck coil, SI and SNR of upper regions of epipharynx are also weakened. In an attempt to solve these problems, we developed a new head and neck surface coil for MR imaging. With this new coil we were able to obtain better images (153 cases) from regions below the hypopharynx to the upper regions of the epipharynx in the same time as images obtained using the head coil and anterior neck coil. 2D TOF MR angiographic images (11 cases) obtained by the head and neck surface coil are superior to 2D TOF angiographic images obtained by the anterior neck coil. MR images obtained with this improved method are valuable in the evaluation and management of head and neck region disease. (author)

  12. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  13. Establishment of the method of surface shaded display for brain PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; Tang Anwu; He Zuoxiang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To establish the method of surface shaded display (SSD) for brain PET imaging. Methods: The original brain PET images volume data were transferred to the personal computer by the local area network, and scaled into 256 grayscale values between 0 and 255. An appropriate threshold could be selected with three differential methods: depended on the histogram or maximum percentage of the volume data and the opposite value percentage of the lesion. The list of vertices and triangles describing the contour surface was produced with a high resolution three dimensional (3D) surface construction algorithm. Results: The final software of SSD for brain PET imaging with interactive user interface can produce 3D brain PET images which can be rotated, scaled, and saved or outputted with several image formats. Conclusion: The method of SSD for brain PET imaging can directly and integrally reflect the surface of brain cortex, and be helpful to locate lesions and display the range of lesions, but can not reflect the severity of lesions, nor can display the structure under brain cortex

  14. Self-organizing of critical state in granulated superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, S.L.; Savitskaya, N.E.

    2000-01-01

    Critical state in granulated superconductors was studied on the basis of two mathematical models - the system of differential equations for calibration and invariant difference of phases and a simplified model describing the system of associated images and equivalent to the standard models to study self-organizing criticality. The critical state of granulated superconductors in all studied cases was shown to be self-organized. Besides, it is shown that the applied models are practically equivalent ones, that is they both show similar critical behavior and lead to coincidence of noncritical phenomena. For the first time one showed that the occurrence of self-organized critically within the system of nonlinear differential equations and its equivalence to self-organized critically in the standard models [ru

  15. Comparison of surface coil and knee coil for evaluation of the patellar cartilage by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, M. van den; Maeseneer, M. de; Hoste, M.; Vanderdood, K.; Ridder, F. de; Osteaux, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to compare the knee coil and the surface coil for the visualisation of the patellar cartilage. Materials and methods: In 28 patients (17 women, 11 men) with an average age of 40 years (range 14-76) with knee pain MR was performed. Transverse images were obtained using a fast spin echo proton density weighted sequence on a Philips Gyroscan Intera 1.5 T clinical system. Transverse images were obtained at the level of the patellar cartilage using both the surface and the knee coil. All images were evaluated by consensus of two radiologists. They evaluated a number of quality criteria on a 4-point scale. Criteria for artefacts were also graded on a 4-point scale. Results: For the visualisation of fluid there was no significant difference between the knee coil and the surface coil (P=0.021). For all other criteria regarding image quality and presence of imaging artefacts there was a significant difference between both coils (P<0.001) with the surface coil obtaining the better result. Conclusion: The use of the surface coil in the visualisation of the patellar cartilage can be recommended at knee MR

  16. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  17. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  18. Recent status of superconductors for accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of superconductor wire and cable which has been or will be used for construction of dipole magnets for all of the large European and US superconducting accelerator rings. Included is a simplified view of the construction methods and operating requirements of an accelerator dipole magnet, with emphasis on required superconductor performance. The methods of fabricating Nb-Ti superconductors are described, including the critical parameters and materials requirements. The superconductor performance requirements are summarized in an effort to relate why these are important to accelerator designers. Some of the recently observed time dependent effects are covered briefly

  19. Quantitative sub-surface and non-contact imaging using scanning microwave microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramse, Georg; Kasper, Manuel; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Brinciotti, Enrico; Rankl, Christian; Kienberger, Ferry; Lucibello, Andrea; Marcelli, Romolo; Patil, Samadhan B.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    The capability of scanning microwave microscopy for calibrated sub-surface and non-contact capacitance imaging of silicon (Si) samples is quantitatively studied at broadband frequencies ranging from 1 to 20 GHz. Calibrated capacitance images of flat Si test samples with varying dopant density (10 15 –10 19 atoms cm −3 ) and covered with dielectric thin films of SiO 2 (100–400 nm thickness) are measured to demonstrate the sensitivity of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) for sub-surface imaging. Using standard SMM imaging conditions the dopant areas could still be sensed under a 400 nm thick oxide layer. Non-contact SMM imaging in lift-mode and constant height mode is quantitatively demonstrated on a 50 nm thick SiO 2 test pad. The differences between non-contact and contact mode capacitances are studied with respect to the main parameters influencing the imaging contrast, namely the probe tip diameter and the tip–sample distance. Finite element modelling was used to further analyse the influence of the tip radius and the tip–sample distance on the SMM sensitivity. The understanding of how the two key parameters determine the SMM sensitivity and quantitative capacitances represents an important step towards its routine application for non-contact and sub-surface imaging. (paper)

  20. Multimodal imaging of ocular surface of dry eye subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhong; Salahura, Gheorghe; Kottaiyan, Ranjini; Yoon, Geunyoung; Aquavella, James V.; Zavislan, James M.

    2016-03-01

    To study the relationship between the corneal lipid layer and the ocular surface temperature (OST), we conducted a clinical trial for 20 subjects. Subjects were clinically screened prior to the trial. Of the 20 subjects, 15 have Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), and 5 have aqueous-deficient dry eye (ADDE). A custom, circularly polarized illumination video tearscope measured the lipid layer thickness of the ocular tear film. A long-wave infrared video camera recorded the dynamic thermal properties of the ocular team film. The results of these two methods were analyzed and compared. Using principal component analysis (PCA) of the lipid layer distribution, we find that the 20 subjects could be categorized into five statistically significant groups, independent of their original clinical classification: thin (6 subjects), medium (5 subjects), medium and homogenous (3 subjects), thick (4 subjects), and very thick (2 subjects) lipids, respectively. We also conducted PCA of the OST data, and recategorized the subjects into two thermal groups by k-means clustering: one includes all ADDE subjects and some MGD subjects; the other includes the remaining MGD subjects. By comparing these two methods, we find that dry eye subjects with thin ( 40 nm), there is no strong correlation between the lipid layer thickness and heterogeneity and the OST patterns.

  1. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  2. Estimation of Shie Glacier Surface Movement Using Offset Tracking Technique with Cosmo-Skymed Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Zhou, W.; Fan, J.; Yuan, W.; Li, H.; Sousa, J. J.; Guo, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Movement is one of the most important characteristics of glaciers which can cause serious natural disasters. For this reason, monitoring this massive blocks is a crucial task. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can operate all day in any weather conditions and the images acquired by SAR contain intensity and phase information, which are irreplaceable advantages in monitoring the surface movement of glaciers. Moreover, a variety of techniques like DInSAR and offset tracking, based on the information of SAR images, could be applied to measure the movement. Sangwang lake, a glacial lake in the Himalayas, has great potentially danger of outburst. Shie glacier is situated at the upstream of the Sangwang lake. Hence, it is significant to monitor Shie glacier surface movement to assess the risk of outburst. In this paper, 6 high resolution COSMO-SkyMed images spanning from August to December, 2016 are applied with offset tracking technique to estimate the surface movement of Shie glacier. The maximum velocity of Shie glacier surface movement is 51 cm/d, which was observed at the end of glacier tongue, and the velocity is correlated with the change of elevation. Moreover, the glacier surface movement in summer is faster than in winter and the velocity decreases as the local temperature decreases. Based on the above conclusions, the glacier may break off at the end of tongue in the near future. The movement results extracted in this paper also illustrate the advantages of high resolution SAR images in monitoring the surface movement of small glaciers.

  3. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O; Wang, R; Tomasi, D

    2011-01-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  4. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Wang, R; Tomasi, D, E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  5. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S.E.; Tomasi, D.; Solis, S.E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A.O.

    2011-07-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  6. Photographing magnetic fields in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.B.; Wright, L.S.

    Magneto-optic techniques coupled with high-speed photography are being used to study the destruction of superconductivity by a magnetic field. The phenomenon of superconductivity will be introduced with emphasis placed on the properties of type I and type II superconductors in a magnetic field. The Faraday effect and its application to the study of the penetration of magnetic fields into these superconductors will be described; the relative effectiveness of some types of paramagnetic glass will be demonstrated. A number of cinefilms will be shown to illustrate the versatility of the magneto-optic method for observing flux motion and patterns. The analysis of data obtained from a high speed film (10,200 fps) of a flux jump in Nb-Zr will be presented and discussed

  7. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  8. QCD as a dual superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariasen, F.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes the construction of an effective action describing long-range Yang-Mills theory. This action is motivated by a study of the system of Dyson equations and Ward identities, but cannot (yet) be derived from the underlying quantum theory. The effective action turns out to describe a medium very much like a dual relativistic superconductor; that is, with electric and magnetic fields interchanged. There is a dual Meissner effect, which serves to compress color electric fields into flux tubes, containing quantized units of color electric flux. This produces electric confinement. There is a magnetic condensate, resulting from a spontaneous symmetry breaking analogous to that in the relativistic superconductor, as in the Abelian Higgs model. He gives the motivation leading to the effective action, and describes the quantized electric flux tube solutions. Finally, he mentions briefly some other applications

  9. Quantitative magneto-optical investigation of superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G; Brisbois, J; Pinheiro, L B G L; Müller, J; Blanco Alvarez, S; Devillers, T; Dempsey, N M; Scheerder, J E; Van de Vondel, J; Melinte, S; Vanderbemden, P; Motta, M; Ortiz, W A; Hasselbach, K; Kramer, R B G; Silhanek, A V

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed quantitative magneto-optical imaging study of several superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures, including Nb deposited on top of thermomagnetically patterned NdFeB and permalloy/niobium with erasable and tailored magnetic landscapes imprinted in the permalloy layer. The magneto-optical imaging data are complemented with and compared to scanning Hall probe microscopy measurements. Comprehensive protocols have been developed for calibrating, testing, and converting Faraday rotation data to magnetic field maps. Applied to the acquired data, they reveal the comparatively weaker magnetic response of the superconductor from the background of larger fields and field gradients generated by the magnetic layer.

  10. Quantitative magneto-optical investigation of superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G.; Brisbois, J.; Pinheiro, L. B. G. L.; Müller, J.; Blanco Alvarez, S.; Devillers, T.; Dempsey, N. M.; Scheerder, J. E.; Van de Vondel, J.; Melinte, S.; Vanderbemden, P.; Motta, M.; Ortiz, W. A.; Hasselbach, K.; Kramer, R. B. G.; Silhanek, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed quantitative magneto-optical imaging study of several superconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structures, including Nb deposited on top of thermomagnetically patterned NdFeB and permalloy/niobium with erasable and tailored magnetic landscapes imprinted in the permalloy layer. The magneto-optical imaging data are complemented with and compared to scanning Hall probe microscopy measurements. Comprehensive protocols have been developed for calibrating, testing, and converting Faraday rotation data to magnetic field maps. Applied to the acquired data, they reveal the comparatively weaker magnetic response of the superconductor from the background of larger fields and field gradients generated by the magnetic layer.

  11. What can Andreev bound states tell us about superconductors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millo, Oded; Koren, Gad

    2018-08-06

    Zero-energy Andreev bound states, which manifest themselves in the tunnelling spectra as zero-bias conductance peaks (ZBCPs), are abundant at interfaces between superconductors and other materials and on the nodal surface of high-temperature superconductors. In this review, we focus on the information such excitations can provide on the properties of superconductor systems. First, a general introduction to the physics of Andreev bound states in superconductor/normal metal interfaces is given with a particular emphasis on why they appear at zero energy in d -wave superconductors. Then, specific spectroscopic tunnelling studies of thin films, bilayers and junctions are described, focusing on the corresponding ZBCP features. Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies show that the ZBCPs on the c -axis YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7- δ (YBCO) films are correlated with the surface morphology and appear only in proximity to (110) facets. STS on c -axis La 1.88 Sr 0.12 CuO 4 (LSCO) films exhibiting the 1/8 anomaly shows spatially modulated peaks near zero bias associated with the anti-phase ordering of the d -wave order parameter predicted at this doping level. ZBCPs were also found in micrometre-size edge junctions of YBCO/SrRuO 3 /YBCO, where SrRuO 3 is ferromagnetic. Here, the results are consistent with a crossed Andreev reflection effect (CARE) at the narrow domain walls of the SrRuO 3 ZBCPs measured in STS studies of manganite/cuprate bilayers could not be attributed to CARE because the manganite's domain wall is much larger than the coherence length in YBCO, and instead are attributed to proximity-induced triplet-pairing superconductivity with non-conventional symmetry. And finally, ZBCPs found in junctions of non-intentionally doped topological insulator films of Bi 2 Se 3 and the s -wave superconductor NbN are attributed to proximity-induced p x  + ip y triplet order parameter in the topological material.This article is part of the theme issue 'Andreev bound states'.

  12. Theoretical studies of unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groensleth, Martin Sigurd

    2008-07-01

    This thesis presents four research papers. In the first three papers we have derived analytical results for the transport properties in unconventional superconductors and ferromagnetic systems with multiple broken symmetries. In Paper I and parts of Paper II we have studied tunneling transport between two non-unitary ferromagnetic spin-triplet superconductors, and found a novel interplay between ferromagnetism and superconductivity manifested in the Josephson effect as a spin- and charge-current in the absence of an applied voltage across the junction. The critical amplitudes of these currents can be adjusted by the relative magnetization direction on each side of the junction. Furthermore, in Paper II, we have found a way of controlling a spin-current between two ferromagnets with spin-orbit coupling. Paper III considers a junction consisting of a ferromagnet and a non-unitary ferromagnetic superconductor, and we show that the conductance spectra contains detailed information about the superconducting gaps and pairing symmetry of the Cooper-pairs. In the last paper we present a Monte Carlo study of an effective Hamiltonian describing orbital currents in the CuO2 layers of high-temperature superconductive cuprates. The model features two intrinsically anisotropic Ising models, coupled through an anisotropic next-nearest neighbor interaction, and an Ashkin-Teller nearest neighbor fourth order coupling. We have studied the specific heat anomaly, as well as the anomaly in the staggered magnetization associated with the orbital currents and its susceptibility. We have found that in a limited parameter regime, the specific heat anomaly is substantially suppressed, while the susceptibility has a non-analytical peak across the order-disorder transition. The model is therefore a candidate for describing the breakup of hidden order when crossing the pseudo-gap line on the under-doped side in the phase diagram of high-temperature superconductors. (Author) 64 refs., figs

  13. Interaction between light and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert, Alain

    In the first part of this review article we resume briefly the fundamental aspect of the photon-superconductor interaction. The emphase is focused on the characteristic times and on the phenomenological models (the T*, the μ* models and the model of the kinetics equations) describing the out of equilibrium superconductivity. The experiments made on classical illuminated superconductors especially on tunnel junctions are then reported. In the second part we present the applied aspect of the photon-superconductor interaction. The interaction of the light with the high Tc superconductors is reviewed in the last part. Dans la première partie de cet article de revue, on résume brièvement 1'aspect fondamental de l'action des photons sur les supraconducteurs en s'attachant surtout à rappeler les différents temps caractéristiques de cette interaction et les modèles phénoménologiques (le modèle T*, le modèle μ*, le modèle des équations cinétiques) décrivant la supraconductivité hors équilibre. La seconde partie rappelle les expériences réalisées sur les supraconducteurs classiques illuminés et spécialement les jonctions tunnel ainsi que certaines applications de la supraconductivité hors équilibre comme les liens faibles controllables par des moyens optiques. La dernière partie est consacrée aux nouvelles expériences qui démarrent concernant l'action de la lumière sur les supraconducteurs à hautes températures critiques.

  14. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  15. Normal appearance of the prostate and seminal tract: MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Moo Sang; Choi, Pil Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Yeon Hee; Choi, Hak Yong

    1994-01-01

    To assess the ability of MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil for the depiction of normal anatomical structure of prostate and its adjacent organs. MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil was performed in 23 male patients(age ; 20-75) to evaluate various prostatic and vasovesicular disorders, i. e, 14 cases of ejaculatory problems, 3 cases of hypogonadism, and 4 cases of prostatic cancers and 2 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia. MR images were obtained with axial, sagittal and coronal fast spin echo long TR/TE images and axial spin echo short TR/TE images. Field of views was 10-12 cm and scan thickness was 3-5 mm. Depiction of normal anatomcial structures was excellent in all cases. On T2WI, zonal anatomy of the prostate and prostatic urethra, urethral crest, and ejaculatory duct were cleary visualized. On T1WI, periprostatic fat plane is more cleary visualized. On transverse images, periprostatic structures were well visualized on T1WI,and on T2WI, anterior fibromuscular stroma, transition zone and peripheral zone could be readily differentiated. Coronal images were more helpful in visualization of both central and peripheral zones. Vas deferens, ejaculatory duct and vermontanum were also more easily defined on these images. Sagittal images was helpful in the depiction of anterior fibromuscular stroma, central zone and peripheral zone with prostatic urethra and ejaculatory duct in a single plane. High resolution MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil can readily visualize the normal anatomy of the prostate and its related structures and may be useful in the evaluation of various diseases of prostate and vasvesicular system

  16. Normal appearance of the prostate and seminal tract: MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Moo Sang; Choi, Pil Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Yeon Hee; Choi, Hak Yong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    To assess the ability of MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil for the depiction of normal anatomical structure of prostate and its adjacent organs. MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil was performed in 23 male patients(age ; 20-75) to evaluate various prostatic and vasovesicular disorders, i. e, 14 cases of ejaculatory problems, 3 cases of hypogonadism, and 4 cases of prostatic cancers and 2 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia. MR images were obtained with axial, sagittal and coronal fast spin echo long TR/TE images and axial spin echo short TR/TE images. Field of views was 10-12 cm and scan thickness was 3-5 mm. Depiction of normal anatomcial structures was excellent in all cases. On T2WI, zonal anatomy of the prostate and prostatic urethra, urethral crest, and ejaculatory duct were cleary visualized. On T1WI, periprostatic fat plane is more cleary visualized. On transverse images, periprostatic structures were well visualized on T1WI,and on T2WI, anterior fibromuscular stroma, transition zone and peripheral zone could be readily differentiated. Coronal images were more helpful in visualization of both central and peripheral zones. Vas deferens, ejaculatory duct and vermontanum were also more easily defined on these images. Sagittal images was helpful in the depiction of anterior fibromuscular stroma, central zone and peripheral zone with prostatic urethra and ejaculatory duct in a single plane. High resolution MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil can readily visualize the normal anatomy of the prostate and its related structures and may be useful in the evaluation of various diseases of prostate and vasvesicular system.

  17. The new superconductors: Prospects for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsky, A.M.; Giese, R.F.; Daniels, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two years ago several groups around the world, excited by the discovery by K. Alex Mueller and J. Georg Bednorz of the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory of a superconducting ceramic oxide, developed an yttrium-barium-copper oxide that superconducted at 90 K. Since then other investigators have found two separate families of copper oxides, one incorporating bismuth and the other thallium, that superconduct at between 110 and 120 K. These high-temperature superconductors could be cooled to 77 degrees K with liquid nitrogen, which is cheap and abundant. This immediately suggested that certain applications of superconductivity long considered not to be economic or practical might be feasible. Yet many of the envisioned applications-generators and motors, energy storage, magnetically levitating trains-raise the same issues to which Onnes referred. It is not yet known whether the new materials can be made easily workable-strong and flexible enough to fashion into wire and other useful forms. Nor is it known whether they can be made to carry large currents and operate in intense magnetic fields. Whether the new discoveries will prove fruitful will depend on the progress made toward achieving design requirements for known applications and on identifying new applications as yet unforeseen. Indeed, such new applications may well have the greater impact. No one foresaw today's most important commercial use of superconductivity, magnetic-resonance imaging for medical diagnosis, in the 1960's, when niobium-3-tin and niobium-titanium were found to remain superconducting while carrying high currents in the presence of sizable magnetic fields. Leaving aside the unforeseen, an informed view of the economic and technical advantages of the new superconductors can help guide attempts to achieve the applications now being envisioned

  18. Ground-based thermal imaging of stream surface temperatures: Technique and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Petre, Sally J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a ground-based handheld thermal imaging system for measuring water temperatures using data from eight southwestern USA streams and rivers. We found handheld thermal imagers could provide considerably more spatial information on water temperature (for our unit one image = 19,600 individual temperature measurements) than traditional methods could supply without a prohibitive amount of effort. Furthermore, they could provide measurements of stream surface temperature almost instantaneously compared with most traditional handheld thermometers (e.g., >20 s/reading). Spatial temperature analysis is important for measurement of subtle temperature differences across waterways, and identification of warm and cold groundwater inputs. Handheld thermal imaging is less expensive and equipment intensive than airborne thermal imaging methods and is useful under riparian canopies. Disadvantages of handheld thermal imagers include their current higher expense than thermometers, their susceptibility to interference when used incorrectly, and their slightly lower accuracy than traditional temperature measurement methods. Thermal imagers can only measure surface temperature, but this usually corresponds to subsurface temperatures in well-mixed streams and rivers. Using thermal imaging in select applications, such as where spatial investigations of water temperature are needed, or in conjunction with stationary temperature data loggers or handheld electronic or liquid-in-glass thermometers to characterize stream temperatures by both time and space, could provide valuable information on stream temperature dynamics. These tools will become increasingly important to fisheries biologists as costs continue to decline.

  19. Exploring surface photoreaction dynamics using pixel imaging mass spectrometry (PImMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershis, Matthew D.; Wilson, Daniel P.; White, Michael G.; John, Jaya John; Nomerotski, Andrei; Brouard, Mark; Lee, Jason W. L.; Vallance, Claire; Turchetta, Renato

    2013-08-01

    A new technique for studying surface photochemistry has been developed using an ion imaging time-of-flight mass spectrometer in conjunction with a fast camera capable of multimass imaging. This technique, called pixel imaging mass spectrometry (PImMS), has been applied to the study of butanone photooxidation on TiO2(110). In agreement with previous studies of this system, it was observed that the main photooxidation pathway for butanone involves ejection of an ethyl radical into vacuum which, as confirmed by our imaging experiment, undergoes fragmentation after ionization in the mass spectrometer. This proof-of-principle experiment illustrates the usefulness and applicability of PImMS technology to problems of interest within the surface science community.

  20. Simulation of Specular Surface Imaging Based on Computer Graphics: Application on a Vision Inspection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulin Ralph

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at detecting surface defects on reflecting industrial parts. A machine vision system, performing the detection of geometric aspect surface defects, is completely described. The revealing of defects is realized by a particular lighting device. It has been carefully designed to ensure the imaging of defects. The lighting system simplifies a lot the image processing for defect segmentation and so a real-time inspection of reflective products is possible. To bring help in the conception of imaging conditions, a complete simulation is proposed. The simulation, based on computer graphics, enables the rendering of realistic images. Simulation provides here a very efficient way to perform tests compared to the numerous attempts of manual experiments.

  1. AFM imaging and fractal analysis of surface roughness of AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaeva, Dinara, E-mail: dinara.dallaeva@yandex.ru [Brno University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Physics Department, Technická 8, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Ţălu, Ştefan [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of AET, Discipline of Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Graphics, 103-105 B-dul Muncii Street, Cluj-Napoca 400641, Cluj (Romania); Stach, Sebastian [University of Silesia, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, Institute of Informatics, Department of Biomedical Computer Systems, ul. Będzińska 39, 41-205 Sosnowiec (Poland); Škarvada, Pavel; Tománek, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír [Brno University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication, Physics Department, Technická 8, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We determined the complexity of 3D surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We used atomic force microscopy and analyzed their fractal geometry. • We determined the fractal dimension of surface roughness of aluminum nitride layers. • We determined the dependence of layer morphology on substrate temperature. - Abstract: The paper deals with AFM imaging and characterization of 3D surface morphology of aluminum nitride (AlN) epilayers on sapphire substrates prepared by magnetron sputtering. Due to the effect of temperature changes on epilayer's surface during the fabrication, a surface morphology is studied by combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fractal analysis methods. Both methods are useful tools that may assist manufacturers in developing and fabricating AlN thin films with optimal surface characteristics. Furthermore, they provide different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters. This combination is used for the first time for measurement on AlN epilayers on sapphire substrates, and provides the overall 3D morphology of the sample surfaces (by AFM imaging), and reveals fractal characteristics in the surface morphology (fractal analysis)

  2. Surface phenomena revealed by in situ imaging: studies from adhesion, wear and cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Mahato, Anirban; Yeung, Ho; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2017-03-01

    Surface deformation and flow phenomena are ubiquitous in mechanical processes. In this work we present an in situ imaging framework for studying a range of surface mechanical phenomena at high spatial resolution and across a range of time scales. The in situ framework is capable of resolving deformation and flow fields quantitatively in terms of surface displacements, velocities, strains and strain rates. Three case studies are presented demonstrating the power of this framework for studying surface deformation. In the first, the origin of stick-slip motion in adhesive polymer interfaces is investigated, revealing a intimate link between stick-slip and surface wave propagation. Second, the role of flow in mediating formation of surface defects and wear particles in metals is analyzed using a prototypical sliding process. It is shown that conventional post-mortem observation and inference can lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to formation of surface cracks and wear particles. The in situ framework is shown to unambiguously capture delamination wear in sliding. Third, material flow and surface deformation in a typical cutting process is analyzed. It is shown that a long-standing problem in the cutting of annealed metals is resolved by the imaging, with other benefits such as estimation of energy dissipation and power from the flow fields. In closure, guidelines are provided for profitably exploiting in situ observations to study large-strain deformation, flow and friction phenomena at surfaces that display a variety of time-scales.

  3. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on iron-chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maletz, Janek; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr; Evtushinsky, Daniil; Thirupathaiah, Setti; Wolter-Giraud, Anja; Harnagea, Luminita; Kordyuk, Alexander; Borisenko, Sergey [IFW Dresden (Germany); Yaresko, Alexander [MPI-FKF, Stuttgart (Germany); Vasiliev, Alexander [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Chareev, Dimitri [RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Rienks, Emile [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany); Shermadini, Zurab; Luetkens, Hubertus; Sedlak, Kamil; Khasanov, Rustem; Amato, Alex; Krzton-Maziopa, Anna; Conder, Kazimierz; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Klauss, Hans-Henning [TU Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The electronic structure of the iron chalcogenide superconductors FeSe{sub 1-x} and Rb{sub 0.77}Fe{sub 1.61}Se{sub 2} was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The results were compared to DFT calculations and μSR measurements. Both compounds share ''cigar-shaped'' Fermi surface sheets in their electronic structure, that can be found in almost all iron-pnictide superconductors. These features originate from a strong interplay of two hole- and electron-like bands in the Brillouin zone center, leading to a pronounced singularity in the density of states just below the Fermi level. This facilitates the coupling to a bosonic mode responsible for superconductivity.

  4. Effect of twinning plane on superconductor magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdin, A.I.; Kuptsov, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of twinning planes on pinning of the Abrikosov vortices in superconductors of the second order with the Ginsburg-Landau parameter, κ >> 1, is considered. The modified Ginsburg-Landau functional, where the effect of superconducting properties improvement near the twinning plane is taken into account by adding the additional δ-function component, is used to descibe superconductivity of twinning plane. Force of interaction of a vortex filament and the twinning plane is calculated. It is shown that in case of the twinning plane opaque to electrons, additional attractive force, being analogous to that occurring in the problem on the surface Been-Livingston barrier, affects the vortex filament. The results can explain anisotropy of vortex pinning observed in the periodic twinning structure in high-temperature superconductors

  5. Square vortex lattice in p-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, J.

    1999-01-01

    Making use of the Ginzburg Landau equation for isotropic p-wave superconductors, we construct the single vortex solution in part analytically. The fourfold symmetry breaking term arising from the tetragonal symmetry distortion of the Fermi surface is crucial, since this term indicates a fourfold distortion of the vortex core somewhat similar to the one found in d-wave superconductors. This fourfold distortion of the vortex core in turn favors the square vortex lattice as observed recently by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment from Sr 2 RuO 4 . We find that the hexagonal vortex lattice at H = H c1 transforms into the square one for H = H cr = 0.26 H c2 . On the other hand the SANS data does not reveal such transition. The square vortex covers everywhere studied by the SANS implying H cr is very close to H c1 . Therefore some improvement in the present model is certainly desirable. (orig.)

  6. Dependence of stability of metastable superconductors on copper fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elrod, S.A.; Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Dresner, L.

    1980-12-01

    The stability of composite superconductors operating in the metastable regime depends upon such factors as matrix resistivity, cooled surface dimensions, fraction of critical current, and volume fraction of stabilizer. By assuming constant thermophysical properties, we developed analytic expressions for the energy and voltage of the minimum propagating zone (MPZ). With other factors held constant, these expressions have been used to predict composite superconductor stability as a function of copper fraction: lower copper fractions lead to higher MPZ energies. MPZ voltages have been measured for three NbTi/Cu composites having different copper fractions and different critical current densities for several magnetic fields and transport currents. Experimental MPZ voltages have been used to calculate an effective heat transfer coefficient, which is subsequently used to calculate the MPZ energy. The experimental MPZ energies support the theoretical expectation that lower copper fractions lead to higher stability in the metastable regime

  7. Clinical application of synthesized brain surface imaging for preoperative simulation of brain biopsy under local anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Yuko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Imai, Fumihiro; Fujisawa, Kazuhisa; Takeshita, Gen; Kanno, Tetsuo; Koga, Sukehiko

    1994-01-01

    Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) is the technique which permits the direct visualization of brain surface structures, including cortical sulci, guri, subcortical lesions as well as skin markings for craniotomy. A synthesized brain surface image is a technique that combines MR angiography (MRA) with SAS, and it proposed by us for detecting cerebral superficial veins with these surface structures on the same image. The purpose of this report is to present the result of applying the synthesized brain surface image to the preoperative simulation of biopsy under local anesthesia in 2 cases of multiple metastatic brain tumors. The parameters for SAS were TR/TE=50/40 msec, flip angle=60deg by the fast T 2 technique using refocused FID in steady-state (STERF technique). SAS images were processed by gray scale reversal. The MRA data were acquired with two-dimensional time of flight (TOF) sequence after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. Before imaging, the water-filled plastic tubes were placed on the patients scalp as markings for craniotomy. Their positions were planned by the neurosurgeons. On SAS, the markings for burr-hole appeared located above the tumors. However on the synthesized brain surface images, the positions of burr-hole were considered to be inadequate, since superficial cerebral vein and sinus were also visualized in the area of the markings. From these results, the positions of burr-hole were reset to avoid the venous structures, and so as to include the lesions in operations. The biopsies were performed successfully and safely because the venous structure could be excluded from the operative field. By this technique it was easy to confirm the relationships among lesions, skin markings and venous structures. The technique described appears to be a useful method for preoperative simulation of biopsies for multiple metastatic brain tumors under local anesthesia. (author)

  8. Imaging performance of annular apertures. VI - Limitations by optical surface deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschunko, Hubert F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of optical systems is limited by imperfect optical surfaces that degrade the images below the level set by wave theoretical limits. The central irradiance functions are derived for slit and circular apertures with five distributions of wavefront errors and for a range of maximal wavefront deviations. For practical frequency of occurrence distributions of wavefront deviations, the point spread and the image energy integral functions are determined. Practical performances of optical systems are derived and performance limits discussed.

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  10. Image potential resonances of the aluminum (100) surface; Bildpotentialresonanzen der Aluminium-(100)-Oberflaeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Matthias

    2011-07-08

    Image-potential resonances on the (100) surface of pure Aluminum are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are conducted both energy- and time-resolved using the method of two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The main attention of the theoretical examination and extensive numerical calculations is devoted to the interaction between surface and bulk states. Image-potential resonances on Al(100) are a system in which a complete series of discrete Rydberg states strongly couples to a continuum of states. As a simple metal it also provides a good opportunity to test theoretical models of the structure of the potential at metal surfaces. This work represents the first high-resolution investigation of image-potential resonances with such strong resonance character. For the first time, it is demonstrated experimentally that isolated image-potential resonances exist on an Aluminum surface. On the (100) surface of Aluminum the second through fifth image-potential resonance are resolved and both, their energies and lifetimes are measured. The binding energies of the image-potential resonances form a Rydberg series of states {epsilon}{sub n}=-(0,85 eV)/((n+a){sup 2}). Within the accuracy of the measurement it is not necessary to introduce a quantum defect a (a=0.022{+-}0.035). Using angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy the effective mass of electrons in the second image-potential resonance is measured to 1.01{+-}0.11 electron masses. The lifetimes of the resonances increase as {tau}{sub n} = (1.0{+-}0.2)fs.n{sup 3} starting from n=2. Calculations using the density matrix formalism show that the experimentally observed lifetimes can be explained well by electrons decaying into the bulk. The effect of resonance trapping leads to extended lifetimes in the process. Contrary to common theoretical models of image-potential states at metal surfaces the first image-potential resonance cannot be observed in two-photon photoemission on Al(100

  11. Fusion and display of 3D spect and MR images registered by a surface fitting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oghabian, M.A.; Kaboli, P.

    2002-01-01

    Since 3D medical images such as SPECT and MRI are taken under different positioning and imaging parameters, interpretation of them, as reconstructed originally, dose not provide an easy and accurate understanding of similarities and differences between them. The problem becomes more crucial where a clinician would like to map accurately region of interest from one study to the other, by which some surgical or therapeutical planning may be based. the research presented here is an investigation into the problems of the registration and display of brain images obtained by different imaging modalities. Following the introduction of an efficient method some clinical useful application of the registration and superimposition were also defined. The various widely used registration algorithms were first studied and their advantages and disadvantages of each method were evaluated. In this approach, an edge-based algorithm (called surface fitting), which are based on a least-square-distance matching, were suggested for registering of brain images. This algorithm minimizes the sum of square-distances between the two surfaces obtained from two modalities. The minimization is performed to find a set of six geometrical transformation parameters (3 shifts and 3 rotations) which indicate how one surface should be transformed in order to match with the other surface

  12. A high-throughput surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on differential interferometric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Daqian; Ding, Lili; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Enyao; Yu, Xinglong; Luo, Zhaofeng; Ou, Huichao

    2012-01-01

    A new high-throughput surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on differential interferometric imaging is reported. The two SPR interferograms of the sensing surface are imaged on two CCD cameras. The phase difference between the two interferograms is 180°. The refractive index related factor (RIRF) of the sensing surface is calculated from the two simultaneously acquired interferograms. The simulation results indicate that the RIRF exhibits a linear relationship with the refractive index of the sensing surface and is unaffected by the noise, drift and intensity distribution of the light source. The affinity and kinetic information can be extracted in real time from continuously acquired RIRF distributions. The results of refractometry experiments show that the dynamic detection range of SPR differential interferometric imaging system can be over 0.015 refractive index unit (RIU). High refractive index resolution is down to 0.45 RU (1 RU = 1 × 10 −6 RIU). Imaging and protein microarray experiments demonstrate the ability of high-throughput detection. The aptamer experiments demonstrate that the SPR sensor based on differential interferometric imaging has a great capability to be implemented for high-throughput aptamer kinetic evaluation. These results suggest that this biosensor has the potential to be utilized in proteomics and drug discovery after further improvement. (paper)

  13. The role of oxygen in quinternary superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, D.R.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The oxygen composition of the new generation of high temperature superconductors (HTSC) has been found to play a crucial role in determining the superconductivity of these materials. However, measurement of the oxygen stoichiometry in such samples has proven difficult due to the small scattering cross section of oxygen, a light element, which has caused the oxygen scattering signal to be overwhelmed by the far larger signals generated off the heavier elements present in the HTSC samples. It is for this reason that previous ion beam analysis of oxide crystals has often either made no attempt to determine the oxygen content or has used O({alpha},{alpha})O resonances such as that at {approx} 3.05 MeV to probe the crystal. This work continues tests of a new technique for probing oxygen which overcomes the problem of an insignificant O BS signal by exploiting the large nuclear resonance found to occur in the O(p,p)O cross-section near an energy of 3.5 MeV in order to produce a significant oxygen edge in the H{sup +} BS spectrum obtained for the HTSC sample. The use of a H{sup +} beam is preferable to a He{sup 2+} beam for such work due to its enhanced sensitivity to light elements. The quinternary superconductor used for this investigation was a good quality pure Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} (BISCO, 2212) crystal. The size of this crystal was 5x5xl mm{sup 3} with the [001] face perpendicular to the surface. Measurements were performed using the University of Melbourne nuclear microprobe. The sample was mounted on an aluminium target holder using a carbon base adhesive which provided good electrical contact and it was oriented inside the target chamber by means of a four axis precision eucentric goniometer. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. The role of oxygen in quinternary superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, D R; Jamieson, D N [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    The oxygen composition of the new generation of high temperature superconductors (HTSC) has been found to play a crucial role in determining the superconductivity of these materials. However, measurement of the oxygen stoichiometry in such samples has proven difficult due to the small scattering cross section of oxygen, a light element, which has caused the oxygen scattering signal to be overwhelmed by the far larger signals generated off the heavier elements present in the HTSC samples. It is for this reason that previous ion beam analysis of oxide crystals has often either made no attempt to determine the oxygen content or has used O({alpha},{alpha})O resonances such as that at {approx} 3.05 MeV to probe the crystal. This work continues tests of a new technique for probing oxygen which overcomes the problem of an insignificant O BS signal by exploiting the large nuclear resonance found to occur in the O(p,p)O cross-section near an energy of 3.5 MeV in order to produce a significant oxygen edge in the H{sup +} BS spectrum obtained for the HTSC sample. The use of a H{sup +} beam is preferable to a He{sup 2+} beam for such work due to its enhanced sensitivity to light elements. The quinternary superconductor used for this investigation was a good quality pure Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} (BISCO, 2212) crystal. The size of this crystal was 5x5xl mm{sup 3} with the [001] face perpendicular to the surface. Measurements were performed using the University of Melbourne nuclear microprobe. The sample was mounted on an aluminium target holder using a carbon base adhesive which provided good electrical contact and it was oriented inside the target chamber by means of a four axis precision eucentric goniometer. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for detection of biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won; Lee, Kangjin; Millner, Patricia; Sharma, Manan; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2008-04-01

    A rapid nondestructive technology is needed to detect bacterial contamination on the surfaces of food processing equipment to reduce public health risks. A portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was used to evaluate potential detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel typically used in the manufacture of food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures, such as E. coli, Pseudomonas pertucinogena, Erwinia chrysanthemi, and Listeria innocula. Following a 1-week exposure, biofilm formations were assessed using fluorescence imaging. In addition, the effects on biofilm formation from both tryptic soy broth (TSB) and M9 medium with casamino acids (M9C) were examined. TSB grown cells enhance biofilm production compared with M9C-grown cells. Hyperspectral fluorescence images of the biofilm samples, in response to ultraviolet-A (320 to 400 nm) excitation, were acquired from approximately 416 to 700 nm. Visual evaluation of individual images at emission peak wavelengths in the blue revealed the most contrast between biofilms and stainless steel coupons. Two-band ratios compared with the single-band images increased the contrast between the biofilm forming area and stainless steel coupon surfaces. The 444/588 nm ratio images exhibited the greatest contrast between the biofilm formations and stainless coupon surfaces.

  16. In-Situ Imaging and Quantification of Tritium Surface Contamination via Coherent Fiber Bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Charles A.; Parker, John J.; Zweben, Stewart J.

    2001-01-01

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has developed a method of imaging tritium on in-situ surfaces for the purpose of real-time data collection. This method expands upon a previous tritium imaging concept, also developed at PPPL. Enhancements include an objective lens coupled to the entry aperture of a coherent fiber optic (CFO) bundle, and a relay lens connecting the exit aperture of the fiber bundle to an intensifier tube and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The system has been specifically fabricated for use in determining tritium concentrations on first wall materials. One potential complication associated with the development of D-T [deuterium-tritium] fueled fusion reactors is the deposition of tritium (i.e., co-deposited layer) on the surface of the primary wall of the vacuum vessel. It would be advantageous to implement a process to accurately determine tritium distribution on these inner surfaces. This fiber optic imaging device provides a highly practical method for determining the location, concentration, and activity of surface tritium deposition. In addition, it can be employed for detection of tritium ''hot-spots'' and ''hide-out'' regions present on the surfaces being imaged

  17. An Effective Surface Modeling Method for Car Styling from a Side-View Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIBao-jun; ZHANGXue-fang; LVZhang-quan; QIYi-chao

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an almost-automatic technique for generating 3D car styling surface models based on a single side-view image. Our approach combines the prior knowledge of car styling and deformable curve network model to obtain an automatic modeling process. Firstly, we define the consistent parameterized curve template for 2D and 3D case respectivelyby analyzingthe characteristic lines for car styling. Then, a semi-automatic extraction from a side-view car image is adopted. Thirdly, statistic morphable model of 3D curve network isused to get the initial solution with sparse point constraints.Withonly afew post-processing operations, the optimized curve network models for creating surfaces are obtained. Finally, the styling surfaces are automatically generated using template-based parametric surface modeling method. More than 50 3D curve network models are constructed as the morphable database. We show that this intelligent modeling toolsimplifiesthe exhausted modeling task, and also demonstratemeaningful results of our approach.

  18. Automated 3D closed surface segmentation: application to vertebral body segmentation in CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P

    2016-05-01

    A fully automated segmentation algorithm, progressive surface resolution (PSR), is presented in this paper to determine the closed surface of approximately convex blob-like structures that are common in biomedical imaging. The PSR algorithm was applied to the cortical surface segmentation of 460 vertebral bodies on 46 low-dose chest CT images, which can be potentially used for automated bone mineral density measurement and compression fracture detection. The target surface is realized by a closed triangular mesh, which thereby guarantees the enclosure. The surface vertices of the triangular mesh representation are constrained along radial trajectories that are uniformly distributed in 3D angle space. The segmentation is accomplished by determining for each radial trajectory the location of its intersection with the target surface. The surface is first initialized based on an input high confidence boundary image and then resolved progressively based on a dynamic attraction map in an order of decreasing degree of evidence regarding the target surface location. For the visual evaluation, the algorithm achieved acceptable segmentation for 99.35 % vertebral bodies. Quantitative evaluation was performed on 46 vertebral bodies and achieved overall mean Dice coefficient of 0.939 (with max [Formula: see text] 0.957, min [Formula: see text] 0.906 and standard deviation [Formula: see text] 0.011) using manual annotations as the ground truth. Both visual and quantitative evaluations demonstrate encouraging performance of the PSR algorithm. This novel surface resolution strategy provides uniform angular resolution for the segmented surface with computation complexity and runtime that are linearly constrained by the total number of vertices of the triangular mesh representation.

  19. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    OpenAIRE

    G. Helas; M. O. Andreae

    2008-01-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly...

  20. Surface coil imaging of the spine using fast sequences: Improvement of intensity profile and contrast behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requardt, H.; Deimling, M.; Weber, H.

    1986-01-01

    Sagittal and axial images obtained using a surface coil suffer from the extreme intensity profile caused by physical properties of the coil and the anatomic entity of subcutaneous fat. The authors present a measuring device that reduces these disadvantages by means of Helmholtz-type coils, and sequences that reduce the fat signal by dephasing its signal part. The extremely short repetition time (<30 msec) allows acquisition times shorter than 10 sec. Breath-holding for this short period to avoid movement artifacts is possible. Images are presented that illustrate the enhanced contrast of spinal tissue and surrounding structures. Comparisons are made with spin-echo and CHESS images

  1. A portable UV-fluorescence multispectral imaging system for the analysis of painted surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Nevin, Austin; Farina, Andrea; Toniolo, Lucia; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2008-08-01

    A portable fluorescence multispectral imaging system was developed and has been used for the analysis of artistic surfaces. The imaging apparatus exploits two UV lamps for fluorescence excitation and a liquid crystal tunable filter coupled to a low-noise charge coupled device as the image detector. The main features of the system are critically presented, outlining the assets, drawbacks, and practical considerations of portability. A multivariate statistical treatment of spectral data is further considered. Finally, the in situ analysis with the new apparatus of recently restored Renaissance wall paintings is presented.

  2. On the effect of image states on resonant neutralization of hydrogen anions near metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Niederhausen, Thomas; Thumm, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    We directly assess the role of image state electronic structures on the ion-survival by comparing the resonant charge transfer dynamics of hydrogen anions near Pd(1 1 1), Pd(1 0 0), and Ag(1 1 1) surfaces. Our simulations show that image states that are degenerate with the metal conduction band favor the recapture of electrons by outgoing ions. In sharp contrast, localized image states that occur inside the band gap hinder the recapture process and thus enhance the ion-neutralization probability

  3. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°

  4. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°.

  5. Imaging and reconstruction of cell cortex structures near the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luhong; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Xiu, Peng; Luo, Wei; Huang, Yujia; Yu, Feng; Kuang, Cuifang; Sun, Yonghong; Liu, Xu; Xu, Yingke

    2017-11-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) provides high optical sectioning capability and superb signal-to-noise ratio for imaging of cell cortex structures. The development of multi-angle (MA)-TIRFM permits high axial resolution imaging and reconstruction of cellular structures near the cell surface. Cytoskeleton is composed of a network of filaments, which are important for maintenance of cell function. The high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of filament organization would contribute to our understanding of cytoskeleton regulation in cell. Here, we used a custom-developed MA-TIRFM setup, together with stochastic photobleaching and single molecule localization method, to enhance the lateral resolution of TIRFM imaging to about 100 nm. In addition, we proposed novel methods to perform filament segmentation and 3D reconstruction from MA-TIRFM images. Furthermore, we applied these methods to study the 3D localization of cortical actin and microtubule structures in U373 cancer cells. Our results showed that cortical actins localize ∼ 27 nm closer to the plasma membrane when compared with microtubules. We found that treatment of cells with chemotherapy drugs nocodazole and cytochalasin B disassembles cytoskeletal network and induces the reorganization of filaments towards the cell periphery. In summary, this study provides feasible approaches for 3D imaging and analyzing cell surface distribution of cytoskeletal network. Our established microscopy platform and image analysis toolkits would facilitate the study of cytoskeletal network in cells.

  6. Cold atoms near superconductors: atomic spin coherence beyond the Johnson noise limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasch, B; Hattermann, H; Cano, D; Judd, T E; Zimmermann, C; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D; Fortagh, J; Scheel, S

    2010-01-01

    We report on the measurement of atomic spin coherence near the surface of a superconducting niobium wire. As compared to normal conducting metal surfaces, the atomic spin coherence is maintained for time periods beyond the Johnson noise limit. The result provides experimental evidence that magnetic near-field noise near the superconductor is strongly suppressed. Such long atomic spin coherence times near superconductors open the way towards the development of coherently coupled cold atom/solid state hybrid quantum systems with potential applications in quantum information processing and precision force sensing.

  7. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, U.

    1995-04-25

    A composition and method are disclosed of preparing YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T{sub c}. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  8. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1995-01-01

    A composition and method of preparing YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T.sub.c. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  9. Superconductors in the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the behavior of high-temperature superconductors and how to demonstrate them safely and effectively in the high school or introductory physics classroom. Included here is a discussion of the most relevant physics topics that can be demonstrated, some safety tips, and a bit of the history of superconductors. In an effort…

  10. Hexatic vortex glass in disordered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that interaction of the flux-line lattice with randomly arranged pinning centers should destroy the long-range positional order in the lattice, but not the long-range orientational order. A new phase: hexatic vortex glass, is suggested for the mixed state of disordered, type-II superconductors. Relevance to amorphous and high-T c superconductors is discussed

  11. Method of production multifilamentary intermetallic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marancik, W.G.; Young, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of making A-15 type intermetallic superconductors is disclosed which features elimination of numerous annealing steps. Nb or V filaments are embedded in Cu matrices; annular layers of Sn or Ga, respectively, separated from each other by Cu layers, provide the other component of the intermetallic superconductors Nb3Sn and V3Ga

  12. Neutron-scattering studies of magnetic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S.K.; Crabtree, G.W.; Hinks, D.G.; Mook, H.A.; Pringle, O.A.

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained in the last few years obtained by neutron diffraction on the nature of the magnetic ordering in magnetic superconductors are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of the complex intermediate phase in ferromagnetic superconductors where both superconductivity and ferromagnetism appear to coexist

  13. The critical current of granular superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'ev, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    A mechanism of hyper vortex pinning in granular superconductors is proposed to describe the field dependence of the critical current density and pinning potential. The results are in a good agreement with the experiment. The model represents the peak effect and the percolation mechanism of conductivity in ceramic superconductors

  14. Seasonal Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are seasonal composites, and were...

  15. Monthly Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are monthly composites, and were...

  16. Grand Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are a composite of several years...

  17. High spatial resolution quantitative MR images: an experimental study of dedicated surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensanne, D; Josse, G; Lagarde, J M; Vincensini, D

    2006-01-01

    Measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T 2 ) by quantitative MR imaging represents a potentially efficient tool to evaluate the physicochemical properties of various media. However, noise in MR images is responsible for uncertainties in the determination of T 2 relaxation times, which limits the accuracy of parametric tissue analysis. The required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the T 2 relaxation behaviour specific to each tissue. Thus, we have previously shown that keeping the uncertainty in T 2 measurements within a limit of 10% implies that SNR values be greater than 100 and 300 for mono- and biexponential T 2 relaxation behaviours, respectively. Noise reduction can be obtained either by increasing the voxel size (i.e., at the expense of spatial resolution) or by using high sensitivity dedicated surface coils (which allows us to increase SNR without deteriorating spatial resolution in an excessive manner). However, surface coil sensitivity is heterogeneous, i.e., it- and hence SNR-decreases with increasing depth, and the more so as the coil radius is smaller. The use of surface coils is therefore limited to the analysis of superficial structure such as the hypodermic tissue analysed here. The aim of this work was to determine the maximum limits of spatial resolution and depth compatible with reliable in vivo T 2 quantitative MR images using dedicated surface coils available on various clinical MR scanners. The average thickness of adipose tissue is around 15 mm, and the results obtained have shown that obtaining reliable biexponential relaxation analysis requires a minimum achievable voxel size of 13 mm 3 for a conventional volume birdcage coil and only of 1.7 mm 3 for the smallest available surface coil (23 mm in diameter). Further improvement in spatial resolution allowing us to detect low details in MR images without deteriorating parametric T 2 images can be obtained by image filtering. By using the non-linear selective blurring filter described in a

  18. Surface scanning through a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid for clinical microwave breast imaging exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Microwave tomographic image quality can be improved significantly with prior knowledge of the breast surface geometry. The authors have developed a novel laser scanning system capable of accurately recovering surface renderings of breast-shaped phantoms immersed within a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid which resides completely external to the tank (and the aqueous environment) and overcomes the challenges associated with the optical distortions caused by refraction from the air, tank wall, and liquid bath interfaces. Methods: The scanner utilizes two laser line generators and a small CCD camera mounted concentrically on a rotating gantry about the microwave imaging tank. Various calibration methods were considered for optimizing the accuracy of the scanner in the presence of the optical distortions including traditional ray tracing and image registration approaches. In this paper, the authors describe the construction and operation of the laser scanner, compare the efficacy of several calibration methods—including analytical ray tracing and piecewise linear, polynomial, locally weighted mean, and thin-plate-spline (TPS) image registrations—and report outcomes from preliminary phantom experiments. Results: The results show that errors in calibrating camera angles and position prevented analytical ray tracing from achieving submillimeter accuracy in the surface renderings obtained from our scanner configuration. Conversely, calibration by image registration reliably attained mean surface errors of less than 0.5 mm depending on the geometric complexity of the object scanned. While each of the image registration approaches outperformed the ray tracing strategy, the authors found global polynomial methods produced the best compromise between average surface error and scanner robustness. Conclusions: The laser scanning system provides a fast and accurate method of three dimensional surface capture in the aqueous environment commonly found in microwave

  19. [A Method to Reconstruct Surface Reflectance Spectrum from Multispectral Image Based on Canopy Radiation Transfer Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-guang; Ma, Ling-ling; Li, Chuan-rong; Zhu, Xiao-hua; Tang, Ling-li

    2015-07-01

    Due to the lack of enough spectral bands for multi-spectral sensor, it is difficult to reconstruct surface retlectance spectrum from finite spectral information acquired by multi-spectral instrument. Here, taking into full account of the heterogeneity of pixel from remote sensing image, a method is proposed to simulate hyperspectral data from multispectral data based on canopy radiation transfer model. This method first assumes the mixed pixels contain two types of land cover, i.e., vegetation and soil. The sensitive parameters of Soil-Leaf-Canopy (SLC) model and a soil ratio factor were retrieved from multi-spectral data based on Look-Up Table (LUT) technology. Then, by combined with a soil ratio factor, all the parameters were input into the SLC model to simulate the surface reflectance spectrum from 400 to 2 400 nm. Taking Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image as reference image, the surface reflectance spectrum was simulated. The simulated reflectance spectrum revealed different feature information of different surface types. To test the performance of this method, the simulated reflectance spectrum was convolved with the Landsat ETM + spectral response curves and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) spectral response curves to obtain the simulated Landsat ETM+ and MODIS image. Finally, the simulated Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images were compared with the observed Landsat ETM+ and MODIS images. The results generally showed high correction coefficients (Landsat: 0.90-0.99, MODIS: 0.74-0.85) between most simulated bands and observed bands and indicated that the simulated reflectance spectrum was well simulated and reliable.

  20. Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Roberts, Michael S.; McNaughton, James L.

    2009-05-01

    We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this investigation was to determine a minimal number of spectral bands suitable to differentiate microbial biofilm formation from the four background materials typically used during food processing. Ultimately, the resultant spectral information will be used in development of handheld portable imaging devices that can be used as visual aid tools for sanitation and safety inspection (microbial contamination) of the food processing surfaces. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells were grown in low strength M9 minimal medium on various surfaces at 22 +/- 2 °C for 2 days for biofilm formation. Biofilm autofluorescence under UV excitation (320 to 400 nm) obtained by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system showed broad emissions in the blue-green regions of the spectrum with emission maxima at approximately 480 nm for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella biofilms. Fluorescence images at 480 nm revealed that for background materials with near-uniform fluorescence responses such as stainless steel and formica cutting board, regardless of the background intensity, biofilm formation can be distinguished. This suggested that a broad spectral band in the blue-green regions can be used for handheld imaging devices for sanitation inspection of stainless, cutting board, and formica surfaces. The non-uniform fluorescence responses of granite make distinctions between biofilm and background difficult. To further investigate potential detection of the biofilm formations on granite surfaces with multispectral approaches, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using the hyperspectral fluorescence image data. The resultant PCA score images revealed distinct contrast between

  1. Future applications of superconductors for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Superconductors have been in existence for many years. Recent developments in superconductivity at higher temperatures are directed towards the potential use of superconductors at ambient temperatures. The diligent efforts of the scientific, engineering, and political agencies in researching and developing superconducting materials have resulted in encouraging accomplishments. Although superconductors could be used in every branch of electrical engineering, the authors focuses on a few areas in this paper. The power distribution and utilization in a typical industry is compared to that of a system using superconductors. Brief discussions of various machines with superconductors at ambient temperatures, based on developments made so far on large superconducting machines, for potential industrial applications are included in this paper

  2. RF properties of high-T/sub c/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.L.; Delayen, J.R.; Dos Santos, D.I.; Lanagan, M.T.; Shepard, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the rf properties of high-T/sub c/ superconductors over a wide range of temperature, frequency, and rf field amplitude. We have tested both bulk polycrystalline samples and thick films on silver substrates. At 150 MHz and 4.2 K, we have measured a surface resistance of 18 μ/sup /OMEGA// at low rf field and 3.6 m/sup /OMEGA// at an rf field of 270 gauss. All samples showed a strong dependence of the surface resistance on rf field; however, no breakdown of the superconducting state has been observed up to the highest field achieved (320 gauss). 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Scanning tunnelling microscope imaging of nanoscale electron density gradients on the surface of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, B; Jacobs, J; Missous, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the scanning tunnelling microscope tunnelling conditions needed to produce constant current images dominated either by surface topology or by electronic effects. A model experimental structure was produced by cleaving a GaAs multiδ-doped layer in UHV and so projecting a spatially varying electron gas density onto the (110) surface. This cross sectional electron density varies on a nanometre scale in the [100] growth direction. The electronic structure and tunnelling properties of this system were modelled, and the tunnelling conditions favouring sensitivity to the surface electron gas density determined

  4. An Extension to a Filter Implementation of Local Quadratic Surface for Image Noise Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    1999-01-01

    Based on regression analysis this paper gives a description for simple image filter design. Specifically 3x3 filter implementations of a quadratic surface, residuals from this surface, gradients and the Laplacian are given. For the residual a 5x5 filter is given also. It is shown that the 3x3......) it is concluded that if striping is to be considered as a part of the noise, the residual from a 3x3 median filter seems best. If we are interested in a salt-and-pepper noise estimator the proposed extension to the 3x3 filter for the residual from a quadratic surface seems best. Simple statistics...

  5. Photoexcitation in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, I.

    1976-06-01

    A measurement has been made for the first time of the relaxation time of the superconducting order parameter and the equilibrium energy gap close to T/sub c/. The results indicate that the relaxation time of the magnitude of the order parameter diverges as 1/Δ/sub eq/ for T/T/sub c/ greater than or equal to 0.99, in agreement with theory. The inelastic collision time for electrons determined from this experiment is consistent with surface-Landau-level-resonance experiments and theory

  6. Surface topography characterization using 3D stereoscopic reconstruction of SEM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh; Flys, Olena; Reddy, Vijeth V.; Rosén, B. G.

    2018-06-01

    A major drawback of the optical microscope is its limitation to resolve finer details. Many microscopes have been developed to overcome the limitations set by the diffraction of visible light. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one such alternative: it uses electrons for imaging, which have much smaller wavelength than photons. As a result high magnification with superior image resolution can be achieved. However, SEM generates 2D images which provide limited data for surface measurements and analysis. Often many research areas require the knowledge of 3D structures as they contribute to a comprehensive understanding of microstructure by allowing effective measurements and qualitative visualization of the samples under study. For this reason, stereo photogrammetry technique is employed to convert SEM images into 3D measurable data. This paper aims to utilize a stereoscopic reconstruction technique as a reliable method for characterization of surface topography. Reconstructed results from SEM images are compared with coherence scanning interferometer (CSI) results obtained by measuring a roughness reference standard sample. This paper presents a method to select the most robust/consistent surface texture parameters that are insensitive to the uncertainties involved in the reconstruction technique itself. Results from the two-stereoscopic reconstruction algorithms are also documented in this paper.

  7. Development of a biosensor microarray towards food screening using imaging surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebe, S.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Giesbers, M.; Norde, W.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the possibilities of implementing direct and competitive immunoassay formats for small and large molecule detection on a microarray, using IBIS imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) system. First, IBIS iSPR optics performance was evaluated. Using a glycerol calibration

  8. Development of a biosensor microarray towards food screening, using imaging surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, Sabina Rebe; Bremer, Maria G. E. G.; Giesbers, Marcel; Norde, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the possibilities of implementing direct and competitive immunoassay formats for small and large molecule detection on a microarray, using IBIS imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) system. First, IBIS iSPR optics performance was evaluated. Using a glycerol calibration

  9. Imaging of Mechanical Properties of Soft Matter. From Heterogeneous Polymer Surfaces to Single Biomolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred; Gosa, Maria; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the atomic force microscope (AFM) has evolved from a high resolution imaging tool to an enabling platform for physical studies at the nanoscale including quantitative mapping of mechanical characteristics of surfaces providing simultaneous topography and mechanical property maps

  10. Infrared photothermal imaging spectroscopy for detection of trace explosives on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; Andrew McGill, R

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a technique for the standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrate surfaces using photothermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more compact IR quantum cascade lasers, which are tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect increases in thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral, and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. The ability to detect trace analytes at standoff on relevant substrates is critical for security applications but is complicated by the optical and thermal analyte/substrate interactions. This manuscript describes a series of PT-IRIS experimental results and analysis for traces of RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate, and sucrose on steel, polyethylene, glass, and painted steel panels. We demonstrate detection at surface mass loadings comparable with fingerprint depositions ( 10μg/cm2 to 100μg/cm2) from an area corresponding to a single pixel within the thermal image.

  11. Preliminary results of endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging for local staging of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G. J.; Barentsz, J. O.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Rosenbusch, G.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endorectal surface coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of adenocarcinoma of the prostate (ACP). A total of 23 patients who were considered candidates for radical prostatectomy because of clinically localized ACP were examined by ERC-MRI.

  12. Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this inve...

  13. Detection of organic residues on poultry processing equipment surfaces by LED-induced fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic residues on equipment surfaces in poultry processing plants can generate cross- contamination and increase the risk of unsafe food for consumers. This research was aimed to investigate the potential of LED-induced fluorescence imaging technique for rapid inspection of stainless steel proces...

  14. Image-based rendering of intersecting surfaces for dynamic comparative visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busking, S.; Botha, C.P.; Ferrarini, L.; Milles, J.; Post, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Nested or intersecting surfaces are proven techniques for visualizing shape differences between static 3D objects (Weigle and Taylor II, IEEE Visualization, Proceedings, pp. 503–510, 2005). In this paper we present an image-based formulation for these techniques that extends their use to dynamic

  15. High resolution imaging of dielectric surfaces with an evanescent field optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.

    1992-01-01

    An evanescent field optical microscope (EFOM) is presented which employs frustrated total internal reflection o­n a localized scale by scanning a dielectric tip in close proximity to a sample surface. High resolution images of dielectric gratings and spheres containing both topographic and

  16. Rectangle Surface Coil Array in a Grid Arrangement for Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-13

    magnet wires with insulating coating for rectangular surface coils. The wires are formed into four one turn 145mm x 32mm rectangular coils...switchable array, RF magnetic field, NQR, MRI, NMR, tuning, decoupling I. INTRODUCTION ESONANCE imaging can be accomplished using Nuclear Magnetic ...grid array. This achieves the switchable array configuration. Later, investigations will have circuit controlled multiplexer for switching to

  17. PROCESSING OF DIGITAL IMAGES OF INDUSTRIAL OBJECT SURFACES DURING NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Hundzin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents modern approaches to processing of images obtained with the help of industrial equipment. Usage of pixel modification in small neighborhoods, application of uniform image processing while changing brightness level, possibilities for combination of several images, threshold image processing have been described in the paper. While processing a number of images on a metal structure containing micro-cracks and being under strain difference between two such images have been determined in the paper. The metal structure represents a contour specifying the difference in images. An analysis of the contour makes it possible to determine initial direction of crack propagation in the metal. A threshold binarization value has been determined while processing the image having a field of medium intensity which are disappearing in the process of simple binarization and merging with the background due to rather small drop between the edges. In this regard an algorithm of a balanced threshold histogram clipping has been selected and it is based on the following approach: two different histogram fractions are “weighed” and if one of the fractions “outweighs” then last column of the histogram fraction is removed and the procedure is repeated again. When there is rather high threshold value a contour break (disappearance of informative pixels may occur, and when there is a low threshold value – a noise (non-informative pixels may appear. The paper shows implementation of an algorithm for location of contact pads on image of semiconductor crystal. Algorithms for morphological processing of production prototype images have been obtained in the paper and these algorithms permit to detect defects on the surface of semiconductors, to carry out filtration, threshold binarization that presupposes application of an algorithm of a balanced threshold histogram clipping. The developed approaches can be used to highlight contours on the surface

  18. Analysis of carotid lumen surface morphology using three-dimensional ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Beletsky, Vadim; Spence, J David; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Carotid plaque surface irregularity and ulcerations play an important role in the risk of ischemic stroke. Ulcerated or fissured plaque, characterized by irregular surface morphology, exposes thrombogenic materials to the bloodstream, possibly leading to life- or brain-threatening thrombosis and embolization. Therefore, the quantification of plaque surface irregularity is important to identify high-risk plaques that would likely lead to vascular events. Although a number of studies have characterized plaque surface irregularity using subjective classification schemes with two or more categories, only a few have quantified surface irregularity using an objective and continuous quantity, such as Gaussian or mean curvature. In this work, our goal was to use both Gaussian and mean curvatures for identifying ulcers from 3D carotid ultrasound (US) images of human subjects. Before performing experiments using patient data, we verified the numerical accuracy of the surface curvature computation method using discrete spheres and tori with different sampling intervals. We also showed that three ulcers of the vascular phantom with 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm diameters were associated with high Gaussian and mean curvatures, and thus, were easily detected. Finally, we demonstrated the application of the proposed method for detecting ulcers on luminal surfaces, which were segmented from the 3D US images acquired for two human subjects.

  19. Analysis of carotid lumen surface morphology using three-dimensional ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bernard; Beletsky, Vadim; Spence, J. David; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2009-03-01

    Carotid plaque surface irregularity and ulcerations play an important role in the risk of ischemic stroke. Ulcerated or fissured plaque, characterized by irregular surface morphology, exposes thrombogenic materials to the bloodstream, possibly leading to life- or brain-threatening thrombosis and embolization. Therefore, the quantification of plaque surface irregularity is important to identify high-risk plaques that would likely lead to vascular events. Although a number of studies have characterized plaque surface irregularity using subjective classification schemes with two or more categories, only a few have quantified surface irregularity using an objective and continuous quantity, such as Gaussian or mean curvature. In this work, our goal was to use both Gaussian and mean curvatures for identifying ulcers from 3D carotid ultrasound (US) images of human subjects. Before performing experiments using patient data, we verified the numerical accuracy of the surface curvature computation method using discrete spheres and tori with different sampling intervals. We also showed that three ulcers of the vascular phantom with 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm diameters were associated with high Gaussian and mean curvatures, and thus, were easily detected. Finally, we demonstrated the application of the proposed method for detecting ulcers on luminal surfaces, which were segmented from the 3D US images acquired for two human subjects.

  20. Active illumination based 3D surface reconstruction and registration for image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ge; Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The medialization laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the voice function of the patient with vocal fold paresis and paralysis. An image guided system for the medialization laryngoplasty will help the surgeons to accurately place the implant and thus reduce the failure rates of the surgery. One of the fundamental challenges in image guided system is to accurately register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. In this paper, we present a combined surface and fiducial based registration method to register the preoperative 3D CT data to the intraoperative surface of larynx. To accurately model the exposed surface area, a structured light based stereo vision technique is used for the surface reconstruction. We combined the gray code pattern and multi-line shifting to generate the intraoperative surface of the larynx. To register the point clouds from the intraoperative stage to the preoperative 3D CT data, a shape priori based ICP method is proposed to quickly register the two surfaces. The proposed approach is capable of tracking the fiducial markers and reconstructing the surface of larynx with no damage to the anatomical structure. We used off-the-shelf digital cameras, LCD projector and rapid 3D prototyper to develop our experimental system. The final RMS error in the registration is less than 1mm.

  1. Imaging of acute injuries of the articular surfaces (chondral, osteochondral and subchondral fractures)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohndorf, K. [Department of Radiology, Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    Fractures involving the articulating surfaces of bone are a common cause of chronic disability after joint injury. Acute fractures of the articular surface typically run parallel to the surface and are confined to the cartilage and/or the immediate subchondral cancellous bone. They should be distinguished from vertical or oblique bone fractures with intra-articular extension. This article reviews the mechanism of acute articular surface injuries, as well as their incidence, clinical presentation, radiologic appearance and treatment. A classification is presented based on direct inspection (arthroscopy) and imaging (especially MRI), emphasizing the distinction between lesions with intact (subchondral impaction and subchondral bone bruises) and disrupted (chondral, osteochondral lesions) cartilage. Hyaline cartilage, subchondral bone plate and subchondral cancellous bone are to be considered an anatomic unit. Subchondral articular surface lesions, osteochondral fractures and solely chondral fractures are different manifestations of impaction injuries that affect the articulating surface. Of the noninvasive imaging modalities, conventional radiography and MRI provide the most relevant information. The appropriate use of short tau inversion recovery, T1-weighted and T2-weighted (turbo) spin-echo as well as gradient-echo sequences, enables MRI to classify the various acute articular surface lesions with great accuracy and provides therapeutic guidance. (orig.)

  2. Imaging of acute injuries of the articular surfaces (chondral, osteochondral and subchondral fractures)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohndorf, K.

    1999-01-01

    Fractures involving the articulating surfaces of bone are a common cause of chronic disability after joint injury. Acute fractures of the articular surface typically run parallel to the surface and are confined to the cartilage and/or the immediate subchondral cancellous bone. They should be distinguished from vertical or oblique bone fractures with intra-articular extension. This article reviews the mechanism of acute articular surface injuries, as well as their incidence, clinical presentation, radiologic appearance and treatment. A classification is presented based on direct inspection (arthroscopy) and imaging (especially MRI), emphasizing the distinction between lesions with intact (subchondral impaction and subchondral bone bruises) and disrupted (chondral, osteochondral lesions) cartilage. Hyaline cartilage, subchondral bone plate and subchondral cancellous bone are to be considered an anatomic unit. Subchondral articular surface lesions, osteochondral fractures and solely chondral fractures are different manifestations of impaction injuries that affect the articulating surface. Of the noninvasive imaging modalities, conventional radiography and MRI provide the most relevant information. The appropriate use of short tau inversion recovery, T1-weighted and T2-weighted (turbo) spin-echo as well as gradient-echo sequences, enables MRI to classify the various acute articular surface lesions with great accuracy and provides therapeutic guidance. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of surface spin textures on bulk crystals by scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamine, Hiroshi; Okumura, So; Farjami, Sahar; Murakami, Yasukazu; Nishida, Minoru

    2016-11-01

    Direct observation of magnetic microstructures is vital for advancing spintronics and other technologies. Here we report a method for imaging surface domain structures on bulk samples by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Complex magnetic domains, referred to as the maze state in CoPt/FePt alloys, were observed at a spatial resolution of less than 100 nm by using an in-lens annular detector. The method allows for imaging almost all the domain walls in the mazy structure, whereas the visualisation of the domain walls with the classical SEM method was limited. Our method provides a simple way to analyse surface domain structures in the bulk state that can be used in combination with SEM functions such as orientation or composition analysis. Thus, the method extends applications of SEM-based magnetic imaging, and is promising for resolving various problems at the forefront of fields including physics, magnetics, materials science, engineering, and chemistry.

  4. The Stellar Imager (SI) Project: Resolving Stellar Surfaces, Interiors, and Magnetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, K.; Karovska, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/Optical. Space-Based Interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsec (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of SI will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. The science of SI focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. Its prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. In this paper we discuss the science goals, technology needs, and baseline design of the SI mission.

  5. Transference of surface markers in X-ray, CT- and MR-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grevelhoerster, T.; Poetter, R.; Prott, F.J.; Dittrich, M.

    1995-01-01

    By using pharmacological capsules and plastic tubes filled with oily contrast medium contraining iodine (Lipiodol; Byk Gulden), marking aids were developed which can be seen in similar definite limits within the framework of MRI-, CT- and conventional X-ray-Imaging. A method to view these new, artificial markers in combination with individual, anatomical landmarks is introduced. The marking aid/surface marker, fixed on anatomical reference structures on the skin, does not result in an additional burden for the patient. The new, artificial markers are also useful for making other structures recognizable, such as anatomical relation lines, center of the portal and edges in planning imaging for radiotherapy treatments and are used as leading and reference structures to compare localisation and extent of lesions in X-ray-, CT- and MRI. Marking aids/surface markers do not have to be changed in different imaging methods. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Pushing CHARA to its Limit: A Pathway Toward 80X80 Pixel Images of Stellar Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Ryan

    2018-04-01

    Imagine a future with 80x80 pixel images of stellar surfaces. With a maximum baseline of 330 m, the CHARA Array is already capable of achieving 0.5 mas resolution, sufficient for imaging the red supergiant Betelgeuse (d = 42.3 mas ) at such a scale. However several issues have hampered attempts to image the largest stars at CHARA, including a lack of baselines shorter than 34 m and instrument sensitivities unable to measure the faintest fringes. Here we discuss what is needed to achieve imaging of large stars at CHARA. We will present suggestions for future telescope placement, describing the advantages of a short baseline, while also considering the needs of other imaging targets that might benefit from additional baselines. We will also present developments in image reconstruction methods that can improve the resolution of images today, albeit of smaller targets and at a lesser scale. Of course, there will be example images, created using simulated oifits data and state of the art reconstruction techniques!

  7. Experimental consequences of predicted charge rigidity of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, J.E., E-mail: jhirsch@ucsd.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The theory of hole superconductivity predicts that in superconductors the charged superfluid is about a million times more rigid than the normal electron fluid. We point out that this physics should give rise to large changes in the bulk and surface plasmon dispersion relations of metals entering the superconducting state, that have not yet been experimentally detected and would be in stark contradiction with the expected behavior within conventional BCS-London theory. We also propose that this explains the puzzling experimental observations of Avramenko et al. on electron sound propagation in superconductors and the puzzling experiments of de Heer et al. detecting large electric dipole moments in small metal clusters, as well as the Tao effect on aggregation of superconducting microparticles in an electric field. Associated with the enhanced charge rigidity is a large increase in the electric screening length of superconductors at low temperatures that has not yet been experimentally detected. The physical origin of the enhanced charge rigidity and its relation to other aspects of the theory of hole superconductivity is discussed.

  8. Superconductor devices useful for disk drives and the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for exchanging information with a circular media and which includes a drive mechanism for radially positioning a head relative to the media with the head including structure for imparting information to the media, for detecting information on the media, or both, comprising: an arm having at least one head attached thereto wherein the head is capable of interchanging information with the media; and bearing means for suspending the arm, the bearing means including a superconductor layer element, a magnetic field source element and means mounting one of the elements on the arm and the other the element in interfacing relationship to the one of the elements so that the interfacing relationship is maintained throughout the radial travel of the arm. A drive for exchanging information between a circular media mounted on a spindle and a head comprising an elongated arm having the head attached thereto and a layer of superconductor material on one side thereof, the arm being radially positionable over the surface of the circular media, an annular magnet means in peripheral relation to the circular media and oriented to direct a magnetic field towards the arm superconductor layer for maintaining a relatively constant spacing between the arm and the media throughout the radial travel of the arm relative to the circular media

  9. Cell surface expression of single chain antibodies with applications to imaging of gene expression in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northrop, Jeffrey P.; Bednarski, Mark; Li, King C.; Barbieri, Susan O.; Lu, Amy T.; Nguyen, Dee; Varadarajan, John; Osen, Maureen; Star-Lack, Josh

    2003-01-01

    Imaging of gene expression in vivo has many potential uses for biomedical research and drug discovery, ranging from the study of gene regulation and cancer to the non-invasive assessment of gene therapies. To streamline the development of imaging marker gene technologies for nuclear medicine, we propose a new approach to the design of reporter/probe pairs wherein the reporter is a cell surface-expressed single chain antibody variable fragment that has been raised against a low molecular weight imaging probe with optimized pharmacokinetic properties. Proof of concept of the approach was achieved using a single chain antibody variable fragment that binds with high affinity to fluorescein and an imaging probe consisting of fluorescein isothiocyanate coupled to the chelator diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid labeled with the gamma-emitter 111 In. We demonstrate specific high-affinity binding of this probe to the cell surface-expressed reporter in vitro and assess the in vivo biodistribution of the probe both in wild-type mice and in mice harboring tumor xenografts expressing the reporter. Specific uptake of the probe by, and in vivo imaging of, tumors expressing the reporter are shown. Since ScFvs with high affinities can be raised to almost any protein or small molecule, the proposed methodology may offer a new flexibility in the design of imaging tracer/reporter pairs wherein both probe pharmacokinetics and binding affinities can be readily optimized. (orig.)

  10. The artificial object detection and current velocity measurement using SAR ocean surface images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatov, Boris; Strotov, Valery; Ershov, Maksim; Muraviev, Vadim; Feldman, Alexander; Smirnov, Sergey

    2017-10-01

    Due to the fact that water surface covers wide areas, remote sensing is the most appropriate way of getting information about ocean environment for vessel tracking, security purposes, ecological studies and others. Processing of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is extensively used for control and monitoring of the ocean surface. Image data can be acquired from Earth observation satellites, such as TerraSAR-X, ERS, and COSMO-SkyMed. Thus, SAR image processing can be used to solve many problems arising in this field of research. This paper discusses some of them including ship detection, oil pollution control and ocean currents mapping. Due to complexity of the problem several specialized algorithm are necessary to develop. The oil spill detection algorithm consists of the following main steps: image preprocessing, detection of dark areas, parameter extraction and classification. The ship detection algorithm consists of the following main steps: prescreening, land masking, image segmentation combined with parameter measurement, ship orientation estimation and object discrimination. The proposed approach to ocean currents mapping is based on Doppler's law. The results of computer modeling on real SAR images are presented. Based on these results it is concluded that the proposed approaches can be used in maritime applications.

  11. Surface imaging, portal imaging, and skin marker set-up vs. CBCT for radiotherapy of the thorax and pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallotta, Stefania; Bucciolini, Marta; Vanzi, Eleonora; Marrazzo, Livia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Paiar, Fabiola; Ceroti, Marco; Livi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface imaging, portal imaging, and skin marker set-up in radiotherapy of thoracic and pelvic regions, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data as the gold standard. Twenty patients were included in this study. CBCT, surface acquisition (SA), and two orthogonal portal images (PI) were acquired during the first four treatment sessions. Patient set-up corrections, obtained by registering the planning CT with CBCT, were used as the gold standard. Registration results of the PI and SA were evaluated and compared with those obtained with CBCT. The advantage derived from using SA or PI verification systems over a skin marker set-up was also quantified. A statistically significant difference between PI and SA (in favour of PI) was observed in seven patients undergoing treatment of the pelvic region and in two patients undergoing treatment of the thoracic region. The use of SA or PI, compared with a skin marker set-up, improved patient positioning in 50% and 57 % of the thoracic fractions, respectively. For pelvic fractions, the use of PI was beneficial in 73 % of the cases, while the use of SA was beneficial in only 45 %. Patient positioning worsened with SA, particularly along longitudinal and vertical directions. PI yielded more accurate registration results than SA for both pelvic and thoracic fractions. Compared with the skin marker set-up, PI performances were superior to SA for pelvic fractions while comparable results were obtained for thoracic fractions. (orig.) [de

  12. Instabilities in superconductors and in intense laser produced plasma's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Satyajit S.; Mohan, Shyam; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Kahaly, Subendhu; Ravindra Kumar, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this talk I will attempt to discuss phenomena's in two areas of physics which appear quite divorced from each other, viz., superconductivity and plasma's. The first portion of the talk will describe the behavior of a collection of vortices in superconductors in a random pinning environment. Vortices manifest themselves in a variety of systems, like in fluids and in type II superconductors. A collection of vortices inside superconductors behaves like an elastic media. Investigating this elastic medium of the vortex state is a convenient prototype for investigating similar physics in a wide variety of systems, viz., charge density waves, Wigner crystals, magnetic domains, etc. The behavior of all these systems can be generalized under, nature of elastic media in the presence of a random pinning environment and thermal fluctuations. Based on the idea that softer matter is easy to pin we have attempted to investigate how the vortex lattice disorders as its gets softer. Surprisingly we find evidence to two distinct types of instabilities in the vortex lattice instead of one. These two instabilities produce vastly different effects on certain quantities associated with the extent of disorder in the superconductor. It appears that prior to softening of the vortex state, a heterogeneously pinned state of the vortex matter appears, perhaps through a KT like transition. In the second part of the talk, I will attempt to describe some of our recent results pertaining to instabilities and the appearance of giant magnetic fields in plasma's. These results have been obtained with a high sensitivity magneto-optical imaging setup we have developed at IIT Kanpur. Using the setup, we investigate distribution of magnetic fields around dense solid plasmas generated by intense p-polarized laser (∼10 16 Wcm -2 , 100 fs) irradiation of magnetic tapes, using high sensitivity magneto optical imaging technique. We demonstrate giant axial magnetic fields and map out for the first time

  13. Exploring the Leishmania Hydrophilic Acylated Surface Protein B (HASPB) Export Pathway by Live Cell Imaging Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Lorna; Price, Helen; O'Toole, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania major is a human-infective protozoan parasite transmitted by the bite of the female phlebotomine sand fly. The L. major hydrophilic acylated surface protein B (HASPB) is only expressed in infective parasite stages suggesting a role in parasite virulence. HASPB is a "nonclassically" secreted protein that lacks a conventional signal peptide, reaching the cell surface by an alternative route to the classical ER-Golgi pathway. Instead HASPB trafficking to and exposure on the parasite plasma membrane requires dual N-terminal acylation. Here, we use live cell imaging methods to further explore this pathway allowing visualization of key events in real time at the individual cell level. These methods include live cell imaging using fluorescent reporters to determine the subcellular localization of wild type and acylation site mutation HASPB18-GFP fusion proteins, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to analyze the dynamics of HASPB in live cells, and live antibody staining to detect surface exposure of HASPB by confocal microscopy.

  14. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles for biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Win, Khin Yin; Liu, Shuhua; Teng, Choon Peng; Zheng, Yuangang; Han, Ming-Yong

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the very recent progress of various functional inorganic nanomaterials is reviewed including their unique properties, surface functionalization strategies, and applications in biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics. The proper surface functionalization renders them with stability, biocompatibility and functionality in physiological environments, and further enables their targeted use in bioapplications after bioconjugation via selective and specific recognition. The surface-functionalized nanoprobes using the most actively studied nanoparticles (i.e., gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and magnetic nanoparticles) make them an excellent platform for a wide range of bioapplications. With more efforts in recent years, they have been widely developed as labeling probes to detect various biological species such as proteins, nucleic acids and ions, and extensively employed as imaging probes to guide therapeutics such as drug/gene delivery and photothermal/photodynamic therapy.

  15. Common phase diagram for low-dimensional superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalak, Rudi

    2003-01-01

    A phenomenological phase diagram which has been derived for high-temperature superconductors from NMR Knight-shift measurements of the pseudogap is compared to the phase diagram that is obtained for organic superconductors and spin-ladder superconductors, both low-dimensional systems. This is contrasted to the phase diagram of some Heavy Fermion superconductors, i.e. superconductors not constrained to a low dimensionality

  16. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  17. Intrinsic stability of technical superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veringa, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    For the operation of technical superconductors under high current density conditions, the superconducting wires composing high current cables should be intrinsically stabilized. In this report the various important stability criteria are derived and investigated on their validity. An experimental set up is made to check the occurrence of magnetic instabilities if the different applicable criteria are violated. It is found that the observed instabilities can be predicted on the basis of the model given in this report. Production of high current cables based upon composites made by the ECN technique seems to be possible. (Auth.)

  18. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  19. Renormalized modes in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anushri; Kumari, Anita; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Indu, B. D.

    2018-04-01

    The renormalized mode frequencies are obtained with the help of quantum dynamical approach of many body phonon Green's function technique via a general Hamiltonian (excluding BCS Hamiltonian) including the effects of phonons and electrons, anharmonicities and electron-phonon interactions. The numerical estimates have been carried out to study the renormalized mode frequency of high temperature cuprate superconductor (HTS) YBa2Cu3O7-δ using modified Born-Mayer-Huggins interaction potential (MBMHP) best applicable to study the dynamical properties of all HTS.

  20. Peak effect in twinned superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkin, A.I.; Marchetti, M.C.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    A sharp maximum in the critical current J c as a function of temperature just below the melting point of the Abrikosov flux lattice has recently been observed in both low- and high-temperature superconductors. This peak effect is strongest in twinned crystals for fields aligned with the twin planes. We propose that this peak signals the breakdown of the collective pinning regime and the crossover to strong pinning of single vortices on the twin boundaries. This crossover is very sharp and can account for the steep drop of the differential resistivity observed in experiments. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society