WorldWideScience

Sample records for superconductivity center university

  1. Superconductivity, the Structure Scale of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Saam, R D

    1997-01-01

    A lattice and associated superconducting theory is postulated whereby electromagnetic and gravitational forces are mediated by a particle of mass (110.39 x electron mass) such that the established electron/proton mass is maintained, electron and proton charge is maintained and the universe radius is 1.5E28 cm, the universe mass is 2.00E56 gram, the universe density is 1.45E-29 g/cm3, the universe time or age is 1.57E10 years and the universe Hubble constant is 2.47E-18/sec (76 km/sec-million parsec). The calculated universe mass and density are based on an isotropic homogeneous media filling the vacuum of space analogous to the 'ether' referred to in the 19th century and could be considered a candidate for the 'dark matter' in present universe theories. In this context the COBE satellite universe background microwave black body radiation temperature is linked to universe dark matter superconducting temperature. Also, a reasonable value for the cosmological constant is derived having dimensions of the known un...

  2. Superconducting Microwave Electronics at Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Leonard, Regis F.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last three years, NASA Lewis Research Center has investigated the application of newly discovered high temperature superconductors to microwave electronics. Using thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-delta and Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox deposited on a variety of substrates, including strontium titanate, lanthanum gallate, lanthanum aluminate and magnesium oxide, a number of microwave circuits have been fabricated and evaluated. These include a cavity resonator at 60 GHz, microstrip resonators at 35 GHz, a superconducting antenna array at 35 GHz, a dielectric resonator at 9 GHz, and a microstrip filter at 5 GHz. Performance of some of these circuits as well as suggestions for other applications are reported.

  3. Superconducting cyclotrons at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, H. G.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the status of the three superconducting cyclotrons which are in operation or under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The oldest of these, the K500, has been in operation since September 1982 supporting a national user program in heavy ion nuclear physics. A second large research cyclotron, the K800, is now nearing completion. This cyclotron will accelerate lighter heavy ions to 200 MeV/nuc and heavier particles up to energies given by 1200 Q2/ A MeV/nucleon. The magnet for this cyclotron came into operation in May 1984 and has performed smoothly and reliably in three extended operating periods. At present, K800 construction activity centers on fabrication and installation of the rf system, the extraction system, and the ECR injection line. The third NSCL superconducting cyclotron is a smaller 50 MeV deuteron cyclotron to be used for neutron therapy in the radiation oncology center of a major Detroit hospital (Harper Hospital). Design features of this small, application oriented, cyclotron are described in some detail.

  4. Compact superconducting ring at ritsumeikan university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, H; Nakayama, Y; Ozutsumi, K; Yamamoto, Y; Tokunaga, Y; Saisho, H; Matsubara, T; Ikeda, S

    1998-05-01

    A compact superconducting storage ring (0.575 GeV and 300 mA) with a racetrack microtron injection system was installed at Ritsumeikan University and has been operated successfully since April 1996. As the radius of the circular electron orbit is small (0.5 m), it is possible to use a radiation beam of relatively high photon flux at a short distance from the source point. Beamlines have been constructed including those for XAFS, soft X-ray spectroscopy, VUV spectroscopy, fluorescent X-ray analysis, soft X-ray microscopy, X-ray diffraction/scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy; the photoelectron spectrometer is combined with an ion-beam-scattering spectrometer to obtain information both on the electronic states and on the atomic arrangements of a solid surface. In addition there are two beamlines, one for LIGA exposure and the other for synchrotron radiation ablation, which are devoted to producing new devices and materials. The synchrotron radiation facility is open not only to users in the University but also to researchers in industry, governmental institutions and other universities.

  5. Superconducting Machines at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad;

    2011-01-01

    Two high temperature superconducting (HTS) machine prototypes constructed at the Technical University of Denmark are presented. The construction process is presented and the excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental results are presented for one of the prototypes.......Two high temperature superconducting (HTS) machine prototypes constructed at the Technical University of Denmark are presented. The construction process is presented and the excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental results are presented for one of the prototypes....

  6. Geneva University - Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 29 janvier 2007 COLLOQUE DE LA SECTION DE PHYSIQUE 17 heures - Auditoire Stueckelberg Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects Prof. Hans Mooij / Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology The quantum conjugate variables of a superconductor are the charge or number of Cooper pairs, and the phase of the order parameter. In circuits that contain small Josephson junctions, these quantum properties can be brought forward. In Delft we study so-called flux qubits, superconducting rings that contain three small Josephson junctions. When a magnetic flux of half a flux quantum is applied to the loop, there are two states with opposite circulating current. For suitable junction parameters, a quantum superposition of those macroscopic states is possible. Transitions can be driven with resonant microwaves. These quantum ...

  7. Universal transport signatures of topological superconductivity in quantum spin Hall architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shu-Ping; Aasen, David; Karzig, Torsten; Alicea, Jason

    2015-03-01

    Interfacing s-wave superconductors with quantum spin Hall systems provides a promising route to ``engineered'' topological superconductivity. Given exciting recent progress on the fabrication side, identifying experiments that definitively expose the topological superconducting phase (and clearly distinguish it from a trivial state) raises an increasingly important problem. With this goal in mind we use renormalization group methods to extract universal transport characteristics of superconductor/quantum spin Hall heterostructures where the native edge states serve as a lead. Interestingly, arbitrarily weak interactions induce qualitative changes in the behavior relative to the free-fermion limit, leading to a sharp dichotomy in conductance for the trivial (narrow superconductor) and topological (wide superconductor) cases. Furthermore, we find that strong interactions can in principle induce power-law-localized ``parafermion'' excitations at a superconductor/quantum spin Hall junction. NSF Grant DMR-1341822. (2) Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, an NSF physics frontier center with support from the Moore Foundation.

  8. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  9. Open University Center of the Pontifical Javeriana University, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omayra Parra de Marroquin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Garcia Canclini (1990 there is the assumption that Colombia is a hybrid society. Upon this standpoint, and within a traditional higher education structure characterized by being fundamentally conventional or campus based, the Open University Center of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana was created as an education program that breaks with every traditional scheme, which in turn, encourages a new learning pattern. The Open University Center emerges as a "social response" focused on the "here and now" of today's society in Colombia.The Javeriana University (a hybrid university can be placed in this context as well as the Open University Center, as a part of it. Since its creation, through its programs this center offers education to the most vulnerable of Colombia's population, contributing to raise their quality of life.In this article, the authors outline the Open University Center's place in the University's context: its historical development and its structure concerning students, programs, regulations, infrastructure and technological equipment. They also identify the implications and relationships of the traditional education proper of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, as well as the projection and contributions of the Open University Center to the University's future in the pedagogical order of distance education towards virtual education.

  10. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  11. Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  12. The National Center Test for University Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the National Center Test for University Admissions, a unified national test in Japan, which is taken by 500,000 students every year. It states that implementation of the Center Test began in 1990, with the English component consisting only of the written section until 2005, when the listening section was first implemented…

  13. Coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to superconducting flux qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos, D.; Wubs, Martijn; Taylor, J.M.;

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to achieve coherent coupling between nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and superconducting (SC) flux qubits. The resulting coupling can be used to create a coherent interaction between the spin states of distant NV centers mediated by the flux qubit. Furthermore, the ma...

  14. Quality Improvement in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffini, Cara S.; Toth, Paul L.

    2017-01-01

    University Counseling Centers (UCCs) experience high clinical demands and severe client presentations leaving counselors with limited time and resources to evaluate delivery of services. In this article, we present clinician-friendly quality improvement (QI) strategies used at a large Midwestern university and provide recommendations for…

  15. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  16. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira [University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  17. Increasing Counseling Center Utilization: Yeshiva University's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Victor; Nissel, Chaim; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kay, Jerald; Brown, Joshua T.

    2012-01-01

    Yeshiva University established a counseling center during the 2004-2005 academic year. As a religiously based institution, the administration recognized that there would likely be significant impediments to utilization of on-campus mental health services as a result of negative attitudes about mental illness and its treatment--stigma. To combat…

  18. Increasing Counseling Center Utilization: Yeshiva University's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Victor; Nissel, Chaim; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kay, Jerald; Brown, Joshua T.

    2012-01-01

    Yeshiva University established a counseling center during the 2004-2005 academic year. As a religiously based institution, the administration recognized that there would likely be significant impediments to utilization of on-campus mental health services as a result of negative attitudes about mental illness and its treatment--stigma. To combat…

  19. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  20. Challenger Center's Window on the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, T. A.; Goldstein, J. J.; Smith, S.; Bobrowsky, M.; Radnofsky, M.; Perelmuter, J.-M.; Jaggar, L.

    2001-11-01

    Challenger Center for Space Science Education's Window on the Universe program aims to create a network of under-served communities across the nation dedicated to sustained science, math, and technology education. Window communities presently include Broken Arrow, OK; Muncie, IN; Moscow, ID; Nogales, AZ; Tuskegee, AL; Marquette, MI; Altamont, KS; Washington, D.C.; and other emerging sites. Window uses themes of human space flight and the space sciences as interdisciplinary means to inspire entire communities. Practicing scientists and engineers engaged in these disciplines are invited to volunteer to become a part of these communities for a week, each visitor reaching roughly 2000 K-12 students through individual classroom visits and Family Science Night events during an intense Window on the Universe Week. In the same Window Week, Challenger Center scientists and educators present a workshop for local educators to provide training in the use of a K-12 educational module built around a particular space science and exploration theme. Window communities follow a 3-year development: Year 1, join the network, experience Window Week presented by Challenger Center and visiting researchers; Year 2, same as Year 1 plus workshop on partnering with local organizations to develop sources of visiting researchers and to enhance connections with local resources; Year 3 and subsequent, the community stages its own Window Week, with Challenger Center providing new education modules and training workshops for "master educators" from the Window community, after which the master educators return home to conduct training workshops of their own. Challenger Center remains a resource and clearinghouse for Window communities to acquire experience, technical information, and opportunities for distance collaboration with other Window communities. Window on the Universe is dedicated to assessing degree of success vs. failure in each program component and as a whole, using pre- and post

  1. Space applications of superconducting microwave electronics at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. F.; Bhasin, K. B.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Cubbage, C. D.; Chorey, C. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in 1987, NASA Lewis Research Center has been involved in efforts to demonstrate its advantages for applications involving microwave electronics in space, especially space communications. The program included thin film fabrication by means of laser ablation. Specific circuitry which was investigated includes microstrip ring resonators at 32 GHz, phase shifters which utilize a superconducting, optically activated switch, an 8x8 32 GHz superconducting microstrip antenna array, and an HTS-ring-resonator stabilized oscillator at 8 GHz. The latter two components are candidates for use in space experiments which are described in other papers. Experimental data on most of the circuits are presented as well as, in some cases, a comparison of their performance with an identical circuit utilizing gold or copper metallization.

  2. Fabrication of Superconducting Detectors for Studying the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ari-David

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting detectors offer unparalleled means of making astronomical/cosmological observations. Fabrication of these detectors is somewhat unconventional; however, a lot of novel condensed matter physics/materials scientific discoveries and semiconductor fabrication processes can be generated in making these devices.

  3. A Superconducting Magnet with Center Field of 10 T and φ100 mm Warm Bore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋良; 严陆光; 赵宝志; 宋守森

    2006-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet with central field of 10T and warm bore of 100 mm was designed based on a Nb3Sn and two NbTi superconducting coils. At the first stage, the NbTi coils have been fabricated and tested. A two-stage 4 K Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler with the second-stage power in 1W, 4.2K is used to cool the magnet from room temperature to 4 K. The superconducting magnet with the same power supply has the operating current of 116A. The magnet can be rotated with a support frame to be operated with either horizontal or vertical position. A pair of Bi-2223 high temperature superconducting current leads was employed to reduce heat leakage into 4.2K level. The NbTi coils reachto the operating current of 120A without training effect to be observed during charging of the magnet during 40 minutes charging time and generate the center field of 6.5T. The training effect in the NbTi magnet directly cool-down by cryocooler and inter-winding support structure in magnet can be remarkably improved. The superconducting magnet has been stably operated for more than 275 hours with 6.5T. In this paper, the detailed design, fabrication, stress analysis and quench protection characteristics are presented.

  4. Coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to superconducting flux qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, D; Wubs, M; Taylor, J M; Aguado, R; Lukin, M D; Sørensen, A S

    2010-11-19

    We propose a method to achieve coherent coupling between nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and superconducting (SC) flux qubits. The resulting coupling can be used to create a coherent interaction between the spin states of distant NV centers mediated by the flux qubit. Furthermore, the magnetic coupling can be used to achieve a coherent transfer of quantum information between the flux qubit and an ensemble of NV centers. This enables a long-term memory for a SC quantum processor and possibly an interface between SC qubits and light.

  5. Coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to superconducting flux qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos, D.; Wubs, Martijn; Taylor, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to achieve coherent coupling between nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and superconducting (SC) flux qubits. The resulting coupling can be used to create a coherent interaction between the spin states of distant NV centers mediated by the flux qubit. Furthermore, the ma......, the magnetic coupling can be used to achieve a coherent transfer of quantum information between the flux qubit and an ensemble of NV centers. This enables a long-term memory for a SC quantum processor and possibly an interface between SC qubits and light....

  6. Road to room-temperature superconductivity: A universal model

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In a semiclassical view superconductivity is attributed exclusively to the advance of atoms' outer s electrons through the nuclei of neighbor atoms in a solid. The necessary progression of holes in the opposite direction has the electric and magnetic effect as if two electrons were advancing instead of each actual one. Superconductivity ceases when the associated lateral oscillation of the outer s electrons extends between neighbor atoms. If such overswing occurs already at T = 0, then the material is a normal conductor. Otherwise, lateral overswing can be caused by lattice vibrations at a critical temperature Tc or by a critical magnetic field Bc. Lateral electron oscillations are reduced - and Tc is increased - when the atoms of the outer s electrons are squeezed, be it in the bulk crystal, in a thin film, or under external pressure on the sample. The model is applied to alkali metals and alkali-doped fullerenes. Aluminum serves as an example of a simple metal with superconductivity. Application of the mode...

  7. Size effects of nano-scale pinning centers on the superconducting properties of YBCO single grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutalbi, Nahed; Noudem, Jacques G.; M'chirgui, Ali

    2014-08-01

    High pinning superconductors are the most promising materials for power engineering. Their superconducting properties are governed by the microstructure quality and the vortex pinning behavior. We report on a study of the vortex pinning in YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) single grain with defects induced through the addition of insulating nano-particles. In order to improve the critical current density, YBCO textured bulk superconductors were elaborated using the Top Seeded Melt Texture and Growth process with different addition amounts of Al2O3 nano-particles. Serving as strong pinning centers, 0.05% excess of Al2O3 causes a significant enhancement of the critical current density Jc under self field and in magnetic fields at 77 K. The enhanced flux pinning achieved with the low level of alumina nano-particles endorses the effectiveness of insulating nano-inclusions to induce effectives pinning sites within the superconducting matrix. On the other side, we focused on the effect of the size of pinning centers on the critical current density. This work was carried out using two batches of alumina nano-particles characterized by two different particle size distributions with mean diameters PSD1 = 20 nm and PSD2 = 2.27 μm. The matching effects of the observed pinning force density have been compared. The obtained results have shown that the flux pinning is closely dependent on the size of the artificial pinning centers. Our results suggest that the optimization of the size of the artificial pinning centers is crucial to a much better understanding of the pinning mechanisms and therefore to insure high superconducting performance for the practical application of superconducting materials.

  8. Universal limiting pressure for a three-flavor color superconducting PNJL model phase diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Ayriyan, A; Blaschke, D; Lastowiecki, R

    2016-01-01

    The phase diagram of a three-flavor Polyakov-loop Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model is analyzed for the case of isospin symmetric matter with color superconducting phases. The coexistence of chiral symmetry breaking and two-flavor color superconductivity (2SC phase) and a thermodynamic instability due to the implementation of a color neutrality constraint is observed. It is suggested to use a universal hadronization pressure to estimate the phase border between hadronic and quark-gluon plasma phases. Trajectories of constant entropy per baryon are analyzed for conditions appropriate for heavy-ion collisions in the NICA-FAIR energy range.

  9. Colleges and Universities Highway Traffic and Safety Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, James E., Ed.; Ritzel, Dale O., Ed.

    After consideration of the organizing of university safety centers and the growth and role of such centers in the future, descriptions are presented of the activities and practices in each of 16 existing college and university highway traffic and safety centers. Information is presented regarding center objectives, programs, staff composition,…

  10. Together with Research Centers and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Domingos Garrido

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Journal Motricidade has always been walking in parallel with the scientific communities. We found that the affiliation of most authors has, nearly always, a University (Uni or a Research Center (RC. In fact it is almost impossible to conduct research outside these two universes. In this sense, Uni and RC feed the most, if not all, of scientific journals worldwide. By this I mean that is in the interest of Motricidade to be associated with high-quality RC and Uni equally recognized. With regard to RC, Motricidade will publish this year a supplement of the International Congress of Research Centre in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development (CIDESD. This RC has conducted research in a variety of areas within the Sport Sciences and Health and always with high recognition and associated publications. It was not by chance that this RC was evaluated with ‘very good’ by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT panel and has been granted funding. This Congress, which takes place every two years, targets to converge research and high level practices within these three areas: Sports, Health and Human Development. The 2016 CIDESD edition is dedicated to "Exercise and Health, Sports and Human Development" and will be held at the University of Évora, between 11 and 12 November of 2016. The readers can check the program in the following link http://gdoc.uevora.pt/450120 and get more information in the Congress Site available at http://www.cidesd2016.uevora.pt/. With regard to Uni, Motricidade signed a cooperation protocol with the University of Beira Interior (UBI in May of 2016, involving the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge in Sports Sciences, Psychology, Human Development and Health. At the present, UBI hosts more than 6,000 students spread across five faculties - Arts & Letters, Sciences, Health Sciences, Humanities and Social Sciences and Engineering. When looking at the rankings, for instance

  11. Mississippi State University Sustainable Energy Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W. Glenn [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-09-26

    The Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC) project at Mississippi State University included all phases of biofuel production from feedstock development, to conversion to liquid transportation fuels, to engine testing of the fuels. The feedstocks work focused on non-food based crops and yielded an increased understanding of many significant Southeastern feedstocks. an emphasis was placed on energy grasses that could supplement the primary feedstock, wood. Two energy grasses, giant miscanthus and switchgrass, were developed that had increased yields per acre. Each of these grasses was patented and licensed to companies for commercialization. The fuels work focused on three different technologies that each led to a gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel product. The three technologies were microbial oil, pyrolysis oil, and syngas-to liquid-hydrocarbons

  12. Superconducting transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  13. New library buildings: Creighton University Bio-Information Center.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    In May 1977 the newly constructed Creighton University Bio-Information Center, costing over $4 million and containing more than 57,000 square feet of space, officially began to provide services. This facility houses three educational support programs--the Health Sciences Library, the Learning Resources Center, and the Biomedical Communications Center--that primarily serve the University's health sciences schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and allied health, and the University'...

  14. University of Washington Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  15. Technology Transfer from University-Based Research Centers: The University of New Mexico Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.; Hall, Brad; Hashimoto, Michio; Steffensen, Morten; Speakman, Kristen L.; Timko, Molly K.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 55 research centers at the University of New Mexico investigated the nature of the typical center, why funding has risen during the 1990s, reasons for founding the centers, the director's role, how university-based research centers transfer technology to private companies and other organizations, and what determines program…

  16. Universal holonomic quantum gates in decoherence-free subspace on superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Z. D.

    2015-08-01

    To implement a set of universal quantum logic gates based on non-Abelian geometric phases, it is conventional wisdom that quantum systems beyond two levels are required, which is extremely difficult to fulfill for superconducting qubits and appears to be a main reason why only single-qubit gates were implemented in a recent experiment [A. A. Abdumalikov, Jr. et al., Nature (London) 496, 482 (2013), 10.1038/nature12010]. Here we propose to realize nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspace on circuit QED, where one can use only the two levels in transmon qubits, a usual interaction, and a minimal resource for the decoherence-free subspace encoding. In particular, our scheme not only overcomes the difficulties encountered in previous studies but also can still achieve considerably large effective coupling strength, such that high-fidelity quantum gates can be achieved. Therefore, the present scheme makes realizing robust holonomic quantum computation with superconducting circuits very promising.

  17. 13 CFR 306.7 - Performance evaluations of University Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance evaluations of... Development Program § 306.7 Performance evaluations of University Centers. (a) EDA will: (1) Evaluate each... evaluation period. (b) The performance evaluation will determine in part whether a University Center...

  18. The Social Work Research Center at Colorado State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winokur, Marc A.; Valentine, Deborah P.; Drendel, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The Social Work Research Center is an innovative university-community partnership within the School of Social Work in the College of Applied Human Sciences at Colorado State University. The center is focused on working with county and state child welfare agencies to generate applied research that translates into evidence-based practice for serving…

  19. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wan-Lu; Yang, Wan-Li; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Chen, Chang-Yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-09-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters.

  20. Bifurcation Diagram and Pattern Formation of Phase Slip Centers in Superconducting Wires Driven with Electric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J.; Sternberg, P.; Ma, Q.

    2007-10-01

    We provide here new insights into the classical problem of a one-dimensional superconducting wire exposed to an applied electric current using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model. The most striking feature of this system is the well-known appearance of oscillatory solutions exhibiting phase slip centers (PSC’s) where the order parameter vanishes. Retaining temperature and applied current as parameters, we present a simple yet definitive explanation of the mechanism within this nonlinear model that leads to the PSC phenomenon and we establish where in parameter space these oscillatory solutions can be found. One of the most interesting features of the analysis is the evident collision of real eigenvalues of the associated PT-symmetric linearization, leading as it does to the emergence of complex elements of the spectrum.

  1. Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics, Auburn University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deis, Dan W.; Hopkins, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The union of Auburn University's Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics and the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center to form a Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) is discussed. An area of focus for the CCDS will be the development of silicon carbide electronics technology, in terms of semiconductors and crystal growth. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  2. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  3. Superconductivity program for electric systems, Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, annual progress report for fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, J.O.; Newnam, B.E. [eds.; Peterson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    Development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) has undergone tremendous progress during the past year. Kilometer tape lengths and associated magnets based on BSCCO materials are now commercially available from several industrial partners. Superconducting properties in the exciting YBCO coated conductors continue to be improved over longer lengths. The Superconducting Partnership Initiative (SPI) projects to develop HTS fault current limiters and transmission cables have demonstrated that HTS prototype applications can be produced successfully with properties appropriate for commercial applications. Research and development activities at LANL related to the HTS program for Fiscal Year 1997 are collected in this report. LANL continues to support further development of Bi2223 and Bi2212 tapes in collaboration with American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) and Oxford Superconductivity Technology, Inc. (OSTI), respectively. The tape processing studies involving novel thermal treatments and microstructural characterization have assisted these companies in commercializing these materials. The research on second-generation YBCO-coated conductors produced by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) over buffer template layers produced by ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) continues to lead the world. The applied physics studies of magnetic flux pinning by proton and heavy ion bombardment of BSCCO and YBCO tapes have provided many insights into improving the behavior of these materials in magnetic fields. Sections 4 to 7 of this report contain a list of 29 referred publications and 15 conference abstracts, a list of patent and license activities, and a comprehensive list of collaborative agreements in progress and completed.

  4. Hail Columbia: Fairchild Center, Columbia University, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progressive Architecture, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The design of the Sherman Fairchild Center for the Life Sciences at Columbia University emphasizes the lightness necessitated by the building's placement on an existing five-story podium structure. (Author/MLF)

  5. Hail Columbia: Fairchild Center, Columbia University, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progressive Architecture, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The design of the Sherman Fairchild Center for the Life Sciences at Columbia University emphasizes the lightness necessitated by the building's placement on an existing five-story podium structure. (Author/MLF)

  6. Data Center Consolidation at the University at Albany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Mugridge

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the experience of the University at Albany (UAlbany Libraries’ migration to a centralized University data center. Following an introduction to the environment at UAlbany, the authors discuss the advantages of data center consolidation. Lessons learned from the project include the need to participate in the planning process, review migration schedules carefully, clarify costs of centralization, agree on a service level agreement, communicate plans to customers, and leverage economies of scale.

  7. Can Superconducting Cosmic Strings Piercing Seed Black Holes Generate Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Lake, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes at redshifts $z> 6$, when the Universe was only nine hundred million years old, has raised the fundamental question of how such massive compact objects could form in a (cosmologically) short time interval. Each of the proposed standard scenarios for black hole formation, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes, or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short time formation of supermassive objects. In the present Letter, we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings, piercing small seed black holes, is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. The increase in mass of a primordial seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings is estimated and it is shown that this increases linearly in time. Due to the high energy transfer rate from the cosmic strings, we find that supermassi...

  8. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

  9. Ethics Centers' Activities and Role in Promoting Ethics in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safatly, Lise; Itani, Hiba; El-Hajj, Ali; Salem, Dania

    2017-01-01

    In modern and well-structured universities, ethics centers are playing a key role in hosting, organizing, and managing activities to enrich and guide students' ethical thinking and analysis. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of the goals, activities, and administration of ethics centers, as well as their role in promoting ethical thinking…

  10. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  11. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  12. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  13. Customer-Centered Structuring in University Libraries and Personnel Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Yılmaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM aims at creating a client-centered organizati- on and providing customer satisfaction. This study reviews TQM and its applica- tions in university libraries and examines employees' satisfaction with their work respectively. It was hypothesized that library personnel is not satisfıed because university libraries lack customer-centered (users and personnel structuring. Survey method was used to gather data. The questionnaire was administered to the 66 employees of Hacettepe University (HU libraries. High-level administra- tors of HU libraries were also interviewed. Data w ere analyzed using “t test” and “one-way analysis ofvariance (ANOVA”.

  14. TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS TO SOCIETY BY UNIVERSITY TRANSPORTATION CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. JOHNS

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of knowledge in the global economy and reviews the process in which knowledge is applied to develop innovations. It confirms the importance of innovation as a key factor for success in today's competitive environment. The paper discusses the contributions a university can make to the innovation process in the field of transportation, and offers a vision of how a university center can enhance and facilitate these contributions. It then describes the efforts of one center, including three examples of innovations facilitated by the center in traffic detection, regional planning, and pavement management. The paper concludes with suggestions that would strengthen the societal contributions of university transportation centers.

  15. Entanglement dynamics of Nitrogen-vacancy centers spin ensembles coupled to a superconducting resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimin; You, Jiabin; Hou, Qizhe

    2016-02-23

    Exploration of macroscopic quantum entanglement is of great interest in both fundamental science and practical application. We investigate a hybrid quantum system that consists of two nitrogen-vacancy centers ensembles (NVE) coupled to a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator (CPWR). The collective magnetic coupling between the NVE and the CPWR is employed to generate macroscopic entanglement between the NVEs, where the CPWR acts as the quantum bus. We find that, this NVE-CPWR hybrid system behaves as a system of three coupled harmonic oscillators, and the excitation prepared initially in the CPWR can be distributed into these two NVEs. In the nondissipative case, the entanglement of NVEs oscillates periodically and the maximal entanglement always keeps unity if the CPWR is initially prepared in the odd coherent state. Considering the dissipative effect from the CPWR and NVEs, the amount of entanglement between these two NVEs strongly depends on the initial state of the CPWR, and the maximal entanglement can be tuned by adjusting the initial states of the total system. The experimental feasibility and challenge with currently available technology are discussed.

  16. Smartphone use at a university health science center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushhousen, Ellie; Norton, Hannah F; Butson, Linda C; Auten, Beth; Jesano, Rae; David, Don; Tennant, Michele R

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of library patrons conducted by librarians and information technology specialists at the Health Science Center Libraries at the University of Florida. The purpose of the survey was to learn if and how library patrons were using smartphones to perform their work-related tasks and how patrons felt the library could support smartphone use at the Health Science Center.

  17. Superconducting MgB{sub 2} films with introduced artificial pinning centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorenko, Anatoli [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Industrial Technologies ASM, Kishinev MD2028 (Moldova); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zdravkov, Vladimir; Surdu, Andrei [Institute of Electronic Engineering and Industrial Technologies ASM, Kishinev MD2028 (Moldova); Obermeier, Guenter [Institute of Applied Physics, University Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Frommen, Christoph; Walheim, Stefan [Institute of Nanotechnology, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Koch, Thomas; Schimmel, Thomas [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Karlsruhe, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    High quality superconducting magnesium diboride films were prepared using DC-magnetron sputtering and post annealing in Mg vapor within a specially designed Nb reactor. The influence of embedded gold nano particles on resistive transition broadening in external magnetic field has been investigated. The transition broadening in strong magnetic fields could be explained by the change of the effective dimensionality of superconductivity nucleation in magnesium diboride, because of the dimensional crossover of fluctuations.

  18. The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

  19. Establishing a Teaching Support Center at a Land Grant University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    The Teaching Support Center (TSC) at the University of North Dakota was established in 1992 to provide faculty and graduate assistants with a wide range of pedagogical, professional, and technological assistance in order to improve the quality of instruction. A 3-year plan was developed to implement 13 goals, which are: (1) determining the needs…

  20. Walk-In Triage Systems in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Katharine S.; Love, Michael M.; Chapman, Kelsey M.; Horn, Angela J.; Haak, Patricia P.; Shen, Claire Y. W.

    2017-01-01

    To meet the complex mental health needs of students, some university counseling centers (UCCs) have implemented walk-in triage intake systems, which have not yet been empirically investigated. This study compared client and clinician differences (N = 5564) between a traditional scheduled intake system (Year 1) and a walk-in triage system (Year 2)…

  1. Rice University: Building an Academic Center for Nonprofit Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaworth, Angela

    2012-01-01

    According to the author, the setting for their nonprofit education center was close to ideal: Support from a dean who cares deeply about nonprofit organizations; encouragement from the university and its renewed focus on reaching beyond its walls on the eve of its centennial; and a generous gift from alumni who have been affiliated with the…

  2. Electronic Commerce Resource Centers. An Industry--University Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Thomas R.; Sommer, Rainer; Tarimcilar, M. Murat

    1999-01-01

    Electronic Commerce Resource Centers focus on transferring emerging technologies to small businesses through university/industry partnerships. Successful implementation hinges on a strategic operating plan, creation of measurable value for customers, investment in customer-targeted training, and measurement of performance outputs. (SK)

  3. Group Treatment of Eating Disorders in a University Counseling Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Gregory; And Others

    Sociocultural pressures to pursue an unrealistic ideal of thinness have contributed to an increasing number of students seeking help at a university counseling center for the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. To help these students, a group treatment technique was developed using a cognitive-behavioral approach. Treatment…

  4. Electronic Commerce Resource Centers. An Industry--University Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Thomas R.; Sommer, Rainer; Tarimcilar, M. Murat

    1999-01-01

    Electronic Commerce Resource Centers focus on transferring emerging technologies to small businesses through university/industry partnerships. Successful implementation hinges on a strategic operating plan, creation of measurable value for customers, investment in customer-targeted training, and measurement of performance outputs. (SK)

  5. The value of a writing center at a medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariail, Jennie; Thomas, Suzanne; Smith, Tom; Kerr, Lisa; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Shaw, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Students often enter graduate healthcare/biomedical schools with insufficient undergraduate instruction in effective writing, yet the ability to write well affects their career opportunities in health care and in scientific research. The present study was conducted to determine the value and effectiveness of instruction by faculty with expertise in teaching writing at a writing center at an academic health science center. Two separate sources of data were collected and analyzed. First, an anonymous campus-wide survey assessed students' satisfaction and utilization of the university's Writing Center. Second, a nonexperimental objective study was conducted comparing a subsample of students who used versus those who did not receive instruction at the Writing Center on quality of writing, as determined by an evaluator who was blind to students' utilization status. From the campus-wide survey, more than 90% of respondents who used the center (which was 26% of the student body) agreed that it was a valuable and effective resource. From the objective study of writing quality, students who used the Writing Center were twice as likely as students who did not to receive an A grade on the written assignment, and the blinded evaluator accurately estimated which students used the Writing Center based on the clarity of writing. The instruction at the Writing Center at our university is highly valued by students, and its value is further supported by objective evidence of efficacy. Such a center offers the opportunity to provide instruction that medical and other healthcare students increasingly need without requiring additions to existing curricula. By developing competency in writing, students prepare for scholarly pursuits, and through the process of writing, they engage critical thinking skills that can make them more attuned to narrative and more reflective and empathetic in the clinical setting.

  6. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  7. 77 FR 59660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... Stanford University Archaeology Center. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  8. Condition for the occurrence of phase slip centers in superconducting nanowires under applied current or voltage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michotte, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Piraux, L.;

    2004-01-01

    Experimental results on the phase slip process in superconducting lead nanowires are presented under two different experimental conditions: constant applied current or constant voltage. Based on these experiments we established a simple model which gives us the condition of the appearance of phas...

  9. Universality in the Self Organized Critical behavior of a cellular model of superconducting vortex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yudong; Vadakkan, Tegy; Bassler, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    We study the universality and robustness of variants of the simple model of superconducting vortex dynamics first introduced by Bassler and Paczuski in Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3761 (1998). The model is a coarse-grained model that captures the essential features of the plastic vortex motion. It accounts for the repulsive interaction between vortices, the pining of vortices at quenched disordered locations in the material, and the over-damped dynamics of the vortices that leads to tearing of the flux line lattice. We report the results of extensive simulations of the critical ``Bean state" dynamics of the model. We find a phase diagram containing four distinct phases of dynamical behavior, including two phases with distinct Self Organized Critical (SOC) behavior. Exponents describing the avalanche scaling behavior in the two SOC phases are determined using finite-size scaling. The exponents are found to be robust within each phase and for different variants of the model. The difference of the scaling behavior in the two phases is also observed in the morphology of the avalanches.

  10. Superconductivity and superconductive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, M. R.

    1990-12-01

    The Stanford Center for Research on Superconductivity and Superconductive Electronics is currently focused on developing techniques for producing increasingly improved films and multilayers of the high-temperature superconductors, studying their physical properties and using these films and multilayers in device physics studies. In general the thin film synthesis work leads the way. Once a given film or multilayer structure can be made reasonably routinely, the emphasis shifts to studying the physical properties and device physics of these structures and on to the next level of film quality or multilayer complexity. The most advanced thin films synthesis work in the past year has involved developing techniques to deposit a-axis and c-axis YBCO/PBCO superlattices and related structures. The in-situ feature is desirable because no solid state reactions with accompanying changes in volume, morphology, etc., that degrade the quality of the film involved.

  11. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  12. The Universe Observation Center: an educational center devoted to Astronomy in Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, D.

    The Universe Observation Center (in Catalan language, Centre d'Observació de l'Univers, COU) is located in close proximity to the Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec, OAM), in eastern Catalonia (Spain). Both centers comprise the Montsec Astronomical Park (Parc Astronòmic Montsec, PAM), managed by the Consorci del Montsec. Montsec Mountain remains the finest location for astronomical observation in Catalonia, as demonstrated by a site-testing campaign conducted by the Astronomy and Meteorology Department of the University of Barcelona. The COU consists of a Central Building (including a permanent exhibition and three classrooms possessing broadband Internet access), the Telescope Park (two astronomical domes equipped with medium-size telescopes, a coelostat for solar observation, and a portable telescope park), the Eye of Montsec (a digital planetarium and, at the same time, an extremely innovative platform for sky observation) and the Garden of the Universe (a tour of the land surrounding the COU, visiting several areas within it). The COU will offer to the Spanish academic community a host of fascinating and unique activities in the fields of astronomy and geology. The Center is open not only to students (from primary school through university), but also to amateur astronomers, people interested in science and the general public.

  13. Universal mechanism for breaking the hc/2e periodicity of flux-induced oscillations in small superconducting rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakaryuk, Victor

    2008-10-17

    A universal mechanism of restoration of minimal hc/e periodicity in the response of small superconducting rings or cylinders to the magnetic flux is proposed. The mechanism is based on the dependence of the Cooper pair's internal energy on its motion as a whole and does not rely on the presence of quasiparticles in the system. The thermal equilibrium hc/2e periodicity is broken by an offset of the transition between different current-carrying states. The magnitude of the offset is calculated for an s-wave superconducting cylinder of radius R in the limit R>xi_{0}, where xi_{0} is the BCS coherence length and turns out to be exponentially small. A possible enhancement of the effect for nodal superconductors is suggested. Similar conclusions should also apply to the response of charged or neutral superfluids to rotation.

  14. The Briscoe Library, University of Texas Health Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, V M

    1994-09-01

    The Briscoe Library at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio opened in 1983, to replace and expand space for the growing campus. Work on the design phase began in 1979, once the legislature allocated $9.5 million for the new building. Of the 23 design objectives specified in the building program, flexibility to accommodate changing services and technology was given first priority. Details cover layout and technology, as well as changes to the environment and the building since it opened.

  15. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorland, William [University of Maryland

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  16. A Crucial Dipole Test of the Expansion Center Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzi, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The expansion center Universe gives a dipole anisotropy to the Hubble law, at any Hubble depth D. After a long series of successful dipole tests on the nearby Universe, using historic data sets of about half a century, and that carried out on 53 SCP SNe Ia ranging around the average redshift =0.5 (ECM paper VI: SAIt2004 in Milan), here is a crucial multiple dipole test at z bins centred on the mean =1.0, or Hubble depth D=c/H0, and based on data from SCP Union compilation (SCPU: Kowalski et al. 2008) and SCP Union2 (SCPU2: Amanullah et al. 2010), including those obtained within "The new wedge-shaped Hubble diagram of 398 SCP supernovae..." (ECM paper IX: SAIt2010 in Naples). Table 5abc lists data of two main samples, with 48 SCPU SNe Ia and 58 SCPU2 SNe Ia respectively. The confirmed dipole anisotropy, shown by 6 primary sample tests and by another 27 from 9 encapsulated z bins with D=DL/(1+z), gives a model independent result, in full accordance with the expansion center model. This means a maximum cz range ...

  17. The Universe Observing Center a modern center to teach and communicate astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Salvador J.

    2011-06-01

    The Universe Observing Center is one of the parts of the Parc Astronòmic Montsec (PAM). PAM is an initiative of the Catalan government, through the Consorci del Montsec (Montsec Consortium), to take advantage of the capabilities and potential of the Montsec region to develop scientific research, training and outreach activities, particularly in the field of Astronomy. The choice of the Montsec mountains to install the PAM was motivated by the magnificent conditions for observing the sky at night; the sky above Montsec is the best (natural sky free of light pollution) in Catalonia for astronomical observations. The PAM has two main parts: the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM) and the Universe Observing Center (COU). The OAdM is a professional observatory with an 80-cm catadioptric telescope (Joan Oró Telescope). This telescope is a robotic telescope that can be controlled from anywhere in the world via the Internet. The COU is a large multipurpose center which is intended to become an educational benchmark for teaching and communicate astronomy and other sciences in Catalonia. The management of the COU has three main goals: 1) Teach primary and secondary school students in our Educational Training Camp. 2) Teach university students housing the practical astronomy lectures of the universities. 3) Communicate astronomy to the general public. The COU comprises special areas for these purposes: the Telescopes Park with more than 20 telescopes, a coelostat for solar observations and two dome containing full-automated telescopes. The most special equipment is ``The Eye of Montsec'', with its 12m dome containing a multimedia digital planetarium and a platform for direct observation of the sky and the environment. During 2009 we expect around 10000 visitors in Montsec area to enjoy science with Montsec dark skies and an special natural environment.

  18. The Nashville University Center: Report of the Executive Director, 1972-73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville Univ. Center, TN.

    This document presents the report of the Executive Director of the Nashville University Center (NUC) for the academic year 1972-1973. Following an overview of the Nashville University Center in 1972-73, emphasis is placed on fine arts in the Center, the fine arts festival, library cooperation in the Center, cross-registration, departmental…

  19. 77 FR 59661 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Stanford University...

  20. New Mexico State University Arrowhead Center PROSPER Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peach, James

    2012-12-31

    This document is the final technical report of the Arrowhead Center Prosper Project at New Mexico State University. The Prosper Project was a research and public policy initiative funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Prosper project (DOE Grant Number DE-NT0004397) began on October 1, 2008 (FY2009, Quarter 1) and ended on December 31, 2012 (FY2013, Quarter 1). All project milestones were completed on time and within the budget. This report contains a summary of ten technical reports resulting from research conducted during the project. This report also contains a detailed description of the research dissemination and outreach activities of the project including a description of the policy impacts of the project. The report also describes project activities that will be maintained after the end of the project.

  1. Tianjin Normal University Establishes Women’s Studies Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    IN July, 1993, an international seminar titled "Chinese Women and Development—Status, Health and Employment" was sponsored by the Women’s Studies Center at Tianjin Normal University. More than 100 international and domestic specialists and workers who deal with women’s issues attended. At the conference, the Women’s Research Institute of the All-China Women’s Federation disclosed the results of an investigation about the status of women in China, which was launched in the early 1990s on a nationwide scale. The results showed that China’s economic reform has greatly affected women. As a result, many researchers who began their research by considering China’s present economic situation, tried to determine the influences the state’s

  2. Joint development utility and university and utility and research center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R.; Valgas, Helio Moreira [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows the background acquired by CEMIG in dealing with projects associated with R and D (Research and Development), carried out as a result of the establishment of contracts or governants with universities and research center for direct application on the solution of problems related to the operation of the system, within the scope of electrical operation planning. The various aspects of a project of this nature such as legal questions, characterization of a contract or a covenant, main developments and new opportunity areas should be covered. Finally the subject shall be dealt with under the Total Quality approach, involving the proposition of control items associated to the process and goals to be reached. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  4. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  5. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  6. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  7. The Stocker AstroScience Center at Florida International University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The new Stocker AstroScience Center located on the MMC campus at Florida International University in Miami Florida represents a unique facility for STEM education that arose from a combination of private, State and university funding. The building, completed in the fall of 2013, contains some unique spaces designed not only to educate, but also to inspire students interested in science and space exploration. The observatory consists of a 4-story building (3 floors) with a 24” ACE automated telescope in an Ash dome, and an observing platform above surrounding buildings. Some of the unique features of the observatory include an entrance/exhibition hall with a 6-ft glass tile floor mural linking the Florida climate to space travel, a state-of-the art telescope control that looks like a starship bridge, and displays such as “Music from the universe”. The observatory will also be the focus of our extensive public outreach program that is entering its 20 year.

  8. Extending Universal Nodal Excitations Optimizes Superconductivity in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, G.; Pushp, A.; Parker, C.V.; Pasupathy, A.N.; Gomes, K.K.; Ono, S.; Wen, J.; Xu, Z.; Yazdani, A.

    2009-06-26

    Understanding the mechanism by which d wave superconductivity in the cuprates emerges and is optimized by doping the Mott insulator is one of the major outstanding problems in condensed-matter physics. Our high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the high-transition temperature (T{sub c}) superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} show that samples with different T{sub c} values in the low doping regime follow a remarkably universal d wave low-energy excitation spectrum, indicating a doping-independent nodal gap. We demonstrate that T{sub c} instead correlates with the fraction of the Fermi surface over which the samples exhibit the universal spectrum. Optimal T{sub c} is achieved when all parts of the Fermi surface follow this universal behavior. Increasing the temperature above T{sub c} turns the universal spectrum into an arc of gapless excitations, whereas overdoping breaks down the universal nodal behavior.

  9. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center... Archaeology Center, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items... affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center....

  10. The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bruce S; Gouveia, Kristine; Oprea, Tudor I; Sklar, Larry A

    2014-03-01

    The University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery (UNMCMD) is an academic research center that specializes in discovery using high throughput flow cytometry (HTFC) integrated with virtual screening, as well as knowledge mining and drug informatics. With a primary focus on identifying small molecules that can be used as chemical probes and as leads for drug discovery, it is a central core resource for research and translational activities at UNM that supports implementation and management of funded screening projects as well as "up-front" services such as consulting for project design and implementation, assistance in assay development and generation of preliminary data for pilot projects in support of competitive grant applications. The HTFC platform in current use represents advanced, proprietary technology developed at UNM that is now routinely capable of processing bioassays arrayed in 96-, 384- and 1536-well formats at throughputs of 60,000 or more wells per day. Key programs at UNMCMD include screening of research targets submitted by the international community through NIH's Molecular Libraries Program; a multi-year effort involving translational partnerships at UNM directed towards drug repurposing - identifying new uses for clinically approved drugs; and a recently established personalized medicine initiative for advancing cancer therapy by the application of "smart" oncology drugs in selected patients based on response patterns of their cancer cells in vitro. UNMCMD discoveries, innovation, and translation have contributed to a wealth of inventions, patents, licenses and publications, as well as startup companies, clinical trials and a multiplicity of domestic and international collaborative partnerships to further the research enterprise.

  11. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  12. Influence of the introduction and formation of artificial pinning centers on the transport properties of nanostructured Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L B S; Rodrigues, C A; Bormio-Nunes, C; Oliveira, N F Jr; Rodrigues, D Jr, E-mail: lucas_sarno@ppgem.eel.usp.b, E-mail: durval@demar.eel.usp.b [Superconductivity Group, Department of Materials Engineering (DEMAR) Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP Polo Urbo-Industrial, Gleba AI-6 - PO Box 116 - Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-01

    The formation of nanostructures projected to act as pinning centers is presented as a highly promising technique for the transport properties optimization of superconductors. However, due to the necessity of nanometric dimensions of these pinning centers, the heat treatment (HT) profiles must be carefully analyzed. The present work describes a methodology to optimize the HT profiles in respect to diffusion, reaction and formation of the superconducting phases. After the HT, samples were removed for micro structural characterization. Measurements of transport properties were performed to analyze the influence of the introduction of artificial pinning centers (APC) on the superconducting phase and to find the flux pinning mechanism acting in these wires. Fitting the volumetric pinning force vs. applied magnetic field (F{sub p} vs. mu{sub o}H) curves of transport properties, we could determine the type and influence of flux pinning mechanism acting in the global behavior of the samples. It was concluded that the maximum current densities were obtained when normal phases (due to the introduction of the APCs) are the most efficient pinning centers in the global behavior of the samples. The use of HT with profile 220{sup 0}C/100h+575{sup 0}C/50h+650{sup 0}C/100h was found as the best treatment for these nanostructured superconducting wires.

  13. University of Illinois FRIENDS Children’s Environmental Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FRIENDS Children's Environmental Health Center at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, was established in 2001 to investigate the interactive effects of...

  14. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping

  15. Space Monitoring Data Center at Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Shugay, Yulia; Barinov, Oleg; Dolenko, Sergey; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Shiroky, Vladimir

    Space monitoring data center of Moscow State University provides operational information on radiation state of the near-Earth space. Internet portal http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/ gives access to the actual data characterizing the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation conditions in the magnetosphere and heliosphere in the real time mode. Operational data coming from space missions (ACE, GOES, ELECTRO-L1, Meteor-M1) at L1, LEO and GEO and from the Earth’s surface are used to represent geomagnetic and radiation state of near-Earth environment. On-line database of measurements is also maintained to allow quick comparison between current conditions and conditions experienced in the past. The models of space environment working in autonomous mode are used to generalize the information obtained from observations on the whole magnetosphere. Interactive applications and operational forecasting services are created on the base of these models. They automatically generate alerts on particle fluxes enhancements above the threshold values, both for SEP and relativistic electrons using data from LEO orbits. Special forecasting services give short-term forecast of SEP penetration to the Earth magnetosphere at low altitudes, as well as relativistic electron fluxes at GEO. Velocities of recurrent high speed solar wind streams on the Earth orbit are predicted with advance time of 3-4 days on the basis of automatic estimation of the coronal hole areas detected on the images of the Sun received from the SDO satellite. By means of neural network approach, Dst and Kp indices online forecasting 0.5-1.5 hours ahead, depending on solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field, measured by ACE satellite, is carried out. Visualization system allows representing experimental and modeling data in 2D and 3D.

  16. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  17. 2007 University Exemplary Department Award honors industrial and systems engineering; apparel, housing, and resource management; and University Academic Advising Center

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering in the College of Engineering; the Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences; and University Academic Advising Center will receive the 2007 University Exemplary Department Awards at ceremonies to be held Tuesday, Nov. 27 at The Inn at Virginia Tech.

  18. Vortex dynamics in a thin superconducting film with a non-uniform magnetic field applied at its center with a small coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Thomas R.; Loh, Yen Lee

    2016-10-01

    This paper models the dynamics of vortices that are generated in the middle of a thin, large-area, superconducting film by a low-frequency magnetic field from a small coil, motivated by a desire to better understand measurements of the superconducting coherence length made with a two-coil apparatus. When the applied field exceeds a critical value, vortices and antivortices originate near the middle of the film at the radius where the Lorentz force of the screening supercurrent is largest. The Lorentz force from the screening supercurrent pushes vortices toward the center of the film and antivortices outward. In an experiment, vortices are detected as an increase in mutual inductance between the drive coil and a coaxial "pickup" coil on the opposite side of the film. The model shows that the essential features of measurements are well described when vortex pinning and the attendant hysteresis are included.

  19. R&D Characteristics and Organizational Structure: Case Studies of University-Industry Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Maureen McArthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades, university-industry research centers have been developed in large numbers and emphasized as a valuable policy tool for innovation. Yet little is known about the heterogeneity of organizational structure within these centers, which has implications regarding policy for and management of these centers. This dissertation…

  20. Access and Finance Issues: The University of Alabama's Education Policy Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Established in the 1920s, the Education Policy Center (EPC) is the oldest center or institute at The University of Alabama. Our work centers on four interrelated areas: (a) access and finance of public higher education, (b) college completion, (c) Pell Grants, and (d) rural community colleges. As place-based institutions with service delivery…

  1. R&D Characteristics and Organizational Structure: Case Studies of University-Industry Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Maureen McArthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades, university-industry research centers have been developed in large numbers and emphasized as a valuable policy tool for innovation. Yet little is known about the heterogeneity of organizational structure within these centers, which has implications regarding policy for and management of these centers. This dissertation…

  2. The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Research Center for Families and Children at Tulane University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Katie Lauve; Buttell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Center for Families and Children is a community-based research center within the School of Social Work at the Tulane University. The Wisner Center primarily supports research projects that examine the causes and consequences of intimate partner violence, promote the development of new frameworks for…

  3. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  4. University of Illinois at Chicago Health Policy Center - Funding

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Funding Data, Appropriations...

  5. University of Illinois at Chicago Health Policy Center - Funding

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Funding Data, Appropriations...

  6. Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subscribe Resources For Families New to Deaf Education Online Networks Odyssey Magazine Publications Shared Reading Project Cochlear Implant Education Center Products Info To Go American Sign Language Assistive Technology ...

  7. University of Rhode Island Regional Earth Systems Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, Lewis [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Cornillon, P. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The primary objective of this program was to establish the URI Regional Earth System Center (“Center”) that would enhance overall societal wellbeing (health, financial, environmental) by utilizing the best scientific information and technology to achieve optimal policy decisions with maximum stakeholder commitment for energy development, coastal environmental management, water resources protection and human health protection, while accelerating regional economic growth. The Center was to serve to integrate existing URI institutional strengths in energy, coastal environmental management, water resources, and human wellbeing. This integrated research, educational and public/private sector outreach Center was to focus on local, state and regional resources. The centerpiece activity of the Center was in the development and implementation of integrated assessment models (IAMs) that both ‘downscaled’ global observations and interpolated/extrapolated regional observations for analyzing the complexity of interactions among humans and the natural climate system to further our understanding and, ultimately, to predict the future state of our regional earth system. The Center was to begin by first ‘downscaling’ existing global earth systems management tools for studying the causes of local, state and regional climate change and potential social and environmental consequences, with a focus on the regional resources identified above. The Center would ultimately need to address the full feedbacks inherent in the nonlinear earth systems by quantifying the “upscaled” impacts of those regional changes on the global earth system. Through an interacting suite of computer simulations that are informed by observations from the nation’s evolving climate observatories, the Center activities integrates climate science, technology, economics, and social policy into forecasts that will inform solutions to pressing issues in regional climate change science,

  8. User-Centered Design in Practice: The Brown University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordac, Sarah; Rainwater, Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study in user-centered design that explores the needs and preferences of undergraduate users. An analysis of LibQual+ and other user surveys, interviews with public service staff, and a formal American with Disabilities Act accessibility review served as the basis for planning a redesign of the Brown University…

  9. Collaboration between schools of social work and university medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracht, N F; Briar, S

    1979-05-01

    Although the interface involving social work, medicine, and the other health professions occurs primarily in the day-to-day world of practice in hospitals and other health agencies, an equally important opportunity exists for interaction at the university level between schools of social work and schools for health professionals. This artice analyzes one school's effort to build effective interdisciplinary linkages.

  10. Measuring and Reporting Physician's Performance in a University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazan-Fishman, Ana Lucia

    This paper describes a Patient Satisfaction survey and database used to measure and report on physician performance at the Ohio State University Health System (OSUHS). The OSUHS averages 6,000 inpatients in any given month, and more than 7,000 emergency patients and 70,000 outpatient encounters. Data from the Patient Satisfaction measures are…

  11. Reforming the University: The Role of the Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Sam D.; Lazarsfeld, Paul F.

    The authors seek to show the potentiality of research organizations for the achievement of basic university goals, and to isolate the conditions that impede or promote the success of these integrative agencies. In addition, they examine the role of the managerial scholars who are in the positions of leadership since they believe this role is vital…

  12. Growth of a Science Center: The Center for Science and Mathematics Education (CESAME) at Stony Brook University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafney, Leo; Bynum, R. David; Sheppard, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the origin and development of CESAME (The Center for Science and Mathematics Education) at Stony Brook University. The analysis identifies key ingredients in areas of personnel, funding, organizational structures, educational priorities, collaboration, and institutionalization. After a discussion of relevant issues in…

  13. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  14. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  15. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  16. The Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) Network National Information and Reporting System (NIRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A searchable, web-based tool for accessing data on AUCD training programs, projects, activities, and products. Includes data on the University Center for Excellence...

  17. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients of the Kuwait University Dental Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali, Mohammad; Joseph, Bobby; Sundaram, Devipriya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the number, types, and locations of oral mucosal lesions in patients who attended the Admission Clinic at the Kuwait University Dental Center to determine...

  18. Screening and management of overweight and obesity at a university student health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcido, Maria Estela; Monsivais, Diane B

    2016-06-16

    This article discusses a quality improvement project focused on developing, implementing, and evaluating an evidence-based best practice protocol for screening and management of overweight and obesity in college students in a university-based student health center.

  19. Teaching professional writing in an academic health sciences center: the Writing Center model at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tom G; Ariail, Jennie; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Kerr, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Writing is taught as professional competency in higher education generally, but the health science education literature emphasizes writing as a pedagogical means rather than a professional end. The Medical University of South Carolina established a Writing Center in 1994 to teach professional writing. This report describes the rationale for profession-specific, graduate-level writing instruction; summarizes the Writing Center model; and reports usage data. Students have reported improvement in particular texts and said they would be better able to complete writing tasks in the future. Interventions modeled after the Writing Center and staffed with professionally trained writing teachers may provide a means to pool resources to teach writing as professional competency. The Writing Center has provided the expertise to teach professional writing without demanding curricular revision.

  20. Tsinghua University Sino-Russian R & D Center for Light Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Sino-Russian R&D Center for Light Alloys was founded at Tsinghua University in 2001 and aimed at the development of the Chinese-Russian and international cooperation in the area of new competitive light metal-based materials, technologies and equipment for the production and processing of high-quality light alloys. Both Chinese and Russian experts work in the Center.

  1. A Wish List for the Advancement of University and College Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, John B.

    2016-01-01

    University and college counseling centers continue to meet emerging challenges in higher education. This article addresses three issues: the need for a more unified organizational structure to represent the profession, the potential value for counseling centers in seeking accreditation, and the importance of specialized training for those entering…

  2. The University of Missouri Career Center in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Joseph A.; Benson, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The University of Missouri Career Center is responding to six trends shaping career centers: personal career theory, diverse customers, empowerment through technology, accountability, and new ideas about the meaning of career. Responses include new types of staff and different service delivery methods. (SK)

  3. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Education, Aeronautics, Space, Autonomy, Earth and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M. (Editor); Lumia, R. (Editor); Tunstel, E., Jr. (Editor); White, B. (Editor); Malone, J. (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first volume of the Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) Center Press Series on NASA University Research Center's (URC's) Advanced Technologies on Space Exploration and National Service constitute a report on the research papers and presentations delivered by NASA Installations and industry and Report of the NASA's fourteen URC's held at the First National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico from February 16-19, 1997.

  4. A Management Review and Analysis of Purdue University Libraries and Audio-Visual Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaske, Jan; And Others

    A management review and analysis was conducted by the staff of the libraries and audio-visual center of Purdue University. Not only were the study team and the eight task forces drawn from all levels of the libraries and audio-visual center staff, but a systematic effort was sustained through inquiries, draft reports and open meetings to involve…

  5. Pressures We Face in Running Counseling Centers on College and University Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilman, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Georgetown University Counseling and Psychiatric Service director Philip Meilman discusses two distinct emerging pressures faced by directors of college and university counseling centers. The first of these is the pressure to provide more of, and an increasing range of, counseling and psychiatric services. The second is related:…

  6. Schools of Promise: A School District-University Partnership Centered on Inclusive School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causton-Theoharis, Julie; Theoharis, George; Bull, Thomas; Cosier, Meghan; Dempf-Aldrich, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    A university-school district partnership, Schools of Promise (SOP), was formed to improve elementary schools for all children through whole-school reform. This effort focused on the concepts of belonging and inclusion, positioning the needs of marginalized students at the center of the reform through a university-facilitated restructuring of…

  7. A Place of Her Own: The Case for University-Based Centers for Women Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The author describes the benefits of university-based women entrepreneur centers as an educational and outreach strategy and argues for their establishment and support by universities interested in educating women entrepreneurs and advancing women-owned businesses. Based on extensive research on women business owners and firsthand experience with…

  8. The Influence of Lifestyle on Cardio-metabolic Risk in Students from Timisoara University Center

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela ORAVIȚAN; Avram, Claudiu; Stela IURCIUC; Petru MERGHEȘ; Bogdan ALMĂJAN-GUȚĂ

    2013-01-01

    This study is a part of the activities in a cross border cooperation project that has proposed the management of obesity and cardiometabolic risk at students from Timisoara and Szeged university centres. The target group of Timisoara University Center was formed out of 600 students enrolled in the four major universities from Timisoara; target group students were questioned about their lifestyle and were evaluated anthropometric parameters, body composition and arterial stiffness; based on qu...

  9. Development of Tunneling Spectroscopy Apparatus for Kelvin and Sub-Kelvin Measurements of Superconducting Energy Gaps by Multi-disciplinary students at a Liberal Arts University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Matt

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling spectroscopy is an important technique used to measure the superconducting energy gap, a feature that is at the heart of the nature of superconductivity in various materials. In this presentation, we report the progress and results in developing high-resolution tunneling spectroscopy experimental platforms in a helium three cryostat, a 3 Kelvin cryocooler and a helium dip-tester. The experimental team working in a liberal arts university is a multi-disciplinary group consisting of one physics major, chemisty majors and a biology major. Students including non-physics majors learned and implemented current-voltage measurement techniques, vacuum system engineering, built electronic boxes and amplifier circuits from scratch, built custom multi-conductor cables for thermometry and current-voltage measurements, and performed conductance measurements. We report preliminary results. Acknowledgments: We acknowledge support from National Science Foundation Grant # DMR-1206561.

  10. [Trends in interhospital transfers from a Swiss university hospital center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Meylan, Nicolas; Yersin, Bertrand; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise; Vallotton, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Research on interhospital transfers provides a basis for describing and quantifying patient flow and its evolution over time, offering an insight into hospital organization and management and hospital overcrowding. The purpose of this study was to conduct a qualitative and quantitative analysis of patient flow and to examine trends over an eight-year period. A retrospective descriptive study of interhospital transfers was conducted between 2003 and 2011 based on an analysis of demographic, medical and operational characteristics. Ambulance transfers and transfers requiring physician assistance were analyzed separately. The number of interhospital transfers increased significantly over the study period,from 4,026 in 2003 to 6,481 in 2011 (+60.9%). The number of ambulance transfers increased by almost 300% (616 in 2003 compared to 2,460 in 2011). Most of the transfers (98%) were to hospitals located less than 75 km from the university hospital (median: 24 km, 5-44). In 2011, 24% of all transfers were to psychiatric institutions. 26% of all transfer cases were direct transfers from the emergency department. An increasing number of transfers required physician assistance. 18% of these patients required ventilatory support, whole 9.8% required vasoactive drugs. 11.6% of these transfers were due to hospital overcrowding. The study shows that there has been a significant increase in interhospital transfers. This increase is related to hospital overcrowding and to the network-based systems governing patient care strategies.

  11. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-02-08

    considerations on the kagome lattice are completing the discussion, where a sublattice interference dramatically affects the Fermi-surface instabilities, suppressing the usual spin-density wave and d+id-wave superconductivity. Thereby, some different fascinating charge and bond orders as well as a nematic are observable. In short, this thesis provides an insight to distinct classes of unconventional superconductors with appropriate simulation techniques. This facilitates to separate the material specific properties from the universal ones.

  12. Glaucoma at the Hamilton Glaucoma Center and the University of California, San Diego

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert N. Weinreb

    2011-01-01

    @@ Known for its unique cross-disciplinary investigative programs and clinical excellence, the scientists and clinicians at the Hamilton Glaucoma Center of the University of California, San Diego seek to enhance the discovery and translation of innovative research to clinical glaucoma care to prevent and cure glaucoma blindness.With state of the art laboratory and clinical facilities located on the La Jolla campus (Figure 1), the Center is a home for a worldrenowned team of scientists and staff.More than 100 post-doctoral fellows in Glaucoma, many of whom hold distinguished academic positions throughout the world, have been trained at the Hamilton Glaucoma Center and the University of California, San Diego.At the core of Hamilton Glaucoma Center activities are the outstanding faculty that are described below.

  13. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  14. Entangled microwaves as a resource for entangling spatially separate solid-state qubits: Superconducting qubits, nitrogen-vacancy centers, and magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Angela Viviana; Rodríguez, Ferney Javier; Quiroga, Luis; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    Quantum correlations present in a broadband two-line squeezed microwave state can induce entanglement in a spatially separated bipartite system consisting of either two single qubits or two-qubit ensembles. By using an appropriate master equation for a bipartite quantum system in contact with two separate but entangled baths, the generating entanglement process in spatially separated quantum systems is thoroughly characterized. Decoherence thermal effects on the entanglement transfer are also discussed. Our results provide evidence that this entanglement transfer by dissipation is feasible, yielding to a steady-state amount of entanglement in the bipartite quantum system which can be optimized for a wide range of realistic physical systems that include state-of-the-art experiments with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, superconducting qubits, or even magnetic molecules embedded in a crystalline matrix.

  15. Evaluation of Courses and Programs Offered Under the Auspices of Wayne State University and the University of Michigan at the University Center for Adult Education, Detroit, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Paul O. A.

    By use of interviews, questionnaires, and observation, the courses and programs offered by the University Center for Adult Education, in Detroit, were evaluated. The courses concerned Communication and Language Art, Environment, Practical Economics, Behavioral Science, Technology, Extension Courses, and Special Events. Evaluation findings show…

  16. Anatomy of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (BSAC): The NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center on MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    a larger research organization than most research  consortia   would be able to maintain.   (4) Maintain collaboration with  Industrial  Members to insure...DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Anatomy of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (BSAC): The NSF Industry /University...This has been achieved through creative combinations of resources, incentives and shared goals involving Academia, Industry , and Government. The

  17. The Influence of Lifestyle on Cardio-metabolic Risk in Students from Timisoara University Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela ORAVIȚAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is a part of the activities in a cross border cooperation project that has proposed the management of obesity and cardiometabolic risk at students from Timisoara and Szeged university centres. The target group of Timisoara University Center was formed out of 600 students enrolled in the four major universities from Timisoara; target group students were questioned about their lifestyle and were evaluated anthropometric parameters, body composition and arterial stiffness; based on questionnaires was determine too the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes mellitus type II. Analysis of the results revealed the strong correlations between lifestyle and cardio-metabolic risk in these students.

  18. Critical limits (alert values) for physician notification: universal or medical center specific limits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, G

    1998-01-01

    The concept of critical limits (alert values), defined as an imminent life threatening laboratory result requiring immediate physician notification, has been widely adopted as a standard of good laboratory practice. Although virtually all laboratories have tests with critical limits, surveys have shown that there is no universal alert value list. Recently, nine VA medical centers in the New England region, which now constitute one consolidated entity, were surveyed with the objective of summarizing critical limits. Universal (100 percent) critical limit tests for clinical chemistry were: Calcium; mean low/high, 6.5/12.4 mg/dL: Glucose 48/432 mg/dL: Potassium 2.8/6.1 mmol/L: Sodium 121/159 mmol/L. Universal hematology tests included: Hematocrit 22.2/59.7 percent: Platelet count 61K/983K: white blood count 1.9K/29K. Although there was universal agreement that abnormal coagulation tests (PT, PTT) should be included on the hematology critical limit list, there was wide variation in the reporting of coagulation tests (seconds and INR) and patient therapeutic status (anticoagulant or no-anticoagulant). Universal alert values for microbiology were: Positive blood culture: Positive cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) culture: Positive CSF Gram stain. There was no universal agreement regarding critically high (potentially toxic) therapeutic drugs, with two medical centers declining to notify physicians of any abnormally high therapeutic drug level. No other qualitative critical limits for other laboratory sections, such as physician notification of an unexpected malignancy (surgical pathology) were universal. Medical center specific critical limits, designed to meet the clinical needs of each facility, are the norm in the nine medical centers. Laboratories do need periodically to review their critical limit lists with appropriate clinical input to avoid including critical limits for laboratory tests not required for urgent physician notification and patient evaluation and treatment.

  19. The changing face of academic health centers: a path forward for the University of Colorado Denver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M Roy; Krugman, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    This article describes a decade of major changes at an academic health center (AHC) and university. The authors describe two major changes undertaken at the University of Colorado and its AHC during the past 10 years and the effects of these changes on the organization as a whole. First, the AHC's four health professional schools and two partner hospitals were completely relocated from a space-limited urban campus to a closed Army base. The impact of that change and the management of its potential disruption of academic programs are discussed in detail. In the middle of this total relocation, the AHC campus was consolidated with a general academic campus within the University of Colorado system, compounding the challenge. The authors describe the strategies employed to implement this major consolidation, including changing the organizational structure and selecting the new name of the university--the University of Colorado Denver.

  20. Using Electronic Information Resources Centers by Faculty Members at University Education: Competencies, Needs and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelenein, Yousri

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the factual situation of electronic information resources centers to faculty members at university education. Competencies that faculty members should possess regarding this issue were determined. Also their needs for (scientific research skills and teaching) were assessed. In addition, problems that hinder their…

  1. Implementing the Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity in University Counseling Center Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Lese-Fowler, Karen; Bursley, Kevin; Reyes, Elizabeth; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential contribution of the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") to predoctoral internship training programs housed in university counseling centers. The purpose of this article is to present recommendations for how to best implement the Values…

  2. History of the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Jean Mayer United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, while quite a mouthful, is aptly named, since it has contributed substantially to the legacy of Jean Mayer, to the scientific stature of the USDA and, in Atwater’s tradition, to the d...

  3. 78 FR 25469 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated.... Gregory Waselkov, Director, University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies, 6052 USA Drive...:113) called the ``delightful West Bend neighborhood'' in the late 1800s. Cultural materials from site...

  4. Authority in an Agency-Centered, Inquiry-Based University Calculus Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Hope; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Authority roles among teachers and students have traditionally been hierarchal and centered with the expertise and power of the teacher limiting opportunities for students to act with autonomy to build and justify mathematics. In this paper we discuss authority roles for teachers and students that have been realized in an inquiry-based university,…

  5. EPA Announces Grant Funding to the University of Maryland to Support Regional Environmental Finance Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    PHILADELPHIA (August 25, 2015) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has selected the University of Maryland as one of the nine winners of a six-year grant to support a regional Environmental Finance Center. Through the Environmental Finance C

  6. Nashville University Center. Report of the Executive Director 1973-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville Univ. Center, TN.

    This report gives a picture of the Nashville University Center (NUC) during the academic year 1973-74. The purpose of the NUC is "to encourage through cooperation operating economies and academic and community programs that cannot be undertaken by individual institutions." To succeed in creating individual programs of cooperation, the NUC must…

  7. Authority in an Agency-Centered, Inquiry-Based University Calculus Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Hope; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Authority roles among teachers and students have traditionally been hierarchal and centered with the expertise and power of the teacher limiting opportunities for students to act with autonomy to build and justify mathematics. In this paper we discuss authority roles for teachers and students that have been realized in an inquiry-based university,…

  8. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  9. Have the Presenting Problems of Clients at University Counseling Centers Increased in Severity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Examined changes in severity level for personal, vocational, and educational problems demonstrated by college students (between 1,444 and 1,575 each year) seen in a university counseling services center using intake records. Found that, when counselors spoke of severity of problems, they usually referred to personal problems. Data did not show…

  10. Implementing the Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity in University Counseling Center Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Lese-Fowler, Karen; Bursley, Kevin; Reyes, Elizabeth; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential contribution of the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") to predoctoral internship training programs housed in university counseling centers. The purpose of this article is to present recommendations for how to best implement the Values…

  11. Brief Therapy at a University Counseling Center: Working Alliance, Readiness to Change, and Symptom Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Megan; Laux, John M.; Ritchie, Martin H.; Piazza, Nick J.; Tiamiyu, Mojisola F.

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated whether students receiving short-term individual counseling at a university counseling center showed progress as evidenced by perceived client and counselor outcomes and the roles that client readiness to change and working alliance played in this setting. The results indicated that the counselor reports, not the client…

  12. Impact of 5 years of Lean Six Sigma in a university medical center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C. Niemeijer; A. Trip; L.J. de Jong; K.W. Wendt; R.J.M.M. Does

    2012-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherla

  13. Building "Bob": A Project Exploring the Human Body at Western Illinois University Preschool Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouette, Scott

    2008-01-01

    When the children at Western Illinois University Preschool Center embarked on a study of human bodies, they decided to build a life-size model of a body, organ by organ from the inside out, to represent some of the things they were learning. This article describes the building of "Bob," the human body model, highlighting the children's…

  14. Performance Evaluation of Extension Education Centers in Universities Based on the Balanced Scorecard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at developing a set of appropriate performance evaluation indices mainly based on balanced scorecard (BSC) for extension education centers in universities by utilizing multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). Through literature reviews and experts who have real practical experiences in extension education, adequate performance…

  15. Serving Generation 1.5 Learners in the University Writing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonus, Terese

    2003-01-01

    Explains how a key academic support service--the university writing center, can assist Generation 1.5 students (long-term U.S. residents and English language learners fluent in spoken English) as they develop their writing skills. (Author/VWL)

  16. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  17. Working with Clients Who Have Religious/Spiritual Issues: A Survey of University Counseling Center Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ian S.; Hill, Clara E.; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Freitas, Gary

    2010-01-01

    University counseling center therapists (N = 220) completed an Internet survey about religion/spirituality in therapy, with 200 of these therapists describing therapy with a recent client whose issues involved religion/spirituality. Common client religion/spirituality issues were questioning one's childhood religion, exploring…

  18. Obstacles and Solutions of Commercialization of University Research: Case Study of Small Businesses Development Center of University of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahangir Yadolahi FARSI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With the entrepreneurship mission incorporated into the education and research missions of universities, their role in the economic and social development in societies has increased. Thus, subjects revolving around academic entrepreneurship and knowledge commercialization have drawn the attention of many researchers and politicians in different countries in the world. In Iran, too, the knowledge commercialization phenomenon is in its prime and is in its early stages of taking shape and development. Therefore, this paper aims to identify obstacles and solutions in the commercialization of university research in Iran. The qualitative research method has been used in the form of a case study. The research data collection tools consist of semi-structured interviews. As a compliment of data collection tools, some evidence and documents were also studies. The research statistical population includes all the individuals engaged in knowledge commercialization in the University of Tehran. Twenty six interviews were conducted before data saturation reached. The results of the qualitative research indicate that the organizational, environmental/institutional and internal university research commercialization impeding factors are critical obstacles in the Small Business Development Center (SBDC of the University of Tehran and policy makers should devise proper strategies in light of these factors.

  19. The University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women: science inspired by women's stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Carol E

    2011-09-01

    Research in the violence against women area has been undertaken for more than 30 years, but individual researchers who have made these scholarly contributions have not been advantaged by adequate attention, funding, or organizational structure within the university setting. This article offers a detailed description of a model of an interdisciplinary research center designed to provide an academic architecture within which research on intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and other forms of violence against women can flourish and advance. The article describes the impetus for creation of the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women, its current mission, organizational structure, financial operations, and initiatives related to research, education, and public service. Practical strategies for establishing and sustaining a center of this type are offered.

  20. University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Education: Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Crotty, G.; Cai, L.; Sana, P.; Doolittle, A.; Ropp, M.; Krygowski, T.; Narasimha, S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-09-01

    This is a second annual report since the University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Education was established at Georgia Tech. The major focus of the center is crystalline silicon, and the mission of the Center is to improve the fundamental understanding of the science and technology of advanced photovoltaic devices and materials, to fabricate high-efficiency cells, and develop low-cost processes, to provide training and enrich the equational experience of students in this field, and to increase US competitiveness by providing guidelines to industry and DOE to achieve cost-effective and high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. This report outlines the work of the Center from July 1993--June 1994.

  1. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  2. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Fire Smoke Transport in the Tsinghua University Sports Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jianguo; CHEN Haixin; FU Song

    2005-01-01

    Fire Dynamics Simulator v3.0 was used to investigate and assess fire smoke transport and management in a realistic indoor sports center. An atrium fire test case illustrated the code's superiority over code-type empirical models for both accuracy and capability. Four fire scenarios in the Tsinghua University Sports Center were then simulated. The smoke layer's descent speed was predicted for each case. The importance of the door effect was revealed and an additional mechanical ventilation system for the building was proved to be of no help. The door effect must be carefully considered in future fire safety designs.

  4. A University-based Forensics Training Center as a Regional Outreach, Education, and Research activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayford B. Vaughn

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a university-based Forensics Training Center (FTC established by a Department of Justice grant for the purpose of improving the ability of state and local law enforcement in the Southeastern part of the United States to address the rising incidence of computer based crime. The FTC effort is described along with supporting evidence of its need. The program is not only a service activity, but also contributes to the Mississippi State University (MSU security program pedagogy, and research effort.

  5. Research and industrial applications at the McClellan Nuclear Research Center, University of California, Davis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, B.; Lerche, M.; Shackelford, J.; Steingass, W., E-mail: mlerche@ucdavis.edu [Univ. of California, Davis, McClellan Nuclear Research Center, Davis CA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The MNRC is a facility centered around a 2 MW TRIGA research reactor, one of the three largest university research reactors in the US and the youngest. A wide range of research studies is underway including the imaging of fuel cells, tomography of geological minerals, neutron activation analysis of biological samples and plant seed irradiation. Industrial applications include radiography of precision aerospace castings and irradiation of electronics. The McClellan reactor may become part of a consortium of university reactors that will provide radiopharmaceuticals in response to a critical shortage in North America.

  6. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  7. The Preparation of Master's-Level Professional Counselors for Positions in College and University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian M.; Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; Ward, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated college and university counseling center directors' perceptions of the adequacy of the preparation of master's-level counselors for work in college and university counseling centers. Results indicated that counselors were rated on average as prepared; however, many directors had concerns about counselors'…

  8. Situation analysis of trauma based on Arizona trauma center standards in university hospitals of Tehran, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahdi Sharif-Alhoseini; Aliashraf Eghbali; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar; Soheil Saadat

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Injuries are common and important problem in Tehran, capital of Iran. Although therapeutic centers are not essentially established following the constructional principles of developed countries, the present opportunities and equipments have to be used properly. We should recognize and reduce the deficits based on the global standards.This study deliberates the trauma resources and capacities in university hospitals of Tehran based on Arizona trauma center standards, which are suitable for the assessment of trauma centers.Methods: Forty-one university hospitals in Tehran were evaluated for their conformity with "Arizona trauma center standards" in 2008. A structured interview was arranged with the "Educational Supervisor" of all hospitals regarding their institutional organization, departments, clini-cal capabilities, clinical qualifications, facilities and resources, rehabilitation services, performance improvement, continuing education, prevention, research and additional requirements for pediatric trauma patients. Relative frequencies and percentages were calculated and Student's t test was used to compare the mean values.Results: Forty-one hospitals had the average of 77.7 (50.7%) standards from 153 Arizona trauma center standards and these standards were present in 97.5 out of 153 (63.7%) in 17 general hospitals. Based on the subgroups of the standards, 64.8% items of hospital resources and capabilities were considered as a subgroup with the maximum criteria, and 17.7% items of research section as another subgroup with the minimum standards.Conclusions: On the basis of our findings, no hospital meet all the Arizona trauma center standards completely. The hospitals as trauma centers at different levels must be promoted to manage trauma patients desirably.

  9. An Investigation of Creative Climate of University R&D Centers and Policy Implications for Innovation in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Rasmussen, Palle; Luo, Lingling

    2017-01-01

    The chapter focuses on the influences of science and technology (S&T) policies on creative climate of university R&D centers in China that provide policy implications for improving roles of university R&D in innovation system. The empirical data came from two questionnaire surveys, one...... is with members from R&D centers, another with leaders of S&T fund management sectors in universities. The results demonstrate both strengths and weaknesses of creative climate of university R&D centers. This leads to implications such as to improve a more comprehensive innovation Measurement system and to build...

  10. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Qehaja Buçaj; Edmond Puca; Sadie Namani; Muharem Bajrami; Valbon Krasniqi; Lindita Ajazaj Berisha; Xhevat Jakupi; Bahrie Halili; Dhimiter Kraja

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about epidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the diseas...

  11. Strategies for biosafety and minimizing the risk of health problems in laboratories of a university center

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchner, Rosane Maria; Loebens,Luíza; Scherer, Mônica Elisa; Ochôa, Priscila Ozelame; Chaves, Magda Antunes de; Silinske, Jaqueline; Soares, Adriana Ribas

    2013-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/2236117010745This project provided to study environmental risks triggering of aggravating health problems in Teaching and Research laboratories in a university center and to aware workers from these places in order to develop procedures to minimize the risk of personal accidents and environmental contamination. There were lectures, interviews, distribution of educational material and preparation of risk maps, which are displayed in each of the laboratories involved. ...

  12. LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Jean Leyder

    2000-01-01

    The LHC is the next step in CERN's quest to unravel the mysteries of the Universe. It will accelerate protons to energies never before achieved in laboratories, and to hold them on course it will use powerful superconducting magnets on an unprecedented scale.

  13. The Process of Building the Gene Smith Tibetology Literature Center at the Southwest University for Nationalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIXI Lamu; LIU Yong; BENG Jia

    2014-01-01

    The Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center ( TBRC) founded by Gene Smith , is a non-profit organization which concentrates on collec-ting, sorting, and digitizing Tibetan literature . Most of the documents comes from Gene Smith ’ s personal collection , and the content covers reli-gion, philosophy, medicine, arts, psychology, as-trology, poetics, and history, etc.The digitali-zation of Tibetan literature and putting them on line is the key project of the institute .The purpose of the Ethnic Literature Center in the Southwest Uni-versity for Nationalities ( SWUN) is to rescue and preserve the ancient manuscripts of the ethnic groups , and there is a Tibetan Literature Section in the center .

  14. Establishment of a university academic spine center: from concept to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Paul M; Burton, Douglas C; Khan, Talal W; Dixon, Kimberly A; Asher, Marc A; Varghese, George

    2013-01-01

    In fewer than five years, the University of Kansas Hospital Spine Center became the largest and most comprehensive spine care facility in the greater metropolitan Kansas City area. The 22,000-square-foot facility has 27 exam rooms, four specialized diagnostic rooms, 11 pre-/post-interventional procedure rooms, and a 4000-square-foot outpatient rehabilitation gym. Patients can meet with their physicians, undergo diagnostic tests and treatment, and attend therapy sessions in one location. The multidisciplinary Spine Center brings together orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, neurologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, pain-management anesthesiologists, radiologists, and physical and occupational therapists. The Spine Center became successful because a group of physicians bought into the philosophy of a comprehensive interdisciplinary program, were willing to sacrifice some territorial claims, and were willing to put patient care and the good of the institution above individual egos.

  15. Jackson State University's Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications: New facilities and new paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce E.; Elliot, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Jackson State University recently established the Center for Spatial Data Research and Applications, a Geographical Information System (GIS) and remote sensing laboratory. Taking advantage of new technologies and new directions in the spatial (geographic) sciences, JSU is building a Center of Excellence in Spatial Data Management. New opportunities for research, applications, and employment are emerging. GIS requires fundamental shifts and new demands in traditional computer science and geographic training. The Center is not merely another computer lab but is one setting the pace in a new applied frontier. GIS and its associated technologies are discussed. The Center's facilities are described. An ARC/INFO GIS runs on a Vax mainframe, with numerous workstations. Image processing packages include ELAS, LIPS, VICAR, and ERDAS. A host of hardware and software peripheral are used in support. Numerous projects are underway, such as the construction of a Gulf of Mexico environmental data base, development of AI in image processing, a land use dynamics study of metropolitan Jackson, and others. A new academic interdisciplinary program in Spatial Data Management is under development, combining courses in Geography and Computer Science. The broad range of JSU's GIS and remote sensing activities is addressed. The impacts on changing paradigms in the university and in the professional world conclude the discussion.

  16. Superconductivity in Italian Secondary Schools: the experimentation carried out by Udine University with Supercomet2 (SC2) materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo; Viola, Rossana; Corni, Federico

    2008-05-01

    Through a highly interactive tools on CD, which comprises animation and films of demonstrative experiments, and uses modern pedagogical methods, such as collaborative learning and problem solving, the Supercomet 2 Project (SUPERCOnductivity Multimedia Educational Tool phase 2 of the European Union) aims to introduce superconductivity to European high school curriculums. During the first year of the project the following were produced: a CD-ROM with didactic material, a teacher's guide to clarify characteristics and roles of support material (texts, worksheets and computer presentations) and preview didactic courses. During the second year of the project It was: translated the material into the languages of countries participating in the project, experimented the application in high school classes in various parts of Europe, tested the updating course and the teacher's guide with a group of reference teachers. At the end of the first period of experimentation and dissemination were revised and new material was integrated in order to produce a final version at the end of the project. Further integrated proposals have been included with the revised material. In this paper the main characteristics realized during the project will be described.

  17. 1st September 2010 - British Vice-Chancellor, Liverpool University Sir Newby and Lady Newby signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with P. Cruikshank; accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier and Liverpool University T. Bowcock and P. Allport.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    1st September 2010 - British Vice-Chancellor, Liverpool University Sir Newby and Lady Newby signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with P. Cruikshank; accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier and Liverpool University T. Bowcock and P. Allport.

  18. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  19. Superconducting electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogalla, Horst

    1994-01-01

    During the last decades superconducting electronics has been the most prominent area of research for small scale applications of superconductivity. It has experienced quite a stormy development, from individual low frequency devices to devices with high integration density and pico second switching

  20. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public.

  1. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  2. Japan. Superconductivity for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.

    2012-11-15

    Currently, many smart grid projects are running or planned worldwide. These aim at controlling the electricity supply more efficiently and more stably in a new power network system. In Japan, especially superconductivity technology development projects are carried out to contribute to the future smart grid. Japanese cable makers such as Sumitomo Electric and Furukawa Electric are leading in the production of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. The world's largest electric current and highest voltage superconductivity proving tests have been started this year. Big cities such as Tokyo will be expected to introduce the HTS power cables to reduce transport losses and to meet the increased electricity demand in the near future. Superconducting devices, HTS power cables, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and flywheels are the focus of new developments in cooperations between companies, universities and research institutes, funded by the Japanese research and development funding organization New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)

  3. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-21

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  4. [Researches on virology at the Tohoku University Research Center in the Philippines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshitani, Hitoshi; Saito, Mariko; Okamoto, Michiko; Tamaki, Raita; Kamigaki, Taro; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine has established the Tohoku-RITM Collaborative Research Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Diseases at Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) in the Philippines in 2008. Our aim of the center is to conduct operational researches, which can contribute to control of infectious diseases in the Philippines. Therefore most of our researches in the Philippines are being conducted in the fields. Main research themes include severe acute respiratory infections in children, influenza disease burden study, molecular epidemiology of rabies, and viral etiology of acute diarrhea. The study on severe acute respiratory infections in children in Leyte Island has recruited hospitalized cases with severe pneumonia. We showed that enterovirus 68 was one of important causative agents in severe pneumonia cases. We also conducted other analyses including molecular epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pathogenesis of human rhinoviruses (HRV). Based on these studies, we initiated more comprehensive researches in the Philippines since 2010.

  5. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-21

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  6. Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems, New Mexico State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Stephen; DeLeon, Phillip; Borah, Deva; Lyman, Ray

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems activities at New Mexico State University. Presentations cover the following topics: (1) small satellite communications, including nanosatellite radio and virtual satellite development; (2) modulation and detection studies, including details on smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) spectra and highlights of an adaptive turbo multiuser detector; (3) decoupled approaches to nonlinear ISI compensation; (4) space internet testing; (4) optical communication; (5) Linux-based receiver for lightweight optical communications without a laser in space, including software design, performance analysis, and the receiver algorithm; (6) carrier tracking hardware; and (7) subband transforms for adaptive direct sequence spread spectrum receivers.

  7. The new library building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronick, D A; Bowden, V M; Olivier, E R

    1985-01-01

    The new University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Library opened in June 1983, replacing the 1968 library building. Planning a new library building provides an opportunity for the staff to rethink their philosophy of service. Of paramount concern and importance is the need to convey this philosophy to the architects. This paper describes the planning process and the building's external features, interior layouts, and accommodations for technology. Details of the move to the building are considered and various aspects of the building are reviewed. Images PMID:3995205

  8. Center of the universal Askey-Wilson algebra at roots of unity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hau-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by a profound observation on the Racah-Wigner coefficients of Uq (sl2), the Askey-Wilson algebras were introduced in the early 1990s. A universal analog △q of the Askey-Wilson algebras was recently studied. For q not a root of unity, it is known that Z (△q) is isomorphic to the polynomial ring of four variables. A presentation for Z (△q) at q a root of unity is displayed in this paper. As an application, a presentation for the center of the double affine Hecke algebra of type (C1∨ ,C1) at roots of unity is obtained.

  9. THE ROLE OF STUDENT-CENTERED EDUCATION IN STIMULATING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT OF UNIVERSITY GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosca Remus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship plays a major role in the economic growth and development of most modern economies. Measures are being taken by most governments in order to stimulate entrepreneurship, however even more can be done by promoting entrepreneurship in the educational context. According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Global Report (2013 Romania is performing slightly under the average of similar countries when it comes to entrepreneurial activity, is above the average at necessity-driven entrepreneurship and low at innovation driven entrepreneurship. Under these circumstances, a focus on entrepreneurship in higher education is required in order to help Romania bridge the gap to the other efficiency-driven economies. Our study aims to assess the impact of the university level education on the career choices of present entrepreneurs in the Bihor county of Romania. 30 university graduates that are currently running a business have been interviewed regarding the reasons for starting their companies as well as the relationship that they had and have with the university from which they graduated. While some of the entrepreneurs claim that their education had little impact on the decision to become an entrepreneur, most of them believe that it played a big role on their performance and it prepared them somewhat for the challenges they faced once they opened their businesses. Also a large portion of them report being involved in the activity of the university. The participants offered valuable feedback regarding their experience with the university. They also provided considerable information regarding the improvement that they would like to see in the future and how a more student-centered education process could positively impact the development of entrepreneurial spirit and better prepare future graduates to start and run a business. We further discuss the means through which this could be achieved in the context of our institution and other

  10. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubukov, Andrey V [University of Wisconsin

    2015-06-10

    This proposal is for theoretical work on strongly correlated electron systems, which are at the center of experimental and theoretical activities in condensed-matter physics. The interest to this field is driven fascinating variety of observed effects, universality of underlying theoretical ideas, and practical applications. I propose to do research on Iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), which currently attract high attention in the physics community. My goal is to understand superconductivity and magnetism in these materials at various dopings, the interplay between the two, and the physics in the phase in which magnetism and superconductivity co-exist. A related goal is to understand the origin of the observed pseudogap-like behavior in the normal state. My research explores the idea that superconductivity is of electronic origin and is caused by the exchange of spin-fluctuations, enhanced due to close proximity to antiferromagnetism. The multi-orbital/multi-band nature of FeSCs opens routes for qualitatively new superconducting states, particularly the ones which break time-reversal symmetry. By all accounts, the coupling in pnictdes is below the threshold for Mott physics and I intend to analyze these systems within the itinerant approach. My plan is to do research in two stages. I first plan to address several problems within weak-coupling approach. Among them: (i) what sets stripe magnetic order at small doping, (ii) is there a preemptive instability into a spin-nematic state, and how stripe order affects fermions; (iii) is there a co-existence between magnetism and superconductivity and what are the system properties in the co-existence state; (iv) how superconductivity emerges despite strong Coulomb repulsion and can the gap be s-wave but with nodes along electron FSs, (v) are there complex superconducting states, like s+id, which break time reversal symmetry. My second goal is to go beyond weak coupling and derive spin-mediated, dynamic interaction between

  11. A Problem Solving Curriculum for Active Learning at the Northwest Center for Medical Education, Indiana University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatridis, Panayotis G.

    An innovative curriculum called the "Regional Center Alternative Pathway," recently adopted by the Northwest Center for Medical Education (part of Indiana University's School of Medicine), is presented. The curriculum combines the traditional structure's didactic approach with a new problem-based tutorial curriculum. In this curriculum…

  12. Evidence-Informed Leadership in the Japanese Context: Middle Managers at a University Self-Access Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, John; Brown, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the steering of a self-access learning center in a Japanese university by its "middle management" committee over the first years of its operation. Middle management practice was informed by an ethnographic archive of various facets of center use, particularly concerning language policy and curriculum integration, issues about…

  13. The Emergence of University-Based Education Policy Centers. ERIC/CEM Trends and Issues Series, Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha M.; Hall, Gayle C.

    A closeup look is provided of a trend in the field of educational policy in the 1980's: the establishment of university-based centers that have a mission of providing state policymakers with nonpartisan, reliable data on education policy options. The development and characteristics of education policy centers are examined. The first section…

  14. Play in the Sandpit: A University and a Child-Care Center Collaborate in Facilitated-Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Olga; French-Lee, Stacey; Bulunuz, Nermin; Bulunuz, Mizrap

    2010-01-01

    Sand play commonly occupies children at preschools, child-development centers, and school and park playgrounds. The authors review the research on sand play and present a small study on outdoor sand play conducted at a university-based, child-development center using a method they call "facilitated-action research." This study had four…

  15. The evolving organizational structure of academic health centers: the case of the University of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Douglas J

    2008-09-01

    The organizational structures of academic health centers (AHCs) vary widely, but they all exist along a continuum of integration--that is, the degree to which the academic and clinical missions operate under a single administrative and governance structure. This author provides a brief overview of the topic of AHC integration, including the pros and cons of more integrated or less integrated models. He then traces the evolution of the University of Florida (UF) Health Science Center, which was created in the 1950s as a fully integrated AHC and which now operates under a more distributed management and governance model. Starting as a completely integrated AHC, UF's Health Science Center reached a time of maximal nonintegration (or dys-integration) in the late 1990s and at the beginning of this decade. Circumstances are now pushing the expanding clinical and academic enterprises to be more together as they face the challenges of market competition, federal research budget constraints, and reengineering clinical operations to reduce costs, enhance access, and improve quality and patient safety. Although formal organizational integration may not be possible or appropriate for any number of legal or political reasons, the author suggests that AHCs should strive for "functional integration" to be successful in the current turbulent environment.

  16. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities.

  17. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mago, Pedro [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Newell, LeLe [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  18. The birth of the RCMI Clinical Research Center is a joint venture of the University of Hawaii and Kapiolani Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trockman, C; Pelke, S; Skidmore, H; Greenwood, F; Easa, D

    1997-04-01

    Hawaii established a Clinical Research Center with collaboration from the University of Hawaii Pacific Biomedical Research Center, the John A. Burns School of Medicine and Kapiolani Health via a five year award from the Research Centers in Minority Institutions of the National Institutes of Health. Support offered includes consultative services for protocol design; epidemiological and biostatistical analysis; design of study forms; and data and specimen collection and analysis.

  19. Impelementation of Information Technology Service Management at Data And Information System Center of XYZ University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelius Irfandhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Information Technology (IT is increasingly progressing. Nowadays, the success of a business of the organization/company is highly dependent on the IT infrastructure used. Therefore, organizations/companies have to manage their IT service to be optimal to their customers. Looking at this matter and the increasing dynamics of XYZ University, then Data and Information System Center (Pusdatin - an IT provider of XYZ University began implementing IT Service Management (ITSM from 2013 using the latest version of Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL, namely ITIL v3 as a framework for implementing ITSM in its business processes. However, along the way, there are still some problems happen in Pusdatin in order that ITSM can actually support and align with the objectives of XYZ University. Through this paper, the authors want to explain how the implementation of ITSM at Pusdatin, identify the problems related to the implementation of ITSM, and provide the solutions for each problem. The methods used are direct observation to Pusdatin, conductan interview with the Head of Pusdatin and Staff of Pusdatin, and also perform a literature review of books and papers that discuss about ITIL. The result of this research is that ITSM process of Pusdatin generally works quite well but there are still some shortcomings because ITSM is not 100% implemented in all areas.

  20. Rams Head Center : an innovative vegetative roof plaza at the University of North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.; Potts, A. [Cahill Associates Inc., West Chester, PA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A newly constructed vegetative roof plaza on the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill campus serves as a link between 2 sides of the campus. The multi-use Rams Head Center is a green roof plaza constructed over a large parking garage. As part of the campus's expansion plans, the University set rigorous environmental goals, such as balancing growth with preservation of natural drainage systems; managing stormwater as an opportunity instead of a problem; managing total stormwater volume on-site; enhancing and protecting the water quality of streams; and, reinforcing the University as a role model. During large storms, the entire green roof system discharges into a bioswale, a stormwater infiltration bed, and a recreated stream segment. The 40,000 square foot green roof plaza includes a 56,000 gallon cistern and a permanent water storage zone under the planting soil to support trees and shrubs. Visual stormwater connections and signs are placed to raise community awareness of water resource issues. This paper reviewed the basic design principles for the remainder of non-cistern areas of the green roof. Issues regarding landscape design, seasonal operation and maintenance were also discussed. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Magnetic Field Reentrant Superconductivity in Aluminum Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence; Goldman, Allen

    Reentrance to the superconducting state through the application of a magnetic field to quasi-one dimensional superconductors driven resistive by current, is counter to the expected properties of superconductors. It was not until recently that a microscopic mechanism explaining the phenomenon was proposed in which superconductivity and phase slip driven dissipation coexist in a non-equilibrium state. Here we present additional results of magnetic field induced reentrance into the superconducting state in quasi-one-dimensional aluminum nanowires with an in-plane magnetic field both transverse to, and along the wire axis. The reentrant behavior is seen in the magnetic field dependence of the I-V characteristic and resistance vs. temperature, and in the wire's magnetoresistance at 450mK. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-02ER46004. Samples were fabricated at the Minnesota Nanofabrication Center. Parts of this work were carried out in the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, a member of the Materials Research Facilities Network (www.mrfn.org) funded via the NSF MRSEC program.

  2. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John; Cox, James

    2003-08-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  3. Pediatric burns in University Clinical Center of Kosovo from 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Selmani, Mimoza E; Gashi, Sanije

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and cause of burns in children of our population. This was a retrospective study that included 399 patients with burns, younger than 15 years old who were admitted to the Department of Plastic Surgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo, between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2010. The patients were categorized into the following three age groups: infants and toddlers (0-2 years), early childhood (3-6 years), and late childhood (7-15 years). Arithmetic median and standard deviation were calculated from statistical parameters for gender and age; the differences between the three age groups were measured with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A p value of Kosovo induces hospital admissions and prolonged hospital stays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Research and education at the NASA Fisk University Center for Photonic Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Enrique

    1996-07-01

    In 1992, NASA awarded Fisk University a 5 year grant to establish a center for research and education on photonic materials are synthesized, characterized and, in some cases, developed into devices with applications in the fields of radiation detectors and nonlinear optical crystals, glasses and nanomaterials. The educational components include participation in the research by 3 types of students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology: 1) Fisk undergraduates participating during the academic year. 2) Fisk graduates performing their Maser Thesis research. 3) Fisk and other HBCU's and Minority Institutions' undergraduates attending a 10 week summer workshop with a very rigorous program of study, research and progress reporting. Funds are available for supporting participating students. Prerequisite, schedules of activities, evaluation procedures and typical examples of the outcome are presented.

  5. University of Maryland Wall Washer Retrofit - LED Modules Replace Halogen Lamps in a Performing Arts Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abell, Thomas C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Perrin, Tess E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The University of Maryland (UMD) began retrofitting halogen wall washers in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center (CSPAC) in April 2014. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting (SSL) GATEWAY program documented this process through the final installation in March 2015, summarized in this report. The wall washers illuminate hallways lining the atrium, providing task illuminance for transitioning between spaces and visual interest to the atrium boundaries. The main goals of the retrofit were to maintain the visual appearance of the space while reducing maintenance costs – energy savings was considered an additional benefit by UMD Facilities Management. UMD Facilities Management is pleased with the results of this retrofit, and continues to initiate LED retrofit projects across the UMD campus.

  6. Prevalence and factors associated with 2009 to 2011 influenza vaccinations at a university medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Kathleen A; Myers, Ronnie; Magda, Lori A; Morse, Stephen S; Brandt-Rauf, Paul; Gershon, Robyn R M

    2013-09-01

    Information on the rates and factors associated with influenza vaccinations, although limited, is important because it can inform the development of effective vaccination campaigns in a university medical center setting. A study was conducted in 2011 to identify individual and organizational level barriers and facilitators to influenza vaccination among clinical and nonclinical personnel (N = 428) from a major university medical center. Seventy-one percent of clinical personnel (n = 170) reported pandemic H1N1 vaccination compared with 27% of nonclinical personnel (n = 258), even though vaccine was made widely available to all personnel at no cost. Similarly, disparate rates between clinical and nonclinical personnel were noted for the 2009/2010 seasonal influenza vaccine (82% vs 42%, respectively) and 2010/2011 combination (pandemic plus seasonal) influenza vaccine (73% vs 28%, respectively). Factors associated with pandemic vaccination in nonclinical personnel included the following: high level of influenza-related knowledge, concern regarding influenza contagion, history of previous influenza vaccinations or influenza illness, participation in vaccine-related training, and awareness of the institution's written pandemic plan. For clinicians, past history of seasonal influenza vaccination was associated with pandemic vaccination. For all participants, taking any 1 or more of the 3 influenza vaccines available in 2009 to 2011 was associated with intent to take a hypothetical future novel pandemic vaccine (odds ratio, 6.7; 95% confidence interval: 4.32-10.44; P vaccination uptake are amenable to organizational strategies. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of university and college counseling centers in advancing the professionalization of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Rosie Phillips

    2015-11-01

    Psychologists in university and college counseling centers (UCCCs) have helped to shape and advance the professionalization of psychology. Most definitions of a profession contain at least 5 components. A profession has (1) systematic theories and underlying principles; (2) authority to practice provided by the client; (3) a long educational process, including training and mentoring; (4) standards and a code of ethics; and (5) a culture of service and accountability to the public. UCCC professionals have evolved in a manner that demonstrates all 5 components of a profession. They advance the discipline of psychology as a profession through their counseling interventions because such interventions are based on scientific theories and principles. While their practice rests on scientific principles, their work helps to confirm and modify that science. Authority to practice is evidenced by the continuous growth of counseling centers since World War II. UCCCs aid the extended educational process for psychology graduate students as evidenced by their providing more internship training sites than any other category of training agencies. The majority of UCCC professionals are licensed and must abide by their state code of ethics. Such codes hold psychologists accountable to the public because they regularly deliver counseling service to at least 10% of the campus student population and offer outreach services to many more in their communities.

  8. Spin S = 1 centers: a universal type of paramagnetic defects in nanodiamonds of dynamic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Vul', A. Ya

    2012-06-01

    Intrinsic paramagnetic defects in ˜5 nm sized nanodiamonds, produced by various dynamic synthesis (DySND) techniques (detonation, shock-wave, pulsed laser ablation of solid carbon containing targets), have been studied by multi-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). X-band (9-10 GHz) EPR spectra of DySND, in addition to the main intensive singlet Lorentzian-like EPR signal, reveal a low intensity doublet pattern within the half-field (HF) region (g ˜ 4). On transferring spectra to the Q-band (34 GHz) the shape of the HF pattern changes and splitting between doublet components is reduced from 10.4 to 2.6 mT. The HF patterns observed are attributed to the ‘forbidden’ ΔMS = 2 transitions between the Zeeman levels of some spin-triplet (S = 1) centers. The model of two triplet centers with g ˜ 2.003 and zero-field splitting parameters D1 = 0.095 cm-1 (TR1) and D2 = 0.030 cm-1 (TR2) satisfactorily describes experimental results at both microwave frequencies. The spin-triplet-type defects are observed in a wide variety of DySND samples irrespective of industrial supplier, cooling and carbon soot refinement methods, initial purity, disintegration, or subsequent targeted chemical modification. This indicates that the intrinsic defects with S = 1 in DySND systems are of universal origin.

  9. [E-learning in ENT: Usage in University Medical Centers in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiherr von Saß, Peter; Klenzner, Thomas; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Chaker, Adam

    2017-01-18

    E-learning is an essential part of innovative medical teaching concepts. The challenging anatomy and physiology in ENT is considered particularly suitable for self-assessed and adaptive e-learning. Usage and data on daily experience with e-learning in German ENT-university hospitals are currently unavailable and the degree of implementation of blended learning including feed-back from medical students are currently not known. We investigated the current need and usage of e-learning in academic ENT medical centers in Germany. We surveyed students and chairs for Otorhinolaryngology electronically and paperbased during the summer semester 2015. Our investigation revealed an overall heterogenous picture on quality and quantity of offered e-learning applications. While the overall amount of e-learning in academic ENT in Germany is rather low, at least half of the ENT-hospitals in medical faculties reported that e-learning had improved their own teaching activities. More collaboration among medical faculties and academic ENT-centers may help to explore new potentials, overcome technical difficulties and help to realize more ambitious projects.

  10. The proposed EROSpace institute, a national center operated by space grant universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; Swiden, LaDell R.; Waltz, Frederick A.

    1993-01-01

    The "EROSpace Institute" is a proposed visiting scientist program in associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC). The Institute would be operated by a consortium of universities, possible drawn from NASA's Space Grant College and Fellowship Program consortia and the group of 17 capability-enhancement consortia, or perhaps from consortia though out the nation with a topical interest in remote sensing. The National Center for Atmospheric Research or the Goddard Institute for Space Studies provide models for the structure of such an institute. The objectives of the Institute are to provide ready access to the body of data housed at the EDC and to increase the cadre of knowledgeable and trained scientists able to deal with the increasing volume of remote sensing data to become available from the Earth Observing System. The Institute would have a staff of about 100 scientists at any one time, about half permanent staff, and half visiting scientists. The latter would include graduate and undergraduate students, as well as faculty on temporary visits, summer fellowships, or sabbatical leaves. The Institute would provide office and computing facilities, as well as Internet linkages to the home institutions so that scientists could continue to participate in the program from their home base.

  11. Cohort Profile: Estonian Biobank of the Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitsalu, Liis; Haller, Toomas; Esko, Tõnu; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Alavere, Helene; Snieder, Harold; Perola, Markus; Ng, Pauline C; Mägi, Reedik; Milani, Lili; Fischer, Krista; Metspalu, Andres

    2015-08-01

    The Estonian Biobank cohort is a volunteer-based sample of the Estonian resident adult population (aged ≥18 years). The current number of participants-close to 52000--represents a large proportion, 5%, of the Estonian adult population, making it ideally suited to population-based studies. General practitioners (GPs) and medical personnel in the special recruitment offices have recruited participants throughout the country. At baseline, the GPs performed a standardized health examination of the participants, who also donated blood samples for DNA, white blood cells and plasma tests and filled out a 16-module questionnaire on health-related topics such as lifestyle, diet and clinical diagnoses described in WHO ICD-10. A significant part of the cohort has whole genome sequencing (100), genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data (20 000) and/or NMR metabolome data (11 000) available (http://www.geenivaramu.ee/for-scientists/data-release/). The data are continuously updated through periodical linking to national electronic databases and registries. A part of the cohort has been re-contacted for follow-up purposes and resampling, and targeted invitations are possible for specific purposes, for example people with a specific diagnosis. The Estonian Genome Center of the University of Tartu is actively collaborating with many universities, research institutes and consortia and encourages fellow scientists worldwide to co-initiate new academic or industrial joint projects with us.

  12. Establishment of a National Wind Energy Center at University of Houston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Su Su [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The DOE-supported project objectives are to: establish a national wind energy center (NWEC) at University of Houston and conduct research to address critical science and engineering issues for the development of future large MW-scale wind energy production systems, especially offshore wind turbines. The goals of the project are to: (1) establish a sound scientific/technical knowledge base of solutions to critical science and engineering issues for developing future MW-scale large wind energy production systems, (2) develop a state-of-the-art wind rotor blade research facility at the University of Houston, and (3) through multi-disciplinary research, introducing technology innovations on advanced wind-turbine materials, processing/manufacturing technology, design and simulation, testing and reliability assessment methods related to future wind turbine systems for cost-effective production of offshore wind energy. To achieve the goals of the project, the following technical tasks were planned and executed during the period from April 15, 2010 to October 31, 2014 at the University of Houston: (1) Basic research on large offshore wind turbine systems (2) Applied research on innovative wind turbine rotors for large offshore wind energy systems (3) Integration of offshore wind-turbine design, advanced materials and manufacturing technologies (4) Integrity and reliability of large offshore wind turbine blades and scaled model testing (5) Education and training of graduate and undergraduate students and post- doctoral researchers (6) Development of a national offshore wind turbine blade research facility The research program addresses both basic science and engineering of current and future large wind turbine systems, especially offshore wind turbines, for MW-scale power generation. The results of the research advance current understanding of many important scientific issues and provide technical information for solving future large wind turbines with advanced design

  13. New Cosmic Center Universe Model Matches Eight of Big Bang's Major Predictions Without The F-L Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, R V

    2003-01-01

    Accompanying disproof of the F-L expansion paradigm eliminates the basis for expansion redshifts, which in turn eliminates the basis for the Cosmological Principle. The universe is not the same everywhere. Instead the spherical symmetry of the cosmos demanded by the Hubble redshift relation proves the universe is isotropic about a nearby universal Center. This is the foundation of the relatively new Cosmic Center Universe (CCU) model, which accounts for, explains, or predicts: (i) The Hubble redshift relation, (ii) a CBR redshift relation that fits all current CBR measurements, (iii) the recently discovered velocity dipole distribution of radiogalaxies, (iv) the well-known time dilation of SNeIa light curves, (v) the Sunyaev-Zeldovich thermal effect, (vi) Olber's paradox, (vii) SN dimming for z 1 an enhanced brightness that fits SN 1997ff measurements, (ix) the existence of extreme redshift (z > 10) objects which, when observed, will further distinguish it from the big bang. The CCU model also plausibly expl...

  14. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  15. The teaching of rheumatology at the University. The journey from teacher based to student-centered learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Antonio; de Toro, Javier; Nolla, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, university education has undergone profound changes as a result of the creation of the European Space for Higher Education. It has gone from a teacher-centered model, based on the transmission of knowledge through lectures, to being student-centered, based on the acquisition of skills and attaching great importance to independent learning. This transformation involves the need to reorganize academic activity and employ new teaching tools, such as active learning methodologies, more in line with current requirements. In this article, the backbones of the European Space for Higher Education are presented, and diverse experiences of teaching innovation described under Reumacademia and from three Spanish universities.

  16. Development of superconducting tunnel junction radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katagiri, Masaki; Kishimoto, Maki; Ukibe, Masahiro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakazawa, Masaharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Kurakado, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Kenji; Maehata, Keisuke

    1998-07-01

    Study on development of high energy resolution X-ray detector using superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) for radiation detection was conducted for 5 years under cooperation of University of Tokyo group and Kyushu University group by Quantum measurement research group of Advanced fundamental research center of JAERI. As the energy resolution of STJ could be obtained better results than that of Si semiconductor detector told to be actually best at present, this study aimed to actualize an X-ray detector usable for the experimental field and to elucidate radiation detection mechanism due to STJ. The STJ element used for this study was the one developed by Kurakado group of Nippon Steel Corp. As a results, some technical problems were almost resolved, which made some trouble when using the STJ element to detection element of X-ray spectrometer. In order to make the X-ray detector better, it is essential to manufacture a STJ element and develop serial junction type STJ element on the base of optimization of the element structure and selection and single crystallization of new superconducting materials such as Ta and others, activating the research results. (G.K.)

  17. A historical perspective on the University of Nebraska Medical Center's College of Dentistry Class of 1961.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mary S; Badakhsh, Roshan A

    2006-06-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) College of Dentistry (COD) Class of 1961 to glean information that might be useful in the design of dental education programs in Nebraska and elsewhere. We scanned annual class newsletters, demographic statistics for students entering the UNMC dental program for each decade from 1961 to 2001, and UNMC COD alumni data for patterns and themes among thirty-two dental professionals. Eighty-four percent of those contacted provided responses to a survey. We found that, like current dental cohorts nationwide, the UNMC COD Class of 1961 is mostly of European ancestry (non-Hispanic) and male. But in contrast to current dental college graduates, the UNMC Class of '61 were able to rely upon self-employment and spousal and/or military support (GI Bill) to cover the costs of their dental education. They also were more likely to enter dental school before completion of an undergraduate degree and have a substantial work history before entering the UNMC dental program. Although the most common reason for attending dental school related to independence and financial security, "time with family" and "family vacations" were the next most important reasons cited for becoming dental professionals. Among '61 graduates, the average number of years spent in the dental profession is thirty-seven years. Despite the notable changes in dental technology and the continual need for updating knowledge and skill, eight members of the UNMC COD Class of 1961 continue to practice dentistry. Most maintain contact with other class members, providing support to former classmates and maintaining an identity with their alma mater, the University of Nebraska.

  18. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  19. Outcomes of Older Adults with Burn Injury: University Clinical Center of Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B Duci, Shkelzen; M Arifi, Hysni; R Ahmeti, Hasan; K Zatriqi, Violeta; A Buja, Zejn; T Hoxha, Enver; Y Mekaj, Agon

    2015-07-01

    Advances in burn care over the past 50 years have brought about remarkable improvement in mortality rates such that survival has become an expected outcome even in patients with extensive injuries. Although these improvements have occurred in all age groups, survival in older adults still lags far behind that in younger cohorts. This study determines the outcomes of older adults with burn injury in University Clinical Center of Kosovo. This is a retrospective study that includes 56 burn patients, older than 60 years who were admitted at the Department of Plastic Surgery, between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. Data processing was done with the statistical package of Stat 3. From the statistical parameters the structural index, arithmetic median, and standard deviation were calculated. Fifty six burned patient older than 60 years were included during a 10-year period. Of the 56 elderly patients 29 were women and 27 were men with a mean age of 66.7 years (range, 60-85 years). The differences were not statistically significant for both genders regarding the causes of burn injury. Considering the gradual increase of the elderly population in our country based on the data of the Ministry of Public Services, an increase is expected to the incidence of burn injuries in the population of this category of our country.

  20. Thoracic outlet syndrome: a 50-year experience at Baylor University Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourlis, Harry

    2007-01-01

    During the past 5 decades, the recognition and management of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) have evolved. This article elucidates these changes and improvements in the diagnosis and management of TOS at Baylor University Medical Center. The most remarkable change over the past 50 years is the use of nerve conduction velocity to diagnose and monitor patients with nerve compression. Recognition that procedures such as breast implantation and median sternotomy may produce TOS has been revealing. Prompt thrombolysis followed by surgical venous decompression for Paget-Schroetter syndrome has markedly improved results compared with the conservative anticoagulation approach; thrombolysis and prompt first rib resection is the optimal treatment for most patients with Paget-Schroetter syndrome. Complete first rib extirpation at the initial procedure markedly reduces the incidence of recurrent neurologic symptoms or the need for a second procedure. Chest pain or pseudoangina can be caused by TOS. Dorsal sympathectomy is helpful for patients with sympathetic maintained pain syndrome or causalgia and patients with recurrent TOS symptoms who need a second procedure. PMID:17431445

  1. Sports hernia: the experience of Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskitt, John T

    2011-04-01

    Groin injuries in high-performance athletes are common, occurring in 5% to 28% of athletes. Athletic pubalgia syndrome, or so-called sports hernia, is one such injury that can be debilitating and sport ending in some athletes. It is a clinical diagnosis of chronic, painful musculotendinous injury to the medial inguinal floor occurring with athletic activity. Over the past 12 years, we have operated on >100 patients with this injury at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. These patients have included professional athletes, collegiate athletes, competitive recreational athletes, and the occasional "weekend warrior." The repair used is an open technique using a lightweight polypropylene mesh. Patient selection is important, as is collaboration with other experienced and engaged sports health care professionals, including team trainers, physical therapists, team physicians, and sports medicine and orthopedic surgeons. Of the athletes who underwent surgery, 98% have returned to competition. After a minimum of 6 weeks for recovery and rehabilitation, they have usually returned to competition within 3 months.

  2. Impact of 5 years of lean six sigma in a University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; de Jong, Laura J; Wendt, Klaus W; Does, Ronald J M M

    2012-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherlands, with LSS. It was introduced in 2007 to create the financial possibility to develop innovations. In this article, we describe how LSS was introduced, and how it developed in the following years. We zoom in at the traumatology department, where all main processes have been analyzed and improved. An evaluation after 5 years shows that LSS helped indeed reducing cost and improving quality. Moreover, it aided the transition of the organization from purely problem oriented to more process oriented, which in turn is helpful in eliminating waste and finding solutions for difficult problems. A major benefit of the program is that own employees are trained to become project leaders for improvement. Several people from the primary process were thus stimulated and equipped to become role models for continuous improvement.

  3. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients of the Kuwait University Dental Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Joseph, Bobby; Sundaram, Devipriya

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the number, types, and locations of oral mucosal lesions in patients who attended the Admission Clinic at the Kuwait University Dental Center to determine prevalence and risk factors for oral lesions. Intraoral soft tissue examination was performed on new patients seen between January 2009 and February 2011. The lesions were divided into six major groups: white, red, pigmented, ulcerative, exophytic, and miscellaneous. Five hundred thirty patients were screened, out of which 308 (58.1%) had one or more lesions. A total of 570 oral lesions and conditions were identified in this study, of which 272 (47.7%) were white, 25 (4.4%) were red, 114 (20.0%) were pigmented, 21 (3.7%) were ulcerative, 108 (18.9%) were exophytic, and 30 (5.3%) were in the miscellaneous group. Overall, Fordyce granules (n = 116; 20.4%) were the most frequently detected condition. A significantly higher (p lesions than those in the ⩽20 years age group. A significantly higher (p lesions than did nonsmokers. Most of the lesions and conditions were found on the buccal mucosa and gingiva. White, pigmented, and exophytic lesions were the most common types of oral mucosal lesions found in this study. Although most of these lesions are innocuous, the dentist should be able to recognize and differentiate them from the worrisome lesions, and decide on the appropriate treatment.

  4. Operational control of radiation conditions in Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Shugay, Yulia; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Space Monitoring Data Center (SMDC) of Moscow State University provides mission support for Russian satellites and give operational analysis of radiation conditions in space. SMDC Web-sites (http://smdc.sinp.msu.ru/ and http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/) give access to current data on the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation state of Earth's magnetosphere and heliosphere in near-real time. For data analysis the models of space environment factors working online have been implemented. Interactive services allow one to retrieve and analyze data at a given time moment. Forecasting applications including solar wind parameters, geomagnetic and radiation condition forecasts have been developed. Radiation dose and SEE rate control are of particular importance in practical satellite operation. Satellites are always under the influence of high-energy particle fluxes during their orbital flight. The three main sources of particle fluxes: the Earth's radiation belts, the galactic cosmic rays, and the solar energetic particles (SEP), are taken into account by SMDC operational services to estimate the radiation dose caused by high-energy particles to a satellite at LEO orbits. ISO 15039 and AP8/AE8 physical models are used to estimate effects of galactic cosmic rays and radiation belt particle fluxes. Data of geosynchronous satellites (GOES or Electro-L1) allow to reconstruct the SEP fluxes spectra at a given low Earth orbit taking into account the geomagnetic cut-off depending on geomagnetic activity level.

  5. Perception of the nursing team of a Surgical Center regarding Hospital Accreditation at a University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Hellen Maria de Lima Graf; Peniche, Aparecida de Cássia Giani

    2015-02-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of nursing teams at a surgical center regarding the process of hospital accreditation, in the evaluative aspects of structure, process, and result. Method The study takes a quantitative and exploratory-descriptive approach, carried out at a university hospital. Result The population consisted of 69 nursing professionals, and the data collection was performed in the months of January and February 2014 by way of a questionnaire, utilizing the Likert scale. The methodology used a Cronbach's Alpha equal to 0.812. In the comparison of the three aspects, the one with the highest favorability score was "result", with an average of 47.12 (dp±7.23), and the smallest was "structure," with an average of 40.70 (dp±5.19). Conclusion This situational diagnostic can assist in the restructuring of the vulnerable areas evaluated in these three aspects, mainly in the aspect of structure, with a goal of level 2 accreditation by the ONA (Brazilian's National Organization for Accreditation) defended by the Institution.

  6. STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRANQUADA, J.M.

    2005-08-22

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  7. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  8. Results of students surveys in similar courses given in different centers of the Technical University of Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Mendiola Ubillos, María Ángeles; Arraiza Bermudez-Cañete, Maria Paz; Aguado Cortijo, P.; Calderón Guerrero, C.; Lopez Alvarez, Jose Vicente

    2012-01-01

    We present and analyze the results of surveys conducted in recent years with students from two related subjects, but taught in different centers of the University of Madrid. These surveys are part of the objectives of various projects of educational innovation, and applied through the platform Moodle.

  9. #Socialmedia: A Preliminary Report of Social Networking Use among University and College Counseling Center Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Carrie; Much, Kari

    2017-01-01

    The social networking use of university and college counseling center (UCCC) mental health providers has not been widely researched. Most of the 20 providers surveyed in this preliminary study reported engaging in social networking despite identifying pros and cons to its use. Participants' reported use of social media may indicate that social…

  10. Use of Evidence-Based Practice Resources and Empirically Supported Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among University Counseling Center Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Morgen Joray

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to determine the degree to which psychologists at college and university counseling centers (UCCs) utilized empirically supported treatments with their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clients. In addition, an attempt was made to determine how frequently UCC psychologists utilized a number of…

  11. How Wageningen University and Research Center managed to influence researchers publishing behaviour towards more quality, impact and visibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fondermann, Philipp; Togt, van der P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Wageningen University and Research Center (WUR) is one of the most prestigious research institutions in the world in life sciences and improved significantly in several rankings over the last years. One of the `drivers` of this success story is a comprehensive quality management exercise based on Re

  12. The Experimental Teaching Reform in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for Undergraduate Students in Peking University Health Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and…

  13. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  15. Cryogenic helium gas circulation system for advanced characterization of superconducting cables and other devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamidi, Sastry; Kim, Chul Han; Kim, Jae-Ho; Crook, Danny; Dale, Steinar

    2012-04-01

    A versatile cryogenic test bed, based on circulating cryogenic helium gas, has been designed, fabricated, and installed at the Florida State University Center for Advanced Power Systems (FSU-CAPS). The test bed is being used to understand the benefits of integrating the cryogenic systems of multiple superconducting power devices. The helium circulation system operates with four sets of cryocooler and heat exchanger combinations. The maximum operating pressure of the system is 2.1 MPa. The efficacy of helium circulation systems in cooling superconducting power devices is evaluated using a 30-m-long simulated superconducting cable in a flexible cryostat. Experiments were conducted at various mass flow rates and a variety of heat load profiles. A 1-D thermal model was developed to understand the effect of the gas flow parameters on the thermal gradients along the cable. Experimental results are in close agreement with the results from the thermal model.

  16. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are pres...

  17. Takeshi Sasaki (center), president of the University of Tokyo, visited CERN on 29 July when the renewal of the memorandum for the academic exchange agreement between the university and CERN was signed

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Takeshi Sasaki (center), president of the University of Tokyo, visited CERN on 29 July when the renewal of the memorandum for the academic exchange agreement between the university and CERN was signed

  18. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliti NR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Naim R Haliti,1 Fehim R Haliti,2 Ferit K Koçani,3 Ali A Gashi,4 Shefqet I Mrasori,3 Valon I Hyseni,5 Samir I Bytyqi,5 Lumnije L Krasniqi,2 Ardiana F Murtezani,5 Shaip L Krasniqi5 1Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, 2Department of Children Dentistry, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 3Department of Oral Disease, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 4Department of Oral Surgery, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 5Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo Background: Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK.Methods: The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription.Results: Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics.Conclusion: Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. Keywords: antibiotic, analgesics

  19. PRE AND POST TRAINING EVALUATION ON UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS (UP PRACTICES AT PUTAT JAYA HEALTH CENTER, SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholis Bachroen

    2012-11-01

    membersihkan instrumen secara tepat rata-rata naik sekitar 35%. Kalau dihitung peningkatan kepatuhan terhadap UP pada setiap menangani  kasus, maka terflhat bahwa kenaikan setelah pelatihan adalah dari 0% menjadi 19,6% untuk mencuci tangan sebelum menyuntik, mengganti sarung tangan setiap melayani pasien meningkat dari 17,9% menjadi 59,5%, penggunaan 'one hand technique' dalam 'recapping' jarum suntik dari 6,7% menjadi 100% serta mengganti sarung tangan untuk petugas poli gigi dari 20,5% menjadi 100%. Keywords: Training Evaluation, Universal Precaution, Health Center, Diseases Prevention

  20. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  1. The Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education at Case Western Reserve University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Daniel J.; Singer, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Established in the year 2000, the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education is a multidisciplinary center located at a school of social work that engages in collaborative, community-based research and evaluation that spans multiple systems and disciplines. The Center currently occupies 4,200 sq. ft. with multiple offices and…

  2. The incidence of caesarean sections in the university clinical center of kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshani, Brikene; Daci, Armond; Gashi, Sanije; Lulaj, Shefqet

    2012-12-01

    As in most countries of the world also at Kosovo the rate of Cesarean section from year to year is increasing. The main purpose of this paper was to present the incidence of births completed by Caesarean section at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics of University Clinical Center of Kosovo in Prishtinë. This study is retrospective, namely its made by collecting epidemiological data from patients' histories that completed birth by Caesarean section for the period 2000-2006 in this clinic. During this period, 14 maternal deaths were recorded during or after Caesarean section. Besides this, 14 lethal outcomes, the object of our study was 84 mothers which completed birth by Caesarean section and which are best used as a control group. The average age of mothers who died during or after Caesarean section was 32.1 years (SD ± 4.9). Youngest in this group was 24 years old and oldest 42 years. While the average age of mothers from the control group was 30.6 years (SD ± 5.9). Youngest was 19 and oldest 43 years, without significant difference. Most mothers included in the survey had more than one indication for Caesarean section. The most frequent indication was PIH syndrome with 33.7% and previous Caesarean section in 32.7%. Then with the participation of 12.2% were abruption of the placenta and disproportio feto pelvinea, 11.2% pelvinea and placenta praevia presentation, 10.2% parturiens while other indications were much rarer with less than 10% participation. Based on this we can conclude that the risk of the Caesarean section is high.

  3. Histoplasmosis in solid organ transplant recipients at a large Midwestern university transplant center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifeld, A G; Iwen, P C; Lesiak, B L; Gilroy, R K; Stevens, R B; Kalil, A C

    2005-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum sporadically causes severe infections in solid organ transplant (SOT) patients in the Midwest, but it has been an unusual infection among those patients followed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), located at the western edge of the 'histo belt.' Nine SOT patients with histoplasmosis are described (6 renal or renal-pancreas and 3 liver recipients) who developed severe histoplasmosis over a recent 2.5-year period at UNMC. Symptoms started a median of 11 months (range, 1.2-90 months) after organ transplant and consisted primarily of fever, cough, shortness of breath, and malaise or fatigue present for approximately 30 days prior to medical evaluation. All patients had an abnormal chest radiograph and/or computed tomographic scan. Tacrolimus was the main immunosuppressant in all 9 patients, along with prednisone or mycophenolate. Dacluzimab or thymoglobulin had been given around the time of transplant in 6 of 9. None was treated for an episode of acute rejection within 2 months before onset of histoplasmosis, although 2 were on high-dose immunosuppression after recent transplants. Diagnosis was made by culture in 8 of the 9 patients, with positive serum and urine histoplasma antigen tests in all 9 cases. From 1997 to 2001, during a period of relative quiescence of the disease in the general population, the rate of clinical histoplasmosis among SOT patients at UNMC was estimated at 0.11%, whereas during 2002 through the first half of 2004, the rate rose 17-fold to 1.9%. Histoplasmosis can present as a prolonged febrile illness with subacute pulmonary symptoms in a cohort of SOT patients, despite the absence of a regional outbreak.

  4. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Qehaja Buçaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about epidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the disease, clinical presentations, serological test, serum biochemistry and reatment were collected from hospital medical records. The diagnosis of brucellosis based on clinical and laboratory findings. Results: This descriptive study included 47 patients, who 33 of them (70.2% were males. The mean age was 37.9 ± 19.3 years. The route of transmission of the disease was known in 28 59.5% of them. Direct contact with livestock in 22 (46.8% and ingestion of dairy products in six cases (12.7% were reported as the transmission route. The majority of patients (27 patients, 57.4% were from rural area. The main presenting symptoms were atigue, fever and arthralgia. Osteoarticular manifestations were the common forms of localized disease. Regarding to the therapy, 45 (95.7% of patients were treated with streptomycin and doxycycline for the first three weeks. Conclusion: Human brucellosis is not a common in Kosovo but there is a potential risk. Osteoarticular symptoms were the most common presentation reasons. The most effective and preferred treatment regimen was Streptomycin plus Doxycycline for the first three weeks, and Doxycycline plus Rifampicin thereafter. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(4: 147-150

  5. Experience with multimodality telepathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several modes of telepathology exist including static (store-and-forward, dynamic (live video streaming or robotic microscopy, and hybrid technology involving whole slide imaging (WSI. Telepathology has been employed at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC for over a decade at local, national, and international sites. All modes of telepathology have been successfully utilized to exploit our institutions subspecialty expertise and to compete for pathology services. This article discusses the experience garnered at UPMC with each of these teleconsultation methods. Static and WSI telepathology systems have been utilized for many years in transplant pathology using a private network and client-server architecture. Only minor clinically significant differences of opinion were documented. In hematopathology, the CellaVision® system is used to transmit, via email, static images of blood cells in peripheral blood smears for remote interpretation. While live video streaming has remained the mode of choice for providing immediate adequacy assessment of cytology specimens by telecytology, other methods such as robotic microscopy have been validated and shown to be effective. Robotic telepathology has been extensively used to remotely interpret intra-operative neuropathology consultations (frozen sections. Adoption of newer technology and increased pathologist experience has improved accuracy and deferral rates in teleneuropathology. A digital pathology consultation portal (https://pathconsult.upmc.com/ was recently created at our institution to facilitate digital pathology second opinion consults, especially for WSI. The success of this web-based tool is the ability to handle vendor agnostic, large image files of digitized slides, and ongoing user-friendly customization for clients and teleconsultants. It is evident that the practice of telepathology at our institution has evolved in concert with advances in technology and user experience

  6. Experience with multimodality telepathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Wiley, Clayton A; Demetris, Anthony; Lesniak, Andrew; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Cable, William; Contis, Lydia; Parwani, Anil V

    2012-01-01

    Several modes of telepathology exist including static (store-and-forward), dynamic (live video streaming or robotic microscopy), and hybrid technology involving whole slide imaging (WSI). Telepathology has been employed at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) for over a decade at local, national, and international sites. All modes of telepathology have been successfully utilized to exploit our institutions subspecialty expertise and to compete for pathology services. This article discusses the experience garnered at UPMC with each of these teleconsultation methods. Static and WSI telepathology systems have been utilized for many years in transplant pathology using a private network and client-server architecture. Only minor clinically significant differences of opinion were documented. In hematopathology, the CellaVision(®) system is used to transmit, via email, static images of blood cells in peripheral blood smears for remote interpretation. While live video streaming has remained the mode of choice for providing immediate adequacy assessment of cytology specimens by telecytology, other methods such as robotic microscopy have been validated and shown to be effective. Robotic telepathology has been extensively used to remotely interpret intra-operative neuropathology consultations (frozen sections). Adoption of newer technology and increased pathologist experience has improved accuracy and deferral rates in teleneuropathology. A digital pathology consultation portal (https://pathconsult.upmc.com/) was recently created at our institution to facilitate digital pathology second opinion consults, especially for WSI. The success of this web-based tool is the ability to handle vendor agnostic, large image files of digitized slides, and ongoing user-friendly customization for clients and teleconsultants. It is evident that the practice of telepathology at our institution has evolved in concert with advances in technology and user experience. Early and

  7. A microtomography beamline at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Kyungmin; Jin, Hua; Butler, Leslie G.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2002-03-01

    A microtomography beamline has been recently assembled and is currently operating at the Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron (CAMD). It has been installed on a bending magnet white-light beamline at port 7A. With the storage ring operating at 1.5 GeV, this beamline has a maximum usable x-ray energy of ˜15 keV. The instrumentation consists of computer-controlled positioning stages for alignment and rotation, a CsI(Tl) phosphor screen, a reflecting mirror, a microscope objective (1:1, 1:4), and Linux/LabVIEW-controlled charge coupled device. With the 1:4 objective, the maximum spatial resolution is 2.25 μm. The positioning and image acquisition computers communicate via transfer control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP). A small G4/Linux cluster has been installed for the purpose of on-site reconstruction. Instrument, alignment and reconstruction programs are written in MATLAB, IDL, and C. The applications to date are many and we present several examples. Several biological samples have been studied as part of an effort on biological visualization and computation. Future improvements to this microtomography station include the addition of a double-multilayer monochromator, allowing one to evaluate the three-dimensional elemental composition of materials. Plans also include eventual installation at the CAMD 7 T wiggler beamline, providing x rays in excess of 50 keV to provide better penetration of higher mass-density materials.

  8. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people’s health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. Method: a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. Results: people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. Conclusion: a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. PMID:28146179

  9. The drug thief at Georgetown University Medical Center: anatomy of a $2 billion class-action lawsuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Separate lawsuits filed on behalf of plaintiff patients at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, have been consolidated under a District of Columbia judge who is scheduled to rule soon on whether to certify them as a class-action suit against the medical center. The case involves a drug-abusing worker in the interventional radiology unit at Georgetown University Hospital who may have exposed up to 500 patients to HIV, hepatitis, and other viruses during his period of employment from September 8, 1999 to February 2, 2000. The lawsuits allege that the med center failed to protect patients by not adopting American Hospital Association guidelines that call for universal pre-employment drug screening. The hospital currently is in the final stages of being sold to Medstar Health, Columbia, MD, which may eventually change the drug-screening policy. The episode not only has been embarrassing for the prestigious medical center, but also has focused attention on the potential consequences for hospitals that do not screen employees for drug use.

  10. Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing - a GATE Center of Excellence at the University of Michigan-Dearborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, P. K.

    2012-08-30

    The Center for Lightweighting Materials and Processing (CLAMP) was established in September 1998 with a grant from the Department of Energy’s Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) program. The center received the second round of GATE grant in 2005 under the title “Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing”. Using the two grants, the Center has successfully created 10 graduate level courses on lightweight automotive materials, integrated them into master’s and PhD programs in Automotive Systems Engineering, and offered them regularly to the graduate students in the program. In addition, the Center has created a web-based lightweight automotive materials database, conducted research on lightweight automotive materials and organized seminars/symposia on lightweight automotive materials for both academia and industry. The faculty involved with the Center has conducted research on a variety of topics related to design, testing, characterization and processing of lightweight materials for automotive applications and have received numerous research grants from automotive companies and government agencies to support their research. The materials considered included advanced steels, light alloys (aluminum, magnesium and titanium) and fiber reinforced polymer composites. In some of these research projects, CLAMP faculty have collaborated with industry partners and students have used the research facilities at industry locations. The specific objectives of the project during the current funding period (2005 – 2012) were as follows: (1) develop new graduate courses and incorporate them in the automotive systems engineering curriculum (2) improve and update two existing courses on automotive materials and processing (3) upgrade the laboratory facilities used by graduate students to conduct research (4) expand the Lightweight Automotive Materials Database to include additional materials, design case studies and make it more

  11. The Connecticut Mental Health Center: Celebrating 50 Years of a Successful Partnership Between the State and Yale University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jeanne L; Anez-Nava, Luis; Baranoski, Madelon; Cole, Robert; Davidson, Larry; Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam; Dike, Charles; DiLeo, Paul J; Duman, Ronald S; Kirk, Thomas; Krystal, John; Malison, Robert T; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Sernyak, Michael J; Srihari, Vinod; Styron, Thomas; Tebes, Jacob K; Woods, Scott; Zonana, Howard; Jacobs, Selby C

    2016-12-01

    September 28, 2016, marked the 50th anniversary of the Connecticut Mental Health Center, a state-owned and state-operated joint venture between the state and Yale University built and sustained with federal, state, and university funds. Collaboration across these entities has produced a wide array of clinical, educational, and research initiatives, a few of which are described in this column. The missions of clinical care, research, and education remain the foundation for an organization that serves 5,000 individuals each year who are poor and who experience serious mental illnesses and substance use disorders.

  12. The Peer-Interactive Writing Center at the University of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The one-on-one format of tutoring, which is the norm for "writing" centers, can foster the much-maligned view of a "writing center" as a fix-it shop and undermine the role of the tutor as a co-learner and facilitator of peer-to-peer interactions. The peer-interactive "writing center approach", presented here, moves away from the one-on-one model…

  13. Use of Expedited Partner Therapy for Sexually Transmitted Diseases in College and University Health Centers in the United States, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ryan; Martinez, Nina; Roberts, Craig; Habel, Melissa A; Leino, E Victor; Leichliter, Jami S

    2015-10-01

    We examined expedited partner therapy for chlamydia and gonorrhea in college and university health centers by institutional and policy characteristics. Expedited partner therapy awareness and use was low (44.1% used), did not differ by institutional characteristics, and differed by policy environment. Our findings suggest missed opportunities for sexually transmitted disease prevention in college and university health centers.

  14. Number Theory : A Seminar held at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York

    CERN Document Server

    Chudnovsky, Gregory; Cohn, Harvey; Nathanson, Melvyn

    1989-01-01

    The New York Number Theory Seminar was organized in 1982 to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of recent advances in higher arithmetic and its applications. Papers included in this volume are based on the lectures presented by their authors at the Seminar at the Graduate Center of C.U.N.Y. in 1985-88. Papers in the volume cover a wide spectrum of number theoretic topics ranging from additive number theory and diophantine approximations to algebraic number theory and relations with algebraic geometry and topology.

  15. University/Science Center Collaborations (A Science Center Perspective): Developing an Infrastructure of Partnerships with Science Centers to Support the Engagement of Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach for Broad Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Science centers, professional associations, corporations and university research centers share the same mission of education and outreach, yet come from ``different worlds.'' This gap may be bridged by working together to leverage unique strengths in partnership. Front-end evaluation results for the development of new resources to support these (mostly volunteer-based) partnerships elucidate the factors which lead to a successful relationship. Maintaining a science museum-scientific community partnership requires that all partners devote adequate resources (time, money, etc.). In general, scientists/engineers and science museum professionals often approach relationships with different assumptions and expectations. The culture of science centers is distinctly different from the culture of science. Scientists/engineers prefer to select how they will ultimately share their expertise from an array of choices. Successful partnerships stem from clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Scientists/engineers are somewhat resistant to the idea of traditional, formal training. Instead of developing new expertise, many prefer to offer their existing strengths and expertise. Maintaining a healthy relationship requires the routine recognition of the contributions of scientists/engineers. As professional societies, university research centers and corporations increasingly engage in education and outreach, a need for a supportive infrastructure becomes evident. Work of TryScience.org/VolTS (Volunteers TryScience), the MRS NISE Net (Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network) subcommittee, NRCEN (NSF Research Center Education Network), the IBM On Demand Community, and IEEE Educational Activities exemplify some of the pieces of this evolving infrastructure.

  16. The Center for the Holographic Arts Begins a New Artist Workshop and Residency Program in Conjunction with Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrongovius, Martina; Kagan, Harris; Moree, Sam

    2013-02-01

    This year the Center for the Holographic Arts (Holocenter) kicked off a new Artist Workshop and Residency Program in conjunction with Ohio State University. The newly renovated holography facility houses the Holocenter's pulse laser camera and two recording tables with continuous wave lasers. This facility is being utilized for undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Art and Technology as well as the Artist Workshop and Residency Program.

  17. Managing Disaster Recovery Centers on Campus: The Experience of Southeastern Louisiana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Heather; Shafer, Duane

    2007-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005, Southeastern Louisiana University was spared the brunt of the storm and was fortunate that most structures on campus remained intact. However, the storm still affected the campus for weeks. This article reflects on the experiences of university leaders and facility managers as they provided…

  18. At University of Chicago, Dispute over Friedman Center Continues to Simmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, David

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the dispute about the creation of an institute named for the late economist and free-market advocate Milton Friedman at the University of Chicago. Five months after the University of Chicago announced plans to invest $200-million in an economics institute named for the late Milton Friedman, the project is still generating…

  19. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2011-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs) largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J.W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004)] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µmrad), and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term ...

  20. Overview of Superconducting Photoinjectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A

    2009-01-01

    The success of most of the proposed ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR) and high power IR-FELs is contingent upon the development of an appropriate source. Electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1 µm rad) and high average current (hundreds of mA) are required to meet the FEL specification [1]. An elegant way to create such an unique beam is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting RF photo injector with the superconducting technology to get a superconducting RF photo injector (SRF gun). SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches are under investigation at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, JLab, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University). Lot of progress could be achieved during the last years and first long term operation was demonstrated at the FZD [2]. In the near future, this effort will lead to SRF guns, which are indispensab...

  1. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Yvernault, Benjamin C.; Boyd, Brian D.; Damon, Stephen M.; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N.; Phillips, Nicholas S.; Rogers, Baxter P.; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and RedCAP to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers. PMID:25988229

  2. Topological superconductivity induced by ferromagnetic metal chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Hua; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei; MacDonald, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent experiments have provided evidence that one-dimensional (1D) topological superconductivity can be realized experimentally by placing transition-metal atoms that form a ferromagnetic chain on a superconducting substrate. We address some properties of this type of system by using a Slater-Koster tight-binding model to account for important features of the electronic structure of the transition-metal chains on the superconducting substrate. We predict that topological superconductivity is nearly universal when ferromagnetic transition-metal chains form straight lines on superconducting substrates and that it is possible for more complex chain structures. When the chain is weakly coupled to the substrate and is longer than superconducting coherence lengths, its proximity-induced superconducting gap is ˜Δ ESO/J where Δ is the s -wave pair potential on the chain, ESO is the spin-orbit splitting energy induced in the normal chain state bands by hybridization with the superconducting substrate, and J is the exchange splitting of the ferromagnetic chain d bands. Because of the topological character of the 1D superconducting state, Majorana end modes appear within the gaps of finite length chains. We find, in agreement with the experiment, that when the chain and substrate orbitals are strongly hybridized, Majorana end modes are substantially reduced in amplitude when separated from the chain end by less than the coherence length defined by the p -wave superconducting gap. We conclude that Pb is a particularly favorable substrate material for ferromagnetic chain topological superconductivity because it provides both strong s -wave pairing and strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling, but that there is an opportunity to optimize properties by varying the atomic composition and structure of the chain. Finally, we note that in the absence of disorder, a new chain magnetic symmetry, one that is also present in the crystalline topological insulators, can stabilize multiple

  3. Itinerant Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karchev, Naoum

    2004-01-01

    Superconductivity has again become a challenge following the discovery of unconventional superconductivity. Resistance-free currents have been observed in heavy-fermion materials, organic conductors and copper oxides. The discovery of superconductivity in a single crystal of $UGe_2$, $ZrZn_2$ and $URhGe$ revived the interest in the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism. The experiments indicate that: i)The superconductivity is confined to the ferromagnetic phase. ii)The ferromag...

  4. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  5. Integrating with users is one thing, but living with them? A case study on loss of space from the Medical Center Library, University of California, San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center is the primary hospital for the UCSD School of Medicine. The UCSD Medical Center Library (MCL), a branch of the campus's biomedical library, is located on the medical center campus. In 2007, the medical center administration made a request to MCL for space in its facility to relocate pharmacy administration from the hospital tower. The university librarian brought together a team of library managers to deliberate and develop a proposal, which ultimately accommodated the medical center's request and enhanced some of MCL's public services.

  6. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  7. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Center for Childhood Neurotoxicology and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The main focus of the UMDNJ Children's Center, established in 2002, is to examine the effects of environmental chemicals on neurological health and development, with...

  8. The George W. Woodruff Physical Education Center at Atlanta's Emory University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Clyde

    1985-01-01

    The George W. Woodruff Physical Education Center was designed to exude openness and space which would encourage participation while preserving existing playing fields and programs. Exterior and interior design of the facility are described. (DF)

  9. Universal increase in the superconducting critical temperature of two-dimensional semiconductors at low doping by the electron-electron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Matteo; Zoccante, Paolo; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-02-20

    In two-dimensional multivalley semiconductors, at low doping, even a moderate electron-electron interaction enhances the response to any perturbation inducing a valley polarization. If the valley polarization is due to the electron-phonon coupling, the electron-electron interaction results in an enhancement of the superconducting critical temperature. By performing first-principles calculations beyond density functional theory, we prove that this effect accounts for the unconventional doping dependence of the superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) and of the magnetic susceptibility measured in Li(x)ZrNCI. Finally, we discuss what are the conditions for a maximal T(c) enhancement in weakly doped two-dimensional semiconductors.

  10. North-South Partnership in Space Research and Application: Space Research Center at Minufiyia University, Egypt, as Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Minufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1.Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2.Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3.Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4.Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2003 and 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the worl d, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5.Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  11. A novel no-insulation winding technique of high temperature-superconducting racetrack coil for rotating applications: A progress report in Korea university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y. H.; Song, J. B.; Yang, D. G.; Kim, Y. G.; Hahn, S.; Lee, H. G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents our recent progress on core technology development for a megawatt-class superconducting wind turbine generator supported by the international collaborative R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning. To outperform the current high-temperature-superconducting (HTS) magnet technology in the wind turbine industry, a novel no-insulation winding technique was first proposed to develop the second-generation HTS racetrack coil for rotating applications. Here, we briefly report our recent studies on no-insulation (NI) winding technique for GdBCO coated conductor racetrack coils in the following areas: (1) Charging-discharging characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils with respect to external pressures applied to straight sections; (2) thermal and electrical stabilities of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils encapsulated with various impregnating materials; (3) quench behaviors of no-insulation racetrack coils wound with GdBCO conductor possessing various lamination layers; (4) electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under time-varying field conditions. Test results confirmed that this novel NI winding technique was highly promising. It could provide development of a compact, mechanically dense, and self-protecting GdBCO magnet for use in real-world superconducting wind turbine generators.

  12. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  13. High Temperature Superconducting Maglev Measurement System

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jia-Su; Wang, Su-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Three high temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev measurement systems were successfully developed in the Applied Superconductivity Laboratory (ASCLab) of Southwest Jiaotong University, P. R. China. These systems include liquid nitrogen vessel, Permanent Magnet Guideway (PMG), data collection and processing, mechanical drive and Autocontrol features. This chapter described the three different measuring systems along with their theory of operations and workflow. The SCML-01 HTS Maglev measure...

  14. A Model for the University Operating as a Center for the Formation of a Local Environment for Adult Ongoing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina I. Ukraintseva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper features the results of a study conducted as part of the project ‘The Development of Universities as Centers for the Formation of a Local Environment for the Ongoing Education of the Adult Population of a City’, undertaken by Sochi State University in 2016 as an assignment commissioned by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation. The paper examines, via a comparative-pedagogical approach, the theoretical and practical foundations of putting together a local environment for adult ongoing education and provides a rationale for the role of universities in the development and operation of a municipal system of ongoing education. The authors share the results of an analysis and systematization of the major trends in adult ongoing education by reference to the current best practices employed domestically and internationally. Based on the findings of a theoretical analysis of relevant research and a problem analysis of the activity of institutions of higher learning operating in local markets for educational services, the authors single out several models for the formation by universities of a municipal educational environment for adult ongoing education and draw a conclusion about the need to develop a more comprehensive, integrative, and consistent model. The paper brings forward a new model for the university operating as a center for the formation of a local environment for adult ongoing education, characterizes its specific components (objective-and-function, content, structural-logistical, instrumental-technological, and organizational-managerial, establishes the prospects for it as a tool for managing the education system, and sets out the key strategies for putting together a local educational environment for adult ongoing education.

  15. Epidemiology of sports injuries referring to Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center from 2005 to 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza Sharif; Ali Akbarnejad; Alireza Moravveji; Rasool Hamayattalab; Mansour Sayyah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Among the injury types, sports ones constitute a considerable proportion of patients who refer to the medical centers. This research was conducted to examine the frequency of sports-related injuries referring to Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center from 2005 to 2011. Methods: This was a retrospective research in which existing data from the data bank of Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center were employed. The data were extracted from the main source by SPSS version 16.0. Variables such as age, education, occupation and gender were analyzed. Results: The highest proportion of injuries was observed in students (59.4%) followed by workers (11.8%). Upper and lower extremities were most commonly injured. The most frequent injury was strain (35.4%), followed by sprain (27.7%). Conclusion: The results of this research showed that the majority of the sports trauma occurrs in students;therefore, they need more attention in regard to sports injuries. Preventive measures such as informing the coaches and teachers as well as increasing the students’ awareness about the injury risk can decrease the incidences of sports injuries.

  16. Theory of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Crisan, Mircea

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the most important aspects of the theory. The phenomenological model is followed by the microscopic theory of superconductivity, in which modern formalism of the many-body theory is used to treat most important problems such as superconducting alloys, coexistence of superconductivity with the magnetic order, and superconductivity in quasi-one-dimensional systems. It concludes with a discussion on models for exotic and high temperature superconductivity. Its main aim is to review, as complete as possible, the theory of superconductivity from classical models and methods up t

  17. A systematic strategic planning process focused on improved community engagement by an academic health center: the University of Kansas Medical Center's story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David C; Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Ast, Cori; Lillis, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    A growing number of academic health centers (AHCs) are considering approaches to expand collaboration with their communities in order to address complex and multisystem health concerns. In 2010, internal leaders at the University of Kansas Medical Center undertook a strategic planning process to enhance both community engagement activities and the scholarship resulting from these engagement activities. The authors describe the strategic planning process, recommendations, and actions associated with elevating community engagement within the AHC's mission and priorities. The strategic planning process included conducting an inventory of community engagement activities within the AHC; analyzing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for community engagement work; and identifying goals and strategies to improve future community engagement activities and scholarship. The resulting road map for enhancing community engagement at their institution through 2015 consists of four main strategies: emphasize scholarship in community engagement, revise organizational structures to better facilitate community engagement, prioritize current engagement activities to ensure appropriate use of resources, and enhance communication of engagement initiatives to further develop stakeholder relationships.The authors also discuss implementation of the plan to date and highlight lessons learned that may inform other AHCs as they enhance and expand similar endeavors.

  18. Enjoying the Roller Coaster Ride: Directors' Perspectives on Fostering Staff Morale in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eells, Gregory T.; Seals, Tom; Rockett, Jeri; Hayes, Denise

    2005-01-01

    The demand for mental health services in higher education settings continues to increase and places more pressure on staff, highlighting further the importance of good staff morale in these agencies. This task of bolstering staff morale is often placed primarily on the shoulders of counseling center directors. The present article outlines several…

  19. FGPA Mission Assurance Center (FMAC) Support Activity at the University of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    two primary tools. The first tool, GNU Radio Companion (GRC), allows the user to drag and drop Digital Signal Processing (DSP) blocks to a workspace...Outputs GRC GNU Radio Companion GSFC NASA Goddard Space Flight Center GUI Graphical User Interface HDL Hardware Descriptive Language HWICAP HardWare...6 4.3 Software Defined Radio (SDR

  20. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  1. The Pratt Center for Community Improvement: A University Urban Action Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, George M.; Shiffman, Ronald

    The Pratt Center for Community Improvement was founded in Brooklyn in 1963 by Pratt Institute. Its aim was to help equalize the knowledge level of city and community representatives concerning issues in urban renewal, and to gain the confidence of local residents and enhance their participation in decision making. Participant education and…

  2. 76 FR 19996 - Cooperative Agreement With the University of Mississippi's National Center for Natural Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... National Center for Natural Products Research (U01) To Develop and Disseminate Botanical Natural Product... and dissemination of natural products research and science and the programs developed under the... develop and disseminate botanical natural product research with an emphasis on public safety according...

  3. Enjoying the Roller Coaster Ride: Directors' Perspectives on Fostering Staff Morale in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eells, Gregory T.; Seals, Tom; Rockett, Jeri; Hayes, Denise

    2005-01-01

    The demand for mental health services in higher education settings continues to increase and places more pressure on staff, highlighting further the importance of good staff morale in these agencies. This task of bolstering staff morale is often placed primarily on the shoulders of counseling center directors. The present article outlines several…

  4. Science Park of Universities in Jiangsu Province Nanjing Jingang Science Pioneering Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> The Nanjing Jingang Science Pioneering Center was estab-lished in August 2000. It is located at Tower A, Jingang Building, 251 Heyan Road, Nanjing, and has a 28-story and 25,000m2 of space for the incubation of projects of

  5. Sentinel node biopsy for early-stage oral cavity cancer: the VU University Medical Center experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Toom, I.J.; Heuveling, D.A.; Flach, G.B.; van Weert, S.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; van Schie, A.; Bloemena, E.; Leemans, C.R.; de Bree, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in head and neck cancer is recently introduced as the staging technique of oral squamous cell carcinoma. We report the results of SNB in patients diagnosed with a T1-T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma and clinically negative (N0) neck in a single center. Methods A

  6. The Social Welfare Practice and Research Center at the Chinese University of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2009-01-01

    The organization and research programs of the Social Welfare Practice and Research Centre (SWPRC) at the Chinese University of Hong Kong are outlined. There are five regular research programs (Family and Group Practice Research Centre, Human Behavior and the Social Environment Research Program, Mutual Aid and Social Capital Research Program,…

  7. The Social Welfare Practice and Research Center at the Chinese University of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2009-01-01

    The organization and research programs of the Social Welfare Practice and Research Centre (SWPRC) at the Chinese University of Hong Kong are outlined. There are five regular research programs (Family and Group Practice Research Centre, Human Behavior and the Social Environment Research Program, Mutual Aid and Social Capital Research Program,…

  8. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  9. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  10. A Collaborative Effort at Marketing the University: Detailing a Student-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Judith H.; Petroshius, Susan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe the use of an experiential team-based project in a capstone marketing management course. In the project, students worked with the university administration to develop a marketing plan for the Admissions Office's Tour Guide Program. The authors discuss why such marketing activities are important to colleges and…

  11. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful…

  12. Interpersonal Violence and Sexual Assault: Trauma-Informed Communication Approaches in University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Christina Granato; Campbell, Kimberly Brown

    2016-01-01

    A university in the United States Mountain West utilized grant resources to track counseling services for students who were currently experiencing or who had historically experienced relationship violence, sexual assault and/or stalking. This report reflects on the first 2 years of this program, including an overview of prevalence and reporting…

  13. Internship Concepts and Applications; A Report to the Center for Urban Affairs, Indiana University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Charles

    The term "internship" is applied to a plethora of divergent programs. All of them involve non-classroom, off-campus situations in which students are expected to perform tasks of some utility to the host organization. Whether distinctively educational benefits flow to the intern himself and to the university depends upon how the internship…

  14. Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosrow Behbehani

    2013-02-26

    The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

  15. The Federal Collection Center and its contribution in building the library collection of the National and University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kodrič-Dačič

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of library collections from the disbanded Austrian monasteries to lyceum and university libraries at the end of 18th century stimulated the development of these libraries and also the development of the Ljubljana Lyceum Library similar phenomena happened shortly after World War II, when some 400.000 books, mostly from con fiscated private libraries, ended up in state libraries - a number of them in The National and University Library. The preserved documents prove that The Book Office of the Federal Collection Center, which was executing the transfer and distribution of library material, tried to put some sense of order into the elemental forces of the post war period and its endeavours contributed to the preservation of this library material.

  16. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteoradionecrosis of the jaw bones at the University of Kentucky Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.; Raybould, T.; Maruyama, Y.

    1989-07-01

    There is disagreement over the management of teeth in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. Some oral surgeons support preirradiation extraction; others favor maintaining teeth. Before 1974, The University of Kentucky Department of Radiation Medicine found osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaw in 10.9% of 220 irradiated cancer patients. After a program of oral care was instituted, the incidence declined to 2.7%. Of 109 patients who received radiotherapy between 1976 and 1985, only three (2.7%) developed ORN of the mandible. There was also a reduction in patients treated with interstitial therapy during this time. A review of the most recent experiences shows that, with present management methods at the University of Kentucky, ORN is not a significant problem. Of 30 patients treated in 1986, only one had ORN, and this was of the maxilla. Post-irradiation extractions were not identified as a significant risk for necrosis. Hyperbaric oxygen is used as a treatment for persistent ORN.

  18. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: U01 Natural Products Screening | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project was to enlarge the chemical space probed by Project 1 (High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line Panel) by screening an expanded natural products library (~40,000) in an effort to further define vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. This new library is derived from a diverse collection of marine bacteria (prepared by Dr. John MacMillan, University of Texas Southwestern).

  19. Artificial Intelligence (Al) Center of Excellence at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Yves Schabes "Computational Feasibility of Assistant Professor, University of Some Constrained Grammatical Nebraska...proposed FLAT MMF is used. Parsing with Lexicalized Tree Adjoining Grammar Yves Schabes Aravind K. Joshi MS-CIS-90-11 LINC LAB 164 Most...A Lexicalized Tree Adjoining Grammar for English Anne Abeille, Kathleen Bishop, Sharon Cote, and Yves Schabes MS-CIS-90-24 LINC LAB 170 This

  20. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository operated by the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine...

  1. Archive of information about geological samples available for research from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Polar Rock Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Rock Repository (PRR) operated by the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) at the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  2. 27 November 2013 - Greek Deputy Minister of Health Z. Makri with Governor of Thessaly K. Agorastos visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Senior Scientists D. Delikaris, E. Hatziangeli and E. Tsesmelis. E. Gazis, ATLAS Collaboration, National Technical University of Athens also present.

    CERN Document Server

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    27 November 2013 - Greek Deputy Minister of Health Z. Makri with Governor of Thessaly K. Agorastos visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Senior Scientists D. Delikaris, E. Hatziangeli and E. Tsesmelis. E. Gazis, ATLAS Collaboration, National Technical University of Athens also present.

  3. 23rd June 2010 - University of Bristol Head of the Aerospace Engineering Department and Professor of Aerospace Dynamics N. Lieven visiting CERN control centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and CMS User J. Goldstein.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - University of Bristol Head of the Aerospace Engineering Department and Professor of Aerospace Dynamics N. Lieven visiting CERN control centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and CMS User J. Goldstein.

  4. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  5. Basic principle of superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  6. Overview on superconducting photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arnold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of most of the proposed energy recovery linac (ERL based electron accelerator projects for future storage ring replacements (SRR and high power IR–free-electron lasers (FELs largely depends on the development of an appropriate source. For example, to meet the FEL specifications [J. W. Lewellen, Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 5534, 22 (2004PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.557378] electron beams with an unprecedented combination of high brightness, low emittance (0.1  μmrad, and high average current (hundreds of mA are required. An elegant way to create a beam of such quality is to combine the high beam quality of a normal conducting rf photoinjector with the superconducting technology, i.e., to build a superconducting rf photoinjector (SRF gun. SRF gun R&D programs based on different approaches have been launched at a growing number of institutes and companies (AES, Beijing University, BESSY, BNL, DESY, FZD, TJNAF, Niowave, NPS, Wisconsin University. Substantial progress was achieved in recent years and the first long term operation was demonstrated at FZD [R. Xiang et al., in Proceedings of the 31st International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 09, Liverpool, UK (STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, 2009, p. 488]. In the near future SRF guns are expected to play an important role for linac-driven FEL facilities. In this paper we will review the concepts, the design parameters, and the status of the major SRF gun projects.

  7. A new trend in Sabancı University Information Center: QR code application

    OpenAIRE

    Özel, Cem; Ozel, Cem; Akkurt, Mine

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of mobile technologies in recent years has facilitated the use of the popular QR code application for various purposes. The new generation’s rapid adaptation to change has allowed this application's widespread usage. QR codes with structural properties can be supported with new ideas. It has developed into a new trend in libraries/information centers, as well as in the other areas. One of the usage areas of the QR code is in the marketing field. In this study, various QR...

  8. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, July 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriani, R.A.

    1981-01-30

    At present, the research ranges from the quantum mechanics of the corrosion unit reactions, organic and inorganic coatings, surface reactions on polymers, metals and semiconductors to high-temperature chemistry of interest to solar-energy conversion. A second objective of the Center is to increase the utilization of corrosion data by the technical community through education and through the dissemination of appropriately formatted information. At present, two projects are in the planning stage for the near future. One is a pedagogical symposium on corrosion in microelectronic components and systems; the other is a series of lectures and videotapes, as well as a workshop on cathodic protection.

  9. A retrospective study of 22 patients with necrotising fasciitis treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo (2005-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifi, Hysni M; Duci, Shkelzen B; Zatriqi, Violeta K; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Ismajli, Vildane H; Gashi, Musli M; Zejnullahu, Ylber M; Mekaj, Agon Y

    2013-08-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a destructive invasive infection of skin, subcutaneous tissue and deep fascia. The aim of the study is to determine the causative agents of NF, its localisation, predisposing factors and comorbid conditions, duration of treatment and distribution of NF in different age groups and over the years. We conducted a retrospective study including 22 patients with NF from 2005 to 2010 in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The data were collected and analysed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The average age of patients was 56·9 years. In eight cases or 36·4% of total patients studied, NF was caused by monobacterial agents with a predominance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (five cases or 22·7% of total infections). Polybacterial agents were responsible for NF infection in other 14 cases (63·6%). Majority of the patients had other comorbidities like diabetes, trauma and prior history of surgical interventions. Diabetes was present in 17 patients or 77·3%. The remaining five patients (22·7%) had previous trauma and recent surgical intervention. Average length of treatment was 43 days. The hospital mortality rate in our case series was 22·6%. Early identification and diagnosis of NF significantly improves outcome and reduces mortality. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  10. University 4.4 – A Development Strategy for Education and Research Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin BOJA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to increased demand for qualified human resources, for 'new & rare skills', for software solutions, reliable products and services in the field of applied informatics, there are large available financial funds that can be accessed by Informatics and Cybernetics schools. Edu-cational and research departments must capitalize funds provided by the Europe-an/international institutions and private companies, by supporting the creation of spin-off en-tities that will conduct technology transfer projects. These funds must be used to increase the quality of teaching and to improve research results by assuring the financial needs and tech-nical resources of teachers (project based payments, students (scholarships projects and the community (public available projects. The presented strategy, University 4.4 describes four development directions for a four years period. It has been developed by Catalin Boja, Razvan Bologa, Marius Popa and Cristian Toma and since November 2011 it represents the assumed development strategy of The Department of Economic Informatics and Cybernetics (DICE from The Bucharest University of Economic Studies.

  11. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems and Career Counseling Services. Eleventh Annual Report [of the] Oakland University Adult Career Counseling Center: September 1993-June 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splete, Howard

    This report profiles the Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University, Michigan. Conceived in 1982, the Center provides services for adults seeking career guidance. The ACCC supplies career information, counseling, advice in preparation and interviewing skills, and referral information, all at no charge. The ACCC employed computers…

  12. Tissue procurement system in Japan: the role of a tissue bank in medical center for translational research, Osaka University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawara, H; Fukushima, N; Kitagawa, T; Ito, T; Masutani, Y; Sawa, Y

    2010-01-01

    Although organ procurement has been regulated by The Organ Transplantation Law (brain-dead donors since 1997, donors after cardiac death since 1979), there has been no law or governmental procurement network (except for cornea) in Japan. Since the late 1980s, some university hospitals have developed original banks. Finally, in 2001 guidelines for tissue procurement were established by The Japanese Society of Tissue Transplantation and Japan Tissue Transplant Network (JTTN) to coordinate tissue harvesting. Five tissue banks were joined to the tissue transplant network (skin in one, heart valves in two, and bone in two). As the number of tissue banks is small, each bank cooperates on procurement, but cannot cover the entire country. With regard to skin transplantation, only one skin bank-The Japan Skin Bank Network (JSBN), which is located in Tokyo-has organized skin procurement. Therefore, it has been difficult to procure skin in areas distant from Tokyo, especially around Osaka. In order to improve such a situation, a tissue bank collaborating with the JSBN was established at The Medical Center for Translational Research (MTR), Osaka University Hospital in April 2008. The bank has played a role in skin procurement center in western Japan and supported procurement and preservation at the time of the skin procurement. Between April 2008 and September 2009, the bank participated in eight tissue procurements in the western area. In the future, the bank is planning to procure and preserve pancreatic islets and bones. Moreover, there is a plan to set up an induced pluripotent stem cells center and stem cell bank in MTR. This tissue bank may play a role to increase tissue procurement in Japan, especially in the western area.

  13. Superconductivity in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  14. Enhanced superconductivity of fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, II, Aaron L.; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2017-06-20

    Methods for enhancing characteristics of superconductive fullerenes and devices incorporating the fullerenes are disclosed. Enhancements can include increase in the critical transition temperature at a constant magnetic field; the existence of a superconducting hysteresis over a changing magnetic field; a decrease in the stabilizing magnetic field required for the onset of superconductivity; and/or an increase in the stability of superconductivity over a large magnetic field. The enhancements can be brought about by transmitting electromagnetic radiation to the superconductive fullerene such that the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the fullerene with an energy that is greater than the band gap of the fullerene.

  15. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  16. Superconducting material development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    A superconducting compound was developed that showed a transition to a zero-resistance state at 65 C, or 338 K. The superconducting material, which is an oxide based on strontium, barium, yttrium, and copper, continued in the zero-resistance state similar to superconductivity for 10 days at room temperature in the air. It was also noted that measurements of the material allowed it to observe a nonlinear characteristic curve between current and voltage at 65 C, which is another indication of superconductivity. The research results of the laboratory experiment with the superconducting material will be published in the August edition of the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics.

  17. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  18. The Future of Dental Schools in Research Universities and Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Laurie K

    2017-09-01

    As a profession, dentistry is at a point of discernible challenge as well as incredible opportunity in a landscape of evolving changes to health care, higher education, and evidence-based decision making. Respecting the past yet driving forward, a well-mapped future course is critical. Orchestrating this course in a collaborative manner is essential for the visibility, well-being, and potentially the existence of the dental profession. The research performed in dental institutions needs to be contemporary, aligned with biomedical science in general, and united with other disciplines. Dentistry is at risk of attrition in the quality of its research and discovery mission if participation with bioscience colleagues in the collaborative generation of new knowledge is underoptimized. A fundamental opportunity dentistry has is to contribute via its position in academic health centers. Rigorous research as to the impact of interprofessional education and collaborative care on population health outcomes provides significant potential for the dental profession to participate and/or lead such evidence-centered efforts. It is imperative that academic dental institutions are part of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary organizations that move health care into its new day. Strategizing diversity by bringing together people who have different ways of seeing problems to share perspectives, heuristics, interpretations, technologies, and predictive models across disciplines will lead to impactful progress. Academic dental institutions are a natural part of an emphasis on translational research and acceleration of implementing new scientific discoveries. Dentistry needs to remain an essential and integrated component of higher education in the health professions; doing so necessitates deliberate, respectful, and committed change. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  19. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-004-1568, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, R.; Seligman, P.J.

    1985-03-01

    Area air samples were analyzed for organic solvent vapors and aldehydes at the Biochemistry Department, George Washington University, Washington, DC in October 1983, and February and August 1984. The evaluation was requested by the Safety Director because of employee complaints of eye and respiratory irritation. Questionnaires were administered to 75 employees in the Biochemistry Department and 24 employees in the Pharmacology Department who served as comparisons. Humidity measurements were made. The authors note that the complaints subsided during the spring of 1984, with no explanation. They conclude that the complaints among the employees, especially on the fifth floor, were due to eye irritation. The causative agent could not be identified. Recommendations include evaluating all ventilation systems and repeating the air sampling if complaints of irritation recur.

  20. [Computerized medical register of venous thromboembolic disease at the Grenoble University Hospital Center: description and evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, E; Bosson, J L; Pichot, O; Vidal, F; Rossignol, S; Schwartzmann, J; Carpentier, P H

    1994-01-01

    The number of vascular exams for venous thromboembolic disease increases dramatically in the vascular medicine unit at the Grenoble University Hospital (France). In order to improve the efficiency and the homogeneity of all the medical staff involved, a computerized register has been created. It automatically provides a letter for the prescriber of the consultation. This database, working on a computer network, has three main functions: office automation (medical folder, report), education, and clinical research. The office automation evaluation is performed after a 6 month experience, comparing 100 medical reports about venous thrombosis assisted by the computer to 100 medical reports written before the installation of the system. The introduction of digitized register is real, still this evaluation has induced some modification in the system in order to be more efficient.

  1. Issue-centered Earth Science undergraduate instruction in U.S. colleges and universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Semester-long introductory courses in Earth Science at U.S. colleges and universities often contain astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and geology taught as single entities. My experience teaching Earth Science that way and using a trade Earth Science textbook results in cursory knowledge and poor retention of each topic area. This seems to be especially true for liberal arts students who take Earth Science to satisfy a distribution requirement in the sciences. Instead, my method of teaching Earth Science at the State University of New York is to use two books that together explore consequences of global warming caused by the combustion of fossil fuels by humans. In this way, students who do not intend to major in science are given in-depth information about how and why this challenge to the well-being of life on Earth in the present century and beyond must be addressed in a thoughtful way. The books, Tyler Volk's CO2 Rising - The World's Greatest Environmental Challenge and James Edinger's Watching for the Wind, are inexpensive paperbacks that the students read in their entirety. Besides supplemental information I provide in the lectures, students have weekly examinations that are narrative in form, and there are written assignments for exhibits at science and other museums in NYC that complement some of the topics. The benefit of teaching Earth Science in this non-traditional way is that students seem more interested in the subject because it is relevant to everyday experience and news accounts about a serious global science problem for which an informed public must take a positive role to solve.

  2. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Annual report, September 15, 1990--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  3. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  4. Hurricane Public Health Research Center at Louisiana State University a Case of Academia Being Prepared

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, I. L.

    2006-12-01

    Recent floods along the Atlantic and Gulf seaboards and elsewhere in the world before Katrina had demonstrated the complexity of public health impacts including trauma; fires; chemical, sewerage, and corpse contamination of air and water; and diseases. We realized that Louisiana's vulnerability was exacerbated because forty percent of the state is coastal zone in which 70% of the population resides. Ninety percent of this zone is near or below sea level and protected by man-made hurricane-protection levees. New Orleans ranked among the highest in the nation with respect to potential societal, mortality, and economic impacts. Recognizing that emergency responders had in the past been unprepared for the extent of the public health impacts of these complex flooding disasters, we created a multi-disciplinary, multi-campus research center to address these issues for New Orleans. The Louisiana Board of Regents, through its millennium Health Excellence Fund, awarded a 5-year contract to the Center in 2001. The research team combined the resources of natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, and the mental health and medical communities. We met annually with a Board of Advisors, made up of federal, state, local government, and non-governmental agency officials, first responders and emergency managers. Their advice was invaluable in acquiring various datasets and directing aspects of the various research efforts. Our center developed detailed models for assessment and amelioration of public health impacts due to hurricanes and major floods. Initial research had showed that a Category 3 storm would cause levee overtopping, and that most levee systems were unprotected from the impacts of storm-induced wave erosion. Sections of levees with distinct sags suggested the beginnings of foundation and subsidence problems. We recognized that a slow moving Cat 3 could flood up to the eaves of houses and would have residence times of weeks. The resultant mix of sewage, corpses

  5. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification. The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to an extra phase factor in wavefunction. We proposed a superconducting quantum Faraday cage to detect temporal interference effect as a consequence of scalar AB phase. Using the superconducting quantum circuit model, the physical system is solved and resulting AB effect is predicted. Further discussion in this chapter shows that treating the experimental apparatus quantum mechanically, spatial scalar AB effect, proposed by Aharanov-Bohm, can't be observed. Either a decoherent interference apparatus is used to observe spatial scalar AB effect, or a quantum Faraday cage is used to observe temporal scalar AB effect. The second study involves protecting a quantum system from losing coherence, which is crucial to any practical quantum computation scheme. We present a theory to encode any qubit, especially superconducting qubits, into a universal quantum degeneracy point (UQDP) where low frequency noise is suppressed significantly. Numerical simulations for superconducting charge qubit using experimental parameters show that its coherence time is prolong by two orders of magnitude using our universal degeneracy point approach. With this improvement, a set of universal quantum gates can be performed at high fidelity without losing too much quantum coherence. Starting in 2004, the use of circuit QED has enabled the manipulation of superconducting qubits with photons. We applied quantum optical approach to model coupled resonators and obtained a four-wave mixing toolbox to operate photons

  6. Strengthening the role of universities in addressing sustainability challenges: the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions as an institutional experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Hart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the magnitude, complexity, and urgency of many sustainability problems increase, there is a growing need for universities to contribute more effectively to problem solving. Drawing upon prior research on social-ecological systems, knowledge-action connections, and organizational innovation, we developed an integrated conceptual framework for strengthening the capacity of universities to help society understand and respond to a wide range of sustainability challenges. Based on experiences gained in creating the Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions (Mitchell Center, we tested this framework by evaluating the experiences of interdisciplinary research teams involved in place-based, solutions-oriented research projects at the scale of a single region (i.e., the state of Maine, USA. We employed a multiple-case-study approach examining the experiences of three interdisciplinary research teams working on tidal energy development, adaptation to climate change, and forest vulnerability to an invasive insect. Drawing upon documents, observations, interviews, and other data sources, three common patterns emerged across these cases that were associated with more effective problem-solving strategies. First, an emphasis on local places and short-term dynamics in social-ecological systems research provides more frequent opportunities for learning while doing. Second, iterative stakeholder engagement and inclusive forms of knowledge co-production can generate substantial returns on investment, especially when researchers are dedicated to a shared process of problem identification and they avoid framing solutions too narrowly. Although these practices are time consuming, they can be accelerated by leveraging existing stakeholder relationships. Third, efforts to mobilize interdisciplinary expertise and link knowledge with action are facilitated by an organizational culture that emphasizes mutual respect, adaptability, and solutions

  7. Superconducting wires and fractional flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    1996-05-01

    The quantization of flux quanta in superconductors is revisited and analyzed in a new geometry. The system analyzed is a superconducting wire. The geometry is such that the superconducting wire winds N times around an insulating cylinder and that the wire has its end connected back to its beginning, thus producing an N-loop short circuited solenoid. The winding number N acts as a topological index that controls flux quantization. In this case, fractional flux quanta can be measured through the center of the insulating cylinder, provided that the cylinder radius is small enough. The Little-Parks experiment for an identical geometry is discussed. The period of oscillation of the transition temperature of the wire is found to vary as 1/N in units of flux Φ relative to the flux quantum Φ0. When a SQUID is made in such a geometry the maximal current through the SQUID varies with period Φ0/N.

  8. Gambling participation and problems among employees at a university health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Mallya, Sarita

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the frequency and intensity of gambling behaviors among employees at an academic health center. Employees were sent an anonymous questionnaire assessing demographic characteristics, participation in gambling activities, and gambling-related problems. Of the 904 respondents, 96% reported gambling in their lifetimes, with 69% gambling in the past year, 40% in the past two months, and 21% in the past week. The most common forms of gambling were lottery and scratch tickets, slot machines, card playing, sports betting, bingo, and track. Only 1.2% of the sample reported gambling on the internet. Using scores on the South Oaks Gambling Screen, 3.0% of the respondents were classified as Level 2 (or problem) gamblers, and an additional 1.8% were Level 3 (or pathological) gamblers. Compared to Level 1 (non-problem) gamblers, Level 2 and Level 3 gamblers were more likely to be male, single, and employed full-time, and to have lower income and education. About half of the Level 2 and Level 3 gamblers reported interest in an evaluation of their gambling behaviors and treatment interventions. These data suggest the need to screen for gambling problems in health care professionals and to provide gambling-specific treatments.

  9. Predicting Factors of Drop Out Counseling Process in University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer OZER

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predicting factors the drop out the counseling process. Methods: The study group consists of 555 college students admitted to a Counseling and Guidance Center (CGC and participated in at least one session of counseling after the first view in the 2013-2014 academic year. As a data collection tool, an “Application Form” on the demographic information and the “Brief Symptom Inventory” was applied to the students; and independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression techniques were used in the analysis of the collected data. Results: According to the analysis results, the age of the students attending the counseling process was found to be higher than those who drop out, but no significant difference was found in their psychometric properties in terms of continuation of the counseling process. Only the age of clients and their previous psychiatric help history was found to predict the dropping out counseling process early. Conclusion: Drop outs are less frequently observed in clients having a previous psychiatric help experience. In addition, it was determined that older clients less frequently drop out the counseling process

  10. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1996 - March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been operated successfully from April, 1996 to January, 1997. Although the operation of the accelerator became unstable in the middle of January, it was a short period. The research in the Tandem Accelerator Center covers wide fields, that is, polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, the nonresonant breakup of Li-7, the further refinement of the CDCC theory, fusion and fission in heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam {gamma} ray spectroscopy, solid state physics using fast ion bemas, Moessbauer effect, NMR, the application of accelerated ion beams to PIXE, and accelerator mass spectrometry. In addition, two major installations were carried out in this academic year. One is a small tandem accelerator which was moved from Electrotechnical Laboratory in Tsukuba, and the other is a system for the production and analysis of atomic clusters. The research activities at the accelerator and experimental facilities and on experimental nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, cluster science, and ion beam application are reported in this book. Also the list of the publications by these groups is given. Ph. D. and M. Sc. theses are listed, and the speakers and the titles of seminars are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This report briefly described the investigations performed during the period from April 1997 to March 1998 in Tandem Accelerator Center. The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was reconstructed and the first beam test was carried out in Nov. 1997. In nuclear physics, the measurement of total reaction cross sections, the non-resonant breakup of {sup 7}Li and {sup 9}Be, the investigation of hole states via (p,d) reaction, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam {gamma} ray spectroscopy and the study of the three dimensional cranking model have been performed. In interdisciplinary fields, the development of AMS system has been continued. The trace element analysis of mineral samples has been carried out by means of PIXE with the proton beam which was focused on the sample as narrow as 50 {mu}m{sup 2}. The hydrogen analysis using H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{gamma}) reaction has been started aiming at the extension of the measurement of depth profile down to a few tens of {mu}m deep region. (M.N.)

  12. Relationships between obesity management and depression management in a university-based family medicine center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Emily R; Theeke, Laurie; Minchau, Elizabeth; Mallow, Jennifer; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Wampler, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine relationships among sociodemographics, obesity, and depression management in Appalachian adults. This study was conducted in a primary care center and used a cross-sectional, quantitative, nonexperimental descriptive, and predictive design. Data were obtained from a random sample of 240 adult records that were stratified by gender. Analysis included exploration of all variables for descriptive information followed by bivariate analyses to determine significant relationships between variables, and regression analysis using variables with significant relation to obesity and depression management. Obesity was prevalent (48%) though less than 1% had documented diagnosis. Over 98% of the 65 participants diagnosed with depression did not have documentation of use of a depression screening tool. Diagnosis of depression correlated significantly with elevated body mass index (BMI) and diagnosis of obesity. Gender bias was evident with males having more documentation of weight-loss discussions and planning, and women receiving more referrals to behavioral health for counseling. Innovations to enhance the diagnosis of obesity could lead to consistent provider-led management. Implementation studies of valid depression screening tools in the electronic medical record could enhance the identification of depressive symptoms and could promote health equity. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Registry of kidney biopsy in a single center in Puerto Rico: university district hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez Bonilla, Rafael; Parrilla, Francisco; Kidd, Ortiz; Cangiano, José L

    2011-01-01

    Glomerular diseases continue to be the leading cause of end-stage renal disease globally. Renal biopsy plays a fundamental role in the evaluation of glomerular diseases not only to establish an accurate diagnosis but also help deciding on appropriate treatment and assessing prognosis. The prevalence of glomerular disease and the clinical indications for kidney biopsies are poorly delineated in Puerto Rico. We undertook a retrospective analysis of the indications, clinical presentation and pathologic reports in renal biopsies performed at the University District Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico from the year 1995 to 2008. A total of 208 kidney biopsies showed a predominance of membranous nephropathy representing 20% of the studied population. Women were more frequently biopsied than men (57.2% vs. 42.7%). Lupus nephritis, a condition affecting mostly women was identified in 16.9% of the patients. Minimal change disease was reported in 13.6% of the patients, a condition that affects mostly children and adolescents. In contrast to other geographical areas IgAN was reported only in 6.3% and FSG in 0.9% of patients. In our biopsied patient population, membranous nephropathy is the most common primary glomerular disease and lupus erythematosus the most frequent secondary glomerular disease.

  14. [Multidisciplinary management of the obese patient: example from the Obesity Center at the University of Liege].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Rorive, M; Letiexhe, M; Devoitille, L; Jandrain, B

    2001-07-01

    Obesity is a mulfactorial disease whose prevalence is progressively increasing. Ideally, it requires a multidisciplinary management by medical doctors, dieticians, psychologists and kinetherapists. The new "Centre de l'Obésité" at the University of Liège aims at fulfilling such objectives with: 1) a first outpatient visit including the simultaneous participation of an endocrinologist, a dietician and a psychologist; 2) a structured and individualized programme of physical rehabilitation; 3) an individualized management of obese subjects as in-(hospital) and/or outpatients, using medical and/or surgical approaches; and 4) an opportunity to benefit of other specialized medical advices, if necessary, in order to increase both the efficacy and safety of the treatment. Owing to the increasing importance of obesity and the well-known difficulties to succeed in treating it, general practitioners should consider this new centre as a valuable help rather than a competitive structure for the management of their patients, especially those with severe or morbid obesity.

  15. [Management of HIV infected patients. Experience of the Liege University Hospital Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkoghe, D; Léonard, P; Nnegue, S; Moutschen, M; Demonty, J

    2002-08-01

    We present data from 112 patients followed in the Infectious Diseases Unit of the Liege University Hospital (CHU Sart-Tilman). The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on surrogate immunological and virological parameters. The study also aimed at determining the prevalence of opportunistic infections and iatrogenic metabolical abnormalities in the era of HAART. Data from HIV infected patients under combined treatment were collected from March 1996 till July 1999. The follow-up focused on the variation of the CD4 cell counts and viral load, and the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The average age was 39 +/- 10 years and the sex ratio (M/F) was 2.3. At baseline, the CD4 count was 352 +/- 244/mm3 and the viral load was 4.1 +/- 1.2 log. After 12 months, the CD4 cells were at 540 +/- 374 and the viral load at 2.5 +/- 1.5 log. This favourable outcome was observed in 70% of patients (naive and experienced). Clinically, patients in therapeutic success presented few opportunistic infections, but many drugs related toxicity. Our data demonstrate the efficiency of combined treatment in the management of HIV infected patients. However, the apparition of toxicity problems could limit the benefit brought by these drugs.

  16. [Prescribing and performing autologous blood transfusion: experience at a University Medical Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregeon, Y F; Grouille, D; Roussanne, A; Lathelize, M; Feiss, P

    1995-01-01

    Prescription and carrying out of autologous blood transfusion in a university hospital during a whole year (1992) were investigated. 554 patients were involved. 88% of them gave at least one blood unit. Three surgical groups are specified: cardiac surgery with bypass (95 patients), orthopaedic procedures with knee or hip replacement or spine surgery (276 patients) and other types of surgery (117 patients). Prescriptions of blood donation before cardiac surgery were not carried out (by the transfusion centre) twice more often than in the other groups. This is why autologous blood taking is now effected in the anaesthetic unit. 88.9% (n = 434) of all patients did not receive homologous blood (90% in the orthopaedic group, 84% in the cardiac group). 25% of the collected units were not transfused. This figure is only 8% for the cardiac patients. An efficiency index is suggested taking in account the transfusion of autologous blood units and the need of homologous transfusion: % autologous used units x % procedures realized without homologous blood. The good rate to achieve could be 70%. In aorto-coronary bypass surgery when no autologous blood was collected preoperatively, 57.5% patients received homologous blood vs 16% when at least one unit was predeposited. A short review of literature shows an increasing place of predeposited autotransfusion, with some limits in orthopaedic surgery where a combination of autologous blood donation and other erythrocytes saving methods appears to give the best results. Erythropoietin, critical haemoglobine concentration threshold, autologous transfusion in cancer patients still need further studies.

  17. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-30

    this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people's health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. o estudo desenvolveu um modelo de parceria de cuidados centrados nas pessoas (CCP) para uma sociedade que está envelhecendo, com o fim de enfrentar os desafios das mudanças sociais que afetam a saúde das pessoas e o novo papel da prática avançada de enfermagem para sustentar a cobertura universal de saúde. um modelo de parceria de cuidados centrados nas pessoas foi desenvolvido com base na meta-síntese qualitativa da literatura e a avaliação de 14 projetos relacionados. Os projetos em curso resultaram na transformação individual e social, melhorando a alfabetização de saúde da comunidade e comportamentos que usam o cuidado centrado nas pessoas e aumentando a parceria entre os profissionais de saúde e membros da comunidade por meio da prática avançada de enfermagem

  18. PREFACE: Focus on superconductivity in Fe-based systems Focus on superconductivity in Fe-based systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozorov, Ruslan; Chubukov, Andrey; Meingast, Christoph; Putti, Marina

    2012-08-01

    The past four years of incredibly intense research into Fe-based superconductors have brought about many unexpected surprises. Our understanding of their behavior and physical properties is constantly evolving. Unlike any other superconductors, those containing iron span diverse groups of materials: pnictides, chalcogenides, intermetallics and oxides. Some major properties of the materials are quite similar, yet each group has its own distinct features. Significant effort has been put into identifying new superconducting compositions, modifying the existing ones with new dopants and treatments, and producing single crystals, thin films, wires and polycrystalline bulk material. A wide array of experimental techniques was applied to study Fe-based superconductors and the result is a tremendous amount of data collected over a period of less than four years. Theoretical debates are still lively, and there is an ongoing search for possible universalities and commonalities with other unconventional superconductors, like high-Tc cuprates or heavy fermion materials. The three-dimensional electronic structures of Fe-based superconductors, as well as their extreme sensitivity to disorder, present serious challenges for both theoretical analysis and the interpretation of experiments. However, some key properties emerge from multiple studies. Unconventional, multiband superconductivity originating from an electronic mechanism has found both experimental and theoretical support. There has been great progress in the understanding of various anisotropies of superconducting gap structures, including the possibility of gap nodes even if the gap symmetry is s-wave. Similar to high-Tc cuprates, the superconducting phase has a dome-like shape on T-doping or T-pressure phase diagrams. The anisotropy of the superconducting gap evolves with doping and is likely to become stronger at the dome's edge. In many Fe-based superconductors there is a range where superconductivity coexists and

  19. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  20. Increasing Internal Stakeholder Consensus about a University Science Center's Outreach Policies and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Richard D.

    For decades the United States has tried to increase the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. Educators and policy makers continue to seek strategies to increase the number of students in the STEM education pipeline. Public institutions of higher education are involved in this effort through education and public outreach (EPO) initiatives. Arizona State University opened its largest research facility, the new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV (ISTB4) in September, 2012. As the new home of the School of Earth & Space Exploration (SESE), ISTB4 was designed to serve the school's dedication to K-12 education and public outreach. This dissertation presents a menu of ideas for revamping the EPO program for SESE. Utilizing the Delphi method, I was able to clarify which ideas would be most supported, and those that would not, by a variety of important SESE stakeholders. The study revealed that consensus exists in areas related to staffing and expansion of free programming, whereas less consensus exist in the areas of fee-based programs. The following most promising ideas for improving the SESE's EPO effort were identified and will be presented to SESE's incoming director in July, 2013: (a) hire a full-time director, theater manager, and program coordinator; (b) establish a service-learning requirement obligating undergraduate SESE majors to serve as docent support for outreach programs; (c) obligate all EPO operations to advise, assist, and contribute to the development of curricula, activities, and exhibits; (d) perform a market and cost analysis of other informational education venues offering similar programming; (3) establish a schedule of fee-based planetarium and film offerings; and (f) create an ISTB4 centric, fee-based package of programs specifically correlated to K12 education standards that can be delivered as a fieldtrip experience.

  1. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Project at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, D; Susman, J; McCurdy, F; O'Dell, D; Paulman, P; Stott, J

    2001-04-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine (Nebraska) had three goals: (1) to increase first- and second-year students' exposure to primary care practice in the community; (2) to develop specific educational programs introducing these students to the principles and practices of primary care medicine; and (3) to establish a generalist coordinating council to provide leadership and to nurture generalist educational initiatives in the College of MEDICINE: Students at Nebraska were already required to spend three half-days a semester in a longitudinal clinical experience (LCE) and to complete a three-week primary care block experience in the summer between the first and second years. IGC Project funds were used increase the number of required LCE visits to five a semester and to develop curricular enhancements that would maximize the educational potential of community-based clinical experiences for first- and second-year students. Curricular elements developed included a focus on faculty development for preceptors and development of the Primary Care Introduction to Medicine Curriculum, an eight-week, interdisciplinary module scheduled late in the first year to help prepare students for intensive summer rotations. Other developments were the implementation of a pediatric physical examination experience for first-year students and the implementation of instruction in community-oriented primary care in the second year. Lessons learned are related to: (1) the value and power of early clinical experiences; and (2) the enhancing effect of a holistic, longitudinal view of the curriculum on the planning of early clinical experiences.

  2. Beyond the Letter of the Law: Accessibility, Universal Design, and Human-Centered Design in Video Tutorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S. Clossen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article demonstrates how Universal and Human-Centered Design approaches can be applied to the process of library video tutorial creation in order to enhance accessibility. A series of questions that creators should consider in order to focus their design process is discussed. These questions break down various physical and cognitive limitations that users encounter, providing a framework for future video creation that is not dependent on specific software. By approaching accommodations more holistically, videos are created with accessibility in mind from their conception. Working toward the ideal of a video tutorial that is accessible to every user leads to the creation of more clearly worded, effective learning objects that are much more inclusive, making instructional concepts available to users of all abilities.

  3. Introduction of a learning management system for medical education at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handels, Heinz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Connected with the introduction of a learning management system at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf three different learning management systems were evaluated. Based on the purposes and demands of modern medical education the systems WebCT CE 4.0, ILIAS 3.6 and Moodle 1.5.3 were testet and evaluated.This comparison led to an installation of the learning management system Moodle, which is now used by pilot projects and is getting prepared for normal student access in autumn 2006. First experiences under practical conditions are denoted. Finally prospective subjects like the concept of support and further options of use, even in the research domain, are discussed.

  4. Interprofessional academic health center leadership development: the case of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Grant T; Duncan, W Jack; Knowles, Kathy L; Nelson, Kathleen; Rogers, David A; Kennedy, Karen N

    2014-05-01

    The study describes the genesis of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy (HLA), highlights the HLA's outcomes, discloses how the HLA has changed, and delineates future directions for academic health center (AHC) interprofessional leadership training. While interprofessional training is recognized as an important component of the professional education for health professionals, AHCs have not focused on interprofessional leadership training to prepare future AHC leaders. As professional bureaucracies, AHCs require leadership distributed across different professions; these leaders not only should be technical experts, but also skilled at interprofessional teamwork and collaborative governance. The HLA is examined using the case method, which is supplemented with a descriptive analysis of program evaluation data and outcomes. The HLA has created a networked community of AHC leaders; the HLA's interprofessional team projects foster innovative problem solving. Interprofessional leadership training expands individuals' networks and has multiple organizational benefits. © 2014.

  5. Observation of immuno-labeled cells at high resolution using soft X-ray microscope at Ritsumeikan University SR Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, A [Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266, Tamura-cho, Nagahama, Shiga, 526-0829 (Japan); Takemoto, K; Kihara, H [Department of Physics, Kansai Medical University, 18-89 Uyamahigashi, Hirakata, Osaka, 573-1136 (Japan); Fukui, T; Yoshimura, Y; Namba, H [Department of Physical Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan); Okuno, K, E-mail: takemoto@makino.kmu.ac.j [SR Center, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-Higashi Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    Mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells were labeled with the heavy metal (silver and gold) and observed intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope. Microtubules, Golgi apparatus and early endosomes of NIH3T3 cells were stained with immuno-gold nanoparticles, and immuno-staining was intensified by silver or gold enhancement procedure. Using a transmission soft X-ray microscope beamline (BL12) at Ritsumeikan University SR center, we observed immuno-stained NIH3T3 cells with several wavelengths just below and above oxygen edge ({lambda} = 2.32 nm). Using this method, cytoskeleton (microtubules) and organelles (Golgi apparatus and early endosomes) were successfully imaged with high resolution. Thus, immuno-gold silver and gold enhancement technique is useful for specific labeling of intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope.

  6. Observation of immuno-labeled cells at high resolution using soft X-ray microscope at Ritsumeikan University SR Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Takemoto, K.; Fukui, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Okuno, K.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2009-09-01

    Mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells were labeled with the heavy metal (silver and gold) and observed intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope. Microtubules, Golgi apparatus and early endosomes of NIH3T3 cells were stained with immuno-gold nanoparticles, and immuno-staining was intensified by silver or gold enhancement procedure. Using a transmission soft X-ray microscope beamline (BL12) at Ritsumeikan University SR center, we observed immuno-stained NIH3T3 cells with several wavelengths just below and above oxygen edge (λ = 2.32 nm). Using this method, cytoskeleton (microtubules) and organelles (Golgi apparatus and early endosomes) were successfully imaged with high resolution. Thus, immuno-gold silver and gold enhancement technique is useful for specific labeling of intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope.

  7. Satellite Remote Sensing of Harmful Algal Blooms at the University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, P. J.; Carvalho, G.; Baringer, W.; Banzon, V.

    2007-05-01

    As part of the NSF-NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health at the University of Miami, research is being conducted into the remote sensing of ocean color signatures associated with the occurrence of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). Data from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are down-linked at the University of Miami's Center for Southeastern Tropical Advanced Remote Sensing (CSTARS) and processed in near-real time to produce mapped fields of water leaving radiance in the ocean color bands, derived quantities including inherent optical properties (IOPs) of seawater, chlorophyll concentration, and sea-surface temperature. Images of these fields are available in near-real time on a web-server. The server also provides access to the data files themselves. One of the applications currently being researched using these data is the identification of HABs over the Central West Florida Shelf where blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis have a nearly annual occurance. Since chlorophyll concentration alone cannot be used as a unique variable to determine algal taxonomy, other spectral features or optical properties must be brought into play to discriminate among different phytoplankton types. A published technique developed for SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) to detect K. brevis (based on high concentration of chlorophyll and low particulate backscatter) was transitioned to measurements of Terra MODIS and replicated the results. These were confirmed by comparisons with in situ measurements. This technique is currently being applied to a multi-year time series of remote measurements from the Aqua MODIS and tested against ship-based data.

  8. Prevalence, Severity and Factors Related to Mastalgia among Women Referring to Health Centers Affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Vaziri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mastalgia is a common problem among women. Severe mastalgia can have a negative impact on sexual, physical and sleep activities and behaviors. Regarding the absence of a study on the prevalence and severity of mastalgia in southern Iran, the current study was conducted. Methods: This is an analytical cross-sectional study. The participants were women who referred to health centers affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz. The inclusion criteria were willingness to participate in the study, not being pregnant and breastfeed. The severity of breast pain was calculated with visual analog scale. The data of 845 questionnaires were analyzed with SPSS software. Results: The participants’ age ranged from 15-50 years; the mean age was 32.84±9.49 years. Among 845 participants, 33% (279 of them had experienced mastalgia in the past three months. Among those who had experienced mastalgia, 81% (226 had cyclical mastalgai and 19% (53 had non-cyclical mastalgia. The mean of pain score was 4.32±2.38 and 12.9% of the participants (36 had pain scores of 8 to 10. The impact of mastalgia on daily and sexual activities and sleep behaviors was reported 9.31% (26, 12.66% (29 and 13.97% (36, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the spread of mastalgia in women referred to health centers affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences is lower than that reported in western studies and has lesser effects on their daily, sexual and sleep activities and behaviors. We suggest further studies about mastalgia in others locations in Iran.

  9. Inter-institutional decision making in the technology transfer process: Some preliminary issues in the evaluation of ORNL's High-Temperature Superconductivity Pilot Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, D.L.

    1989-09-01

    This report illuminates the decision-making processes affecting technology transfer at ORNL as they potentially impact upon development of high-temperature superconductors. The methodology of this report consists of an analysis of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) documents laws, and regulations; a review of relevant literature on licensing, patents, and user center decision making; and interviews with persons directly involved in technology development and transfer at the laboratory. The process of technology development at ORNL encompasses, among other things, activities aimed at research and development (R D), technology transfer, and technology utilization. Each of these activities has officially become part of an overall laboratory mission referred to as technology development. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Collaboration Platforms in China for Translational and Clinical Research: The Partnership Between Peking University Health Science Center and the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolars, Joseph C; Fang, Weigang; Zheng, Kai; Huang, Amy Y; Sun, Qiudan; Wang, Yanfang; Woolliscroft, James O; Ke, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Clinical and translational research is increasing in China, attracting faculty-to-faculty collaborations between U.S. and Chinese researchers. However, examples of successful institution-to-institution collaborations to facilitate this research are limited. The authors describe a partnership between Peking University Health Science Center (PUHSC) and the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) designed to enable faculty-initiated joint translational and clinical research projects. In 2009, UMMS leadership identified PUHSC as the most appropriate institutional partner, and the Joint Institute for Translational and Clinical Research was established in 2010. Each contributed $7 million for joint research projects in areas of mutual interest. A shared governance structure, four thematic programs (pulmonary, cardiovascular, liver, and renal diseases), three joint research-enabling cores, and processes for awarding funding have been established along with methods for collaborating and mechanisms to share data and biomaterials. As of November 2015, 52 joint faculty proposals have been submitted, and 25 have been funded. These projects have involved more than 100,000 patients in the United States and China and have generated 13 peer-reviewed publications. Pilot data have been leveraged to secure $3.3 million of U.S. extramural funding. Faculty and trainee exchanges take place regularly (including an annual symposium), and mechanisms exist to link faculty seeking collaborations. Critical determinants of success include having co-ownership at all levels with coinvestment of resources. Each institution is committed to continuing its support with a repeat $7 million investment. Next steps include initiating studies in new clinical areas and pursuing large clinical intervention trials.

  11. Electromagnetic radiation of superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, D. A.; Zadorozhna, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmic strings are relics of the early Universe which can be formed during the phase transitions of fields with spontaneously broken symmetry in the early Universe. Their existence finds support in modern superstrings theories, both in compactification models and in theories with extended additional dimensions. Strings can hold currents, effectively become electrically superconducting wires of astrophysical dimensions. Superconducting cosmic strings can serve as powerful sources of non-thermal radiation in wide energy range. Mechanisms of radiation are synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and inverse-Compton on CMB photons radiation of electrons accelerated by bow shock wave, created by magnetosphere of relativistically moving string in intergalactic medium (IGM). Expected fluxes of radiation from the shocked plasma around superconducting cosmic strings are calculated for strings with various tensions and for different cases of their location. Possibilities of strings detection by existing facilities are estimated.

  12. [Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant recipients--Merkur University Hospital single center experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipec-Kanizaj, Tajana; Budimir, Jelena; Colić-Cvrlje, Vesna; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Sustercić, Dunja; Naumovski-Mihalić, Slavica; Mrzljak, Anna; Kolonić, Slobodanka Ostojić; Sobocan, Nikola; Bradić, Tihomir; Dolić, Zrinka Misetić; Kocman, Branislav; Katicić, Miroslava; Zidovec-Lepej, Snjezana; Vince, Adriana

    2011-09-01

    favoring the diagnosis. The management of PTLD poses a major therapeutic challenge and although there is reasonable agreement about the overall principles of treatment, there is still considerable controversy about the optimal treatment of individual patients. EBV-related PTLDs are a significant cause of mortality in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation with the observed mortality rate of up to 50%. This paper presents the experience acquired at Merkur University Hospital in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with liver transplantation and PTLD.

  13. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven

  14. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigle N. Clark

    2006-12-31

    This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

  15. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  16. The evolution of integrative medical education:the influence of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria Maizes; Randy Horwitz; Patricia Lebensohn; Hilary McClafferty; James Dalen; Andrew Weil

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (AzCIM) was founded in 1994 with a primary focus of educating physicians in integrative medicine (IM). Twenty years later, IM has become an international y recognized movement in medicine. With 40% of United States’ medical schools having membership in the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health it is foreseeable that al medical students and residents wil soon receive training in the principles and practices of IM. The AzCIM has the broadest range and depth of IM educational programs and has had a major influence on integrative medical education in the United States. This review describes the fel owship, residency and medical student programs at AzCIM as wel as other significant national drivers of IM education; it also points out the chal enges faced in developing IM initiatives. The field of IM has matured with new national board certification in IM requiring fel owship training. Al ied health professional IM educational courses, as wel as integrative health coaching, assure that al members of the health care team can receive training. This review describes the evolution of IM education and wil be helpful to academic centers, health care institutions, and countries seeking to introduce IM initiatives.

  17. Epidemiologic characteristics of oral cancer:single-center analysis of 4097 patients from the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhang; Ming Song; Fan Gao; AnKui Yang; WenKuan Chen; ShuWei Chen; Huan Li; Xing Zhang; ZhongYuan Yang; XinLin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer is a common type of head and neck cancers. Knowing its epidemiologic characteristics is crucial to preventing, diagnosing, and treating this cancer. This study aimed to explore the epidemiologic characteris‑tics of oral cancer in South China. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 4097 oral cancer patients treated at the Sun Yat‑sen University Cancer Center between 1960 and 2013. We compared the age of onset, sex ratio, pathologic type, and primary tumor location among three subcultural areas (Guangfu, Hakka, and Chaoshan) and between an economically developed region and a less‑developed one in Guangdong. Results: Overall, oral cancer had a male‑to‑female ratio of approximately 2:1, and this ratio decreased over time. Oral cancer occurred mostly in patients of 45–64 years old (54.5%), and the percentage of older patients gradually increased over time. The most common tumor location was the tongue. Squamous cell carcinoma was the predomi‑nant pathologic type. The percentage of blood type O in oral cancer patients was lower than that in the healthy pop‑ulation. The male‑to‑female ratio in the Chaoshan area was higher than that in the Guangfu and Hakka areas, whereas the age of disease onset in Guangfu was higher than that in Hakka and Chaoshan. The male‑to‑female ratio was lower and the age of disease onset was higher in the economically developed region than in the less‑developed region. Conclusion: The incidence of oral cancer in South China presents typical characteristics to which doctors should pay attention when diagnosing and treating oral cancer patients.

  18. Informing Science (IS and Science and Technology Studies (STS: The University as Decision Center (DC for Teaching Interdisciplinary Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Castelao-Lawless

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Students of history and philosophy of science courses at my University are either naïve robust realists or naïve relativists in relation to science and technology. The first group absorbs from culture stereotypical conceptions, such as the value-free character of the scientific method, that science and technology are impervious to history or ideology, and that science and religion are always at odds. The second believes science and technology were selected arbitrarily by ideologues to have privileged world views of reality to the detriment of other interpretations. These deterministic outlooks must be challenged to make students aware of the social importance of their future roles, be they as scientists and engineers or as science and technology policy decision makers. The University as Decision Center (DC not only reproduces the social by teaching standard solutions to well-defined problems but also provides information regarding conflict resolution and the epistemological, individual, historical, social, and political mechanisms that help create new science and technology. Interdisciplinary research prepares students for roles that require science and technology literacy, but raises methodological issues in the context of the classroom as it increases uncertainty with respect to apparently self-evident beliefs about scientific and technological practices.

  19. Constructing a Superconducting Corrector Magnet for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    1998-01-01

    1. Construction principles : development at CERN shown on a decapolar (MCD) superconducting corrector magnet.2. Computer controlled automatic winding : development with Ferrara University, Italy.3. Electro-mechanically controlled automatic winding : development with CAT-Patel, India

  20. Accreditation the Education Development Centers of Medical-Sciences Universities: Another Step toward Quality Improvement in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohagheghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: : In order to improve the quality of education in universities of medical sciences (UMS, and because of the key role of education development centers (EDCs, an accreditation scheme was developed to evaluate their performance.Method: A group of experts in the medical education field was selected based on pre-defined criteria by EDC of Ministry of Health and Medical education. The team, worked intensively for 6 months to develop a list of essential standards to assess the performance of EDCs. Having checked for the content validity of standards, clear and measurable indicators were created via consensus. Then, required information were collected from UMS EDCs; the first round of accreditation was carried out just to check the acceptability of this scheme, and make force universities to prepare themselves for the next factual round of accreditation.Results: Five standards domains were developed as the conceptual framework for defining main categories of indicators. This included: governing and leadership, educational planning, faculty development, assessment and examination and research in education. Nearly all of UMS filled all required data forms precisely with minimum confusion which shows the practicality of this accreditation scheme.Conclusion: It seems that the UMS have enough interest to provide required information for this accreditation scheme. However, in order to receive promising results, most of universities have to work intensively in order to prepare minimum levels in all required standards. However, it seems that in long term, implementation of a valid accreditation scheme plays an important role in improvement of the quality of medical education around the country.

  1. Frontiers in Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Anant V

    2005-01-01

    Frontiers in Superconducting Materials gives a state-of-the-art report of the most important topics of the current research in superconductive materials and related phenomena. It comprises 30 chapters written by renowned international experts in the field. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in Physics and Materials Science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students. It also addresses electronic and electrical engineers. Even non-specialists interested in superconductivity might find some useful answers.

  2. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  3. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  4. Fundamentals of Superconducting Nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Anatolie

    2011-01-01

    This book demonstrates how the new phenomena in superconductivity on the nanometer scale (FFLO state, triplet superconductivity, Crossed Andreev Reflection, synchronized generation etc.) serve as the basis for the invention and development of novel nanoelectronic devices and systems. It demonstrates how rather complex ideas and theoretical models, like odd-pairing, non-uniform superconducting state, pi-shift etc., adequately describe the processes in real superconducting nanostructues and novel devices based on them. The book is useful for a broad audience of readers, researchers, engineers, P

  5. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  6. Superconducting optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  7. Basic Study of Superconductive Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    涌井, 和也; 荻原, 宏康

    2000-01-01

    There are two kinds of electromagnetic propulsion ships : a superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship and a superconductive electricity propulsion ship. A superconductive electromagnetic propulsion ship uses the electromagnetic force (Lorenz force) by the interaction between a magnetic field and a electric current. On the other hand, a superconductive electricity propulsion ship uses screws driven by a superconductive motor. A superconductive propulsion ship technique has the merits of ...

  8. New Challenges in Superconductivity: Experimental Advances and Emerging Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, J.; Eremin, Mikhail V.; Cohn, Joshua L.; Eremin, Ilya; Manske, Dirk; Pavuna, Davor; Zuo, Fuliln

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 2004 University of Miami Workshop onUnconventional Superconductivity. The workshop was the fourth in a series of successful meetings on High-TC Superconductivity and related topics, which took place at the James L. Knight Physics Building on the University of Miami campus in Coral Gables, Florida, in January 1991, 1995, 1999, and 2004. The volume includes high-quality papers on state of the art works on unconventional superconductivity. A key issue, discussed by many in the workshop, was how homogeneous the cuprates are.

  9. A new type of HTc superconducting film comb-shape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Hai-yan; WANG Fu-ren; MENG Shu-chao; MAO Bo; LI Zhuang-zhi; NIE Rui-juan; LIU Xin-yuan; DAI Yuan-dong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of HTc superconducting film combshape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUID) has been designed.This new type of superconducting film comb-shape resonator is formed by a foursquare microstrip line without a flux concentrator.The range of the center frequency of this type of resonator varies from 800 MHz to 1300 MHz by changing the length of the teeth.In this paper,we report on simulating the relationship of the value of the center frequency and the length of the teeth,and testing the noise of HTc RF SQUID coupling this comb-shape resonator.

  10. The crystallography of color superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, J A; Bowers, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2003-01-01

    We describe the crystalline phase of color superconducting quark matter. This phase may occur in quark matter at densities relevant for compact star physics, with possible implications for glitch phenomena in pulsars. We use a Ginzburg-Landau approach to determine that the crystal has a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure. Moreover, our results indicate that the phase is robust, with gaps, critical temperature, and free energy comparable to those of the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase. Our calculations also predict ``crystalline superfluidity'' in ultracold gases of fermionic atoms.

  11. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Mekaj, Agon Y; Morina, Arsim A; Mekaj, Ymer H; Suzana Manxhuka-Kerliu; Miftari, Ermira I; Duci, Shkelzen B; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Mentor R Gjelaj; Kelmendi, Fatos M; Qamile Sh. Morina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008-2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical...

  12. Superconductivity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Superconductivity is one of the most exciting areas of research in physics today. Outlining the history of its discovery, and the race to understand its many mysterious and counter-intuitive phenomena, this Very Short Introduction explains in accessible terms the theories that have been developed, and how they have influenced other areas of science, including the Higgs boson of particle physics and ideas about the early Universe. It is an engaging and informative accountof a fascinating scientific detective story, and an intelligible insight into some deep and beautiful ideas of physics

  13. Communication for heath behavior change: experiences lived at the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins University.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira Monteiro dos SANTOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sharing experiences is the best way to learn and contribute to the construction of knowledge. It is with this intention that arises this article, a result of the lived experience of the author in workshop taught by the Center for Communication Programs - CCP (Communication Programs Center at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA, in June 2014. In this workshop intensive of 20 days, with daily classes full-time, the author had the opportunity to study and share experiences with great thinkers and professionals from Johns Hopkins. This promoted contact with the philosophy of the institution and the methodologies they developed and implemented in countries around the world, in order to promote improvements in the health status of populations through strategic planning focused on behavior change communication. This was an experience not just in study and planning communication, but a leadership training experience, withmore aware, engaged and complete professionals and, above all, of self-knowledge and personal growth. An article would not be enough to describe all this experience, so we chose to focus on issues about the institution’s vision on health, the practice of health communication, behavior change and an overview of the essential aspects the methodology developed and used by them, called P process. In this article, the reader will come across a breach of academic theoretical reflections promoted by further technical discussions practices, managerial characteristics. This ends up reflecting the logic implemented by the CCP, which develops the practice based on a broad theoretical framework. And in the same way that the institution does not close in their theories and allows to reinvent itself, this article will also feature the author’s own reflections about some of the issues presented.

  14. Quantum Magnetomechanics with Levitating Superconducting Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Isart, O; Navau, C; Sanchez, A; Cirac, J I

    2011-01-01

    We show that by magnetically trapping a superconducting microsphere close to a quantum circuit, it is experimentally feasible to perform ground state cooling and to prepare quantum superpositions of the center-of-mass motion of the microsphere. Due to the absence of clamping losses and time dependent electromagnetic fields, the mechanical motion of micrometer-sized metallic spheres in the Meissner state is predicted to be extremely well isolated from the environment. Hence, we propose to combine the technology of magnetic mictrotraps and superconducting qubits to bring relatively large objects to the quantum regime.

  15. Thirty Years of Pancreas Transplantation at Leiden University Medical Center : Long-Term Follow-Up in a Large Eurotransplant Center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopp, Wouter H; Verhagen, Merel J J; Blok, Joris J; Huurman, Volkert A L; de Fijter, Johan W; de Koning, Eelco J; Putter, Hein; Baranski, Andzrej G; Schaapherder, Alexander F M; Braat, Andries E; Ringers, Jan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An overview of 30 years of pancreas transplantation at a high volume center. Analysis of patient survival- and graft survival-associated risk factors. METHODS: All pancreas transplantations performed in our center from January 1, 1984, till December 31, 2012, were evaluated. Covariates i

  16. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  17. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  18. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  19. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliti, Naim R; Haliti, Fehim R; Koçani, Ferit K; Gashi, Ali A; Mrasori, Shefqet I; Hyseni, Valon I; Bytyqi, Samir I; Krasniqi, Lumnije L; Murtezani, Ardiana F; Krasniqi, Shaip L

    2015-01-01

    Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK). The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription. Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics. Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards.

  20. The experimental teaching reform in biochemistry and molecular biology for undergraduate students in Peking University Health Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and participated in some original research work. There is a critical educational need to prepare these students for the increasing accessibility of research experience. The redesigned experimental curriculum of biochemistry and molecular biology was developed to fulfill such a requirement, which keeps two original biochemistry experiments (Gel filtration and Enzyme kinetics) and adds a new two-experiment component called "Analysis of anti-tumor drug induced apoptosis." The additional component, also known as the "project-oriented experiment" or the "comprehensive experiment," consists of Western blotting and a DNA laddering assay to assess the effects of etoposide (VP16) on the apoptosis signaling pathways. This reformed laboratory teaching system aims to enhance the participating students overall understanding of important biological research techniques and the instrumentation involved, and to foster a better understanding of the research process all within a classroom setting. Student feedback indicated that the updated curriculum helped them improve their operational and self-learning capability, and helped to increase their understanding of theoretical knowledge and actual research processes, which laid the groundwork for their future research work.

  1. [Lung disease and HIV infection in children at the Charles de Gaulle university pediatric hospital center in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouéta, Fla; Yé, Diarra; Dao, Lassina; Zoungrana-Kaboré, Alice; Ouédraogo, Sylvie Armelle P; Napon, M; Sawadogo, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological aspects of lung diseases in HIV-positive and HIV-negative children, we conducted a retrospective case control study covering a 3-year period from January 2003 through December 2005 at Charles de Gaulle University Pediatric Hospital Center in Ouagadougou. HIV-positive patients hospitalised for lung disease were matched to HIV-negative patients controls, hospitalised for the same symptoms, by age and date of hospitalisation. The study included 186 patients (93 HIV-positive and 93 HIV-negative) and collected data on age, sex, clinical signs, radiological signs and short-term course. Of the 93 HIV-positive children suspected to have been contaminated by mother-to-child transmission, 92 had HIV1 and 1 had a double infection of HIV1 and 2. The mean age in both groups was 48 months. Clinically severe lung disease (44%) was more common in HIV-positive children. Radiology showed that interstitial syndrome was significantly more common in HIV-positive children (p=0001) with a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 60%. The case-fatality rate was 4.2% among HIV-positive children. This study allows us to remind paediatricians of the importance of lung disease in HIV-infected children. Moreover, the vertical transmission responsible for disease in all our patients shows the need to accelerate the scaling up of the program for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in our country.

  2. Impact of local donor and regionalization on a German transplantation center. UNI NRW. Universities of North Rhine Westfalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, C; Deng, M C; Gradaus, R; Kley, S; Breithardt, G; Scheld, H H

    1999-01-01

    Optimal allocation of donor organs is an ongoing matter of debate. We report on the impact of the foundation of UNI NRW, a close transplant collaboration of seven university centers with the intention of improving donor organ allocation, on the heart transplant program in Münster. All donor organs retrieved were offered first to the patients within this region before going into the Eurotransplant (ET) Foundation pool. The heart transplant program data were prospectively (for 1997) and retrospectively (for 1996) analyzed with regard to donor organ availability and allocation. There was a slight decrease in the number of donor hearts offered and accepted within the UNI NRW region in 1997 as compared to in 1996. However, due to the significantly lower organ export rate, the number of heart transplantations performed in UNI NRW rose from 47 to 72 procedures. In Münster, only six donor organs (16%) were procured from outside UNI NRW in 1997, and these were, in part, due to special urgency requests. In conclusion, the institutionalization of UNI NRW within the framework of ET offers more flexibility, decreases total ischemic time, and may help to lower costs.

  3. Spanish courses for older adults at the University of the third age and Adult day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Zavrl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents theoretical starting points regarding older adults and learning Spanish language in late adulthood. The starting points are based on the assumption that in order to effectively learn a foreign language in late adulthood; the definitions of the cognitive characteristics of the elderly and the characteristics of learning in this period have to be defined first. I continuation the paper explains various characteristics of learning with older adults. The main emphasis is on analyzing the ability of older people to learn a foreign language and their motivation to learn. The empirical part of the paper presents the results of the survey conducted among participants in the initial and intermediate Spanish courses at the University of the Third Age and day center activities for the elderly in Ljubljana; during the academic year 2013/14. The results showed that the most important reason for attending the course were the love of language and the chance to attend trips to Spanish-speaking countries. As the most important activities in the course the participants highlighted listening to the instructor and making notes; exercises in pronunciation and learning new words. The participants valued relaxed atmosphere of mutual understanding as well as cooperation within the learning group. The most important features of a good instructor; according to the participants; are coherent explanation; positive attitude towards the participants; and learning support.

  4. Protocol for the treatment of malignant inoperable bowel obstruction: a prospective study of 80 cases at Grenoble University Hospital Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Guillemette; Arvieux, Catherine; Stefani, Laetitia; Villard, Marie-Laure; Mestrallet, Jean-Phillippe; Cardin, Nicolas

    2006-06-01

    A prospective protocol for treatment of malignant inoperable bowel obstruction was implemented at Grenoble University Hospital Center for 4 years. All 80 episodes of obstruction resulted from peritoneal carcinomatosis and none could expect another treatment cure. The protocol comprised three successive stages. Stage I included treatment for 5 days with a corticosteroid, antiemetic, anticholinergic, and analgesic. Stage II provided a somatostatin analogue if vomiting persisted. After 3 days, Stage III provided a venting gastrostomy. Obstruction relief with symptom control was obtained by medical treatment in 29 cases and symptom control occurred alone in an additional 32 cases. Ten patients were relieved by venting gastrostomy. Symptom control without permanent nasogastric tube (NGT) placement occurred in 72 episodes (90%). Eight patients with refractory vomiting were obliged to continue the NGT until death. Fifty-eight obstruction episodes (73%) were controlled in 10 days or less. Median time before gastrostomy was 17 days. Median survival was 31 days. This series suggests that a staged protocol for the treatment of inoperable malignant bowel obstruction is highly effective in relieving symptoms. A subgroup experiences relief of obstruction using this approach.

  5. Centenary of the discovery of superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Vernède

    2011-01-01

    To mark the centenary of the discovery of the phenomenon of superconductivity, MANEP and the University of Geneva are organising open days at the PhysiScope between 8 and 15 April 2011. On 13 April CERN will make a contribution to the series of events with a lecture on superconductivity followed by a demonstration of the phenomenon at the Globe   Historic graph showing the superconducting transition of mercury, measured in Leiden in 1911 by H. Kamerlingh Onnes. On 8 April 2011 it will be a hundred years since the discovery of superconductivity by the Dutch physicist Kamerlingh Onnes. To mark the occasion, the University of Geneva and MANEP are organising a week-long interactive workshop at the PhysiScope. “The purpose of this initiative is to introduce the general public to this spectacular phenomenon by giving them an opportunity to take part in entertaining experiments”, explains Adriana Aleman, Head of Communications of the University of Geneva. As its contribution to the e...

  6. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  7. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, James R.; Anastas, George V., Jr.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Goldie, James H.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Hockney, Richard L.; Torti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible.

  8. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  9. Librarians, Faculty, and the Writing Center Partnering to Build an Interdisciplinary Course: A Case Study at the University of Houston, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Alexandra C.

    2017-01-01

    This article covers how an interdisciplinary course was developed using the expertise and resources of a history professor, the history and psychology subject librarians, and the university's writing center. The course, supported by a grant, was aimed at helping students improve their research, information literacy, and writing skills across…

  10. Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS): Psychometric Testing of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Hurricane Assessment and Referral Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Tonya Cross; Osofsky, Joy D.; Osofsky, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Post disaster psychosocial surveillance procedures are important for guiding effective and efficient recovery. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS) is a model designed with the goal of assisting recovering communities in understanding the needs of and targeting services…

  11. Assessment of microbiological monitoring for the evaluation of GMP-compliance at a department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of the University Medical Center Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beugeling, M.; Ekoume, F.; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Luurtsema, G.; Lub-de Hooge, M.N.; Touw, D.J.; Rubow, S.M.; Boersma, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to assess trends and deviations from microbiological monitoring in De cleanroom facilities at the department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of the University Medical Center Groningen over the past five years. This was done to evaluate the status of

  12. Creating a Supportive Teaching Culture in the Research University Context: Strategic Partnering and Interdisciplinary Collaboration between a Teaching Center and Academic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marie Kendall; Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Schreck, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes 2 "strategic partnering" and "interdisciplinary collaboration" case studies between a Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and an academic unit at a mid-sized metropolitan research university in the American Midwest. These faculty development partnerships were developed to meet the unique needs of faculty…

  13. Librarians, Faculty, and the Writing Center Partnering to Build an Interdisciplinary Course: A Case Study at the University of Houston, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Alexandra C.

    2017-01-01

    This article covers how an interdisciplinary course was developed using the expertise and resources of a history professor, the history and psychology subject librarians, and the university's writing center. The course, supported by a grant, was aimed at helping students improve their research, information literacy, and writing skills across…

  14. Career Tracks: A Collaborative Approach between a University Career Center and a College of Education in Building a Career Counseling Paraprofessional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Marilyn; Peper, Christye; McVey, David C.; Schuster, Martha K.

    Career Tracks is an alternative for college and university career centers experiencing an increased demand for services in a time of reduced financial and human resources; committed to providing a quality practical training experience for those joining the career services profession; and seeking to establish a meaningful and highly visible…

  15. 5 years of experience implementing a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus search and destroy policy at the largest university medical center in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Vos (Margreet); M.D. Behrendt (Myra); D.C. Melles (Damian); F.P.N. Mollema (Femke); W. de Groot (Woutrinus); G. Parlevliet (Gerard); A. Ott (Alewijn); D. Horst-Kreft (Deborah); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a rigorous search and destroy policy for controlling methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization. DESIGN: Hospital-based observational follow-up study. SETTING: Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, a 1,2

  16. Assessment of microbiological monitoring for the evaluation of GMP-compliance at a department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of the University Medical Center Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beugeling, M.; Ekoume, F.; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Luurtsema, G.; Lub-de Hooge, M.N.; Touw, D.J.; Rubow, S.M.; Boersma, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to assess trends and deviations from microbiological monitoring in De cleanroom facilities at the department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of the University Medical Center Groningen over the past five years. This was done to evaluate the status of

  17. Summary of the Script and Program Review of Sesame Street by the Chicano Study Center, University of California in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.

    The Sesame Street research staff summarizes comments on the fourth season of the program by the Chicano Study Center of the University of California at Los Angeles. Included are reviews of Sesame Street scripts and programs containing Spanish content; sex role observations; examples of modeling behavior; and comments on segments which challenge…

  18. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  19. [An analysis of mental disorders of international students visiting the Mental Health Service at Tsukuba University Health Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takafumi; Tachikawa, Hirokazu; Ishii, Terumi; Shimada, Naoko; Takemori, Tadashi; Lebowitz, Adam; Asadas, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    With the expected increase in the number of international students coming to Japan as part of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology's "300,000 Foreign Student (Global 30) Plan", the demands on university mental health facilities will also increase. However, the rate of mental disorders of recent international students has not been fully evaluated. As part of an initiative to establish effective treatment measures for the mental health of international students, we investigated the present status and recent trends of these students who visited the Mental Health Service (MHS) in the Tsukuba University Health Center. The demographic characteristics, pathway, stress, and diagnosis of international students who visited the MHS from 2005 to 2010 were investigated retrospectively based on medical records. The subjects were 59 international students (15 male, 44 female; mean age: 28.4). The consultation rate of international students was significantly lower than that of Japanese students each year. Although the rate is almost stable in Japanese students (2.1-2.5%), it has increased significantly in international students, from 0.5% in 2005 to 1.4% in 2010. A larger percentage of the subjects were from Asia (66%), compared to the former Soviet Union (10%) and Europe (7%). A greater proportion of the subjects were graduate students (67%). The diagnoses were as follows: depression (34%), adjustment disorder (32%), insomnia (15%), and schizophrenia (9%). The percentage requiring emergency consultation was 24%, including the most severe cases that had to return to their home country. Sixty-nine percent of the subjects stayed in Japan for more than 1 year. Half of the subjects decided to visit the MHS themselves. The results of the present study show that the consultation rate of international students was lower than that of Japanese students in spite of the "culture shock" experienced by international students. This result is in agreement with

  20. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garifullin, I.A., E-mail: ilgiz_garifullin@yahoo.com [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Leksin, P.V.; Garif' yanov, N.N.; Kamashev, A.A. [Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Fominov, Ya.V. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O.G. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Büchner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoO{sub x}/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers. - Highlights: • We studied a spin switch design F1/F2/S. • We prepared a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). • The full spin switch effect for the superconducting current was realized. • We observed its oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness. • We obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity.

  1. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  2. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  3. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  4. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  5. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center remains tracker: A novel application for tracking decedents and improving the autopsy workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available All hospitals deal with patient deaths. Multiple departments and personnel must be coordinated to ensure that decedents are safely managed. Prior to 2004, at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC, when a patient passed away, the process of alerting involved personnel, transporting the decedent, and tracking the completion of clinical documents was cumbersome and inefficient. In order to address these concerns, UPMC Remains Tracker, a web-based application, was developed to improve the efficiency and simplify the logistics related to the management of patient deaths. The UPMC Information Services division developed UPMC Remains Tracker, an application that tracks decedents′ locations, documentation status, and autopsy status within UPMC hospitals. We assessed qualitative improvement in decedent remains tracking, decedent paperwork management, and staff satisfaction and compliance. UPMC Remains Tracker improved the process of tracking decedents′ locations, identifying involved personnel, monitoring autopsy requests, and determining the availability for funeral home transportation. Resident satisfaction with UPMC Remains Tracker was generally positive and scored as "Improved efficiency" and makes identifying and tracking decedents "Much easier". Additionally, the nursing staff reacted favorably to the application. A retrospective review of the use of the application in the management of 100 decedents demonstrated a 93% compliance rate. Among the cases requiring an autopsy, there was a 90% compliance rate. The process of tracking decedents, their paperwork, involved staff, and decedent autopsy status is often inefficient. This assessment suggests that incorporating new technologies such as UPMC Remains Tracker into the management of hospital deaths provides accurate tracking of remains, streamlines the administrative tasks associated with deaths, and increases nursing and resident satisfaction and compliance.

  6. Health promotion and partnerships: collaboration of a community health management center, county health bureau, and university nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Effective partnerships were established between a community health management center, a county health bureau and a university nursing program. A health fair was undertaken to heighten public health awareness through the collaboration of these various agencies. In this research, formative, process, and summative evaluations were conducted to determine the benefits of partnerships. Elements evaluated included the planning process, health fair relevancy, integration of community resources, participants satisfaction and knowledge acquisition, and partnership satisfaction. The samples of this study included (1) 529 adult participants who completed the on-site evaluation questionnaires; (2) 1,090 child participants who returned gift-reward cards; (3) 114 partners who gave written feedback on their satisfaction; and (4) 57 third-year and 16 fourth-year undergraduate nursing student participants. Data was collected from the evidence report of the Department of Health, the project proposal, activity protocols, meeting records, the project final report, students term papers, and questionnaires. The chief administrator of the County Health Bureau was very impressed with the creative exhibits in the fair and, therefore, invited a coalition to continue further workshops. Seventeen educational exhibits, two dance programs and two drama programs related to health issues were demonstrated in the fair. Resources from community organizations were successfully integrated and allocated. Community participants expressed satisfaction with the fair and anticipated similar activities in the future. Participants revealed more than 80% accuracy in health knowledge quizzes. The senior nursing students highlighted their interaction with the community, community health nurses, and health volunteers. Community-based health promotion and nursing education can be successfully connected when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships.

  7. Ischemic stroke in patients with gliomas at The University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Cachia, David; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Rodriguez, Yvo A; Garciarena, Pedro; Rodarte, Elsa M; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W

    2015-10-01

    Patients with gliomas are at risk of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) with potential consequences on survival, function, and local tumor control. Our objective was to provide information about CVA in patients with gliomas and to estimate survival in this group. We reviewed all adult glioma patients with ischemic CVA at the University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2003 through 2014. We extracted demographic, clinical, imaging, treatment and outcome data. We used descriptive summary data and estimated or compared survival rates where appropriate. 60 of 6500 patients (0.1%) with high-grade (HGG, n = 47) or low-grade glioma (LGG, n = 13) had ischemic CVA Thirty-two (53%) patients had postoperative strokes, and 20 (33%) had CVA after 2 weeks of surgery. Forty-one patients (68%) had gross total resection. For HGG and CVA, the poststroke median overall survival was 17 months versus 61 months in LGG and CVA (P = 0.03; hazard ratio (HR): 2.8; 95% CI 1.07-4.60). Survival stratified by modified Rankin Scale grade was significant (X(2) = 9.8, P = 0.007). Five patients received bevacizumab before stroke onset; none responded to antiangiogenic therapy. There was no stroke-related death. At our institution for 10 years, ischemic CVA in glioma patients was a rare complication, clearly associated in half of cases to surgery, and with a variable negative impact on performance status and neurologic function. In this group, patients with more neurological deficits lived less. The survival difference between and within subgroups was most likely due to tumor grade. More research is necessary to improve prevention of postoperative stroke in glioma patients.

  8. Fostering the health of communities: a unifying mission for the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A; Galbraith, P; Alfero, C; Urbina, C; Derksen, D; Wiese, W; Contreras, R; Kalishman, N

    1996-05-01

    Fostering the health of communities can serve as a unifying mission of the academic health center (AHC), which can set the AHC apart from other health providers in the community. To achieve this mission, the University of New Mexico's AHC is increasingly focusing education, research, and service upon the identified health and service needs of communities in its state. Since major health problems in our society have social, behavioral, and economic roots, New Mexico's AHC has tapped into the broad expertise of its different components as well as that of its state and community partners to adequately address health problems in the community. Its hospitals offer financing and management resources, its colleges offer innovative approaches to community-based education, and the state department of health offers expertise in health policy development. To adequately respond to the complexity of community health needs, the different colleges and departments at New Mexico's AHC are increasingly merging into integrated governance units. Measures of community outreach success include evidence of strengthened community development, increased health care access, and improved indices of community health. New Mexico's AHC formed an interdisciplinary rural outreach task force, which has demonstrated its ability to form partnerships with state and local agencies and to mobilize institutional resources in education, research, and service from the AHC's different departments, colleges, and hospitals to respond promptly to unique community health needs. Evidence shows that such an integrated, coordinated AHC intervention can generate strong and lasting AHC-community alliances, improve the quality and economic viability of community health systems, and enhance the financial resources of the AHC.

  9. Un ente innovativo di ricerca e di servizi per la informazione geospaziale: GIS Research Center della Feng-Chia University di Taiwan (GIS.FCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Salvemini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La storia di un Laboratorio GIS a Taiwan nato da un accordo tra Feng-Chia University e la Università di Roma “LaSapienza” oggi tra i primi nel mondo nel settore dell’informazione geospaziale per la ricerca nell’ambito dei testdell’interoperabilità.A body of research and innovative services for geospatial infor-mation: GIS Research Center of Feng-Chia University in Taiwan (GIS.FCUThe story of a GIS laboratory in Taiwan born on an agreement between the Feng-Chia University and the University of Rome "La Sapienza" now among the first in the world in the field of information for research for geospatial application.

  10. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  11. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    , the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10...... offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However...... MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train....

  12. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  13. Superconductivity fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckel, Werner

    2004-01-01

    This is the second English edition of what has become one of the definitive works on superconductivity in German -- currently in its sixth edition. Comprehensive and easy to understand, this introductory text is written especially with the non-specialist in mind. The authors, both long-term experts in this field, present the fundamental considerations without the need for extensive mathematics, describing the various phenomena connected with the superconducting state, with liberal insertion of experimental facts and examples for modern applications. While all fields of superconducting phenomena are dealt with in detail, this new edition pays particular attention to the groundbreaking discovery of magnesium diboride and the current developments in this field. In addition, a new chapter provides an overview of the elements, alloys and compounds where superconductivity has been observed in experiments, together with their major characteristics. The chapter on technical applications has been considerably expanded...

  14. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  15. Photoemission, Correlation and Superconductivity:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Cloëtta, D.; Pavuna, D.; Perfetti, L.; Grioni, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    We review some of the problems still affecting photoemission as a probe of high-temperature superconductivity, as well as important recent results concerning their solution. We show, in particular, some of the first important results on thin epitaxial films grown by laser ablation, which break the monopoly of cleaved BCSCO in this type of experiments. Such results, obtained on thin LSCO, may have general implications on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity.

  16. Emergent Higgsless Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Diamantini M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Higgsless model of superconductivity, inspired from anyon superconductivity but P- and T-invariant and generalizable to any dimension. While the original anyon superconductivity mechanism was based on incompressible quantum Hall fluids as average field states, our mechanism involves topological insulators as average field states. In D space dimensions it involves a (D-1-form fictitious pseudovector gauge field which originates from the condensation of topological defects in compact lowenergy effective BF theories. There is no massive Higgs scalar as there is no local order parameter. When electromagnetism is switched on, the photon acquires mass by the topological BF mechanism. Although the charge of the gapless mode (2 and the topological order (4 are the same as those of the standard Higgs model, the two models of superconductivity are clearly different since the origins of the gap, reflected in the high-energy sectors are totally different. In 2D thi! s type of superconductivity is explicitly realized as global superconductivity in Josephson junction arrays. In 3D this model predicts a possible phase transition from topological insulators to Higgsless superconductors.

  17. Superconducting Fullerene Nanowhiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Takano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized superconducting fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs by potassium (K intercalation. They showed large superconducting volume fractions, as high as 80%. The superconducting transition temperature at 17 K was independent of the K content (x in the range between 1.6 and 6.0 in K-doped C60 nanowhiskers (KxC60NWs, while the superconducting volume fractions changed with x. The highest shielding fraction of a full shielding volume was observed in the material of K3.3C60NW by heating at 200 °C. On the other hand, that of a K-doped fullerene (K-C60 crystal was less than 1%. We report the superconducting behaviors of our newly synthesized KxC60NWs in comparison to those of KxC60 crystals, which show superconductivity at 19 K in K3C60. The lattice structures are also discussed, based on the x-ray diffraction (XRD analyses.

  18. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  19. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  20. Design of university data center based on Cloud Computing%基于云计算的高校数据中心的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽娟

    2014-01-01

    基于云计算的高校数据中心的构建,不仅推动了高校环境、资源及应用的数字化发展,在以往的高校中搭建了一个数字空间,同时还有效拓展了现代高校的时间及空间维度,使校园数据中心的运行效率得到极大提升。本文分析了云计算的概念及特点,并阐述了基于云计算的高校数据中心的优势及目标,最后,针对构建高校云计算数据中心提出几点建议及措施。%The construction of university data center based on cloud computing,not only to promote thedevelopment of the digital resources of university environment,and application,to build a digital space in theUniversity,but also effective to expand the time and space of modern colleges and universities, the running efficiency of campus data center greatly enhance.This paper analyzes the concept and characteristics of cloud computing,and discusses the advantage and the target,the data center based on cloud computing and finally,toconstruct the cloud computing data center and puts forward some suggestions and measures.

  1. Radiation Therapy Improves Survival Outcome in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Comparison of a 15-Year Institutional Experience at the University of Nebraska Medical Center with SEER Data

    OpenAIRE

    Baine, Michael J.; Chi Lin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the role of radiation therapy (RT) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) treatment through a 15-year retrospective analysis of patients treated at University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) as well as those from the SEER database. Methods. A total of 561 patients diagnosed with PA at UNMC between 1995 and 2011 and 60,587 patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2009 from the SEER were included. Examined prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) were age, gender, race, stag...

  2. DC superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, P.; Villard, C.; Cointe, Y.

    2006-03-01

    There is a lack of satisfying solutions for fault currents using conventional technologies, especially in DC networks, where a superconducting fault current limiter could play a very important part. DC networks bring a lot of advantages when compared to traditional AC ones, in particular within the context of the liberalization of the electric market. Under normal operation in a DC network, the losses in the superconducting element are nearly zero and only a small, i.e. a low cost, refrigeration system is then required. The absence of zero crossing of a DC fault current favourably accelerates the normal zone propagation. The very high current slope at the time of the short circuit in a DC grid is another favourable parameter. The material used for the experiments is YBCO deposited on Al2O3 as well as YBCO coated conductors. The DC limitation experiments are compared to AC ones at different frequencies (50-2000 Hz). Careful attention is paid to the quench homogenization, which is one of the key issues for an SC FCL. The University of Geneva has proposed constrictions. We have investigated an operating temperature higher than 77 K. As for YBCO bulk, an operation closer to the critical temperature brings a highly improved homogeneity in the electric field development. The material can then absorb large energies without degradation. We present tests at various temperatures. These promising results are to be confirmed over long lengths.

  3. Correlation of Managers' Value Systems and Students' Moral Development in High Schools and Pre-University Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Hamid Reza; Rahimipoor, Tahereh

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the managers' value system, the students' moral development, and their relationship in the high schools and pre-universities of District One in Kerman City. The research method used was descriptive-correlational. The statistical population was composed of high school and pre-university managers and…

  4. Successful interventions to reduce first-case tardiness in Dutch university medical centers: results of a nationwide operating room benchmark study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen-Berkx, Elizabeth; Elkhuizen, Sylvia G; Kalkman, Cor J; Buhre, Wolfgang F; Kazemier, Geert

    2014-06-01

    First-case tardiness is still a common source of frustration. In this study, a nationwide operating room (OR) Benchmark database was used to assess the effectiveness of interventions implemented to reduce tardiness and calculate its economic impact. Data from 8 University Medical Centers over 7 years were included: 190,295 elective inpatient first cases. Data were analyzed with SPSS statistics and multidisciplinary focus-group study meetings. Analysis of variance with contrast analysis measured the influence of interventions. Seven thousand ninety-four hours were lost annually to first-case tardiness, which has a considerable economic impact. Four University Medical Centers implemented interventions and effectuated a significant reduction in tardiness, eg providing feedbacks directly when ORs started too late, new agreements between OR and intensive care unit departments concerning "intensive care unit bed release" policy, and a shift in responsibilities regarding transport of patients to the OR. Nationwide benchmarking can be applied to identify and measure the effectiveness of interventions to reduce first-case tardiness in a university hospital OR environment. The implemented interventions in 4 centers were successful in significantly reducing first-case tardiness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Superconductivity in Cuba: Reaching the Frontline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arés Muzio, Oscar; Altshuler, Ernesto

    The start of experimental research in the field of superconductivity was a very special moment for Cuban physics: Cuban scientists at the Physics Faculty, University of Havana, synthesized the first Cuban superconductor (a 123-YBCO ceramic sample) just 2 months after the publication of the famous paper by Wu and co-workers that triggered the frantic race of High Tc superconductors all over the world. We timely joined the world's frontline in superconductor research.

  6. Center for Plant and Microbial Complex Carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center: Progress Report for the Funding Period November 1, 2002 - October 31, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, Peter [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2003-10-31

    This progress report describes the research, service, and training activities conducted with the support of the DOE center grant. The research activities are summarized in the form of reprints or abstracts of 46 papers citing support from the DOE center grant that were produced during the reporting period. These papers include those that are published, in press, submitted, or in preparation. The papers include those produced entirely by CCRC personnel and those papers representing research work conducted in collaboration with scientists at other institutions. (See Appendix I.) A major component of this grant is to provide service to researchers at other academic institutions and industries located throughout the US and other parts of the world. A summary of all our service activities during the reporting period is also included with this report, including samples of poly/oligosaccharides and antibodies distributed to scientists (see Appendix II). A description of the three training courses held at the CCRC during 2003 is also provided, together with the names and affiliations of participants who attended the courses (see Appendix III).

  7. Center of Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, J. Steven; Wood-Steed, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how college and university student centers are becoming the institution's marketing tools. Explores how the Millennium Center at the University of Missouri in St. Louis exemplifies this new trend. (GR)

  8. Method for detecting superconducting stripes in high-temperature superconductors based on nonlinear resistivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Rodrigo A; Martin, Ivar

    2011-09-16

    We theoretically study the effect that stripelike superconducting inclusions would have on the nonlinear resistivity in single crystals. Even if the stripe orientation varies throughout the sample between two orthogonal directions due to twinning, we predict that there should be a universal dependence of the nonlinear resistivity on the angle between the applied current and the crystal axes. This prediction can be used to test the existence of superconducting stripes at and above the superconducting transition temperature in cuprate superconductors.

  9. Model of Activities of the Resource Training Center of the Russian State Social University in Terms of Professional Orientation and Employment of Persons with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikbulatova A.A.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the importance of professional and vocational guidance for persons with disabilities. It describes the main approaches to providing such type of guidance to the disabled students and reveals the technologies of motivating people with disabilities to seek education and to make informed choices of profession. The research was aimed at developing the model of career guidance offered at resource and training centers established by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation on the basis higher educational institutions. The paper presents the developed model of professional and vocational guidance for persons with disabilities and explains the algorithm of its implementation in the resource and training centers. Also, the paper gives recommendations on how to change the technology of communication between universities, regional job centers and offices of medical and social assessment.

  10. Synthesis and superconductivity of (Agx/CuTl-1223 composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Jabbar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Series of (Agx/(Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2Cu3O10-δ {(Agx/CuTl-1223} nano-superconductor composites were synthesized with different concentrations (i.e. x=0~4.0 wt% of silver (Ag nanoparticles. Low anisotropic CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix was prepared by solid-state reaction and Ag nanoparticles were prepared by a sol–gel method separately. The required (Agx/CuTl-1223 composition was obtained by the inclusion of Ag nanoparticles in CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix. Structural, morphological, compositional and superconducting transport properties of these composites were investigated in detail by x-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive x-rays (EDX spectroscopy and four-point probe electrical resistivity (ρ measurements. The inclusion of Ag nanoparticles enhanced the superconducting properties without affecting the tetragonal structure of the host CuTl-1223 matrix. The improvement in superconducting properties of (Agx/CuTl-1223 composites is most likely due to enhanced inter-grains coupling and increased superconducting volume fraction after the addition of metallic Ag nanoparticles at the inter-crystallite sites in the samples. The presence of Ag nanoparticles at the grain-boundaries may increase the number of flux pinning centers, which were present in the form of weak-links in the pure CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix.

  11. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Five-year report, September 15, 1987--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, Peter; Darvill, Alan

    1992-05-01

    The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) is the home of ten independent but complementary interdisciplinary research groups led by nine regular faculty and one adjunct faculty. The research of these groups represents a broad spectrum of interests, and they are involved in about 90 collaborations with their CCRC and UGA colleagues and with scientists at other institutions and companies in the US, Canada, Europe, Israel, and Japan. The hallmark of the CCRC is the collaborative, interactive environment encouraged by its directors, faculty and tong-term staff. Newcomers to the CCRC or short-term members soon learn that everyone benefits from this process. The team-oriented approach in carbohydrate science translates into the day-today generous giving of one's time and expertise to the work of others, whether it be in sharing specialized instrumentation, participating in the design of experiments and interpretalon of data, providing service to scientists outside the CCRC, or joining collaborative projects. The CCRC is founded on the principle that the cross-fertilization of ideas and know-how leads to the synergistic advancement of science. This report contains a series of appendices that document the extent and breadth of the Plant and Microbial Carbohydrate Center's contributions to collaborative research and education. Several collaborative research projects that have received postdoctoral research associate support from the Grant are highlighted, as these projects are particularly illustrative of the wide-ranging collaborations that have evolved as a result of this Grant and the quality of the science that the Grant enables.

  12. Pairing theory of striped superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loder, Florian; Kampf, Arno P.; Kopp, Thilo; Graser, Siegfried [Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Augsburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Striped high-T{sub c} superconductors such as La{sub 7/8}Ba{sub 1/8}CuO{sub 4} show a fascinating competition between spin and charge order on the one hand and superconductivity on the other. A theory for these systems therefore has to capture both the spin correlations in an antiferromagnet and the pair-correlation of a superconductor. For this purpose we have developed an effective Hartree-Fock theory by merging electron pairing with finite center-of-mass momentum and antiferromagnetism. We show that this theory reproduces the key experimental features such as the formation of the antiferromagnetic stripe patterns at 7/8 band filling or the quasi one-dimensional electronic structure observed by photoemission spectroscopy.

  13. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  14. Nanoscience and Engineering in Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Lang, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    For emerging energy saving technologies, superconducting materials with superior performance are needed. Such materials can be developed by manipulating the 'elementary building blocks' through nanostructuring. For superconductivity the 'elementary blocks' are Cooper pair and fluxon (vortex). This book presents new ways how to modify superconductivity and vortex matter through nanostructuring and the use of nanoscale magnetic templates. The basic nano-effects, vortex and vortex-antivortex patterns, vortex dynamics, Josephson phenomena, critical currents, and interplay between superconductivity

  15. Psychological Center as a Foundation for the Practical Training of Clinical psychologists at the Saint-Petersburg State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Burina

    2016-05-01

    In overall, the Psychological Center with its long-term experience of preparation and practical skills training for the students of the Clinical Psychology specialty, has proven its necessity, relevance, and effectiveness.

  16. The astronomical observatory of the University of Havana. A project for its rehabilitation as a center for science popularisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Guardia Durán, Mónica

    2011-06-01

    The project aims to recover the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Havana (AOUH) for science outreach at the national level, in order to help increasing the interest in science primarily among children and youth.

  17. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  18. Jackson State University (JSU)’s Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (CESTEME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-08

    SCHOOL COLLEGE/ UNIVERSITY ATTENDING MAJOR/ Career Choice Barksdale, Marcus Lanier HS Jackson State University Civil Engineering Bennett...enhance the STEM academic infrastructure, and 2) mentor students to pursue careers and advanced degrees in STEM disciplines of relevance to the DoD...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER Paul Tchounwou Paul B. Tchounwou, Theresa Hamilton, Lorene Essex 206022 c

  19. Connectivity and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The motto of connectivity and superconductivity is that the solutions of the Ginzburg--Landau equations are qualitatively influenced by the topology of the boundaries, as in multiply-connected samples. Special attention is paid to the "zero set", the set of the positions (also known as "quantum vortices") where the order parameter vanishes. The effects considered here usually become important in the regime where the coherence length is of the order of the dimensions of the sample. It takes the intuition of physicists and the awareness of mathematicians to find these new effects. In connectivity and superconductivity, theoretical and experimental physicists are brought together with pure and applied mathematicians to review these surprising results. This volume is intended to serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers in physics or mathematics interested in superconductivity, or in the Schrödinger equation as a limiting case of the Ginzburg--Landau equations.

  20. Large Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Védrine, P.

    2014-07-17

    The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb−Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

  1. Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2011-11-28

    Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

  2. Failed theories of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalian, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kammerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer. During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of the scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

  3. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  4. Fingerprints of Mott Superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强华

    2003-01-01

    We improve a previous theory of doped Mott insulators with duality between pairing and magnetism by a further duality transform. As the result we obtained a quantum Ginzburg-Landau theory describing the Cooper pair condensate and the dual of spin condensate. We address the superconductivity by doping a Mott insulator,which we call the Mott superconductivity. Some fingerprints of such novelty in cuprates are the scaling between neutron resonance energy and superfluid density, and the induced quantized spin moment by vortices or Zn impurity (together with circulating charge super-current to be checked by experiments).

  5. On the Learner-Centered Teaching Approach --The Reflection Getting from New College English By ZheJiang University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯海荣

    2001-01-01

    This paper first focuses on a brief evaluation of the teacher-centered and the learner-centered methodologies and the relevant result and the necessity for changing. Secondly ,it represents the practical ways of teaching based on the learner-centered approach in classrooms to show how students' initiative is given .Thirdly , it presents the guidance for fellow teachers and students in group activities .The author of the paper believes that getting students started is the initial step towards active learning and fruitful teaching. It is proposed that efforts made to get students involved should focus not only on forms of activities but also on their contents , skill integration and establishing cooperative relationships between teachers and students or among students.

  6. Exploration on professional construction of university and college's counseling center in China%我国高校心理中心专业化建设探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓一

    2015-01-01

    Currently,the professional construction of univerisities and colleges'counseling centers in China is not per-fect.In reference to the professional construction experiences of foreign universities and colleges'counseling centers, the author carries on the ponder and exploration on aspacts of the identification standerds,the relationships of the counseling center to the university community,counseling service personnel,professional development and so on, proposes the corresponding countermeasures,in hope of optimizing the counseling service of colleges and universi-ties.%在借鉴国外高校心理中心专业化建设经验的基础上,笔者从高校心理中心的鉴定标准、隶属关系、人员设置和组成以及高校心理咨询师的职后发展等方面进行思考和探索,提出相应对策,以期优化高校心理咨询工作。

  7. [Interdisciplinarity and chronic pain therapy--implementation of a new Interdisciplinary Center at the University Hospital Dresden on the basis of an integrated health care contract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Sabine; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Joraschky, Peter; Reichmann, Heinz; Koch, Thea; Eberlein-Gonska, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Due to the bio-psycho-social complexity and presence of various health departments, chronic pain requires interdisciplinary cooperation which enables the accurate evaluation of the clinical findings and is a prerequisite for an individual and resource-oriented therapeutic concept focusing on both physical and mental activation. This concept forms the basis of medical care at the University Pain Center, which was founded in April 2004 at the Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital in Dresden. Since then, day care and inpatient services have been provided in addition to well-established outpatient care. The motive behind the foundation of the Pain Center was to sensitize health insurers to the complex problems of chronic pain and existing regional structural deficits. Following a draft version of a coherent multimodal, interdisciplinary healthcare concept along with full cost accounting after 1 1/2 years, an integrative healthcare contract got signed by two health insurances (AOK-Sachsen and VdAK) in June 2004. After two years of existence, the first experiences, results and especially the Pain Center's treatment spectrum ought to be demonstrated.

  8. A solar station in Ica - Mutsumi Ishitsuka: a research center to improve education at the university and schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas-Ramos, Raúl

    2012-07-01

    The San Luis Gonzaga National University of Ica has built a solar station, in collaboration with the Geophysical Institute of Peru, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and the Hida Observatory. The Solar Station has the following equipment: a digital Spectrograph Solar Refractor Telescope Takahashi 15 cm aperture, 60 cm reflector telescope aperture, a magnetometer-MAGDAS/CPNM and a Burst Monitor Telescope Solar-FMT (Project CHAIN). These teams support the development of astronomical science and Ica in Peru, likewise contributing to science worldwide. The development of basic science will be guaranteed when university students, professors and researchers work together. The Solar Station will be useful for studying the different levels of university education and also for the general public. The Solar Station will be a good way to spread science in the region through public disclosure.

  9. Proximity effect-induced superconducting networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, S.; Tanda, S.

    2009-02-01

    We have studied proximity effect-induced superconductivity of micro wire networks in a magnetic field for investigating topological effects of the superconducting order parameter through Little-Parks oscillation. We prepared a regular honeycomb network, which has Pb-Au bilayer structure, by standard electron beam lithography and measured variation of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in a magnetic field. We also fabricated a honeycomb network made of Pb monolayer and measured it in the same way. In the experimental results of the monolayer network, 2.06 ± 0.02 Gauss of periodic variation of Tc in a magnetic field was observed at around 7.2 K. The area estimated from this period is 10.04 μm2 and correspond to unit honeycomb enclosed by center of the wire. While, in the results of the bilayer network, 2.66 ± 0.04 Gauss of periodic variation of Tc in a magnetic field was observed at around 4.3 K because of the proximity effect. The area estimated from this period is 7.78 μm2 and correspond to unit honeycomb enclosed by edge of the wire. In the latter case, the superconducting current flows through edge of the wire since the order parameter can be considered to be more developed and inhomogeneous on the wire cross-section at around 4.3 K less than 7.2 K. Consequently, a novel network of paths flowing through the superconducting current, which consists of loops enclosed by edge of the wire, can be realized by controlling the proximity effect.

  10. Teaching Centers in Open Education and Construction of Learning Centers in the Open University of China%开放教育教学点与国家开放大学学习中心建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾斌

    2012-01-01

      Recently the Ministry of Education has officially approved the establishment of the Open University of China on the basis of the Central Radio & TV University, which will soon mark the strategic transformation from RTVU to OU. But what status will be for the learning centers of OU and what functions and responsibilities should be for them to have? This paper systematically introduces the origin, status and responsibilities of study centers in open education and puts forward some considerations on the status and responsibilities of learning centers in OU. They are inheriting the orientation and responsibility of teaching centers in open education, strengthening the service function of community education and lifelong education, making a clear division of responsibilities between local colleges and learning centers, and setting the entry standards to learning centers.%  近日,教育部已经正式批复同意在中央电大的基础上建立国家开放大学,这标志着从广播电视大学到开放大学的战略转型即将实现。针对未来国家开放大学的学习中心应如何定位并具备哪些功能和职责,本文系统地梳理了开放教育教学点的由来及其定位和职责,并提出了对国家开放大学学习中心将来定位和职责的几点思考,如要继承开放教育教学点的定位和职责、增强为社区教育和终身学习服务的功能、理清地方学院与学习中心的职责分工以及明确国家开放大学学习中心的准入标准。

  11. Commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam delivery system at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Houston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Bues, Martin; Ciangaru, George; Sawakuchi, Gabriel; Poenisch, Falk; Arjomandy, Bijan; Martin, Craig; Titt, Uwe; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Smith, Alfred R.; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, U.T. MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To describe a summary of the clinical commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam at the Proton Therapy Center, Houston (PTC-H). Methods: Discrete spot scanning system is composed of a delivery system (Hitachi ProBeat), an electronic medical record (Mosaiq V 1.5), and a treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse V 8.1). Discrete proton pencil beams (spots) are used to deposit dose spot by spot and layer by layer for the proton distal ranges spanning from 4.0 to 30.6 g/cm{sup 2} and over a maximum scan area at the isocenter of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. An arbitrarily chosen reference calibration condition has been selected to define the monitor units (MUs). Using radiochromic film and ion chambers, the authors have measured spot positions, the spot sizes in air, depth dose curves, and profiles for proton beams with various energies in water, and studied the linearity of the dose monitors. In addition to dosimetric measurements and TPS modeling, significant efforts were spent in testing information flow and recovery of the delivery system from treatment interruptions. Results: The main dose monitors have been adjusted such that a specific amount of charge is collected in the monitor chamber corresponding to a single MU, following the IAEA TRS 398 protocol under a specific reference condition. The dose monitor calibration method is based on the absolute dose per MU, which is equivalent to the absolute dose per particle, the approach used by other scanning beam institutions. The full width at half maximum for the spot size in air varies from approximately 1.2 cm for 221.8 MeV to 3.4 cm for 72.5 MeV. The measured versus requested 90% depth dose in water agrees to within 1 mm over ranges of 4.0-30.6 cm. The beam delivery interlocks perform as expected, guarantying the safe and accurate delivery of the planned dose. Conclusions: The dosimetric parameters of the discrete spot scanning proton beam have been measured as part of the clinical commissioning program

  12. Commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam delivery system at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Houston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillin, Michael T; Sahoo, Narayan; Bues, Martin; Ciangaru, George; Sawakuchi, Gabriel; Poenisch, Falk; Arjomandy, Bijan; Martin, Craig; Titt, Uwe; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Smith, Alfred R; Zhu, X Ronald

    2010-01-01

    To describe a summary of the clinical commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam at the Proton Therapy Center, Houston (PTC-H). Discrete spot scanning system is composed of a delivery system (Hitachi ProBeat), an electronic medical record (Mosaiq V 1.5), and a treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse V 8.1). Discrete proton pencil beams (spots) are used to deposit dose spot by spot and layer by layer for the proton distal ranges spanning from 4.0 to 30.6 g/cm2 and over a maximum scan area at the isocenter of 30 x 30 cm2. An arbitrarily chosen reference calibration condition has been selected to define the monitor units (MUs). Using radiochromic film and ion chambers, the authors have measured spot positions, the spot sizes in air, depth dose curves, and profiles for proton beams with various energies in water, and studied the linearity of the dose monitors. In addition to dosimetric measurements and TPS modeling, significant efforts were spent in testing information flow and recovery of the delivery system from treatment interruptions. The main dose monitors have been adjusted such that a specific amount of charge is collected in the monitor chamber corresponding to a single MU, following the IAEA TRS 398 protocol under a specific reference condition. The dose monitor calibration method is based on the absolute dose per MU, which is equivalent to the absolute dose per particle, the approach used by other scanning beam institutions. The full width at half maximum for the spot size in air varies from approximately 1.2 cm for 221.8 MeV to 3.4 cm for 72.5 MeV. The measured versus requested 90% depth dose in water agrees to within 1 mm over ranges of 4.0-30.6 cm. The beam delivery interlocks perform as expected, guarantying the safe and accurate delivery of the planned dose. The dosimetric parameters of the discrete spot scanning proton beam have been measured as part of the clinical commissioning program, and the machine is found to function in a safe

  13. Superconducting Magnets for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity has been the most influential technology in the field of accelerators in the last 30 years. Since the commissioning of the Tevatron, which demonstrated the use and operability of superconductivity on a large scale, superconducting magnets and rf cavities have been at the heart of all new large accelerators. Superconducting magnets have been the invariable choice for large colliders, as well as cyclotrons and large synchrotrons. In spite of the long history of success, superconductivity remains a difficult technology, requires adequate R&D and suitable preparation, and has a relatively high cost. Hence, it is not surprising that the development has also been marked by a few setbacks. This article is a review of the main superconducting accelerator magnet projects; it highlights the main characteristics and main achievements, and gives a perspective on the development of superconducting magnets for the future generation of very high energy colliders.

  14. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  15. Relationship of Interpersonal Behaviors and Health-Related Control Appraisals to Patient Satisfaction and Compliance in a University Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Thomas A.; Auerbach, Stephen M.; Kiesler, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' aim was to evaluate patient-provider relationships in a college health center. Participants: Eighty student patients and their health-care providers. Methods: Patients completed a measure of perceived health competence before a consultation and measures of provider participatory behavior and interpersonal behavior before…

  16. Effective Faculty Evaluation at the Teaching-Centered University: Building a Fair and Authentic Portfolio of Faculty Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the most fair, authentic, and reliable elements to include in a portfolio of faculty work, specifically at teaching-centered institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper examines and evaluates relevant literature pertaining to faculty portfolios of work and recommends portfolio formats…

  17. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  18. Superconducting Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    of Nb/Al- Nx /NbTiN junctions for SIS mixer applications,” IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconduct., vol. 11, pp. 76–79, Mar. 2001. [48] M. Gurvitch, W. A...Another connector developed by IBM for commercial applications using a dendritic interposer technology. A “beam-on-pad” approach developed by Siemens

  19. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  20. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  1. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  2. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  3. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  4. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  5. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  6. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  7. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, R [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Ejrnaes, M [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Naples (Italy); Esposito, E [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Lisitskyi, M P [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Nappi, C [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Pagano, S [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Perez de Lara, D [CNR-Istituto di Cibernetica E. Caianiello, 80078 Pozzuoli (Namibia) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  8. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  9. Superconducting doped topological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Satoshi, E-mail: sasaki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mizushima, Takeshi, E-mail: mizushima@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Studies on both normal- and SC-state properties of doped topological materials. • Odd-parity pairing systems with the time-reversal-invariance. • Robust superconductivity in the presence of nonmagnetic impurity scattering. • We propose experiments to identify the existence of Majorana fermions in these SCs. - Abstract: Recently, the search for Majorana fermions (MFs) has become one of the most important and exciting issues in condensed matter physics since such an exotic quasiparticle is expected to potentially give rise to unprecedented quantum phenomena whose functional properties will be used to develop future quantum technology. Theoretically, the MFs may reside in various types of topological superconductor materials that is characterized by the topologically protected gapless surface state which are essentially an Andreev bound state. Superconducting doped topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators are promising candidates to harbor the MFs. In this review, we discuss recent progress and understanding on the research of MFs based on time-reversal-invariant superconducting topological materials to deepen our understanding and have a better outlook on both the search for and realization of MFs in these systems. We also discuss some advantages of these bulk systems to realize MFs including remarkable superconducting robustness against nonmagnetic impurities.

  10. Nonlinearities in Microwave Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ledenyov, Dimitri O.; Ledenyov, Viktor O.

    2012-01-01

    The research is focused on the modeling of nonlinear properties of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) thin films, using Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Lumped Element Circuit theories, with purpose to enhance microwave power handling capabilities of microwave filters and optimize design of microwave circuits in micro- and nano- electronics.

  11. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  12. Applications of Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  13. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  14. ISR Superconducting Quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Michel Bouvier is preparing for curing the 6-pole superconducting windings inbedded in the cylindrical wall separating liquid helium from vacuum in the quadrupole aperture. The heat for curing the epoxy glue was provided by a ramp of infrared lamps which can be seen above the slowly rotating cylinder. See also 7703512X, 7702690X.

  15. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozar, A., E-mail: adrian.gozar@yale.edu [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bozovic, I. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T{sub c} superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T{sub c} Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  16. Challenging Conventional Wisdom: Building an Adult-Centered Degree Completion Program at a Traditional University's Satellite Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson Norton, Susan; Pickus, Keith

    2011-01-01

    This essay will discuss the creation of adult-learner degree programs at Wichita State University's satellite campuses with a particular focus on how such programs complement the mission of a traditional urban-serving research institution. It will assess the decision-making process that led to the transformation of satellite campuses into…

  17. A Person-Centered Perspective on Multidimensional Perfectionism in Canadian and Chinese University Students: A Multigroup Latent Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin M.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Yan, Gonggu; Sherry, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the generalizability of the tripartite model of perfectionism across Canadian and Chinese university students. Using latent profile analysis and indicators of perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, and neuroticism in both groups, the authors derived a 3-profile solution: adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive…

  18. Pricing the Services of the Computer Center at the Catholic University of Louvain. Program on Institutional Management in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecquet, Ignace; And Others

    Principles are outlined that are used as a basis for the system of pricing the services of the Computer Centre. The system illustrates the use of a management method to secure better utilization of university resources. Departments decide how to use the appropriations granted to them and establish a system of internal prices that reflect the cost…

  19. A Person-Centered Perspective on Multidimensional Perfectionism in Canadian and Chinese University Students: A Multigroup Latent Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin M.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Yan, Gonggu; Sherry, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the generalizability of the tripartite model of perfectionism across Canadian and Chinese university students. Using latent profile analysis and indicators of perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, and neuroticism in both groups, the authors derived a 3-profile solution: adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive…

  20. OPPORTUNITIES OF EXERCISING THE ROLE OF AN ACTIVE STUDENT AS A PREMISE OF STUDENT-CENTERED EDUCATION IN THE ECONOMIC SCIENCES FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ORADEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosca Remus Dorel

    2014-07-01

    The ideas presented in this paper are to represent a part of a good practice guide on implementing student-centered education within a high educational institution. The concern for this concept is determined by the current context of the high educational system in Romania characterized by: the intensification of the competitive environment; increasing employers’ demands; increasing high school graduates and students’ demands towards the quality offered by a high educational institution; the performance indicators used by ARACIS in the evaluation of the universities, a very relevant example being the graduates’ professional route in the labour field. We are convinced that the ideas presented in this paper are important to the decision factors from the academic environment, factors that should initiate and facilitate the implementation of the student- centered education concept.

  1. Inflammation, regeneration, and transformation in the pancreas: results of the Collaborative Research Center 518 (SFB 518) at the University of Ulm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giehl, Klaudia; Bachem, Max; Beil, Michael; Böhm, Bernhard O; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fulda, Simone; Gress, Thomas M; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Kestler, Hans A; Kornmann, Marko; Menke, Andre; Möller, Peter; Oswald, Franz; Schmid, Roland M; Schmidt, Volker; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz; Wagner, Martin; Walther, Paul; Wirth, Thomas; Adler, Guido

    2011-05-01

    The primary diseases of the pancreas include diabetes mellitus, acute and chronic pancreatitis, as well as pancreatic carcinoma. This review presents findings and emerging questions on the diseases of the pancreas obtained by the consortium of the Collaborative Research Center 518 (SFB 518), "Inflammation, Regeneration, and Transformation in the Pancreas" at the University of Ulm. During the last 12 years, the SFB 518 contributed considerably to the understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of pancreatic diseases and established the basis for the development of new strategies for prevention and causal therapy for diabetes, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

  2. Climate Science Centers: An "Existence Theorem" for a Federal-University Partnership to Develop Actionable and Needs-Driven Science Agendas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B., III

    2014-12-01

    Climate Science Centers: An "Existence Theorem" for a Federal-University Partnership to Develop Actionable and Needs-Driven Science Agendas. Berrien Moore III (University of Oklahoma) The South Central Climate Science Center (CSC) is one of eight regional centers established by the Department of the Interior (DoI) under Secretarial Order 3289 to address the impacts of climate change on America's water, land, and other natural and cultural resources. Under DoI leadership and funding, these CSCs will provide scientific information tools and techniques to study impacts of climate change synthesize and integrate climate change impact data develop tools that the DoI managers and partners can use when managing the DOI's land, water, fish and wildlife, and cultural heritage resources (emphasis added) The network of Climate Science Centers will provide decision makers with the science, tools, and information they need to address the impacts of climate variability and change on their areas of responsibility. Note from Webster, a tool is a device for doing work; it makes outcomes more realizable and more cost effective, and, in a word, better. Prior to the existence of CSCs, the university and federal scientific world certainly contained a large "set" of scientists with considerable strength in the physical, biological, natural, and social sciences to address the complexities and interdisciplinary nature of the challenges in the areas of climate variability, change, impacts, and adaptation. However, this set of scientists were hardly an integrated community let alone a focused team, but rather a collection of distinguished researchers, educators, and practitioners that were working with disparate though at times linked objectives, and they were rarely aligning themselves formally to an overarching strategic pathway. In addition, data, models, research results, tools, and products were generally somewhat "disconnected" from the broad range of stakeholders. I should note also

  3. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  4. [Mountain sports: their role in 2200 facial injuries occurring over 4 years at the University Hospital Center in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bescond, Y; Lebeau, J; Delgove, L; Sadek, H; Raphael, B

    1992-01-01

    Injuries caused by mountain sports account for many of the injuries admitted to the University Hospital of Grenoble. Out of 4,490 traumas, 470 were injuries sustained during the practice of mountain sports. While the frequency of these accidents does not evolve much, the etiological distribution depends on fashion. Thus an increasing number of lesions caused by cross-country biking has been noted during the past two years. We find it urgent to propose protective measures adapted to this new sport.

  5. Prevalence and correlates of depression and anxiety among patients with tuberculosis at WolaitaSodo University Hospital and Sodo Health Center, WolaitaSodo, South Ethiopia, Cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duko, Bereket; Gebeyehu, Abebaw; Ayano, Getnet

    2015-01-01

    ....A total of 417 TB patients, who had regular follow up at WolaitaSodo University Hospital and Sodo Health Center, WolaitaSodo, South Ethiopia, were recruited to assess depression and anxiety and its associated correlates...

  6. The celebration of the Tenth Anniversity of founding of the center on Minority Women's Studies of Central Ethnic University & The Third International Academic Seminar on Women's Development and progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoWei

    2004-01-01

    To celebrate the Tenth Anniversity of founding of the Center on Minority Women's Studies, the Third International Academic Seminar on Women's Development and Progress, was organized by the Central Ethnic University, on 16, 17, Oct. in Beijing.

  7. Discovery Of A Major Contradiction In Big Bang Cosmology Points To The New Cosmic Center Universe Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, R V

    2003-01-01

    The BAL z=3.91 quasar's high Fe/O ratio has led to a reexamination of big bang's spacetime expansion postulate and the discovery that it predicts a CBR redshift of z>36000 instead of the widely accepted z~1000. This result leads an expansion-predicted CBR temperature of only T = 0.08K, which is contradicted by the experimental T = 2.73K. Contrary to long-held belief, these results strongly suggest that the F-L expanding spacetime paradigm, with its expansion redshifts, is not the correct relativistic description of the universe. This conclusion agrees with the earlier finding (gr-qc/9806061) that the universe is relativistically governed by the Einstein static spacetime solution of the field equations, not the F-L solution. Disproof of expansion redshifts removes the only support for the Cosmological Principle, thus showing that the spherical symmetry of the cosmos demanded by the Hubble redshift relation can no longer be attributed to the universe being the same everythere. The Cosmological Principle is flaw...

  8. Superconductivity and the environment: a Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Shigehiro; Eckroad, Steven; Marian, Adela; Choi, Kyeongdal; Kim, Woo Seok; Terai, Motoaki; Deng, Zigang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Jiasu; Umemoto, Katsuya; Du, Jia; Febvre, Pascal; Keenan, Shane; Mukhanov, Oleg; Cooley, Lance D.; Foley, Cathy P.; Hassenzahl, William V.; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-11-01

    There is universal agreement between the United Nations and governments from the richest to the poorest nations that humanity faces unprecedented global challenges relating to sustainable energy, clean water, low-emission transportation, coping with climate change and natural disasters, and reclaiming use of land. We have invited researchers from a range of eclectic research areas to provide a Roadmap of how superconducting technologies could address these major challenges confronting humanity. Superconductivity has, over the century since its discovery by Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, promised to provide solutions to many challenges. So far, most superconducting technologies are esoteric systems that are used in laboratories and hospitals. Large science projects have long appreciated the ability of superconductivity to efficiently create high magnetic fields that are otherwise very costly to achieve with ordinary materials. The most successful applications outside of large science are high-field magnets for magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory magnetometers for mineral and materials characterization, filters for mobile communications, and magnetoencephalography for understanding the human brain. The stage is now set for superconductivity to make more general contributions. Humanity uses practically unthinkable amounts of energy to drive our modern way of life. Overall, global power usage has been predicted to almost double from 16.5 to 30 TW in the next four decades (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources). The economy with which electrons carry energy compels the continued quest for efficient superconducting power generation, energy storage, and power transmission. The growing global population requires new arable land and treatment of water, especially in remote areas, and superconductivity offers unique solutions to these problems. Exquisite detectors give warning of changes that are otherwise invisible. Prediction of climate and

  9. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean observatories have already demonstrated their ability to maintain long-term time series, capture episodic events, provide context for improved shipboard sampling, and improve accessibility to a broader range of participants. Communicating Ocean Sciences, an already existing college course (http://www.cacosee.net/collegecourse) from COSEE California has demonstrated its ability to teach future scientists essential communication skills. The NSF-funded Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) project will leverage these experiences and others to demonstrate a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. The COSIA effort will be one of the pathfinders for ensuring that the new scientific results from the increasing U.S. investments in ocean observatories is effectively communicated to the nation, and will serve as a model for other fields. Our presentation will describe a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. COSIA established partnerships between informal science education institutions and universities nationwide to facilitate quality outreach by scientists and the delivery of rigorous, cutting edge science by informal educators while teaching future scientists (college students) essential communication skills. The COSIA model includes scientist-educator partnerships that develop and deliver a college course derived from COS that teaches communication skills through the understanding of learning theory specifically related to informal learning environments and the practice of these skills at aquariums and science centers. The goals of COSIA are to: provide a model for establishing substantive, long-term partnerships between scientists and informal science education institutions to meet their respective outreach needs; provide future scientists with experiences delivering outreach to informal

  10. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods.

  11. Development and analysis of superconductors with projected nanostructured pinning centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carlos A.; Rodrigues, D.

    2004-08-01

    The present work has the main objective to study the influence of the proximity effect on the superconducting properties of materials with pinning center dimensions comparable to the coherence length. Artificial Pinning Centers (APC) of Cu(Sn) were introduced into the Nb 3Sn superconducting phase using successive bundlings followed by swaging and wire drawing. Three superconductor wires were produced using the internal tin method. After fabrication, the samples were heat treated to optimize the superconducting phase formation. Microstructural and superconducting characterization of the samples were realized. The results showed the influence of the proximity effect on Tc, Jc and Bc2.

  12. Superconductivity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiner, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this proven text has been developed further in both scope and scale to reflect the potential for superconductivity in power engineering to increase efficiency in electricity transmission or engines. The landmark reference remains a comprehensive introduction to the field, covering every aspect from fundamentals to applications, and presenting the latest developments in organic superconductors, superconducting interfaces, quantum coherence, and applications in medicine and industry. Due to its precise language and numerous explanatory illustrations, it is suitable as an introductory textbook, with the level rising smoothly from chapter to chapter, such that readers can build on their newly acquired knowledge. The authors cover basic properties of superconductors and discuss stability and different material groups with reference to the latest and most promising applications, devoting the last third of the book to applications in power engineering, medicine, and low temperature physics. An e...

  13. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  14. Statistical mechanics of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kita, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical, step-by-step comprehensive explanation of superconductivity for undergraduate and graduate students who have completed elementary courses on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. To this end, it adopts the unique approach of starting with the statistical mechanics of quantum ideal gases and successively adding and clarifying elements and techniques indispensible for understanding it. They include the spin-statistics theorem, second quantization, density matrices, the Bloch–De Dominicis theorem, the variational principle in statistical mechanics, attractive interaction, and bound states. Ample examples of their usage are also provided in terms of topics from advanced statistical mechanics such as two-particle correlations of quantum ideal gases, derivation of the Hartree–Fock equations, and Landau’s Fermi-liquid theory, among others. With these preliminaries, the fundamental mean-field equations of superconductivity are derived with maximum mathematical clarity based on ...

  15. Superconducting switch pack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, V.C.; Wollan, J.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a superconducting switch pack at least one switch element. The switch element including a length of superconductive wire having a switching portion and two lead portions, the switching portion being between the lead portions; means for supporting the switching portion in a plane in a common mold; hardened resin means encapsulating the switching portion in the plane in a solid body; wherein the solid body has an exterior surface which is planar and substantially parallel with and spaced apart from the plane in which the switching portion is positioned. The exterior surface being exposed to the exterior of the switch pack and the resin means filling the space between the exterior surface and the plane of the switching portion so as to provide uninterrupted thermal communication between the plane of the switching portion and the exterior of the switch pack; and a heater element in thermal contact with the switching portion.

  16. Tunable superconducting nanoinductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziata, Anthony J; Santavicca, Daniel F; Frunzio, Luigi; Rooks, Michael J; Prober, Daniel E [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Catelani, Gianluigi [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Frydman, Aviad, E-mail: anthony.annunziata@yale.edu, E-mail: daniel.prober@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2010-11-05

    We characterize inductors fabricated from ultra-thin, approximately 100 nm wide strips of niobium (Nb) and niobium nitride (NbN). These nanowires have a large kinetic inductance in the superconducting state. The kinetic inductance scales linearly with the nanowire length, with a typical value of 1 nH {mu}m{sup -1} for NbN and 44 pH {mu}m{sup -1} for Nb at a temperature of 2.5 K. We measure the temperature and current dependence of the kinetic inductance and compare our results to theoretical predictions. We also simulate the self-resonant frequencies of these nanowires in a compact meander geometry. These nanowire inductive elements have applications in a variety of microwave frequency superconducting circuits.

  17. Time ripe for superconductivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsh

    2002-04-01

    But there is a crucial deadline and failure to meet it could send superconductivity back to the commercial shadows (at least outside the medical and scientific niches where it is a key enabler in analytical instruments, magnetic resonance imaging, and particle accelerators for another 30 years. Later this decade, the vintage infrastructure of dense copper conductors that supports power distribution in developed countries, in particular in the US, will become due for renewal. (Recent power problems in California were largely those of distribution infrastructure. At the same time, boosting capacity to serve the needs of increasingly affluent populations will pose a challenge. Superconductivity could provide the answer — if the technology matures in time and cost targets are met.

  18. Development of Innovative Radioactive Isotope Production Techniques at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Amanda M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center; Heidrich, Brenden [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center; Durrant, Chad [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Department of mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Center; Bascom, Andrew [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Department of mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Center; Unlu, Kenan [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    2013-08-15

    The Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) has produced radioisotopes for research and commercial purposes since 1956. With the rebirth of the radiochemistry education and research program at the RSEC, the Center stands poised to produce a variety of radioisotopes for research and industrial work that is in line with the mission of the DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Isotope Development and Production Research and Application Program. The RSEC received funding from the Office of Science in 2010 to improve production techniques and develop new capabilities. Under this program, we improved our existing techniques to provide four radioisotopes (Mn-56, Br-82, Na-24, and Ar-41) to researchers and industry in a safe and efficient manner. The RSEC is also working to develop new innovative techniques to provide isotopes in short supply to researchers and others in the scientific community, specifically Cu-64 and Cu-67. Improving our existing radioisotopes production techniques and investigating new and innovative methods are two of the main initiatives of the radiochemistry research program at the RSEC.

  19. Relativistic Model for two-band Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsaku, Tadafumi

    2003-01-01

    To understand the superconductivity in MgB2, several two-band models of superconductivity were proposed. In this paper, by using the relativistic fermion model, we clearize the effect of the lower band in the superconductivity.

  20. [Certification and quality management of a complex university cardiac center according to law EN ISO 9001: 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beholz, Sven; Koch, Christina; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2003-04-01

    Quality management systems can improve quality in health care units. The introduction of a quality management system according to ISO 9001: 2000 in a university department of cardiovascular surgery is described. First a thorough analysis of all processes of patient treatment and clinical research was obtained. Multiple interfaces had to be defined to different departments as well as to administration units. All necessary resources were evaluated and optimised. Customer satisfaction was evaluated by surveys of patients and collaborating physicians. Quality rounds including physicians, nurses and technicians were instituted. Based on these preparatory works all processes including their responsibilities and necessary resources were redefined and described in the quality manual. After 18 months' of certification of our quality management system according to ISO 9001: 2000 was recommended by an independent, accredited organisation. In summary, certification of a university department of cardiovascular surgery according to ISO 9001: 2000 is possible and may represent the first step towards total quality management. In complex health care units the certification of individual departments may help to generate a consciousness for quality on the road to total quality management.