WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconductivity dependent friction

  1. Ultralow Friction in a Superconducting Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, Hans J.; Siegel, Michael; Zaitsev, Oleg; Bareiss, Martin; Laschuetza, Helmut

    1996-01-01

    Passive levitation by superconducting magnetic bearings can be utilized in flywheels for energy storage. Basic design criteria of such a bearing are high levitation force, sufficient vertical and horizontal stability and low friction. A test facility was built for the measurement and evaluation of friction in a superconducting magnetic bearing as a function of operating temperature and pressure in the vacuum vessel. The bearing consists of a commercial disk shaped magnet levitated above single grain, melt-textured YBCO high-temperature superconductor material. The superconductor was conduction cooled by an integrated AEG tactical cryocooler. The temperature could be varied from 50 K to 80 K. The pressure in the vacuum chamber was varied from 1 bar to 10(exp -5) mbar. At the lowest pressure setting, the drag torque shows a linear frequency dependence over the entire range investigated (0 less than f less than 40 Hz). Magnetic friction, the frequency independent contribution, is very low. The frequency dependent drag torque is generated by molecular friction from molecule-surface collisions and by eddy currents. Given the specific geometry of the set-up and gas pressure, the molecular drag torque can be estimated. At a speed of 40 Hz, the coefficient of friction (drag-to-lift ratio) was measured to be mu = 1.6 x 10(exp -7) at 10(exp -5) mbar and T = 60 K. This is equivalent to a drag torque of 7.6 x 10(exp -10) Nm. Magnetic friction causes approx. 1% of the total losses. Molecular friction accounts for about 13% of the frequency dependent drag torque, the remaining 87% being due to eddy currents and losses from rotor unbalance. The specific energy loss is only 0.3% per hour.

  2. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...... shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity....

  3. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  4. Velocity Dependence of Friction of Confined Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the f......We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence...... in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer (case b) the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...

  5. Time dependent friction in a free gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Cristiano; Sisti, Francesco; Stagno, Gabriele V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a body moving in a perfect gas, described by the mean-field approximation and interacting elastically with the body, we study the friction exerted by the gas on the body fixed at constant velocities. The time evolution of the body in this setting was studied in Caprino et al. [Math. Phys. 264, 167-189 (2006)], Caprino et al. [Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci. 17, 1369-1403 (2007)], and Cavallaro [Rend. Mat. Appl. 27, 123-145 (2007)] for object with simple shape; the first study where a simple kind of concavity was considered was in Sisti and Ricciuti [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 46, 3759-3611 (2014)], showing new features in the dynamic but not in the friction term. The case of more general shape of the body was left out for further difficulties, and we believe indeed that there are actually non-trivial issues to be faced for these more general cases. To show this and in the spirit of getting a more realistic perspective in the study of friction problems, in this paper, we focused our attention on the friction term itself, studying its behavior on a body with a more general kind of concavity and fixed at constant velocities. We derive the expression of the friction term for constant velocities, we show how it is time dependent, and we give its exact estimate in time. Finally, we use this result to show the absence of a constant velocity in the actual dynamic of such a body.

  6. Low friction in mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J. R.; Hilton, E. F.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Lockwood, A.; Strasik, M.

    1995-12-01

    Individual magnetic steel rotors were levitated by combining the attractive force between permanent magnets and the steel with the repulsive force between high-temperature superconductors and the steel. The free spindown of several rotors was observed, and the effective coefficient of friction for the bearing was calculated as a function of geometry. Low-speed coefficients of <10-8 were observed, and the velocity dependence of MnZn ferrite rotors suggest that coefficients of <10-6 are attainable at bearing rim velocities of 100 m/s.

  7. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  8. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  9. Temperature dependent effective friction coefficient estimation in friction stir welding with the bobbin tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction coefficient in many friction stir welding researches is generally used as an effective, constant value without concern on the adaptable and changeable nature of the friction during welding sequence. This is understandable because the main problem in analyzing friction in friction stir welding are complex nature of the friction processes, case-dependent and time dependent contact between the bodies, influence of the temperature, sliding velocity, etc. This paper is presenting a complex experimental-numerical-analytical model for estimating the effective friction coefficient on contact of the bobbin tool and welding plates during welding, considering the temperature at the contact as the most influencing parameter on friction. The estimation criterion is the correspondence of the experimental temperature and temperature from the numerical model. The estimation procedure is iterative and parametric - the heat transport parameters and friction coefficient are adapted during the estimation procedure in a realistic manner to achieve relative difference between experimental and model’s temperature lower than 3%. The results show that friction coefficient varies from 0.01 to 0.21 for steel-aluminium alloy contact and temperature range from 406°C to 22°C.

  10. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  11. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  12. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly mu ~ A(0)(-chi/4), where A0 is the apparent area and chi is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  13. Quantum Drude friction for time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Lopata, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    Friction is a desired property in quantum dynamics as it allows for localization, prevents backscattering, and is essential in the description of multistage transfer. Practical approaches for friction generally involve memory functionals or interactions with system baths. Here, we start by requiring that a friction term will always reduce the energy of the system; we show that this is automatically true once the Hamiltonian is augmented by a term of the form ∫a(q ;n0)[∂j(q,t)/∂t]ṡJ(q)dq, which includes the current operator times the derivative of its expectation value with respect to time, times a local coefficient; the local coefficient will be fitted to experiment, to more sophisticated theories of electron-electron interaction and interaction with nuclear vibrations and the nuclear background, or alternately, will be artificially constructed to prevent backscattering of energy. We relate this term to previous results and to optimal control studies, and generalize it to further operators, i.e., any operator of the form ∫a(q ;n0)[∂c(q,t)/∂t]ṡC(q)dq (or a discrete sum) will yield friction. Simulations of a small jellium cluster, both in the linear and highly nonlinear excitation regime, demonstrate that the friction always reduces energy. The energy damping is essentially double exponential; the long-time decay is almost an order of magnitude slower than the rapid short-time decay. The friction term stabilizes the propagation (split-operator propagator here), therefore increasing the time-step needed for convergence, i.e., reducing the overall computational cost. The local friction also allows the simulation of a metal cluster in a uniform jellium as the energy loss in the excitation due to the underlying corrugation is accounted for by the friction. We also relate the friction to models of coupling to damped harmonic oscillators, which can be used for a more sophisticated description of the coupling, and to memory functionals. Our results open the

  14. Solar and seasonal dependence of ion frictional heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    Full Text Available Ion frictional heating constitutes one of the principal mechanisms whereby energy, originating in the solar wind, is deposited into the Earth's ionosphere and ultimately the neutral atmosphere. Common programme observations by the EISCAT UHF radar system, spanning the years 1984 to 1995, provide the basis for a comprehensive statistical study of ion frictional heating, results of which are documented in this and a previous paper by the authors. In the present work, the authors demonstrate the solar and seasonal dependence of the universal time distribution of frictional heating, and explain these results with reference to corresponding dependences of the ion velocity. Although EISCAT observes a significant increase in the occurrence of enhanced ion velocities associated with increased solar activity, the latter characterised according to the prevailing 10.7 cm solar flux, this is not reflected to such an extent in the occurrence of frictional heating. It is suggested that this is a consequence of the decreased neutral atmosphere response times associated with active solar conditions, resulting from the higher ionospheric plasma densities present. Seasonal effects on the diurnal distribution of ion frictional heating are well explained by corresponding variations in ionospheric convection, the latter principally a result of geometrical factors. It is noted that, over the entire dataset, the variations in the unperturbed F-region ion temperature, required to implement the identification criterion for ion heating, are highly correlated with model values of thermospheric temperature.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density

  15. Characteristics of frictional properties' dependency on afterslip propagation speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyoshi, K.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Hino, R.; Hori, T.

    2016-12-01

    The propagation speed of postseismic slip seems to vary from place to place. On the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake (M8), the time lag is about 80 minutes for the largest aftershock (M7.4) off Tokachi [Miyazaki and Larson, 2008 GRL] and one year for the M7 earthquakes off Kushiro [Murakami et al., 2006 GRL]. Since the distance from the epicenter of mainshock to the largest aftershock and the M7 aftershocks off Kushiro is about 40 km and 160 km, respectively, these time lags means that propagation speed of the afterslip from the mainshock to the largest aftershock is significantly higher than to the M7 afteshocks off Kushiro. On the Sanriku-Haruka-Oki earthquakes, Matsuzawa et al. [2004 EPS] pointed out that propagation speed of the postseismic slip seems to be an order of 10 km/day for shallower part of the subduction plate boundary while 10 km/month for deeper part. These results indicate that propagation speed of postseismic slip depends on frictional properties and effective normal stress in addition to slip velocity. To know the frictional properties controlling the propagation speed of postseismic slip, some numerical simulations of interplate earthquakes based on a rate- and state-dependent friction law (RSF) [Dieterich, 1979 JGR; Ruina, 1983 JGR] have been recently performed. From those previous studies, the propagation speed of postseismic slip becomes lower in case of higher frictional stability, longer characteristic slip distance [Kato and Hirasawa, 1999 PAGEOPH], and higher effective normal stress [Ariyoshi et al., 2007 EPSL]. Since we have not quantitatively understood why such cases make the postseismic slip propagation slower, it is necessary to know analytical relation between the frictional properties and the propagation speed of postseismic slip. In this study, we develop an expression for the propagation speed of postseismic slip as a function of frictional properties including effective normal stress, and discuss its validity quantitatively by

  16. Glassy dynamics of Brownian particles with velocity-dependent friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We consider a two-dimensional model system of Brownian particles in which slow particles are accelerated while fast particles are damped. The motion of the individual particles is described by a Langevin equation with Rayleigh-Helmholtz velocity-dependent friction. In the case of noninteracting particles, the time evolution equations lead to a non-Gaussian velocity distribution. The velocity-dependent friction allows negative values of the friction or energy intakes by slow particles, which we consider active motion, and also causes breaking of the fluctuation dissipation relation. Defining the effective temperature proportional to the second moment of velocity, it is shown that for a constant effective temperature the higher the noise strength, the lower the number of active particles in the system. Using the Mori-Zwanzig formalism and the mode-coupling approximation, the equations of motion for the density autocorrelation function are derived. The equations are solved using the equilibrium structure factors. The integration-through-transients approach is used to derive a relation between the structure factor in the stationary state considering the interacting forces, and the conventional equilibrium static structure factor.

  17. Velocity dependence of rotational loss in Evershed-type superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.; Labataille, Joseph F.

    1997-02-01

    Results of free spin down in vacuum are reported for an Evershed-type superconducting bearing in which a permanent magnet (PM) ring is levitated over an array of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) and under a similar PM ring in magnetic attraction. The velocity dependence of the rotational loss strongly suggests that the observed velocity-dependent losses are primarily due to eddy currents induced in the PM by inhomogeneity of the field produced by the magnetized HTS array. The results show that the Evershed-type bearing is capable of reducing these eddy-current losses to an extremely low level, so that at a maximum magnet rim velocity of 28 m/s, the fractional kinetic-energy loss per hour was 2.4×10-4. Significant levitation heights are also possible, and at a 23 mm height, we measured a low-speed coefficient of friction of 3×10-8.

  18. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  19. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Effect of velocity-dependent friction on multiple-vehicle collisions in traffic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    We present the dynamic model for the multiple-vehicle collisions to take into account the velocity-dependent friction force. We study the effect of the velocity-dependent friction on the chain-reaction crash on a road. In the traffic situation, drivers brake according to taillights of the forward vehicle and the friction force depends highly on the vehicular speed. The first crash may induce more collisions. We investigate whether or not the first collision induces the multiple-vehicle collisions, numerically and analytically. The dynamic transitions occur from no collisions, through a single collision and double collisions, to multiple collisions with decreasing the headway. We explore the effect of the velocity-dependent friction on the dynamic transitions and the region maps in the multiple-vehicle collisions.

  1. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  2. The temperature dependence of the friction in the fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaji, Shuhei [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We study the slow collective motion at finite excitation on the basis of the linear response theory. The transport coefficients such as friction {gamma}, inertia M and local stiffness C formulated within a locally harmonic approximation are computed along the fission path of {sup 224}Th. It is found that the effective damping rate {eta} = {gamma}/=2{radical}(M|C|)= increases with the temperature T in accord with the fission experiment with the emission of {gamma}-rays. (author)

  3. Temperature dependence of ice-on-rock friction at realistic glacier conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C; Savage, H; Nettles, M

    2017-02-13

    Using a new biaxial friction apparatus, we conducted experiments of ice-on-rock friction in order to better understand basal sliding of glaciers and ice streams. A series of velocity-stepping and slide-hold-slide tests were conducted to measure friction and healing at temperatures between -20°C and melting. Experimental conditions in this study are comparable to subglacial temperatures, sliding rates and effective pressures of Antarctic ice streams and other glaciers, with load-point velocities ranging from 0.5 to 100 µm s(-1) and normal stress σn = 100 kPa. In this range of conditions, temperature dependences of both steady-state friction and frictional healing are considerable. The friction increases linearly with decreasing temperature (temperature weakening) from μ = 0.52 at -20°C to μ = 0.02 at melting. Frictional healing increases and velocity dependence shifts from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour with decreasing temperature. Our results indicate that the strength and stability of glaciers and ice streams may change considerably over the range of temperatures typically found at the ice-bed interface.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  4. Temperature dependence of ice-on-rock friction at realistic glacier conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Savage, H.; Nettles, M.

    2017-02-01

    Using a new biaxial friction apparatus, we conducted experiments of ice-on-rock friction in order to better understand basal sliding of glaciers and ice streams. A series of velocity-stepping and slide-hold-slide tests were conducted to measure friction and healing at temperatures between -20°C and melting. Experimental conditions in this study are comparable to subglacial temperatures, sliding rates and effective pressures of Antarctic ice streams and other glaciers, with load-point velocities ranging from 0.5 to 100 µm s-1 and normal stress σn = 100 kPa. In this range of conditions, temperature dependences of both steady-state friction and frictional healing are considerable. The friction increases linearly with decreasing temperature (temperature weakening) from μ = 0.52 at -20°C to μ = 0.02 at melting. Frictional healing increases and velocity dependence shifts from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour with decreasing temperature. Our results indicate that the strength and stability of glaciers and ice streams may change considerably over the range of temperatures typically found at the ice-bed interface. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  5. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  6. Measurement of improved pressure dependence of superconducting transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, S.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a technique for making electrical transport measurements in a diamond anvil cell at liquid helium temperature having in situ pressure measurement option, permitting accurate pressure determination at any low temperature during the resistance measurement scan. In general, for four-probe resistivity measurements on a polycrystalline sample, four fine gold wires are kept in contact with the sample with the help of the compression from the soft solid (usually alkali halides such as NaCl, KCl, etc.) acting as a pressure-transmitting medium. The actual pressure on the sample is underestimated if not measured from a ruby sphere placed adjacent to the sample and at that very low temperature. Here, we demonstrate the technique with a quasi-four-probe resistance measurement on an Fe-based superconductor in the temperature range 1.2-300 K and pressures up to 8 GPa to find an improved pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature.

  7. The frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint and its dependency on the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, E; Kawai, N; Tanaka, M; Todoh, M; van Eijden, T; Hanaoka, K; Dalla-Bona, D A; Takata, T; Tanne, K

    2004-05-01

    In synovial joints, friction between articular surfaces leads to shear stress within the cartilaginous tissue, which might result in tissue rupture and failure. Joint friction depends on synovial lubrication of the articular surfaces, which can be altered due to compressive loading. Therefore, we hypothesized that the frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is affected by the magnitude and duration of loading. We tested this by measuring the frictional coefficient in 20 intact porcine TMJs using a pendulum-type friction tester. The mean frictional coefficient was 0.0145 (SD 0.0027) after a constant loading of 50 N during 5 sec. The frictional coefficient increased with the length of the preceding loading duration and exceeded 0.0220 (SD 0.0014) after 1 hr. Application of larger loading (80 N) resulted in significantly larger frictional coefficients. In conclusion, the frictional coefficient in the TMJ was proportional to the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

  8. Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Goldsby, David L.; Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela; Carpick, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe the macroscale frictional behavior of a broad range of materials, including rocks found in the seismogenic zone of Earth's crust. A fundamental aspect of the RSF laws is frictional "aging," where friction increases with the time of stationary contact due to asperity creep and/or interfacial strengthening. Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale silica contacts exhibit aging due to the progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds. The role of normal load (and, thus, normal stress) on this interfacial chemical bond-induced (ICBI) friction is predicted to be significant but has not been examined experimentally. Here, we show using AFM that, for nanoscale ICBI friction of silica-silica interfaces, aging (the difference between the maximum static friction and the kinetic friction) increases approximately linearly with the product of the normal load and the log of the hold time. This behavior is attributed to the approximately linear dependence of the contact area on the load in the positive load regime before significant wear occurs, as inferred from sliding friction measurements. This implies that the average pressure, and thus the average bond formation rate, is load independent within the accessible load range. We also consider a more accurate nonlinear model for the contact area, from which we extract the activation volume and the average stress-free energy barrier to the aging process. Our work provides an approach for studying the load and time dependence of contact aging at the nanoscale and further establishes RSF laws for nanoscale asperity contacts.

  9. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters ( b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{{c}}), keeping the direct effect parameter ( a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{{c}} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{{c}} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{{c}} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  10. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters (b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{c} ), keeping the direct effect parameter (a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{c} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{c} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{c} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  11. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of loading rate-dependent static friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H.; Deshpande, V. S.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2016-08-01

    From a microscopic point of view, the frictional force associated with the relative sliding of rough surfaces originates from deformation of the material in contact, by adhesion in the contact interface or both. We know that plastic deformation at the size scale of micrometres is not only dependent on the size of the contact, but also on the rate of deformation. Moreover, depending on its physical origin, adhesion can also be size and rate dependent, albeit different from plasticity. We present a two-dimensional model that incorporates both discrete dislocation plasticity inside a face-centred cubic crystal and adhesion in the interface to understand the rate dependence of friction caused by micrometre-size asperities. The friction strength is the outcome of the competition between adhesion and discrete dislocation plasticity. As a function of contact size, the friction strength contains two plateaus: at small contact length (≲0.6 μ m), the onset of sliding is fully controlled by adhesion while for large contact length (≳10 μ m), the friction strength approaches the size-independent plastic shear yield strength. The transition regime at intermediate contact size is a result of partial de-cohesion and size-dependent dislocation plasticity, and is determined by dislocation properties, interfacial properties as well as by the loading rate.

  12. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  13. Frictional behaviour of sandstone: A sample-size dependent triaxial investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Hamid; Masoumi, Hossein; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Frictional behaviour of rocks from the initial stage of loading to final shear displacement along the formed shear plane has been widely investigated in the past. However the effect of sample size on such frictional behaviour has not attracted much attention. This is mainly related to the limitations in rock testing facilities as well as the complex mechanisms involved in sample-size dependent frictional behaviour of rocks. In this study, a suite of advanced triaxial experiments was performed on Gosford sandstone samples at different sizes and confining pressures. The post-peak response of the rock along the formed shear plane has been captured for the analysis with particular interest in sample-size dependency. Several important phenomena have been observed from the results of this study: a) the rate of transition from brittleness to ductility in rock is sample-size dependent where the relatively smaller samples showed faster transition toward ductility at any confining pressure; b) the sample size influences the angle of formed shear band and c) the friction coefficient of the formed shear plane is sample-size dependent where the relatively smaller sample exhibits lower friction coefficient compared to larger samples. We interpret our results in terms of a thermodynamics approach in which the frictional properties for finite deformation are viewed as encompassing a multitude of ephemeral slipping surfaces prior to the formation of the through going fracture. The final fracture itself is seen as a result of the self-organisation of a sufficiently large ensemble of micro-slip surfaces and therefore consistent in terms of the theory of thermodynamics. This assumption vindicates the use of classical rock mechanics experiments to constrain failure of pressure sensitive rocks and the future imaging of these micro-slips opens an exciting path for research in rock failure mechanisms.

  14. Biomechanics of ant adhesive pads: frictional forces are rate- and temperature-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federle, Walter; Baumgartner, Werner; Hölldobler, Bert

    2004-01-01

    Tarsal adhesive pads enable insects to hold on to smooth plant surfaces. Using a centrifuge technique, we tested whether a "wet adhesion" model of a thin film of liquid secreted between the pad and the surface can explain adhesive and frictional forces in Asian Weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina). When forces are acting parallel to the surface, pads in contact with the surface can slide smoothly. Force per unit pad contact area was strongly dependent on sliding velocity and temperature. Seemingly consistent with the effect of a thin liquid film in the contact zone, (1) frictional force linearly increased with sliding velocity, (2) the increment was greater at lower temperatures and (3) no temperature dependence was detected for low-rate perpendicular detachment forces. However, we observed a strong, temperature-independent static friction that was inconsistent with a fully lubricated contact. Static friction was too large to be explained by the contribution of other (sclerotized) body parts. Moreover, the rate-specific increase of shear stress strongly exceeded predictions derived from estimates of the adhesive liquid film's thickness and viscosity. Both lines of evidence indicate that the adhesive secretion alone is insufficient to explain the observed forces and that direct interaction of the soft pad cuticle with the surface ("rubber friction") is involved.

  15. Microwave dependence of subharmonic gap structure in superconducting junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffman; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1974-01-01

    with the superconducting energy gap itself. The location in voltage of all these structures is given by eV=(2Δ±nh ν) / m, where 2Δ is the superconducting energy gap, ν is the applied frequency, h is Planck's constant, e is the magnitude of the electronic charge, V is the dc voltage drop across the junction, and m and n...

  16. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  17. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of loading rate-dependent static friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, H.; Deshpande, V. S.; van der Giessen, E.

    2016-01-01

    From a microscopic point of view, the frictional force associated with the relative sliding of rough surfaces originates from deformation of the material in contact, by adhesion in the contact interface or both. We know that plastic deformation at the size scale of micrometres is not only dependent

  18. Scale dependence of interface dislocation storage governing the frictional sliding of single asperities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-08-01

    Single-asperity friction tests have found a critical dependence of friction stress on the nanoscale contact size, as successfully explained by the nucleation of interface dislocations as opposed to concurrent sliding of all the interfacial atoms in contact. Modeling and simulation results, however, vary when the motion and interactions of multiple dislocations dominate at a larger scale regime. A Rice-Peierls framework is employed to investigate the multiplication and storage of interface dislocations, and the critical conditions for dislocation initiation and steady-state gliding are determined numerically. Our findings identify the key parameters that govern various friction mechanisms in the Hurtado-Kim and Deshpande-Needleman-van der Giessen models.

  19. Anomalous Velocity Dependence of the Friction Coefficient of an Air Supported Pulley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismani, Matteo; Nauenberg, Michael

    2009-11-01

    A standard undergraduate lab exercise to verify Newton's law, F = ma, is to measure the acceleration a of a glider of mass m suspended on an air track. In our experiment the glider is accelerated by a thin tape attached to the glider at one end, and to a weight of mass M at the other end. The weight hangs vertically via a pulley over which the tape is suspended by air pressure. In the absence of friction, the force pulling the glider is F = (M m/(M + m)g, where g is the acceleration of gravity. To the accuracy provided by the fast electronic timers (accurate to 1/10000 second) used in our experiment to measure the velocity and the acceleration of the glider, we verified that the friction due to the air track can be neglected. But we found that this is not the case for the friction due to the air pulley which adds a component -v/T to the force F on the glider, where T is the friction coefficient. We have measured the dependence of this coefficient on v, and found an excellent analytic fit to our data. This fit deviates considerable from the conventional assumption that 1/T is a constant and/or depends linearly on v.

  20. pH dependence of friction forces between silica surfaces in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Elena; Donose, Bogdan C; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-05-01

    The pH dependence of the friction between a silica particle and a silica wafer was investigated using lateral force microscopy. Measurements were done in the range of 3.6 < or = pH < or = 10.6 and the effect of high loading force was also examined. It is found that the friction is independent of the pH of solutions and increases linearly with the applied load, when the pH is between 3.6 and 8.6. On the other hand, once the pH is above 9.0, the friction becomes extremely small and the dependence on the applied load becomes nonlinear. It is postulated that this transition is due to the development of a gel layer composed of polymer-like segments of silicilic acid anchored on the surface; at the lower applied load, this layer acts as a boundary lubricant between the surfaces, but, at the higher applied load, the entanglements of these segments and more direct contact between two solid surfaces leads to the increase of the friction. The effects found here are expected to play an important role in elucidating the basic mechanism of the planarization process of silica wafers.

  1. Bias dependence of the response of superconducting tunnel junctions used as photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Poelaert, A; Peacock, A; Kozorezov, A; Wigmore, J K

    2000-01-01

    In the last decade, several research groups have developed superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) for photon detection in astronomy. Despite extensive studies, the behavior of multi-layered devices, subject to the superconducting proximity effect (proximized devices), has remained difficult to model. Recently, a new model has been presented, leading to a more realistic approach for the photon detection within an STJ. This model is based on the existence of local traps in the superconducting electrodes of the STJ. In this paper, we show that the new model is successful in predicting the bias dependence of the response of an STJ. The bias dependence also demonstrates that the quasiparticles, i.e. the charge carriers created as a result of the photon absorption process, cannot relax down to the superconducting energy gap. This result is important, since most theoretical developments to date (implicitly) assume that quasiparticle relax to the gap energy. crystal-structure; energy-levels; tantalum-; traps cooper-p...

  2. Friction and wear studies on the temperature dependence of brake-pad materials containing brass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddoumy Fatima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brake pad materials for automobile applications are basically polymer matrix composites. Various reinforcing constituents used in brake pads are organic, metallic and ceramic fillers which play among others an important role on the mechanical and thermal properties, and the wear resistance at high temperature. Friction and wear depend on various parameters such as the micro-chemical structure of the pad and of the metallic counter-face, the rotation speed, the pressure, and the contact surface temperature (M.G. Jacko 1983. This latter parameter can be locally as high as 600 up to 1.500 ∘C depending on the brake type (M.G. Jacko 1983; Blau 2001. Thermal models have been developed to study interface effects at contacting surfaces (Majcherczak, Dufrenoy et al. 2007. Frictional energy can be dissipated through different mechanisms such as oxidation, rise in temperature, formation of wear particles, entropy changes associated to viscoelastic and viscoplastic deformation, and noise generation (Eddoumy, Addiego et al. 2011. Studies of friction brake show that more than 95% of the dissipated energy is transformed into heat (Kasem, Thevenet et al.; Majcherczak, Dufrenoy et al. 2007. Thermal analysis is therefore a primordial step in the study of brake systems since it provides thermo-mechanical properties (Majcherczak, Dufrenoy et al. 2007. The influence of the addition of metallic fibers on the performance of organic friction composites has been investigated using friction tests (Qu, Zhang et al. 2004. Benefits or limitations of the different fibers have been reported, however the issues of thermo-mechanical properties or effect of temperature on friction and wear behavior were not yet investigated (Bijwe, Kumar et al. 2008. No effort was done to correlate the thermo-mechanical and thermal properties with the friction and wear behavior. An important prerequisite is to get a good understanding on how brake materials behave. However, a link

  3. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction stir welding of stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Selvaraj

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the effect of process parameters on heat generation per mm length of the weld and peak temperature during the friction stir welding process. Simulations of friction stir welding process were carried out on 304L stainless steel workpieces for various rotational and welding speeds. The predicted thermal cycle, power required and temperature distributions were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The heat generation per mm length of weld and peak temperature were found to be directly proportional to rotational speed and inversely proportional to welding speed. The rate of increase in heat generation per mm length of the weld and peak temperature are found to be higher at lower rotational speeds and lower at higher rotational speed. The heat generation during friction stir welding was found to be 80.8 % at shoulder, 16.1 % at pin side and 3.1 % at the bottom of the pin.

  4. Heterogeneous nanotribological response of polymorphic self-assembled monolayers arising from domain and phase dependent friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradinas, Markos; Munuera, Carmen; Silien, Christophe; Buck, Manfred; Ocal, Carmen

    2013-01-28

    Micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems demand robust ultrathin films for lubrication. As they can drastically modify the frictional properties of surfaces, few nanometers thick self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) constitute accepted candidates as boundary lubricants. Their high stability and easy preparation make them attractive also for low cost applications. Given their high order, organosulfur SAMs have been archetypal systems for structural investigations, but few efforts have been devoted to analyze the influence of lateral inhomogeneities on their surface properties. The impact on the frictional response of the surface due to the existence of crystalline domains with lateral dimension in the sub-micrometer range is considered here. To this end, two polymorphic structures of self-assembled monolayers of ω-(4'-methylbiphenyl-4-yl) butane-1-thiol coexisting on Au(111) are investigated by scanning tunneling and force microscopy. Described by rectangular 5√5 × 3 (α-phase) and oblique 6√3 × 2√3 (β-phase) unit cells, they exhibit pronouncedly different frictional responses. The lateral nano-tribological heterogeneity of the surface is further influenced by the azimuthal orientation dependence of friction for each phase. In particular, this phenomenon is exploited in the less densely packed β-phase for which the separate analysis of forward and backward lateral force scans is used to differentiate domains rotated 180°. The results demonstrate the level of structural control required in the design of SAMs for nano-tribology applications.

  5. Magnetic field dependence of the superconducting proximity effect in a two atomic layer thin metallic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caminale, Michael; Leon Vanegas, Augusto A.; Stepniak, Agnieszka; Oka, Hirofumi; Fischer, Jeison A.; Sander, Dirk; Kirschner, Juergen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The intriguing possibility to induce superconductivity in a metal, in direct contact with a superconductor, is under renewed interest for applications and for fundamental aspects. The underlying phenomenon is commonly known as proximity effect. In this work we exploit the high spatial resolution of scanning tunneling spectroscopy at sub-K temperatures and in magnetic fields. We probe the differential conductance along a line from a superconducting 9 ML high Pb nanoisland into the surrounding two layer thin Pb/Ag wetting layer on a Si(111) substrate. A gap in the differential conductance indicates superconductivity of the Pb island. We observe an induced gap in the wetting layer, which decays with increasing distance from the Pb island. This proximity length is 21 nm at 0.38 K and 0 T. We find a non-trivial dependence of the proximity length on magnetic field. Surprisingly, we find that the magnetic field does not affect the induced superconductivity up to 0.3 T. However, larger fields of 0.6 T suppress superconductivity in the wetting layer, where the Pb island still remains superconducting. We discuss the unexpected robustness of induced superconductivity in view of the high electronic diffusivity in the metallic wetting layer.

  6. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Henry, M.; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, Tc. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb2O5, consumed the top 6-10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. Tc measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a Tc approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  7. STRESS DEPENDENT INTERNAL FRICTION AND MODULUS CHANGES IN IRON BASED METALLIC GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Posgay, G.; Kiss, S; Kedves, F.; Harangozó, I.; CseresnyÉs, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The measurements were made in a torsional pendulum at about 0.1 cps using longitudinal stress (5 - 150 MPa) in the temperature range 20 - 600°C. The internal friction (i.f.) decreases and the modulus increases monotonously with increasing longitudinal stress in the, amorphous state. This i.f. change is more pronounced in the temperature range of structural relaxation. Changing the stress at constant temperature the changes of the measured parameters were time and temperature dependent. These ...

  8. Interaction between two sliders in a system with rate- and state-dependent friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Changrong; (何昌荣)

    2003-01-01

    This study examines slip recurrence patterns in a two-block spring-slider model with rate- and state-dependent friction. Both weak and strong heterogeneities are considered with different settings of coupling stiffness. The results show that the recurrence pattern of slips strongly depends on the degree of coupling between the two blocks. With strong coupling between the two blocks (e.g., kc/ki max >~1), the slip pattern of the system is simple and characterized by periodical stick-slips, with the two blocks slipping together. With strong heterogeneity in friction strength, period-2 motion is found for moderate coupling stiffness (kc/ki max=0.4) between the two blocks. More complicated patterns are found with weak coupling stiffness (kc/ki max=0.2) and strong heterogeneity. With strong heterogeneity, very weak coupling leads to chaotic slip patterns. With coupling stiffness kc=5 ki max and strong heterogeneity, chaotic slip patterns are not found, in contrast with the results by Huang and Turcotte who employed the classical static/kinetic friction law.

  9. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Naoki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: ide@nitech.ac.jp; Atsumi, Tomohiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nishino, Yoichi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2006-12-20

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10{sup -9} was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency.

  10. Electronic friction near metal surfaces: a case where molecule-metal couplings depend on nuclear coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Dou, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    We derive an explicit form for the electronic friction as felt by a molecule near a metal surface for the general case that molecule-metal couplings depend on nuclear coordinates. Our work generalizes a previous study by von Oppen et al [Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, 3, 144, 2012], where we now go beyond the Condon approximation (i.e. molecule-metal couplings are not held constant). Using a non-equilibrium Green's function formalism in the adiabatic limit, we show that fluctuating metal-molecule couplings lead to new frictional damping terms and random forces, plus a correction to the potential of mean force. Numerical tests are performed and compared with a modified classical master equation; our results indicate that violating the Condon approximation can have a large effect on dynamics.

  11. Electronic friction near metal surfaces: A case where molecule-metal couplings depend on nuclear coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2017-03-01

    We derive an explicit form for the electronic friction as felt by a molecule near a metal surface for the general case that molecule-metal couplings depend on nuclear coordinates. Our work generalizes a previous study by von Oppen et al. [Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 3, 144 (2012)], where we now go beyond the Condon approximation (i.e., molecule-metal couplings are not held constant). Using a non-equilibrium Green's function formalism in the adiabatic limit, we show that fluctuating metal-molecule couplings lead to new frictional damping terms and random forces, plus a correction to the potential of mean force. Numerical tests are performed and compared with a modified classical master equation; our results indicate that violating the Condon approximation can have a large effect on dynamics.

  12. Dependence of superconductivity in CuxBi2Se3 on quenching conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhong, R. D.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Topological superconductivity, implying gapless protected surface states, has recently been proposed to exist in the compound CuxBi2Se3 . Unfortunately, low diamagnetic shielding fractions and considerable inhomogeneity have been reported in this compound. In an attempt to understand and improve on the finite superconducting volume fractions, we have investigated the effects of various growth and postannealing conditions. With a melt-growth (MG) method, diamagnetic shielding fractions of up to 56% in Cu0.3Bi2Se3 have been obtained, the highest value reported for this method. We investigate the efficacy of various quenching and annealing conditions, finding that quenching from temperatures above 560∘C is essential for superconductivity, whereas quenching from lower temperatures or not quenching at all is detrimental. A modified floating zone (FZ) method yielded large single crystals but little superconductivity. Even after annealing and quenching, FZ-grown samples had much less chance of being superconducting than MG-grown samples. From the low shielding fractions in FZ-grown samples and the quenching dependence, we suggest that a metastable secondary phase having a small volume fraction in most of the samples may be responsible for the superconductivity.

  13. Does fault strengthening in laboratory rock friction experiments really depend primarily upon time and not slip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pathikrit; Rubin, Allan M.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2017-08-01

    The popular constitutive formulations of rate-and-state friction offer two end-member views on whether friction evolves only with slip (Slip law) or with time even without slip (Aging law). While rate stepping experiments show support for the Slip law, laboratory-observed frictional behavior near-zero slip rates has traditionally been inferred as supporting Aging law style time-dependent healing, in particular, from the slide-hold-slide experiments of Beeler et al. (1994). Using a combination of new analytical results and explicit numerical (Bayesian) inversion, we show instead that the slide-hold-slide data of Beeler et al. (1994) favor slip-dependent state evolution during holds. We show that, while the stiffness-independent rate of growth of peak stress (following reslides) with hold duration is a property shared by both the Aging and (under a more restricted set of parameter combinations) Slip laws, the observed stiffness dependence of the rate of stress relaxation during long holds is incompatible with the Aging law with constant rate-state parameters. The Slip law consistently fits the evolution of the stress minima at the end of the holds well, whether fitting jointly with peak stresses or otherwise. But neither the Aging nor Slip laws fit all the data well when a - b is constrained to values derived from prior velocity steps. We also attempted to fit the evolution of stress peaks and minima with the Kato-Tullis hybrid law and the shear stress-dependent Nagata law, both of which, even with the freedom of an extra parameter, generally reproduced the best Slip law fits to the data.

  14. Stoichiometry and thickness dependence of superconducting properties of niobium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, Melissa R., E-mail: mrbeebe@email.wm.edu; Beringer, Douglas B.; Burton, Matthew C.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, R. Alejandra [Department of Physics, The College of William & Mary, Small Hall, 300 Ukrop Way, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The current technology used in linear particle accelerators is based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities fabricated from bulk niobium (Nb), which have smaller surface resistance and therefore dissipate less energy than traditional nonsuperconducting copper cavities. Using bulk Nb for the cavities has several advantages, which are discussed elsewhere; however, such SRF cavities have a material-dependent accelerating gradient limit. In order to overcome this fundamental limit, a multilayered coating has been proposed using layers of insulating and superconducting material applied to the interior surface of the cavity. The key to this multilayered model is to use superconducting thin films to exploit the potential field enhancement when these films are thinner than their London penetration depth. Such field enhancement has been demonstrated in MgB{sub 2} thin films; here, the authors consider films of another type-II superconductor, niobium nitride (NbN). The authors present their work correlating stoichiometry and superconducting properties in NbN thin films and discuss the thickness dependence of their superconducting properties, which is important for their potential use in the proposed multilayer structure. While there are some previous studies on the relationship between stoichiometry and critical temperature T{sub C}, the authors are the first to report on the correlation between stoichiometry and the lower critical field H{sub C1}.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Friction Stir Welding Process by Using Rate-dependent Constitutive Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwu ZHANG; Zhao ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Rate-dependent constitutive model was used to simulate the friction stir welding process. The effect of the viscosity coefficient and the process parameters on the material behaviors and the stress distributions around the pin were studied. Results indicate that the stress in front of the pin is larger than that behind the pin. The difference between the radial/circumferential stress in front of the pin and that behind it becomes smaller when the material gets closer to the top surface. This difference increases with increasing the viscosity coefficient and becomes smaller when the welding speed decreases. The variation of the angular velocity does not significantly affect the difference.

  16. Investigation of scale effects and directionality dependence on friction and adhesion of human hair using AFM and macroscale friction test apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaTorre, Carmen; Bhushan, Bharat

    2006-01-01

    Macroscale testing of human hair tribological properties has been widely used to aid in the development of better shampoos and conditioners. Recently, literature has focused on using the atomic force microscope (AFM) to study surface roughness, coefficient of friction, adhesive force, and wear (tribological properties) on the nanoscale in order to increase understanding about how shampoos and conditioners interact with the hair cuticle. Since there are both similarities and differences when comparing the tribological trends at both scales, it is thus recognized that scale effects are an important aspect of studying the tribology of hair. However, no microscale tribological data for hair exists in literature. This is unfortunate because many interactions between hair-skin, hair-comb, and hair-hair contact takes place at microasperities ranging from a few mum to hundreds of mum. Thus, to bridge the gap between the macro- and nanoscale data, as well as to gain a full understanding of the mechanisms behind the trends, it is now worthwhile to look at hair tribology on the microscale. Presented in this paper are coefficient of friction and adhesive force data on various scales for virgin and chemically damaged hair, both with and without conditioner treatment. Macroscale coefficient of friction was determined using a traditional friction test apparatus. Microscale and nanoscale tribological characterization was performed with AFM tips of various radii. The nano-, micro-, and macroscale trends are compared and the mechanisms behind the scale effects are discussed. Since the coefficient of friction changes drastically (on any scale) depending on whether the direction of motion is along or against the cuticle scales, the directionality dependence and responsible mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Investigation of scale effects and directionality dependence on friction and adhesion of human hair using AFM and macroscale friction test apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaTorre, Carmen [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS (NLIM), Ohio State University, Suite 255, 650 Ackerman Road, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States); Bhushan, Bharat [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS (NLIM), Ohio State University, Suite 255, 650 Ackerman Road, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States)]. E-mail: bhushan.2@osu.edu

    2006-06-15

    Macroscale testing of human hair tribological properties has been widely used to aid in the development of better shampoos and conditioners. Recently, literature has focused on using the atomic force microscope (AFM) to study surface roughness, coefficient of friction, adhesive force, and wear (tribological properties) on the nanoscale in order to increase understanding about how shampoos and conditioners interact with the hair cuticle. Since there are both similarities and differences when comparing the tribological trends at both scales, it is thus recognized that scale effects are an important aspect of studying the tribology of hair. However, no microscale tribological data for hair exists in literature. This is unfortunate because many interactions between hair-skin, hair-comb, and hair-hair contact takes place at microasperities ranging from a few {mu}m to hundreds of {mu}m. Thus, to bridge the gap between the macro- and nanoscale data, as well as to gain a full understanding of the mechanisms behind the trends, it is now worthwhile to look at hair tribology on the microscale. Presented in this paper are coefficient of friction and adhesive force data on various scales for virgin and chemically damaged hair, both with and without conditioner treatment. Macroscale coefficient of friction was determined using a traditional friction test apparatus. Microscale and nanoscale tribological characterization was performed with AFM tips of various radii. The nano-, micro-, and macroscale trends are compared and the mechanisms behind the scale effects are discussed. Since the coefficient of friction changes drastically (on any scale) depending on whether the direction of motion is along or against the cuticle scales, the directionality dependence and responsible mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stępniak, A.; Caminale, M.; Leon Vanegas, A. A.; Oka, H.; Sander, D., E-mail: sander@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  19. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  20. Isothermal Langevin dynamics in systems with power-law spatially dependent friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Shaked; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Farago, Oded

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamics of Brownian particles in a heterogeneous one-dimensional medium with a spatially dependent diffusion coefficient of the form D(x)∼|x|^{c}, at constant temperature. The particle's probability distribution function (PDF) is calculated both analytically, by solving Fick's diffusion equation, and from numerical simulations of the underdamped Langevin equation. At long times, the PDFs calculated by both approaches yield identical results, corresponding to subdiffusion for c1, the diffusion equation predicts that the particles accelerate. Here we show that this phenomenon, previously considered in several works as an illustration for the possible dramatic effects of spatially dependent thermal noise, is unphysical. We argue that in an isothermal medium, the motion cannot exceed the ballistic limit (〈x^{2}〉∼t^{2}). The ballistic limit is reached when the friction coefficient drops sufficiently fast at large distances from the origin and is correctly captured by Langevin's equation.

  1. Velocity, temperature and normal force dependence on friction: An analytical and molecular dynamic study

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, R A; Rapini, M; Costa, B V

    2007-01-01

    In this work we propose an extension to the analytical one-dimensional model proposed by E. Gnecco (Phys. Rev. Lett. 84:1172) to describe friction. Our model includes normal forces and the dependence with the angular direction of movement in which the object is dragged over a surface. The presence of the normal force in the model allow us to define judiciously the friction coefficient, instead of introducing it as an {\\sl a posteriori} concept. We compare the analytical results with molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated model corresponds to a tip sliding over a surface. The tip is simulated as a single particle interacting with a surface through a Lennard-Jones $(6-12)$ potential. The surface is considered as consisting of a regular BCC(001) arrangement of particles interacting with each other through a Lennard-Jones $(6-12)$ potential. We investigate the system under several conditions of velocity, temperature and normal forces. Our analytical results are in very good agreement with those obtained by...

  2. The Load and Time Dependence of Chemical Bonding-Induced Frictional Ageing of Silica at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Goldsby, D. L.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are empirical relationships that describe the frictional behavior of rocks and other materials in experiments, and reproduce a variety of observed natural behavior when employed in earthquake models. A pervasive observation from rock friction experiments is the linear increase of static friction with the log of contact time, or 'ageing'. Ageing is usually attributed to an increase in real area of contact associated with asperity creep. However, recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate that ageing of nanoscale silica-silica contacts is due to progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds in the absence of plastic deformation, in a manner consistent with the multi-contact ageing behavior of rocks [Li et al., 2011]. To further investigate chemical bonding-induced ageing, we explored the influence of normal load (and thus contact normal stress) and contact time on ageing. Experiments that mimic slide-hold-slide rock friction experiments were conducted in the AFM for contact loads and hold times ranging from 23 to 393 nN and 0.1 to 100 s, respectively, all in humid air (~50% RH) at room temperature. Experiments were conducted by sequentially sliding the AFM tip on the sample at a velocity V of 0.5 μm/s, setting V to zero and holding the tip stationary for a given time, and finally resuming sliding at 0.5 μm/s to yield a peak value of friction followed by a drop to the sliding friction value. Chemical bonding-induced ageing, as measured by the peak friction minus the sliding friction, increases approximately linearly with the product of normal load and the log of the hold time. Theoretical studies of the roles of reaction energy barriers in nanoscale ageing indicate that frictional ageing depends on the total number of reaction sites and the hold time [Liu & Szlufarska, 2012]. We combine chemical kinetics analyses with contact mechanics models to explain our results, and develop a new approach for curve

  3. Implementation into earthquake sequence simulations of a rate- and state-dependent friction law incorporating pressure solution creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.

    2016-05-01

    Pressure solution creep (PSC) is an important elementary process in rock friction at high temperatures where solubilities of rock-forming minerals are significantly large. It significantly changes the frictional resistance and enhances time-dependent strengthening. A recent microphysical model for PSC-involved friction of clay-quartz mixtures, which can explain a transition between dilatant and non-dilatant deformation (d-nd transition), was modified here and implemented in dynamic earthquake sequence simulations. The original model resulted in essentially a kind of rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law, but assumed a constant friction coefficient for clay resulting in zero instantaneous rate dependency in the dilatant regime. In this study, an instantaneous rate dependency for the clay friction coefficient was introduced, consistent with experiments, resulting in a friction law suitable for earthquake sequence simulations. In addition, a term for time-dependent strengthening due to PSC was added which makes the friction law logarithmically rate-weakening in the dilatant regime. The width of the zone in which clasts overlap or, equivalently, the interface porosity involved in PSC plays a role as the state variable. Such a concrete physical meaning of the state variable is a great advantage in future modelling studies incorporating other physical processes such as hydraulic effects. Earthquake sequence simulations with different pore pressure distributions demonstrated that excess pore pressure at depth causes deeper rupture propagation with smaller slip per event and a shorter recurrence interval. The simulated ruptures were arrested a few kilometres below the point of pre-seismic peak stress at the d-nd transition and did not propagate spontaneously into the region of pre-seismic non-dilatant deformation. PSC weakens the fault against slow deformation and thus such a region cannot produce a dynamic stress drop. Dynamic rupture propagation further down to

  4. Velocity dependence of coefficient of friction of diamond like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Kumar, Niranjan; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    The velocity dependence of coefficient of friction (CoF) of hydrogen-free and hydrogenated Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) coatings was studied on sliding. In low velocity regime, CoF of hydrogen-free DLC was found to increase which may be linked to a thermally activated pre-mature breaking of the surface asperities. However, CoF of hydrogenated DLC was found to decrease due to formation of graphite like lubricious layer and sustainability of cross-linked network of H-bonded atoms. In high velocity regime, CoF of hydrogen free DLC increases marginally due to an inefficient transfer of thermal energy while that of hydrogenated DLC increases due to rapid formation and rupture of atomic bonds.

  5. Orbital-dependent two-band superconductivity in MgB sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Yanagisawa, T

    2003-01-01

    We show that a two-band model with k-dependent superconducting gaps well describes the transmission and optical conductivity measured for MgB sub 2 thin films. It is also shown that the two-band anisotropic modelconsistently describes the specific-heat jump and thermodynamic critical magnetic field H sub c. A single-gap anisotropic model is shown to be insufficient to understand consistently optical and thermodynamic behaviors. In our model, the pairing symmetry in each band has an anisotropic characteristic which is determined almost uniquely; the superconducting gap in the sigma-band has anisotropy in the ab-plane and the gap in the pi-band has a prolate form exhibiting anisotropy in the c-direction. (author)

  6. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  7. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  8. How graphene slides: measurement and theory of strain-dependent frictional forces between graphene and SiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitt, Alexander L; Qi, Zenan; Rémi, Sebastian; Park, Harold S; Swan, Anna K; Goldberg, Bennett B

    2013-06-12

    Strain, bending rigidity, and adhesion are interwoven in determining how graphene responds when pulled across a substrate. Using Raman spectroscopy of circular, graphene-sealed microchambers under variable external pressure, we demonstrate that graphene is not firmly anchored to the substrate when pulled. Instead, as the suspended graphene is pushed into the chamber under pressure, the supported graphene outside the microchamber is stretched and slides, pulling in an annulus. Analyzing Raman G band line scans with a continuum model extended to include sliding, we extract the pressure dependent sliding friction between the SiO2 substrate and mono-, bi-, and trilayer graphene. The sliding friction for trilayer graphene is directly proportional to the applied load, but the friction for monolayer and bilayer graphene is inversely proportional to the strain in the graphene, which is in violation of Amontons' law. We attribute this behavior to the high surface conformation enabled by the low bending rigidity and strong adhesion of few layer graphene.

  9. Dependence of sea-surface microwave emissivity on friction velocity as derived from SMMR/SASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, F. J.; Christensen, E. J.; Richardson, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The sea-surface microwave emissivity is derived using SMMR brightness temperatures and SASS inferred friction velocities for three North Pacific Seasat passes. The results show the emissivity increasing linearly with friction velocity with no obvious break between the foam-free and foam regimes up to a friction velocity of about 70 cm/sec (15 m/sec wind speed). For horizontal polarization the sensitivity of emissivity to friction velocity greatly increases with frequency, while for vertical polarization the sensitivity is much less and is independent of frequency. This behavior is consistent with two-scale scattering theory. A limited amount of high friction velocity data above 70 cm/sec suggests an additional increase in emissivity due to whitecapping.

  10. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of the control strategy introduced by Schoppa and Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998), 10.1063/1.869789] as a function of Reynolds number (Re). The skin-friction drag reduction method proposed by these authors, consisting of streamwise-invariant, counter-rotating vortices, was analyzed by Canton et al. [Flow, Turbul. Combust. 97, 811 (2016), 10.1007/s10494-016-9723-8] in turbulent channel flows for friction Reynolds numbers (Reτ) corresponding to the value of the original study (i.e., 104) and 180. For these Re, a slightly modified version of the method proved to be successful and was capable of providing a drag reduction of up to 18%. The present study analyzes the Reynolds number dependence of this drag-reducing strategy by performing two sets of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for Reτ=360 and 550. A detailed analysis of the method as a function of the control parameters (amplitude and wavelength) and Re confirms, on the one hand, the effectiveness of the large-scale vortices at low Re and, on the other hand, the decreasing and finally vanishing effectiveness of this method for higher Re. In particular, no drag reduction can be achieved for Reτ=550 for any combination of the parameters controlling the vortices. For low Reynolds numbers, the large-scale vortices are able to affect the near-wall cycle and alter the wall-shear-stress distribution to cause an overall drag reduction effect, in accordance with most control strategies. For higher Re, instead, the present method fails to penetrate the near-wall region and cannot induce the spanwise velocity variation observed in other more established control strategies, which focus on the near-wall cycle. Despite the negative outcome, the present results demonstrate the shortcomings of the control strategy and show that future focus should be on methods that directly target the near-wall region or other suitable alternatives.

  11. Superconductivity without dependence on valence electron density in Zn doped YBCO systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ping-Lin; Wang Yong-Yong; Tian Yong-Tao; Wang Jing; Niu Xiao-Li; Wang Jun-Xi; Wang Dan-Dan; Wang Xiao-Xia

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that the YBa2Cu3-xZnxO7-δ(x=0-0.4)samples are researched by means of x-ray diffraction,calculations of binding energy,the positron experiments and variations of oxygen content.The results of simulated calculations,positron experiments and variations of oxygen content support the existence of cluster effect.Moreover,it is concluded that the cluster effect is an important factor on suppression of high-Tc cuprate superconductivity and the Tc does not depend on the density of valence electron directly.

  12. Numerical Studies of Friction Between Metallic Surfaces and of its Dependence on Electric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintanis, Evangelos; Marder, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We will present molecular dynamics simulations that explore the frictional mechanisms between clean metallic surfaces. We employ the HOLA molecular dynamics code to run slider-on-block experiments. Both objects are allowed to evolve freely. We recover realistic coefficients of friction and verify the importance of cold-welding and plastic deformations in dry sliding friction. We also find that plastic deformations can significantly affect both objects, despite a difference in hardness. Metallic contacts have significant technological applications in the transmission of electric currents. To explore the effects of the latter to sliding, we had to integrate an electrodynamics solver into the molecular dynamics code. The disparate time scales involved posed a challenge, but we have developed an efficient scheme for such an integration. A limited electrodynamic solver has been implemented and we are currently exploring the effects of currents in the friction and wear of metallic contacts.

  13. Size Dependence of Oxygen-Annealing Effects on Superconductivity of Fe1+yTe1-xSx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Teruo; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Yaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    For the Fe-based superconductor Fe1+yTe1-xSx, superconductivity is induced by annealing treatment in oxygen atmosphere, whereas as-grown samples do not show superconductivity. We investigated the sample-size dependence of O2-annealing effects in Fe1.01Te0.91S0.09. The annealing conditions were fixed to 1 atm, 200 °C, and 2 h. We carried out magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements in order to evaluate the superconducting volume fraction. We found that Fe1+yTe1-xSx has an optimal size for the induction of bulk superconductivity by O2 annealing. Our results indicate that O2 annealing is probably effective near the surface of samples over a length of a few tens of micro meters.

  14. Analysis of a Dynamic Viscoelastic Contact Problem with Normal Compliance, Normal Damped Response, and Nonmonotone Slip Rate Dependent Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Barboteu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical model which describes the dynamic evolution of a viscoelastic body in frictional contact with an obstacle. The contact is modelled with a combination of a normal compliance and a normal damped response law associated with a slip rate-dependent version of Coulomb’s law of dry friction. We derive a variational formulation and an existence and uniqueness result of the weak solution of the problem is presented. Next, we introduce a fully discrete approximation of the variational problem based on a finite element method and on an implicit time integration scheme. We study this fully discrete approximation schemes and bound the errors of the approximate solutions. Under regularity assumptions imposed on the exact solution, optimal order error estimates are derived for the fully discrete solution. Finally, after recalling the solution of the frictional contact problem, some numerical simulations are provided in order to illustrate both the behavior of the solution related to the frictional contact conditions and the theoretical error estimate result.

  15. Friction and scale-dependent deformation processes of large experimental carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Carpenter, Brett M.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Scuderi, Marco M.; Sagy, Amir; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Collettini, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    We studied the frictional behaviour and deformation products of large (20 cm × 20 cm bare surfaces) experimental limestone faults. We sheared samples in a direct shear configuration, with an imposed normal force of 40-200 kN and shear velocity of 10 μm/s. The steady-state shearing of these surfaces yielded a coefficient of friction 0.7hold-slide tests, is null (Δμ≤0 upon re-shear). Moreover, sliding of these surfaces is accompanied by dilatation and production of grooves, gouge striations and fault mirrors. These products are entirely analogous to slip surface phenomena found on natural limestone-bearing faults at both the macroscale and at the microscale. We infer that high friction, accompanied by dilatant deformation, and null frictional healing are the macroscopic effect of brittle damage on the sliding surface, constrained by the strength of the rock and by fast healing processes in the gouge. Simultaneously to brittle failure, plastic deformation occurs on the sliding surface and inside the intact rock via nanoparticle formation (mirrors) and twinning at the micron scale. Because of the similarity between experimental and natural structures, we suggest that sliding of carbonate-bearing faults in the uppermost crust could be characterized by high friction, fast healing and strongly dilatant deformation, which would help to explain shallow seismicity frequently documented in carbonatic terrains such as the Northern Apennines of Italy.

  16. Spin-dependent boundary conditions for isotropic superconducting Green’s functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottet, A.; Huertas-Hernando, D.; Belzig, W.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    2009-01-01

    The quasiclassical theory of superconductivity provides the most successful description of diffusive heterostructures comprising superconducting elements, namely, the Usadel equations for isotropic Green’s functions. Since the quasiclassical and isotropic approximations break down close to interface

  17. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  18. Angular Dependence of Lateral and Levitation Forces in Asymmetric Small Magnet/Superconducting Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. M. Al-Khateeb; M. K. Alqadi; F. Y. Alzoubi; N. Y. Ayoub

    2007-01-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction model is used to calculate the angular dependence of lateral and levitation forces on a small permanent magnet and a cylindrical superconductor in the Meissner state lying laterally offthe symmetric axis of the cylinder. Under the assumption that the lateral displacement of the magnet is small compared with the physical dimensions of the system, we obtain analytical expressions for the lateral and levitation forces as functions of geometrical parameters of the superconductor as well as the height, the lateral displacement and the orientation of magnetic moment of the magnet. The effect of thickness and radius of the superconductor on the levitation force is similar to that for a symmetric magnet/superconducting cylinder system, but within the range of lateral displacement. The splitting in the levitation force increases with the increasing angle of orientation of the magnetic moment of the magnet. For a given lateral displacement of the magnet, the lateral force vanishes when the magnetic moment is perpendicular to the surface of the superconductor and has a maximum value when the moment is parallel to the surface. For a given orientation of the magnetic moment, the lateral force has a linear relationship with the lateral displacement. The stability of the magnet above the superconducting cylinder is discussed in detail.

  19. Fracture behaviors of thin superconducting films with field-dependent critical current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, An; Xue, Cun; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe, E-mail: zhouyh@lzu.edu.cn

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The fracture behaviors of superconducting films for the Kim model are studied. • The profile of stress intensity factor is generally the same as magnetostriction. • The crack problem of two collinear cracks is also researched for the Kim model. -- Abstract: The fracture behaviors under electromagnetic force with field-dependent critical current density in thin superconducting film are investigated. Applying finite element method, the energy release rates and stress intensity factors of one central crack versus applied field and crack length are obtained for the Bean model and Kim model. It is interesting that the profile of the stress intensity factor is generally the same as the magnetostrictive behavior during one full cycle applied field. Furthermore, the crack problem of two collinear cracks with respect to crack length and distance is also researched for the Kim model. The results show that the energy release rates and stress intensity factors of the two collinear cracks at left tip and right tip are remarkably different for relatively small crack distance and long crack length. This work can offer good estimations and provide a basis for interpretation of cracking and mechanical failure of HTS thin films in numerous real situations.

  20. A numerical study of comparison of two one-state-variable, rate- and state-dependent friction evolution laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeen-Hwa Wang

    2009-01-01

    The two one-state-variable, rate- and state-dependent friction laws, i.e., the slip and slowness laws, are compared on the basis of dynamical behavior of a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model through numerical simulations. Results show that two (normalized) model parameters, i.e., △(the normalized characteristic slip distance) and β-α (the difference in two normalized parameters of friction laws), control the solutions. From given values of △, β, and α, for the slowness laws, the solution exists and the unique non-zero fixed point is stable when △>(β-α), yet not when △<β-α). For the slip law, the solution exists for large ranges of model parameters and the number and stability of the non-zero fixed points change from one case to another. Results suggest that the slip law is more appropriate for controlling earthquake dynamics than the slowness law.

  1. Frequency-dependent friction and its significance for liquid pipeline simulation; Influencia do fator de atrito com dependencia da frequencia na simulacao de transientes em oleodutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepedino, Alexandre F. [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rachid, Felipe B. Freitas [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Transporte de Liquidos e Gases

    2008-07-01

    Unsteady liquid flow in pipelines is usually described by using one-dimensional models and, in a procedure referred to as quasi-steady approximation, friction losses are estimated by formulae derived for steady state flow conditions. The assumption is that the friction loss during transient flow conditions can be approximated by the friction loss obtained for a steady flow with the same average velocity. However, during unsteady flow conditions the velocity profile can be considerably different from the steady flow. The shear stress at the pipe wall and the mean velocity are not in phase. Therefore, friction losses computed according to the quasi-steady approximation are inaccurate. To overcome this, the concept of frequency-dependent friction was proposed, including the time history of the mean flow velocity and acceleration, resulting in better correlation to experimental data. This work presents an investigation of situations in which the use of a frequency-dependent friction model could bring additional improvement for the petroleum and products pipeline simulation. To do so, through computer simulations, the predictions of both quasi-steady and unsteady friction models, for short and long lines, operating under a range of Reynolds numbers, are compared and the significance of the friction model is evaluated. (author)

  2. Screening-Dependent Study of Superconductivity in 3d-Transition Metals Binary Alloys Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aditya M. Vora

    2009-01-01

    In the present article, we report the screening-dependent study of the superconducting state parameters (SSPs), viz. electron-phonon coupling strength A, Coulomb pseudopotential μ*, transition temperature Tc, isotope effect exponent a, and effective interaction strength NoV of 3d-band transition metals binary alloys superconductors have been made extensively in the present work using a model potential formalism and employing the pseudo-alloy-atom (PAA) model for the first time. Five local field correction functions proposed by Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaxu-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) are used in the present investigation to study the screening influence on the aforesaid properties. The present results of the SSPs obtained from H-screening are found in qualitative agreement with the available experimental data wherever exist.

  3. Detection of second harmonic of phase dependence of superconducting current in Nb/Au/YBCO heterojunctions

    CERN Document Server

    Komissinskij, F V; Ilichev, E V; Ivanov, Z G

    2001-01-01

    The results of the experimental study on the current phase dependence (CPD) of the heterotransitions, consisting of the niobium and the YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x (YBCO) film with an additional interlayer from gold (Nb/Au/YBCO) are presented. The CPD measurement is carried out through the radiofrequency superconducting quantum interferometer. The CPD second harmonic is determined in the Nb/Au/YBCO heterotransitions. Possible causes of its appearance are discussed within the frames of the d +- s combined symmetry of the YBCO order parameter. One of the causes of the CPD second harmonic appearance is the twinning of the YBCO films (001). The second cause of existing the anomalously high critical current consists in the availability of the Nb/Au boundary with the transparence of approx 10 sup - sup 1 in the Nb/Au/YBCO

  4. Fracture behaviors of thin superconducting films with field-dependent critical current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, An; Xue, Cun; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-09-01

    The fracture behaviors under electromagnetic force with field-dependent critical current density in thin superconducting film are investigated. Applying finite element method, the energy release rates and stress intensity factors of one central crack versus applied field and crack length are obtained for the Bean model and Kim model. It is interesting that the profile of the stress intensity factor is generally the same as the magnetostrictive behavior during one full cycle applied field. Furthermore, the crack problem of two collinear cracks with respect to crack length and distance is also researched for the Kim model. The results show that the energy release rates and stress intensity factors of the two collinear cracks at left tip and right tip are remarkably different for relatively small crack distance and long crack length. This work can offer good estimations and provide a basis for interpretation of cracking and mechanical failure of HTS thin films in numerous real situations.

  5. The Solution to the BCS Gap Equation for Superconductivity and Its Temperature Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From the viewpoint of operator theory, we deal with the temperature dependence of the solution to the BCS gap equation for superconductivity. When the potential is a positive constant, the BCS gap equation reduces to the simple gap equation. We first show that there is a unique nonnegative solution to the simple gap equation, that it is continuous and strictly decreasing, and that it is of class with respect to the temperature. We next deal with the case where the potential is not a constant but a function. When the potential is not a constant, we give another proof of the existence and uniqueness of the solution to the BCS gap equation, and show how the solution varies with the temperature. We finally show that the solution to the BCS gap equation is indeed continuous with respect to both the temperature and the energy under a certain condition when the potential is not a constant.

  6. Search for stress dependence in the internal friction of fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, Phil; Lamb, Corinne; Heptonstall, Alastair; Hough, Jim

    2003-12-01

    The quality factor (Q) of the vertical bounce mode of a fused silica fiber pendulum is measured at high and low stresses. The internal friction of fused silica fibers is found to be independent of stress from 12.8 to 213 MPa at a level of 1.6x10{sup -8}. Comparison with Q's of fiber bending modes is consistent with losses concentrated in the surface of the fiber.

  7. Search for stress dependence in the internal friction of fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Phil; Lamb, Corinne; Heptonstall, Alastair; Hough, Jim

    2003-12-01

    The quality factor ( Q) of the vertical bounce mode of a fused silica fiber pendulum is measured at high and low stresses. The internal friction of fused silica fibers is found to be independent of stress from 12.8 to 213 MPa at a level of 1.6×10 -8. Comparison with Q's of fiber bending modes is consistent with losses concentrated in the surface of the fiber.

  8. Current dependence of heat leak on the terminals in the superconducting DC transmission and distribution system of CASER-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Toshio; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Emoto, Masahiko; Hamabe, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Sataro; Hikichi, Yasuo; Minowa, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Superconductivity can solve the energy problems in the world as energy saving technologies. In particular, superconducting direct current (DC) transmission and distribution (T&D) systems is promising, as it can be easily extended to large scale energy transmission systems for energy sharing. We are developing criogenic systems for effective cooling of superconducting T&D systems. In the cooling experiments with the 200 m-class superconducting DC T&D system at Chubu University (CASER-2), we have estimated the performance of the system. For example, our superconducting cable is connected to the outside at the terminals using Peltier current leads (PCLs). The PCL is composed of a thermoelectric material and a copper lead. Small thermal conductivity and large thermopower of the thermoelectric modules can effectively insulate the heat leak to the low temperature end. We measured the temperature along the current leads and the heat leak at the terminals. As current leads have an optimal shape factor, the optimum operation current exists. The current dependence of the system performance is discussed.

  9. Temperature Dependence of the Superconducting Gap Anistropy in Bi_2 Sr_2CaCu_2O8+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Quitmann, C.; Kelley, R. J.; Berger, H.; Margaritondo, G.; Onellion, M.

    1995-02-01

    Detailed data on the momentum-resolved temperature dependence of the superconducting gap of Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O8+x are presented, complemented by similar data on the intensity of the photoemission superconducting condensate spectral area. The gap anisotropy between the Gamma-overline{M} and Gamma-X directions increases markedly with increasing temperature, contrary to what happens for conventional anisotropic-gap superconductors, such as lead. Specifically, the size of the superconducting gap along the Gamma-X direction decreases to values indistinguishable from zero at temperatures for which the gap retains virtually full value along the Gamma-overline{M} direction. These data rule out the simplest type of d-wave order parameter.

  10. Critical current characteristics and history dependence in superconducting SmFeAsOF bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, B; Ge, J [Department of Life, Environment and Materials Science, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Kiuchi, M; Otabe, E S [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka 820-8502 (Japan); Gao, Z; Wang, L; Qi, Y; Zhang, X; Ma, Y, E-mail: nee@fit.ac.j [Key Laboratory of Applied Superconductivity, Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 2703, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-06-01

    The superconducting SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (x=0.2) polycrystalline bulks were prepared by the powder-in-tube (PIT) method. The magnetic field and temperature dependences of critical current densities in the samples were investigated by resistive and ac inductive (Campbell's) methods. It was found that a fairly large shielding current density over 10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2}, which is considered to correspond to the local critical current density, flows locally with the perimeter size similar to the average grain size of the bulk samples, while an extremely low transport current density of about 10{sup 5} A/m{sup 2} corresponding to the global critical current density flows through the whole sample. Furthermore, a unique history dependence of global critical current density was observed, i.e., it shows a smaller value in the increasing-field process than that in the decreasing-field process. The history dependence of global critical current characteristic in our case can be ascribed to the existence of the weak-link property between the grains in SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} bulk.

  11. Critical current characteristics and history dependence in superconducting SmFeAsOF bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, B.; Ge, J.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Gao, Z.; Wang, L.; Qi, Y.; Zhang, X.; Ma, Y.

    2010-06-01

    The superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFx (x=0.2) polycrystalline bulks were prepared by the powder-in-tube (PIT) method. The magnetic field and temperature dependences of critical current densities in the samples were investigated by resistive and ac inductive (Campbell's) methods. It was found that a fairly large shielding current density over 109 A/m2, which is considered to correspond to the local critical current density, flows locally with the perimeter size similar to the average grain size of the bulk samples, while an extremely low transport current density of about 105 A/m2 corresponding to the global critical current density flows through the whole sample. Furthermore, a unique history dependence of global critical current density was observed, i.e., it shows a smaller value in the increasing-field process than that in the decreasing-field process. The history dependence of global critical current characteristic in our case can be ascribed to the existence of the weak-link property between the grains in SmFeAsO1-xFx bulk.

  12. Size dependence of phase transition temperatures of ferromagnetic ,ferroelectric and superconductive nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG Xing-you; JIANG Qing

    2007-01-01

    With the miniaturization of devices,size and interface effects become increasingly important for the properties and performances of nanomaterials.Here,we present a thermodynamic approach to the mechanism behind size-induced unusual behavior in the phase stabilities of ferromagnetic(FM),antiferromagnetic(AFM),ferroelectric (FE),and superconductive(SC)nanocrystals,which are different dramatically from their bulk counterparts.This method is based on the Lindemann criterion for melting,Mott's expression for the vibrational melting entropy,and the Shi model for the size-dependent melting temperature.Simple and unified functions,without any adjustable parameter,are established for the size and interface dependences of thermal and phase stabilities of FM,AFM,FE and SC nanocrystals.According to these analytic functions,as the size of nanocrystals is reduced,the thermal and phasestabilities may strengthen or weaken,depending on the confluence of the.surface/volume ratio of nanocrystals and the FM(AFM,FE or SC)/substrate interface situations.The validity of this model is confirmed by a large number of experimental results.This theory will be significant for the choice of materials and the design of devices for practicalapplication.

  13. Grain-size dependence of superconductivity in dc sputtered Nb films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting transition temperature and grain size of dc sputtered Nb films are systematically investigated. The results show that the superconductivity is closely related to the grain size, rather than to the scattering strength of electrons or the surface layer proximity effect of the films.

  14. Magnetization of a Current-Carrying Superconducting Disk with B-Dependent Critical Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mahdi; Babaei-Brojeny, Ali A.

    2010-11-01

    In the frame work of the critical state model (CSM), the magnetic response of a thin type-II superconducting disk that carries a radial transport current and is subjected to an applied magnetic field have been studied. To this end, we have studied the process of the magnetic flux-penetration. For a disk initially containing no magnetic flux but carrying a radial current, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, magnetic flux-penetration occurs in three stages: (1) the magnetic flux gradually penetrates from the edges of the disk until an instability occurs, (2) there is a rapid inflow of magnetic flux into the disk’s central region, which becomes resistive, and (3) magnetic flux continues to enter the disk, while persistent azimuthal currents flow in an outer annular region where the net current density is equal to J c . Also the behavior of a current-carrying disk subjected to an AC magnetic field is calculated. The magnetic flux, the current profiles and the magnetization hysteresis loops are calculated for several commonly used J c ( B) dependences. Finally, the results of the applications of the local field-dependent of the critical current density J c ( B) are compared with those obtained from the Bean model.

  15. Superconducting correlations above Tc in the pseudogap state of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ cuprates revealed by angular-dependent magnetotunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Th.; Katterwe, S. O.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present an angular-dependent magnetotunneling technique, which facilitates unambiguous separation of superconducting (supporting circulating screening currents) and nonsuperconducting (not supporting screening currents) contributions to the pseudogap phenomenon in layered Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ cuprates. Our data indicate persistence of superconducting correlations at temperatures up to 1.5 Tc in a form of both phase and amplitude fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. However, despite a profound fluctuations region, only a small fraction of the pseudogap spectrum is caused by superconducting correlations, while the dominating part comes from a competing nonsuperconducting order, which does not support circulating orbital currents.

  16. Reynolds-dependence of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction induced by spanwise forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Gatti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how increasing the value of the Reynolds number $Re$ affects the ability of spanwise-forcing techniques to yield turbulent skin-friction drag reduction. The control strategy is the streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity (Quadrio {\\em et al. J. Fluid Mech.}, vol. 627, 2009, pp. 161--178). The study builds upon an extensive drag-reduction database created with Direct Numerical Simulation of a turbulent channel flow for two, 5-fold separated values of $Re$, namely $Re_\\tau=200$ and $Re_\\tau=1000$. The sheer size of the database, which for the first time systematically addresses the amplitude of the forcing, allows a comprehensive view of the drag-reducing characteristics of the traveling waves, and enables a detailed description of the changes occurring when $Re$ increases. The effect of using a viscous scaling based on the friction velocity of either the non-controlled flow or the drag-reduced flow is described. In analogy with other wall-based drag reduction techniques, like ...

  17. Efficiency of the Inertia Friction Welding Process and Its Dependence on Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Tung, D. J.; Zhang, W.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2017-07-01

    It has been widely assumed, but never proven, that the efficiency of the inertia friction welding (IFW) process is independent of process parameters and is relatively high, i.e., 70 to 95 pct. In the present work, the effect of IFW parameters on process efficiency was established. For this purpose, a series of IFW trials was conducted for the solid-state joining of two dissimilar nickel-base superalloys (LSHR and Mar-M247) using various combinations of initial kinetic energy ( i.e., the total weld energy, E o), initial flywheel angular velocity ( ω o), flywheel moment of inertia ( I), and axial compression force ( P). The kinetics of the conversion of the welding energy to heating of the faying sample surfaces ( i.e., the sample energy) vs parasitic losses to the welding machine itself were determined by measuring the friction torque on the sample surfaces ( M S) and in the machine bearings ( M M). It was found that the rotating parts of the welding machine can consume a significant fraction of the total energy. Specifically, the parasitic losses ranged from 28 to 80 pct of the total weld energy. The losses increased (and the corresponding IFW process efficiency decreased) as P increased (at constant I and E o), I decreased (at constant P and E o), and E o (or ω o) increased (at constant P and I). The results of this work thus provide guidelines for selecting process parameters which minimize energy losses and increase process efficiency during IFW.

  18. Modeling the Effects of a Normal-Stress-Dependent State Variable, Within the Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Framework, at Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kenny J.; Oglesby, David D.

    2017-03-01

    The development of the rate- and state-dependent friction framework (Dieterich Appl Geophys 116:790-806, 1978; J Geophys Res 84, 2161-2168, 1979; Ruina Friction laws and instabilities: a quasistatic analysis of some dry friction behavior, Ph.D. Thesis, Brown Univ., Providence, R.I., 1980; J Geophys Res 88:10359-10370, 1983) includes the dependence of friction coefficient on normal stress (Linker and Dieterich J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992); however, a direct dependence of the friction law on time-varying normal stress in dynamic stepover and dip-slip fault models has not yet been extensively explored. Using rate- and state-dependent friction laws and a 2-D dynamic finite element code (Barall J Int 178, 845-859, 2009), we investigate the effect of the Linker-Dieterich dependence of state variable on normal stress at stepovers and dip-slip faults, where normal stress should not be constant with time (e.g., Harris and Day J Geophys Res 98:4461-4472, 1993; Nielsen Geophys Res Lett 25:125-128, 1998). Specifically, we use the relation d ψ/d t = -( α/ σ)(d σ/d t) from Linker and Dieterich (J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992), in which a change in normal stress leads to a change in state variable of the opposite sign. We investigate a range of values for alpha, which scales the impact of the normal stress change on state, from 0 to 0.5 (laboratory values range from 0.2 to 0.56). For stepovers, we find that adding normal-stress dependence to the state variable delays or stops re-nucleation on the secondary fault segment when compared to normal-stress-independent state evolution. This inhibition of jumping rupture is due to the fact that re-nucleation along the secondary segment occurs in areas of decreased normal stress in both compressional and dilational stepovers. However, the magnitude of such an effect differs between dilational and compressional systems. Additionally, it is well known that the asymmetric geometry of reverse and normal faults can lead to greater

  19. Synthetic modeling of a fluid injection-induced fault rupture with slip-rate dependent friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urpi, Luca; Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Cappa, Frédéric; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    Poro-elastic stress and effective stress reduction associated with deep underground fluid injection can potentially trigger shear rupture along pre-existing faults. We modeled an idealized CO2 injection scenario, to assess the effects on faults of the first phase of a generic CO2 aquifer storage operation. We used coupled multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to evaluate the stress and pressure perturbations induced by fluid injection and the response of a nearby normal fault. Slip-rate dependent friction and inertial effects have been aken into account during rupture. Contact elements have been used to take into account the frictional behavior of the rupture plane. We investigated different scenarios of injection rate to induce rupture on the fault, employing various fault rheologies. Published laboratory data on CO2-saturated intact and crushed rock samples, representative of a potential target aquifer, sealing formation and fault gouge, have been used to define a scenario where different fault rheologies apply at different depths. Nucleation of fault rupture takes place at the bottom of the reservoir, in agreement with analytical poro-elastic stress calculations, considering injection-induced reservoir inflation and the tectonic scenario. For the stress state here considered, the first triggered rupture always produces the largest rupture length and slip magnitude, correlated with the fault rheology. Velocity weakening produces larger ruptures and generates larger magnitude seismic events. Heterogeneous faults have been considered including velocity-weakening or velocity strengthening sections inside and below the aquifer, while upper sections being velocity-neutral. Nucleation of rupture in a velocity strengthening section results in a limited rupture extension, both in terms of maximum slip and rupture length. For a heterogeneous fault with nucleation in a velocity-weakening section, the rupture may propagate into the overlying velocity

  20. Microplasticity and dislocation mobility in copper-nickel single crystals evaluated from strain-amplitude-dependent internal friction. [CuNi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Y.; Okada, Y.; Asano, S. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Inst. of Tech. (Japan))

    1992-02-16

    Internal friction in copper-0.4 to 7.6 at% nickel single crystals is measured as a function of strain amplitude at various temperatures. Analysis of the data on the amplitude-dependent internal friction yields the relation of effective stress and microplastic strain of the order of 10{sup -9}. The stress-strain responses thus obtained exhibit that the microplastic flow stress increases more rapidly on alloying than the macroscopic yield stress. The mean dislocation velocity is also evaluated from the internal-friction data, which corresponds well to the etch-pit data. It is shown that the dislocation motion is impeded by friction due to dispersed solute atoms. (orig.).

  1. Anisotropic Field Dependence of the Superconducting Transition in the Magnetic Molecular Superconductor κ-(BETS)2FeBr4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Shuhei; Yamashita, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujiwara, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Angle-resolved heat capacity measurements of a π-d interacting system of κ-(BETS)2FeBr4 [BETS = bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene] with in-plane magnetic fields are performed. We observed a thermal anomaly in association with the superconducting transition of the π electrons in the π-d compound for the first time. By pursuing a systematic change in the thermal anomaly, we found that the thermodynamic feature of the superconducting state shows large anisotropy against in-plane magnetic fields. When the field is applied parallel to the c-axis, the thermal anomaly remains up to 2.6 T with a distinct peak structure. On the other hand, it is suppressed in synchrony with the decrease of the antiferromagnetic transition temperature, when the field is applied parallel to the a-axis. Our thermodynamic results indicate that the effect of the π-d interaction appears even when the π electrons are itinerant and that the anisotropic field-direction dependence of the superconducting transition originates from the correlation between superconductivity and magnetism.

  2. Doping dependence of spin excitations and its correlations with high-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Lu, Xingye; Tan, Guotai; Luo, Huiqian; Song, Yu; Wang, Miaoyin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Goremychkin, E A; Perring, T G; Maier, T A; Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Dai, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides occurs when electrons and holes are doped into their antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Since spin excitations may be responsible for electron pairing and superconductivity, it is important to determine their electron/hole-doping evolution and connection with superconductivity. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to show that while electron doping to the antiferromagnetic BaFe₂As₂ parent compound modifies the low-energy spin excitations and their correlation with superconductivity (100 meV), hole-doping suppresses the high-energy spin excitations and shifts the magnetic spectral weight to low-energies. In addition, our absolute spin susceptibility measurements for the optimally hole-doped iron pnictide reveal that the change in magnetic exchange energy below and above T(c) can account for the superconducting condensation energy. These results suggest that high-T(c) superconductivity in iron pnictides is associated with both the presence of high-energy spin excitations and a coupling between low-energy spin excitations and itinerant electrons.

  3. Control of Chaos in Rate-Dependent Friction-Induced Vibration Using Adaptive Sliding Mode Control and Impulse Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Maani Miandoab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different control methods, namely, adaptive sliding mode control and impulse damper, are used to control the chaotic vibration of a block on a belt system due to the rate-dependent friction. In the first method, using the sliding mode control technique and based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a sliding surface is determined, and an adaptive control law is established which stabilizes the chaotic response of the system. In the second control method, the vibration of this system is controlled by an impulse damper. In this method, an impulsive force is applied to the system by expanding and contracting the PZT stack according to efficient control law. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of both methods in controlling the chaotic vibration of the system. It is shown that the settling time of the controlled system using impulse damper is less than that one controlled by adaptive sliding mode control; however, it needs more control effort.

  4. Annealing condition dependence of the superconducting property and the pseudo-gap in the protect-annealed electron-doped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Woo Been; Cho, Su Hyun; Kim, Chang Young [Center for Correlated Electron Systems, Institute for Basic Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Dong Joon [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Park, Seung Ryong [Dept. of Physics, Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Annealing as-grown electron-doped cuprates under a low oxygen-partial-pressure condition is a necessary step to achieve superconductivity. It has been recently found that the so-called protect annealing results in much better superconducting properties in terms of the superconducting transition temperature and volume fraction. In this article, we report on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of a protect-annealed electron-doped cuprate Pr0.9La1.0Ce0.1CuO4 on annealing condition dependent superconducting and pseudo-gap properties. Remarkably, we found that the one showing a better superconducting property possesses almost no pseudo-gap while others have strong pseudo-gap feature due to an anti-ferromagnetic order.

  5. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-01

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the Ia-Ba plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  6. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cun Xue

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the Ia-Ba plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  7. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe, E-mail: zhouyh@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Disaster and Environment in Western China attached to the Ministry of Education of China, and Department of Mechanics and Engineering Sciences, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2013-12-15

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-T{sub c} superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the I{sub a}-B{sub a} plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  8. A Possible Link Between Macroscopic Wear and Temperature Dependent Friction Behaviors of MoS2 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    P., Rabinowicz , E., Iwasa, Y.: Friction and wear of polymeric materials at 293-k, 77-k and 4.2-k. Cryogenics 31, 695–704 (1991). doi:10.1016/0011-2275...Lett. 27, 113–117 (2007) 9. Michael, P.C., Rabinowicz , E., Iwasa, Y.: Thermal activation in boundary lubricated friction. Wear 193, 218–225 (1996

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of metallic friction and of its dependence on electric currents - development and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintanis, Evangelos Anastasios

    We have extended the HOLA molecular dynamics (MD) code to run slider-on-block friction experiments for Al and Cu. Both objects are allowed to evolve freely and show marked deformation despite the hardness difference. We recover realistic coefficients of friction and verify the importance of cold-welding and plastic deformations in dry sliding friction. Our first data also show a mechanism for decoupling between load and friction at high velocities. Such a mechanism can explain an increase in the coefficient of friction of metals with velocity. The study of the effects of currents on our system required the development of a suitable electrodynamic (ED) solver, as the disparity of MD and ED time scales threatened the efficiency of our code. Our first simulations combining ED and MD are presented.

  10. Manipulation of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silicon wafer in the peak force tapping mode in water: pH-dependent friction and adhesion force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiwek, Simon; Stark, Robert W., E-mail: stark@csi.tu-darmstadt.de, E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Dietz, Christian, E-mail: stark@csi.tu-darmstadt.de, E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 10, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Physics of Surfaces, Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 16, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Heim, Lars-Oliver [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 10, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-03-14

    The friction force between nanoparticles and a silicon wafer is a crucial parameter for cleaning processes in the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about the pH-dependency of the friction forces and the shear strength at the interface. Here, we push polystyrene nanoparticles, 100 nm in diameter, with the tip of an atomic force microscope and measure the pH-dependency of the friction, adhesion, and normal forces on a silicon substrate covered with a native silicon dioxide layer. The peak force tapping mode was applied to control the vertical force on these particles. We successively increased the applied load until the particles started to move. The main advantage of this technique over single manipulation processes is the achievement of a large number of manipulation events in short time and in a straightforward manner. Geometrical considerations of the interaction forces at the tip-particle interface allowed us to calculate the friction force and shear strength from the applied normal force depending on the pH of an aqueous solution. The results clearly demonstrated that particle removal should be performed with a basic solution at pH 9 because of the low interaction forces between particle and substrate.

  11. Magneto-elastic behaviour of thin type-II superconducting strip with field-dependent critical current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-01-01

    The magneto-elastic behavior of thin superconducting strip in perpendicular magnetic field with field-dependent critical current is studied. We calculate numerically the body force, strain, displacement, and thickness changes in the strip for the Bean model and Kim model during the field ascent and descent. The differences in magnetostriction between the Bean model and the Kim model are analyzed. The magnetostriction during one full cycle of the applied field for both models is presented. The results show that magnetostriction loops are different in these models, and at low temperatures Kim model is in better agreement with experiment than Bean model.

  12. Doping dependence of the vortex dynamics in single-crystal superconducting NaFe{}_{1-x}Co x As

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, D.; Choi, W. J.; Seo, Y. I.; Jung, S.-G.; Kim, Y. C.; Salem-Sugui, S., Jr.; Park, T.; Kwon, Y. S.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the doping dependence of flux pinning in superconducting NaFe{}1-xCo x As (x = 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.07) single crystals grown by the Bridgman method. The electronic specific heat displays a pronounced anomaly in a sample series at superconducting transition temperature, which hardly shows any residual part at low temperature. We found that Co doping plays an important role in signifying the secondary peak in the magnetic hysteresis of optimally doped (x = 0.03) and heavily doped (x = 0.05, 0.07) crystals. Furthermore, the dependence of the relaxation rate S = ∣d ln M/d ln t∣ on magnetic field and temperature exhibits a decreasing trend within a certain range corresponding to the secondary peak effect in the optimally and heavily doped samples. The magnetic relaxation rate combined with the Maley analysis of the current-dependent creep energy shows a single-vortex pinning in the lightly doped sample dominant at low applied fields, and plastic pinning at high applied fields, without showing a secondary peak. However, in the optimally and heavily doped samples, the magnetic relaxation rate and U(J) isothermal analysis show that the collective pinning that dominates below H peak crosses over to plastic pinning for fields above H peak.

  13. On the Field Dependent Surface Resistance Observed in Superconducting Niobium Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative description is presented of the non-linear current-voltage response in superconducting niobium cavities for accelerator application. It is based on a fit for a large sample of data from cavity tests of different kind. Trial functions for the surface resistance describing this non-linear relation are established by a least square data fit. Those trial functions yielding the best fit are quantitatively explained by basic physics.

  14. Pressure dependence of structural phase transition and superconducting transition in CsI

    CERN Document Server

    Nirmala-Louis, C

    2003-01-01

    The self-consistent band structure calculation for CsI performed both in CsCl and HCP structures using the TB-LMTO method is reported. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and the phase-transition pressure at which the compound undergoes structural phase transition from CsCl to HCP are predicted from the total-energy calculations. The band structure, density of states (DOS), electronic charge distributions, metallization and superconducting transition temperature (T sub c) of CsI are obtained as a function of pressure for both the CsCl and HCP structures. It is found that the charge transfer from s and p states to d state causes metallization and superconductivity in CsI. The highest T sub c estimated is 2.11 K and the corresponding pressure is 1.8 Mbar. This value is in agreement with the recent experimental observation. The experimental trend - ''metallization and superconductivity is rather insensitive to the crystal structure of CsI'' - is also confirmed in our work. (Abstract Copyright [2003], ...

  15. Effect of grain size on amplitude-dependent internal friction in polycrystalline copper. Do takessho no naibu masatsu no shinpuku izon sei ni oyobosu kessho ryukei no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, H.; Nishino, Y.; Asano, S. (Nagoya Inst. of Technology, Nagoya (Japan))

    1991-08-20

    In this research, amplitude-dependency of internal friction was measured on various polycrystalline copper of varying grain size. Furthermore, the measurement data of amplitude-dependency of internal friction were analyzed from the phenomenological standpoint and microplastic strain was calculated as a function of stress. The obtained correlation between microplastic strain and stress corresponded to the stress-strain curve obtainable from normal tensile tests. Hence, comparing with the Hall-Petch relation, the relationship between flow stress and grain size in the microplastiic zone was discussed. The obtained results are summarized as follows: When grains were refined, amplitude dependency of internal friction was inhibited. As a result of the analysis of the data obtained, it was found that the flow stress in the microplastic zone increased following refining of grains. This agreed qualitatively with the macro deformation obtained from normal tensile tests. The grain size dependency of flow stress in the microplastic zone did not follow the normal Hall-Pitch relation, but the plastic strain increased, the dependency moved towards it. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Tailoring of the flip effect in the orientation of a magnet levitating over a superconducting torus: Geometrical dependencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez-Jimenez, Efren, E-mail: ediez@ing.uc3m.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque, 15, E28911 Leganes (Spain); Sander, Berit; Timm, Lauri; Perez-Diaz, Jose-Luis [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque, 15, E28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A local model is used to demonstrate a flip effect in the orientation of a magnet over a superconductor. {yields} A superconducting torus shape is studied. {yields} Increasing the inner radius of the torus elevates the flip effect point. {yields} There are linear piecewises in the geometrical dependency functions that help to fit the flip effect point. - Abstract: In a previous study, a general local model was used in order to demonstrate the apparition of a flip effect in the equilibrium orientation of a magnet when it is over a superconducting torus. This effect can be easily used in devices such as binary position detectors for magneto-microscopy, contactless sieves or magnetic levels amongst others. We present an initial study useful to design devices based on the flip effect between magnets and torus superconductors. It demonstrates that varying different geometrical parameters the flip effect point can be fixed. Also, it can be observed that increasing the inner radius of the torus elevates the flip effect point. A magneto-mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is exposed. For an increment of cross-section diameter occurs the same behavior. There are linear piecewises in the geometrical dependency functions that can be used for a more accurate fitting of the flip effect point.

  17. Temperature dependence of the critical current of the superconducting microladder in zero magnetic field: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, H.J. (Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (USA)); Buisson, O.; Pannetier, B. (Centre de Recherches sur les Tres Basses Temperature, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Boite Postale 166X, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX, France (FR))

    1991-05-01

    The largest supercurrent which can be injected into a superconducting microladder was calculated as a function of nodal spacing {ital scrL} and temperature for zero magnetic flux using (i) exact solutions of the Ginzburg-Landau equation in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions and (ii) approximate solutions in terms of hyperbolic functions. The agreement is good for {ital scrL}/{xi}({ital T}){lt}3, where {xi}({ital T}) is the temperature-dependent coherence length. Since solution (ii) is much simpler than solution (i), it is of considerable value when calculating critical currents of micronets with nodal spacings comparable to {xi}({ital T}). We find that the temperature-dependent critical current deviates significantly from the classical 3/2 power law of the Ginzburg-Landau theory. Preliminary experiments on a submicrometer ladder confirm such deviations.

  18. Effect of the time-dependent coupling on a superconducting qubit-field system under decoherence: Entanglement and Wehrl entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Khalek, S., E-mail: sayedquantum@yahoo.co.uk [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Miramare-Trieste (Italy); Berrada, K. [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Miramare-Trieste (Italy); Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), College of Science, Department of Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Eleuch, H. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Department of Physics, Université de Montréal, 2900 boul. douard-Montpetit, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of a superconducting (SC) qubit interacting with a field under decoherence with and without time-dependent coupling effect is analyzed. Quantum features like the collapse–revivals for the dynamics of population inversion, sudden birth and sudden death of entanglement, and statistical properties are investigated under the phase damping effect. Analytic results for certain parametric conditions are obtained. We analyze the influence of decoherence on the negativity and Wehrl entropy for different values of the physical parameters. We also explore an interesting relation between the SC-field entanglement and Wehrl entropy behavior during the time evolution. We show that the amount of SC-field entanglement can be enhanced as the field tends to be more classical. The studied model of SC-field system with the time-dependent coupling has high practical importance due to their experimental accessibility which may open new perspectives in different tasks of quantum formation processing.

  19. Origin of dc voltage in type II superconducting flux pumps: field, field rate of change, and current density dependence of resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J.; Matsuda, K.; Fu, L.; Fagnard, J.-F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Shen, B.; Dong, Q.; Baghdadi, M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting flux pumps are the kind of devices which can generate direct current into superconducting circuit using external magnetic field. The key point is how to induce a dc voltage across the superconducting load by ac fields. Giaever (1966 IEEE Spectr. 3 117) pointed out flux motion in superconductors will induce a dc voltage, and demonstrated a rectifier model which depended on breaking superconductivity. van de Klundert et al (1981 Cryogenics 21 195, 267) in their review(s) described various configurations for flux pumps all of which relied on inducing the normal state in at least part of the superconductor. In this letter, following their work, we reveal that a variation in the resistivity of type II superconductors is sufficient to induce a dc voltage in flux pumps and it is not necessary to break superconductivity. This variation in resistivity is due to the fact that flux flow is influenced by current density, field intensity, and field rate of change. We propose a general circuit analogy for travelling wave flux pumps, and provide a mathematical analysis to explain the dc voltage. Several existing superconducting flux pumps which rely on the use of a travelling magnetic wave can be explained using the analysis enclosed. This work can also throw light on the design and optimization of flux pumps.

  20. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  1. The Effect of Temperature Dependence of AC Losses in a Bi-2223/Ag Insert of an 8-T Superconducting Magnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Qiuliang; Wang, Hui;

    2016-01-01

    A conduction-cooled split-gap superconducting magnet system with a center field of 8 T has been designed and fabricated in the Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The system consists of two Bi-2223/Ag coils and six NbTi coils. Due to a large aspect ratio of the high...... dependence relations of the critical current density .1c are considered. The calculations are carried out in three steps. First, to estimate the magnitude of ac losses rapidly in the Bi-2223/Ag coils, the ac losses are calculated when the Bi-2223/Ag and NbTi coils are simultaneously charged, in which...... the temperature distribution is not considered. Second, the temperature variation is considered to calculate the ac losses under the same operating conditions with those in the first case. Finally, the NbTi coils are charged first, followed by the Bi-2223/Ag coils; the ac losses calculated are less than those...

  2. Sintering time dependence of iron diffusion in MgB2 and its effect on superconducting properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulgen, Asaf Tolga; Belenli, Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of the iron diffusion on the crystal structure and superconducting properties of pelletised magnesium diboride (MgB2) bulk samples employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), critical transition temperature, and room temperature resistivity measurements. The Fe diffusion into MgB2 bulk pellets upon sintering at 900°C has been studied for sintering time durations of 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 4 hours. We have carried out XRD and room temperature resistivity determinations along the depth starting from iron coated surface by successive removal of thin layers from the surface mechanically. Sintering time dependence of the Fe diffusion coefficients has been calculated from depth profiles of lattice parameter c and room temperature resistivity values. It has been found that the Fe diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing sintering time.

  3. Size-dependent superconducting state of individual nanosized Pb islands grown on Si(111) by tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jiepeng; Wu Xuefeng; Ming Fangfei; Zhang Xieqiu; Wang Kedong; Xiao Xudong [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Wang Bing, E-mail: xdxiao@phy.cuhk.edu.hk [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscales, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2011-07-06

    By measuring the temperature-dependent tunneling spectroscopy of a set of flat-top Pb islands from 3.2 to 15 K, the limiting size of a nine-monolayer-thick Pb island with superconductivity above 3.2 K was determined to be {approx} 30 nm{sup 2}, in good agreement with the Anderson criterion. Further analysis indicates that the zero-temperature energy gap decreases significantly faster than the transition temperature when the Pb island size approaches this limit. This leads to a decrease of 2{Delta}(0)/k{sub B}T{sub C} from 4.5 to 3.3, thus showing that the Pb island superconductors undergo a change from strong to weak electron-phonon coupling.

  4. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    frictions, a call option should never be exercised early, but only at expiration or just before the underlying stock pays a dividend. Chapter one of this thesis shows that suffciently severe frictions can make early exercise optimal. Short-sale costs especially represent an important driver of early...

  5. Studying temperature dependence of pairing gap parameter in a nucleus as a small superconducting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatinejad, A.; Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we have taken the effect of small size of nucleus and static fluctuations into account in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity calculations of 45Ti nucleus. Thermodynamic quantities of 45Ti have been extracted within the BCS model with the inclusion of the average value of the pairing gap square, extracted by the modified Ginzburg-Landau (MGL) method for small systems. Calculated values of the excitation energy and entropy within the MGL+BCS method improve the extracted results within the usual BCS model and show a smooth behavior around the critical temperature with a very good agreement with the semi-empirical values. The result of using MGL+BCS method for the heat capacity of 45Ti is compared with the corresponding semi-empirical values and the calculated values within the BCS, static path approximation (SPA) and Modified Pairing gap BCS (MPBCS) which is a method that was proposed in our previous publications. Both MGL+BCS and MPBCS avoid the discontinuity of the heat capacity curve, which is observed in the usual BCS method, and lead to an S-shaped curve with a good agreement with the semi-empirical results.

  6. Position dependent spatial and spectral resolution measurement of distributed readout superconducting imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Verhoeve, P.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Martin, D. D. E.; Wigmore, J. K.; Jerjen, I.; Venn, R.; Groot, P. J.

    2008-04-01

    We present direct measurements of spatial and spectral resolution of cryogenic distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs). The spatial and spectral resolutions have been experimentally determined by scanning a 10μm spot of monochromatic visible light across the detector. The influences of the photon energy, bias voltage, and absorber length and width on the spatial and spectral resolutions have been examined. The confinement of quasiparticles in the readout sensors (superconducting tunnel junctions) as well as the detector's signal amplitude can be optimized by tuning the bias voltage, thereby improving both the spatial and spectral resolutions. Changing the length of the absorber affects the spatial and spectral resolutions in opposite manner, making it an important parameter to optimize the DROID for the application at hand. The results have been used to test expressions for photon energy, position, and spatial and spectral resolutions which have been derived by using an existing one-dimensional model. The model is found to accurately describe the experimental data, but some limitations have been identified. In particular, the model's assumption that the two sensors have identical response characteristics and noise, the approximation of the detailed quasiparticle dynamics in the sensors by border conditions, and the use of a one-dimensional diffusion process is not always adequate.

  7. Modeling of Kashmir Aftershock Decay Based on Static Coulomb Stress Changes and Laboratory-Derived Rate-and-State Dependent Friction Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, F.; Hainzl, S.; Aoudia, A.; Qaisar, M.

    2016-05-01

    We model the spatial and temporal evolution of October 8, 2005 Kashmir earthquake's aftershock activity using the rate-and-state dependent friction model incorporating uncertainties in computed coseismic stress perturbations. We estimated the best possible value for frictional resistance " Aσ n", background seismicity rate " r" and coefficient of stress variation "CV" using maximum log-likelihood method. For the whole Kashmir earthquake sequence, we measure a frictional resistance Aσ n ~ 0.0185 MPa, r ~ 20 M3.7+ events/year and CV = 0.94 ± 0.01. The spatial and temporal forecasted seismicity rate of modeled aftershocks fits well with the spatial and temporal distribution of observed aftershocks that occurred in the regions with positive static stress changes as well as in the apparent stress shadow region. To quantify the effect of secondary aftershock triggering, we have re-run the estimations for 100 stochastically declustered catalogs showing that the effect of aftershock-induced secondary stress changes is obviously minor compared to the overall uncertainties, and that the stress variability related to uncertain slip model inversions and receiver mechanisms remains the major factor to provide a reasonable data fit.

  8. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  9. Pressure Dependence of the Ginzburg-Landau Parameter in Superconducting YB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabáni, S.; Orendáč, Mat.; Kušnír, J.; Gažo, E.; Pristáš, G.; Mori, T.; Flachbart, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present measurements of the superconducting critical temperature T_c , the upper critical field H_{c2} and the third critical field H_{c3} as a function of pressure in BCS type-II superconductor YB6 (T_c = 7.5 K, H_{c2}(0) = 270 mT and H_{c3}(0) = 450 mT at ambient pressure) up to 3 GPa. Magnetic susceptibility measurements down to 2 K have shown a negative pressure effect on T_c as well as on H_{c2} with slopes dT_c/dp = -0.531 K/GPa (d ln T_c/{dp} = -7.1 %/GPa) and dH_{c2}(0)/dp = -37 mT/GPa (d ln H_{c2}/{dp} = -14 %/GPa) , respectively. Parallel magnetoresistance measurements evidenced nearly the same slopes of d ln T_c/{dp} = -5.9 %/GPa (d ln H_{c3}/{dp} = -11 %/GPa) in the equal pressure range. From these results, the estimated pressure effect on the coherence length dξ (0)/{dp} = 2.05 nm/GPa together with the supposed zero pressure effect on the magnetic penetration depth (dλ (0)/{dp} ≈ 0 ) implies that the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ (0) = {λ }(0)/{ξ }(0) decreases with pressure as dκ (0)/d{p} = -0.31/GPa. According to this decrease, a transition from type-II to type-I superconductor should be observed in YB6 at a critical pressure p_c ≈ 10 GPa.

  10. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  11. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  12. On the Use of the Water Hammer Equations with Time Dependent Friction during a Valve Closure, for Discharge Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana Dunca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new method for in site discharge estimation in pressured pipes. The method consists in using the water hammer equations solved with the method of characteristics with an unsteady friction factor model. The differential pressure head variation measured during a complete valve closure is used to derive the initial flow rate, similarly to the pressure-time (Gibson method. The method is validated with a numerical experiment, and tested with experimental laboratory measurements. The results show that the proposed method can reduce the discharge estimation error by 0.6% compared to the standard pressure-time (Gibson method for the flow rate investigation.

  13. Elastic model of dry friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E., E-mail: dekl2@cam.ac.uk [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  14. Irreversibility line and magnetic field dependence of the critical current in superconducting MgB sub 2 bulk samples

    CERN Document Server

    Gioacchino, D D; Tripodi, P; Grimaldi, G

    2003-01-01

    The third harmonic components of the ac susceptibility of MgB sub 2 bulk samples have been measured as a function of applied magnetic fields, together with standard magnetization cycles. The irreversibility line (IL) of the magnetic field has been extracted from the onset of the third harmonic components. Using a (1 - t) supalpha glass/liquid best fit where alpha 1.27 IL shows a coherent length xi divergence with exponent nu = 0.63, which indicates a 3D behaviour. Moreover, using the numerical solution of the non-linear magnetic diffusion equation, considering the creep model in a 3D vortex glass, a good description of the vortex dynamics has been obtained. The behaviour of the magnetization amplitude (approx Hz) and the ac susceptibility signals (kHz), at different applied magnetic fields, 3.5 T < H sub d sub c < 4.5 T, and at the reduced temperature 0.86 < t < 0.93 (T = 22 K), shows that the superconducting dynamic response of vortices in the MgB sub 2 samples is not evidently dependent on the f...

  15. SURFACE DYNAMIC FRICTION OF POLYMER GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Gong; G.Kagata; Y.Iwasaki; Y.Osada

    2000-01-01

    The sliding friction of various kinds of hydrogels has been studied and it was found that the frictional behaviors of the hydrogels do not conform to Amonton's law F =μW which well describes the friction of solids. The frictional force and its dependence on the load are quite different depending on the chemical structures of the gels, surface properties of the opposing substrates, and the measurement condition. The gel friction is explained in terms of interfacial interaction, either attractive or repulsive, between the polymer chain and the solid surface. According to this model, the friction is ascribed to the viscous flow of solvent at the interface in the repulsive case. In the attractive case, the force to detach the adsorbing chain from the substrate appears as friction. The surface adhesion between glass particles and gels measured by AFM showed a good correlation with the friction, which supported the repulsion-adsorption model proposed by the authors.

  16. The Dependence of the Field Decay on the Powering History of the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sammut, N; Micallef, J; Sanfilippo, S

    2006-01-01

    The decay of the allowed multipoles in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) dipoles is expected to perturb the beam stability during the particle injection. The decay amplitude is largely affected by the powering history of the magnet and is particularly dependent on the pre-cycle flat-top current and duration as well as the pre-injection preparation duration. With possible prospects of having different genres of cycles during the LHC operation, the powering history effect must be taken into account in the Field Description Model for the LHC and must hence be corrected during machine operation. This paper presents the results of the modelling of this phenomenon.

  17. Nonstationary Superconductivity: Quantum Dissipation and Time-Dependent Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly A. Barybin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport equations of the macroscopic superfluid dynamics are revised on the basis of a combination of the conventional (stationary Ginzburg-Landau equation and Schrödinger's equation for the macroscopic wave function (often called the order parameter by using the well-known Madelung-Feynman approach to representation of the quantum-mechanical equations in hydrodynamic form. Such an approach has given (a three different contributions to the resulting chemical potential for the superfluid component, (b a general hydrodynamic equation of superfluid motion, (c the continuity equation for superfluid flow with a relaxation term involving the phenomenological parameters GL and GL, (d a new version of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation for the modulus of the order parameter which takes into account dissipation effects and reflects the charge conservation property for the superfluid component. The conventional Ginzburg-Landau equation also follows from our continuity equation as a particular case of stationarity. All the results obtained are mutually consistent within the scope of the chosen phenomenological description and, being model-neutral, applicable to both the low-c and high-c superconductors.

  18. Dependences on RE of superconducting properties of transition metal co-doped (Ca, RE)FeAs2 with RE = La-Gd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakita, H.; Ogino, H.; Sala, A.; Okada, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Kishio, K.; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H.; Shimoyama, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dependence of superconducting properties of (Ca, RE)(Fe, TM)As2 [(Ca, RE)112, TM: Co, Ni)] on RE elements (RE = La-Gd) was systematically investigated. Improvement of superconducting properties by Co or Ni co-doping was observed for all (Ca, RE)112, which is similar to Co-co-doped (Ca, La)112 or (Ca, Pr)112. Tc of Co-co-doped samples decreased from 38 K for RE = La to 29 K for RE = Gd with decreasing ionic radii of RE3+. However, Co-co-doped (Ca, Eu)112 showed exceptionally low Tc = 21 K probably due to the co-existence of Eu3+ and Eu2+ suggested by longer interlayer distance dFe-Fe of (Ca, Eu)112 than other (Ca, RE)112.

  19. Site-Dependent Tension Properties of Inertia Friction-Welded Joints Made From Dissimilar Ni-based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Semiatin, S. L.; Woodward, C.

    2015-03-01

    Microstructure, tensile properties, and fracture behavior of the inertia friction weld joints of dissimilar superalloys, cast Mar-M247 and wrought LSHR, were studied to assess the weld quality. Tensile tests were conducted at 23 and 704 °C on the samples containing different areas of the weld interface of the same welded material. The stress-strain curves were registered at different axial distances from the weld interface. In all tested samples, plastic deformation was localized on Mar-M247 side, outside the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the resistance to plastic deformation of Mar-M247 increased with a decrease in the distance from the weld interface inside HAZ. Only elastic deformation occurred on the LSHR side. Fracture occurred on the Mar-M247 side, outside HAZ, or at the weld interface. In the latter case, welding defects in the form of clusters of nanometer-sized oxide and carbide particles were observed at the fracture surfaces. These results revealed that the IFW process is capable of producing the weld joints between Mar-M247 and LSHR with the fracture strength higher than that of Mar-M247. However, optimization of the IFW processing parameters is required to minimize clustering of oxide/carbide particles at the weld interface in this alloy pair.

  20. The Friction of Saline Ice on Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wallen-Russell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction of ice on other materials controls loading on offshore structures and vessels in the Arctic. However, ice friction is complicated, because ice in nature exists near to its melting point. Frictional heating can cause local softening and perhaps melting and lubrication, thus affecting the friction and creating a feedback loop. Ice friction is therefore likely to depend on sliding speed and sliding history, as well as bulk temperature. The roughness of the sliding materials may also affect the friction. Here we present results of a series of laboratory experiments, sliding saline ice on aluminium, and controlling for roughness and temperature. We find that the friction of saline ice on aluminium μice-al=0.1 typically, but that this value varies with sliding conditions. We propose physical models which explain the variations in sliding friction.

  1. Anomalous pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature of beta-pyrochlore AOs2O6 oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, T; Takeshita, N; Terakura, C; Takagi, H; Tokura, Y; Yonezawa, S; Muraoka, Y; Hiroi, Z

    2005-10-14

    High-pressure effects on the superconducting transitions of beta-pyrochlore oxide superconductors AOs(2)O(6) (A = Cs,Rb,K) are studied by measuring resistivity under high pressures up to 10 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature T(c) first increases with increasing pressure in every compound and then exhibits a broad maximum at 7.6 K (6 GPa), 8.2 K (2 GPa), and 10 K (0.6 GPa) for A = Cs, Rb, and K, respectively. Finally, the superconductivity is suppressed completely at a critical pressure near 7 GPa and 6 GPa for A = Rb and K and probably above 10 GPa for A = Cs. Characteristic changes in the coefficient A of the T(2) term in resistivity and residual resistivity are observed, both of which are synchronized with the corresponding change in T(c).

  2. Estimate bond angle dependence of superconducting transition temperature in NaFeAs with the first principle methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tieyu; Huang, Haitao; Peng, Biaolin; Zheng, Renkui; Lam, Chi-Hang; Tang, Tao; Wang, Yu

    2016-11-01

    The change of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) with bond angle in iron-pnictides was investigated by first-principles calculation based on density functional theory. A Green's function method was adopted to estimate the maximum eigenvalue of Eliashberg equation (an indicator of Tc) for NaFeAs with different bond angles. Through calculations the band structure of NaFeAs was obtained. It was found that hole pockets could form at the center of the first Brillion zone in the band structure, which confirmed the existence of superconductivity in NaFeAs. The upper limit of the Fe-As-Fe bond angle for superconductivity was found to be 121° and the highest Tc would occur at the angle of 108°.

  3. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  4. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  5. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  6. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-02-08

    A general theory for all classes of unconventional superconductors is still one of the unsolved key issues in condensed-matter physics. Actually, it is not yet fully settled if there is a common underlying pairing mechanism. Instead, it might be possible that several distinct sources for unconventional (not phonon-mediated) superconductivity have to be considered, or an electron-phonon interaction is not negligible. The focus of this thesis is on the most probable mechanism for the formation of Cooper pairs in unconventional superconductors, namely a strictly electronic one where spin fluctuations are the mediators. Studying different superconductors in this thesis, the emphasis is put on material-independent features of the pairing mechanism. In addition, the investigation of the phase diagrams enables a view on the vicinity of superconductivity. Thus, it is possible to clarify which competing quantum fluctuations enhance or weaken the propensity for a superconducting state. The broad range of superconducting materials requires the use of more than one numerical technique to study an appropriate microscopic description. This is not a problem but a big advantage because this facilitates the approach-independent description of common underlying physics. For this evaluation, the strongly correlated cuprates are simulated with the variational cluster approach. Especially the question of a pairing glue is taken into consideration. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between retarded and non-retarded contributions to the gap function. The cuprates are confronted with the cobaltate Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} and graphene. These weakly correlated materials are investigated with the functional renormalization group (fRG) and reveal a comprehensive phase diagram, including a d+id-wave superconductivity, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding gap function is nodeless, but for NaCoO, it features a doping-dependent anisotropy. In addition, some general

  7. Magnetic field dependence of the coupling efficiency of a superconducting transmission line due to the proximity effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, S.; Zijlstra, T.; Golubov, A.A.; Van den Bemt, M.; Baryshev, A.M.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    The coupling efficiency of a Nb superconducting transmission line has been measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer for different magnetic fields. It is found that the coupling decreases with increasing magnetic field when the frequency is close to the gap of the Nb superconductor. This is at

  8. Superconducting Qubits as Mechanical Quantum Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtleben, Kewin; Mazon, Kahio T.; Rego, Luis G. C.

    2017-09-01

    We propose the equivalence of superconducting qubits with a pistonlike mechanical quantum engine. The work reports a study on the nature of the nonequilibrium work exchanged with the quantum-nonadiabatic working medium, which is modeled as a multilevel coupled quantum well system subject to an external control parameter. The quantum dynamics is solved for arbitrary control protocols. It is shown that the work output has two components: one that depends instantaneously on the level populations and another that is due to the quantum coherences built in the system. The nonadiabatic coherent dynamics of the quantum engine gives rise to a resistance (friction) force that decreases the work output. We consider the functional equivalence of such a device and a rf-SQUID flux qubit.

  9. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force...

  10. The measurement of friction coefficient down to 1.8 K for LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Poncet, Alain; Savary, F; Veness, R J M

    1994-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proposed for construction at CERN consists of a series of high field superconducting dipole magnet operating at 1.8K. The mechanical structure of these magnets contains many components in close contact. A knowledge of the friction coefficient between these components is required. Indeed, during assembly and cool down of the magnets, prestresses must be transferred to the superconducting coils. During operation, frictional heating may provoke loss of superconductivity. A machine has been built at CERN to measure the coefficient of friction from room temperature down to 1.8K. This paper describes the cryogenic tribometer and the results collected to date.

  11. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  12. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  13. Hybridization and suppression of the superconductivity in CeFeAsO1-y. Pressure and temperature dependences of the electronic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi [Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako (Japan); Jarrige, Ignace [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Hyogo (Japan); Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Hyogo (Japan); Tsutsui, Satoshi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Inst., Hyogo (Japan); Lin, Jung-Fu [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Takeshita, Nao [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science adn Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan); Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides (TRIP), Tokyo (Japan); Miyazawa, Kiichi [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science adn Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan); Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides (TRIP), Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Univ. of Science, Chiba (Japan); Iyo, Akira [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science adn Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan); Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides (TRIP), Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Univ. of Science, Chiba (Japan); Kito, Hijiri [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science adn Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan); Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides (TRIP), Tokyo (Japan); Eisaki, Hiroshi [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science adn Technology (AIST), Ibaraki (Japan); Transformative Research-Project on Iron Pnictides (TRIP), Tokyo (Japan); Hiraoka, Nozomu [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu (Taiwan); Ishii, Hirofumi [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu (Taiwan); Tsuei, Ku-Ding [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    2010-09-23

    Pressure and temperature dependence of the electronic structure of superconducting (SC) CeFeAsO1-y and non-SC CeFeAsO1-y have been investigated using two complementary hard x-ray spectroscopic probes at the Ce L3 edge, partial fluorescence yield x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy. With increasing pressure, the ratio between the intensity of the peak related to the f0 (Ce4+ ) state and that of the f1 (Ce3+ ) state, I(f0)/I(f1 ), is found to increase continuously for both compounds, indicating a continuous increase in the Ce valence. The valence of non-SC CeFeAsO1-y is found to be slightly higher than that of SC CeFeAsO1-y in the entire pressure and temperature ranges of this study. The valence of CeFeAsO1-y around 6 GPa, where the superconductivity breaks down, is estimated to be ~3.0 , but no change in the valence is observed upon cooling. The dependence of the interatomic distances on the concentration of oxygen vacancies is studied via extended absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  14. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  15. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  16. Statistical properties of the one-dimensional Burridge-Knopoff model of earthquakes obeying the rate and state dependent friction law

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamura, Hikaru; Kakui, Shingo; Morimoto, Syouji; Yamamoto, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Statistical properties of the homogeneous one-dimensional spring-block (Burridge-Knopoff) model of earthquakes obeying the rate and state dependent friction law are studied by extensive computer simulations. The quantities computed include the magnitude distribution, the rupture-length distribution, the mainshock recurrence-time distribution, the seismic time correlations before and after the mainshock, the mean slip amount and the mean stress drop at the mainshock, etc. Events of the model can be classified into two distinct categories. One tends to be unilateral with its epicenter located at the rim of the rupture zone of the preceding event, while the other tends to be bilateral with enhanced "characteristic" features resembling the so-called "asperity". For both types events, the distribution of the rupture length L_r exhibits an exponential behavior at larger sizes, exp[-L_r/L_0] with a characteristic "seismic correlation length" L_0. The continuum limit of the model is examined, where the model is found...

  17. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  18. Unified picture of the doping dependence of superconducting transition temperatures in alkali metal/ammonia intercalated FeSe

    OpenAIRE

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Valenti, Roser

    2014-01-01

    In the recently synthesized Li$_x$(NH$_2$)$_y$(NH$_3$)$_z$Fe$_2$Se$_2$ family of iron chalcogenides a molecular spacer consisting of lithium ions, lithium amide and ammonia separates layers of FeSe. It has been shown that upon variation of the chemical composition of the spacer layer, superconducting transition temperatures can reach $T_c\\sim 44 \\mathrm{K}$, but the relative importance of the layer separation and effective doping to the $T_c$ enhancement is currently unclear. Using state of t...

  19. Strain dependence of critical superconducting properties of Nb3Sn with different intrinsic strains based on a semi-phenomenological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Gao, Peifeng; Wang, Xingzhe

    2017-09-01

    A semi-phenomenological approach, which combined the microscopic properties calculated by first-principles and macroscopic critical characteristics determined from empirical relations, is suggested to investigate the superconducting critical properties of the low temperature superconductor Nb3Sn with different intrinsic strain modes like uniaxial tension, shear and torsion deformations. Firstly, the microscopic properties of the electronic structure and density of state for Nb3Sn are numerically obtained by first-principles calculations using density-functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation. These are further incorporate with the macroscopic empirical relation of the unified scaling law for predicting critical parameters of the strained Nb3Sn superconductor. The superconducting critical profiles of critical temperature, magnetic field and current, in such a way, are achieved for Nb3Sn under different strains. The predictions on the critical parameters of the superconductor bulk in uniaxial tension/compression state exhibit obvious degradations and bell-shaped curves with maximum critical values at zero strain and a slight asymmetry between the tensile and compressive strains, which show quite good agreements with the experimental data. As for Nb3Sn under shear and torsion deformations, the similar degradations on critical parameters also are presented which are monotonously decreased with the applied strains. The first-principles calculations and results in this work are based on an assumption which the superconducting critical properties from the strain-induced variations in the electronic density of states. Furthermore, the modified critical surfaces of Nb3Sn, determined by the critical temperature, current and magnetic field dependence upon the applied different strains are depicted. The present study will be helpful to identify the scaling relation for the critical parameters and understanding the origin of strain sensitivity in Nb3Sn

  20. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  1. Magnetization-orientation dependence of the superconducting transition in AF-F/S/F and S/F/F-AF type spin valve heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdravkov, Vladimir [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); D. Ghitsu Institute of the Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies ASM, MD 2028 Kishiniev (Moldova, Republic of); Lenk, Daniel; Kehrle, Jan; Obermeier, Guenter; Ullrich, Aladin; Mueller, Claus; Krug von Nidda, Hans-Albrecht; Horn, Siegfried; Tidecks, Reinhard [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Morari, Roman; Sidorenko, Anatoli [D. Ghitsu Institute of the Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies ASM, MD 2028 Kishiniev (Moldova, Republic of); Tagirov, Lenar [Solid State Physics Department, Kazan Federal University, 420008 Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    In F/S/F spin valve core structures, i.e. Cu{sub 41}Ni{sub 59}/Nb/Cu{sub 41}Ni{sub 59} systems, deposited on an antiferromagnetic CoO{sub x} layer, or with such a layer on top, critical temperature oscillations and reentrant superconductivity are observed, which can be well described by the theory. Introducing a Co sub-layer yields exchange bias effects, which influence the magnetic field dependence of the superconducting transition. Aging effects are studied, which especially alter the transparency of the lower F/S interface, resulting in a change of the behavior of the transition temperature as a function of the ferromagnetic layer thickness from extinction, over reentrant, to oscillating. The results are discussed in comparison to the S/F/F-AF triplet spin valve effect in a Nb/Cu{sub 41}Ni{sub 59}/nc-Nb/Co/CoO{sub x} system, where nc-Nb acts as a normal conducting spacer to decouple the ferromagnetic layers.

  2. Field-Angle-Dependent Low-Energy Excitations around a Vortex in the Superconducting Topological Insulator CuxBi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuki

    2014-06-01

    We study the quasiparticle excitations around a single vortex in the superconducting topological insulator CuxBi2Se3, focusing on a superconducting state with point nodes. Inspired by the recent Knight shift measurements, we propose two ways to detect the positions of point nodes, using an explicit formula of the density of states with Kramer-Pesch approximation in the quasiclassical treatment. The zero-energy local density of states around a vortex parallel to the c-axis has a twofold shape and splits along the nodal direction with increasing energy; these behaviors can be detected by the scanning tunneling microscopy. An angular dependence of the density of states with a rotating magnetic field on the a-b plane has deep minima when the magnetic field is parallel to the directions of point nodes, which can be detected by angular-resolved heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurements. All the theoretical predictions are detectable via standard experimental techniques in magnetic fields.

  3. Phase slips in superconducting weak links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmel, Gregory; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting vortices and phase slips are primary mechanisms of dissipation in superconducting, superfluid, and cold-atom systems. While the dynamics of vortices is fairly well described, phase slips occurring in quasi-one- dimensional superconducting wires still elude understanding. The main reason is that phase slips are strongly nonlinear time-dependent phenomena that cannot be cast in terms of small perturbations of the superconducting state. Here we study phase slips occurring in superconducting weak links. Thanks to partial suppression of superconductivity in weak links, we employ a weakly nonlinear approximation for dynamic phase slips. This approximation is not valid for homogeneous superconducting wires and slabs. Using the numerical solution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation and bifurcation analysis of stationary solutions, we show that the onset of phase slips occurs via an infinite period bifurcation, which is manifested in a specific voltage-current dependence. Our analytical results are in good agreement with simulations.

  4. Acoustics of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  5. Friction tensor concept for textured surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Y Simha; Anirudhan Pottirayil; Pradeep L Menezes; Satish V Kailas

    2008-06-01

    Directionality of grinding marks influences the coefficient of friction during sliding. Depending on the sliding direction the coefficient of friction varies between maximum and minimum for textured surfaces. For random surfaces without any texture the friction coefficient becomes independent of the sliding direction. This paper proposes the concept of a friction tensor analogous to the heat conduction tensor in anisotropic media. This implies that there exists two principal friction coefficients $\\mu_{1,2}$ analogous to the principal conductivities $k_{1,2}$. For symmetrically textured surfaces the principal directions are orthogonal with atleast one plane of symmetry. However, in the case of polished single crystalline solids in relative sliding motion, crystallographic texture controls the friction tensor.

  6. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  7. Low temperature friction force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunckle, Christopher Gregory

    The application of friction force techniques within atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for direct measurements of friction forces at a sliding, single-asperity interface. The temperature dependence of such single-asperity contacts provides key insight into the comparative importance of dissipative mechanisms that result in dry sliding friction. A variable temperature (VT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) AFM was used with an interface consisting of a diamond coated AFM tip and diamond-like carbon sample in a nominal sample temperature range of 90 to 275K. The results show that the coefficient of kinetic friction, mu k, has a linear dependence that is monotonically increasing with temperature varying from 0.28 to 0.38. To analyze this data it is necessary to correlate the sample temperature to the interface temperature. A detailed thermal model shows that the sample temperature measured by a macroscopic device can be very different from the temperature at the contact point. Temperature gradients intrinsic to the design of VT, UHV AFMs result in extreme, non-equilibrium conditions with heat fluxes on the order of gigawatts per squared meter through the interface, which produce a discontinuous step in the temperature profile due to thermal boundary impedance. The conclusion from this model is that measurements acquired by VT, UHV AFM, including those presented in this thesis, do not provide meaningful data on the temperature dependence of friction for single-asperities. Plans for future work developing an isothermal AFM capable of the same measurements without the introduction of temperature gradients are described. The experimental results and thermal analysis described in this thesis have been published in the Journal of Applied Physics, "Temperature dependence of single-asperity friction for a diamond on diamondlike carbon interface", J. App. Phys., 107(11):114903, 2010.

  8. Trial manufacture of rotary friction tester and frictional force measurement of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Kanari, M; Tanzawa, S

    2002-01-01

    In the plasma confinement type fusion reactor, in-vessel structures such as a blanket module slide at the joints each other when plasma disruption occurs, and then frictional heat is generated there. Therefore, for the selection of material and the use as the design data, it is important to understand the frictional characteristics of metals and ceramic films in the vacuum. In the present study, we have manufactured a prototype of rotary friction tester and examined the performances of the tester. The frictional characteristics of metals in the room air was measured using the friction tester, and the results obtained are as follows. A drifting friction force for a constant time and a friction force during the idling were 98 mN and 225 mN, respectively. These values were sufficiently small as compared to pressing load (9.8 - 57.8 N) used in the friction test. In a friction force measurement of stainless steel, dynamic friction force obeyed Amontons' law which indicated that dynamic friction force is not depend...

  9. Inelastic x-ray scattering study of superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFy single crystals: Evidence for strong momentum-dependent doping-induced renormalizations of optical phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tacon, M.; Forrest, T. R.; Rüegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Walters, A. C.; Mittal, R.; Rønnow, H. M.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Hill, J. P.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    We report inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on the lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO and superconducting SmFeAsO0.60F0.35 single crystals. Particular attention was paid to the dispersions along the [100] direction of three optical modes close to 23 meV, polarized out of the FeAs planes. Remarkably, two of these modes are strongly renormalized upon fluorine doping. These results provide significant insight into the energy and momentum dependence of the coupling of the lattice to the electron system and underline the importance of spin-phonon coupling in the superconducting iron pnictides.

  10. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  11. Current dependence of the hot-spot response spectrum of superconducting single-photon detectors with different layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaev, I.; Semenov, A.; Doerner, S.; Gomard, G.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.

    2017-02-01

    We show that avoiding bends in a current-carrying superconducting nanowire enhances the probability for low energy photons to be detected and that this enhancement is entirely due to the increase in the experimentally achievable critical current. We studied nanowires shaped as either meander or spiral. The spirals had different layouts, a double-spiral layout with an S-turn in the middle and a single-spiral layout without such a turn. Nanowires were prepared from films of niobium nitride with a thickness of 5 nm. For specimens with each layout we measured the spectra of the single-photon response in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1600 nm and defined the cut-off wavelength (λ c) beyond which the response rolls off. The largest and the smallest λ c were found for the single-spiral layout and for the meander, respectively. For all three layouts the relationship between λ c and the relative bias current falls onto a universal curve which has been predicted earlier in the framework of the modified hot-spot model. For the single-spiral layout, the efficiency of photon detection at wavelengths smaller than λ c reaches the expected absorbance of the spiral structure and the timing jitter per unit length of the nanowire has the smallest value.

  12. Upper critical field, pressure-dependent superconductivity and electronic anisotropy of Sm4Fe2As2Te(1-x)O(4-y)F(y).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoni, A; Katrych, S; Szirmai, P; Náfrádi, B; Gaál, R; Karpinski, J; Forró, L

    2016-03-23

    We present a detailed study of the electrical transport properties of a recently discovered iron-based superconductor: Sm4Fe2As2Te0.72O2.8F1.2. We followed the temperature dependence of the upper critical field by resistivity measurement of single crystals in magnetic fields up to 16 T, oriented along the two main crystallographic directions. This material exhibits a zero-temperature upper critical field of 90 T and 65 T parallel and perpendicular to the Fe2As2 planes, respectively. An unprecedented superconducting magnetic anisotropy γH=H(c2)(ab)/H(c2)(c) ~ 14 is observed near Tc, and it decreases at lower temperatures as expected in multiband superconductors. Direct measurement of the electronic anisotropy was performed on microfabricated samples, showing a value of ρ(c)/ρ(ab)(300K) ~ 5 that rises up to 19 near Tc . Finally, we have studied the pressure and temperature dependence of the in-plane resistivity. The critical temperature decreases linearly upon application of hydrostatic pressure (up to 2 GPa) similarly to overdoped cuprate superconductors. The resistivity shows saturation at high temperatures, suggesting that the material approaches the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit for metallic conduction. Indeed, we have successfully modelled the resistivity in the normal state with a parallel resistor model that is widely accepted for this state. All the measured quantities suggest strong pressure dependence of the density of states.

  13. GRADIENT DEPENDENT NONLOCAL FRICTION MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION IN MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF BOLT%梯度依赖的非局部摩擦模型及其在锚杆受力分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟平; 扶名福

    2014-01-01

    Based on the gradient theory , a gradient dependent nonlocal friction model was established and used to analyze bolt .By using Mindlin's solution of displacement , a solution of shear stress in the anchorage was derived . The nonlocal effect on the contact surface was revealed and the solution of shear stress of the anchorage section was given.The results were compared with those obtained by the gradient dependent nonlocal friction model and local frication model .Factors affecting the nonlocal friction were discussed .Taking account of the nonlocal friction effects , the shear stress peak value in the anchorage zone was smaller than the one without the consideration .%基于梯度理论,建立了梯度依赖的非局部摩擦模型,并应用其对锚杆受拉时锚固段的剪应力进行理论分析。根据Mindlin问题的位移解,导出锚杆锚固段的剪应力,得到在非局部摩擦模型下的锚杆锚固段的剪应力解,并对梯度依赖的非局部摩擦模型和局部摩擦模型(库仑模型)下的剪应力结果进行比较,进一步对影响剪应力非局部效应的相关因素进行分析。计算结果表明,考虑非局部摩擦效应时,沿锚固体的剪应力峰值比不考虑的要小。

  14. The microphysics of phyllosilicate friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts most of the experimentally observed trends in frictional behaviour and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  15. Design and manufacture of intelligent Cu-based wet friction materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁华东; 韩文政; 傅苏黎; 杜建华; 遇元宏

    2004-01-01

    The friction sheets working process was analyzed. It is found that its characteristic is microregion instantaneous high temperature and the current cooling method, making the sheets cooled by the lubricating oil flowing through the friction surface, is not very efficient. Then, intelligent materials concept was introduced, the component and microstructure of intelligent Cu-based friction materials were designed, and the intelligent Cu-based wet friction materials as well as sheets were manufactured. And the intelligent friction materials working principle, i.e. the materials cooling the friction microregion in real time or the friction sheets cutting the peak value of microregion instantaneous high temperature during friction process, was given depending on the characteristics of the materials' and friction sheets' working process. Finally, it is indicated that the intelligent friction sheets excell the currently used friction sheets in properties, including anti-heating property, anti-wearing property as well as friction characteristic.

  16. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  17. Superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study intrinsic superconductivity in doped Dirac semimetals. Dirac semimetals host bulk Dirac points, which are formed by doubly degenerate bands, so the Hamiltonian is described by a 4 ×4 matrix and six types of k -independent pair potentials are allowed by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. We show that the unique spin-orbit coupling leads to characteristic superconducting gap structures and d vectors on the Fermi surface and the electron-electron interaction between intra and interorbitals gives a novel phase diagram of superconductivity. It is found that when the interorbital attraction is dominant, an unconventional superconducting state with point nodes appears. To verify the experimental signature of possible superconducting states, we calculate the temperature dependence of bulk physical properties such as electronic specific heat and spin susceptibility and surface state. In the unconventional superconducting phase, either dispersive or flat Andreev bound states appear between point nodes, which leads to double peaks or a single peak in the surface density of states, respectively. As a result, possible superconducting states can be distinguished by combining bulk and surface measurements.

  18. Temperature dependence of the flux line lattice transition into square symmetry in superconducting LuNi2B2C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, M.R.; Abrahamsen, A.B.; Kogan, V.G.;

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the H parallel to c flux line lattice structural phase transition from square to hexagonal symmetry, in the tetragonal superconductor LuNi2B2C (T-c = 16.6 K). At temperatures below 10 K the transition onset field, H-2(T), is only weakly temperature...... dependent. Above 10 K, H-2(T) rises sharply, bending away from the upper critical field. This contradicts theoretical predictions of H-2(T) merging with the upper critical field and suggests that just below the H-c2(T) curve the flux line lattice might be hexagonal....

  19. Temperature-dependence of the superconducting condensate and gap in Bi 2Sr 2Ca 1Cu 2O 8+ z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Quitmann, C.; Kelley, R. J.; Alméras, P.; Berger, H.; Margaritondo, G.; Onellion, M.

    1994-12-01

    Using high energy resolution angle-resolved photoemission, we have measured both the superconducting gap and the photoemission superconducting condensate spectral area of Bi 2Sr 2Ca 1Cu 1O 8+ z as a function of temperature in two different locations of the Brillouin zone. We found that the size of superconducting gap along the Γ- X direction decreases to values indistinguishable from zero for which the gap retains virtually full value along the Γ - M¯ direction. The increased gap anisotropy with increasing temperature is in contrast to what happens for conventional anisotropic superconductors such as lead.

  20. Temperature-dependence of the superconducting condensate and gap in Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmann, C.; Kelly, R. J.; Onellion, M.; Alméras, P.; Berger, H.; Margaritondo, G.

    1994-12-01

    Using high energy resolution angle-resolved photoemission, we have measured both the superconducting gap and the photoemission superconducting condensate spectral area of Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu1O8+x as a function of temperature in two different locations of the Brillouin zone. We found that the size of superconducting gap along the Γ - X direction decreases to values indistinguishable from zero for which the gap retains virtually full value along the Γ - M direction. The increased gap anisotropy with increasing temperature is in contrast to what happens for conventional anisotropic superconductors such as lead.>

  1. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  2. Field Dependence of π-Band Superconducting Gap in MgB2 Thin Films from Point-Contact Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan; XI Xiao-Xing; WANG Yong-Lei; SHAN Lei; JIA Ying; YANG Huan; WEN Hai-Hu; ZHUANG Cheng-Gang; LI Qi; CUI Yi

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of point-contact spectroscopy measurements on high-quality epitaxial MgB2 thin films with injected current along the c-axis. The temperature and field dependences of л-band properties with the field parallel to (H‖) or perpendicular to (H┴ ) the c-axis are investigated in detail. When a magnetic field is applied, either parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis, the density of the quasiparticle state (DOS) of the л-band proliferates quickly with increasing field, while the gap amplitude of the л-band decreases slowly, which is different from the recent theoretical calculations, showing a field dependent competition between the interband scattering and the pair-breaking effects.

  3. Momentum Dependence of Superconducting Gap, Strong-Coupling Dispersion Kink, And Tightly Bound Cooper Pairs in the High-T(C)(Sr,Ba)(1-X)(K,Na)(X)Fe(2) As(2) Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, L.; Qian, D.; Hsieh, D.; Xia, Y.; Li, L.; Checkelsky, J.G.; Pasupathy, A.; Gomes, K.K.; Parker, C.V.; Fedorov, A.V.; Chen, G.F.; Luo, J.L.; Yazdani, A.; Ong, N.P.; Wang, N.L.; Hasan, M.Z.

    2009-05-28

    We present a systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopic study of the high-T{sub c} superconductor class (Sr/Ba){sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By utilizing a photon-energy-modulation contrast and scattering geometry we report the Fermi surface and the momentum dependence of the superconducting gap, {triangle}(k{open_square}). A prominent quasiparticle dispersion kink reflecting strong scattering processes is observed in a binding-energy range of 25--55 meV in the superconducting state, and the coherence length or the extent of the Cooper pair wave function is found to be about 20 {angstrom}, which is uncharacteristic of a superconducting phase realized by the BCS-phonon-retardation mechanism. The observed 40{+-}15 meV kink likely reflects contributions from the frustrated spin excitations in a J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} magnetic background and scattering from the soft phonons. Results taken collectively provide direct clues to the nature of the pairing potential including an internal phase-shift factor in the superconducting order parameter which leads to a Brillouin zone node in a strong-coupling setting.

  4. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  5. Friction and wear behavior of the superconducting compound oxide of Ag/Bi_(1. 6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)%超导Ag/Bi_(1.6)Pb_(0.4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)复合氧化物摩擦磨损性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭义; 李长生; 董丽荣; 丁巧党; 王昊璐

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting Bi_(1.6)Pb_(0.4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x) samples were prepared by the solid-state synthesismethod. The tribological properties were measured on the friction and wear tester from ambient temperature toliquid nitrogen temperature. The results indicate that the friction coefficient of Bi_(1.6)Pb_(0.4)Srz_2Ca_2Cu_30_(10-x) againststainless steel is about 0.35 at the ambient temperature and decreases abruptly to half of the normal state value whenthe temperature is below the superconducting transition temperature of Bi_(1.6)Pb_(0. 4_Srz_2Ca_2Cu_30_(10-x). Themeasurements prove directly the effect of electronic excitation on friction. Moreover, the Ag/Bi_(1.6) Pb_(0.4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x) composite samples were prepared by sintering Bi_(1.6)Pb_(0.4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x) with Ag at different mass fractions to improve the tribological properties of Bi_(1.6)Pb_(0.4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x) at room temperature. The experimental results show that the friction coefficient of 10 Wt%Ag/Bi_(1. 6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x) is about 0. 2~O. 3 and the wear rate is 4. 57×10~(-4)mm~3·(N·m)~(-1), and the superconductivity of 10 Wt% Ag/Bi_(1. 6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x) is not degenerated.%为适应20℃~-200℃温度的适用范围, 采用固相法制备了Bi_(1.6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)超导材料, 用摩擦磨损试验机测试了Bi_(1.6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)从液氮温度至室温的摩擦学性能. 结果表明: 在室温20℃下, Bi_(1. 6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)与对偶件轴承钢盘对摩时, 摩擦系数约为0. 35, 当温度降到超导转变温度以下时(液氮温度-170℃)摩擦系数大幅度降低, Bi_(1. 6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)超导态摩擦系数为正常态值的一半, 实验证明了电子激励对摩擦能量耗散的作用. 为改善室温下Bi_(1. 6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)摩擦学性能, 掺杂不同质量分数Ag作为润滑组元, 制备了Ag/Bi_(1. 6) Pb_(0. 4)Sr_2Ca_2Cu_3O_(10-x)

  6. Torsional friction damper optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shaochun; Williams, Keith A.

    2006-06-01

    A new approach for the analysis of friction dampers is presented in this work. The exact form of the steady-state solution for a friction damper implemented on a primary system is developed and numerical solutions are used to determine the optimum friction in a friction damper applied to a specific primary system. When compared to classical results presented by earlier authors, the new approach provides a more optimal solution. In addition, viscous damping in the primary system may be included with the new analysis approach. The ability to optimize a friction damper when viscous damping is included in the primary system is a significant improvement over earlier methods and shows potential for serving as a guide to realizing a more accurate estimate of the optimal damping for friction dampers.

  7. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  8. Thermodynamic aspects of rock friction

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Noa

    2013-01-01

    Rate- and state-dependent friction law for velocity-step tests is analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A simple macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic model with a single internal variable reproduces instantaneous jump and relaxation. Velocity weakening appears as a consequence of a plasticity related nonlinear coefficient. Permanent part of displacement corresponds to plastic strain, and relaxation effects are analogous to creep in thermodynamic rheology.

  9. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  10. THE FRICTION OF QUARTZ IN HIGH VACUUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    the effects of surface cleanliness . Ultra-high vacuums (to 10 to the minus 10th power torr) and high temperatures (to 350 deg C) were combined with...chemical cleaning and careful handling techniques to produce the maximum surface cleanliness . The coefficient of static friction under varying...on 30-40 mesh glass balls. The coefficient of friction of smooth quartz was found to vary from 0.1 to 1.0 depending on the surface cleanliness . The

  11. Anisotropic superconductivity driven by kinematic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. A.

    2000-11-01

    We have analysed the effect of kinematic pairing on the symmetry of superconducting order parameter for a square lattice in the frame of the strongly correlated Hubbard model. It is argued that in the first perturbation order the kinematic interaction renormalizes the Hubbard-I dispersions and provides at low doping the mixed singlet (s + s*)-wave superconductivity, giving way at higher doping to the triplet p-wave superconductivity. The obtained phase diagram depends only on the hopping integral parameter. The influence of the Coulomb repulsion on the kinematic superconducting pairing has been estimated. The (s + s*)-wave gap and the thermodynamic critical magnetic field have been derived.

  12. Friction laws from dimensional-analysis point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Hatano, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Friction laws, which are a key to the understanding of the diversity of earthquakes, are considered theoretically. Using dimensional analysis, the logarithmic dependence of the friction coefficient on the slip velocity and the state variable is derived without any knowledge of the underlying physical processes on the frictional surface. This is based on a simple assumption that the friction coefficient is expressed as the difference from a reference state. Therefore, the functional form of the rate and state dependent friction law itself does not necessarily mean that thermal activation processes dominate friction. It is also shown that, if there are two (or more) state variables having the same dimension, we need not assume the logarithmic dependence on the state variables.

  13. Tunable superconducting nanoinductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziata, Anthony J; Santavicca, Daniel F; Frunzio, Luigi; Rooks, Michael J; Prober, Daniel E [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Catelani, Gianluigi [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Frydman, Aviad, E-mail: anthony.annunziata@yale.edu, E-mail: daniel.prober@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2010-11-05

    We characterize inductors fabricated from ultra-thin, approximately 100 nm wide strips of niobium (Nb) and niobium nitride (NbN). These nanowires have a large kinetic inductance in the superconducting state. The kinetic inductance scales linearly with the nanowire length, with a typical value of 1 nH {mu}m{sup -1} for NbN and 44 pH {mu}m{sup -1} for Nb at a temperature of 2.5 K. We measure the temperature and current dependence of the kinetic inductance and compare our results to theoretical predictions. We also simulate the self-resonant frequencies of these nanowires in a compact meander geometry. These nanowire inductive elements have applications in a variety of microwave frequency superconducting circuits.

  14. High speed superconducting flywheel system for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, H. J.; Urban, C.; Boegler, P.; Ritter, T.; Zaitsev, O.; Weber, K.; Rietschel, H.

    1994-12-01

    A prototype of a flywheel system with auto stable high temperature superconducting bearings was built and tested. The bearings offered good vertical and lateral stability. A metallic flywheel disk, ø 190 mm x 30 mm, was safely rotated at speeds up to 15000 rpm. The disk was driven by a 3 phase synchronous homopolar motor/generator. Maximum energy capacity was 3.8 Wh, maximum power was 1.5 KW. The dynamic behavior of the prototype was tested, characterized and evaluated with respect to axial and lateral stiffness, decay torques (bearing drag), vibrational modes and critical speeds. The bearings supports a maximum weight of 65 N at zero gap, axial and lateral stiffness at 1 mm gap were 440 N/cm and 130 N/cm, respectively. Spin down experiments were performed to investigate the energy efficiency of the system. The decay rate was found to depend upon background pressure in the vacuum chamber and upon the gap width in the bearing. At a background pressure of 5x10 -4 Torr, the coefficient of friction (drag-to-lift ratio) was measured to be 0.000009 at low speeds for 6 mm gap width in the bearing. Our results indicate that further refinement of this technology will allow operation of higly efficient superconducting flywheels in the kWh range.

  15. Friction in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  16. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  17. At the Frontiers of Science Superconductivity and Its Electric Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-07-01

    Electricity - it is one of our modern scientific miracles, and today we could not imagine living without it. But what if we could make it better? Superconductivity has the potential to do just that, by improving the capacity, quality, and reliability of products that use electricity. There has been a great deal of discussion about superconductivity in the last 10 years, but what exactly is it? In this document you will learn the definition of superconductivity, how it works, and its present and potential uses. You will also get an inside look at the challenges that scientists around the world are working to overcome in order to fully incorporate superconductivity in our everyday lives. When you turn on a lamp at home, the electric current flows - is conducted - through a wire made of copper or aluminum. Along the way, this wire resists the flow of electricity, and this resistance is something very much like friction. The resistance causes some of the electricity to be lost in the form of heat. Which means that every time you use an appliance, from a radio to a generator, you are not getting 100% of the energy that flows through it; some of it is wasted by the conductor. Superconductivity - the ability of a material to conduct electricity without losses to resistance - is a physical property inherent to a variety of metals and ceramics, much the same way magnetism is present in a variety of materials. It is dependent on temperature; that is, a material will not exhibit superconductivity until it is sufficiently cold. The necessary temperatures to induce superconductivity are well below what we might commonly consider 'cold.' They are so low, in fact, that they are measured using the Kelvin temperature scale (K). Absolute zero, or 0 K, is equal to -459 Fahrenheit (F). It is defined as the lowest temperature theoretically possible, or the complete absence of heat. In 1911, working in a laboratory in Holland, the Dutch scientist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes cooled

  18. Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheike, T; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Ballestar, A; Setzer, A

    2012-11-14

    Granular superconductivity in powders of small graphite grains (several tens of micrometers) is demonstrated after treatment with pure water. The temperature, magnetic field and time dependence of the magnetic moment of the treated graphite powder provides evidence for the existence of superconducting vortices with some similarities to high-temperature granular superconducting oxides but even at temperatures above 300 K. Room temperature superconductivity in doped graphite or at its interfaces appears to be possible.

  19. Frictional forces between hydrophilic and hydrophobic particle coated nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Petra M; Claesson, Per M.; Swerin, Agne;

    2013-01-01

    by utilizing the atomic force microscope (AFM). The chemistry of the surfaces and the probe was varied between hydrophilic silica and hydrophobized silica. For hydrophilic silica surfaces, the friction coefficient was significantly higher for the particle coated surfaces than on the flat reference surface. All...... the particle coated surfaces exhibited similar friction coefficients, from which it may be concluded that the surface geometry, and not the roughness amplitude per se, influenced the measured friction. During measurements with hydrophobic surfaces, strong adhesive forces related to the formation of a bridging...... air cavity were evident from both normal force and friction force measurements. In contrast to the frictional forces between the hydrophilic surfaces, the friction coefficient for hydrophobic surfaces was found to depend on the surface structure and we believe that this dependence is related...

  20. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  1. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  2. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  3. 4. MESOSCOPIC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY: Proximity Action theory of superconductive nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, M. A.; Larkin, A. I.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2001-10-01

    We review a novel approach to the superconductive proximity effect in disordered normal-superconducting (N-S) structures. The method is based on the multicharge Keldysh action and is suitable for the treatment of interaction and fluctuation effects. As an application of the formalism, we study the subgap conductance and noise in two-dimensional N-S systems in the presence of the electron-electron interaction in the Cooper channel. It is shown that singular nature of the interaction correction at large scales leads to a nonmonotonuos temperature, voltage and magnetic field dependence of the Andreev conductance.

  4. Controlling vortex motion and vortex kinetic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco; Savel'ev, Sergey

    2006-05-01

    We summarize some recent results of vortex motion control and vortex kinetic friction. (1) We describe a device [J.E. Villegas, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, E.M. Gonzalez, J.V. Anguita, R. Garcìa, J.L. Vicent, Science 302 (2003) 1188] that can easily control the motion of flux quanta in a Niobium superconducting film on an array of nanoscale triangular magnets. Even though the input ac current has zero average, the resulting net motion of the vortices can be directed along either one direction, the opposite direction, or producing zero net motion. We also consider layered strongly anisotropic superconductors, with no fixed spatial asymmetry, and show [S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, Nature Materials 1 (2002) 179] how, with asymmetric drives, the ac motion of Josephson and/or pancake vortices can provide a net dc vortex current. (2) In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, we present [A. Maeda, Y. Inoue, H. Kitano, S. Savel'ev, S. Okayasu, I. Tsukada, F. Nori , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 077001] a comparative study of the friction force felt by vortices in superconductors and charge density waves.

  5. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  6. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is mad

  7. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is

  8. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is mad

  9. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  10. Ratchet device with broken friction symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norden, Bengt; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2002-01-01

    An experimental setup (gadget) has been made for demonstration of a ratchet mechanism induced by broken symmetry of a dependence of dry friction on external forcing. This gadget converts longitudinal oscillating or fluctuating motion into a unidirectional rotation, the direction of which is in ac......An experimental setup (gadget) has been made for demonstration of a ratchet mechanism induced by broken symmetry of a dependence of dry friction on external forcing. This gadget converts longitudinal oscillating or fluctuating motion into a unidirectional rotation, the direction of which...

  11. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  12. Friction Properties of Inkjet and Flexographic Prints on Different Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction between different papers, inkjet and flexographic prints has been experimentally investigated. Flexographic prints have been made using an anilox roller, and inkjet prints have been produced covering paper with one and four toner layers. Static (SCOF and kinetic (KCOF friction coefficients between paper and paper, paper and prints, prints and prints have been determined. Friction properties have been discovered to be different in flexographic and laser prints. The dependence of SCOF and KCOF on pressure (both decrease together with roughness measurements enables to conclude that the friction of prints is mainly governed by adhesion forces.

  13. Frictional coefficient depending on active friction radius with BPV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The braking system is essential and crucial part of the active safety control of automobiles. .... active safety of the automobiles and the passenger. .... Communications and Information Technology, China North China institute of Aerospace ...

  14. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  15. STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRANQUADA, J.M.

    2005-08-22

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  16. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  17. Development of Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2012-01-01

    (HTS); and one is a fully superconducting generator based on MgB2. It is concluded that there is large commercial interest in superconducting machines, with an increasing patenting activity. Such generators are however not without their challenges. The superconductors have to be cooled down......In this paper the commercial activities in the field of superconducting machines, particularly superconducting wind turbine generators, are reviewed and presented. Superconducting generators have the potential to provide a compact and light weight drive train at high torques and slow rotational...... to somewhere between 4K and 50K, depending on what type of superconductor is employed, which poses a significant challenge both from a construction and operation point of view. The high temperature superconductors can facilitate a higher operation temperature and simplified cooling, but the current price...

  18. Shearing Nanometer-Thick Confined Hydrocarbon Films: Friction and Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, I. M.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) friction and adhesion calculations for nanometer-thick confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths 20, 100 and 1400 carbon atoms. We study the dependency of the frictional shear stress on the confining pressure and sliding speed. We present results...

  19. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  20. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  1. Friction characteristics of trocars in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazmani, Ali; Roshan, Rupesh; Jayne, David G; Neville, Anne; Culmer, Peter

    2015-04-01

    This article investigates the friction characteristics of the instrument-trocar interface in laparoscopic surgery for varying linear instrument velocities, trocar seal design and material, and trocar tilt. Furthermore, the effect of applying lubrication at the instrument-trocar seal interface on friction was studied. A friction testing apparatus was designed and built to characterise the resistance force at the instrument-trocar interface as a function of the instrument's linear movement in the 12-mm trocar (at constant velocity) for different design, seal material, and angle of tilt. The resistance force depended on the trocar seal design and material properties, specifically surface roughness, elasticity, hardness, the direction of movement, and the instrument linear velocity, and varied between 0.25 and 8 N. Lubricating the shaft with silicone oil reduced the peak resistance force by 75% for all trocars and eliminated the stick-slip phenomenon evident in non-lubricated cases. The magnitude of fluctuation in resistance force depends on the trocar design and is attributed to stick-slip of the sealing mechanism and is generally higher during retraction in comparison to insertion. Trocars that have an inlet seal made of rubber/polyurethane showed higher resistance forces during retraction. Use of a lubricant significantly reduced frictional effects. Comparisons of the investigated trocars indicate that a low friction port, providing the surgeon with improved haptic feedback, can be designed by improving the tribological properties of the trocar seal interface.

  2. Stimulated Superconductivity at Strong Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ning; Dong, Xi; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    Stimulating a system with time dependent sources can enhance instabilities, thus increasing the critical temperature at which the system transitions to interesting low-temperature phases such as superconductivity or superfluidity. After reviewing this phenomenon in non-equilibrium BCS theory (and its marginal fermi liquid generalization) we analyze the effect in holographic superconductors. We exhibit a simple regime in which the transition temperature increases parametrically as we increase the frequency of the time-dependent source.

  3. Electronic friction at the atomic scale: Conduction, electrostatic and magnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jacqueline; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a magnetic probe microscopy study of levitation and atomic-scale friction for Fe on YBCO (Tc = 92.5K) in the temperature range 65 - 293 K, to explore electronic contributions to friction at the atomic scale. The samples were prepared with oxygen-depleted surfaces, with thin semiconducting surface layers present atop the bulk. Below Tc, the friction coefficient was observed to be constant at 0.19 and exhibited no correlation with the strength of superconducting levitation forces observed below Tc. The friction coefficient exhibited a change in slope within experimental error of Tc that increased progressively above Tc and reached 0.33 by room temperature. The results were analyzed within the context of underlying atomic-scale electronic and phononic mechanisms that give rise to friction we conclude that contact electrification and static electricity play a significant role above Tc. Supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  4. Friction phenomena and their impact on the shear behaviour of granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Bettina; Six, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    In the discrete element simulation of granular materials, the modelling of contacts is crucial for the prediction of the macroscopic material behaviour. From the tribological point of view, friction at contacts needs to be modelled carefully, as it depends on several factors, e.g. contact normal load or temperature to name only two. In discrete element method (DEM) simulations the usage of Coulomb's law of friction is state of the art in modelling particle-particle contacts. Usually in Coulomb's law, for all contacts only one constant coefficient of friction is used, which needs to reflect all tribological effects. Thus, whenever one of the influence factors of friction varies over a wide range, it can be expected that the usage of only one constant coefficient of friction in Coulomb's law is an oversimplification of reality. For certain materials, e.g. steel, it is known that a dependency of the coefficient of friction on the contact normal load exists. A more tribological tangential contact law is implemented in DEM, where the interparticle friction coefficient depends on the averaged normal stress in the contact. Simulations of direct shear tests are conducted, using steel spheres of different size distributions. The strong influence of interparticle friction on the bulk friction is shown via a variation of the constant interparticle friction coefficient. Simulations with constant and stress-dependent interparticle friction are compared. For the stress-dependent interparticle friction, a normal stress dependency of the bulk friction is seen. In the literature, measurements of different granular materials and small normal loads also show a stress dependency of the bulk friction coefficient. With increasing applied normal stress, the bulk friction coefficient reduces both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  5. Friction phenomena and their impact on the shear behaviour of granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Bettina; Six, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In the discrete element simulation of granular materials, the modelling of contacts is crucial for the prediction of the macroscopic material behaviour. From the tribological point of view, friction at contacts needs to be modelled carefully, as it depends on several factors, e.g. contact normal load or temperature to name only two. In discrete element method (DEM) simulations the usage of Coulomb's law of friction is state of the art in modelling particle-particle contacts. Usually in Coulomb's law, for all contacts only one constant coefficient of friction is used, which needs to reflect all tribological effects. Thus, whenever one of the influence factors of friction varies over a wide range, it can be expected that the usage of only one constant coefficient of friction in Coulomb's law is an oversimplification of reality. For certain materials, e.g. steel, it is known that a dependency of the coefficient of friction on the contact normal load exists. A more tribological tangential contact law is implemented in DEM, where the interparticle friction coefficient depends on the averaged normal stress in the contact. Simulations of direct shear tests are conducted, using steel spheres of different size distributions. The strong influence of interparticle friction on the bulk friction is shown via a variation of the constant interparticle friction coefficient. Simulations with constant and stress-dependent interparticle friction are compared. For the stress-dependent interparticle friction, a normal stress dependency of the bulk friction is seen. In the literature, measurements of different granular materials and small normal loads also show a stress dependency of the bulk friction coefficient. With increasing applied normal stress, the bulk friction coefficient reduces both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  6. Ratchet due to broken friction symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norden, Bengt; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2002-01-01

    A ratchet mechanism that occurs due to asymmetric dependence of the friction of a moving system on its velocity or a driving force is reported. For this kind of ratchet, instead of a particle moving in a periodic potential, the dynamics of which have broken space-time symmetry, the system must...

  7. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yanzhong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed could be finally obtained by the data k and s/sm. The method provides a well interpretation of friction condition and friction coefficient prediction and the agreement between theoretical and experimental friction coefficients is reasonably good.

  8. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energy interpretation of the coefficient of friction is showed. From this position the friction coefficient is the most informative characteristic of the process. Experimental friction curves have been generalized. As a result of the energy analysis of friction, the energy diagram of the structural evolution of the friction surfaces is suggested.

  9. Frictional properties of high strength; Kokyodo porima sen'i kyoka purasuchikku no masatsu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, T.; Yoshino, D. [Sophia University, Tokyo (Japan); Kashima, T.; Yamanaka, A. [Toyobo Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    Dyneema fiber reinforced plastic there is the property, which expands with the reduced temperature, and the use as a superconducting coil reel material is examined. In this paper, Zylon fiber reinforced plastic also measured friction coefficient of the surface of ZFRP, and it has the similar property, and possibility of application as a coil reel material of ZFRP is examined. (NEDO)

  10. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  11. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  12. Proximity Action theory of superconductive nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skvortsov, M A; Larkin, A I; Feigel' man, M V [L D Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Kosygina 2, 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-10-01

    We review a novel approach to the superconductive proximity effect in disordered normal-superconducting (N-S) structures. The method is based on the multicharge Keldysh action and is suitable for the treatment of interaction and fluctuation effects. As an application of the formalism, we study the subgap conductance and noise in two-dimensional N-S systems in the presence of the electron-electron interaction in the Cooper channel. It is shown that singular nature of the interaction correction at large scales leads to a nonmonotonuos temperature, voltage and magnetic field dependence of the Andreev conductance. (4. mesoscopic superconductivity)

  13. Physics of Friction in Disposable Plastic Syringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann-Vinson, A.; Vogler, E. A.; Martin, D. A.; Montgomery, D. B.; Sugg, H. W.; Monahan, L. A.

    1997-03-01

    Nosocomial applications of disposable plastic syringes demand excellent frictional behavior with no stick-slip over a broad velocity range and, simultaneously, a tight seal between stopper and barrel. However, when used in syringe pumps at slow injection speeds, stick-slip motion is frequently observed and high "break-out" forces are often necessary to initiate plunger movement after extended storage times. We have traced this frictional behavior to a velocity-dependent interaction between the elastomeric stopper and the plastic syringe barrel mediated by the syringe lubricant, almost universally a polydimethyl siloxane fluid. Lubricant properties were altered by crosslinking the surface of the silicone oil in an oxygen plasma. Changes in surface chemistry and morphology of the crosslinked oil were correlated with changes in frictional performance.

  14. Adhesion and friction of thin metal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with thin films of titanium, chromium, iron, and platinum sputter deposited on quartz or mica substrates. A single crystal hemispherically tipped gold slider was used in contact with the films at loads of 1.0 to 30.0 and at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min at 23 C. Test results indicate that the friction coefficient is dependent on the adhesion of two interfaces, that between the film and its substrate and the slider and the film. There exists a relationship between the percent d bond character of metals in bulk and in thin film form and the friction coefficient. Oxygen can increase adhesive bonding of a metal film (platinum) to a substrate.

  15. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  16. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  17. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  18. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  19. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  20. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  1. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  2. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  3. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  4. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der E.; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is fre

  5. Gravitomagnetic dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Cashen, Benjamin; Kesden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A supermassive black hole moving through a field of stars will gravitationally scatter the stars, inducing a backreaction force on the black hole known as dynamical friction. In Newtonian gravity, the axisymmetry of the system about the black hole's velocity $\\mathbf{v}$ implies that the dynamical friction must be anti-parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$. However, in general relativity the black hole's spin $\\mathbf{S}$ need not be parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$, breaking the axisymmetry of the system and generating a new component of dynamical friction similar to the Lorentz force $\\mathbf{F} = q\\mathbf{v} \\times \\mathbf{B}$ experienced by a particle with charge $q$ moving in a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$. We call this new force gravitomagnetic dynamical friction and calculate its magnitude for a spinning black hole moving through a field of stars with Maxwellian velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, assuming that both $v$ and $\\sigma$ are much less than the speed of light $c$. We use post-Newtonian equations of motion accurate to $...

  6. The Debye temperature of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-. delta. and its dependence on the volume fraction of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Phillips, N.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Gordon, J.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Amherst Coll., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    Specific-heat measurements, on polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, YBCO, have shown sample-to-sample variations in the volume fraction of superconductivity, f{sub s}, which is correlated with the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments in the YBCO lattice. At low temperatures the lattice specific heat also varies with f{sub s}, but these variations do not persist above {approximately}20K. The low-temperature data show that {Theta}{sub 0}{sup {minus}3} varies linearly with f{sub 3}, and give values of 520 and 390K for {Theta}{sub o} for fully-superconducting and fully-normal'' YBCO, respectively. These results suggest that the long wavelength phonon modes are altered when Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments are present in the lattice. The fact that different samples have the same lattice specific heat at {approximately}20K and above T{sub c} indicates that the higher energy phonon modes are insensitive to these Cu{sup 2+} moments.

  7. The Debye temperature of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and its dependence on the volume fraction of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.A.; Phillips, N.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Gordon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Amherst Coll., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1991-12-01

    Specific-heat measurements, on polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, YBCO, have shown sample-to-sample variations in the volume fraction of superconductivity, f{sub s}, which is correlated with the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments in the YBCO lattice. At low temperatures the lattice specific heat also varies with f{sub s}, but these variations do not persist above {approximately}20K. The low-temperature data show that {Theta}{sub 0}{sup {minus}3} varies linearly with f{sub 3}, and give values of 520 and 390K for {Theta}{sub o} for fully-superconducting and ``fully-normal`` YBCO, respectively. These results suggest that the long wavelength phonon modes are altered when Cu{sup 2+} magnetic moments are present in the lattice. The fact that different samples have the same lattice specific heat at {approximately}20K and above T{sub c} indicates that the higher energy phonon modes are insensitive to these Cu{sup 2+} moments.

  8. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  9. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp. PMID:26979564

  10. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  11. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  12. Superconducting phase transition in STM tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jaeck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, Klaus [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The superconducting properties of systems with dimensions comparable to the London penetration depth considerably differ from macroscopic systems. We have studied the superconducting phase transition of vanadium STM tips in external magnetic fields. Employing Maki's theory we extract the superconducting parameters such as the gap or the Zeeman splitting from differential conductance spectra. While the Zeeman splitting follows the theoretical description of a system with s=1/2 and g=2, the superconducting gaps as well as the critical fields depend on the specific tip. For a better understanding of the experimental results, we solve a one dimensional Usadel equation modeling the superconducting tip as a cone with the opening angle α in an external magnetic field. We find that only a small region at the apex of the tip is superconducting in high magnetic fields and that the order of the phase transition is directly determined by α. Further, the spectral broadening increases with α indicating an intrinsic broadening mechanism due to the conical shape of the tip. Comparing these calculations to our experimental results reveals the order of the superconducting phase transition of the STM tips.

  13. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J; Su, Y; Howard, C A; Kundys, D; Grigorenko, A N; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V; Nair, R R

    2016-03-16

    Despite graphene's long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc's strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  14. Optimization of Rolling Process for Bi(2223)/Ag Superconducting Tapes by a Statistical Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ag-sheathed (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox tapes were prepared by the powder-in-tube method. The influences of rolling parameters on superconducting characteristics of Bi(2223)/Ag tapes were analyzed qualitatively with a statistical method. The results demonstrate that roll diameter and reduction per pass significantly influence the properties of superconducting tapes while roll speed does less and working friction the least. An optimized rolling process was therefore achieved according to the above results.

  15. Application of textured YBCO bulks with artificial holes for superconducting magnetic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, D. H. N.; Sotelo, G. G.; Moysés, L. A.; Telles, L. G. T.; Bernstein, P.; Kenfaui, D.; Aburas, M.; Chaud, X.; Noudem, J. G.

    2015-07-01

    The levitation force between a superconductor and a permanent magnet has been investigated for the development of superconducting magnetic bearings (SMBs). Depending on the proposed application, the SMBs can be arranged with two kinds of symmetries: rotational or linear. The SMBs present passive operation, low level of noise and no friction, but they need a cooling system for their operation. Nowadays the cooling problem may be easily solved by the use of a commercial cryocooler. The levitation force of SMBs is directly related to the quality of the superconductor material (which depends on its critical current density) and the permanent magnet arrangement. Also, research about the YBa2Cu3Ox (Y123) bulk materials has shown that artificial holes enhance the superconducting properties, in particular the magnetic trapped field. In this context, this work proposes the investigation of the levitation force of a bulk Y123 sample with multiple holes and the comparison of its performances with those of conventional plain Y123 superconductors.

  16. Influence of shear velocity on frictional characteristics of rock surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Singh; A K Verma; Tanmay Kumar; Avi Dutt

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the fundamental issues related with the effect of shear velocity on frictional characteristics at the interface of rock surfaces is an important issue. In this paper, strain-rate dependence on friction is investigated in relation to sliding behaviour under normal load. The phenomenon of stick-slip of granite and shaly sandstone with a tribometer at constant rate of strain under normal loads was observed. Friction at the interface of the rock samples was developed by increasing shear strain at a constant rate by applying constant velocity using the tribometer. For shaly sandstone, state parameters ( and ) played a major role in determining the friction values and roughness of the contact surfaces as well. Higher values of for shaly sandstone may be attributed to the fact that its surface had a greater number of pronounced asperities. Rubbing between the surfaces does not mean that surface becomes smoother. This is because of variation of friction between surfaces.

  17. Anyon Superconductivity of Sb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-; Parengkuan, August

    2016-10-01

    In any permutatives to Pedro P. Kuczhynski from Peru, for anyon superconductivity sought EZ Kuchinskii et al.: ``Anion height dependence of Tc & d.o.s of Fe-based Superconductors'', 2010 as well as ``on the basis of electron microscopy & AFM measurements, these phenomena are quantified with focus on fractal dimension, particle perimeter & size of the side branch(tip width) in bert Stegemann et al.:Crystallization of Sb nanoparticles-Pattern Formation & Fractal Growth'', J.PhysChem B., 2004. For dendritic & dendrimer fractal characters shown further: ``antimony denrites were found to be composed of well-crystallized nanoflakes with size 20-4 nm''- Bou Zhau, et al., MaterialLetters, 59 (2005). The alkyl triisopropyl attached in TIPSb those includes in DNA, haemoglobin membrane/fixed-bed reactor for instance quotes in Dragony Fu, Nature Review Cancer, 12 (Feb 2012). Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. Handojo.

  18. First-principles study of the pressure and crystal-structure dependences of the superconducting transition temperature in compressed sulfur hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Ryosuke; Kawamura, Mitsuaki; Tsuneyuki, Shinji; Nomura, Yusuke; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) in sulfur hydrides H2S and H3S from first principles using the density functional theory for superconductors. At pressures of ≲150 GPa, the high values of Tc (≥130 K) observed in a recent experiment (A. P. Drozdov, M. I. Eremets, and I. A. Troyan, arXiv:1412.0460) are accurately reproduced by assuming that H2S decomposes into R 3 m H3S and S. For higher pressures, the calculated Tc's for I m 3 ¯m H3S are systematically higher than those for R 3 m H3S and the experimentally observed maximum value (190 K), which suggests the possibility of another higher-Tc phase. We also quantify the isotope effect from first principles and demonstrate that the isotope effect coefficient can be larger than the conventional value (0.5) when multiple structural phases energetically compete.

  19. A Microphysical Model for Phyllosilicate Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, S. A. M.; Faulkner, D.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts the experimentally observed temperature dependence of (a-b) and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  20. Superconducting gap anomaly in heavy fermion systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G C Rout; M S Ojha; S N Behera

    2008-04-01

    The heavy fermion system (HFS) is described by the periodic Anderson model (PAM), treating the Coulomb correlation between the -electrons in the mean-field Hartree-Fock approximation. Superconductivity is introduced by a BCS-type pairing term among the conduction electrons. Within this approximation the equation for the superconducting gap is derived, which depends on the effective position of the energy level of the -electrons relative to the Fermi level. The latter in turn depends on the occupation probability f of the -electrons. The gap equation is solved self-consistently with the equation for f; and their temperature dependences are studied for different positions of the bare -electron energy level, with respect to the Fermi level. The dependence of the superconducting gap on the hybridization leads to a re-entrant behaviour with increasing strength. The induced pairing between the -electrons and the pairing of mixed conduction and -electrons due to hybridization are also determined. The temperature dependence of the hybridization parameter, which characterizes the number of electrons with mixed character and represents the number of heavy electrons is studied. This number is shown to be small. The quasi-particle density of states (DOS) shows the existence of a pseudo-gap due to superconductivity and the signature of a hybridization gap at the Fermi level. For the choice of the model parameters, the DOS shows that the HFS is a metal and undergoes a transition to the gap-less superconducting state.

  1. Friction in rail guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  2. Inhomogeneous superconductivity in quasi-one dimensional organic conductors and ropes of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellafi, B.; Haddad, S.; Sfar, I.; Charfi-Kaddour, S.

    2009-03-01

    It has been reported that, in quasi-one dimensional organic conductors, superconductivity may coexist macroscopically with non-superconducting states giving rise to an inhomogeneous phase. We investigate, based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, the effect of disorder on the stability of the superconducting phase in such a mixed state. We also focus on the interplay between superconductivity and disorder in ropes of carbon nanotubes. We show that the superconducting transition temperature in quasi-one organic conductors is reduced by disorder but does not obey the Abrikosov-Gorkov law. However, and contrary to what is expected, disorder can further superconductivity in ropes of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  4. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  5. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  6. The insulating-to-superconducting transition in europium high-temperature superconducting ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenbaum, R

    1997-01-01

    Experiment resistivity data on high-temperature superconducting ceramics of fully oxygenated EuBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 sub - sub x Co sub x O sub y show that the insulating-to-superconducting transitions take place at liquid-helium temperature, provided that the cobalt fraction x exceeds 0.3. The resistivity follows a simple power-law dependence rho propor to T sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 , attributed to electron-electron interactions. A model based upon intrinsic Josephson tunnelling junctions is suggested to explain the transition from insulating to superconducting states. (author)

  7. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  8. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  9. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  10. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  11. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  12. Variable enstrophy flux and energy spectrum in two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2012-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that in the forward cascade regime, the energy spectrum of two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction deviates from Kraichnan's prediction of $k^{-3}$ power spectrum. In this letter we explain this observation using an analytic model based on variable enstrophy flux arising due to Ekman friction. We derive an expression for the enstrophy flux which exhibits a logarithmic dependence in the inertial range for the Ekman-friction dominated flows. The energy spectrum obtained using this enstrophy flux shows a power law scaling for large Reynolds number and small Ekman friction, but has an exponential behaviour for large Ekman friction and relatively small Reynolds number.

  13. On the nature of the static friction, kinetic friction and creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.; Mancosu, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the nature of the static and kinetic friction, and of (thermally activated) creep.We focus on boundary lubrication at high confining pressure (∼1GPa), as is typical for hard solids, where one or at most two layers of confined molecules separates the sliding surfaces. We...... may depend linearly on ln (v/v0), as usually observed experimentally, rather than non-linearly [−ln (v/v0)]2/3 as predicted by a simple theory of activated processes. We also discuss the role of elasticity at stop and start. We show that for "simple" rubber (at low start velocity), the static friction...

  14. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J. W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.557378] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1  μmrad, and high average current (hundreds of mA are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun. SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University. Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term operation was demonstrated at FZD [R. Xiang et al., in Proceedings of the 31st International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 09, Liverpool, UK (STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, 2009, p. 488]. In the near future SRF guns are expected to play an important role for linac-driven FEL facilities. In this paper we will review the concepts, the design parameters, and the status of the major SRF gun projects.

  15. On the origin of Amonton’s friction law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Bo N J; Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N

    2008-01-01

    Amonton's law states that the sliding friction force increases linearly with the load. We show that this result is expected for stiff enough solids, even when the adhesional interaction between the solids is included in the analysis. As a function of the magnitude of the elastic modulus E, one can...... on the load and is non-vanishing at zero load. In this last case a finite pull-off force is necessary in order to separate the solids. Based on molecular dynamics calculations, we also discuss the pressure dependence of the frictional shear stress for polymers. We show that the frictional shear stress...

  16. Multiscaling behavior of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesar, M.; Jamali, T.; Sadeghi, A.; Movahed, S. M. S.; Fesler, G.; Meyer, E.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Jafari, G. R.

    2017-06-01

    The scaling behavior of friction between rough surfaces is a well-known phenomenon. It might be asked whether such a scaling feature also exists for friction at an atomic scale despite the absence of roughness on atomically flat surfaces. Indeed, other types of fluctuations, e.g., thermal and instrumental fluctuations, become appreciable at this length scale and can lead to scaling behavior of the measured atomic-scale friction. We investigate this using the lateral force exerted on the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) when the tip is dragged over the clean NaCl (001) surface in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Here the focus is on the fluctuations of the lateral force profile rather than its saw-tooth trend; we first eliminate the trend using the singular value decomposition technique and then explore the scaling behavior of the detrended data, which contains only fluctuations, using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The results demonstrate a scaling behavior for the friction data ranging from 0.2 to 2 nm with the Hurst exponent H =0.61 ±0.02 at a 1 σ confidence interval. Moreover, the dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent, h (q ) , on the index variable q confirms the multifractal or multiscaling behavior of the nanofriction data. These results prove that fluctuation of nanofriction empirical data has a multifractal behavior which deviates from white noise.

  17. Static and kinetic friction characteristics of nanowire on different substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon; Nguyen, Gia Hau; Ky, Dinh Le Cao; Tran, Da Khoa; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Friction characteristics of nanowires (NWs), which may be used as building blocks for nano-devices, are crucial, especially for cases where contact sliding occurs during the device operation. In this work, the static and kinetic friction characteristics of oxidized Si NWs deposited on thermally grown SiO2 and chemical vapor-deposited single layer graphene were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Kinetic friction between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was directly measured by the AFM. Static friction was also obtained from the most bent state of the NWs using the individually determined elastic moduli of the NWs from kinetic friction experiments based on elastic beam theory. Furthermore, the shear stress between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was estimated based on adhesive contact theory. It was found that both static and kinetic friction increased as the radius of the NWs increased. The friction of the oxidized Si NWs on the graphene substrate was found to be smaller than that on the SiO2 substrate, which suggests that chemical vapor-deposited graphene can be used as a lubricant or as a protective layer in nano-devices to reduce friction. The shear stress estimated from the kinetic friction data between the oxidized Si NWs and the SiO2 substrate ranged from 7.5 to 12.3 MPa while that between the oxidized Si NWs and the graphene substrate ranged from 4.7 to 7.0 MPa. The result also indicated that the dependence of shear stress on the radius of the NWs was not significant. These findings may provide insight into the friction characteristics of NWs.

  18. The Influence of Normal Load and Sliding Speed on Frictional Properties of Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Shi-rong Ge; Hua Zhu; Xi-chuan Cao; Ning Li

    2008-01-01

    The study of frictional properties of human skin is important for medical research, skin care products and textile exploitation. In order to investigate the influence of normal load and sliding speed on the frictional properties of skin and its possible mechanism, tests were carried out on a multi-specimen friction tester. When the normal load increases from 0.1 N to 0.9 N,normal displacement and the friction coefficient of skin increase. The friction coefficient is dependent on the load, indicating that both adhesion and deformation contribute to the friction behaviour. The deformation friction was interpreted using the plough model of fiiction. When sliding speed increases from 0.5 mm·s-1 to 4 mm·s-1,the friction coefficient increases and "stick-slip" phenomena increase, indicating that hysteretic friction contributes to the friction. The hysteretic friction was interpreted using schematic of energy translation during the rigid spherical probe sliding on the soft skin surface, which provides an explanation for the influence of the sliding speed on the frictional characteristics of the skin.

  19. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  20. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  1. Static and kinetic friction characteristics of nanowire on different substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon [Department of Precision Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Sangju 37224 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Gia Hau; Ky, Dinh Le Cao; Tran, Da Khoa [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ki-Joon [Department of Environmental Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 22212 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Koo-Hyun, E-mail: khchung@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Direct measurement of kinetic friction of oxidized Si NW using AFM. • Determination of static friction of oxidized Si NW from most bent state. • Friction characteristics of oxidized Si NW on SiO{sub 2} and graphene. • Estimation of shear stress between cylindrical NW and flat substrate. • No significant dependence of shear stress on NW radius. - Abstract: Friction characteristics of nanowires (NWs), which may be used as building blocks for nano-devices, are crucial, especially for cases where contact sliding occurs during the device operation. In this work, the static and kinetic friction characteristics of oxidized Si NWs deposited on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} and chemical vapor-deposited single layer graphene were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Kinetic friction between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was directly measured by the AFM. Static friction was also obtained from the most bent state of the NWs using the individually determined elastic moduli of the NWs from kinetic friction experiments based on elastic beam theory. Furthermore, the shear stress between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was estimated based on adhesive contact theory. It was found that both static and kinetic friction increased as the radius of the NWs increased. The friction of the oxidized Si NWs on the graphene substrate was found to be smaller than that on the SiO{sub 2} substrate, which suggests that chemical vapor-deposited graphene can be used as a lubricant or as a protective layer in nano-devices to reduce friction. The shear stress estimated from the kinetic friction data between the oxidized Si NWs and the SiO{sub 2} substrate ranged from 7.5 to 12.3 MPa while that between the oxidized Si NWs and the graphene substrate ranged from 4.7 to 7.0 MPa. The result also indicated that the dependence of shear stress on the radius of the NWs was not significant. These findings may provide insight into the friction characteristics

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission studies of the superconducting gap symmetry in Fe-based superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-B. Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The superconducting gap is the fundamental parameter that characterizes the superconducting state, and its symmetry is a direct consequence of the mechanism responsible for Cooper pairing. Here we discuss about angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting gap in the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. We show that the superconducting gap is Fermi surface dependent and nodeless with small anisotropy, or more precisely, a function of the momentum location in the Brillouin zone. We show that while this observation seems inconsistent with weak coupling approaches for superconductivity in these materials, it is well supported by strong coupling models and global superconducting gaps. We also suggest that a smaller lifetime of the superconducting Cooper pairs induced by the momentum dependent interband scattering inherent to these materials could affect the residual density of states at low energies, which is critical for a proper evaluation of the superconducting gap.

  3. Fundamental considerations in adhesion, friction and wear for ceramic-metal contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental studies of friction, wear and adhesion of ceramics in contact with metals are evaluated. It is shown that friction and adhesion are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. The surface energy, friction, adhesion and hardness of a metal are related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. Generally, the greater the sheer modulus, the less metal transfer there is to the ceramic.

  4. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.; Gutkowski, Witold; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle fri

  5. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  6. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  7. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  8. Friction and Wear of Sintered Alumina at High Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Senda, Tetsuya; TAKAHASHl, Chiori; UEMATSU, Susumu; Amada, Shigeyasu

    1991-01-01

    The frictional behavior of alumina ceramics was investigated at various temperatures up to 1200℃. The coefficient of friction decreased with increasing temperature and this temperature dependency became more pronounced as higher contact pressures were applied. Wear loss at room temperature could be interpreted as being caused by one of either two different behavior modes. These have a rate difference of a factor of ten. At temperatures higher than 800℃, the wear loss was far less than that at...

  9. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    . The anthropologist Anna Tsing has developed the concept-metaphor friction as a way to discuss the energy created when various actors narrate “the same” event(s) in different ways, and see the other participants’ accounts as fantasies or even fabrications. I will use my position as researcher and my relations...... is Stone Town in Zanzibar and the de-velopment and dissolution going on under the shadow of the UNESCO World Heritage flag; a growing tourism; a global and local increase in islamisation; and the political tension within the Tanzanian union. My main focus is narratives of the identity of Zanzibar since...

  10. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  11. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  12. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  13. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  14. FRICTION ANALYSIS OF KINETIC SCHEMES - THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  15. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  16. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  17. Giant and Tunable Anisotropy of Nanoscale Friction in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Clara M.; Prioli, Rodrigo; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; de Cicco, Marcelo; Menezes, Marcos G.; Achete, Carlos A.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2016-08-01

    The nanoscale friction between an atomic force microscopy tip and graphene is investigated using friction force microscopy (FFM). During the tip movement, friction forces are observed to increase and then saturate in a highly anisotropic manner. As a result, the friction forces in graphene are highly dependent on the scanning direction: under some conditions, the energy dissipated along the armchair direction can be 80% higher than along the zigzag direction. In comparison, for highly-oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG), the friction anisotropy between armchair and zigzag directions is only 15%. This giant friction anisotropy in graphene results from anisotropies in the amplitudes of flexural deformations of the graphene sheet driven by the tip movement, not present in HOPG. The effect can be seen as a novel manifestation of the classical phenomenon of Euler buckling at the nanoscale, which provides the non-linear ingredients that amplify friction anisotropy. Simulations based on a novel version of the 2D Tomlinson model (modified to include the effects of flexural deformations), as well as fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, are able to reproduce and explain the experimental observations.

  18. Water-vapor effects on friction of magnetic tape in contact with nickel-zinc ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity of moist nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a nickel-zinc ferrite spherical pin were studied. The results indicate that the coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. Although the coefficient of friction remains low below 40-percent relative humidity, it increases rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent. The general ambient environment of the tape does not have any effect on the friction behavior if the area where the tape is in sliding contact with the ferrite pin is flooded with controlled nitrogen. The response time for the friction of the tape to humidity changes is about 10 sec. The effect of friction as a function of relative humidity on dehumidifying is very similar to that on humidifying. A surface softening of the tape due to water vapor increases the friction of the tape.

  19. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  20. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  1. Oxide-based platform for reconfigurable superconducting nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Joshua P.; Cheng, Guanglei; Irvin, Patrick; Cen, Cheng; Bogorin, Daniela F.; Bi, Feng; Huang, Mengchen; Bark, Chung-Wung; Ryu, Sangwoo; Cho, Kwang-Hwan; Eom, Chang-Beom; Levy, Jeremy

    2013-09-01

    We report quasi-1D superconductivity at the interface of LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The material system and nanostructure fabrication method supply a new platform for superconducting nanoelectronics. Nanostructures having line widths w ˜ 10 nm are formed from the parent two-dimensional electron liquid using conductive atomic force microscope lithography. Nanowire cross-sections are small compared to the superconducting coherence length in LaAlO3/SrTiO3, placing them in the quasi-1D regime. Broad superconducting transitions versus temperature and finite resistances in the superconducting state well below Tc ≈ 200 mK are observed, suggesting the presence of fluctuation- and heating-induced resistance. The superconducting resistances and V-I characteristics are tunable through the use of a back gate. Four-terminal resistances in the superconducting state show an unusual dependence on the current path, varying by as much as an order of magnitude. This new technology, i.e., the ability to ‘write’ gate-tunable superconducting nanostructures on an insulating LaAlO3/SrTiO3 ‘canvas’, opens possibilities for the development of new families of reconfigurable superconducting nanoelectronics.

  2. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yalin

    interesting physical process is buried between the two contact interfaces, thus makes a direct measurement more difficult. Atomistic simulation is able to simulate the process with the dynamic information of each single atom, and therefore provides valuable interpretations for experiments. In this, we will systematically to apply Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation to optimally model the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurement of atomic friction. Furthermore, we also employed molecular dynamics simulation to correlate the atomic dynamics with the friction behavior observed in experiments. For instance, ParRep dynamics (an accelerated molecular dynamic technique) is introduced to investigate velocity dependence of atomic friction; we also employ MD simulation to "see" how the reconstruction of gold surface modulates the friction, and the friction enhancement mechanism at a graphite step edge. Atomic stick-slip friction can be treated as a rate process. Instead of running a direction simulation of the process, we can apply transition state theory to predict its property. We will have a rigorous derivation of velocity and temperature dependence of friction based on the Prandtl-Tomlinson model as well as transition theory. A more accurate relation to prediction velocity and temperature dependence is obtained. Furthermore, we have included instrumental noise inherent in AFM measurement to interpret two discoveries in experiments, suppression of friction at low temperature and the attempt frequency discrepancy between AFM measurement and theoretical prediction. We also discuss the possibility to treat wear as a rate process.

  3. Study of the relation between evaluation of strain distribution on superconducting coil and mechanical heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Minoru; Herai, Toshiki; Suzuki, Eiji

    2002-10-01

    In the superconducting Maglev system, on-board superconducting magnets (SCMs) are vibrated at various frequencies according to the train speed by the electromagnetic disturbance which is caused when the train passes over ground coils. Then a mechanical loss is generated inside the inner vessel in the SCM. This phenomenon increases the heat load on the cryogenic equipment in the SCM. It has been surmised that the mechanical heat inside the inner vessel is generated by the frictional heat caused by the relative microscopic slips between fasteners and superconducting coil (SC coil). Nevertheless, heat generation mechanisms inside the inner vessel have not been studied sufficiently. In this study, we suggest a hypothesis that the frictional heat generated by the relative microscopic slips between fasteners and a SC coil will be indicated if the calculated strain distribution on the SC coil is evaluated. The results of this study supported this hypothesis.

  4. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  5. Theory of friction based on brittle fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of friction is presented that may be more applicable to geologic materials than the classic Bowden and Tabor theory. In the model, surfaces touch at the peaks of asperities and sliding occurs when the asperities fail by brittle fracture. The coefficient of friction, ??, was calculated from the strength of asperities of certain ideal shapes; for cone-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.1 and for wedge-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.15. For actual situations which seem close to the ideal model, observed ?? was found to be very close to 0.1, even for materials such as quartz and calcite with widely differing strengths. If surface forces are present, the theory predicts that ?? should decrease with load and that it should be higher in a vacuum than in air. In the presence of a fluid film between sliding surfaces, ?? should depend on the area of the surfaces in contact. Both effects are observed. The character of wear particles produced during sliding and the way in which ?? depends on normal load, roughness, and environment lend further support to the model of friction presented here. ?? 1967 The American Institute of Physics.

  6. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Mars - Wind friction speeds for particle movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Leach, R.; White, B.; Iversen, J.; Pollack, J.

    1976-01-01

    Wind friction threshold speeds for particle movement were determined in a low pressure boundary layer wind tunnel at an atmospheric pressure of 5.3 mb. The results imply that for comparable pressures on Mars, the minimum wind friction threshold speed is about 2.5 m/sec, which would require free-stream winds of 50 to 135 m/sec, depending on the character of the surface and the atmospheric conditions. The corresponding wind speeds at the height of the Viking lander meteorology instrument would be about a factor of two less than the free-stream wind speed. The particle size most easily moved by winds on Mars is about 160 microns; particles both larger and smaller than this (at least down to about 5 microns) require stronger winds to initiate movement.

  8. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garifullin, I.A., E-mail: ilgiz_garifullin@yahoo.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Leksin, P.V.; Garif' yanov, N.N.; Kamashev, A.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Fominov, Ya.V. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O.G. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Büchner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoO{sub x}/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. - Highlights: • We studied a spin switch design F1/F2/S. • We prepared a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). • The full spin switch effect for the superconducting current was realized. • We observed its oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness. • We obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity.

  9. Modeling of the voltage-controlled friction effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟永钢; 蒋洪军; 常秋英; 黄柏林

    2002-01-01

    A phenomenological model of the dependence of friction coefficient on external voltage is proposed based on experimental results of friction and electric current of three different trbopairs, Si3N4-ball/steel-disc, Si3N4-ball/brass-disc and SiO2-ball/steel-disc, lubricated with zinc strearate suspension. It was found that the variation of friction coefficient correlates with the variation of electric current for all of the three tribopairs. The change in electric current is considered to be caused by the rate of electrochemical reactions occurring on the rubbing surface. By taking the electrochemical reaction into account in the total energy consumption, an expression for describing the relationship between the rates of friction coefficient and electric current is derived, and the constants included in the expression are determined through curve fitting of experimental data.

  10. Friction mechanisms and interfacial slip at fluid-solid interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Leger, L

    2003-01-01

    We present series of experiments based on near field laser velocimetry, developed to characterize the friction mechanisms at fluid-solid interfaces. For polymers, entangled polymer melts are sheared against smooth solid surfaces, covered by surface attached polymer chains of the same chemical species, having a controlled surface density. Direct measurements of the interfacial velocity and of the shear force allow identification of the molecular mechanisms of friction. Depending on the value of the inverse of the shear rate experienced by the polymer compared to the reptation time, the transition between a regime of high and a regime of low friction observed when increasing the shear rate can be related to disentanglement or to the extraction of the surface chains from the bulk polymer. Surfaces with adjusted friction properties can thus be designed by choosing chain anchored length and surface density. For simple fluids, the direct measurements of the interfacial velocity show that, contrary to the usual hypo...

  11. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  12. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  13. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third...

  14. Superconductivity of lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorse, H.A.; Cook, D.B.; Zemansky, W.M.

    1950-06-01

    Numerous determinations of the zero-field transition temperature of lead have been made. All of these observations except that of Daunt were made by the direct measurement of electrical resistance. Daunt`s method involved the shielding effect of persistent currents in a hollow cylinder. In the authors work on columbium to be described in a forthcoming paper an a.c. induction method was used for the measurement of superconducting transitions. The superconductor was mounted as a cylindrical core of a coil which functioned as the secondary of a mutual inductance. The primary coil was actuated by an oscillator which provided a maximum a.c. field within the secondary of 1.5 oersteds at a frequency of 1000 cycles per second. The secondary e.m.f. which was dependent for its magnitude on the permeability of the core was amplified, rectifie, and observed on a recording potentiometer. During the application of this method to the study of columbium it appeared that a further check on the zero-field transition temperature of lead would be worth while especially if agreement between results for very pure samples could be obtained using this method. Such result would help in establishing the lead transition temperature as a reasonably reproducible reference point in the region between 4 deg and 10 deg K.

  15. Quantum Magnetomechanics with Levitating Superconducting Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Isart, O; Navau, C; Sanchez, A; Cirac, J I

    2011-01-01

    We show that by magnetically trapping a superconducting microsphere close to a quantum circuit, it is experimentally feasible to perform ground state cooling and to prepare quantum superpositions of the center-of-mass motion of the microsphere. Due to the absence of clamping losses and time dependent electromagnetic fields, the mechanical motion of micrometer-sized metallic spheres in the Meissner state is predicted to be extremely well isolated from the environment. Hence, we propose to combine the technology of magnetic mictrotraps and superconducting qubits to bring relatively large objects to the quantum regime.

  16. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...... MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train....

  17. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  18. Superconductivity fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckel, Werner

    2004-01-01

    This is the second English edition of what has become one of the definitive works on superconductivity in German -- currently in its sixth edition. Comprehensive and easy to understand, this introductory text is written especially with the non-specialist in mind. The authors, both long-term experts in this field, present the fundamental considerations without the need for extensive mathematics, describing the various phenomena connected with the superconducting state, with liberal insertion of experimental facts and examples for modern applications. While all fields of superconducting phenomena are dealt with in detail, this new edition pays particular attention to the groundbreaking discovery of magnesium diboride and the current developments in this field. In addition, a new chapter provides an overview of the elements, alloys and compounds where superconductivity has been observed in experiments, together with their major characteristics. The chapter on technical applications has been considerably expanded...

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Temperature Field in Automotive Dry Friction Clutch

    OpenAIRE

    O.I. Abdullah; J. Schlattmann

    2012-01-01

    The friction clutch design is strongly dependent upon the frictional heat generated between contact surfaces during the slipping at beginning of engagement. Because of that the frictional heat generated firstly will reduce the performance of clutch system and then will lead to premature failure in some cases. Finite element method was used to investigate aneffect of thermal load type on the temperature field of the clutch system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric model was used to study the tempe...

  20. Mechanics of granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids in civil and mining engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehossein, H.; Qin, Z.

    2013-10-01

    The shear stress generated in mine backfill slurries and fresh concrete contains both velocity gradient dependent and frictional terms, categorised as frictional viscous plastic fluids. This paper discusses application of the developed analytical solution for flow rate as a function of pressure and pressure gradient in discs, pipes and cones for such frictional Bingham-Herschel-Bulkley fluids. This paper discusses application of this continuum fluid model to industrial materials like mine and mineral slurries, backfills and fresh concrete tests.

  1. Dynamic friction of self-affine surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Stéphane

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the velocity dependence of the friction between two rigid blocks limited by a self-affine surface such as the one generated by a crack. The upper solid is subjected either to gravity or to an external elastic stiffness, and is driven horizontally at constant velocity, V, while the lower solid is fixed. For low velocities, the apparent friction coefficient is constant. For high velocities, the apparent friction is shown to display a velocity weakening. The weakening can be related to the variation of the mean contact time due to the occurrence of jumps during the motions. The cross-over between these two regimes corresponds to a characteristic velocity which depends on the geometry of the surfaces and on the mean normal force. In the case of simple gravity loading, the velocity dependence of the apparent friction at high velocities is proportional to 1/V^2 where V is the imposed tangential velocity. In the case of external elastic stiffness, two velocity weakening regimes can be identified, the first is identical to the gravity case with a 1/V^2 dependence, the second appears at higher velocities and is characterized by a 1/V variation. The characteristic velocity of this second cross-over depends on the roughness and the elastic stiffness. The statistical distribution of ballistic flight distances is analysed, and is shown to reveal in all cases the self-affinity of the contacting surfaces. Nous analysons la dépendence en vitesse du frottement entre deux solides limités par une surface rugueuse auto-affine comme celle d'une surface de fracture. Le solide supérieur est soumis soit à la gravité, soit à une raideur élastique externe, et est entraîné à vitesse horizontale constante V sur le solide inférieur fixe. A faible vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent, est constant. A forte vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent devient inversement proportionnel à la vitesse. Cette dépendance peut être reliée à la variation du temps

  2. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  3. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  4. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  5. Superconductivity in alkali-metal-doped picene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamanari, Yusuke; Mitamura, Hiroki; Kambe, Takashi; Ikeda, Naoshi; Okamoto, Hideki; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yamaji, Minoru; Kawasaki, Naoko; Maniwa, Yutaka; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2010-03-04

    Efforts to identify and develop new superconducting materials continue apace, motivated by both fundamental science and the prospects for application. For example, several new superconducting material systems have been developed in the recent past, including calcium-intercalated graphite compounds, boron-doped diamond and-most prominently-iron arsenides such as LaO(1-x)F(x)FeAs (ref. 3). In the case of organic superconductors, however, no new material system with a high superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) has been discovered in the past decade. Here we report that intercalating an alkali metal into picene, a wide-bandgap semiconducting solid hydrocarbon, produces metallic behaviour and superconductivity. Solid potassium-intercalated picene (K(x)picene) shows T(c) values of 7 K and 18 K, depending on the metal content. The drop of magnetization in K(x)picene solids at the transition temperature is sharp (<2 K), similar to the behaviour of Ca-intercalated graphite. The T(c) of 18 K is comparable to that of K-intercalated C(60) (ref. 4). This discovery of superconductivity in K(x)picene shows that organic hydrocarbons are promising candidates for improved T(c) values.

  6. Future of IT, PT and superconductivity technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2003-10-01

    Recently the Information Technology is developing very rapidly and the total traffic on the Internet is increasing dramatically. The numerous equipments connected to the Internet must be operated at very high-speed and the electricity consumed in the Internet is also increasing. Superconductivity devices of very high-speed and very low power consumption must be introduced. These superconducting devices will play very important roles in the future information society. Coated conductors will be used to generate extremely high magnetic fields of beyond 20 T at low temperatures. At the liquid nitrogen temperature they can find many applications in a wide range of Power Technology and other industries, since we have already large critical current and brilliant magnetic field dependences in some prototypes of coated conductors. It is becoming certain that the market for the superconductivity technology will be opened between the years of 2005 and 2010.

  7. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  8. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  9. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. X.; Wei, L. F.; Johansson, J. R.; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the ``vibrational'' mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a superconducting quantum interference device). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings and/or decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way. [4pt] Y.X. Liu, L.F. Wei, J.R. Johansson, J.S. Tsai, F. Nori, Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions, Phys. Rev. B 76, 144518 (2007). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v76/e144518

  10. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  11. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  12. Friction Modeling in Concentric Tube Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jesse; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-01-01

    Concentric tube robots are a novel class of continuum robots that are constructed by combining pre-curved elastic tubes such that the overall shape of the robot is a function of the relative rotations and translations of the constituent tubes. Frictionless kinematic and quasistatic force models for this class of robots have been developed that incorporate bending and twisting of the tubes. Experimental evaluation of these models has revealed, however, a directional dependence of tube rotation on robot shape that is not predicted by these models. To explain this behavior, this paper models the contributions of friction arising from two sources: the distributed forces of contact between the tubes along their length and the concentrated bending moments generated at discontinuities in curvature and at the boundaries. It is shown that while friction due to distributed forces is insufficient to explain the experimentally observed tube twisting, a simple model of frictional torque arising from concentrated moments provides a good match with the experimental data.

  13. Anisotropic effect of appearing superconductivity on the electron transport in FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Sinchenko, A. A.; Kesharpu, K. K.; Shakin, A.; Mogilyuk, T. I.; Orlov, A. P.; Frolov, A. V.; Lyubshin, D. S.; Chareev, D. A.; Volkova, O. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2017-06-01

    A theoretical model has been proposed to describe the conductivity of a layered anisotropic normal metal containing small superconducting inclusions at an arbitrary eccentricity of spheroidal superconducting islands. The electron transport and magnetic properties of FeSe single crystals have been measured. The results indicate the existence of superconductivity at temperatures much higher than the critical superconducting transition temperature corresponding to vanishing electrical resistance. Within the proposed model, quantitative agreement has been achieved between the volume fraction of superconducting inclusions and its temperature dependence determined from the transport and magnetic measurements.

  14. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  15. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Pickett, Galen T

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  16. Quantifying the Frictional Forces between Skin and Nonwoven Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardana, Kavinda; Ovenden, Nicholas C.; Cottenden, Alan

    2017-01-01

    When a compliant sheet of material is dragged over a curved surface of a body, the frictional forces generated can be many times greater than they would be for a planar interface. This phenomenon is known to contribute to the abrasion damage to skin often suffered by wearers of incontinence pads and bed/chairbound people susceptible to pressure sores. Experiments that attempt to quantify these forces often use a simple capstan-type equation to obtain a characteristic coefficient of friction. In general, the capstan approach assumes the ratio of applied tensions depends only on the arc of contact and the coefficient of friction, and ignores other geometric and physical considerations; this approach makes it straightforward to obtain explicitly a coefficient of friction from the tensions measured. In this paper, two mathematical models are presented that compute the material displacements and surface forces generated by, firstly, a membrane under tension in moving contact with a rigid obstacle and, secondly, a shell-membrane under tension in contact with a deformable substrate. The results show that, while the use of a capstan equation remains fairly robust in some cases, effects such as the curvature and flaccidness of the underlying body, and the mass density of the fabric can lead to significant variations in stresses generated in the contact region. Thus, the coefficient of friction determined by a capstan model may not be an accurate reflection of the true frictional behavior of the contact region. PMID:28321192

  17. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  18. Test equipment for a flywheel energy storage system using a magnetic bearing composed of superconducting coils and superconducting bulks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, M.; Matsue, H.; Yamashita, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Nagashima, K.; Maeda, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Mukoyama, S.; Shimizu, H.; Horiuchi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Energy storage systems are necessary for renewable energy sources such as solar power in order to stabilize their output power, which fluctuates widely depending on the weather. Since ‘flywheel energy storage systems’ (FWSSs) do not use chemical reactions, they do not deteriorate due to charge or discharge. This is an advantage of FWSSs in applications for renewable energy plants. A conventional FWSS has capacity limitation because of the mechanical bearings used to support the flywheel. Therefore, we have designed a superconducting magnetic bearing composed of a superconducting coil stator and a superconducting bulk rotor in order to solve this problem, and have experimentally manufactured a large scale FWSS with a capacity of 100 kWh and an output power of 300 kW. The superconducting magnetic bearing can levitate 4 tons and enables the flywheel to rotate smoothly. A performance confirmation test will be started soon. An overview of the superconducting FWSS is presented in this paper.

  19. A study on the frictional response of reptilian shed skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; Vargiolu, R.; Zahouani, H.; El Mansori, M.

    2011-08-01

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined tribological response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its tribological behaviour according to the evolution of sliding conditions. In seeking inspirations for such designs, many engineers are turning toward the biological world to study the construction and behaviour of bio-analogues, and to probe the role surface topography assumes in conditioning of frictional response. That is how a bio-analogue can self-adjust its tribological response to adapt to habitat constraints. From a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a snake (Python regius). The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakes. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the backward direction. Diagonal and side winding motion induces a different value of the friction coefficient. We discuss the origin of such a phenomenon in relation to surface texturing and study the energy constraints, implied by anisotropic friction, on the motion of the reptile.

  20. Kinetic Friction Coefficient of Ice,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    For the hardest ice tested (xi = 0.33 described by Rabinowicz (1965), where To is inter- mm, H, = 1525 kPa), the calculated values of a preted as...material with a low elastic pressures. The frictional force was measured at modulus ( Rabinowicz 1965). It has been observed the application point of...tion 10, pp. 8-16. Barnes, P. and D. Tabor (1966) Plastic flow and Rabinowicz , E. (1965) Friction and Wear of Mate- pressure melting in the deformation

  1. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    1995-01-01

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  2. Tire/runway friction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  3. Labor Supply and Optimization Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I investigate the nature of optimization frictions by studying the labor market of Danish students. This particular labor market is an interesting case study as it features a range of special institutional settings that affect students’ incentive to earn income and comparing outcomes...... theory. More concretely I find the dominate optimization friction to be individuals’ inattention about their earnings during the year, while real adjustment cost and gradual learning appears to be of less importance....

  4. Laboratory experiment for the study of friction forces using rotating apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kladivová, Mária; Kovaľaková, Mária; Gibová, Zuzana; Fričová, Oľga; Hutníková, Mária; Kecer, Ján

    2016-11-01

    The standard experimental set-up enabling observation of rotational motion of a bar around its centre of mass, which is set into motion due to the external torque generated by the small weight, was extended with an optical gate and position sensor and connected to a computer with software, which made it possible to display measured values of bar half-rotations during accelerated and decelerated motion as well as to process the data immediately. The detailed analysis of experimental data obtained for decelerated rotational motion due to frictional torque only (without small weight) showed that, besides the constant term due to dry friction at an axle, the expression for friction forces in the system has to include terms depending on the first and/or second power of angular speed, which is evidence that viscous forces influence the motion of a bar. The frictional torque due to viscous forces can be evaluated as the difference between the effective frictional torque acting on the system and the frictional torque due to dry friction at an axle. The data obtained in the experiment in which the bar performed damped oscillatory motion provided the values of effective frictional torque and the moment of inertia of rotating bodies. The frictional torque due to dry friction can be obtained as a minimum torque (calculated using minimum mass of weight) needed to start rotational motion. The last two proposed experiments can be included in undergraduate laboratory practicals.

  5. The effect of elastic modulus and friction coefficient on rubber tube sealing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhimiao; Xu, Siyuan; Ren, Fushen; Liu, Jubao

    2015-03-01

    The packer is the key element in separating geosphere layers of water injection, water plugging and fracturing operations in the oilfield. The sealing ability of the packer is depending on the contact pressure between rubber tube and the casing. The circumferential strain of casing wall was tested by the strain gauge to get the contact pressure distribution along axial direction of the tube. The friction force between the casing and the rubber tube was taken by the pressure sensor in compression process. Under the 20,60 and 100 degrees Celsius conditions, the friction forces and the contact pressure distribution were taken in work condition of single rubber tube, double rubber tubes and combination rubber tubes after oil immersion .The result shows that elastic modulus of rubber tube has little effect on the friction force and contact pressure. With elastic modulus decreasing, the friction forces has gradually decreasing trend; The friction coefficient has much impact on friction force: the friction forces under the condition of dry friction and wet friction are respectively equivalent to 48.27% and 5.38% axial compression forces. At wet friction condition, the contact pressure distribution is more uniform and the sealing effect is better.

  6. Higher order mode spectra and the dependence of localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position in third harmonic superconducting cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    An electron beam entering an accelerating cavity excites a wakefield. This wakefield can be decomposed into a series of multi-poles or modes. The dominant component of the transverse wakefield is dipole. This report summarizes the higher order mode (HOM) signals of the third harmonic cavities of FLASH measured at various stages: transmission measurements in the single cavity test stand at Fermilab, at CMTB (Cryo- Module Test Bench) and at FLASH, and beam-excited measurements at FLASH. Modes in the first two dipole bands and the fifth dipole band have been identified using a global Lorentzian fit technique. The beam-pipe modes at approximately 4 GHz and some modes in the fifth dipole band have been observed as localized modes, while the first two dipole bands, containing some strong coupling cavity modes, propagate. This report also presents the dependence of the localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position. Linear dependence for various modes has been observed. This makes them suitable for beam position diagnostics. These modes, together with some propagating, strong coupling modes, have been considered in the design of a dedicated electronics for beam diagnostics with HOMs for the third harmonic cavities.

  7. Momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling and self-energy effects in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 within the local density approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter; Zeyher, Roland; Manske, Dirk

    2008-04-04

    Using the local density approximation and a realistic phonon spectrum we determine the momentum and frequency dependence of alpha(2)F(k,omega) in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) for the bonding, antibonding, and chain band. The resulting self-energy Sigma is rather small near the Fermi surface. For instance, for the antibonding band the maximum of ReSigma as a function of frequency is about 7 meV at the nodal point in the normal state and the ratio of bare and renormalized Fermi velocities is 1.18. These values are a factor of 3-5 too small compared to the experiment showing that only a small part of Sigma can be attributed to phonons. Furthermore, the frequency dependence of the renormalization factor Z(k,omega) is smooth and has no anomalies at the observed kink frequencies which means that phonons cannot produce well-pronounced kinks in stoichiometric YBa(2)Cu()3)O(7), at least, within the local density approximation.

  8. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Ken Mao

    2013-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented us...

  9. Effect of boundary vibration on the frictional behavior of a dense sheared granular layer

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdowsi, B; Guyer, R A; Johnson, P A; Carmeliet, J

    2014-01-01

    We report results of 3D Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations aiming at investigating the role of the boundary vibration in inducing frictional weakening in sheared granular layers. We study the role of different vibration amplitudes applied at various shear stress levels, for a granular layer in the stick-slip regime and in the steady-sliding regime. Results are reported in terms of friction drops and kinetic energy release associated with frictional weakening events. We find that larger vibration amplitude induces larger frictional weakening events. The results show evidence of a threshold below which no induced frictional weakening takes place. Friction drop size is found to be dependent on the shear stress at the time of vibration. A significant increase in the ratio between the number of slipping contacts to the number of sticking contacts in the granular layer is observed for large vibration amplitudes. These vibration-induced contact rearrangements enhance particle mobilization and induces a fricti...

  10. Third harmonics in the minor loop of a sintered Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting disk and its dc-field dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Makino, Y.; Watanabe, N.; Rao, K.V. (Department of Solid State Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden (SE))

    1990-05-01

    We have investigated the low-field {ital M}-{ital H} minor loop of a sintered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} disk ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}=87 K at {ital R}=0) at liquid nitrogen temperatures both in the zero-field and field-cooled states. It is found that the {ital M}-{ital H} minor loop is of the Rayleigh type with only {ital odd} {ital harmonics} of the Fourier series as is well known in ferromagnetic materials. The third harmonic component shows a dc-bias field dependence with symmetric and asymmetric hysteresis in the respective zero-field and low field-cooled states. These results are qualitatively explained in terms of the vortex dynamics and the associated losses in an external bias field.

  11. Scaling laws of gelatin hydrogels for steady dynamic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinit; Singh, Arun K.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we use population balance based dynamic friction model for steady sliding to develop scaling laws in the terms of mesh size of gelatin hydrogels. First of all, it is observed in the sliding experiments that shear modulus of gelatin hydrogels depends on sliding velocity. This dependence is more evident in the case of low sliding velocity. Moreover, relaxation time constant of a dangling chain at the sliding interface scales with the same exponent as its stiffness. The scaling law is also developed for chain density and viscous retardation at the sliding interface. It is also established that the Hookean-based dynamic friction model is sufficient to study frictional behaviour of hydrogels. The reason for this observation is attributed to the weak bonding between a gelatin hydrogel and glass interface.

  12. Coherence properties in superconducting flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele

    2015-02-16

    The research work discussed in this thesis deals with the study of superconducting Josephson qubits. Superconducting qubits are solid-state artificial atoms which are based on lithographically defined Josephson tunnel junctions properties. When sufficiently cooled, these superconducting devices exhibit quantized states of charge, flux or junction phase depending on their design parameters. This allows to observe coherent evolutions of their states. The results presented can be divided into two parts. In a first part we investigate operations of superconducting qubits based on the quantum coherence in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID). We explain experimental data which has been observed in a SQUID subjected to fast, large-amplitude modifications of its effective potential shape. The motivations for this work come from the fact that in the past few years there have been attempts to interpret the supposed quantum behavior of physical systems, such as Josephson devices, within a classical framework. Moreover, we analyze the possibility of generating GHZ states, namely maximally entangled states, in a quantum system made out of three Josephson qubits. In particular, we investigate the possible limitations of the GHZ state generation due to coupling to bosonic baths. In the second part of the thesis we address a particular cause of decoherence of flux qubits which has been disregarded until now: thermal gradients, which can arise due to accidental non equilibrium quasiparticle distributions. The reason for these detrimental effects is that heat currents flowing through Josephson tunnel junctions in response to a temperature gradient are periodic functions of the phase difference between the electrodes. The phase dependence of the heat current comes from Andreev reflection, namely an interplay between the quasiparticles which carry heat and the superconducting condensate which is sensitive to the superconducting phase difference. Generally speaking

  13. Roughness effects on the sliding frictional force of submonolayer liquid films on solid substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Widom, A.

    1998-01-01

    The sliding frictional force of a liquid submonolayer in contact with a random rough surface in an oscillatory motion is considered. The frictional force is proportional to the square of the sliding velocity v, Ff~v^2, with a proportionality factor that depends on the particular roughness configurat

  14. Jerky-type phenomena at nanocomposite surfaces : The breakdown of the coulomb friction law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosson, Jeff T.M. De; Pei, Yutao; Chen, Changqiang

    This article concentrates on the jerky-type phenomenon of surfaces in relative motion (i.e., a breakdown of the Coulomb friction law) in nanocomposite materials. Physical arguments are provided to understand the dependence of friction on sliding velocity in the sense of self-lubrication. Also

  15. Nanoscience and Engineering in Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Lang, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    For emerging energy saving technologies, superconducting materials with superior performance are needed. Such materials can be developed by manipulating the 'elementary building blocks' through nanostructuring. For superconductivity the 'elementary blocks' are Cooper pair and fluxon (vortex). This book presents new ways how to modify superconductivity and vortex matter through nanostructuring and the use of nanoscale magnetic templates. The basic nano-effects, vortex and vortex-antivortex patterns, vortex dynamics, Josephson phenomena, critical currents, and interplay between superconductivity

  16. Stability of sliding frictional surfaces with varying normal force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, P.E.; Bapna, D. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1994-04-01

    This paper presents the stability analysis of a single degree-of-freedom elastic system following a rate- and state-dependent friction law. Normal force is assumed to depend on the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of the sliding interface. The history dependence of friction on normal force is included in the analysis. It is shown that to achieve steady sliding, system stiffness must exceed a critical value which depends on the expression for normal force. A system in which normal force depends on spring displacement is analyzed in detail. These results indicate that the functional dependence of normal force on system state can have a significant effect on the stability of low-velocity motion. 15 refs.

  17. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  18. Superconductivity below 120 K of new thallium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, B.; Sulpice, A.; Tournier, R.; Hervieu, M.; Maignan, A.; Martin, C.; Michel, C.; Provost, J.; Raveau, B.

    1989-05-01

    Well-cristallized Tl/sub 2/Ba/sub 2/CaCu/sub 2/0/sub 8/ phases have been observed superconducting or normal below 108 K depending on their stoichiometry. This observation is an evidence that a (Cu/sup ii/-0/sup -/) mixed valence induced by vacancies or substitutions on different sites gives rise to superconductivity in this phase. The new phase TlBa/sub 2/Ca/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 9/ which intrinsically contains a mixed valence has been observed as having a sharp transition to bulk superconductivity in the Meissner effect at a critical temperature of 120 K.

  19. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  20. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  1. A possible origin of superconducting currents in cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez, H; Chavez, Helder; Masperi, Luis

    2002-01-01

    The scattering and capture of right-handed neutrinos by an Abelian cosmic string in the SO(10) grand unification model are considered. The scattering cross-section of neutrinos per unit length due to the interaction with the gauge and Higgs fields of the string is much larger in its scaling regime than in the friction one because of the larger infrared cutoff of the former.The probability of capture in a zero mode of the string accompanied by the emission of a gauge or Higgs boson shows a resonant peak for neutrino momentum of the order of its mass. Considering the decrease of number of strings per unit comoving volume in the scaling epoch the cosmological consequences of the superconducting strings formed in this regime will be much smaller than those which could be produced already in the friction one.

  2. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in homogeneously disordered superconducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, E. J.; Levchenko, A.; Protopopov, I. V.; Gornyi, I. V.; Burmistrov, I. S.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a theory for the vortex-unbinding transition in homogeneously disordered superconducting films. This theory incorporates the effects of quantum, mesoscopic, and thermal fluctuations stemming from length scales ranging from the superconducting coherence length down to the Fermi wavelength. In particular, we extend the renormalization group treatment of the diffusive nonlinear sigma model to the superconducting side of the transition. Furthermore, we explore the mesoscopic fluctuations of parameters in the Ginzburg-Landau functional. Using the developed theory, we determine the dependence of essential observables (including the vortex-unbinding temperature, the superconducting density, as well as the temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conductivity) on microscopic characteristics such as the disorder-induced scattering rate and bare interaction couplings.

  3. Failed theories of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalian, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kammerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer. During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of the scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

  4. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  5. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  6. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  7. Normal zone propagation in adiabatic superconducting magnets: Pt. 1; Normal zone propagation velocity in superconducting composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.P.; Iwasa, Y. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center)

    1991-09-01

    A normal zone propagation model has been developed for superconducting composites under adiabatic conditions. It is based on the Whetstone-Roos model, originally developed for normal zone propagation in adiabatic wires of unclad superconductor. The model takes into account the temperature and magnetic field dependent material properties, for both superconductor and matrix metal. Analytical results agree well with experimental data. (author).

  8. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  9. Onset of Vortices in Thin Superconducting Strips and Wires

    CERN Document Server

    Aranson, I S; Shapiro, B Y

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation and the consequent penetration of vortices into thin superconducting films and wires, subjected to a magnetic field, can be considered as a nonlinear stage of primary instability of the current-carrying superconducting state. The development of the instability leads to the formation of a chain of vortices in strips and helicoidal vortex lines in wires. The boundary of instability was obtained analytically. The nonlinear stage was investigated by simulations of the time-dependent generalized Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  10. Novel Majorana mode and magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic superconducting topological insulator

    OpenAIRE

    Goudarzi, Hadi; Khezerlou, Maryam; Asgarifar, Samin

    2017-01-01

    Among the potential applications of topological insulators, we investigate theoretically the effect of coexistence of proximity-induced ferromagnetism and superconductivity on the surface states of 3-dimensional topological insulator, where the superconducting electron-hole excitations can be significantly affected by the magnetization of ferromagnetic order. We find that, Majorana mode energy, as a verified feature of TI F/S structure, along the interface sensitively depends on the magnitude...

  11. Heterodyne spectroscopy with superconducting single-photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Yu. V.; Shcherbatenko, M. L.; Semenov, A. V.; Kovalyuk, V. V.; Korneev, A. A.; Goltsman, G. N.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate successful operation of a Superconducting Single Photon Detector (SSPD) as the core element in a heterodyne receiver. Irradiating the SSPD by both a local oscillator power and signal power simultaneously, we observed beat signal at the intermediate frequency of a few MHz. Gain bandwidth was found to coincide with the detector single pulse width, where the latter depends on the detector kinetic inductance, determined by the superconducting nanowire length.

  12. Heterodyne spectroscopy with superconducting single-photon detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobanov Yu.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate successful operation of a Superconducting Single Photon Detector (SSPD as the core element in a heterodyne receiver. Irradiating the SSPD by both a local oscillator power and signal power simultaneously, we observed beat signal at the intermediate frequency of a few MHz. Gain bandwidth was found to coincide with the detector single pulse width, where the latter depends on the detector kinetic inductance, determined by the superconducting nanowire length.

  13. Small scale substructure, collapse time and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Gambera, M

    1996-01-01

    We solve numerically the equations of motion for the collapse of a shell of baryonic matter, made of galaxies and substructure of $ 10^{6} M_{\\odot} \\div 10^{9} M_{\\odot}$, taking into account the dynamical friction and the parameters on which it depends: the peaks' height $\

  14. Optimization of a tribological properties of friction pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyshlovenko, S. S.; Frolov, N. D.; Kouzmin, Yr. P.; Veiko, Vadim P.

    2003-11-01

    This paper is devoted to analysis of correlation between surface microgeometry and tribological properties of friction pairs. Two experimental methods have been applied for surface microstructuring: vibrorolling and laser ablation. Dependence of different in-service characteristics on groove area has been done. Production examples are demonstrated. Preliminary comparison of laser and mechanical structuring is carried out.

  15. Temperature-Dependent Transformation of the Magnetic Excitation Spectrum on Approaching Superconductivity in Fe1+y-x(Ni/Cu)xTe0.5Se0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Zhao, Yang; Matsuda, Masaaki; Ku, Wei; Liu, Xuerong; Gu, Genda; Lee, D.-H.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Xu, Guangyong

    2012-11-01

    Spin excitations are one of the top candidates for mediating electron pairing in unconventional superconductors. Their coupling to superconductivity is evident in a large number of systems, by the observation of an abrupt redistribution of magnetic spectral weight at the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, for energies comparable to the superconducting gap. Here we report inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe-based superconductors, Fe1-x(Ni/Cu)xTe0.5Se0.5, that emphasize an additional signature. The overall shape of the low energy magnetic dispersion changes from two incommensurate vertical columns at T≫Tc to a distinctly different U-shaped dispersion at low temperature. Importantly, this spectral reconstruction is apparent for temperatures up to ˜3Tc. If the magnetic excitations are involved in the pairing mechanism, their surprising modification on the approach to Tc demonstrates that strong interactions are involved.

  16. Temperature-dependent transformation of the magnetic excitation spectrum on approaching superconductivity in Fe(1+y-x)(Ni/Cu)(x)Te(0.5)Se(0.5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Zhao, Yang; Matsuda, Masaaki; Ku, Wei; Liu, Xuerong; Gu, Genda; Lee, D-H; Birgeneau, R J; Tranquada, J M; Xu, Guangyong

    2012-11-30

    Spin excitations are one of the top candidates for mediating electron pairing in unconventional superconductors. Their coupling to superconductivity is evident in a large number of systems, by the observation of an abrupt redistribution of magnetic spectral weight at the superconducting transition temperature, T(c), for energies comparable to the superconducting gap. Here we report inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Fe-based superconductors, Fe(1+y-x)(Ni/Cu)(x)Te(0.5)Se(0.5) that emphasize an additional signature. The overall shape of the low energy magnetic dispersion changes from two incommensurate vertical columns at T≫T(c) to a distinctly different U-shaped dispersion at low temperature. Importantly, this spectral reconstruction is apparent for temperatures up to ~3T(c). If the magnetic excitations are involved in the pairing mechanism, their surprising modification on the approach to T(c) demonstrates that strong interactions are involved.

  17. Fault Frictional Stability in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Felipe; Violay, Marie; Scuderi, Marco; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Exploitation of underground resources induces hydro-mechanical and chemical perturbations in the rock mass. In response to such disturbances, seismic events might occur, affecting the safety of the whole engineering system. The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory is an underground infrastructure devoted to the study of geological disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland. At the site, it is intersected by large fault zones of about 0.8 - 3 m in thickness and the host rock formation is a shale rock named Opalinus Clay (OPA). The mineralogy of OPA includes a high content of phyllosilicates (50%), quartz (25%), calcite (15%), and smaller proportions of siderite and pyrite. OPA is a stiff, low permeable rock (2×10-18 m2), and its mechanical behaviour is strongly affected by the anisotropy induced by bedding planes. The evaluation of fault stability and associated fault slip behaviour (i.e. seismic vs. aseismic) is a major issue in order to ensure the long-term safety and operation of the repository. Consequently, experiments devoted to understand the frictional behaviour of OPA have been performed in the biaxial apparatus "BRAVA", recently developed at INGV. Simulated fault gouge obtained from intact OPA samples, were deformed at different normal stresses (from 4 to 30 MPa), under dry and fluid-saturated conditions. To estimate the frictional stability, the velocity-dependence of friction was evaluated during velocity steps tests (1-300 μm/s). Slide-hold-slide tests were performed (1-3000 s) to measure the amount of frictional healing. The collected data were subsequently modelled with the Ruina's slip dependent formulation of the rate and state friction constitutive equations. To understand the deformation mechanism, the microstructures of the sheared gouge were analysed. At 7 MPa normal stress and under dry conditions, the friction coefficient decreased from a peak value of μpeak,dry = 0.57 to μss,dry = 0.50. Under fluid-saturated conditions and same normal stress, the

  18. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, which break time-reversal symmetry. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Partly because of the lack of contact with observations, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here, we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  19. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A; Brevik, I

    2015-01-01

    For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum fluctuations. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Because of the lack of contact with phenomena, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  20. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  1. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  2. The problem of friction in two-dimensional relative motion

    CERN Document Server

    Grech, D K; Grech, Dariusz; Mazur, Zygmunt

    2000-01-01

    We analyse a mechanical system in two-dimensional relative motion with friction. Although the system is simple, the peculiar interplay between two kinetic friction forces and gravity leads to the wide range of admissible solutions exceeding most intuitive expectations. In particular, the strong qualitative dependence between behaviour of the system, boundary conditions and parameters involved in its description is emphasised. The problem is intended to be discussed in theoretical framework and might be of interest for physics and mechanics students as well as for physics teachers.

  3. Improve Simulation of Plain Bearings in Dry and Mixed Lubrication Regime by Defining Locally Resolved Dry Friction Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schneider

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Asperity friction is a main indicator for wear and heat conduction [1]. It occurs when thickness of oil film shrinks due to high load or slow speed. Friction is scientifically well known as long as it is dominated by laminar oil film effects. If film thickness shrinks, the friction coefficient depends mainly on surface properties. This inaccuracy is normally preceded in simulation by using friction coefficients defined by Coulomb’s law [2]. To improve simulation results, the simulated friction moment was compared to measurement on a component test rig. Friction moment is produced on every square millimetre of the bearing surface, but can only be measured as an integral. Research findings show that measured results can’t be met by using one global dry friction coefficient for the whole bearing surface, even though it is material dependent. By introducing locally resolved and asperity pressure dependent dry friction coefficients, it was possible to adapt the simulated friction moment to measure one with a deviation of less than 5 percent. By means of simulation it was possible to develop locally resolved results based on integral measurements; and improve modelling the frictional state of mixed lubrication.

  4. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  5. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    of Nb/Al- Nx /NbTiN junctions for SIS mixer applications,” IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconduct., vol. 11, pp. 76–79, Mar. 2001. [48] M. Gurvitch, W. A...Another connector developed by IBM for commercial applications using a dendritic interposer technology. A “beam-on-pad” approach developed by Siemens

  6. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  7. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  8. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  9. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  10. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  11. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  12. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  13. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  14. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  15. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  16. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  17. Superconducting doped topological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Satoshi, E-mail: sasaki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mizushima, Takeshi, E-mail: mizushima@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Studies on both normal- and SC-state properties of doped topological materials. • Odd-parity pairing systems with the time-reversal-invariance. • Robust superconductivity in the presence of nonmagnetic impurity scattering. • We propose experiments to identify the existence of Majorana fermions in these SCs. - Abstract: Recently, the search for Majorana fermions (MFs) has become one of the most important and exciting issues in condensed matter physics since such an exotic quasiparticle is expected to potentially give rise to unprecedented quantum phenomena whose functional properties will be used to develop future quantum technology. Theoretically, the MFs may reside in various types of topological superconductor materials that is characterized by the topologically protected gapless surface state which are essentially an Andreev bound state. Superconducting doped topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators are promising candidates to harbor the MFs. In this review, we discuss recent progress and understanding on the research of MFs based on time-reversal-invariant superconducting topological materials to deepen our understanding and have a better outlook on both the search for and realization of MFs in these systems. We also discuss some advantages of these bulk systems to realize MFs including remarkable superconducting robustness against nonmagnetic impurities.

  18. Nonlinearities in Microwave Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ledenyov, Dimitri O.; Ledenyov, Viktor O.

    2012-01-01

    The research is focused on the modeling of nonlinear properties of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) thin films, using Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Lumped Element Circuit theories, with purpose to enhance microwave power handling capabilities of microwave filters and optimize design of microwave circuits in micro- and nano- electronics.

  19. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  20. Applications of Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  1. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  2. ISR Superconducting Quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Michel Bouvier is preparing for curing the 6-pole superconducting windings inbedded in the cylindrical wall separating liquid helium from vacuum in the quadrupole aperture. The heat for curing the epoxy glue was provided by a ramp of infrared lamps which can be seen above the slowly rotating cylinder. See also 7703512X, 7702690X.

  3. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  4. Lattice parameters guide superconductivity in iron-arsenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzen, Lance M. N.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of superconducting materials has led to their use in technological marvels such as magnetic-field sensors in MRI machines, powerful research magnets, short transmission cables, and high-speed trains. Despite such applications, the uses of superconductors are not widespread because they function much below room-temperature, hence the costly cooling. Since the discovery of Cu- and Fe-based high-temperature superconductors (HTS), much intense effort has tried to explain and understand the superconducting phenomenon. While no exact explanations are given, several trends are reported in relation to the materials basis in magnetism and spin excitations. In fact, most HTS have antiferromagnetic undoped ‘parent’ materials that undergo a superconducting transition upon small chemical substitutions in them. As it is currently unclear which ‘dopants’ can favor superconductivity, this manuscript investigates crystal structure changes upon chemical substitutions, to find clues in lattice parameters for the superconducting occurrence. We review the chemical substitution effects on the crystal lattice of iron-arsenide-based crystals (2008 to present). We note that (a) HTS compounds have nearly tetragonal structures with a-lattice parameter close to 4 Å, and (b) superconductivity can depend strongly on the c-lattice parameter changes with chemical substitution. For example, a decrease in c-lattice parameter is required to induce ‘in-plane’ superconductivity. The review of lattice parameter trends in iron-arsenides presented here should guide synthesis of new materials and provoke theoretical input, giving clues for HTS.

  5. Unconventional high-Tc superconductivity in fullerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Yasuhiro; Prassides, Kosmas

    2016-09-13

    A3C60 molecular superconductors share a common electronic phase diagram with unconventional high-temperature superconductors such as the cuprates: superconductivity emerges from an antiferromagnetic strongly correlated Mott-insulating state upon tuning a parameter such as pressure (bandwidth control) accompanied by a dome-shaped dependence of the critical temperature, Tc However, unlike atom-based superconductors, the parent state from which superconductivity emerges solely by changing an electronic parameter-the overlap between the outer wave functions of the constituent molecules-is controlled by the C60 (3-) molecular electronic structure via the on-molecule Jahn-Teller effect influence of molecular geometry and spin state. Destruction of the parent Mott-Jahn-Teller state through chemical or physical pressurization yields an unconventional Jahn-Teller metal, where quasi-localized and itinerant electron behaviours coexist. Localized features gradually disappear with lattice contraction and conventional Fermi liquid behaviour is recovered. The nature of the underlying (correlated versus weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory) s-wave superconducting states mirrors the unconventional/conventional metal dichotomy: the highest superconducting critical temperature occurs at the crossover between Jahn-Teller and Fermi liquid metal when the Jahn-Teller distortion melts.This article is part of the themed issue 'Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene'.

  6. Effects of tempering on internal friction of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyos, J.J., E-mail: jjhoyos@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Ciencia y Tecnologia de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Carrera 80 Numero 65-223, Medellin (Colombia); Ghilarducci, A.A., E-mail: friccion@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Instituto Balseiro-Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche RN (Argentina); Salva, H.R., E-mail: salva@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Instituto Balseiro-Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche RN (Argentina); Chaves, C.A., E-mail: cachaves@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Ciencia y Tecnologia de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Carrera 80 Numero 65-223, Medellin (Colombia); Velez, J.M., E-mail: jmvelez@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Ciencia y Tecnologia de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Carrera 80 Numero 65-223, Medellin (Colombia)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Time tempering dependent microstructure of two steels is studied by internal friction. {yields} Internal friction indicates the interactions of dislocations with carbon and carbides. {yields} Internal friction detects the first stage of tempering. {yields} Precipitation hardening is detected by the decrease in the background. - Abstract: Two steels containing 0.626 and 0.71 wt.% carbon have been studied to determine the effects of tempering on the microstructure and the internal friction. The steels were annealed at 1093 K, quenched into water and tempered for 60 min at 423 K, 573 K and 723 K. The increase of the tempering time diminishes the martensite tetragonality due to the redistribution of carbon atoms from octahedrical interstitial sites to dislocations. Internal friction spectrum is decomposed into five peaks and an exponential background, which are attributed to the carbide precipitation and the dislocation relaxation process. Simultaneous presence of peaks P1 and P2 indicates the interaction of dislocations with the segregated carbon and carbide precipitate.

  7. Static friction between silicon nanowires and elastomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qingquan; Zhu, Yong

    2011-09-27

    This paper reports the first direct measurements of static friction force and interfacial shear strength between silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). A micromanipulator is used to manipulate and deform the NWs under a high-magnification optical microscope in real time. The static friction force is measured based on "the most-bent state" of the NWs. The static friction and interface shear strength are found to depend on the ultraviolet/ozone (UVO) treatment of PDMS. The shear strength starts at 0.30 MPa without UVO treatment, increases rapidly up to 10.57 MPa at 60 min of treatment and decreases for longer treatment. Water contact angle measurements suggest that the UVO-induced hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion of PDMS surface is responsible for the increase in the static friction, while the hydrophobic recovery effect contributes to the decrease. The static friction between NWs and PDMS is of critical relevance to many device applications of NWs including NW-based flexible/stretchable electronics, NW assembly and nanocomposites (e.g., supercapacitors). Our results will enable quantitative interface design and control for such applications.

  8. Microstructural evolution of 6063 aluminum during friction-stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y.S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Processing; Enomoto, Masatoshi [Showa Aluminum Corp., Oyama City, Tochigi (Japan); Jogan, Shigetoshi [Showa Aluminum Corp., Sakai, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The microstructural distribution associated with a hardness profile in a friction-stir-welded, age-hardenable 6063 aluminum alloy has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The friction-stir process produces a softened region in the 6063 Al weld. Frictional heating and plastic flow during friction-stir welding create fine recrystallized grains in the weld zone and recovered grains in the thermomechanically affected zone. The hardness profile depends greatly on the precipitate distribution and only slightly on the grain size. The softened region is characterized by dissolution and growth of the precipitates during the welding. Simulated weld thermal cycles with different peak temperatures have shown that the precipitates are dissolved at temperatures higher than 675 K and that the density of the strengthening precipitate was reduced by thermal cycles lower than 675 K. A comparison between the thermal cycles and isothermal aging has suggested precipitation sequences in the softened region during friction-stir welding.

  9. Nanoscale friction as a function of activation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, W. W. F.; Rahnejat, H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the scale-dependence of friction is increasingly viewed as a critical quest. With progressively thinner films, mixed and boundary regimes of lubrication have become commonplace. Therefore, at the micro-scale a greater need for mitigating friction is desired in order to improve operational efficiency of many machines and mechanisms. Furthermore, there is a growing tendency to use low friction hard wear-resistant advanced coatings to guard against wear. In parallel, there has been much attention paid to lubricant rheology and formulation. However, only in recent times there has been an emerging view of lubricant-surface combination as a system. In this perspective it is essential to relate the observed and measured friction at component level to the underlying interactions in micro/nano-scales. This is the approach in this paper. Observed phenomenon at micro-scale are related back to the activation energies of lubricant-surface system, providing in particular results for surface modified Ni-SiC coated specimen in combination with formulated lubricants, the combination of which represent the lubricant-surface system of choice in cylinders of high performance race engine. The nano-scale conjunction of an AFM tip with lubricated surface-engineered specimen, subjected to various conjunctional loading and sliding kinematics is investigated. It is shown that the measured frictional characteristics can be adequately described in terms of activation energies in line with the Eyring’s thermal activation model for cases of fairly smooth asperity tip contact conjunctions.

  10. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Study of Friction Loss in Hydrostatic Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rasmus Mørk; Hansen, Michael R.; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.

    2012-01-01

    . This is done by means of additional pressure volumes that in uence the stator de ection. These pressures are referred to as compensation pressures and the main emphasis is on friction or torque loss modeling of the motor as a function of the compensation pressures and the high and low pressures related...... to the load torque. The torque loss modeling is identied as a Stribeck curve which depends on gap height. The asperity friction is decreasing exponentially with an increase in gap height. The parameters of the torque loss model are based on prototype measurements that include the structural de ections......This paper presents a numerical and experimental study of the losses in a hydrostatic motor principle. The motor is designed so that the structural de ections and lubricating regimes between moving surfaces and, subsequently, the leakage and friction losses, can be controlled during operation...

  12. Rotational and frictional dynamics of the slamming of a door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Pascal; Müller, Andreas; Gröber, Sebastian; Molz, Alexander; Kuhn, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the rotational dynamics, including friction, of a slamming door is presented. Based on existing work regarding different damping models for rotational and oscillatory motions, we examine different forms for the (angular) velocity dependence (ωn, n = 0, 1, 2) of the frictional force. An analytic solution is given when all three friction terms are present and several solutions for specific cases known from the literature are reproduced. The motion of a door is investigated experimentally using a smartphone, and the data are compared with the theoretical results. A laboratory experiment under more controlled conditions is conducted to gain a deeper understanding of the movement of a slammed door. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that damping models involving quadratic air drag are most appropriate for the slamming of a door. Examining this everyday example of a physical phenomenon increases student motivation, because they can relate it to their own personal experience.

  13. Wear and Friction Behavior of Metal Impregnated Microporous Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, Gultekin; Koty, D. P.; Tewari, S. N.; Singh, M.; Tekin, A.

    1996-01-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been prepared by pressure-infiltration casting of copper-base alloy melts into microporous carbon preforms. The carbon preforms contained varying proportions of amorphous carbon and graphite. Load dependence of the wear and friction behavior of the composite pins has been examined under ambient conditions against cast-iron plates, using a pin-on-plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance of the composite is significantly improved, as compared with the base alloy. Contrary to the normally expected behavior, the addition of graphite to the amorphous carbon does not reduce the friction coefficient, especially at high loads. The wear and friction behavior of the composites is very sensitive to the size and distribution of the microstructural constituents.

  14. Functional-Friction Networks: New Insights on the Laboratory Earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2013-01-01

    We formulate the universality of regular precursor rupture fronts in functional network parameter space, in light of recent analysis of acoustics emissions-coupled friction experimental results. Furthermore, using a phenomenological approach based on friction networks, we propose that the energy of the ruptures can be extended in terms of networks motifs and the transition from regular rupture to slow deformation can have a third production from the critical rupture class, comparable with the direct observations of this phenomena in the transparent samples . Based on this model, the transition from slow ruptures (i.e., creep pulse) to the critical speeds of ruptures is possible. In addition, the evolution of arrested rupture fronts is inspected through a statistical-network modelling which sheds light on the communities evolution. We propose a phase diagram for the friction networks which depends on the scaling coefficients of scalar parameters and can show a transition towards the capturing of the links by a...

  15. Antiferromagnetic exchange mechanism of superconductivity in cuprates

    CERN Document Server

    Plakida, N M

    2001-01-01

    One examines theory of superconducting coupling resulted from antiferromagnetic exchange in terms of which one explains strong dependence of T sub c superconducting transition temperature on alpha lattice constant. Calculations are based on the Hubbard p-d two-region model within strong correlation limit. DELTA pd excitation high energy at antiferromagnetic exchange of two particles from different Hubbard subregions results in suppression o delay effects and in coupling of all particles in conductivity subregion with Fermi energy E sub F >= DELTA pd : T sub c approx = E sub F exp(-1/lambda), where lambda propor to J. T sub c (alpha) and isotopic effect are explained by J exchange interaction dependence on alpha and on zero oscillations of oxygen ions

  16. Nonclassical correlations in superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliore, Rosanna [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); CNR-INFM, UdR CNISM di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Scala, Matteo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Guccione, Marina; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Messina, Antonino [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    A key step on the road map to solid-state quantum information processing (and to a deeper understanding of many counterintuitive aspects of quantum mechanics) is the generation and manipulation of nonclassical correlations between different quantum systems. Within this framework, we analyze the possibility of generating maximally entangled states in a system of two superconducting flux qubits, as well as the effectof their own environments on the entanglement dynamics. The analysis reported here confirms that the phenomena of sudden birth and sudden death of the entanglement do not depend on the particular measure of the entanglement adopted (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Study of multipacting effect in superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; ZHAO Ming-Hua

    2008-01-01

    A number of superconducting cavities of axis-symmetric geometry have been considered to study the effect in order to achieve the desired performance.It is shown that the multipacting effect is strongly dependent on the condition of the RF surface and can be suppressed with reconsideration of the geometry.The simulation result is compared with the result of the semi-analytical model in the end.

  18. Method for detecting superconducting stripes in high-temperature superconductors based on nonlinear resistivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Rodrigo A; Martin, Ivar

    2011-09-16

    We theoretically study the effect that stripelike superconducting inclusions would have on the nonlinear resistivity in single crystals. Even if the stripe orientation varies throughout the sample between two orthogonal directions due to twinning, we predict that there should be a universal dependence of the nonlinear resistivity on the angle between the applied current and the crystal axes. This prediction can be used to test the existence of superconducting stripes at and above the superconducting transition temperature in cuprate superconductors.

  19. The oxygen isotope effect on critical temperature in superconducting copper oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Mourachkine, A.

    2003-01-01

    The isotope effect provided a crucial key to the development of the BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) microscopic theory of superconductivity for conventional superconductors. In superconducting cooper oxides (cuprates) showing an unconventional type of superconductivity, the oxygen isotope effect is very peculiar: the exponential coefficient strongly depends on doping level. No consensus has been reached so far on the origin of the isotope effect in the cuprates. Here we show that the oxygen i...

  20. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

  1. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...

  2. Frictional heating of tribological contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Johannes

    1995-01-01

    Wherever friction occurs, mechanical energy is transformed into heat. The tem­ perature rise associated with this heating can have an important influence on the tribological behaviour of the contacting components. Apart from determining per­ formance, thermal phenomena affect reliability and may cau

  3. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan none tetrazene 407913 tetrazene 7902454 The mixes which were tested are: NOL 130 (basic lead styphnate , barium nitrate, lead...azide, tetrazene, and antimony sulfide); PA 100 (normal lead styphnate , barium nitrate, tetrazene, lead dioxide, calcium silicide, and antimony...styuhnate, basic lead styphnate , potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan, and tetrazene were tested to determine the- 10% and 50% probability of friction

  4. Rotary Engine Friction Test Rig Development Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    5  4.  Friction Rig Development 7  5.  AutoCAD ...Figure 4. Engine friction test rig AutoCAD model. ........................................................................8  Figure 5. Engine...top dead center. 8 5. AutoCAD Model Development A model of the rotary engine friction test rig was developed to determine the optimal

  5. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Ganguly; Raji George

    2008-02-01

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to wear and shows good temperature stability.

  6. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  7. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  8. Design of new frictional testing machine for shallow fault materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadai, O.; Tanikawa, W.; Hirose, T.; Sakaguchi, M.; Lin, W.

    2009-12-01

    Subduction thrust faults at shallow depth mainly consist of granular and clay-rich materials which strengths are influenced by the presence of pore water. Dilatation and pore pressure generation of fault zones by the dynamic friction will increase the volumetric water content in fault zone, which can assist the fault weakening by acoustic fluidization or hydrodynamic lubrication mechanism. Therefore the evaluation of rheology for clay minerals rich in pore water is critical for understanding of seismic behaviors at shallow depth. Here, we introduce a new testing apparatus for the purpose of accurate evaluation of friction behavior for incohesive fault rock materials. Our machine can shear granular materials up to 80 mm of outer diameter and maximum thickness of 40 mm. The capacities of axial load, torque, and motor are 100kN, 500Nm and 30kW, respectively, and pore pressure is increased up to 50 MPa. Maximum rotation speed is 660 rpm, which is equivalent to 1 m/s of the average slip velocity when sample diameter is 60 mm. We can monitor the dynamic changes of pore pressure and temperature at sliding surface during the friction tests. We can also control the pore pressure, axial load, pore pressure and temperature independently. All parameters can be held at targeted values and be generated at constant incremental velocity. We can control the rotation more sensitively to program the complicated rotation history that slip velocity and acceleration change during the rotation. We used powdered smectite and illite in our friction tests. We measured normal stress dependence on shear stress at normal stress up to 25 MPa with a constant rotation speed from 0.01 to 1 rpm. Normal stress is proportional to shear stress for dry clay minerals, and the friction coefficients are from 0.3 to 0.5. On the other hand, very low friction is observed in clay minerals saturated by water, and shear strength is nearly constant at various normal stresses. Our results suggest that clay

  9. The effect of interlayers on dissimilar friction weld properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Zepeda, Cuauhtemoc

    The influence of silver interlayers on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of dissimilar aluminium alloy/stainless steel friction welds are investigated. An elastic contact model is proposed that explains the conditions at and close to the contact surface, which produce Al2O3 particle fracture in dissimilar MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel friction welds. Intermixed (IM) and particle dispersed (PD) regions are formed in Ag-containing dissimilar friction welds. These regions form very early in the joining operation and both contain Ag3Al. Therefore, an interlayer (Ag) introduced with the specific aim of preventing FexAly compound formation in MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel friction welds promotes the formation of another intermetallic phase at the bondline. Since IM and PD regions are progressively removed as the friction welding operation proceeds thinner intermetallic layers are produced when long friction welding times are applied. This type of behavior is quite different from that observed in silver-free dissimilar MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel welds. Nanoparticles of silver are formed in dissimilar MMC/Ag/AISI 304 stainless steel welds produced using low friction pressures. Nanoparticle formation in dissimilar friction welds has never been previously observed or investigated. The introduction of silver interlayers decreases heat generation during welding, produces narrower softened zone regions and improved notch tensile strength properties. All research to-date has assumed per se that joint mechanical properties wholly depend on the mechanical properties and width of the intermetallic layer formed at the dissimilar joint interface. However, it is shown in this thesis that the mechanical properties of MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel joints are determined by the combined effects of intermetallic formation at the bondline and softened zone formation in MMC base material immediately adjacent to the joint interface. A methodology for calculating the notch tensile

  10. Analysis of the moment caused by friction of cardan joint. Cardan joint no friction kishinryoku kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Yagi, Shida, T. (Atsugi Unisia Corp., Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    Analyzing the vibromotive force, generated by the friction, in generation morphology, level, dynamical characteristics, etc., through measurement of joint unit friction simulation of frictional vibromotive force and on-platform measurement of propeller shaft in vibromotive force, the present report investigated the influence of friction on the vehicle in sound vibration performance. By a vibromotive force measurement system, internally equipped with a piezoelectric type force meter, frictional vibromotive force could be quantitatively grasped. The friction must be appropriately controlled, because the moment, generated by it, is expected to be put in the vehicle by intermediation of a supporting point and adversely influence the sound vibration performance. Apart from the above, elucidation was made of relation between the ordinal number components of rotation of vibromotive force and friction, calculation of reaction force at the supporting point by the frictional measurement, relation between the joint angle and frictional vibromotive force, second couple force due to the friction, etc. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Effect of Coulomb friction on orientational correlation and velocity distribution functions in a sheared dilute granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta; Alam, Meheboob

    2011-08-01

    From particle simulations of a sheared frictional granular gas, we show that the Coulomb friction can have dramatic effects on orientational correlation as well as on both the translational and angular velocity distribution functions even in the Boltzmann (dilute) limit. The dependence of orientational correlation on friction coefficient (μ) is found to be nonmonotonic, and the Coulomb friction plays a dual role of enhancing or diminishing the orientational correlation, depending on the value of the tangential restitution coefficient (which characterizes the roughness of particles). From the sticking limit (i.e., with no sliding contact) of rough particles, decreasing the Coulomb friction is found to reduce the density and spatial velocity correlations which, together with diminished orientational correlation for small enough μ, are responsible for the transition from non-gaussian to gaussian distribution functions in the double limit of small friction (μ→0) and nearly elastic particles (e→1). This double limit in fact corresponds to perfectly smooth particles, and hence the maxwellian (gaussian) is indeed a solution of the Boltzmann equation for a frictional granular gas in the limit of elastic collisions and zero Coulomb friction at any roughness. The high-velocity tails of both distribution functions seem to follow stretched exponentials even in the presence of Coulomb friction, and the related velocity exponents deviate strongly from a gaussian with increasing friction.

  12. Odd-parity superconductivity in bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuharu; Yanase, Youichi

    2017-08-01

    Spin-orbit coupling in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) causes spin-valley locking, giving rise to unconventional optical, transport, and superconducting properties. In this paper, we propose exotic superconductivity in bilayer group-IV TMDCs by symmetry control. The sublattice-dependent "hidden" spin-orbit coupling arising from local inversion symmetry breaking in the crystal structure may stabilize the odd-parity superconductivity by purely s -wave local pairing interaction. The stability of the odd-parity superconducting state depends on the bilayer stacking. The 2 Hb stacking in MoX2 and WX2 (X =S ,Se) favors the odd-parity superconductivity due to interlayer quantum interference. On the other hand, the odd-parity superconductivity is suppressed by the 2 Ha stacking of NbSe2. Calculating the phase diagram of the tight-binding model derived from first-principles band calculations, we conclude that the intercalated bilayer MoS2 and WS2 are candidates for a new class of odd-parity superconductors by spin-orbit coupling.

  13. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  14. Finite Element Model of Training in the superconducting quadrupole magnet SQ02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, Shlomo; Ferracin, Paolo

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes the use of 3D finite element models to study training in superconducting magnets. The simulations are used to examine coil displacements when the electromagnetic forces are cycled, and compute the frictional energy released during conductor motion with the resulting temperature rise. A computed training curve is then presented and discussed. The results from the numerical computations are compared with test results of the Nb{sub 3}Sn racetrack quadrupole magnet SQ02.

  15. Superconductivity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this proven text has been developed further in both scope and scale to reflect the potential for superconductivity in power engineering to increase efficiency in electricity transmission or engines. The landmark reference remains a comprehensive introduction to the field, covering every aspect from fundamentals to applications, and presenting the latest developments in organic superconductors, superconducting interfaces, quantum coherence, and applications in medicine and industry. Due to its precise language and numerous explanatory illustrations, it is suitable as an introductory textbook, with the level rising smoothly from chapter to chapter, such that readers can build on their newly acquired knowledge. The authors cover basic properties of superconductors and discuss stability and different material groups with reference to the latest and most promising applications, devoting the last third of the book to applications in power engineering, medicine, and low temperature physics. An e...

  16. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  17. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  18. Superconducting switch pack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, V.C.; Wollan, J.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a superconducting switch pack at least one switch element. The switch element including a length of superconductive wire having a switching portion and two lead portions, the switching portion being between the lead portions; means for supporting the switching portion in a plane in a common mold; hardened resin means encapsulating the switching portion in the plane in a solid body; wherein the solid body has an exterior surface which is planar and substantially parallel with and spaced apart from the plane in which the switching portion is positioned. The exterior surface being exposed to the exterior of the switch pack and the resin means filling the space between the exterior surface and the plane of the switching portion so as to provide uninterrupted thermal communication between the plane of the switching portion and the exterior of the switch pack; and a heater element in thermal contact with the switching portion.

  19. Time ripe for superconductivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsh

    2002-04-01

    But there is a crucial deadline and failure to meet it could send superconductivity back to the commercial shadows (at least outside the medical and scientific niches where it is a key enabler in analytical instruments, magnetic resonance imaging, and particle accelerators for another 30 years. Later this decade, the vintage infrastructure of dense copper conductors that supports power distribution in developed countries, in particular in the US, will become due for renewal. (Recent power problems in California were largely those of distribution infrastructure. At the same time, boosting capacity to serve the needs of increasingly affluent populations will pose a challenge. Superconductivity could provide the answer — if the technology matures in time and cost targets are met.

  20. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in ODS Steel MA956

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    OF RESIDUAL STRESS AS A FUNCTION OF FRICTION STIR WELDING PARAMETERS IN ODS STEEL MA956 by Martin S. Bennett June 2013 Thesis Advisor...characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of ODS steel MA956 as a function of heat index. The heat index of a weld is used to...determine relative heat input among different friction stir welding conditions. It depends on a combination of the rotational speed and traverse, or

  1. Relativistic Model for two-band Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsaku, Tadafumi

    2003-01-01

    To understand the superconductivity in MgB2, several two-band models of superconductivity were proposed. In this paper, by using the relativistic fermion model, we clearize the effect of the lower band in the superconductivity.

  2. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Cristian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  3. Unconventional superconductivity near inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenicke, A.F.

    2008-01-25

    After the presentation of a quasi-classical theory the specific heat of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is considered. Then tunneling spectroscopy on cuprate superconductors is discussed. Thereafter the subharmonic gap structure in d-wave superconductors is considered. Finally the application of the S-matrix in superconductivity is discussed with spin mixing, CrO{sub 2} as example, and an interface model. (HSI)

  4. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F., E-mail: francois.lefloch@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA - INAC - SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D. [Université Paris-sud, CNRS - IEF, F-91405 Orsay - France (France); Hasselbach, K. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS - Inst. Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for probing at nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  5. Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer (SQOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The SQOT (Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer ) project proposes to build a novel electro-optic system which can...Apr-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) The views, opinions and...journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: "Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer " (SQOT) Report Title The

  6. Effect of capillary-condensed water on the dynamic friction force at nanoasperity contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirghi, L.

    2003-05-01

    A single nanoasperity contact in ambient air is usually wetted by capillary condensation of water vapor and is surrounded by a water meniscus. This phenomenon strongly affects the contact friction, not only by the effect of meniscus loading force (superficial tension and capillary forces), but also by a friction force that accounts for the energy loss in the meniscus movement along with the sliding contact. Occurrence of the water-meniscus-generated friction is experimentally proved by atomic force microscopy measurements of the tip-sample friction force at minimum possible external load (before pull-off). A qualitative explanation for the observed dependence of the friction force on air humidity and solid surface wettability is proposed.

  7. The Effects of Contact Interface on the Friction Characteristics of Self-assembly Monolayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHui-chen; GAOYu-zhou; YANLi

    2004-01-01

    The effects of different contact interfaces on the friction characteristics of OTS self-assembled monolayers were investigated by a universal micro-tribometer in different sliding velocities. The results indicate that there exist lower friction coefficients between OTS SAMs and Ti, Ni and Cu films deposited on GCrl5 steel balls than those between OTS SAMs and GCr15 steel ball. The friction coefftcient between OTS SAMs and Ti film is the largest, and the friction coefficient between OTS SAMs and Cu film is the least in these three films, which depends the iatrinsic characteristics of the materials. The friction coefficients between OTS SAMs and GCrI5 steel balland three nanometer films increase with the sliding velachy increasing, which can be explained by the relaxationcharacteristics of OTS molecules.

  8. Characteristics of Deformation Layer for Vermicular Iron under Dry Sliding Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Le-min; SHANG Guan-bao; ZHANG Yong-zhen; CHEN Yue

    2004-01-01

    At room temperature, dry sliding wear tests were carried out using pin-on-disc test rig, in which the pin is made of vermicular iron and the disc is made of 40Cr steel. The microstructures of the frictional surfaces for the pin specimens were investigated. Under the action of both frictional heat and frictional shearing stress, a plastic deformation layer under the frictional surface is formed. The morphology and properties of the plastic deformation layer depend on specimen material, contact pressure and frictional shearing stress. In the plastic deformation layer, the phosphorous mass percent varies at different depth and results in different hardness. On the outer side of surface, the hardness is the biggest and the phosphorous mass percent is the highest. They become gradually small from outer side to inner side of the surface.

  9. Friction and lubrication modeling in sheet metal forming simulations of a Volvo XC90 inner door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvant, M.; Pilthammar, J.; Hol, J.; Wiebenga, J. H.; Chezan, T.; Carleer, B.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-11-01

    The quality of sheet metal formed parts is strongly dependent on the tribology, friction and lubrication conditions that are acting in the actual production process. Although friction is of key importance, it is currently not considered in detail in stamping simulations. This paper presents a selection of results considering friction and lubrication modeling in sheet metal forming simulations of the Volvo XC90 right rear door inner. For this purpose, the TriboForm software is used in combination with the AutoForm software. Validation of the simulation results is performed using door inner parts taken from the press line in a full-scale production run. The results demonstrate the improved prediction accuracy of stamping simulations by accounting for accurate friction and lubrication conditions, and the strong influence of friction conditions on both the part quality and the overall production stability.

  10. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  11. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-04-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  12. US Navy superconductivity program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  13. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  14. Superconductivity in CVD diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-24

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 10(20) cm(-3), diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  15. Unconventional superconductivity in honeycomb lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sahebsara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available   ‎ The possibility of symmetrical s-wave superconductivity in the honeycomb lattice is studied within a strongly correlated regime, using the Hubbard model. The superconducting order parameter is defined by introducing the Green function, which is obtained by calculating the density of the electrons ‎ . In this study showed that the superconducting order parameter appears in doping interval between 0 and 0.5, and x=0.25 is the optimum doping for the s-wave superconductivity in honeycomb lattice.

  16. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  17. Towards inducing superconductivity into graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efetov, Dmitri K.

    dependent effective Debey temperature - the so-called Bloch-Gruneisen temperature theta BG. We also probe the transport properties of the high energy sub-bands in bilayer graphene by electrolyte gating. Furthermore we demonstrate that electrolyte gates can be used to drive intercalation reactions in graphite and present an all optical study of the reaction kinetics during the creation of the graphene derived graphite intercalation compound LiC 6, and show the general applicability of the electrolyte gates to other 2-dimensional materials such as thin films of complex oxides, where we demonstrate gating dependent conductance changes in the spin-orbit Mott insulator Sr 2IrO4. Another, entirely different approach to induce superconducting correlations into graphene is by bringing it into proximity to a superconductor. Although not intrinsic to graphene, Cooper pairs can leak in from the superconductor and exist in graphene in the form of phase-coherent electron-hole states, the so-called Andreev states. Here we demonstrate a new way of fabricating highly transparent graphene/superconductor junctions by vertical stacking of graphene and the type-II van der Waals superconductor NbSe2. Due to NbSe2's high upper critical field of Hc2=4T we are able to test a long proposed and yet not well understood regime, where proximity effect and quantum Hall effect coexist.

  18. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  19. Experimental hysteretic loss for a series of superconducting filamentary NbTi wires and a field dependent critical state model. Final technical report 2 Oct 1972--31 Dec 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmer, M.C.; Wollan, J.J.; Lawson, L.O.

    1975-07-01

    This report summarizes the Air Force superconducting wire applications, the goals of future superconducting materials development, the state of the art theories of ac loss in superconductors, and the results of hysteretic loss measurements on a series of niobium--titanium multifilamentary wires. Expressions were developed for magnetization and hysteretic loss for half cycle and full cycle for rod geometries for a critical state model with critical current inversely proportional to field. Bulk effects with surface like character are discussed along with surface shielding fields and the demagnetizing factor. The loss expressions of various models are compared to experimental loss. Universal loss curves constructed from experimental loss curves by appropriate normalization are obtained and used to predict loss accurately. (GRA)

  20. High temperature skin friction measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  1. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  2. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  3. Properties of superconducting Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system remelted under higher gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, M. P.; Melekh, B. T.; Parfeniev, R. V.; Kartenko, N. F.; Regel, L. L.; Turchaninov, A. M.

    1992-04-01

    The structure and magnetic properties of high Tc superconductor Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O samples remelted under 1 g0, 8 g0 and 12 g0 gravity levels have been investigated. Superconducting properties make a change along the ingots. The dependence of structural and superconducting properties on the gravity level and their time degradation have been observed.

  4. Suppression of superconductivity and resistivity anomaly in Rh17S15 by cobalt substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Ramzy; Berthebaud, David; Maignan, Antoine

    2017-02-01

    The chalcogenide superconductor Rh17S15 is known for having an upper critical field of nearly twice the Pauli limit and an unusual temperature dependence of the resistivity. When doped with small amounts of cobalt, superconductivity in Rh17-x Co x S15 (0  superconductivity.

  5. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  6. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat...... generation and local material deformation (often referred to as flow) during the welding process itself. ii) Prediction of the residual stresses that will be present in the joint structure post to welding. While the former in general will call for a fully-coupled thermomechanical procedure, however...... for the FSW process at hand, the heat generation must either be prescribed analytically or based on a fully coupled analysis of the welding process itself. Along this line, a recently proposed thermal-pseudo-mechanical model is presented in which the temperature dependent yield stress of the weld material...

  7. Advanced adhesion and friction measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    An advanced micro-force tester for investigating the micromechanical behavior of various patterned surfaces in dry and wet conditions is presented in this paper. The parallel slice-beam configuration of the tester not only eliminates the large load-dependent slope and tangential displacement at the free end that is found in a single beam system, but also performs a trans-scale deflection with high sensitivity and linearity for force sensing. Meanwhile, the simple structure is characterized by low cost, high efficiency, and ease of fabrication. An integrated nano- and micro-stage comprise the mobile table to produce a large stroke with high resolution, which is specifically required in wet adhesion testing because of the formation of a long liquid bridge. Preliminary experiments of adhesion and friction conducted using PDMS pillars with a plano-convex lens validated the feasibility of this setup.

  8. Quantifying Stream Bed Gravel Mobility from Friction Angle Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. A.; Dunne, T.

    2012-12-01

    A method to measure friction angles using force gauges was field tested to determine its utility at quantifying critical shear stress in a gravel bedded reach of the San Joaquin River in California. Predictions of mobility from friction angles were compared with observations of the movement of tagged particles from locations for which local shear stress was quantified with a validated 2-D flow model. The observations of movement, distance of travel, and location of the end of travel were made after extended flow releases from Friant dam. Determining the critical shear stress for gravel bed material transport currently depends upon bedload sampling or tracer studies. Often, such measurements can only be made during occasional and untimely flow events, and at limited, suboptimal locations. Yet, theoretical studies conclude that the friction angle is an important control on the critical shear stress for mobility of any grain size, and therefore of the excess shear stress which strongly influences bedload transport rate. The ability to predict bed mobility at ungauged and unmonitored locations is also an important requirement for planning of flow regimes and channel design. Therefore, a method to measure friction angles that can be performed quickly in low flow conditions would prove useful for river management and research. To investigate this promising method friction angle surveys were performed at two riffle sites where differences in bed material size and distribution, and channel slope were observed. The friction angle surveys are sensitive enough to detect differences between the sites as well as spatially and temporally within a single riffle. Low friction angles were observed along the inside of a long bend where sand content was greater (by ~20%) than other surveyed locations. Friction angles decreased slightly after a depositional event associated with transient large woody debris and bank erosion, and increased again after a 5 year return interval flow

  9. The Danish Superconducting Cable Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The design and construction of a superconducting cable is described. The cable has a room temperature dielectric design with the cryostat placed inside the electrical insulation.BSCCO 2223 superconducting tapes wound in helix form around a former are used as the cable conductor. Results from...

  10. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found onthe applications of superconducting bearings...

  11. Effects of water-vapor on friction and deformation of polymeric magnetic media in contact with a ceramic oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity (water-vapor) in nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite spherical pin were studied. The coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. In elastic contacts the coefficient of friction increased linearly with increasing humidity; it decreased linearly when humidity was lowered. This effect is the result of changes in the chemistry and interaction of tape materials such as degradation of the lubricant. In plastic contacts there was no effect of humidity on friction below 40 percent relative humidity. There is no effect on friction associated with the breakthrough of the adsorbed water-vapor film at the interface of the tape and Ni-Zn ferrite. The coefficient of friction, however, increased rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent in plastic contacts.

  12. THE THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF VIBRATION DAMPERS BY ROLLING FRICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Bondarenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. There are some unresolved issues in vibration damping – the lack of engineering calculations for the vibration dampers by rolling friction; the absence of evidence of their application appropriateness. Considering this fact, the authors suggest to prove that the dampers based on rolling friction, are similar in rate of oscillation damping by hydraulic shock absorbers. At the same time, they are easier for the hydraulic design, and easily amenable to manual adjustment, both in automatic and manual mode. Methodology. Fixed techniques of practice in order to determine amplitudes of the oscillations of a shock absorber led to a predetermined result and will apply this theory in the calculation of other vibration dampers. Findings. Analysis of the formulas and graphs leads to the following conclusions and recommendations: 1 the nature of the oscillation damping at vibration dampers by rolling friction is close to their decay in the viscous resistance; 2 when conducting the necessary experiments the shock absorber rolling can be recommended as alternatives to hydraulic ones. The research results of this task will help implement the new trend in reduction of dynamic loads in vehicles. Originality. With the help of theoretical curves to determine the coefficients of rolling friction the dependences for determining the amplitudes of the oscillations in the vertical movement of cargo were obtained. At the same time, the previously proposed analytical dependence for determining the coefficient of rolling friction contains only conventional mechanical constants of the contacting bodies and there geometrical dimensions. Practical value. Due to the existing well-known disadvantages of hydraulic shock absorbers it would be logical to apply shock absorbers that are technologically convenient in manufacturing and easy to adjust the damping rate. The proposed theory can be used in the design of shock absorbers rolling as an alternative to the hydraulic

  13. A superconducting magnetic gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  14. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  15. Japan. Superconductivity for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.

    2012-11-15

    Currently, many smart grid projects are running or planned worldwide. These aim at controlling the electricity supply more efficiently and more stably in a new power network system. In Japan, especially superconductivity technology development projects are carried out to contribute to the future smart grid. Japanese cable makers such as Sumitomo Electric and Furukawa Electric are leading in the production of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. The world's largest electric current and highest voltage superconductivity proving tests have been started this year. Big cities such as Tokyo will be expected to introduce the HTS power cables to reduce transport losses and to meet the increased electricity demand in the near future. Superconducting devices, HTS power cables, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and flywheels are the focus of new developments in cooperations between companies, universities and research institutes, funded by the Japanese research and development funding organization New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)

  16. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  17. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    Public lecture by Philippe Lebrun, who works at CERN on applications of superconductivity and cryogenics for particle accelerators. He was head of CERN’s Accelerator Technology Department during the LHC construction period. Centre culturel Jean Monnet, route de Gex Tuesday 11 October from 8.30 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. » Suitable for all – Admission free - Lecture in French » Number of places limited For further information: +33 (0)4 50 42 29 37

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  19. Conventional and unconventional superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Superconductivity has been one of the most fruitful areas of research in condensed matter physics, bringing together researchers with distinct interests in a collaborative effort to understand from its microscopic basis to its potential for unprecedented technological applications. The concepts, techniques, and methods developed along its centennial history have gone beyond the realm of condensed matter physics and influenced the development of other fascinating areas, such as particle physics and atomic physics. These notes, based on a set of lectures given at the 2011 Advanced Summer School of Cinvestav, aim to motivate the young undergraduate student in getting involved in the exciting world of conventional and unconventional superconductors.

  20. Superconductivity from correlated hopping

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, C D; Aligia, A A

    1995-01-01

    We consider a chain described by a next-nearest-neighbor hopping combined with a nearest-neighbor spin flip. In two dimensions this three-body term arises from a mapping of the three-band Hubbard model for CuO$_2$ planes to a generalized $t-J$ model and for large O-O hopping favors resonance-valence-bond superconductivity of predominantly $d$-wave symmetry. Solving the ground state and low-energy excitations by analytical and numerical methods we find that the chain is a Luther-Emery liquid with correlation exponent $K_{\\rho} = (2-n)^2/2$, where $n$ is the particle density.

  1. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  2. Introduction to superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rose-Innes, AC

    1978-01-01

    Introduction to Superconductivity differs from the first edition chiefly in Chapter 11, which has been almost completely rewritten to give a more physically-based picture of the effects arising from the long-range coherence of the electron-waves in superconductors and the operation of quantum interference devices. In this revised second edition, some further modifications have been made to the text and an extra chapter dealing with """"high-temperature"""" superconductors has been added. A vast amount of research has been carried out on these since their discovery in 1986 but the results, both

  3. Superconducting Electronic Film Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-14

    cubic, yttria stabilized, zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with (100) orientation and ao = 0.512 to 0.516 nm. Films were magnetron-sputtered... Crown by Solid-State and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy," IEEE Trans. Uagn. 25(2), 2538 (1989). 6. J. H. Kang, R. T. Kampwirth, and K. E. Gray, "Superconductivity...summarized in Fig. 1, are too high for SrTiO3 or yttria- stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to be used in rf applications. MgO, LaAIO 3 , and LaGaO3 have a tan 6

  4. Heavy fermion superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brison, Jean-Pascal; Glémot, Loı̈c; Suderow, Hermann; Huxley, Andrew; Kambe, Shinsaku; Flouquet, Jacques

    2000-05-01

    The quest for a precise identification of the symmetry of the order parameter in heavy fermion systems has really started with the discovery of the complex superconducting phase diagram in UPt 3. About 10 years latter, despite numerous experiments and theoretical efforts, this is still not achieved, and we will quickly review the present status of knowledge and the main open question. Actually, the more forsaken issue of the nature of the pairing mechanism has been recently tackled by different groups with macroscopic or microscopic measurement, and significant progress have been obtained. We will discuss the results emerging from these recent studies which all support non-phonon-mediated mechanisms.

  5. Dynamical friction for supersonic motion in a homogeneous gaseous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Daniel; Kuiper, Rolf; Schmidt, Franziska; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-05-01

    Context. The supersonic motion of gravitating objects through a gaseous ambient medium constitutes a classical problem in theoretical astrophysics. Its application covers a broad range of objects and scales from planetesimals, planets, and all kind of stars up to galaxies and black holes. In particular, the dynamical friction caused by the wake that forms behind the object plays an important role for the dynamics of the system. To calculate the dynamical friction for a particular system, standard formulae based on linear theory are often used. Aims: It is our goal to check the general validity of these formulae and provide suitable expressions for the dynamical friction acting on the moving object, based on the basic physical parameters of the problem: first, the mass, radius, and velocity of the perturber; second, the gas mass density, soundspeed, and adiabatic index of the gaseous medium; and finally, the size of the forming wake. Methods: We perform dedicated sequences of high-resolution numerical studies of rigid bodies moving supersonically through a homogeneous ambient medium and calculate the total drag acting on the object, which is the sum of gravitational and hydrodynamical drag. We study cases without gravity with purely hydrodynamical drag, as well as gravitating objects. In various numerical experiments, we determine the drag force acting on the moving body and its dependence on the basic physical parameters of the problem, as given above. From the final equilibrium state of the simulations, for gravitating objects we compute the dynamical friction by direct numerical integration of the gravitational pull acting on the embedded object. Results: The numerical experiments confirm the known scaling laws for the dependence of the dynamical friction on the basic physical parameters as derived in earlier semi-analytical studies. As a new important result we find that the shock's stand-off distance is revealed as the minimum spatial interaction scale of

  6. Method for Predicting Void Ratio and Triaxial Friction Angle from Laboratory CPT at Shallow Depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    In this report an investigation of the relationship between the tip resistance, qc of a laboratory CPT-probe versus the relative density, Dr and friction angle, ∏ of Aalborg University Sand No. 0 is carried out. A method for estimating the relative density and the triaxial friction angle from...... the cone resistance of the laboratory probe is proposed. The suggested method deals with the fact that the friction angle is depended of the stress level especially at low stresses. The method includes a calibration of the cone resistance from the laboratory CPT at shallow depths i.e. low values of d...

  7. Friction factor of annular Poiseuille flow in a transitional regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Annular Poiseuille flows in a transitional regime were investigated by direct numerical simulations with an emphasis on turbulent statistics including the friction factor that are affected by the presence of large-scale transitional structures. Five different radius ratios in the range of 0.1–0.8 and several friction Reynolds numbers in the range of 48–150 were analyzed to consider various flow states accompanied by characteristic transitional structures. Three characteristic structures, namely, turbulent–laminar coexistence referred to as “(straight puff,”“helical puff,” and “helical turbulence” were observed. The selection of the structures depends on both the radius ratio and the Reynolds number. The findings indicated that despite the transitional state with a turbulent–laminar coexistence, the helical turbulence resulted in a friction factor that was as high as the fully turbulent value. In contrast, with respect to the occurrence of streamwise-finite transitional structures, such as straight/helical puffs, the friction factor decreased in a stepwise manner toward a laminar level. The turbulent statistics revealed asymmetric distributions with respect to the wall-normal direction wherein the profiles and magnitudes were significantly influenced by the occurrence of transitional structures.

  8. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  9. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  10. The influence of air friction in speed skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen Schenau, G J

    1982-01-01

    With the use of a wind tunnel the air friction force Fw on six speed skaters of different body builds was measured. The dependence of the drag coefficient CD on air velocity v and the influence of different skating postures on drag were investigated. At an air velocity of v = 12 m/sec, an angle between upper and lower leg of 110 degrees and a horizontal trunk position, the measured air friction constant kn(=Fw/V2) of all subjects was calculated from their height l and weight m according to the formula 0.0205 l3 square root m (standard error 2%). CD and as a consequence k appeared to be strongly dependent on air velocity. Expressions to correct k for other velocities and postures were derived and substituted into a power balance by which the influence of posture, ice condition, wind and altitude on performance was predicted.

  11. Model of Fracture, Friction, and Wear Phenomena of Porous Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shatsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical and tribotechnical features of powdered materials are strongly influenced by pore volume, fracture character, impurities, alloying, concentration inhomogeneity, friction conditions, and other factors. Pores also have influence on acceleration of diffusion processes and reduce undercooled austenite resistance. Annealed in hydrogen, ultra pure iron powder was used to study porous iron features. Toughness fracture and tribotechnical features had nonmonotonic dependence from porosity different from all known dependences got from technical iron powders. Researches brought out the fact that in process of porosity reduction by pressing and annealing cycles, the average dimension of porous is changed. According to the analysis of porous structure were created models of friction, wear, and fracture of pure porous iron.

  12. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one.

  13. Magnetic Field Reentrant Superconductivity in Aluminum Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence; Goldman, Allen

    Reentrance to the superconducting state through the application of a magnetic field to quasi-one dimensional superconductors driven resistive by current, is counter to the expected properties of superconductors. It was not until recently that a microscopic mechanism explaining the phenomenon was proposed in which superconductivity and phase slip driven dissipation coexist in a non-equilibrium state. Here we present additional results of magnetic field induced reentrance into the superconducting state in quasi-one-dimensional aluminum nanowires with an in-plane magnetic field both transverse to, and along the wire axis. The reentrant behavior is seen in the magnetic field dependence of the I-V characteristic and resistance vs. temperature, and in the wire's magnetoresistance at 450mK. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-02ER46004. Samples were fabricated at the Minnesota Nanofabrication Center. Parts of this work were carried out in the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, a member of the Materials Research Facilities Network (www.mrfn.org) funded via the NSF MRSEC program.

  14. Vortex properties of mesoscopic superconducting samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Leonardo R.E. [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Barba-Ortega, J. [Grupo de Fi' sica de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Souza Silva, C.C. de [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J., E-mail: albino@df.ufpe.b [Laboratorio de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avancados, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil)

    2010-10-01

    In this work we investigated theoretically the vortex properties of mesoscopic samples of different geometries, submitted to an external magnetic field. We use both London and Ginzburg-Landau theories and also solve the non-linear Time Dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations to obtain vortex configurations, equilibrium states and the spatial distribution of the superconducting electron density in a mesoscopic superconducting triangle and long prisms with square cross-section. For a mesoscopic triangle with the magnetic field applied perpendicularly to sample plane the vortex configurations were obtained by using Langevin dynamics simulations. In most of the configurations the vortices sit close to the corners, presenting twofold or three-fold symmetry. A study of different meta-stable configurations with same number of vortices is also presented. Next, by taking into account de Gennes boundary conditions via the extrapolation length, b, we study the properties of a mesoscopic superconducting square surrounded by different metallic materials and in the presence of an external magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the square surface. It is determined the b-limit for the occurrence of a single vortex in a mesoscopic square of area d{sup 2}, for 4{xi}(0){<=}d{<=}10{xi}(0).

  15. Quantum memristor in a superconducting circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmilehto, Juha; Sanz, Mikel; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Solano, Enrique

    Memristors, resistive elements that retain information of their past, have garnered interest due to their paradigm-changing potential in information processing and electronics. The emergent hysteretic behaviour allows for novel architectural applications and has recently been classically demonstrated in a simplified superconducting setup using the phase-dependent conductance in the tunnel-junction-microscopic model. In this contribution, we present a truly quantum model for a memristor constructed using established elements and techniques in superconducting nanoelectronics, and explore the parameters for feasible operation as well as refine the methods for quantifying the memory retention. In particular, the memristive behaviour is shown to arise from quasiparticle-induced tunneling in the full dissipative model and can be observed in the phase-driven tunneling current. The relevant hysteretic behaviour should be observable using current state-of-the-art measurements for detecting quasiparticle excitations. Our theoretical findings constitute the first quantum memristor in a superconducting circuit and act as the starting point for designing further circuit elements that have non-Markovian characteristics The authors acknowledge support from the CCQED EU project and the Finnish Cultural Foundation.

  16. Finite Element Analysis of Temperature Field in Automotive Dry Friction Clutch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Abdullah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction clutch design is strongly dependent upon the frictional heat generated between contact surfaces during the slipping at beginning of engagement. Because of that the frictional heat generated firstly will reduce the performance of clutch system and then will lead to premature failure in some cases. Finite element method was used to investigate aneffect of thermal load type on the temperature field of the clutch system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric model was used to study the temperature distribution for the clutch system (pressure plate, clutch disc and flywheel during heating phase (slipping period and in the cooling phase (full engagement period. Depending on basic friction clutch design two types of thermal loads were applied; load type A (uniform pressure and load type B (uniform wear. Repeated engagements made at regular interval wereconsidered in this work. ANSYS13 has been used to perform the numerical calculation in this paper.

  17. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofidi, M; Prakash, B [Division of Machine Elements, Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa SE-97187 (Sweden); Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Albohr, O [Pirelli Deutschland AG, 64733 Hoechst/Odenwald, Postfach 1120 (Germany)

    2008-02-27

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  18. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  19. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, M.; Prakash, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.

    2008-02-01

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  20. Modelling cohesive, frictional and viscoplastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehossein, Habib; Qin, Zongyi

    2016-06-01

    Most materials in mining and civil engineering construction are not only viscoplastic, but also cohesive frictional. Fresh concrete, fly ash and mining slurries are all granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids, although solid concrete is normally considered as a cohesive frictional material. Presented here is both a formulation of the pipe and disc flow rates as a function of pressure and pressure gradient and the CFD application to fresh concrete flow in L-Box tests.